WorldWideScience

Sample records for abundant quantitative trait

  1. Quantitative traits and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzJohn, Richard G

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative traits have long been hypothesized to affect speciation and extinction rates. For example, smaller body size or increased specialization may be associated with increased rates of diversification. Here, I present a phylogenetic likelihood-based method (quantitative state speciation and extinction [QuaSSE]) that can be used to test such hypotheses using extant character distributions. This approach assumes that diversification follows a birth-death process where speciation and extinction rates may vary with one or more traits that evolve under a diffusion model. Speciation and extinction rates may be arbitrary functions of the character state, allowing much flexibility in testing models of trait-dependent diversification. I test the approach using simulated phylogenies and show that a known relationship between speciation and a quantitative character could be recovered in up to 80% of the cases on large trees (500 species). Consistent with other approaches, detecting shifts in diversification due to differences in extinction rates was harder than when due to differences in speciation rates. Finally, I demonstrate the application of QuaSSE to investigate the correlation between body size and diversification in primates, concluding that clade-specific differences in diversification may be more important than size-dependent diversification in shaping the patterns of diversity within this group.

  2. Quantitated transcript haplotypes (QTH) of AGTR1, reduced abundance of mRNA haplotypes containing 1166C (rs5186:A>C), and relevance to metabolic syndrome traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Mohammad R; Lewis, Rohan M; Gaunt, Tom R; Cumming, Debbie V E; Rodriguez, Santiago; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew; Collins, Andrew R; Syddall, Holly E; Howell, William M; Cooper, Cyrus; Godfrey, Keith M; Cameron, Iain T; Day, Ian N M

    2007-04-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) is the main target through which angiotensin II influences cardiovascular tone, cell growth, and fluid and electrolyte balance. AGTR1 polymorphism has been reported to associate with hypertension, myocardial infarction (MI), and metabolic traits. Here we describe a novel approach to quantitation of transcript haplotypes (QTH) of AGTR1. To determine relative allelic expression from haplotypes, within-individual-between-allele ratiometric analyses in placental cDNA were developed for the transcribed SNPs rs5182:C>T (encoding p.L191) and rs5186:A>C (3'-noncoding "A1166C"). Additionally, between-individual comparisons were made using TaqMan assays applied to both homozygous and heterozygous genotypes and haplotypes. In conjunction, linkage disequilibrium (LD) and genomic haplotype associations with metabolic syndrome were examined. There was no significant difference of mRNA level for alleles of rs5182:C>T, but allele and mRNA haplotypes carrying 1166C exhibited reduced abundance. The effect was much greater in CC homozygotes than in heterozygotes. The promoter region was confirmed to be in a separate haplotype block from the AGTR1 3' region containing rs5182:C>T and rs5186:A>C. Metabolic syndrome trait associations were strongest for the 3' block generally and for the C allele of rs5186:A>C specifically. All effects were much more prominent in homozygotes, possibly reflecting interallelic interaction through feedback loops of mRNA regulation. Differential abundance of AGTR1 mRNA haplotypes may mediate clinical phenotypic observations of the AGTR1 genotype. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Quantitative genetics of disease traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, N R; Visscher, P M

    2015-04-01

    John James authored two key papers on the theory of risk to relatives for binary disease traits and the relationship between parameters on the observed binary scale and an unobserved scale of liability (James Annals of Human Genetics, 1971; 35: 47; Reich, James and Morris Annals of Human Genetics, 1972; 36: 163). These two papers are John James' most cited papers (198 and 328 citations, November 2014). They have been influential in human genetics and have recently gained renewed popularity because of their relevance to the estimation of quantitative genetics parameters for disease traits using SNP data. In this review, we summarize the two early papers and put them into context. We show recent extensions of the theory for ascertained case-control data and review recent applications in human genetics.

  4. Quantitative Trait Loci for Fertility Traits in Finnish Ayrshire Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, Nina F; Sahana, Goutam; Lund, Mogens S

    2008-01-01

    A whole genome scan was carried out to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fertility traits in Finnish Ayrshire cattle. The mapping population consisted of 12 bulls and 493 sons. Estimated breeding values for days open, fertility treatments, maternal calf mortality and paternal non-return rate...... if these effects were due to a pleiotropic QTL affecting fertility and milk yield traits or to linked QTL causing the effects. This distinction could only be made with confidence on BTA1 where a QTL affecting milk yield is linked to a pleiotropic QTL affecting days open and fertility treatments...

  5. Quantitative trait loci underlying udder morphology traits in dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; El-Zarei, M F; Alvarez, L; Bayón, Y; de la Fuente, L F; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J J

    2008-09-01

    A genome scan was conducted on the basis of the daughter design to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing udder morphology traits in Spanish Churra dairy sheep. A total of 739 ewes belonging to 11 half-sib families were genotyped for 182 microsatellite markers covering 3,248.2 cM (Kosambi) of the ovine autosomal genome. Phenotypic traits included scores for 5 linear udder traits: udder depth, udder attachment, teat placement, teat size, and udder shape. Quantitative measurements for the QTL analysis were calculated for each trait from evaluation scores using within-family yield deviations corrected for fixed environmental effects. Joint analysis of all families using Haley-Knott regression identified 5 regions that exceeded the 5% chromosome-wise significance threshold on chromosomes 7, 14, 15, 20, and 26. Based on the across-family results, a within-family analysis was carried out to identify families segregated according to the QTL and to estimate the QTL effect. The allelic substitution effect for individual families ranged from 0.47 to 1.7 phenotypic standard deviation units for udder shape on chromosome 15 and udder depth on chromosome 14, respectively. These QTL regions provide a starting point for further research aimed at the characterization of genetic variability involved in udder traits in Churra sheep. This paper presents the first report of a sheep genome scan for udder-related traits in a dairy sheep outbred population.

  6. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Endosperm Traits with Molecular Marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chen-wu; LI Tao; SUN Chang-sen; GU Shi-liang

    2002-01-01

    Based on the genetic models for triploid endosperm traits and on the methods for mapping diploid quantitative traits loci (QTLs), the genetic constitutions, components of means and genetic variances of QTL controlling endosperm traits under flanking marker genotypes of different generations were presented. From these results, a multiple linear regression method for mapping QTL underlying endosperm traits in cereals was proposed, which used the means of endosperm traits under flanking marker genotypes as a dependent variable, the coefficient of additive effect ( d ) and dominance effect ( h 1 and/or h2 ) of a putative QTL in a given interval as independent variables. This method can work at any position in a genome covered by markers and increase the estimation precision of QTL location and their effects by eliminating the interference of other relative QTLs. This method can also be easily used in other uneven data such as markers and quantitative traits detected or measured in plants and tissues different either in generations or at chromosomal ploidy levels, and in endosperm traits controlled by complicated genetic models considering the effects produced by genotypes of both maternal plants and seeds on them.

  7. Quantitative trait loci underlying milk production traits in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; El-Zarei, M F; Alvarez, L; Bayón, Y; de la Fuente, L F; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J-J

    2009-08-01

    Improvement of milk production traits in dairy sheep is required to increase the competitiveness of the industry and to maintain the production of high quality cheese in regions of Mediterranean countries with less favourable conditions. Additional improvement over classical selection could be reached if genes with significant effects on the relevant traits were specifically targeted by selection. However, so far, few studies have been undertaken to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in dairy sheep. In this study, we present a complete genome scan performed in a commercial population of Spanish Churra sheep to identify chromosomal regions associated with phenotypic variation observed in milk production traits. Eleven half-sib families, including a total of 1213 ewes, were analysed following a daughter design. Genome-wise multi-marker regression analysis revealed a genome-wise significant QTL for milk protein percentage on chromosome 3. Eight other regions, localized on chromosomes 1, 2, 20, 23 and 25, showed suggestive significant linkage associations with some of the analysed traits. To our knowledge, this study represents the first complete genome scan for milk production traits reported in dairy sheep. The experiment described here shows that analysis of commercial dairy sheep populations has the potential to increase our understanding of the genetic determinants of complex production-related traits.

  8. Interval Mapping of Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.

    1993-01-01

    The interval mapping method is widely used for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in segregating generations derived from crosses between inbred lines. The efficiency of detecting and the accuracy of mapping multiple QTLs by using genetic markers are much increased by employing multiple Q

  9. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liti, Gianni; Warringer, Jonas; Blomberg, Anders

    2017-08-01

    Natural Saccharomyces strains isolated from the wild differ quantitatively in molecular and organismal phenotypes. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping is a powerful approach for identifying sequence variants that alter gene function. In yeast, QTL mapping has been used in designed crosses to map functional polymorphisms. This approach, outlined here, is often the first step in understanding the molecular basis of quantitative traits. New large-scale sequencing surveys have the potential to directly associate genotypes with organismal phenotypes, providing a broader catalog of causative genetic variants. Additional analysis of intermediate phenotypes (e.g., RNA, protein, or metabolite levels) can produce a multilayered and integrated view of individual variation, producing a high-resolution view of the genotype-phenotype map. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Transmission-disequilibrium tests for quantitative traits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, D.B. [Columbia Univ. College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) of Spielman et al. is a family-based linkage-disequilibrium test that offers a powerful way to test for linkage between alleles and phenotypes that is either causal (i.e., the marker locus is the disease/trait allele) or due to linkage disequilibrium. The TDT is equivalent to a randomized experiment and, therefore, is resistant to confounding. When the marker is extremely close to the disease locus or is the disease locus itself, tests such as the TDT can be far more powerful than conventional linkage tests. To date, the TDT and most other family-based association tests have been applied only to dichotomous traits. This paper develops five TDT-type tests for use with quantitative traits. These tests accommodate either unselected sampling or sampling based on selection of phenotypically extreme offspring. Power calculations are provided and show that, when a candidate gene is available (1) these TDT-type tests are at least an order of magnitude more efficient than two common sib-pair tests of linkage; (2) extreme sampling results in substantial increases in power; and (3) if the most extreme 20% of the phenotypic distribution is selectively sampled, across a wide variety of plausible genetic models, quantitative-trait loci explaining as little as 5% of the phenotypic variation can be detected at the .0001 a level with <300 observations. 57 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Multiple quantitative trait analysis using bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutari, Marco; Howell, Phil; Balding, David J; Mackay, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Models for genome-wide prediction and association studies usually target a single phenotypic trait. However, in animal and plant genetics it is common to record information on multiple phenotypes for each individual that will be genotyped. Modeling traits individually disregards the fact that they are most likely associated due to pleiotropy and shared biological basis, thus providing only a partial, confounded view of genetic effects and phenotypic interactions. In this article we use data from a Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross (MAGIC) winter wheat population to explore Bayesian networks as a convenient and interpretable framework for the simultaneous modeling of multiple quantitative traits. We show that they are equivalent to multivariate genetic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) and that they are competitive with single-trait elastic net and single-trait GBLUP in predictive performance. Finally, we discuss their relationship with other additive-effects models and their advantages in inference and interpretation. MAGIC populations provide an ideal setting for this kind of investigation because the very low population structure and large sample size result in predictive models with good power and limited confounding due to relatedness.

  12. Quantitative trait loci for flowering time and morphological traits in multiple populations of Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, P.; Jianjun Zhao, Jianjun; Kim, J.S.; Shen, Shuxing; Pino del Carpio, D.; Song, Xiaofei; Jin, M.; Vreugdenhil, D.; Wang, Xiaowu; Koornneef, M.; Bonnema, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Wide variation for morphological traits exists in Brassica rapa and the genetic basis of this morphological variation is largely unknown. Here is a report on quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of flowering time, seed and pod traits, growth-related traits, leaf morphology, and turnip formation in

  13. Quantitative trait loci for flowering time and morphological traits in multiple populations of Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, P.; Jianjun Zhao, Jianjun; Kim, J.S.; Shen, Shuxing; Pino del Carpio, D.; Song, Xiaofei; Jin, M.; Vreugdenhil, D.; Wang, Xiaowu; Koornneef, M.; Bonnema, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Wide variation for morphological traits exists in Brassica rapa and the genetic basis of this morphological variation is largely unknown. Here is a report on quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of flowering time, seed and pod traits, growth-related traits, leaf morphology, and turnip formation in

  14. Influence analysis in quantitative trait loci detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaoling; Kuriki, Satoshi; Maeno, Akiteru; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents systematic methods for the detection of influential individuals that affect the log odds (LOD) score curve. We derive general formulas of influence functions for profile likelihoods and introduce them into two standard quantitative trait locus detection methods-the interval mapping method and single marker analysis. Besides influence analysis on specific LOD scores, we also develop influence analysis methods on the shape of the LOD score curves. A simulation-based method is proposed to assess the significance of the influence of the individuals. These methods are shown useful in the influence analysis of a real dataset of an experimental population from an F2 mouse cross. By receiver operating characteristic analysis, we confirm that the proposed methods show better performance than existing diagnostics.

  15. Joint association analysis of bivariate quantitative and qualitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mengdie; Diao, Guoqing

    2011-11-29

    Univariate genome-wide association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits has been investigated extensively in the literature. In the presence of correlated phenotypes, it is more intuitive to analyze all phenotypes simultaneously. We describe an efficient likelihood-based approach for the joint association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits in unrelated individuals. We assume a probit model for the qualitative trait, under which an unobserved latent variable and a prespecified threshold determine the value of the qualitative trait. To jointly model the quantitative and qualitative traits, we assume that the quantitative trait and the latent variable follow a bivariate normal distribution. The latent variable is allowed to be correlated with the quantitative phenotype. Simultaneous modeling of the quantitative and qualitative traits allows us to make more precise inference on the pleiotropic genetic effects. We derive likelihood ratio tests for the testing of genetic effects. An application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data is provided. The new method yields reasonable power and meaningful results for the joint association analysis of the quantitative trait Q1 and the qualitative trait disease status at SNPs with not too small MAF.

  16. Quantitative Trait Loci and Antagonistic Associations for Two Developmentally Related Traits in the Drosophila Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Federico H.

    2017-01-01

    In insects, some developmentally related traits are negatively correlated. Here, we mapped Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for traits of eye size and head capsule, in an intercontinental set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Drosophila melanogaster. Composite interval mapping identified QTL on all major chromosomes. Two negatively correlated traits (size of eyes and between-eyes distance) were influenced by one QTL that appeared to be antagonistic between the traits (QTL cytological range is 25F5–30A6), consistent with a negative genetic correlation between these traits of the head capsule. Comparisons of QTL across traits indicated a nonrandom distribution over the genome, with a considerable overlap between some QTL across traits. Developmentally-related traits were influenced by QTL in a pattern that is consistent both with 1) the sign of the genetic correlation between the traits and 2) a constraint in the micro-evolutionary differentiation in the traits. PMID:28130460

  17. Quantitative trait loci analysis of swine meat quality traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H D; Lund, M S; Christensen, O F

    2010-01-01

    were estimated from a posterior distribution of the QTL position. In total, 31 QTL for the 6 meat quality traits were found to be significant at the 5% chromosome-wide level, among which 11 QTL were significant at the 5% genome-wide level and 5 of these were significant at the 0.1% genome-wide level...... will be helpful for fine mapping and identifying genes affecting meat quality traits, and tightly linked markers may be incorporated into marker-assisted selection programs......A QTL study was performed in large half-sib families to characterize the genetic background of variation in pork quality traits as well as to examine the possibilities of including QTL in a marker-assisted selection scheme. The quality traits included ultimate pH in LM and the semimembranosus, drip...

  18. Quantitative trait loci analysis of osteocondrosis traits in the elbow joint of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, O F; Busch, M E; Gregersen, V R;

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondrosis is a growth disorder in the cartilage of young animals and is characterised by lesions found in the cartilage and bone. This study identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with six osteochondrosis lesion traits in the elbow joint of finishing pigs. The traits were...

  19. Combined expression trait correlations and expression quantitative trait locus mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated regulation of gene expression levels across a series of experimental conditions provides valuable information about the functions of correlated transcripts. The consideration of gene expression correlation over a time or tissue dimension has proved valuable in predicting gene function. Here, we consider correlations over a genetic dimension. In addition to identifying coregulated genes, the genetic dimension also supplies us with information about the genomic locations of putative regulatory loci. We calculated correlations among approximately 45,000 expression traits derived from 60 individuals in an F2 sample segregating for obesity and diabetes. By combining the correlation results with linkage mapping information, we were able to identify regulatory networks, make functional predictions for uncharacterized genes, and characterize novel members of known pathways. We found evidence of coordinate regulation of 174 G protein-coupled receptor protein signaling pathway expression traits. Of the 174 traits, 50 had their major LOD peak within 10 cM of a locus on Chromosome 2, and 81 others had a secondary peak in this region. We also characterized a Riken cDNA clone that showed strong correlation with stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 expression. Experimental validation confirmed that this clone is involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. We conclude that trait correlation combined with linkage mapping can reveal regulatory networks that would otherwise be missed if we studied only mRNA traits with statistically significant linkages in this small cross. The combined analysis is more sensitive compared with linkage mapping alone.

  20. Data-driven encoding for quantitative genetic trait prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dan; Wang, Zhanyong; Parida, Laxmi

    2015-01-01

    Given a set of biallelic molecular markers, such as SNPs, with genotype values on a collection of plant, animal or human samples, the goal of quantitative genetic trait prediction is to predict the quantitative trait values by simultaneously modeling all marker effects. Quantitative genetic trait prediction is usually represented as linear regression models which require quantitative encodings for the genotypes: the three distinct genotype values, corresponding to one heterozygous and two homozygous alleles, are usually coded as integers, and manipulated algebraically in the model. Further, epistasis between multiple markers is modeled as multiplication between the markers: it is unclear that the regression model continues to be effective under this. In this work we investigate the effects of encodings to the quantitative genetic trait prediction problem. We first showed that different encodings lead to different prediction accuracies, in many test cases. We then proposed a data-driven encoding strategy, where we encode the genotypes according to their distribution in the phenotypes and we allow each marker to have different encodings. We show in our experiments that this encoding strategy is able to improve the performance of the genetic trait prediction method and it is more helpful for the oligogenic traits, whose values rely on a relatively small set of markers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that discusses the effects of encodings to the genetic trait prediction problem.

  1. Plant trait-species abundance relationships vary with environmental properties in subtropical forests in eastern china.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Rong Yan

    Full Text Available Understanding how plant trait-species abundance relationships change with a range of single and multivariate environmental properties is crucial for explaining species abundance and rarity. In this study, the abundance of 94 woody plant species was examined and related to 15 plant leaf and wood traits at both local and landscape scales involving 31 plots in subtropical forests in eastern China. Further, plant trait-species abundance relationships were related to a range of single and multivariate (PCA axes environmental properties such as air humidity, soil moisture content, soil temperature, soil pH, and soil organic matter, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P contents. At the landscape scale, plant maximum height, and twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, whereas mean leaf area (MLA, leaf N concentration (LN, and total leaf area per twig size (TLA were negatively correlated with species abundance. At the plot scale, plant maximum height, leaf and twig dry matter contents, twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, but MLA, specific leaf area, LN, leaf P concentration and TLA were negatively correlated with species abundance. Plant trait-species abundance relationships shifted over the range of seven single environmental properties and along multivariate environmental axes in a similar way. In conclusion, strong relationships between plant traits and species abundance existed among and within communities. Significant shifts in plant trait-species abundance relationships in a range of environmental properties suggest strong environmental filtering processes that influence species abundance and rarity in the studied subtropical forests.

  2. PEMETAAN QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI UNTUK SIFAT BERSKALA KATEGORIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farit Mochamad Afendi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Genes or regions on chromosome underlying a quantitative trait are called quantitative trait loci (QTL. Characterizing genes controlling quantitative trait on their position in chromosome and their effect on trait is through a process called QTL mapping. In estimating the QTL position and its effect, QTL mapping utilizes the association between QTL and DNA makers. However, many important traits are obtained in categorical scale, such as resistance from certain disease. From a theoritical point of view, QTL mapping method assuming continuous trait could not be applied to categorical trait. This research was facusing on the assessment of the performance of maximum likehood (ML and regression (REG approach employed in QTL mapping for binary trait by means of simulation study. The simulation study to evaluate the performance of ML and REG approach was conducted by taking into accounte several factors that may affecting the performance of both approaches. The factors are (1 maker density, (2 QTL effect, (3 sample size, and (4 shape of phenotypic distribution. Form simulation study, it was obtained that the two approaches showing comparable performance. Hence, QTL analysis could be performed using these two approaches due to their similar performance

  3. Mapping quantitative trait loci for plant adaptation and morphology traits in wheat using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) morphological and adaptation-related traits that are controlled by quantitative traits loci (QTL) define potential growing areas of a wheat cultivar. To dissect the QTL for heading date (HD), lodging resistance (LR), shattering resistance (SR), cold tolerance (CT), plant...

  4. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for conformation and functional traits in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, C.; Bovenhuis, H.; Coppieters, W.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A granddaughter design was used to locate quantitative trait loci determining conformation and functional traits in dairy cattle. In this granddaughter design, consisting of 20 Holstein Friesian grandsires and 833 sons, genotypes were determined for 277 microsatellite markers covering the whole geno

  5. Genome Scan Detects Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Female Fertility Traits in Danish and Swedish Holstein Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Johanna Karolina; Guldbrandtsen, B; Su, G;

    2009-01-01

    Data from the joint Nordic breeding value prediction for Danish and Swedish Holstein grandsire families were used to locate quantitative trait loci (QTL) for female fertility traits in Danish and Swedish Holstein cattle. Up to 36 Holstein grandsires with over 2,000 sons were genotyped for 416 mic...

  6. Statistical mechanics and the evolution of polygenic quantitative traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barton, N.H.; De Vladar, H.P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of quantitative characters depends on the frequencies of the alleles involved, yet these frequencies cannot usually be measured. Previous groups have proposed an approximation to the dynamics of quantitative traits, based on an analogy with statistical mechanics. We present a modified

  7. An international collaborative family-based whole genome quantitative trait linkage scan for myopic refractive error

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Diana; Li, Yi-Ju; Guggenheim, Jeremy A;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate quantitative trait loci linked to refractive error, we performed a genome-wide quantitative trait linkage analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism markers and family data from five international sites.......To investigate quantitative trait loci linked to refractive error, we performed a genome-wide quantitative trait linkage analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism markers and family data from five international sites....

  8. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Underlying Function-Valued Traits Using Functional Principal Component Analysis and Multi-Trait Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Youp Kwak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously proposed a simple regression-based method to map quantitative trait loci underlying function-valued phenotypes. In order to better handle the case of noisy phenotype measurements and accommodate the correlation structure among time points, we propose an alternative approach that maintains much of the simplicity and speed of the regression-based method. We overcome noisy measurements by replacing the observed data with a smooth approximation. We then apply functional principal component analysis, replacing the smoothed phenotype data with a small number of principal components. Quantitative trait locus mapping is applied to these dimension-reduced data, either with a multi-trait method or by considering the traits individually and then taking the average or maximum LOD score across traits. We apply these approaches to root gravitropism data on Arabidopsis recombinant inbred lines and further investigate their performance in computer simulations. Our methods have been implemented in the R package, funqtl.

  9. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of the Early Domestication of Sunflower

    OpenAIRE

    David M Wills; Burke, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic analyses of the domestication syndrome have revealed that domestication-related traits typically have a very similar genetic architecture across most crops, being conditioned by a small number of quantitative trait loci (QTL), each with a relatively large effect on the phenotype. To date, the domestication of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) stands as the only counterexample to this pattern. In previous work involving a cross between wild sunflower (also H. annuus) and a highly improv...

  10. Multivariate analysis of quantitative traits can effectively classify rapeseed germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankulovska Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the use of different multivariate approaches to classify rapeseed genotypes based on quantitative traits has been presented. Tree regression analysis, PCA analysis and two-way cluster analysis were applied in order todescribe and understand the extent of genetic variability in spring rapeseed genotype by trait data. The traits which highly influenced seed and oil yield in rapeseed were successfully identified by the tree regression analysis. Principal predictor for both response variables was number of pods per plant (NP. NP and 1000 seed weight could help in the selection of high yielding genotypes. High values for both traits and oil content could lead to high oil yielding genotypes. These traits may serve as indirect selection criteria and can lead to improvement of seed and oil yield in rapeseed. Quantitative traits that explained most of the variability in the studied germplasm were classified using principal component analysis. In this data set, five PCs were identified, out of which the first three PCs explained 63% of the total variance. It helped in facilitating the choice of variables based on which the genotypes’ clustering could be performed. The two-way cluster analysissimultaneously clustered genotypes and quantitative traits. The final number of clusters was determined using bootstrapping technique. This approach provided clear overview on the variability of the analyzed genotypes. The genotypes that have similar performance regarding the traits included in this study can be easily detected on the heatmap. Genotypes grouped in the clusters 1 and 8 had high values for seed and oil yield, and relatively short vegetative growth duration period and those in cluster 9, combined moderate to low values for vegetative growth duration and moderate to high seed and oil yield. These genotypes should be further exploited and implemented in the rapeseed breeding program. The combined application of these multivariate methods

  11. Genetic mapping of quantitative phenotypic traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Steve; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2012-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a favorite production organism in industrial biotechnology presenting new challenges to yeast engineers in terms of introducing advantageous traits such as stress tolerances. Exploring subspecies diversity of S. cerevisiae has identified strains that bear industrially relevant phenotypic traits. Provided that the genetic basis of such phenotypic traits can be identified inverse engineering allows the targeted modification of production strains. Most phenotypic traits of interest in S. cerevisiae strains are quantitative, meaning that they are controlled by multiple genetic loci referred to as quantitative trait loci (QTL). A straightforward approach to identify the genetic basis of quantitative traits is QTL mapping which aims at the allocation of the genetic determinants to regions in the genome. The application of high-density oligonucleotide arrays and whole-genome re-sequencing to detect genetic variations between strains has facilitated the detection of large numbers of molecular markers thus allowing high-resolution QTL mapping over the entire genome. This review focuses on the basic principle and state of the art of QTL mapping in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore we discuss several approaches developed during the last decade that allow down-scaling of the regions identified by QTL mapping to the gene level. We also emphasize the particular challenges of QTL mapping in nonlaboratory strains of S. cerevisiae.

  12. Marker-assisted selection for quantitative traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Schuster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although thousands of scientific articles have been published on the subject of marker-assisted selection (MAS andquantitative trait loci (QTL, the application of MAS for QTL in plant breeding has been restricted. Among the main causes for thislimited use are the low accuracy of QTL mapping and the high costs of genotyping thousands of plants with tens or hundreds ofmolecular markers in routine breeding programs. Recently, new large-scale genotyping technologies have resulted in a costreduction. Nevertheless, the MAS for QTL has so far been limited to selection programs using several generations per year, wherephenotypic selection cannot be performed in all generations, mainly in recurrent selection programs. Methods of MAS for QTL inbreeding programs using self-pollination have been developed.

  13. Complex genetic interactions in a quantitative trait locus.

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    Himanshu Sinha

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Whether in natural populations or between two unrelated members of a species, most phenotypic variation is quantitative. To analyze such quantitative traits, one must first map the underlying quantitative trait loci. Next, and far more difficult, one must identify the quantitative trait genes (QTGs, characterize QTG interactions, and identify the phenotypically relevant polymorphisms to determine how QTGs contribute to phenotype. In this work, we analyzed three Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-temperature growth (Htg QTGs (MKT1, END3, and RHO2. We observed a high level of genetic interactions among QTGs and strain background. Interestingly, while the MKT1 and END3 coding polymorphisms contribute to phenotype, it is the RHO2 3'UTR polymorphisms that are phenotypically relevant. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis of the Htg QTGs in hybrids between S288c and ten unrelated S. cerevisiae strains reveals that the contributions of the Htg QTGs are not conserved in nine other hybrids, which has implications for QTG identification by marker-trait association. Our findings demonstrate the variety and complexity of QTG contributions to phenotype, the impact of genetic background, and the value of quantitative genetic studies in S. cerevisiae.

  14. Quantitative trait loci for yield and morphological traits in maize under drought stress

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    Nikolić Ana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the most important factors contributing to crop yield loss. In order to develop maize varieties with drought tolerance, it is necessary to explore the genetic basis. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL that control the yield and associate agronomic traits is one way of understanding drought genetics. QTLs associated with grain yield (GY, leaf width (LW3, LW4 plant height (PH, ear height (EH, leaf number (NL, tassel branch number (TBN and tassel length (TL were studied with composite interval mapping. A total of 43 QTLs were detected, distributed on all chromosomes, except chromosome 9. Phenotypic variability determined for the identified QTLs for all the traits was in the range from 20.99 to 87.24%. Mapping analysis identified genomic regions associated with two traits in a manner that was consistent with phenotypic correlation among traits, supporting either pleiotropy or tight linkage among QTLs.

  15. A bivariate quantitative genetic model for a threshold trait and a survival trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damgaard Lars

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many of the functional traits considered in animal breeding can be analyzed as threshold traits or survival traits with examples including disease traits, conformation scores, calving difficulty and longevity. In this paper we derive and implement a bivariate quantitative genetic model for a threshold character and a survival trait that are genetically and environmentally correlated. For the survival trait, we considered the Weibull log-normal animal frailty model. A Bayesian approach using Gibbs sampling was adopted in which model parameters were augmented with unobserved liabilities associated with the threshold trait. The fully conditional posterior distributions associated with parameters of the threshold trait reduced to well known distributions. For the survival trait the two baseline Weibull parameters were updated jointly by a Metropolis-Hastings step. The remaining model parameters with non-normalized fully conditional distributions were updated univariately using adaptive rejection sampling. The Gibbs sampler was tested in a simulation study and illustrated in a joint analysis of calving difficulty and longevity of dairy cattle. The simulation study showed that the estimated marginal posterior distributions covered well and placed high density to the true values used in the simulation of data. The data analysis of calving difficulty and longevity showed that genetic variation exists for both traits. The additive genetic correlation was moderately favorable with marginal posterior mean equal to 0.37 and 95% central posterior credibility interval ranging between 0.11 and 0.61. Therefore, this study suggests that selection for improving one of the two traits will be beneficial for the other trait as well.

  16. A bivariate quantitative genetic model for a threshold trait and a survival trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Lars Holm; Korsgaard, Inge Riis

    2006-01-01

    Many of the functional traits considered in animal breeding can be analyzed as threshold traits or survival traits with examples including disease traits, conformation scores, calving difficulty and longevity. In this paper we derive and implement a bivariate quantitative genetic model for a threshold character and a survival trait that are genetically and environmentally correlated. For the survival trait, we considered the Weibull log-normal animal frailty model. A Bayesian approach using Gibbs sampling was adopted in which model parameters were augmented with unobserved liabilities associated with the threshold trait. The fully conditional posterior distributions associated with parameters of the threshold trait reduced to well known distributions. For the survival trait the two baseline Weibull parameters were updated jointly by a Metropolis-Hastings step. The remaining model parameters with non-normalized fully conditional distributions were updated univariately using adaptive rejection sampling. The Gibbs sampler was tested in a simulation study and illustrated in a joint analysis of calving difficulty and longevity of dairy cattle. The simulation study showed that the estimated marginal posterior distributions covered well and placed high density to the true values used in the simulation of data. The data analysis of calving difficulty and longevity showed that genetic variation exists for both traits. The additive genetic correlation was moderately favorable with marginal posterior mean equal to 0.37 and 95% central posterior credibility interval ranging between 0.11 and 0.61. Therefore, this study suggests that selection for improving one of the two traits will be beneficial for the other trait as well.

  17. Quantitative trait loci associated with anthracnose resistance in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an aim to develop a durable resistance to the fungal disease anthracnose, two unique genetic sources of resistance were selected to create genetic mapping populations to identify regions of the sorghum genome that encode anthracnose resistance. A series of quantitative trait loci were identifi...

  18. Quantitative trait loci for udder conformation and other udder traits in Finnish Ayrshire cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. SCHULMAN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Udder traits are important due to their correlation with clinical mastitis which causes major economic losses to the dairy farms. Chromosomal areas associated with udder conformation traits, milking speed and leakage could be used in breeding programs to improve both udder traits and mastitis resistance. Quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping for udder traits was carried out on bovine chromosomes (BTA 9, 11, 14, 18, 20, 23, and 29, where earlier studies have indicated QTL for mastitis. A granddaughter design with 12 Ayrshire sire families and 360 sons was used. The sires and sons were typed for 35 markers. The traits analysed were udder depth, fore udder attachment, central ligament, distance from udder to floor, body stature, fore teat length, udder balance, rear udder height, milking speed, and leakage. Associations between markers and traits were analysed with multiple marker regression. Five genome-wise significant QTL were detected: stature on BTA14 and 23, udder balance on BTA23, rear udder height on BTA11, and central ligament on BTA23. On BTA11 and 14 the suggested QTL positions for udder traits are at the same position as previously detected QTL for mastitis and somatic cell count.;

  19. Mapping quantitative trait loci for binary trait in the F2:3 design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chengsong Zhu; Yuan-Ming Zhang; Zhigang Guo

    2008-12-01

    In the analysis of inheritance of quantitative traits with low heritability, an F2:3 design that genotypes plants in F2 and phenotypes plants in F2:3 progeny is often used in plant genetics. Although statistical approaches for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the F2:3 design have been well developed, those for binary traits of biological interest and economic importance are seldom addressed. In this study, an attempt was made to map binary trait loci (BTL) in the F2:3 design. The fundamental idea was: the F2 plants were genotyped, all phenotypic values of each F2:3 progeny were measured for binary trait, and these binary trait values and the marker genotype informations were used to detect BTL under the penetrance and liability models. The proposed method was verified by a series of Monte–Carlo simulation experiments. These results showed that maximum likelihood approaches under the penetrance and liability models provide accurate estimates for the effects and the locations of BTL with high statistical power, even under of low heritability. Moreover, the penetrance model is as efficient as the liability model, and the F2:3 design is more efficient than classical F2 design, even though only a single progeny is collected from each F2:3 family. With the maximum likelihood approaches under the penetrance and the liability models developed in this study, we can map binary traits as we can do for quantitative trait in the F2:3 design.

  20. Functional mapping imprinted quantitative trait loci underlying developmental characteristics

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    Li Gengxin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting, a phenomenon referring to nonequivalent expression of alleles depending on their parental origins, has been widely observed in nature. It has been shown recently that the epigenetic modification of an imprinted gene can be detected through a genetic mapping approach. Such an approach is developed based on traditional quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping focusing on single trait analysis. Recent studies have shown that most imprinted genes in mammals play an important role in controlling embryonic growth and post-natal development. For a developmental character such as growth, current approach is less efficient in dissecting the dynamic genetic effect of imprinted genes during individual ontology. Results Functional mapping has been emerging as a powerful framework for mapping quantitative trait loci underlying complex traits showing developmental characteristics. To understand the genetic architecture of dynamic imprinted traits, we propose a mapping strategy by integrating the functional mapping approach with genomic imprinting. We demonstrate the approach through mapping imprinted QTL controlling growth trajectories in an inbred F2 population. The statistical behavior of the approach is shown through simulation studies, in which the parameters can be estimated with reasonable precision under different simulation scenarios. The utility of the approach is illustrated through real data analysis in an F2 family derived from LG/J and SM/J mouse stains. Three maternally imprinted QTLs are identified as regulating the growth trajectory of mouse body weight. Conclusion The functional iQTL mapping approach developed here provides a quantitative and testable framework for assessing the interplay between imprinted genes and a developmental process, and will have important implications for elucidating the genetic architecture of imprinted traits.

  1. The effects of selection on linkage analysis for quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, M J; Georges, M A

    1992-12-01

    The effects of within-sample selection on the outcome of analyses detecting linkage between genetic markers and quantitative traits were studied. It was found that selection by truncation for the trait of interest significantly reduces the differences between marker genotype means thus reducing the power to detect linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). The size of this reduction is a function of proportion selected, the magnitude of the QTL effect, recombination rate between the marker locus and the QTL, and the allele frequency of the QTL. Proportion selected was the most influential of these factors on bias, e.g., for an allele substitution effect of one standard deviation unit, selecting the top 80%, 50% or 20% of the population required 2, 6 or 24 times the number of progeny, respectively, to offset the loss of power caused by this selection. The effect on power was approximately linear with respect to the size of gene effect, almost invariant to recombination rate, and a complex function of QTL allele frequency. It was concluded that experimental samples from animal populations which have been subjected to even minor amounts of selection will be inefficient in yielding information on linkage between markers and loci influencing the quantitative trait under selection.

  2. Genome-wide identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs in human heart.

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    Tamara T Koopmann

    Full Text Available In recent years genome-wide association studies (GWAS have uncovered numerous chromosomal loci associated with various electrocardiographic traits and cardiac arrhythmia predisposition. A considerable fraction of these loci lie within inter-genic regions. The underlying trait-associated variants likely reside in regulatory regions and exert their effect by modulating gene expression. Hence, the key to unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying these cardiac traits is to interrogate variants for association with differential transcript abundance by expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis. In this study we conducted an eQTL analysis of human heart. For a total of 129 left ventricular samples that were collected from non-diseased human donor hearts, genome-wide transcript abundance and genotyping was determined using microarrays. Each of the 18,402 transcripts and 897,683 SNP genotypes that remained after pre-processing and stringent quality control were tested for eQTL effects. We identified 771 eQTLs, regulating 429 unique transcripts. Overlaying these eQTLs with cardiac GWAS loci identified novel candidates for studies aimed at elucidating the functional and transcriptional impact of these loci. Thus, this work provides for the first time a comprehensive eQTL map of human heart: a powerful and unique resource that enables systems genetics approaches for the study of cardiac traits.

  3. QTL analysis for some quantitative traits in bread wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was conducted in bread wheat for 14 important traits utilizing data from four different mapping populations involving different approaches of QTL analysis. Analysis for grain protein content (GPC) suggested that the major part of genetic variation for this trait is due to environmental interactions. In contrast, pre-harvest sprouting tolerance (PHST) was controlled mainly by main effect QTL (M-QTL) with very little genetic variation due to environmental interactions; a major QTL for PHST was detected on chromosome arm 3AL. For grain weight, one QTL each was detected on chromosome arms 1AS, 2BS and 7AS. QTL for 4 growth related traits taken together detected by different methods ranged from 37 to 40; nine QTL that were detected by single-locus as well as two-locus analyses were all M-QTL. Similarly, single-locus and two-locus QTL analyses for seven yield and yield contributing traits in two populations respectively allowed detection of 25 and 50 QTL by composite interval mapping (CIM), 16 and 25 QTL by multiple-trait composite interval mapping (MCIM) and 38 and 37 QTL by two-locus analyses. These studies should prove useful in QTL cloning and wheat improvement through marker aided selection.

  4. Mapping functional traits: comparing abundance and presence-absence estimates at large spatial scales.

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    Tim Newbold

    Full Text Available Efforts to quantify the composition of biological communities increasingly focus on functional traits. The composition of communities in terms of traits can be summarized in several ways. Ecologists are beginning to map the geographic distribution of trait-based metrics from various sources of data, but the maps have not been tested against independent data. Using data for birds of the Western Hemisphere, we test for the first time the most commonly used method for mapping community trait composition - overlaying range maps, which assumes that the local abundance of a given species is unrelated to the traits in question - and three new methods that as well as the range maps include varying degrees of information about interspecific and geographic variation in abundance. For each method, and for four traits (body mass, generation length, migratory behaviour, diet we calculated community-weighted mean of trait values, functional richness and functional divergence. The maps based on species ranges and limited abundance data were compared with independent data on community species composition from the American Christmas Bird Count (CBC scheme coupled with data on traits. The correspondence with observed community composition at the CBC sites was mostly positive (62/73 correlations but varied widely depending on the metric of community composition and method used (R(2: 5.6 × 10(-7 to 0.82, with a median of 0.12. Importantly, the commonly-used range-overlap method resulted in the best fit (21/22 correlations positive; R(2: 0.004 to 0.8, with a median of 0.33. Given the paucity of data on the local abundance of species, overlaying range maps appears to be the best available method for estimating patterns of community composition, but the poor fit for some metrics suggests that local abundance data are urgently needed to allow more accurate estimates of the composition of communities.

  5. A bivariate quantitative genetic model for a linear Gaussian trait and a survival trait

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    Damgaard Lars

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the increasing use of survival models in animal breeding to address the genetic aspects of mainly longevity of livestock but also disease traits, the need for methods to infer genetic correlations and to do multivariate evaluations of survival traits and other types of traits has become increasingly important. In this study we derived and implemented a bivariate quantitative genetic model for a linear Gaussian and a survival trait that are genetically and environmentally correlated. For the survival trait, we considered the Weibull log-normal animal frailty model. A Bayesian approach using Gibbs sampling was adopted. Model parameters were inferred from their marginal posterior distributions. The required fully conditional posterior distributions were derived and issues on implementation are discussed. The twoWeibull baseline parameters were updated jointly using a Metropolis-Hastingstep. The remaining model parameters with non-normalized fully conditional distributions were updated univariately using adaptive rejection sampling. Simulation results showed that the estimated marginal posterior distributions covered well and placed high density to the true parameter values used in the simulation of data. In conclusion, the proposed method allows inferring additive genetic and environmental correlations, and doing multivariate genetic evaluation of a linear Gaussian trait and a survival trait.

  6. A bivariate quantitative genetic model for a linear Gaussian trait and a survival trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Lars Holm; Korsgaard, Inge Riis

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing use of survival models in animal breeding to address the genetic aspects of mainly longevity of livestock but also disease traits, the need for methods to infer genetic correlations and to do multivariate evaluations of survival traits and other types of traits has become increasingly important. In this study we derived and implemented a bivariate quantitative genetic model for a linear Gaussian and a survival trait that are genetically and environmentally correlated. For the survival trait, we considered the Weibull log-normal animal frailty model. A Bayesian approach using Gibbs sampling was adopted. Model parameters were inferred from their marginal posterior distributions. The required fully conditional posterior distributions were derived and issues on implementation are discussed. The two Weibull baseline parameters were updated jointly using a Metropolis-Hasting step. The remaining model parameters with non-normalized fully conditional distributions were updated univariately using adaptive rejection sampling. Simulation results showed that the estimated marginal posterior distributions covered well and placed high density to the true parameter values used in the simulation of data. In conclusion, the proposed method allows inferring additive genetic and environmental correlations, and doing multivariate genetic evaluation of a linear Gaussian trait and a survival trait.

  7. Quantitative trait locus analysis of multiple agronomic traits in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondo, Takahiro; Sato, Shusei; Okumura, Kenji; Tabata, Satoshi; Akashi, Ryo; Isobe, Sachiko

    2007-07-01

    The first quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of multiple agronomic traits in the model legume Lotus japonicus was performed with a population of recombinant inbred lines derived from Miyakojima MG-20 x Gifu B-129. Thirteen agronomic traits were evaluated in 2004 and 2005: traits of vegetative parts (plant height, stem thickness, leaf length, leaf width, plant regrowth, plant shape, and stem color), flowering traits (flowering time and degree), and pod and seed traits (pod length, pod width, seeds per pod, and seed mass). A total of 40 QTLs were detected that explained 5%-69% of total variation. The QTL that explained the most variation was that for stem color, which was detected in the same region of chromosome 2 in both years. Some QTLs were colocated, especially those for pod and seed traits. Seed mass QTLs were located at 5 locations that mapped to the corresponding genomic positions of equivalent QTLs in soybean, pea, chickpea, and mung bean. This study provides fundamental information for breeding of agronomically important legume crops.

  8. Linkage disequilibrium interval mapping of quantitative trait loci

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    de Rochambeau Hubert

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years gene mapping studies have been performed through linkage analyses based on pedigree data. Recently, linkage disequilibrium methods based on unrelated individuals have been advocated as powerful tools to refine estimates of gene location. Many strategies have been proposed to deal with simply inherited disease traits. However, locating quantitative trait loci is statistically more challenging and considerable research is needed to provide robust and computationally efficient methods. Results Under a three-locus Wright-Fisher model, we derived approximate expressions for the expected haplotype frequencies in a population. We considered haplotypes comprising one trait locus and two flanking markers. Using these theoretical expressions, we built a likelihood-maximization method, called HAPim, for estimating the location of a quantitative trait locus. For each postulated position, the method only requires information from the two flanking markers. Over a wide range of simulation scenarios it was found to be more accurate than a two-marker composite likelihood method. It also performed as well as identity by descent methods, whilst being valuable in a wider range of populations. Conclusion Our method makes efficient use of marker information, and can be valuable for fine mapping purposes. Its performance is increased if multiallelic markers are available. Several improvements can be developed to account for more complex evolution scenarios or provide robust confidence intervals for the location estimates.

  9. Overdominant quantitative trait loci for yield and fitness in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Yaniv; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Menda, Naama; Zinder, Michael; Krieger, Uri; Issman, Noa; Pleban, Tzili; Lippman, Zachary; Gur, Amit; Zamir, Dani

    2006-08-29

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is a major genetic force that contributes to world food production. The genetic basis of heterosis is not clear, and the importance of loci with overdominant (ODO) effects is debated. One problem has been the use of whole-genome segregating populations, where interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. To assess the contribution of ODO to heterosis in the absence of epistasis, we carried out quantitative genetic and phenotypic analyses on a population of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) introgression lines (ILs), which carry single marker-defined chromosome segments from the distantly related wild species Solanum pennellii. The ILs revealed 841 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 35 diverse traits measured in the field on homozygous and heterozygous plants. ILs showing greater reproductive fitness were characterized by the prevalence of ODO QTL, which were virtually absent for the nonreproductive traits. ODO can result from true ODO due to allelic interactions of a single gene or from pseudoODO that involves linked loci with dominant alleles in repulsion. The fact that we detected dominant and recessive QTL for all phenotypic categories but ODO only for the reproductive traits indicates that pseudoODO due to random linkage is unlikely to explain heterosis in the ILs. Thus, we favor the true ODO model involving a single functional Mendelian locus. We propose that the alliance of ODO QTL with higher reproductive fitness was selected for in evolution and was domesticated by man to improve yields of crop plants.

  10. Segregation Analysis on Genetic System of Quantitative Traits in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gai Junyi

    2006-01-01

    Based on the traditional polygene inheritance model of quantitative traits,the author suggests the major gene and polygene mixed inheritance model.The model was considered as a general one,while the pure major gene and pure polygene inheritance model was a specific case of the general model.Based on the proposed theory,the author established the segregation analysis procedure to study the genetic system of quantitative traits of plants.At present,this procedure can be used to evaluate the genetic effect of individual major genes (up to two to three major genes),the collective genetic effect of polygene,and their heritability value.This paper introduces how to establish the procedure,its main achievements,and its applications.An example is given to illustrate the steps,methods,and effectiveness of the procedure.

  11. Multiparent intercross populations in analysis of quantitative traits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sujay Rakshit; Arunita Rakshit; J. V. Patil

    2011-04-01

    Most traits of interest to medical, agricultural and animal scientists show continuous variation and complex mode of inheritance. DNA-based markers are being deployed to analyse such complex traits, that are known as quantitative trait loci (QTL). In conventional QTL analysis, F2, backcross populations, recombinant inbred lines, backcross inbred lines and double haploids from biparental crosses are commonly used. Introgression lines and near isogenic lines are also being used for QTL analysis. However, such populations have major limitations like predominantly relying on the recombination events taking place in the F1 generation and mapping of only the allelic pairs present in the two parents. The second generation mapping resources like association mapping, nested association mapping and multiparent intercross populations potentially address the major limitations of available mapping resources. The potential of multiparent intercross populations in gene mapping has been discussed here. In such populations both linkage and association analysis can be conductted without encountering the limitations of structured populations. In such populations, larger genetic variation in the germplasm is accessed and various allelic and cytoplasmic interactions are assessed. For all practical purposes, across crop species, use of eight founders and a fixed population of 1000 individuals are most appropriate. Limitations with multiparent intercross populations are that they require longer time and more resource to be generated and they are likely to show extensive segregation for developmental traits, limiting their use in the analysis of complex traits. However, multiparent intercross population resources are likely to bring a paradigm shift towards QTL analysis in plant species.

  12. Family-based bivariate association tests for quantitative traits.

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    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available The availability of a large number of dense SNPs, high-throughput genotyping and computation methods promotes the application of family-based association tests. While most of the current family-based analyses focus only on individual traits, joint analyses of correlated traits can extract more information and potentially improve the statistical power. However, current TDT-based methods are low-powered. Here, we develop a method for tests of association for bivariate quantitative traits in families. In particular, we correct for population stratification by the use of an integration of principal component analysis and TDT. A score test statistic in the variance-components model is proposed. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the proposed method not only outperforms approaches limited to individual traits when pleiotropic effect is present, but also surpasses the power of two popular bivariate association tests termed FBAT-GEE and FBAT-PC, respectively, while correcting for population stratification. When applied to the GAW16 datasets, the proposed method successfully identifies at the genome-wide level the two SNPs that present pleiotropic effects to HDL and TG traits.

  13. Multiple-Line Inference of Selection on Quantitative Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Nico; Khatri, Bhavin S; Lässig, Michael; Berg, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    Trait differences between species may be attributable to natural selection. However, quantifying the strength of evidence for selection acting on a particular trait is a difficult task. Here we develop a population genetics test for selection acting on a quantitative trait that is based on multiple-line crosses. We show that using multiple lines increases both the power and the scope of selection inferences. First, a test based on three or more lines detects selection with strongly increased statistical significance, and we show explicitly how the sensitivity of the test depends on the number of lines. Second, a multiple-line test can distinguish between different lineage-specific selection scenarios. Our analytical results are complemented by extensive numerical simulations. We then apply the multiple-line test to QTL data on floral character traits in plant species of the Mimulus genus and on photoperiodic traits in different maize strains, where we find a signature of lineage-specific selection not seen in two-line tests.

  14. A primary screen of the bovine genome for quantitative trait loci affecting carcass and growth traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R T; Keele, J W; Shackelford, S D; Kappes, S M; Koohmaraie, M

    1999-06-01

    A primary genomic screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting carcass and growth traits was performed by genotyping 238 microsatellite markers on 185 out of 300 total progeny from a Bos indicus x Bos taurus sire mated to Bos taurus cows. The following traits were analyzed for QTL effects: birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WW), yearling weight (YW), hot carcass weight (HCW), dressing percentage (DP), fat thickness (FT), marbling score (MAR), longissimus muscle area (LMA), rib bone (RibB), rib fat (RibF), and rib muscle (RibM), and the predicted whole carcass traits, retail product yield (RPYD), fat trim yield (FATYD), bone yield (BOYD), retail product weight (RPWT), fat weight (FATWT), and bone weight (BOWT). Data were analyzed by generating an F-statistic profile computed at 1-cM intervals for each chromosome by the regression of phenotype on the conditional probability of receiving the Brahman allele from the sire. There was compelling evidence for a QTL allele of Brahman origin affecting an increase in RibB and a decrease in DP on chromosome 5 (BTA5). Putative QTL at or just below the threshold for genome-wide significance were as follows: an increase in RPYD and component traits on BTA2 and BTA13, an increase in LMA on BTA14, and an increase in BWT on BTA1. Results provided represent a portion of our efforts to identify and characterize QTL affecting carcass and growth traits.

  15. Quantitative trait loci linked to PRNP gene controlling health and production traits in INRA 401 sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunel Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, the potential association of PrP genotypes with health and productive traits was investigated. Data were recorded on animals of the INRA 401 breed from the Bourges-La Sapinière INRA experimental farm. The population consisted of 30 rams and 852 ewes, which produced 1310 lambs. The animals were categorized into three PrP genotype classes: ARR homozygous, ARR heterozygous, and animals without any ARR allele. Two analyses differing in the approach considered were carried out. Firstly, the potential association of the PrP genotype with disease (Salmonella resistance and production (wool and carcass traits was studied. The data used included 1042, 1043 and 1013 genotyped animals for the Salmonella resistance, wool and carcass traits, respectively. The different traits were analyzed using an animal model, where the PrP genotype effect was included as a fixed effect. Association analyses do not indicate any evidence of an effect of PrP genotypes on traits studied in this breed. Secondly, a quantitative trait loci (QTL detection approach using the PRNP gene as a marker was applied on ovine chromosome 13. Interval mapping was used. Evidence for one QTL affecting mean fiber diameter was found at 25 cM from the PRNP gene. However, a linkage between PRNP and this QTL does not imply unfavorable linkage disequilibrium for PRNP selection purposes.

  16. Linkage Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Agronomic and Fiber Quality Traits in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Gore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The superior fiber properties of L. serve as a source of novel variation for improving fiber quality in Upland cotton ( L., but introgression from has been largely unsuccessful due to hybrid breakdown and a lack of genetic and genomic resources. In an effort to overcome these limitations, we constructed a linkage map and conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis of 10 agronomic and fiber quality traits in a recombinant inbred mapping population derived from a cross between TM-1, an Upland cotton line, and NM24016, an elite line with stabilized introgression from . The linkage map consisted of 429 simple-sequence repeat (SSR and 412 genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS-based single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP marker loci that covered half of the tetraploid cotton genome. Notably, the 841 marker loci were unevenly distributed among the 26 chromosomes of tetraploid cotton. The 10 traits evaluated on the TM-1 × NM24016 population in a multienvironment trial were highly heritable, and most of the fiber traits showed considerable transgressive variation. Through the QTL analysis, we identified a total of 28 QTLs associated with the 10 traits. Our study provides a novel resource that can be used by breeders and geneticists for the genetic improvement of agronomic and fiber quality traits in Upland cotton.

  17. Plastic traits of an exotic grass contribute to its abundance but are not always favourable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Firn

    Full Text Available In herbaceous ecosystems worldwide, biodiversity has been negatively impacted by changed grazing regimes and nutrient enrichment. Altered disturbance regimes are thought to favour invasive species that have a high phenotypic plasticity, although most studies measure plasticity under controlled conditions in the greenhouse and then assume plasticity is an advantage in the field. Here, we compare trait plasticity between three co-occurring, C(4 perennial grass species, an invader Eragrostis curvula, and natives Eragrostis sororia and Aristida personata to grazing and fertilizer in a three-year field trial. We measured abundances and several leaf traits known to correlate with strategies used by plants to fix carbon and acquire resources, i.e. specific leaf area (SLA, leaf dry matter content (LDMC, leaf nutrient concentrations (N, C:N, P, assimilation rates (Amax and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE. In the control treatment (grazed only, trait values for SLA, leaf C:N ratios, Amax and PNUE differed significantly between the three grass species. When trait values were compared across treatments, E. curvula showed higher trait plasticity than the native grasses, and this correlated with an increase in abundance across all but the grazed/fertilized treatment. The native grasses showed little trait plasticity in response to the treatments. Aristida personata decreased significantly in the treatments where E. curvula increased, and E. sororia abundance increased possibly due to increased rainfall and not in response to treatments or invader abundance. Overall, we found that plasticity did not favour an increase in abundance of E. curvula under the grazed/fertilized treatment likely because leaf nutrient contents increased and subsequently its' palatability to consumers. E. curvula also displayed a higher resource use efficiency than the native grasses. These findings suggest resource conditions and disturbance regimes can be manipulated to

  18. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs mapping for growth traits in the mouse: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medrano Juan F

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attainment of a specific mature body size is one of the most fundamental differences among species of mammals. Moreover, body size seems to be the central factor underlying differences in traits such as growth rate, energy metabolism and body composition. An important proportion of this variability is of genetic origin. The goal of the genetic analysis of animal growth is to understand its "genetic architecture", that is the number and position of loci affecting the trait, the magnitude of their effects, allele frequencies and types of gene action. In this review, the different strategies developed to identify and characterize genes involved in the regulation of growth in the mouse are described, with emphasis on the methods developed to map loci contributing to the regulation of quantitative traits (QTLs.

  19. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fruit quality traits and number of weeks of flowering in the cultivated strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit quality traits and dayneutrality are two major foci of several strawberry breeding programs. The identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and molecular markers linked to these traits could improve breeding efficiency. In this work, an F1 population derived from the cross ‘Delmarvel’ × ...

  20. Quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping for growth traits on bovine chromosome 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Miyata

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping in livestock allows the identification of genes that determine the genetic variation affecting traits of economic interest. We analyzed the birth weight and weight at 60 days QTL segregating on bovine chromosome BTA14 in a F2 resource population using genotypes produced from seven microsatellite markers. Phenotypes were derived from 346 F2 progeny produced from crossing Bos indicus Gyr x Holstein Bos taurus F1 parents. Interval analysis to detect QTL for birth weight revealed the presence of a QTL (p < 0.05 at 1 centimorgan (cM from the centromere with an additive effect of 1.210 ± 0.438 kg. Interval analysis for weight at 60 days revealed the presence of a QTL (p < 0.05 at 0 cM from the centromere with an additive effect of 2.122 ± 0.735 kg. The region to which the QTL were assigned is described in the literature as responsible for some growth traits, milk yield, milk composition, fat deposition and has also been related to reproductive traits such as daughter pregnancy rate and ovulation rate. The effects of the QTL described on other traits were not investigated.

  1. Genomic Distribution of Quantitative Trait Loci for Yield and Yield-related Traits in Common Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yi Zhang; Dong-Cheng Liu; Xiao-Li Guo; Wen-Long Yang; Jia-Zhu Sun; Dao-Wen Wang; Aimin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A major objective of quantitative trait locus(QTL)studies is to find genes/markers that can be used in breeding programs via marker assisted selection(MAS).We surveyed the QTLs for yield and yield related traits and their genomic distributions in common wheat(Triticum aestivum L.)in the available published reports.We then carried out a meta-QTL(MQTL)analysis to identify the major and consistent QTLs for these traits.In total,55 MQTLs were identified,of which 12 significant MQTLs were located on wheat chromosomes 1A,1B,2A,2D,3B,4A,4B,4D and 5A.Our study showed that the genetic control of yield and its components in common wheat involved the important genes such as Rht and Vrn.Furthermore,several significant MQTLs were found in the chromosomal regions corresponding to several rice genomic locations containing important QTLs for yield related traits.Our results demonstrate that meta-QTL analysis is a powerful tool for confirming the major and stable QTLs and refining their chromosomal positions in common wheat,which may be useful for improving the MAS efficiency of yield related traits.

  2. Genetic parameters and mapping quantitative trait loci associated with tibia traits in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragognetti, B N N; Stafuzza, N B; Silva, T B R; Chud, T C S; Grupioni, N V; Cruz, V A R; Peixoto, J O; Nones, K; Ledur, M C; Munari, D P

    2015-12-21

    Selection among broilers for performance traits is resulting in locomotion problems and bone disorders, once skeletal structure is not strong enough to support body weight in broilers with high growth rates. In this study, genetic parameters were estimated for body weight at 42 days of age (BW42), and tibia traits (length, width, and weight) in a population of broiler chickens. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for tibia traits to expand our knowledge of the genetic architecture of the broiler population. Genetic correlations ranged from 0.56 ± 0.18 (between tibia length and BW42) to 0.89 ± 0.06 (between tibia width and weight), suggesting that these traits are either controlled by pleiotropic genes or by genes that are in linkage disequilibrium. For QTL mapping, the genome was scanned with 127 microsatellites, representing a coverage of 2630 cM. Eight QTL were mapped on Gallus gallus chromosomes (GGA): GGA1, GGA4, GGA6, GGA13, and GGA24. The QTL regions for tibia length and weight were mapped on GGA1, between LEI0079 and MCW145 markers. The gene DACH1 is located in this region; this gene acts to form the apical ectodermal ridge, responsible for limb development. Body weight at 42 days of age was included in the model as a covariate for selection effect of bone traits. Two QTL were found for tibia weight on GGA2 and GGA4, and one for tibia width on GGA3. Information originating from these QTL will assist in the search for candidate genes for these bone traits in future studies.

  3. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting body conformation traits in Spanish Churra dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Alvarez, L; de la Fuente, L F; Sanchez, J P; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J J

    2011-08-01

    A genome scan for chromosomal regions influencing body conformation traits was conducted for a population of Spanish Churra dairy sheep following a daughter design. A total of 739 ewes from 11 half-sib sire families were included in the study. The ewes were scored for the 5 linear traits used in the breeding scheme of the Churra breed to assess body conformation: stature, rear legs-rear view, foot angle, rump width, and general appearance. All the animals, including the 11 sires, were genotyped for 181 microsatellite markers evenly distributed across the 26 sheep autosomes. Using the yield deviations of the raw scores adjusted for fixed factors as phenotypic measurements, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed on the basis of a multi-marker regression method. Seven suggestive QTL were identified on chromosomes Ovis aries (OAR)2, OAR5, OAR16, OAR23, and OAR26, but none reached a genome-wise significance level. Putative QTL were identified for all of the traits analyzed, except for general appearance score. The suggestive QTL showing the highest test statistic influenced rear legs-rear view and was localized on OAR16, close to the growth hormone receptor coding gene, GHR. Some of the putative linkage associations reported here are consistent with previously reported QTL in cattle for similar traits. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first report of QTL for body conformation traits in dairy sheep; further studies will be needed to confirm and redefine the linkage associations reported herein. It is expected that future genome-wide association analyses of larger families will help identify genes underlying these putative genetic effects and provide useful markers for marker-assisted selection of such functional traits.

  4. A strategy to apply quantitative epistasis analysis on developmental traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labocha, Marta K; Yuan, Wang; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Zhong, Weiwei

    2017-05-15

    Genetic interactions are keys to understand complex traits and evolution. Epistasis analysis is an effective method to map genetic interactions. Large-scale quantitative epistasis analysis has been well established for single cells. However, there is a substantial lack of such studies in multicellular organisms and their complex phenotypes such as development. Here we present a method to extend quantitative epistasis analysis to developmental traits. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we applied RNA interference on mutants to inactivate two genes, used an imaging system to quantitatively measure phenotypes, and developed a set of statistical methods to extract genetic interactions from phenotypic measurement. Using two different C. elegans developmental phenotypes, body length and sex ratio, as examples, we showed that this method could accommodate various metazoan phenotypes with performances comparable to those methods in single cell growth studies. Comparing with qualitative observations, this method of quantitative epistasis enabled detection of new interactions involving subtle phenotypes. For example, several sex-ratio genes were found to interact with brc-1 and brd-1, the orthologs of the human breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BARD1, respectively. We confirmed the brc-1 interactions with the following genes in DNA damage response: C34F6.1, him-3 (ortholog of HORMAD1, HORMAD2), sdc-1, and set-2 (ortholog of SETD1A, SETD1B, KMT2C, KMT2D), validating the effectiveness of our method in detecting genetic interactions. We developed a reliable, high-throughput method for quantitative epistasis analysis of developmental phenotypes.

  5. Avian malaria, ecological host traits and mosquito abundance in southeastern Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecchio, Alan; Ellis, Vincenzo A; Bell, Jeffrey A; Andretti, Christian B; D'Horta, Fernando M; Silva, Allan M; Tkach, Vasyl V; Weckstein, Jason D

    2017-03-27

    Avian malaria is a vector transmitted disease caused by Plasmodium and recent studies suggest that variation in its prevalence across avian hosts is correlated with a variety of ecological traits. Here we examine the relationship between prevalence and diversity of Plasmodium lineages in southeastern Amazonia and: (1) host ecological traits (nest location, nest type, flocking behaviour and diet); (2) density and diversity of avian hosts; (3) abundance and diversity of mosquitoes; and (4) season. We used molecular methods to detect Plasmodium in blood samples from 675 individual birds of 120 species. Based on cytochrome b sequences, we recovered 89 lineages of Plasmodium from 136 infected individuals sampled across seven localities. Plasmodium prevalence was homogeneous over time (dry season and flooding season) and space, but heterogeneous among 51 avian host species. Variation in prevalence among bird species was not explained by avian ecological traits, density of avian hosts, or mosquito abundance. However, Plasmodium lineage diversity was positively correlated with mosquito abundance. Interestingly, our results suggest that avian host traits are less important determinants of Plasmodium prevalence and diversity in southeastern Amazonia than in other regions in which they have been investigated.

  6. Functional traits predict relationship between plant abundance dynamic and long-term climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; Elumeeva, Tatiana G; Onipchenko, Vladimir G; Shidakov, Islam I; Salpagarova, Fatima S; Khubiev, Anzor B; Tekeev, Dzhamal K; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2013-11-01

    Predicting climate change impact on ecosystem structure and services is one of the most important challenges in ecology. Until now, plant species response to climate change has been described at the level of fixed plant functional types, an approach limited by its inflexibility as there is much interspecific functional variation within plant functional types. Considering a plant species as a set of functional traits greatly increases our possibilities for analysis of ecosystem functioning and carbon and nutrient fluxes associated therewith. Moreover, recently assembled large-scale databases hold comprehensive per-species data on plant functional traits, allowing a detailed functional description of many plant communities on Earth. Here, we show that plant functional traits can be used as predictors of vegetation response to climate warming, accounting in our test ecosystem (the species-rich alpine belt of Caucasus mountains, Russia) for 59% of variability in the per-species abundance relation to temperature. In this mountain belt, traits that promote conservative leaf water economy (higher leaf mass per area, thicker leaves) and large investments in belowground reserves to support next year's shoot buds (root carbon content) were the best predictors of the species increase in abundance along with temperature increase. This finding demonstrates that plant functional traits constitute a highly useful concept for forecasting changes in plant communities, and their associated ecosystem services, in response to climate change.

  7. The nature and identification of quantitative trait loci : a community's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abiola, O; Angel, JM; Avner, P; Bachmanov, AA; Belknap, JK; Bennett, B; Blankenhorn, EP; Blizard, DA; Bolivar, [No Value; Brockmann, GA; Buck, KJ; Bureau, JF; Casley, WL; Chesler, EJ; Cheverud, JM; Churchill, GA; Cook, M; Crabbe, JC; Crusio, WE; Darvasi, A; de Haan, G; Demant, P; Doerge, RW; Elliott, RW; Farber, CR; Flaherty, L; Flint, J; Gershenfeld, H; Gu, JPGJ; Gu, WK; Himmelbauer, H; Hitzemann, R; Hsu, HC; Hunter, K; Iraqi, FA; Jansen, RC; Johnson, TE; Jones, BC; Kempermann, G; Lammert, F; Lu, L; Manly, KF; Matthews, DB; Medrano, JF; Mehrabian, M; Mittleman, G; Mock, BA; Mogil, JS; Montagutelli, [No Value; Morahan, G; Mountz, JD; Nagase, H; Nowakowski, RS; O'Hara, BR; Osadchuk, AV; Paigen, B; Palmer, Abraham A.; Peirce, JL; Pomp, D; Rosemann, M; Rosen, GD; Schalkwyk, LC; Seltzer, Z; Settle, S; Shimomura, K; Shou, SM; Sikela, JM; Siracusa, LD; Spearow, JL; Teuscher, C; Threadgill, DW; Toth, LA; Toye, AA; Vadasz, C; Van Zant, G; Wakeland, E; Zhang, HG; Zou, F; Angel, Joe M.; Belknap, John K.; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.; Bolivar, Valerie; Brockmann, Gudrun A.; Buck, Kari J.; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Casley, William L.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Cheverud, James M.; Crabbe, John C.; Crusio, Wim E.; Elliott, Rosemary W.; Farber, Charles R.; Gibson, John P.; Gu, Jing; Gu, Weikuan; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Jones, Byron C.; Manly, Kenneth F.; Matthews, Douglas B.; Medrano, Juan F.; Mock, Beverly A.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Montagutelli, Xavier; Mountz, John D.; Nowakowski, Richard S.; O’Hara, Bruce F.; Osadchuk, Alexander V.; Peirce, Jeremy L.; Rosen, Glenn D.; Shou, Siming; Siracusa, Linda D.; Spearow, Jimmy L.; Threadgill, David W.; Toth, Linda A.; Williams, Robert W.; Zhang, Huang-Ge; Williams, O.

    2003-01-01

    This white paper by eighty members of the Complex Trait Consortium presents a community’s view on the approaches and statistical analyses that are needed for the identification of genetic loci that determine quantitative traits. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) can be identified in several ways, but i

  8. Finding Quantitative Trait Loci Genes with Collaborative Targeted Maximum Likelihood Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Rose, Sherri; van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative trait loci mapping is focused on identifying the positions and effect of genes underlying an an observed trait. We present a collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimator in a semi-parametric model using a newly proposed 2-part super learning algorithm to find quantitative trait loci genes in listeria data. Results are compared to the parametric composite interval mapping approach.

  9. Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for production, resistance and tolerance traits in Salix. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennberg-Waestljung, Ann Christin; Bertholdsson, Nils-Ove; Glynn, Carolyn; Weih, Martin; Aahman, Inger [SLU, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Plant Biology and Forest Genetics

    2004-05-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for growth traits, water use efficiency and tolerance/resistance against metals and herbivores have been identified. A hybrid F2 population originating from a cross between a Salix dasyclados-clone (SW901290) and a S. viminalis-clone ('Jorunn') was used for the different studies in this project. The growth response was analyzed in a greenhouse experiment with two water treatments, normal and drought. In addition, three field experiments with contrasting soils and climates were established. QTL specific for each treatment or field environment but also QTL stable over the treatments or field environments were detected. Each QTL explained from 8 to 29 % of the phenotypic variation depending on trait, treatment or field environment. Clusters of QTL for different traits were mapped indicating a common genetic base or tightly-linked QTL. Stable QTL identified for dryweight can be useful tools for early selection in Salix. In a separate greenhouse experiment, with a subset of ten genotypes from the F2 population, we show that genotype is more important than irrigation treatment for production of phenolic substances as well as for resistance to herbivory by P vulgatissima.

  10. Detection of Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Live Measurement Traits in Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-hu; XIONG Yuan-zhu; ZUO Bo; LEI Ming-gang; LI Feng-e; LI Jia-lian

    2007-01-01

    Live measurement growth traits are very important economic traits in pig production and breeding. In this research,quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected for 11 live estimated growth and carcass traits, including birth weight (BWT),average daily gain over testing periods (ADG3), live backfat thickness at last 3-4th lumbar (LBFT3), live loin eye area (LLEA), and so on, in 214 pig resource family population, including 180 F2 individual, by 39 microsatellite marker loci on SSC4, SSC6, SSC7, SSC8, and SSC13. The results indicated that 4 chromosome significant level QTL and one suggestive QTL were detected for ADG3 (at position of 50 cM on SSC8), LBFT3 (at position of 147 cM on SSC4), LLEA (one highly significant at position of 48 cM on SSC7; another significant at position of 125 cM on SSC8) and BWT (suggestive significant at position of 0 cM, at marker sw489 on SSC4). The phenotypic variance of these QTL accounted for 0.95% to 16.91%. Most of them were mentioned in previous reports; except the QTL of LLEA at position of sw1953 on SSC8 which maybe a new QTL.

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Leaf Morphological Traits and Chlorophyll Content in Cultivated Tetraploid Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Liang SONG; Wang-Zhen GUO; Zhi-Guo HAN; Tian-Zhen ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful tool for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis at the molecular level. A simple sequence repeat (SSR) genetic map containing 590 markers and a BC1 population from two cultivated tetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars, namely TM-1 and Hai 7124 (G.barbadense L.), were used to map and analyze QTL using the composite interval mapping (CIM) method.Thirty one QTLs, 10 for lobe length, 13 for lobe width, six for lobe angle, and two for leaf chlorophyll content,were detected on 15 chromosomes or linkage groups at logarithm of odds (LOD) ≥ 2.0, of which 15 were found for leaf morphology at LOD ≥.3.0. The genetic effects of the QTL were estimated. These results are fundamental for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of these traits in tetraploid cotton breeding.

  12. Identification of quantitative trait loci for wool traits in Iranian Baluchi sheep. Indian Journal of Animal Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dashab, G R; Aslaminejad, A; Nassiri, M R;

    2012-01-01

    Regions on 3 ovine chromosomes (OAR1, 5 and 25) were selected to study quantitative trait loci (QTL) segregating for wool traits in Baluchi sheep, an indigenous sheep breed in Iran. Progenies (503) from 13 half-sib families were genotyped for 15 microsatellite markers. The average number of proge...

  13. Dynamic Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Plant Phenomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zitong; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2015-12-01

    Advanced platforms have recently become available for automatic and systematic quantification of plant growth and development. These new techniques can efficiently produce multiple measurements of phenotypes over time, and introduce time as an extra dimension to quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies. Functional mapping utilizes a class of statistical models for identifying QTLs associated with the growth characteristics of interest. A major benefit of functional mapping is that it integrates information over multiple timepoints, and therefore could increase the statistical power for QTL detection. We review the current development of computationally efficient functional mapping methods which provide invaluable tools for analyzing large-scale timecourse data that are readily available in our post-genome era. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparing Quantitative Trait Loci and Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop methods to compare the positions of quantitative trait loci (QTL with a set of genes selected by other methods, such as microarray experiments, from a sequenced genome. We apply our methods to QTL for addictive behavior in mouse, and a set of genes upregulated in a region of the brain associated with addictive behavior, the nucleus accumbens (NA. The association between the QTL and NA genes is not significantly stronger than expected by chance. However, chromosomes 2 and 16 do show strong associations suggesting that genes on these chromosomes might be associated with addictive behavior. The statistical methodology developed for this study can be applied to similar studies to assess the mutual information in microarray and QTL analyses.

  15. CSGRqtl: A Comparative Quantitative Trait Locus Database for Saccharinae Grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Conventional biparental quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping has led to some successes in the identification of causal genes in many organisms. QTL likelihood intervals not only provide "prior information" for finer-resolution approaches such as GWAS but also provide better statistical power than GWAS to detect variants with low/rare frequency in a natural population. Here, we describe a new element of an ongoing effort to provide online resources to facilitate study and improvement of the important Saccharinae clade. The primary goal of this new resource is the anchoring of published QTLs for this clade to the Sorghum genome. Genetic map alignments translate a wealth of genomic information from sorghum to Saccharum spp., Miscanthus spp., and other taxa. In addition, genome alignments facilitate comparison of the Saccharinae QTL sets to those of other taxa that enjoy comparable resources, exemplified herein by rice.

  16. Genetic architecture of quantitative traits and complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wenqing; O'Connor, Timothy D; Akey, Joshua M

    2013-12-01

    More than 150 years after Mendel discovered the laws of heredity, the genetic architecture of phenotypic variation remains elusive. Here, we discuss recent progress in deciphering how genotypes map onto phenotypes, sources of genetic complexity, and how model organisms are illuminating general principles about the relationship between genetic and phenotypic variation. Moreover, we highlight insights gleaned from large-scale sequencing studies in humans, and how this knowledge informs outstanding questions about the genetic architecture of quantitative traits and complex diseases. Finally, we articulate how the confluence of technologies enabling whole-genome sequencing, comprehensive phenotyping, and high-throughput functional assays of polymorphisms will facilitate a more principled and mechanistic understanding of the genetic architecture of phenotypic variation.

  17. Multisite haplotype on cattle chromosome 3 is associated with quantitative trait locus effects on lactation traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Zinder, Miri; Donthu, Ravikiran; Larkin, Denis M; Kumar, Charu Gupta; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Andropolis, Kalista E; Oliveira, Rosane; Lewin, Harris A

    2011-11-07

    The goal of this study was to identify candidate genes and DNA polymorphisms for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting milk yield (MY), fat yield (FY), and protein yield (PY) previously mapped to bovine chromosome 3 (BTA3). To accomplish this, 373 half-siblings sired by three bulls previously shown to be segregating for lactation trait QTL, and 263 additional sires in the U.S. Dairy Bull DNA Repository (DBDR) were genotyped for 2,500 SNPs within a 16.3 Mbp QTL critical region on BTA3. Targeted resequencing of ∼1.8 Mbp within the QTL critical region of one of the QTL heterozygous sires identified additional polymorphisms useful for association studies. Twenty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a fine-mapped region were associated with effects on breeding values for MY, FY, or PY in DBDR sires, of which five SNPs were in strong linkage disequilibrium in the population. This multisite haplotype included SNPs located within exons or promoters of four tightly linked genes: RAP1A, ADORA3, OVGP1, and C3H1orf88. An SNP within RAP1A showed strong evidence of a recent selective sweep based on integrated haplotype score and was also associated with breeding value for PY. Because of its known function in alveolar lumen formation in the mammary gland, RAP1A is thus a strong candidate gene for QTL effects on lactation traits. Our results provide a detailed assessment of a QTL region that will be a useful guide for complex traits analysis in humans and other noninbred species.

  18. Detection of quantitative trait loci for carcass composition traits in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard Christine

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis of carcass composition data from a three-generation experimental cross between Meishan (MS and Large White (LW pig breeds is presented. A total of 488 F2 males issued from six F1 boars and 23 F1 sows, the progeny of six LW boars and six MS sows, were slaughtered at approximately 80 kg live weight and were submitted to a standardised cutting of the carcass. Fifteen traits, i.e. dressing percentage, loin, ham, shoulder, belly, backfat, leaf fat, feet and head weights, two backfat thickness and one muscle depth measurements, ham + loin and back + leaf fat percentages and estimated carcass lean content were analysed. Animals were typed for a total of 137 markers covering the entire porcine genome. Analyses were performed using a line-cross (LC regression method where founder lines were assumed to be fixed for different QTL alleles and a half/full sib (HFS maximum likelihood method where allele substitution effects were estimated within each half-/full-sib family. Additional analyses were performed to search for multiple linked QTL and imprinting effects. Significant gene effects were evidenced for both leanness and fatness traits in the telomeric regions of SSC 1q and SSC 2p, on SSC 4, SSC 7 and SSC X. Additional significant QTL were identified for ham weight on SSC 5, for head weight on SSC 1 and SSC 7, for feet weight on SSC 7 and for dressing percentage on SSC X. LW alleles were associated with a higher lean content and a lower fat content of the carcass, except for the fatness trait on SSC 7. Suggestive evidence of linked QTL on SSC 7 and of imprinting effects on SSC 6, SSC 7, SSC 9 and SSC 17 were also obtained.

  19. Hnrnph1 Is A Quantitative Trait Gene for Methamphetamine Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Yazdani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulant addiction is a heritable substance use disorder; however its genetic basis is almost entirely unknown. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping in mice offers a complementary approach to human genome-wide association studies and can facilitate environment control, statistical power, novel gene discovery, and neurobiological mechanisms. We used interval-specific congenic mouse lines carrying various segments of chromosome 11 from the DBA/2J strain on an isogenic C57BL/6J background to positionally clone a 206 kb QTL (50,185,512-50,391,845 bp that was causally associated with a reduction in the locomotor stimulant response to methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.; DBA/2J < C57BL/6J-a non-contingent, drug-induced behavior that is associated with stimulation of the dopaminergic reward circuitry. This chromosomal region contained only two protein coding genes-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, H1 (Hnrnph1 and RUN and FYVE domain-containing 1 (Rufy1. Transcriptome analysis via mRNA sequencing in the striatum implicated a neurobiological mechanism involving a reduction in mesolimbic innervation and striatal neurotransmission. For instance, Nr4a2 (nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2, a transcription factor crucial for midbrain dopaminergic neuron development, exhibited a 2.1-fold decrease in expression (DBA/2J < C57BL/6J; p 4.2 x 10-15. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs-mediated introduction of frameshift deletions in the first coding exon of Hnrnph1, but not Rufy1, recapitulated the reduced methamphetamine behavioral response, thus identifying Hnrnph1 as a quantitative trait gene for methamphetamine sensitivity. These results define a novel contribution of Hnrnph1 to neurobehavioral dysfunction associated with dopaminergic neurotransmission. These findings could have implications for understanding the genetic basis of methamphetamine addiction in humans and the development of novel therapeutics for

  20. Fast empirical Bayesian LASSO for multiple quantitative trait locus mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Shizhong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bayesian shrinkage technique has been applied to multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs mapping to estimate the genetic effects of QTLs on quantitative traits from a very large set of possible effects including the main and epistatic effects of QTLs. Although the recently developed empirical Bayes (EB method significantly reduced computation comparing with the fully Bayesian approach, its speed and accuracy are limited by the fact that numerical optimization is required to estimate the variance components in the QTL model. Results We developed a fast empirical Bayesian LASSO (EBLASSO method for multiple QTL mapping. The fact that the EBLASSO can estimate the variance components in a closed form along with other algorithmic techniques render the EBLASSO method more efficient and accurate. Comparing with the EB method, our simulation study demonstrated that the EBLASSO method could substantially improve the computational speed and detect more QTL effects without increasing the false positive rate. Particularly, the EBLASSO algorithm running on a personal computer could easily handle a linear QTL model with more than 100,000 variables in our simulation study. Real data analysis also demonstrated that the EBLASSO method detected more reasonable effects than the EB method. Comparing with the LASSO, our simulation showed that the current version of the EBLASSO implemented in Matlab had similar speed as the LASSO implemented in Fortran, and that the EBLASSO detected the same number of true effects as the LASSO but a much smaller number of false positive effects. Conclusions The EBLASSO method can handle a large number of effects possibly including both the main and epistatic QTL effects, environmental effects and the effects of gene-environment interactions. It will be a very useful tool for multiple QTL mapping.

  1. Community-Weighted Mean Plant Traits Predict Small Scale Distribution of Insect Root Herbivore Abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja Sonnemann

    Full Text Available Small scale distribution of insect root herbivores may promote plant species diversity by creating patches of different herbivore pressure. However, determinants of small scale distribution of insect root herbivores, and impact of land use intensity on their small scale distribution are largely unknown. We sampled insect root herbivores and measured vegetation parameters and soil water content along transects in grasslands of different management intensity in three regions in Germany. We calculated community-weighted mean plant traits to test whether the functional plant community composition determines the small scale distribution of insect root herbivores. To analyze spatial patterns in plant species and trait composition and insect root herbivore abundance we computed Mantel correlograms. Insect root herbivores mainly comprised click beetle (Coleoptera, Elateridae larvae (43% in the investigated grasslands. Total insect root herbivore numbers were positively related to community-weighted mean traits indicating high plant growth rates and biomass (specific leaf area, reproductive- and vegetative plant height, and negatively related to plant traits indicating poor tissue quality (leaf C/N ratio. Generalist Elaterid larvae, when analyzed independently, were also positively related to high plant growth rates and furthermore to root dry mass, but were not related to tissue quality. Insect root herbivore numbers were not related to plant cover, plant species richness and soil water content. Plant species composition and to a lesser extent plant trait composition displayed spatial autocorrelation, which was not influenced by land use intensity. Insect root herbivore abundance was not spatially autocorrelated. We conclude that in semi-natural grasslands with a high share of generalist insect root herbivores, insect root herbivores affiliate with large, fast growing plants, presumably because of availability of high quantities of food. Affiliation of

  2. Community-Weighted Mean Plant Traits Predict Small Scale Distribution of Insect Root Herbivore Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, Ilja; Pfestorf, Hans; Jeltsch, Florian; Wurst, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Small scale distribution of insect root herbivores may promote plant species diversity by creating patches of different herbivore pressure. However, determinants of small scale distribution of insect root herbivores, and impact of land use intensity on their small scale distribution are largely unknown. We sampled insect root herbivores and measured vegetation parameters and soil water content along transects in grasslands of different management intensity in three regions in Germany. We calculated community-weighted mean plant traits to test whether the functional plant community composition determines the small scale distribution of insect root herbivores. To analyze spatial patterns in plant species and trait composition and insect root herbivore abundance we computed Mantel correlograms. Insect root herbivores mainly comprised click beetle (Coleoptera, Elateridae) larvae (43%) in the investigated grasslands. Total insect root herbivore numbers were positively related to community-weighted mean traits indicating high plant growth rates and biomass (specific leaf area, reproductive- and vegetative plant height), and negatively related to plant traits indicating poor tissue quality (leaf C/N ratio). Generalist Elaterid larvae, when analyzed independently, were also positively related to high plant growth rates and furthermore to root dry mass, but were not related to tissue quality. Insect root herbivore numbers were not related to plant cover, plant species richness and soil water content. Plant species composition and to a lesser extent plant trait composition displayed spatial autocorrelation, which was not influenced by land use intensity. Insect root herbivore abundance was not spatially autocorrelated. We conclude that in semi-natural grasslands with a high share of generalist insect root herbivores, insect root herbivores affiliate with large, fast growing plants, presumably because of availability of high quantities of food. Affiliation of insect root

  3. Quantitative trait loci identification and meta-analysis for rice panicle-related traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yahui; Huang, Ming; Tao, Xingxing; Guo, Tao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Xiao, Wuming

    2016-10-01

    Rice yield is a complex trait controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). In the past three decades, thousands of QTLs for rice yield traits have been detected, but only a very small percentage has been cloned to date, as identifying the QTL genes requires a substantial investment of time and money. Meta-analysis provides a simple, reliable, and economical method for integrating information from multiple QTL studies across various environmental and genetic backgrounds, detecting consistent QTLs powerfully and estimating their genetic positions precisely. In this study, we aimed to locate consistent QTL regions associated with rice panicle traits by applying a genome-wide QTL meta-analysis approach. We first conducted a QTL analysis of 5 rice panicle traits using 172 plants in 2011 and 138 plants in 2012 from an F2 population derived from a cross between Nipponbare and H71D rice cultivators. A total of 54 QTLs were detected, and these were combined with 1085 QTLs collected from 82 previous studies to perform a meta-analysis using BioMercator v4.2. The integration of 82 maps resulted in a consensus map with 6970 markers and a total map length of 1823.1 centimorgan (cM), on which 837 QTLs were projected. These QTLs were then integrated into 87 meta-quantitative trait loci (MQTLs) by meta-analysis, and the 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of them were smaller than the mean value of the original QTLs. Also, 30 MQTLs covered 47 of the 54 QTLs detected from the cross between Nipponbare and H71D in this study. Among them, the two major and stable QTLs, spp10.1 and sd10.1, were found to be included in MQTL10.4. The three other major QTLs, pl3.1, sb2.1, and sb10.1, were included in MQTL3.3, MQTL2.2, and MQTL10.3, respectively. A total of 21 of the 87 MQTLs' phenotypic variation were >20 %. In total, 24 candidate genes were found in 15 MQTLs that spanned physical intervals <0.2 Mb, including genes that have been cloned previously, e.g., EP3, LP, MIP1, HTD1, DSH1, and Os

  4. Quantitative genetic bases of anthocyanin variation in grape (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) berry: a quantitative trait locus to quantitative trait nucleotide integrated study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Le Cunff, Loïc; Gomez, Camila; Doligez, Agnès; Ageorges, Agnès; Roux, Catherine; Bertrand, Yves; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Cheynier, Véronique; This, Patrice

    2009-11-01

    The combination of QTL mapping studies of synthetic lines and association mapping studies of natural diversity represents an opportunity to throw light on the genetically based variation of quantitative traits. With the positional information provided through quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, which often leads to wide intervals encompassing numerous genes, it is now feasible to directly target candidate genes that are likely to be responsible for the observed variation in completely sequenced genomes and to test their effects through association genetics. This approach was performed in grape, a newly sequenced genome, to decipher the genetic architecture of anthocyanin content. Grapes may be either white or colored, ranging from the lightest pink to the darkest purple tones according to the amount of anthocyanin accumulated in the berry skin, which is a crucial trait for both wine quality and human nutrition. Although the determinism of the white phenotype has been fully identified, the genetic bases of the quantitative variation of anthocyanin content in berry skin remain unclear. A single QTL responsible for up to 62% of the variation in the anthocyanin content was mapped on a Syrah x Grenache F(1) pseudo-testcross. Among the 68 unigenes identified in the grape genome within the QTL interval, a cluster of four Myb-type genes was selected on the basis of physiological evidence (VvMybA1, VvMybA2, VvMybA3, and VvMybA4). From a core collection of natural resources (141 individuals), 32 polymorphisms revealed significant association, and extended linkage disequilibrium was observed. Using a multivariate regression method, we demonstrated that five polymorphisms in VvMybA genes except VvMybA4 (one retrotransposon, three single nucleotide polymorphisms and one 2-bp insertion/deletion) accounted for 84% of the observed variation. All these polymorphisms led to either structural changes in the MYB proteins or differences in the VvMybAs promoters. We concluded that

  5. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci in plants - a novel statistical approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative variation is a feature of many important traits such as yield, quality and disease resistance in crop plants and farm animals, and diseases in humans. The genetic mapping, understanding and manipulation of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are therefore of prime importance. Only by using g

  6. Quantitative trait loci for energy balance traits in an advanced intercross line derived from mice divergently selected for heat loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J. Leamy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity in human populations, currently a serious health concern, is considered to be the consequence of an energy imbalance in which more energy in calories is consumed than is expended. We used interval mapping techniques to investigate the genetic basis of a number of energy balance traits in an F11 advanced intercross population of mice created from an original intercross of lines selected for increased and decreased heat loss. We uncovered a total of 137 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for these traits at 41 unique sites on 18 of the 20 chromosomes in the mouse genome, with X-linked QTLs being most prevalent. Two QTLs were found for the selection target of heat loss, one on distal chromosome 1 and another on proximal chromosome 2. The number of QTLs affecting the various traits generally was consistent with previous estimates of heritabilities in the same population, with the most found for two bone mineral traits and the least for feed intake and several body composition traits. QTLs were generally additive in their effects, and some, especially those affecting the body weight traits, were sex-specific. Pleiotropy was extensive within trait groups (body weights, adiposity and organ weight traits, bone traits and especially between body composition traits adjusted and not adjusted for body weight at sacrifice. Nine QTLs were found for one or more of the adiposity traits, five of which appeared to be unique. The confidence intervals among all QTLs averaged 13.3 Mb, much smaller than usually observed in an F2 cross, and in some cases this allowed us to make reasonable inferences about candidate genes underlying these QTLs. This study combined QTL mapping with genetic parameter analysis in a large segregating population, and has advanced our understanding of the genetic architecture of complex traits related to obesity.

  7. Bayes factors for detection of Quantitative Trait Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Enciso Miguel

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fundamental issue in quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping is to determine the plausibility of the presence of a QTL at a given genome location. Bayesian analysis offers an attractive way of testing alternative models (here, QTL vs. no-QTL via the Bayes factor. There have been several numerical approaches to computing the Bayes factor, mostly based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC, but these strategies are subject to numerical or stability problems. We propose a simple and stable approach to calculating the Bayes factor between nested models. The procedure is based on a reparameterization of a variance component model in terms of intra-class correlation. The Bayes factor can then be easily calculated from the output of a MCMC scheme by averaging conditional densities at the null intra-class correlation. We studied the performance of the method using simulation. We applied this approach to QTL analysis in an outbred population. We also compared it with the Likelihood Ratio Test and we analyzed its stability. Simulation results were very similar to the simulated parameters. The posterior probability of the QTL model increases as the QTL effect does. The location of the QTL was also correctly obtained. The use of meta-analysis is suggested from the properties of the Bayes factor.

  8. Graphics processing unit-accelerated quantitative trait Loci detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Guillaume; Filangi, Olivier; Elsen, Jean-Michel; Lavenier, Dominique; Le Roy, Pascale

    2013-09-01

    Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) using genetic marker information is a time-consuming analysis that has interested the mapping community in recent decades. The increasing amount of genetic marker data allows one to consider ever more precise QTL analyses while increasing the demand for computation. Part of the difficulty of detecting QTLs resides in finding appropriate critical values or threshold values, above which a QTL effect is considered significant. Different approaches exist to determine these thresholds, using either empirical methods or algebraic approximations. In this article, we present a new implementation of existing software, QTLMap, which takes advantage of the data parallel nature of the problem by offsetting heavy computations to a graphics processing unit (GPU). Developments on the GPU were implemented using Cuda technology. This new implementation performs up to 75 times faster than the previous multicore implementation, while maintaining the same results and level of precision (Double Precision) and computing both QTL values and thresholds. This speedup allows one to perform more complex analyses, such as linkage disequilibrium linkage analyses (LDLA) and multiQTL analyses, in a reasonable time frame.

  9. Quantitative Trait Loci for Mercury Tolerance in Rice Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-qing WANG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is one of the most toxic heavy metals to living organisms and its conspicuous effect is the inhibition of root growth. However, little is known about the molecular genetic basis for root growth under excess Hg2+ stress. To map quantitative trait loci (QTLs in rice for Hg2+ tolerance, a population of 120 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two japonica cultivars Yuefu and IRAT109 was grown in 0.5 mmol/L CaCl2 solution. Relative root length (RRL, percentage of the seminal root length in +HgCl2 to –HgCl2, was used for assessing Hg2+ tolerance. In a dose-response experiment, Yuefu had a higher RRL than IRAT109 and showed the most significant difference at the Hg2+ concentration of 1.5 μmol/L. Three putative QTLs for RRL were detected on chromosomes 1, 2 and 5, and totally explained about 35.7% of the phenotypic variance in Hg2+ tolerance. The identified QTLs for RRL might be useful for improving Hg2+ tolerance of rice by molecular marker-assisted selection.

  10. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci for Palatability of Milled Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling palatability in rice were identified using a set of 98 backcross inbred lines (BILs) population derived from a cross between a japonica variety Nipponbare and an indica variety Kasalath. The palatability scores of the population measured by RQ1/Plus Rice Analyzer, showed a continuous and transgressive segregative distribution with a range from 66 to 92. Four putative QTLs for palatability, qPAL-5, qPAL-7, qPAL-8a and qPAL-8b, were detected on chromosome 5, 7 and 8, and they accounted 7.83, 7.03, 11.58 and 7.19% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. Three alleles qPAL-5, qPAL-7 and qPAL-8b from Kasalath increased the palatability score, whereas only one Nipponbare allele qPAL-8a increased the score. Eight transgressive lines in palatability were selected to make a comparison between phenotypic and genotypic classes. The result explained the possibility of positive QTLs pyramiding through marker-assisted selection of highly palatable rice.

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci for Mercury Tolerance in Rice Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chong-qing; WANG Tao; MU Ping; LI Zi-chao; YANG Ling

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals to living organisms and its conspicuous effect is the inhibition of root growth.However,little is known about the molecular genetic basis for root growth under excess Hg2+ stress.To map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in rice for Hg2+ tolerance,a population of 120 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two japonica cultivars Yuefu and IRAT109 was grown in 0.5 mmol/L CaCl2 solution.Relative root length (RRL),percentage of the seminal root length in +HgCl2 to -HgCl2,was used for assessing Hg2+ tolerance.In a dose-response experiment,Yuefu had a higher RRL than IRAT109 and showed the most significant difference at the Hg2+ concentration of 1.5 μmol/L.Three putative QTLs for RRL were detected on chromosomes 1,2 and 5,and totally explained about 35.7% of the phenotypic variance in Hg2+ tolerance.The identified QTLs for RRL might be useful for improving Hg2+ tolerance of rice by molecular marker-assisted selection.

  12. Liver expression quantitative trait loci: a foundation for pharmacogenomic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eGlubb

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL analysis can provide insights into the genetic regulation of gene expression at a genomic level and this information is proving extremely useful in many different areas of research. As a consequence of the role of the liver in drug metabolism and disposition, the study of eQTLs in primary human liver tissue could provide a foundation for pharmacogenomics. Thus far, four genome-wide eQTL studies have been performed using human livers. Many liver eQTLs have been found to be reproducible and a proportion of these may be specific to the liver. Already these data have been used to interpret and inform clinic genome-wide association studies, providing potential mechanistic evidence for clinical associations and identifying genes which may impact on clinical phenotypes. However, the utility of liver eQTL data has not yet been fully explored or realized in pharmacogenomics. As further liver eQTL research is undertaken, the genetic regulation of gene expression will become much better characterized and this knowledge will create a rational basis for the prospective pharmacogenomic study of many drugs.

  13. Quantitative trait loci for phyllochron and tillering in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, N; Goto, Y; Matsui, M; Ukai, Y; Morita, M; Nemoto, K

    2004-08-01

    Morphogenetic processes in sequentially growing leaves and tiller buds are highly synchronized in rice ( Oryza sativa L.). Consequently, the appearance of successive leaves in the main tiller acts as the "pacemaker" for the whole shoot system development. The time interval between the appearance of successive leaves (days/leaf) in the main tiller is called the 'phyllochron'. The objectives of the investigation reported here were: (1) to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control rice phyllochron and (2) to understand the roles of phyllochron QTLs as an underlying developmental factor for rice tillering. For this purpose we developed a set of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between IR36 ( indica) and Genjah Wangkal (tropical japonica). Composite interval mapping detected three phyllochron QTLs located on chromosomes 4, 10 and 11, where the presence of a Genjah Wangkal allele increased phyllochron. The largest QTL (on chromosome 4) was located on the genomic region syntenic to the vicinity of the maize Teopod 2 mutation, while the QTL on chromosome 10 was close to the rice plastochron 1 mutation. These three phyllochron QTLs failed to coincide with major tiller number QTLs. However, one tiller number QTL was associated with small LOD peaks for phyllochron and tiller-bud dormancy that were linked in coupling phase, suggesting that linked small effects of phyllochron and tiller-bud dormancy might result in a multiplicative effect on tiller number.

  14. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting haematological traits in swine via genome scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Xiao-Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haematological traits, which consist of mainly three components: leukocyte traits, erythrocyte traits and platelet traits, play extremely important role in animal immune function and disease resistance. But knowledge of the genetic background controlling variability of these traits is very limited, especially in swine. Results In the present study, 18 haematological traits (7 leukocyte traits, 7 erythrocyte traits and 4 platelet traits were measured in a pig resource population consisting of 368 purebred piglets of three breeds (Landrace, Large White and Songliao Black Pig, after inoculation with the swine fever vaccine when the pigs were 21 days old. A whole-genome scan of QTL for these traits was performed using 206 microsatellite markers covering all 18 autosomes and the X chromosome. Using variance component analysis based on a linear mixed model and the false discovery rate (FDR test, 35 QTL with FDR FDR FDR Conclusions Very few QTL were previously identified for hematological traits of pigs and never in purebred populations. Most of the QTL detected here, in particular the QTL for the platelet traits, have not been reported before. Our results lay important foundation for identifying the causal genes underlying the hematological trait variations in pigs.

  15. A robust multiple-locus method for quantitative trait locus analysis of non-normally distributed multiple traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Möttönen, J; Sillanpää, M J

    2015-12-01

    Linear regression-based quantitative trait loci/association mapping methods such as least squares commonly assume normality of residuals. In genetics studies of plants or animals, some quantitative traits may not follow normal distribution because the data include outlying observations or data that are collected from multiple sources, and in such cases the normal regression methods may lose some statistical power to detect quantitative trait loci. In this work, we propose a robust multiple-locus regression approach for analyzing multiple quantitative traits without normality assumption. In our method, the objective function is least absolute deviation (LAD), which corresponds to the assumption of multivariate Laplace distributed residual errors. This distribution has heavier tails than the normal distribution. In addition, we adopt a group LASSO penalty to produce shrinkage estimation of the marker effects and to describe the genetic correlation among phenotypes. Our LAD-LASSO approach is less sensitive to the outliers and is more appropriate for the analysis of data with skewedly distributed phenotypes. Another application of our robust approach is on missing phenotype problem in multiple-trait analysis, where the missing phenotype items can simply be filled with some extreme values, and be treated as outliers. The efficiency of the LAD-LASSO approach is illustrated on both simulated and real data sets.

  16. Epistasis analysis for quantitative traits by functional regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Futao; Boerwinkle, Eric; Xiong, Momiao

    2014-06-01

    The critical barrier in interaction analysis for rare variants is that most traditional statistical methods for testing interactions were originally designed for testing the interaction between common variants and are difficult to apply to rare variants because of their prohibitive computational time and poor ability. The great challenges for successful detection of interactions with next-generation sequencing (NGS) data are (1) lack of methods for interaction analysis with rare variants, (2) severe multiple testing, and (3) time-consuming computations. To meet these challenges, we shift the paradigm of interaction analysis between two loci to interaction analysis between two sets of loci or genomic regions and collectively test interactions between all possible pairs of SNPs within two genomic regions. In other words, we take a genome region as a basic unit of interaction analysis and use high-dimensional data reduction and functional data analysis techniques to develop a novel functional regression model to collectively test interactions between all possible pairs of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within two genome regions. By intensive simulations, we demonstrate that the functional regression models for interaction analysis of the quantitative trait have the correct type 1 error rates and a much better ability to detect interactions than the current pairwise interaction analysis. The proposed method was applied to exome sequence data from the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and CHARGE-S study. We discovered 27 pairs of genes showing significant interactions after applying the Bonferroni correction (P-values < 4.58 × 10(-10)) in the ESP, and 11 were replicated in the CHARGE-S study.

  17. An infinitesimal model for quantitative trait genomic value prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiu Hu

    Full Text Available We developed a marker based infinitesimal model for quantitative trait analysis. In contrast to the classical infinitesimal model, we now have new information about the segregation of every individual locus of the entire genome. Under this new model, we propose that the genetic effect of an individual locus is a function of the genome location (a continuous quantity. The overall genetic value of an individual is the weighted integral of the genetic effect function along the genome. Numerical integration is performed to find the integral, which requires partitioning the entire genome into a finite number of bins. Each bin may contain many markers. The integral is approximated by the weighted sum of all the bin effects. We now turn the problem of marker analysis into bin analysis so that the model dimension has decreased from a virtual infinity to a finite number of bins. This new approach can efficiently handle virtually unlimited number of markers without marker selection. The marker based infinitesimal model requires high linkage disequilibrium of all markers within a bin. For populations with low or no linkage disequilibrium, we develop an adaptive infinitesimal model. Both the original and the adaptive models are tested using simulated data as well as beef cattle data. The simulated data analysis shows that there is always an optimal number of bins at which the predictability of the bin model is much greater than the original marker analysis. Result of the beef cattle data analysis indicates that the bin model can increase the predictability from 10% (multiple marker analysis to 33% (multiple bin analysis. The marker based infinitesimal model paves a way towards the solution of genetic mapping and genomic selection using the whole genome sequence data.

  18. Identification of quantitative trait transcripts for growth traits in the large scales of liver and muscle samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xinwei; Yang, Hui; Yang, Bin; Chen, Congying; Huang, Lusheng

    2015-07-01

    Growth-related traits are economically important traits to the pig industry. Identification of causative gene and mutation responsible for growth-related QTL will facilitate the improvement of pig growth through marker-assisted selection. In this study, we applied whole genome gene expression and quantitative trait transcript (QTT) analyses in 497 liver and 586 longissimus dorsi muscle samples to identify candidate genes and dissect the genetic basis of pig growth in a white Duroc × Erhualian F2 resource population. A total of 20,108 transcripts in liver and 23,728 transcripts in muscle with expression values were used for association analysis between gene expression level and phenotypic value. At the significance threshold of P growth-related traits in liver and muscle, respectively. We also found that some QTTs were correlated to more than one trait. The QTTs identified here showed high tissue specificity. We did not identify any QTTs that were associated with one trait in both liver and muscle. Through an integrative genomic approach, we identified SDR16C5 as the important candidate gene in pig growth trait. These findings contribute to further identification of the causative genes for porcine growth traits and facilitate improvement of pig breeding.

  19. Rat Genome Database: a unique resource for rat, human, and mouse quantitative trait locus data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Rajni; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G Thomas; Smith, Jennifer R; Wang, Shur-Jen; Lowry, Timothy F; Petri, Victoria; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Liu, Weisong; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J

    2013-09-16

    The rat has been widely used as a disease model in a laboratory setting, resulting in an abundance of genetic and phenotype data from a wide variety of studies. These data can be found at the Rat Genome Database (RGD, http://rgd.mcw.edu/), which provides a platform for researchers interested in linking genomic variations to phenotypes. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) form one of the earliest and core datasets, allowing researchers to identify loci harboring genes associated with disease. These QTLs are not only important for those using the rat to identify genes and regions associated with disease, but also for cross-organism analyses of syntenic regions on the mouse and the human genomes to identify potential regions for study in these organisms. Currently, RGD has data on >1,900 rat QTLs that include details about the methods and animals used to determine the respective QTL along with the genomic positions and markers that define the region. RGD also curates human QTLs (>1,900) and houses>4,000 mouse QTLs (imported from Mouse Genome Informatics). Multiple ontologies are used to standardize traits, phenotypes, diseases, and experimental methods to facilitate queries, analyses, and cross-organism comparisons. QTLs are visualized in tools such as GBrowse and GViewer, with additional tools for analysis of gene sets within QTL regions. The QTL data at RGD provide valuable information for the study of mapped phenotypes and identification of candidate genes for disease associations.

  20. Understanding rice adaptation to varying agro-ecosystems: trait interactions and quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Shalabh; Grondin, Alexandre; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Henry, Amelia; Olds, Thomas-Mitchell; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-08-05

    Interaction and genetic control for traits influencing the adaptation of the rice crop to varying environments was studied in a mapping population derived from parents (Moroberekan and Swarna) contrasting for drought tolerance, yield potential, lodging resistance, and adaptation to dry direct seeding. A BC2F3-derived mapping population for traits related to these four trait groups was phenotyped to understand the interactions among traits and to map and align QTLs using composite interval mapping (CIM). The study also aimed to identify QTLs for the four trait groups as composite traits using multivariate least square interval mapping (MLSIM) to further understand the genetic control of these traits. Significant correlations between drought- and yield-related traits at seedling and reproductive stages respectively with traits for adaptation to dry direct-seeded conditions were observed. CIM and MLSIM methods were applied to identify QTLs for univariate and composite traits. QTL clusters showing alignment of QTLs for several traits within and across trait groups were detected at chromosomes 3, 4, and 7 through CIM. The largest number of QTLs related to traits belonging to all four trait groups were identified on chromosome 3 close to the qDTY 3.2 locus. These included QTLs for traits such as bleeding rate, shoot biomass, stem strength, and spikelet fertility. Multivariate QTLs were identified at loci supported by univariate QTLs such as on chromosomes 3 and 4 as well as at distinctly different loci on chromosome 8 which were undetected through CIM. Rice requires better adaptation across a wide range of environments and cultivation practices to adjust to climate change. Understanding the genetics and trade-offs related to each of these environments and cultivation practices thus becomes highly important to develop varieties with stability of yield across them. This study provides a wider picture of the genetics and physiology of adaptation of rice to wide range of

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping for Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Associated Traits in Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Long Yang; Rui-Lian Jing; Xiao-Ping Chang; Wei Li

    2007-01-01

    Parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics (PCFKs) under drought stress condition are generally used to characterize instincts for dehydration tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Therefore, it is important to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for PCFKs in wheat genetic improvement for drought tolerance. A doubled haploid (DH)population with 150 lines, derived from a cross between two common wheat varieties, Hanxuan 10 and Lumai 14,was used to analyze the correlation between PCFKs and chlorophyll content (ChlC) and to map QTLs at the grainfilling stage under conditions of both rainfed (drought stress, DS) and well-watered (WW), respectively. QTLs for these traits were detected by QTLMapper version 1.0 based on the composite interval mapping method of the mixed-linear model. The results showed a very significant positive correlation between Fy, Fm, Fv/Fm and Fv/Fo.The correlation coefficients were generally higher under WW than under DS. Also, there was a significant or a highly significant positive correlation between Fv, Fm, Fv/Fm, Fv/Fo and ChlC. The correlation coefficients were higher in the DS group than the WW group. A total of 14 additive QTLs (nine QTLs detected under DS and five QTLs under WW)and 25 pairs of eplstatic QTLs (15 pairs detected under DS and 10 pairs under WW) for PCFKs were mapped on chromosomes 6A, 7A, 1B, 3B, 4D and 7D. The contributions of additive QTLs for PCFKs to phenotype variation were from 8.40% to 72.72%. Four additive QTLs (two QTLs detected under DS and WW apiece) controlling ChlC were mapped on chromosomes 1A, 5A and 7A. The contributions of these QTLs for ChlC to phenotype variation were from 7.27% to 11.68%. Several QTL clusters were detected on chromosomes 1B, 7A and 7D, but no shared chromosomal regions for them were identified under different water regimes, indicating that these QTLs performed different expression patterns under rainfed and well-watered conditions.

  2. Population differences in transcript-regulator expression quantitative trait loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre R Bushel

    Full Text Available Gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL are useful for identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with diseases. At times, a genetic variant may be associated with a master regulator involved in the manifestation of a disease. The downstream target genes of the master regulator are typically co-expressed and share biological function. Therefore, it is practical to screen for eQTLs by identifying SNPs associated with the targets of a transcript-regulator (TR. We used a multivariate regression with the gene expression of known targets of TRs and SNPs to identify TReQTLs in European (CEU and African (YRI HapMap populations. A nominal p-value of <1×10(-6 revealed 234 SNPs in CEU and 154 in YRI as TReQTLs. These represent 36 independent (tag SNPs in CEU and 39 in YRI affecting the downstream targets of 25 and 36 TRs respectively. At a false discovery rate (FDR = 45%, one cis-acting tag SNP (within 1 kb of a gene in each population was identified as a TReQTL. In CEU, the SNP (rs16858621 in Pcnxl2 was found to be associated with the genes regulated by CREM whereas in YRI, the SNP (rs16909324 was linked to the targets of miRNA hsa-miR-125a. To infer the pathways that regulate expression, we ranked TReQTLs by connectivity within the structure of biological process subtrees. One TReQTL SNP (rs3790904 in CEU maps to Lphn2 and is associated (nominal p-value = 8.1×10(-7 with the targets of the X-linked breast cancer suppressor Foxp3. The structure of the biological process subtree and a gene interaction network of the TReQTL revealed that tumor necrosis factor, NF-kappaB and variants in G-protein coupled receptors signaling may play a central role as communicators in Foxp3 functional regulation. The potential pleiotropic effect of the Foxp3 TReQTLs was gleaned from integrating mRNA-Seq data and SNP-set enrichment into the analysis.

  3. Quantitative trait loci and underlying candidate genes controlling agronomical and fruit quality traits in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Cabeza, Amalia; Domínguez, Pedro; Medina, Juan Jesús; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Amaya, Iraida

    2011-09-01

    Breeding for fruit quality traits in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, 2n = 8x = 56) is complex due to the polygenic nature of these traits and the octoploid constitution of this species. In order to improve the efficiency of genotype selection, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated molecular markers will constitute a valuable tool for breeding programs. However, the implementation of these markers in breeding programs depends upon the complexity and stability of QTLs across different environments. In this work, the genetic control of 17 agronomical and fruit quality traits was investigated in strawberry using a F(1) population derived from an intraspecific cross between two contrasting selection lines, '232' and '1392'. QTL analyses were performed over three successive years based on the separate parental linkage maps and a pseudo-testcross strategy. The integrated strawberry genetic map consists of 338 molecular markers covering 37 linkage groups, thus exceeding the 28 chromosomes. 33 QTLs were identified for 14 of the 17 studied traits and approximately 37% of them were stable over time. For each trait, 1-5 QTLs were identified with individual effects ranging between 9.2 and 30.5% of the phenotypic variation, indicating that all analysed traits are complex and quantitatively inherited. Many QTLs controlling correlated traits were co-located in homoeology group V, indicating linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci. Candidate genes for several QTLs controlling yield, anthocyanins, firmness and L-ascorbic acid are proposed based on both their co-localization and predicted function. We also report conserved QTLs among strawberry and other Rosaceae based on their syntenic location.

  4. Identification of quantitative trait loci for cadmium tolerance and accumulation in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ci, Dunwei; Jiang, Dong; Li, Sishen

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were identified, using 103 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross of Ch×Sh at germination and seedling stages. The traits of germination, growth and physiology were measured. Cd...

  5. Comprehensive Comparison of Self-Administered Questionnaires for Measuring Quantitative Autistic Traits in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masako; Adachi, Katsunori; Sumi, Satoshi; Okada, Kensuke; Kishino, Hirohisa; Sakai, Saeko; Kamio, Yoko; Kojima, Masayo; Suzuki, Sadao; Kanne, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    We comprehensively compared all available questionnaires for measuring quantitative autistic traits (QATs) in terms of reliability and construct validity in 3,147 non-clinical and 60 clinical subjects with normal intelligence. We examined four full-length forms, the Subthreshold Autism Trait Questionnaire (SATQ), the Broader Autism Phenotype…

  6. Joint analysis of binary and quantitative traits with data sharing and outcome-dependent sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Wu, Colin O; Kwak, Minjung; Jiang, Wenhua; Joo, Jungnam; Lima, Joao A C

    2012-04-01

    We study the analysis of a joint association between a genetic marker with both binary (case-control) and quantitative (continuous) traits, where the quantitative trait values are only available for the cases due to data sharing and outcome-dependent sampling. Data sharing becomes common in genetic association studies, and the outcome-dependent sampling is the consequence of data sharing, under which a phenotype of interest is not measured for some subgroup. The trend test (or Pearson's test) and F-test are often, respectively, used to analyze the binary and quantitative traits. Because of the outcome-dependent sampling, the usual F-test can be applied using the subgroup with the observed quantitative traits. We propose a modified F-test by also incorporating the genotype frequencies of the subgroup whose traits are not observed. Further, a combination of this modified F-test and Pearson's test is proposed by Fisher's combination of their P-values as a joint analysis. Because of the correlation of the two analyses, we propose to use a Gamma (scaled chi-squared) distribution to fit the asymptotic null distribution for the joint analysis. The proposed modified F-test and the joint analysis can also be applied to test single trait association (either binary or quantitative trait). Through simulations, we identify the situations under which the proposed tests are more powerful than the existing ones. Application to a real dataset of rheumatoid arthritis is presented. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of Quantitative and Qualitative Traits of 18 Potato Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Bolandi

    2016-10-01

    to those of check. Based on results of this experiment, the clones 397003-7, 396151-27 and 397045-100 could be selected for Ardebil region. The objective of this research was to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative traits of cultivars and advanced potato clones in spring cultivation (Jolge-e-Rokh region. Materials and Methods In this research, 18 potato clones for the quantitative and qualitative traits were compared with three check cultivars including: Agria (suitable for French-fries, Marfona (suitable for boiled eating and Lady Rosetta (suitable for chips in Jolge-Rokh Agriculture Research Station, the location 35'¸ 50° north latitude and 59° east longitude and 1721 m above sea level, in crop year 2011. Experimental design was Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD with three replications. Treatment consisted of 18 advanced potato clones: 396151-8, 397045-4, 397045-10, TP12-13, TP21-29, TP12-8, 397007-16, 397007-17, 396140-6, 397009-8, 397015-14, 397003-7, 396151-27, 397045-100, 397097-9, 396151-20, 397045-7 and 69 indigenous with three control cultivars (Agria, Marfona and Lady Rosetta. Tubers were planted on two rows with 6 meters length. Distance between row and plants on the row were 75 and 25 cm, respectively. Area of each plot was 9 square meter. The evaluated characters were total yield, marketable yield, eye number, dry matter percentage, tuber number per plant, tuber weight per plant and mean of tuber weight. In order to measure total yield, after maturity, and remove the aerial organs, all of the tubers were harvested and the fresh weight was obtained. After removal of the tumor in bad shape, with soft rot and smaller than 30 mm that cannot be sold as part of the marketable yield, rest of them were used to measure marketable yield. Tuber dry matter percentage (TDM% was determined from the relationship between fresh and dry weights of sub-sample of 8-10 thinly sliced tubers dried for 48 h at 80° C. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.1 software. The

  8. The effect of induced mutations on quantitative traits in Arabidopsis thaliana: Natural versus artificial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Frank W; Fenster, Charles B

    2016-12-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of all genetic variations. New mutations are expected to affect quantitative traits differently depending on the extent to which traits contribute to fitness and the environment in which they are tested. The dogma is that the preponderance of mutations affecting fitness will be skewed toward deleterious while their effects on nonfitness traits will be bidirectionally distributed. There are mixed views on the role of stress in modulating these effects. We quantify mutation effects by inducing mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia accession) using the chemical ethylmethane sulfonate. We measured the effects of new mutations relative to a premutation founder for fitness components under both natural (field) and artificial (growth room) conditions. Additionally, we measured three other quantitative traits, not expected to contribute directly to fitness, under artificial conditions. We found that induced mutations were equally as likely to increase as decrease a trait when that trait was not closely related to fitness (traits that were neither survivorship nor reproduction). We also found that new mutations were more likely to decrease fitness or fitness-related traits under more stressful field conditions than under relatively benign artificial conditions. In the benign condition, the effect of new mutations on fitness components was similar to traits not as closely related to fitness. These results highlight the importance of measuring the effects of new mutations on fitness and other traits under a range of conditions.

  9. Mapping of quantitative trait loci affecting quality and production traits in egg layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuiskula-Haavisto, M.; Honkatukia, M.; Vilkki, J.; Koning, de D.J.; Schulman, N.F.; Maki-Tanila, A.

    2002-01-01

    A mapping population segregating for egg quality traits was created by a line cross between two egg layer lines and screened by a genome scan. The F2 generation consisted of 307 hens, which were scored for egg quality and production traits. The mapping population was genotyped for 99 microsatellite

  10. Berry and phenology-related traits in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.: From Quantitative Trait Loci to underlying genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanizza Girolamo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timing of grape ripening initiation, length of maturation period, berry size and seed content are target traits in viticulture. The availability of early and late ripening varieties is desirable for staggering harvest along growing season, expanding production towards periods when the fruit gets a higher value in the market and ensuring an optimal plant adaptation to climatic and geographic conditions. Berry size determines grape productivity; seedlessness is especially demanded in the table grape market and is negatively correlated to fruit size. These traits result from complex developmental processes modified by genetic, physiological and environmental factors. In order to elucidate their genetic determinism we carried out a quantitative analysis in a 163 individuals-F1 segregating progeny obtained by crossing two table grape cultivars. Results Molecular linkage maps covering most of the genome (2n = 38 for Vitis vinifera were generated for each parent. Eighteen pairs of homologous groups were integrated into a consensus map spanning over 1426 cM with 341 markers (mainly microsatellite, AFLP and EST-derived markers and an average map distance between loci of 4.2 cM. Segregating traits were evaluated in three growing seasons by recording flowering, veraison and ripening dates and by measuring berry size, seed number and weight. QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci analysis was carried out based on single marker and interval mapping methods. QTLs were identified for all but one of the studied traits, a number of them steadily over more than one year. Clusters of QTLs for different characters were detected, suggesting linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci, as well as regions affecting specific traits. The most interesting QTLs were investigated at the gene level through a bioinformatic analysis of the underlying Pinot noir genomic sequence. Conclusion Our results revealed novel insights into the genetic control of relevant

  11. Power analysis of artificial selection experiments using efficient whole genome simulation of quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, Darren; Novembre, John

    2015-04-01

    Evolve and resequence studies combine artificial selection experiments with massively parallel sequencing technology to study the genetic basis for complex traits. In these experiments, individuals are selected for extreme values of a trait, causing alleles at quantitative trait loci (QTL) to increase or decrease in frequency in the experimental population. We present a new analysis of the power of artificial selection experiments to detect and localize quantitative trait loci. This analysis uses a simulation framework that explicitly models whole genomes of individuals, quantitative traits, and selection based on individual trait values. We find that explicitly modeling QTL provides qualitatively different insights than considering independent loci with constant selection coefficients. Specifically, we observe how interference between QTL under selection affects the trajectories and lengthens the fixation times of selected alleles. We also show that a substantial portion of the genetic variance of the trait (50-100%) can be explained by detected QTL in as little as 20 generations of selection, depending on the trait architecture and experimental design. Furthermore, we show that power depends crucially on the opportunity for recombination during the experiment. Finally, we show that an increase in power is obtained by leveraging founder haplotype information to obtain allele frequency estimates.

  12. Evidences of local adaptation in quantitative traits in Prosopis alba (Leguminosae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessega, C; Pometti, C; Ewens, M; Saidman, B O; Vilardi, J C

    2015-02-01

    Signals of selection on quantitative traits can be detected by the comparison between the genetic differentiation of molecular (neutral) markers and quantitative traits, by multivariate extensions of the same model and by the observation of the additive covariance among relatives. We studied, by three different tests, signals of occurrence of selection in Prosopis alba populations over 15 quantitative traits: three economically important life history traits: height, basal diameter and biomass, 11 leaf morphology traits that may be related with heat-tolerance and physiological responses and spine length that is very important from silvicultural purposes. We analyzed 172 G1-generation trees growing in a common garden belonging to 32 open pollinated families from eight sampling sites in Argentina. The multivariate phenotypes differ significantly among origins, and the highest differentiation corresponded to foliar traits. Molecular genetic markers (SSR) exhibited significant differentiation and allowed us to provide convincing evidence that natural selection is responsible for the patterns of morphological differentiation. The heterogeneous selection over phenotypic traits observed suggested different optima in each population and has important implications for gene resource management. The results suggest that the adaptive significance of traits should be considered together with population provenance in breeding program as a crucial point prior to any selecting program, especially in Prosopis where the first steps are under development.

  13. [Spontaneous mutation variation (quantitative manifestation) of some traits of the garden rose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykov, K I

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative variability of four traits (anthocyan coloration, flower aroma, double-flowering capacity, and a flower size) in spontaneous gemmacous mutants (sports) of garden rose may be not accidental but preferably orientated to the increase or decrease in the trait manifestation in the case of transaggressive inheritance by initial hybrid forms of the increased or decreased level of these traits in parents. Revealing this regularity enabled us to evolve a hypothesis explaining the decrease or increase in trait quantitative manifestation in sports by inactivation or elimination resulting from mutations in dominant alleles of the polymer genes responsible either for increasing or decreasing in phenotypic expression. Thus, if the parents of an initial form are known, it is possible to forecast in what way the quantitative characters in somatic mutants of the initial form will change, accidentally or getting preferably higher or lower.

  14. Statistical estimation of correlated genome associations to a quantitative trait network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyoung Kim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Many complex disease syndromes, such as asthma, consist of a large number of highly related, rather than independent, clinical or molecular phenotypes. This raises a new technical challenge in identifying genetic variations associated simultaneously with correlated traits. In this study, we propose a new statistical framework called graph-guided fused lasso (GFlasso to directly and effectively incorporate the correlation structure of multiple quantitative traits such as clinical metrics and gene expressions in association analysis. Our approach represents correlation information explicitly among the quantitative traits as a quantitative trait network (QTN and then leverages this network to encode structured regularization functions in a multivariate regression model over the genotypes and traits. The result is that the genetic markers that jointly influence subgroups of highly correlated traits can be detected jointly with high sensitivity and specificity. While most of the traditional methods examined each phenotype independently and combined the results afterwards, our approach analyzes all of the traits jointly in a single statistical framework. This allows our method to borrow information across correlated phenotypes to discover the genetic markers that perturb a subset of the correlated traits synergistically. Using simulated datasets based on the HapMap consortium and an asthma dataset, we compared the performance of our method with other methods based on single-marker analysis and regression-based methods that do not use any of the relational information in the traits. We found that our method showed an increased power in detecting causal variants affecting correlated traits. Our results showed that, when correlation patterns among traits in a QTN are considered explicitly and directly during a structured multivariate genome association analysis using our proposed methods, the power of detecting true causal SNPs with possibly pleiotropic

  15. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Seed Physical and Nutrient Traits in Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xian-liang; ZHANG Tian-zhen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the leading fiber crop,and an important source of the important edible oil and protein meals in the world.Complex genetics and strong environmental effects hinder much progress in seed quality trait breeding in cotton.The use of molecular markers will improve our understanding of the genetic factors conferring seed quality traits,and it is expected to assist in selection of superior genotypes.

  16. Complex pedigree analysis to detect quantitative trait loci in dairy cattle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bink, M.C.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    In dairy cattle, many quantitative traits of economic importance show phenotypic variation. For breeding purposes the analysis of this phenotypic variation and uncovering the contribution of genetic factors is very important. Usually, the individual gene effects contributing to the quantitative gene

  17. Genotype-by-environment interaction in genetic mapping of multiple quantitative trait loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.; Ooijen, J.W. van; Stam, P.; Lister, C.; Dean, C.

    1995-01-01

    The interval mapping method is widely used for the genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs), though true resolution of quantitative variation into QTLs is hampered with this method. Separation of QTLs is troublesome, because single-QTL is models are fitted. Further, genotype-by-environment

  18. High Resolution of Quantitative Traits Into Multiple Loci via Interval Mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.; Stam, Piet

    1994-01-01

    A very general method is described for multiple linear regression of a quantitative phenotype on genotype [putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and markers] in segregating generations obtained from line crosses. The method exploits two features, (a) the use of additional parental and F1 data, whi

  19. Epigenetic variation in the Egfr gene generates quantitative variation in a complex trait in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Rajakumar, Rajendhran; Abouheif, Ehab; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-03-11

    Complex quantitative traits, like size and behaviour, are a pervasive feature of natural populations. Quantitative trait variation is the product of both genetic and environmental factors, yet little is known about the mechanisms through which their interaction generates this variation. Epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation, can mediate gene-by-environment interactions during development to generate discrete phenotypic variation. We therefore investigated the developmental role of DNA methylation in generating continuous size variation of workers in an ant colony, a key trait associated with division of labour. Here we show that, in the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus, global (genome-wide) DNA methylation indirectly regulates quantitative methylation of the conserved cell-signalling gene Epidermal growth factor receptor to generate continuous size variation of workers. DNA methylation can therefore generate quantitative variation in a complex trait by quantitatively regulating the transcription of a gene. This mechanism, alongside genetic variation, may determine the phenotypic possibilities of loci for generating quantitative trait variation in natural populations.

  20. The Genetic Architecture of Quantitative Traits Cannot Be Inferred from Variance Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2016-01-01

    Classical quantitative genetic analyses estimate additive and non-additive genetic and environmental components of variance from phenotypes of related individuals without knowing the identities of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Many studies have found a large proportion of quantitative trait variation can be attributed to the additive genetic variance (VA), providing the basis for claims that non-additive gene actions are unimportant. In this study, we show that arbitrarily defined parameterizations of genetic effects seemingly consistent with non-additive gene actions can also capture the majority of genetic variation. This reveals a logical flaw in using the relative magnitudes of variance components to indicate the relative importance of additive and non-additive gene actions. We discuss the implications and propose that variance component analyses should not be used to infer the genetic architecture of quantitative traits. PMID:27812106

  1. The Genetic Architecture of Quantitative Traits Cannot Be Inferred from Variance Component Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Classical quantitative genetic analyses estimate additive and non-additive genetic and environmental components of variance from phenotypes of related individuals without knowing the identities of quantitative trait loci (QTLs. Many studies have found a large proportion of quantitative trait variation can be attributed to the additive genetic variance (VA, providing the basis for claims that non-additive gene actions are unimportant. In this study, we show that arbitrarily defined parameterizations of genetic effects seemingly consistent with non-additive gene actions can also capture the majority of genetic variation. This reveals a logical flaw in using the relative magnitudes of variance components to indicate the relative importance of additive and non-additive gene actions. We discuss the implications and propose that variance component analyses should not be used to infer the genetic architecture of quantitative traits.

  2. Uncovering the genetic signature of quantitative trait evolution with replicated time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, S U; Kofler, R; Schlötterer, C

    2017-01-01

    The genetic architecture of adaptation in natural populations has not yet been resolved: it is not clear to what extent the spread of beneficial mutations (selective sweeps) or the response of many quantitative trait loci drive adaptation to environmental changes. Although much attention has been given to the genomic footprint of selective sweeps, the importance of selection on quantitative traits is still not well studied, as the associated genomic signature is extremely difficult to detect. We propose 'Evolve and Resequence' as a promising tool, to study polygenic adaptation of quantitative traits in evolving populations. Simulating replicated time series data we show that adaptation to a new intermediate trait optimum has three characteristic phases that are reflected on the genomic level: (1) directional frequency changes towards the new trait optimum, (2) plateauing of allele frequencies when the new trait optimum has been reached and (3) subsequent divergence between replicated trajectories ultimately leading to the loss or fixation of alleles while the trait value does not change. We explore these 3 phase characteristics for relevant population genetic parameters to provide expectations for various experimental evolution designs. Remarkably, over a broad range of parameters the trajectories of selected alleles display a pattern across replicates, which differs both from neutrality and directional selection. We conclude that replicated time series data from experimental evolution studies provide a promising framework to study polygenic adaptation from whole-genome population genetics data.

  3. Analysis of quantitative trait loci underlying the traits related to chlorophyll content of the flag leaf in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guohua YANG; Sansi TU; Shaoqing LI; Lingling FENG; Jin KONG; Hui LI; Yangsheng LI

    2008-01-01

    A population of 117 doubled haploid (DH) lines derived from the cross of Zhaiyeqing 8 (indica) x Jingxi 17 (japonica) was employed to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying four physiological traits related to chlorophyll contents of the flag leaf. There were significantly positive correlations among chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and chlorophyll a+ b content. Chlorophyll a/b ratio was significantly negatively correlated with chlorophyll b content. These four traits were normally distributed with transgressive segregation, suggesting that they were controlled by multiple minor genes. A total of 11 QTLs were detected for the four traits and they lay on six chromosomes. Each of them explained 9.2%-19.6% of the phenotypic variations, respectively. Of these, two QTLs controlling chlorophyll a content were mapped on chromosomes 2 and 5; four QTLs underlying chlorophyll b content were mapped on chromosomes 2, 3, 5 and 9; three QTLs underlying chlorophyll a+b amount were mapped on chromosomes 3, 5 and 9; two QTLs under-lying chlorophyll a/b ratio were mapped on chromosomes 6 and 1 1. The intrinsic relationship among the four traits and the practical implication in rice breeding are discussed.

  4. Quantitative trait locus analysis of leaf morphological characters, yield-related traits, and secondary metabolite contents in Eucommia ulmoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Wei, J K; Li, Z Q; Lei, A N; Liu, M H

    2015-12-22

    Eucommia ulmoides is cultivated for the production of eucommia rubber and Chinese herbal drugs. Molecular breeding methods, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), have the potential to improve the efficiency of E. ulmoides breeding. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was applied to identify marker-trait associations for E. ulmoides using an F1 mapping population of 152 individuals derived from a cross between the wild genotype Xiaoye and the cultivar Qinzhong No. 1. A total of 78 QTLs were identified for 12 leaf traits involving morphology, yield, and secondary metabolites. Phenotypic variance explained by individual QTLs ranged from 10.4 to 53.3%. Fifteen QTL clusters, each harboring loci controlling at least two leaf traits, were detected across nine linkage groups. Co-location of these QTLs may be due to pleiotropy or linkage. Three main QTL regions for secondary metabolites were consistently identified each year. QTL information from this study furthers our understanding of the genetic architecture of these economically important traits and of MAS in E. ulmoides breeding.

  5. A search for quantitative trait loci controlling within-individual variation of physical activity traits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leamy, Larry J; Pomp, Daniel; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2010-09-21

    In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that physical inactivity can predispose individuals to a host of health problems. While many studies have analyzed the effect of various environmental factors on activity, we know much less about the genetic control of physical activity. Some studies in mice have discovered quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing various physical activity traits, but mostly have analyzed inter-individual variation rather than variation in activity within individuals over time. We conducted a genome scan to identify QTLs controlling the distance, duration, and time run by mice over seven consecutive three-day intervals in an F2 population created by crossing two inbred strains (C57L/J and C3H/HeJ) that differed widely (average of nearly 300%) in their activity levels. Our objectives were (a) to see if we would find QTLs not originally discovered in a previous investigation that assessed these traits over the entire 21-day period and (b) to see if some of these QTLs discovered might affect the activity traits only in the early or in the late time intervals. This analysis uncovered 39 different QTLs, over half of which were new. Some QTLs affected the activity traits only in the early time intervals and typically exhibited significant dominance effects whereas others affected activity only in the later age intervals and exhibited less dominance. We also analyzed the regression slopes of the activity traits over the intervals, and found several QTLs affecting these traits that generally mapped to unique genomic locations. It was concluded that the genetic architecture of physical activity in mice is much more complicated than has previously been recognized, and may change considerably depending on the age at which various activity measures are assessed.

  6. Pleiotropy analysis of quantitative traits at gene level by multivariate functional linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Liu, Aiyi; Mills, James L; Boehnke, Michael; Wilson, Alexander F; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Xiong, Momiao; Wu, Colin O; Fan, Ruzong

    2015-05-01

    In genetics, pleiotropy describes the genetic effect of a single gene on multiple phenotypic traits. A common approach is to analyze the phenotypic traits separately using univariate analyses and combine the test results through multiple comparisons. This approach may lead to low power. Multivariate functional linear models are developed to connect genetic variant data to multiple quantitative traits adjusting for covariates for a unified analysis. Three types of approximate F-distribution tests based on Pillai-Bartlett trace, Hotelling-Lawley trace, and Wilks's Lambda are introduced to test for association between multiple quantitative traits and multiple genetic variants in one genetic region. The approximate F-distribution tests provide much more significant results than those of F-tests of univariate analysis and optimal sequence kernel association test (SKAT-O). Extensive simulations were performed to evaluate the false positive rates and power performance of the proposed models and tests. We show that the approximate F-distribution tests control the type I error rates very well. Overall, simultaneous analysis of multiple traits can increase power performance compared to an individual test of each trait. The proposed methods were applied to analyze (1) four lipid traits in eight European cohorts, and (2) three biochemical traits in the Trinity Students Study. The approximate F-distribution tests provide much more significant results than those of F-tests of univariate analysis and SKAT-O for the three biochemical traits. The approximate F-distribution tests of the proposed functional linear models are more sensitive than those of the traditional multivariate linear models that in turn are more sensitive than SKAT-O in the univariate case. The analysis of the four lipid traits and the three biochemical traits detects more association than SKAT-O in the univariate case.

  7. Statistical equivalent of the classical TDT for quantitative traits and multivariate phenotypes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Haldar; Saurabh Ghosh

    2015-12-01

    Clinical end-point traits are usually governed by quantitative precursors. Hence, there is active research interest in developing statistical methods for association mapping of quantitative traits. Unlike population-based tests for association, family-based tests for transmission disequilibrium are protected against population stratification. In this study, we propose a logistic regression model to test the association for quantitative traits based on a trio design. We show that the method can be viewed as a direct extension of the classical transmission diequilibrium test for binary traits to quantitative traits. We evaluate the performance of our method using extensive simulations and compare it with an existing method, family-based association test. We found that the two methods yield comparable powers if all families are considered. However, unlike FBAT, which yields an inflated rate of false positives when noninformative trios with all three individuals’ heterozygous are removed, our method maintains the correct size without compromising too much on power. We show that our method can be easily modified to incorporate multivariate phenotypes. Here, we applied this method to analyse a quantitative endophenotype associated with alcoholism.

  8. An improved procedure of mapping a quantitative trait locus via the EM algorithm using posterior probabilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurabh Ghosh; Partha P. Majumder

    2000-08-01

    Mapping a locus controlling a quantitative genetic trait (e.g. blood pressure) to a specific genomic region is of considerable contemporary interest. Data on the quantitative trait under consideration and several codominant genetic markers with known genomic locations are collected from members of families and statistically analysed to estimate the recombination fraction, , between the putative quantitative trait locus and a genetic marker. One of the major complications in estimating for a quantitative trait in humans is the lack of haplotype information on members of families. We have devised a computationally simple two-stage method of estimation of in the absence of haplotypic information using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. In the first stage, parameters of the quantitative trait locus (QTL) are estimated on the basis of data of a sample of unrelated individuals and a Bayes's rule is used to classify each parent into a QTL genotypic class. In the second stage, we have proposed an EM algorithm for obtaining the maximum-likelihood estimate of based on data of informative families (which are identified upon inferring parental QTL genotypes performed in the first stage). The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether, instead of using genotypically `classified' data of parents, the use of posterior probabilities of QT genotypes of parents at the second stage yields better estimators. We show, using simulated data, that the proposed procedure using posterior probabilities is statistically more efficient than our earlier classification procedure, although it is computationally heavier.

  9. Investigations on abundance and activity of microbial sponge symbionts using quantitative real - time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumala, Lars; Hentschel, Ute; Bayer, Kristina

    Marine sponges are hosts to dense and diverse microbial consortia that are likely to play a key role in the metabolic processes of the host sponge due to their enormous abundance. Common symbioses between nitrogen transforming microorganisms and sponges indicate complex nitrogen cycling within...... the host. Of particular interest is determining the community structure and function of microbial symbionts in order to gain deeper insight into host-symbiont interactions. We investigated the abundance and activity of microbial symbionts in two Mediterranean sponge species using quantitative real-time PCR....... An absolute quantification of functional genes and transcripts in archaeal and bacterial symbionts was conducted to determine their involvement in nitrification and denitrification, comparing the low microbial abundance (LMA) sponge Dysidea avara with the high microbial abundance (HMA) representative Aplysina...

  10. Quantitative trait loci analysis of leaf morphology in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The leaf morphology traits are important componem part of rice ideotype. The present study was conducted with a doubled haploid(DH) population of 117 lines derived from a cross between an indica variety, Zhaiyeqing 8(ZYQ 8) and a japonica variety, Jingxi 17(JX 17). The QTLs responsible for area, perimeter, length, width, and length/width of flag leaf, the second upside-down leaf, and the third upside-down leaf were surveyed and analyzed based on genetic linkage map of 243 molecular markers.

  11. INHERITANCE OF QUANTITATIVE TRAITS IN DRY PEA (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Gantner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted with six parental genotypes: varieties Anno, Gold, Joel, Junior, PF-G1 and Shawnee with aim to improve the dry pea breeding for higher grain yield. Objectives of the research were to investigate: a the inheritance of grain yield per plant and its components; b to determination of the combining ability of parents and their cross-combinations; c the interrelationships among grain yield, its components and morphological traits; d choosing the primary selection criteria; e choosing the best cross-combinations in order to achieve the highest selection response of grain yield; f simple and digenic epistatic gene-effects in the chosen cross-combinations which determ the trait chosen as a primary selection criterion; g the genetic components of variation in the chosen cross-combinations of the trait chosen as a primary selection criterion; h the anticipation of genetic gain of grain yield per plant of the chosen cross-combinations. The research was conducted on experimental fields and laboratories of the Agricultural Institute Osijek. Parental lines were chosen in 2006, the first series of crossings in a diallel fashion were performed in 2007, and the second series in 2008, in a diallel fashion plus back-crossing. The obtained generation material (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1 i BC2 of 15 biparental combinations was seeded in the field trial in 2009. Measurement of the yield, its components and morfological traits was done at the end of vegetation. The inheritance of investigated traits was estimated using Hayman’s approach to diallel analysis, combining abilities were determined using Griffing’s approach to diallel analysis, interrelationships among investigated traits were determined using correlation analysis, the primary selection criterion was chosen according to the inheritance of the investigated traits and their interrelationships, best cross-combinations were chosen upon Griffing’s analysis results and two principles: a

  12. Quantitative trait loci analysis for rice seed vigor during the germination stage*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhou-fei; Wang,Jian-fei; Bao, Yong-Mei; Wang, Fu-Hua; Zhang, Hong-sheng

    2010-01-01

    Seed vigor is an important characteristic of seed quality, and rice cultivars with strong seed vigor are desirable in direct-sowing rice production for optimum stand establishment. In the present study, the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of three traits for rice seed vigor during the germination stage, including germination rate, final germination percentage, and germination index, were investigated using one recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between japonica Dagua...

  13. Quantitative trait locus mapping reveals complex genetic architecture of quantitative virulence in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ethan L; Croll, Daniel; Lendenmann, Mark H; Sanchez-Vallet, Andrea; Hartmann, Fanny E; Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Ma, Xin; McDonald, Bruce A

    2016-11-21

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of virulence in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. High-throughput phenotyping based on automated image analysis allowed the measurement of pathogen virulence on a scale and with a precision that was not previously possible. Across two mapping populations encompassing more than 520 progeny, 540 710 pycnidia were counted and their sizes and grey values were measured. A significant correlation was found between pycnidia size and both spore size and number. Precise measurements of percentage leaf area covered by lesions provided a quantitative measure of host damage. Combining these large and accurate phenotypic datasets with a dense panel of restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) genetic markers enabled us to genetically dissect pathogen virulence into components related to host damage and those related to pathogen reproduction. We showed that different components of virulence can be under separate genetic control. Large- and small-effect QTLs were identified for all traits, with some QTLs specific to mapping populations, cultivars and traits and other QTLs shared among traits within the same mapping population. We associated the presence of four accessory chromosomes with small, but significant, increases in several virulence traits, providing the first evidence for a meaningful function associated with accessory chromosomes in this organism. A large-effect QTL involved in host specialization was identified on chromosome 7, leading to the identification of candidate genes having a large effect on virulence.

  14. Thermal plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster populations from eastern Australia: quantitative traits to transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, A S; Sgrò, C M; Telonis-Scott, M

    2016-12-01

    The flexibility afforded to genotypes in different environments by phenotypic plasticity is of interest to biologists studying thermal adaptation because of the thermal lability of many traits. Differences in thermal performance and reaction norms can provide insight into the evolution of thermal adaptation to explore broader questions such as species distributions and persistence under climate change. One approach is to study the effects of temperature on fitness, morphological and more recently gene expression traits in populations from different climatic origins. The diverse climatic conditions experienced by Drosophila melanogaster along the eastern Australian temperate-tropical gradient are ideal given the high degree of continuous trait differentiation, but reaction norm variation has not been well studied in this system. Here, we reared a tropical and temperate population from the ends of the gradient over six developmental temperatures and examined reaction norm variation for five quantitative traits including thermal performance for fecundity, and reaction norms for thermotolerance, body size, viability and 23 transcript-level traits. Despite genetic variation for some quantitative traits, we found no differentiation between the populations for fecundity thermal optima and breadth, and the reaction norms for the other traits were largely parallel, supporting previous work suggesting that thermal evolution occurs by changes in trait means rather than by reaction norm shifts. We examined reaction norm variation in our expanded thermal regime for a gene set shown to previously exhibit GxE for expression plasticity in east Australian flies, as well as key heat-shock genes. Although there were differences in curvature between the populations suggesting a higher degree of thermal plasticity in expression patterns than for the quantitative traits, we found little evidence to support a role for genetic variation in maintaining expression plasticity. © 2016

  15. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-12-04

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species.

  16. Principal Component Analysis of Some Quantitative and Qualitative Traits in Iranian Spinach Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohebodini Mehdi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Landraces of spinach in Iran have not been sufficiently characterised for their morpho-agronomic traits. Such characterisation would be helpful in the development of new genetically improved cultivars. In this study 54 spinach accessions collected from the major spinach growing areas of Iran were evaluated to determine their phenotypic diversity profile of spinach genotypes on the basis of 10 quantitative and 9 qualitative morpho-agronomic traits. High coefficients of variation were recorded in some quantitative traits (dry yield and leaf area and all of the qualitative traits. Using principal component analysis, the first four principal components with eigen-values more than 1 contributed 87% of the variability among accessions for quantitative traits, whereas the first four principal components with eigen-values more than 0.8 contributed 79% of the variability among accessions for qualitative traits. The most important relations observed on the first two principal components were a strong positive association between leaf width and petiole length; between leaf length and leaf numbers in flowering; and among fresh yield, dry yield and petiole diameter; a near zero correlation between days to flowering with leaf width and petiole length. Prickly seeds, high percentage of female plants, smooth leaf texture, high numbers of leaves at flowering, greygreen leaves, erect petiole attitude and long petiole length are important characters for spinach breeding programmes.

  17. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci for mastitis resistance on bovine chromosome 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, N F; Sahana, G; Iso-Touru, T;

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting clinical mastitis (CM) and somatic cell score (SCS) were mapped on bovine chromosome 11. The mapping population consisted of 14 grandsire families belonging to three Nordic red cattle breeds: Finnish Ayrshire (FA), Swedish Red and White (SRB) and Danish Red......, each affecting one trait; or one QTL affecting a single trait. A QTL affecting CM was fine-mapped. In FA, a haplotype having a strong association with a high negative effect on mastitis resistance was identified. The mapping precision of an earlier detected SCS-QTL was not improved by the LDLA analysis...

  18. Study on mapping Quantitative Trait Loci for animal complex binary traits using Bayesian-Markov chain Monte Carlo approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Jianfeng; ZHANG; Yuan; ZHANG; Qin; WANG; Lixian; ZHANG; Jigang

    2006-01-01

    It is a challenging issue to map Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) underlying complex discrete traits, which usually show discontinuous distribution and less information, using conventional statistical methods. Bayesian-Markov chain Monte Carlo (Bayesian-MCMC) approach is the key procedure in mapping QTL for complex binary traits, which provides a complete posterior distribution for QTL parameters using all prior information. As a consequence, Bayesian estimates of all interested variables can be obtained straightforwardly basing on their posterior samples simulated by the MCMC algorithm. In our study, utilities of Bayesian-MCMC are demonstrated using simulated several animal outbred full-sib families with different family structures for a complex binary trait underlied by both a QTL and polygene. Under the Identity-by-Descent-Based variance component random model, three samplers basing on MCMC, including Gibbs sampling, Metropolis algorithm and reversible jump MCMC, were implemented to generate the joint posterior distribution of all unknowns so that the QTL parameters were obtained by Bayesian statistical inferring. The results showed that Bayesian-MCMC approach could work well and robust under different family structures and QTL effects. As family size increases and the number of family decreases, the accuracy of the parameter estimates will be improved. When the true QTL has a small effect, using outbred population experiment design with large family size is the optimal mapping strategy.

  19. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Rice Quality in a Population of Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hao; MeiZhen Zhu; JiPing Gao; ShiYong Sun; HongXuan Lin

    2009-01-01

    The demand for high quality rice represents a major issue in rice production. The primary components of rice grain quality include appearance, eating, cooking, physico-chemical, milling and nutritional qualities. Most of these traits are complex and controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), so the genetic characterization of these traits is more difficult than that of traits controlled by a single gene. The detection and genetic identification of QTLs can provide insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying quality traits. Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are effective tools used in mapping QTLs. In this study, we constructed 154 CSSLs from backcross progeny (BC3F2) derived from a cross between 'Koshihikari' (an Oryza sativa L. Ssp. Japonica variety) as the recurrent parent and 'Nona Bokra' (an O. Sativa L. Ssp. Indica variety) as the donor parent. In this process, we carried out marker-assisted selection by using 102 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence and simple sequence repeat markers covering most of the rice genome. Finally, this set of CSSLs was used to identify QTLs for rice quality traits. Ten QTLs for rice appearance quality traits were detected and eight QTLs concerned physico-chemical traits. These results supply the foundation for further genetic studies and breeding for the improvement of grain quality.

  20. Genotype by environment interaction of quantitative traits: a case study in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fuping; Xu, Shizhong

    2012-07-01

    Genotype by environment interaction is a phenomenon that a better genotype in one environment may perform poorly in another environment. When the genotype refers to a quantitative trait locus (QTL), this phenomenon is called QTL by environment interaction, denoted by Q×E. Using a recently developed new Bayesian method and genome-wide marker information, we estimated and tested QTL main effects and Q×E interactions for a well-known barley dataset produced by the North American Barley Genome Mapping Project. This dataset contained seven quantitative traits collected from 145 doubled-haploid (DH) lines evaluated in multiple environments, which derived from a cross between two Canadian two-row barley lines, Harrington and TR306. Numerous main effects and Q×E interaction effects have been detected for all seven quantitative traits. However, main effects seem to be more important than the Q×E interaction effects for all seven traits examined. The number of main effects detected varied from 26 for the maturity trait to 75 for the heading trait, with an average of 61.86. The heading trait has the most detected effects, with a total of 98 (75 main, 29 Q×E). Among the 98 effects, 6 loci had both the main and Q×E effects. Among the total number of detected loci, on average, 78.5% of the loci show the main effects whereas 34.9% of the loci show Q×E interactions. Overall, we detected many loci with either the main or the Q×E effects, and the main effects appear to be more important than the Q×E interaction effects for all the seven traits. This means that most detected loci have a constant effect across environments. Another discovery from this analysis is that Q×E interaction occurs independently, regardless whether the locus has main effects.

  1. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Johnsson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait–gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species.

  2. Ecophysiological traits may explain the abundance of climbing plant species across the light gradient in a temperate rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoli, Ernesto; Saldaña, Alfredo; Jiménez-Castillo, Mylthon

    2012-01-01

    Climbing plants are a key component of rainforests, but mechanistic approaches to their distribution and abundance are scarce. In a southern temperate rainforest, we addressed whether the dominance of climbing plants across light environments is associated with the expression of ecophysiological traits. In mature forest and canopy gaps, we measured leaf size, specific leaf area, photosynthetic rate, and dark respiration in six of the most abundant woody vines. Mean values of traits and their phenotypic change (%) between mature forest and canopy gaps were predictor variables. Leaf size and specific leaf area were not significantly associated with climbing plant dominance. Variation in gas-exchange traits between mature forest and canopy gaps explained, at least partly, the dominance of climbers in this forest. A greater increase in photosynthetic rate and a lower increase in dark respiration rate when canopy openings occur were related to the success of climbing plant species. Dominant climbers showed a strategy of maximizing exploitation of resource availability but minimizing metabolic costs. Results may reflect phenotypic plasticity or genetic differentiation in ecophysiological traits between light environments. It is suggested that the dominant climbers in this temperate rainforest would be able to cope with forest clearings due to human activities.

  3. Ecophysiological traits may explain the abundance of climbing plant species across the light gradient in a temperate rainforest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Gianoli

    Full Text Available Climbing plants are a key component of rainforests, but mechanistic approaches to their distribution and abundance are scarce. In a southern temperate rainforest, we addressed whether the dominance of climbing plants across light environments is associated with the expression of ecophysiological traits. In mature forest and canopy gaps, we measured leaf size, specific leaf area, photosynthetic rate, and dark respiration in six of the most abundant woody vines. Mean values of traits and their phenotypic change (% between mature forest and canopy gaps were predictor variables. Leaf size and specific leaf area were not significantly associated with climbing plant dominance. Variation in gas-exchange traits between mature forest and canopy gaps explained, at least partly, the dominance of climbers in this forest. A greater increase in photosynthetic rate and a lower increase in dark respiration rate when canopy openings occur were related to the success of climbing plant species. Dominant climbers showed a strategy of maximizing exploitation of resource availability but minimizing metabolic costs. Results may reflect phenotypic plasticity or genetic differentiation in ecophysiological traits between light environments. It is suggested that the dominant climbers in this temperate rainforest would be able to cope with forest clearings due to human activities.

  4. Quantitative trait loci for milk production and functional traits in two Danish Cattle breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, M D; Rychtarova, J; Zink, V;

    2010-01-01

    ), protein percentage (PP), clinical mastitis (CM), somatic cell score (SCS), maternal stillbirth, maternal calf size (MCS) and maternal calving difficulty. For Red breed, nine grandsire families were genotyped for 166 markers on 18 BTAs. Six traits analysed were MY, FP, PP, CM, SCS and female fertility....... Nine and five QTL were detected in Jersey and Red breed, respectively, in across family tests. In Jersey breed, the results indicate QTL for CM and MCS on BTA 3. Additionally, there is an indication of QTL for MCS and FP on BTA 1 and a tentative evidence for a QTL for MY on BTA 26. There is a high risk...

  5. Major Gene Identiifcation and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Yield-Related Traits in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhe; ZHANG Xin; LIU Yang-yang; JIA Zi-fang; ZHAO Hai-hong; LI Cheng-qi; WANG Qing-lian

    2014-01-01

    Segregation analysis of the mixed genetic model of major gene plus polygene was used to identify the major genesfor cotton yield-related traits using six generations P1, P2, F1, B1, B2, and F2 generated from the cross of Baimian 1×TM-1. In addition to boll size and seed index, the major genes for the other ifve traits were detected:one each for seed yield, lint percentage, boll number, lint index; and two for lint yield. Quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) mapping was performed in the F2 and F2:3 populations of above cross through molecular marker technology, and a total of 50 QTL (26 suggestive and 24 signiifcant) for yield-related traits were detected. Four common QTL were discovered: qLP-3b(F2)/qLP-3(F2:3)andqLP-19b (F2)/qLP-19(F2:3) for lint percentage, qBN-17(F2)/qBN-17(F2:3)for boll number, and qBS-26b(F2)/qBS-26(F2:3) for boll size. Especially, qLP-3b(F2)/qLP-3(F2:3), not only had LOD scores>3 but also exceeded the permutation threshold (5.13 and 5.29, respectively), correspondingly explaining 23.47 and 29.55% of phenotypic variation. This QTL should be considered preferentially in marker assisted selection (MAS). Segregation analysis and QTL mapping could mutually complement and verify, which provides a theoretical basis for genetic improvement of cotton yield-related traits by using major genes (QTL).

  6. Exercise and diet affect quantitative trait loci for body weight and composition traits in an advanced intercross population of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leamy, Larry J; Kelly, Scott A; Hua, Kunjie; Pomp, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Driven by the recent obesity epidemic, interest in understanding the complex genetic and environmental basis of body weight and composition is great. We investigated this by searching for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting a number of weight and adiposity traits in a G(10) advanced intercross population produced from crosses of mice in inbred strain C57BL/6J with those in a strain selected for high voluntary wheel running. The mice in this population were fed either a high-fat or a control diet throughout the study and also measured for four exercise traits prior to death, allowing us to test for pre- and postexercise QTLs as well as QTL-by-diet and QTL-by-exercise interactions. Our genome scan uncovered a number of QTLs, of which 40% replicated QTLs previously found for similar traits in an earlier (G(4)) generation. For those replicated QTLs, the confidence intervals were reduced from an average of 19 Mb in the G(4) to 8 Mb in the G(10). Four QTLs on chromosomes 3, 8, 13, and 18 were especially prominent in affecting the percentage of fat in the mice. About of all QTLs showed interactions with diet, exercise, or both, their genotypic effects on the traits showing a variety of patterns depending on the diet or level of exercise. It was concluded that the indirect effects of these QTLs provide an underlying genetic basis for the considerable variability in weight or fat loss typically found among individuals on the same diet and/or exercise regimen.

  7. Ascertainment correction for Markov chain Monte Carlo segregation and linkage analysis of a quantitative trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianzhong; Amos, Christopher I; Warwick Daw, E

    2007-09-01

    Although extended pedigrees are often sampled through probands with extreme levels of a quantitative trait, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for segregation and linkage analysis have not been able to perform ascertainment corrections. Further, the extent to which ascertainment of pedigrees leads to biases in the estimation of segregation and linkage parameters has not been previously studied for MCMC procedures. In this paper, we studied these issues with a Bayesian MCMC approach for joint segregation and linkage analysis, as implemented in the package Loki. We first simulated pedigrees ascertained through individuals with extreme values of a quantitative trait in spirit of the sequential sampling theory of Cannings and Thompson [Cannings and Thompson [1977] Clin. Genet. 12:208-212]. Using our simulated data, we detected no bias in estimates of the trait locus location. However, in addition to allele frequencies, when the ascertainment threshold was higher than or close to the true value of the highest genotypic mean, bias was also found in the estimation of this parameter. When there were multiple trait loci, this bias destroyed the additivity of the effects of the trait loci, and caused biases in the estimation all genotypic means when a purely additive model was used for analyzing the data. To account for pedigree ascertainment with sequential sampling, we developed a Bayesian ascertainment approach and implemented Metropolis-Hastings updates in the MCMC samplers used in Loki. Ascertainment correction greatly reduced biases in parameter estimates. Our method is designed for multiple, but a fixed number of trait loci.

  8. A method to prioritize quantitative traits and individuals for sequencing in family-based studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaanan P Shah

    Full Text Available Owing to recent advances in DNA sequencing, it is now technically feasible to evaluate the contribution of rare variation to complex traits and diseases. However, it is still cost prohibitive to sequence the whole genome (or exome of all individuals in each study. For quantitative traits, one strategy to reduce cost is to sequence individuals in the tails of the trait distribution. However, the next challenge becomes how to prioritize traits and individuals for sequencing since individuals are often characterized for dozens of medically relevant traits. In this article, we describe a new method, the Rare Variant Kinship Test (RVKT, which leverages relationship information in family-based studies to identify quantitative traits that are likely influenced by rare variants. Conditional on nuclear families and extended pedigrees, we evaluate the power of the RVKT via simulation. Not unexpectedly, the power of our method depends strongly on effect size, and to a lesser extent, on the frequency of the rare variant and the number and type of relationships in the sample. As an illustration, we also apply our method to data from two genetic studies in the Old Order Amish, a founder population with extensive genealogical records. Remarkably, we implicate the presence of a rare variant that lowers fasting triglyceride levels in the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI Heart study (p = 0.044, consistent with the presence of a previously identified null mutation in the APOC3 gene that lowers fasting triglyceride levels in HAPI Heart study participants.

  9. Quantitative resistance can lead to evolutionary changes in traits not targeted by the resistance QTLs.

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, F.; Lannou, C.; Gilligan, CA; Bosch, F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the general concern in plant pathology that the introduction of quantitative resistance in the landscape can lead to increased pathogenicity. Hereto, we study the hypothetical case of a quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting on pathogen spore production per unit lesion area. To regain its original fitness, the pathogen can break the QTL, restoring its spore production capacity leading to an increased spore production per lesion. Or alternatively, it can increase its lesion ...

  10. Integrated genomics and molecular breeding approaches for dissecting the complex quantitative traits in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujur, Alice; Saxena, Maneesha S; Bajaj, Deepak; Laxmi; Parida, Swarup K

    2013-12-01

    The enormous population growth, climate change and global warming are now considered major threats to agriculture and world's food security. To improve the productivity and sustainability of agriculture, the development of highyielding and durable abiotic and biotic stress-tolerant cultivars and/climate resilient crops is essential. Henceforth, understanding the molecular mechanism and dissection of complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits is the prime objective in current agricultural biotechnology research. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in plant genomics and molecular breeding research pertaining to conventional and next-generation whole genome, transcriptome and epigenome sequencing efforts, generation of huge genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic resources and development of modern genomics-assisted breeding approaches in diverse crop genotypes with contrasting yield and abiotic stress tolerance traits. Unfortunately, the detailed molecular mechanism and gene regulatory networks controlling such complex quantitative traits is not yet well understood in crop plants. Therefore, we propose an integrated strategies involving available enormous and diverse traditional and modern -omics (structural, functional, comparative and epigenomics) approaches/resources and genomics-assisted breeding methods which agricultural biotechnologist can adopt/utilize to dissect and decode the molecular and gene regulatory networks involved in the complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits in crop plants. This would provide clues and much needed inputs for rapid selection of novel functionally relevant molecular tags regulating such complex traits to expedite traditional and modern marker-assisted genetic enhancement studies in target crop species for developing high-yielding stress-tolerant varieties.

  11. Genetic diversity among exotic cotton accessions as for qualitative and quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, L P; Farias, F J C; Rodrigues, J I S; Suassuna, N D; Teodoro, P E

    2017-02-08

    Studying genetic diversity among a group of genotypes is important in genetic breeding because identifying hybrid combinations of greater heterotic effect also increases the chance of obtaining plants with favorable allele combinations in an intra-population selection program. The objective of this study was to compare different types of long and extra-long staple cotton and their genetic diversity in relation to the fiber traits and some agronomic traits in order to grant breeding programs. Diversity analysis among 29 cotton accessions based on qualitative and quantitative traits and joint including qualitative and quantitative traits was performed. Analysis based on qualitative and quantitative traits and joint met the accessions in three, two, and three groups, respectively. The cross between genotypes Giza 59 and Pima unknown was the most promising to generate segregating populations, comprising simultaneously resistance (based on molecular markers) to blue disease and bacterial blight, partial resistance to root-knot nematode, smaller size, in addition to good fiber characteristics. These populations can be used in recurrent selection programs as donors of alleles for development of long-staple cotton genotypes.

  12. Developmental quantitative genetic analysis of body weights and morphological traits in the turbot, Scophthalmusmaximus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinan; MA Aijun; MA Deyou

    2015-01-01

    In order to elucidate the genetic mechanism of growth traits in turbot during ontogeny, developmental genetic analysis of the body weights, total lengths, standard lengths and body heights of turbots was conducted by mixed genetic models with additive-dominance effects, based on complete diallel crosses with four different strains of Scophthalmus maximus from Denmark, Norway, Britain, and France. Unconditional genetic analysis revealed that the unconditional additive effects for the four traits were more significant than unconditional dominance effects, meanwhile, the alternative expressions were also observed between the additive and dominant effects for body weights, total lengths and standard lengths. Conditional analysis showed that the developmental periods with active gene expression for body weights, total lengths, standard lengths and body heights were 15–18, 15 and 21–24, 15 and 24, and 21 and 27 months of age, respectively. The proportions of unconditional/conditional variances indicated that the narrow-sense heritabilities of body weights, total lengths and standard lengths were all increased systematically. The accumulative effects of genes controlling the four quantitative traits were mainly additive effects, suggesting that the selection is more efficient for the genetic improvement of turbots. The conditional genetic procedure is a useful tool to understand the expression of genes controlling developmental quantitative traits at a specific developmental period (t-1→t) during ontogeny. It is also important to determine the appropriate developmental period (t-1→t) for trait measurement in developmental quantitative genetic analysis in fish.

  13. Detecting Genetic Interactions for Quantitative Traits Using m-Spacing Entropy Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyong Yee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of statistical methods for detecting gene-gene interactions have been developed in genetic association studies with binary traits. However, many phenotype measures are intrinsically quantitative and categorizing continuous traits may not always be straightforward and meaningful. Association of gene-gene interactions with an observed distribution of such phenotypes needs to be investigated directly without categorization. Information gain based on entropy measure has previously been successful in identifying genetic associations with binary traits. We extend the usefulness of this information gain by proposing a nonparametric evaluation method of conditional entropy of a quantitative phenotype associated with a given genotype. Hence, the information gain can be obtained for any phenotype distribution. Because any functional form, such as Gaussian, is not assumed for the entire distribution of a trait or a given genotype, this method is expected to be robust enough to be applied to any phenotypic association data. Here, we show its use to successfully identify the main effect, as well as the genetic interactions, associated with a quantitative trait.

  14. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for the bolting trait in Brassica rapa under vernalizing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y G; Zhang, L; Ji, X H; Yan, J F; Liu, Y T; Lv, X X; Feng, H

    2014-05-23

    Premature bolting can occur occasionally during spring cultivation of heading Chinese cabbage in East Asia when the plants encounter low temperatures (vernalization), leading to economic loss. Breeding bolting-resistant cultivars is the best choice for solving this problem. We looked for QTLs responsible for varietal differences in the bolting trait in Brassica rapa under environmental conditions that promote vernalization. To achieve this goal, we constructed a linkage map with 107 simple sequence repeats and 54 insertion/deletion markers based on a segregating population of 186 F2 individuals. The resulting map consisted of 10 linkage groups and covered a total length of 947.1 cM, with an average genetic distance of 5.84 cM between adjacent markers. QTL analysis of the bolting trait was performed by two phenotypic evaluations (bolting index and flowering time) based on the scores in an F2 population in the spring of 2010, and scores in F2:3 families in autumn 2010 and spring 2011, respectively. Twenty-six QTLs that controlled bolting were detected, accounting for 2.6 to 31.2% of the phenotypic variance. The detected QTLs with large effects co-localized mainly on linkage groups A02, A06, and A07. These QTLs may provide useful information for marker-assisted selection in a breeding program for late bolting or bolting-resistant cultivars in B. rapa crops.

  15. Identification of major quantitative trait loci underlying floral pollination syndrome divergence in Penstemon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessinger, Carolyn A; Hileman, Lena C; Rausher, Mark D

    2014-08-05

    Distinct floral pollination syndromes have emerged multiple times during the diversification of flowering plants. For example, in western North America, a hummingbird pollination syndrome has evolved more than 100 times, generally from within insect-pollinated lineages. The hummingbird syndrome is characterized by a suite of floral traits that attracts and facilitates pollen movement by hummingbirds, while at the same time discourages bee visitation. These floral traits generally include large nectar volume, red flower colour, elongated and narrow corolla tubes and reproductive organs that are exerted from the corolla. A handful of studies have examined the genetic architecture of hummingbird pollination syndrome evolution. These studies find that mutations of relatively large effect often explain increased nectar volume and transition to red flower colour. In addition, they suggest that adaptive suites of floral traits may often exhibit a high degree of genetic linkage, which could facilitate their fixation during pollination syndrome evolution. Here, we explore these emerging generalities by investigating the genetic basis of floral pollination syndrome divergence between two related Penstemon species with different pollination syndromes--bee-pollinated P. neomexicanus and closely related hummingbird-pollinated P. barbatus. In an F2 mapping population derived from a cross between these two species, we characterized the effect size of genetic loci underlying floral trait divergence associated with the transition to bird pollination, as well as correlation structure of floral trait variation. We find the effect sizes of quantitative trait loci for adaptive floral traits are in line with patterns observed in previous studies, and find strong evidence that suites of floral traits are genetically linked. This linkage may be due to genetic proximity or pleiotropic effects of single causative loci. Interestingly, our data suggest that the evolution of floral traits

  16. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for bovine milk protein composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopen, G.C.B.; Koks, P.D.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Bovenhuis, H.; Visker, M.H.P.W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk protein composition in 849 Holstein–Friesian cows originating from seven sires. One morning milk sample was analysed for the major milk proteins using capillary zone electrophoresis. A gen

  17. Evaluation and Quantitative trait loci mapping of resistance to powdery mildew in lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major leafy vegetable that is susceptible to powdery mildew disease under greenhouse and field conditions. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance to powdery mildew under greenhouse conditions in an interspecific population derived from a cross betw...

  18. Mapping quantitative trait loci in a selectively genotyped outbred population using a mixture model approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, David L.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Arendonk, Johan A.M. van

    1999-01-01

    A mixture model approach is employed for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the situation where individuals, in an outbred population, are selectively genotyped. Maximum likelihood estimation of model parameters is obtained from an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm facilitated by

  19. Quantitative trait locus analysis of nitrogen use efficiency in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindu, G.A.; Tang, J.; Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was conducted on data generated from two pot experiments carried out in 2005 (using four nitrogen rates) and 2008 (with three rates) with AFLP markers and 94 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the

  20. Quantitative trait analysis of yeast biodiversity yields novel gene tools for metabolic engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Nevoigt, Elke; Duitama, Jorge; Meurens, Nicolas; Pais, Thiago M.; Mathé, Lotte; Saerens, Sofie; Nguyen, Huyen Thi Thanh; Swinnen, Steve; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Concilio, Luigi; de Troostembergh, Jean-Claude; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering of metabolic pathways by genetic modification has been restricted largely to enzyme-encoding structural genes. The product yield of such pathways is a quantitative genetic trait. Out of 52 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains phenotyped in small-scale fermentations, we identified strain CBS6

  1. CBCL Pediatric Bipolar Disorder Profile and ADHD: Comorbidity and Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; McCracken, James T.; Dang, Jeffery; Clark, Shaunna; Nelson, Stanley F.; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    The pediatric bipolar disorder profile of the Child Behavior checklist is used to differentiate patterns of comorbidity and to search for quantitative trait loci in multiple affected ADHD sibling pairs. The CBCL-PBD profiling identified 8 percent of individuals with severe psychopathology and increased rates of oppositional defiant, conduct and…

  2. Estimation of effects of quantitative trait loci in large complex pedigrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Goddard, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    A method was derived to estimate effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL) using incomplete genotype information in large outbreeding populations with complex pedigrees. The method accounts for background genes by estimating polygenic effects. The basic equations used are very similar to the usual li

  3. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci using linkage disequilibria with closely linked marker loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Goddard, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    A multimarker linkage disequilibrium mapping method was developed for the fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a dense marker map. The method compares the expected covariances between haplotype effects given a postulated QTL position to the covariances that are found in the data. The

  4. A General Monte Carlo Method for Mapping Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we address the mapping of multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in line crosses for which the genetic data are highly incomplete. Such complicated situations occur, for instance, when dominant markers are used or when unequally informative markers are used in experiments with outbred

  5. Meta-Analysis of Results from Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Studies on Pig Chromosome 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moraes Silva, De K.M.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Knol, E.F.; Merks, J.W.M.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, R.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis of results from multiple studies could lead to more precise quantitative trait loci (QTL) position estimates compared to the individual experiments. As the raw data from many different studies are not readily available, the use of results from published articles may be helpful. In this

  6. CBCL Pediatric Bipolar Disorder Profile and ADHD: Comorbidity and Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; McCracken, James T.; Dang, Jeffery; Clark, Shaunna; Nelson, Stanley F.; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    The pediatric bipolar disorder profile of the Child Behavior checklist is used to differentiate patterns of comorbidity and to search for quantitative trait loci in multiple affected ADHD sibling pairs. The CBCL-PBD profiling identified 8 percent of individuals with severe psychopathology and increased rates of oppositional defiant, conduct and…

  7. Quantitative trait loci for rice yield-related traits using recombinant inbred lines derived from two diverse cultivars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xu Feng Bai; Li Jun Luo; Wen Hao Yan; Mallikarjuna Rao Kovi; Yong Zhong Xing

    2011-08-01

    The thousand-grain weight and spikelets per panicle directly contribute to rice yield. Heading date and plant height also greatly influence the yield. Dissection of genetic bases of yield-related traits would provide tools for yield improvement. In this study, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for spikelets per panicle, thousand-grain weight, heading date and plant height was performed using recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two diverse cultivars, Nanyangzhan and Chuan7. In total, 20 QTLs were identified for four traits. They were located to 11 chromosomes except on chromosome 4. Seven and five QTLs were detected for thousand-grain weight and spikelets per panicle, respectively. Four QTLs were identified for both heading date and plant height. About half the QTLs were commonly detected in both years, 2006 and 2007. Six QTLs are being reported for the first time. Two QTL clusters were identified in regions flanked by RM22065 and RM5720 on chromosome 7 and by RM502 and RM264 on chromosome 8, respectively. The parent, Nanyangzhan with heavy thousand-grain weight, carried alleles with increased effects on all seven thousand-grain weight QTL, which explained why there was no transgressive segregation for thousand-grain weight in the population. In contrast, Chuan7 with more spikelets per panicle carried positive alleles at all five spikelets per panicle QTL except qspp5. Further work on distinction between pleiotropic QTL and linked QTL is needed in two yield-related QTL clusters.

  8. Integrative Transcriptome, Genome and Quantitative Trait Loci Resources Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Turbot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Diego; Fernández, Carlos; Hermida, Miguel; Sciara, Andrés; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Cabaleiro, Santiago; Caamaño, Rubén; Martínez, Paulino; Bouza, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Growth traits represent a main goal in aquaculture breeding programs and may be related to adaptive variation in wild fisheries. Integrating quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and next generation sequencing can greatly help to identify variation in candidate genes, which can result in marker-assisted selection and better genetic structure information. Turbot is a commercially important flatfish in Europe and China, with available genomic information on QTLs and genome mapping. Muscle and liver RNA-seq from 18 individuals was carried out to obtain gene sequences and markers functionally related to growth, resulting in a total of 20,447 genes and 85,344 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Many growth-related genes and SNPs were identified and placed in the turbot genome and genetic map to explore their co-localization with growth-QTL markers. Forty-five SNPs on growth-related genes were selected based on QTL co-localization and relevant function for growth traits. Forty-three SNPs were technically feasible and validated in a wild Atlantic population, where 91% were polymorphic. The integration of functional and structural genomic resources in turbot provides a practical approach for QTL mining in this species. Validated SNPs represent a useful set of growth-related gene markers for future association, functional and population studies in this flatfish species. PMID:26901189

  9. Integrative Transcriptome, Genome and Quantitative Trait Loci Resources Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Turbot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Robledo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Growth traits represent a main goal in aquaculture breeding programs and may be related to adaptive variation in wild fisheries. Integrating quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping and next generation sequencing can greatly help to identify variation in candidate genes, which can result in marker-assisted selection and better genetic structure information. Turbot is a commercially important flatfish in Europe and China, with available genomic information on QTLs and genome mapping. Muscle and liver RNA-seq from 18 individuals was carried out to obtain gene sequences and markers functionally related to growth, resulting in a total of 20,447 genes and 85,344 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Many growth-related genes and SNPs were identified and placed in the turbot genome and genetic map to explore their co-localization with growth-QTL markers. Forty-five SNPs on growth-related genes were selected based on QTL co-localization and relevant function for growth traits. Forty-three SNPs were technically feasible and validated in a wild Atlantic population, where 91% were polymorphic. The integration of functional and structural genomic resources in turbot provides a practical approach for QTL mining in this species. Validated SNPs represent a useful set of growth-related gene markers for future association, functional and population studies in this flatfish species.

  10. Advancing genetic theory and application by metabolic quantitative trait loci analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliebenstein, Danielj

    2009-06-01

    This review describes recent advances in the analysis of metabolism using quantitative genetics. It focuses on how recent metabolic quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies enhance our understanding of the genetic architecture underlying naturally variable phenotypes and the impact of this fundamental research on agriculture, specifically crop breeding. In particular, the role of whole-genome duplications in generating quantitative genetic variation within a species is highlighted and the potential uses of this phenomenon presented. Additionally, the review describes how new observations from metabolic QTL mapping analyses are helping to shape and expand the concepts of genetic epistasis.

  11. Fine mapping and candidate gene prediction of a pleiotropic quantitative trait locus for yield-related trait in Zea mays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixiang Liu

    Full Text Available The yield of maize grain is a highly complex quantitative trait that is controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs with small effects, and is frequently influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Thus, it is challenging to clone a QTL for grain yield in the maize genome. Previously, we identified a major QTL, qKNPR6, for kernel number per row (KNPR across multiple environments, and developed two nearly isogenic lines, SL57-6 and Ye478, which differ only in the allelic constitution at the short segment harboring the QTL. Recently, qKNPR6 was re-evaluated in segregating populations derived from SL57-6×Ye478, and was narrowed down to a 2.8 cM interval, which explained 56.3% of the phenotypic variance of KNPR in 201 F(2∶3 families. The QTL simultaneously affected ear length, kernel weight and grain yield. Furthermore, a large F(2 population with more than 12,800 plants, 191 recombinant chromosomes and 10 overlapping recombinant lines placed qKNPR6 into a 0.91 cM interval corresponding to 198Kb of the B73 reference genome. In this region, six genes with expressed sequence tag (EST evidence were annotated. The expression pattern and DNA diversity of the six genes were assayed in Ye478 and SL57-6. The possible candidate gene and the pathway involved in inflorescence development were discussed.

  12. Quantitative trait locus analysis of lateral branchrelated traits in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) using recombinant inbred lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Su; YUAN XiaoJun; PAN JunSong; HE HuanLe; CAI Run

    2008-01-01

    A group of 224 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was derived from a narrow cross between 2 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) lines, namely, S94 (Northern China type with weak lateral branch growth potential and early lateral branch sprouting time) and S06 (Northern European type with strong lateral branch growth potential and late lateral branch sprouting time). These lines were then used for investigating lateral branch-related traits. A total of 36 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected for the following 4 lateral branch-related traits: lateral branch average length (LBAL), lateral branch total length (LBTL), lateral branch number (LBN), and first lateral branch node (FLBN). Further, each QTL explained 3.1% (Ibtl 2.1, spring) to 32.3% (Ibn2.3, spring) of the observed phenotypic variance. Eleven QTLs (Ibal1.1, Ibtl 1.1, Ibn1.2, fIbn1.2, etc.) for different traits were found to be clustered on the e23m18d-ME23EM6c section (7.4 cM) of linkage group (LG) 1; further, 15 QTLs (Ibal 2.1, Ibtl 2.1, Ibn 2.1, flbn 2.1, etc.)were found to be clustered on the S94A1-ME4SA4a section (13.9 cM) of LG2. Twenty-one QTLs explained more than 10% of the phenotypic variance. Moreover, Ibtl 1.3 (autumn, 26.2%, logarithm of odds (LOD)= 17.4; spring, 26,9%, LOD=17.9) had stable position and contribution in both seasons. Several se-quence-anchor markers (CMBR40, F, CS30, S94A1, CSWTA11B, etc.) were closely linked with some QTLs for LBAL, LBTL, LBN, and FLBN, which can be used for the marker-assisted selection to improve the plant architecture in cucumber breeding.

  13. Quantitative trait locus analysis of lateral branch-related traits in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) using recombinant inbred lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A group of 224 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was derived from a narrow cross between 2 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) lines, namely, S94 (Northern China type with weak lateral branch growth potential and early lateral branch sprouting time) and S06 (Northern European type with strong lateral branch growth potential and late lateral branch sprouting time). These lines were then used for investigating lateral branch-related traits. A total of 36 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected for the following 4 lateral branch-related traits: lateral branch average length (LBAL), lateral branch total length (LBTL), lateral branch number (LBN), and first lateral branch node (FLBN). Further, each QTL explained 3.1% (lbtl2.1, spring) to 32.3% (lbn2.3, spring) of the observed phenotypic variance. Eleven QTLs (lbal1.1, lbtl1.1, lbn1.2, flbn1.2, etc.) for different traits were found to be clustered on the e23m18d-ME23EM6c section (7.4 cM) of linkage group (LG) 1; further, 15 QTLs (lbal2.1, lbtl2.1, lbn2.1, flbn2.1, etc.) were found to be clustered on the S94A1-ME4SA4a section (13.9 cM) of LG2. Twenty-one QTLs explained more than 10% of the phenotypic variance. Moreover, lbtl1.3 (autumn, 26.2%, logarithm of odds (LOD) = 17.4; spring, 26.9%, LOD = 17.9) had stable position and contribution in both seasons. Several se-quence-anchor markers (CMBR40, F, CS30, S94A1, CSWTA11B, etc.) were closely linked with some QTLs for LBAL, LBTL, LBN, and FLBN, which can be used for the marker-assisted selection to improve the plant architecture in cucumber breeding.

  14. Genome-wide Association Study to Identify Quantitative Trait Loci for Meat and Carcass Quality Traits in Berkshire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Iqbal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Meat and carcass quality attributes are of crucial importance influencing consumer preference and profitability in the pork industry. A set of 400 Berkshire pigs were collected from Dasan breeding farm, Namwon, Chonbuk province, Korea that were born between 2012 and 2013. To perform genome wide association studies (GWAS, eleven meat and carcass quality traits were considered, including carcass weight, backfat thickness, pH value after 24 hours (pH24, Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage lightness in meat color (CIE L, redness in meat color (CIE a, yellowness in meat color (CIE b, filtering, drip loss, heat loss, shear force and marbling score. All of the 400 animals were genotyped with the Porcine 62K SNP BeadChips (Illumina Inc., USA. A SAS general linear model procedure (SAS version 9.2 was used to pre-adjust the animal phenotypes before GWAS with sire and sex effects as fixed effects and slaughter age as a covariate. After fitting the fixed and covariate factors in the model, the residuals of the phenotype regressed on additive effects of each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP under a linear regression model (PLINK version 1.07. The significant SNPs after permutation testing at a chromosome-wise level were subjected to stepwise regression analysis to determine the best set of SNP markers. A total of 55 significant (p<0.05 SNPs or quantitative trait loci (QTL were detected on various chromosomes. The QTLs explained from 5.06% to 8.28% of the total phenotypic variation of the traits. Some QTLs with pleiotropic effect were also identified. A pair of significant QTL for pH24 was also found to affect both CIE L and drip loss percentage. The significant QTL after characterization of the functional candidate genes on the QTL or around the QTL region may be effectively and efficiently used in marker assisted selection to achieve enhanced genetic improvement of the trait considered.

  15. Linkage analysis of quantitative trait loci in the presence of heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn; Dalgaard, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Variance component modeling for linkage analysis of quantitative traits is a powerful tool for detecting and locating genes affecting a trait of interest, but the presence of genetic heterogeneity will decrease the power of a linkage study and may even give biased estimates of the location of the quantitative trait loci. Many complex diseases are believed to be influenced by multiple genes and therefore genetic heterogeneity is likely to be present for many real applications of linkage analysis. We consider a mixture of multivariate normals to model locus heterogeneity by allowing only a proportion of the sampled pedigrees to segregate trait-influencing allele(s) at a specific locus. However, for mixtures of normals the classical asymptotic distribution theory of the maximum likelihood estimates does not hold, so tests of linkage and/or heterogeneity are evaluated using resampling methods. It is shown that allowing for genetic heterogeneity leads to an increase in power to detect linkage. This increase is more prominent when the genetic effect of the locus is small or when the percentage of pedigrees not segregating trait-influencing allele(s) at the locus is high.

  16. The LASSO and sparse least square regression methods for SNP selection in predicting quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zeny Z; Yang, Xiaojian; Subedi, Sanjeena; McNicholas, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    Recent work concerning quantitative traits of interest has focused on selecting a small subset of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from amongst the SNPs responsible for the phenotypic variation of the trait. When considered as covariates, the large number of variables (SNPs) and their association with those in close proximity pose challenges for variable selection. The features of sparsity and shrinkage of regression coefficients of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method appear attractive for SNP selection. Sparse partial least squares (SPLS) is also appealing as it combines the features of sparsity in subset selection and dimension reduction to handle correlations amongst SNPs. In this paper we investigate application of the LASSO and SPLS methods for selecting SNPs that predict quantitative traits. We evaluate the performance of both methods with different criteria and under different scenarios using simulation studies. Results indicate that these methods can be effective in selecting SNPs that predict quantitative traits but are limited by some conditions. Both methods perform similarly overall but each exhibit advantages over the other in given situations. Both methods are applied to Canadian Holstein cattle data to compare their performance.

  17. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to Trichostrongylus colubriformis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, K J; Hulme, D J; Callaghan, M J; Leish, Z; Lenane, I; Windon, R G; Maddox, J F

    2002-04-01

    A genome linkage scan was carried out using a resource flock of 1029 sheep in six half-sib families. The families were offspring of sires derived by crossing divergent lines of sheep selected for response to challenge with the intestinal parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis. All animals in the resource flock were phenotypically assessed for worm resistance soon after weaning using a vaccination/challenge regime. After correcting for fixed effects using a least squares linear model the faecal egg count data obtained following the first challenge and the faecal egg count data obtained after the second challenge were designated Trait 1 and Trait 2, respectively. A total of 472 lambs drawn from the phenotypic extremes of the Trait 2 faecal egg count distribution were genotyped with a panel of 133 microsatellite markers covering all 26 sheep autosomes. Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for each of the faecal egg count traits was determined using interval analysis with the Animap program with recombination rates between markers derived from an existing marker map. No chromosomal regions attained genome-wide significance for QTL influencing either of the traits. However, one region attained chromosome-wide significance and five other regions attained point-wise significance for the presence of QTL affecting parasite resistance.

  18. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange.

  19. Detection of parent-of-origin effects for quantitative traits using general pedigree data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hai-Qiang; Mao, Wei-Gao; Pan, Dongdong; Zhou, Ji-Yuan; Chen, Ping-Yan; Fung, Wing Kam

    2014-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is a genetic phenomenon in which certain alleles are differentially expressed in a parent-of-origin-specific manner, and plays an important role in the study of complex traits. For a diallelic marker locus in human, the parentalasymmetry tests Q-PAT(c) with any constant c were developed to detect parent-of-origin effects for quantitative traits. However, these methods can only be applied to deal with nuclear families and thus are not suitable for extended pedigrees. In this study, by making no assumption about the distribution of the quantitative trait, we first propose the pedigree parentalasymmetry tests Q-PPAT(c) with any constant c for quantitative traits to test for parent-of-origin effects based on nuclear families with complete information from general pedigree data, in the presence of association between marker alleles under study and quantitative traits. When there are any genotypes missing in pedigrees, we utilize Monte Carlo (MC) sampling and estimation and develop the Q-MCPPAT(c) statistics to test for parent-of-origin effects. Various simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of the proposed methods, for different sample sizes, genotype missing rates, degrees of imprinting effects and population models. Simulation results show that the proposed methods control the size well under the null hypothesis of no parent-of-origin effects and Q-PPAT(c) are robust to population stratification. In addition, the power comparison demonstrates that Q-PPAT(c) and Q-MCPPAT(c) for pedigree data are much more powerful than Q-PAT(c) only using two-generation nuclear families selected from extended pedigrees.

  20. Quantitative autistic trait measurements index background genetic risk for ASD in Hispanic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Joshua; Constantino, John Nicholas; Zambrana, Katherine; Martin, Eden; Tunc, Ilker; Zhang, Yi; Abbacchi, Anna; Messinger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that quantitative autistic traits (QATs) of parents reflect inherited liabilities that may index background genetic risk for clinical autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in their offspring. Moreover, preferential mating for QATs has been observed as a potential factor in concentrating autistic liabilities in some families across generations. Heretofore, intergenerational studies of QATs have focused almost exclusively on Caucasian populations-the present study explored these phenomena in a well-characterized Hispanic population. The present study examined QAT scores in siblings and parents of 83 Hispanic probands meeting research diagnostic criteria for ASD, and 64 non-ASD controls, using the Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2). Ancestry of the probands was characterized by genotype, using information from 541,929 single nucleotide polymorphic markers. In families of Hispanic children with an ASD diagnosis, the pattern of quantitative trait correlations observed between ASD-affected children and their first-degree relatives (ICCs on the order of 0.20), between unaffected first-degree relatives in ASD-affected families (sibling/mother ICC = 0.36; sibling/father ICC = 0.53), and between spouses (mother/father ICC = 0.48) were in keeping with the influence of transmitted background genetic risk and strong preferential mating for variation in quantitative autistic trait burden. Results from analysis of ancestry-informative genetic markers among probands in this sample were consistent with that from other Hispanic populations. Quantitative autistic traits represent measurable indices of inherited liability to ASD in Hispanic families. The accumulation of autistic traits occurs within generations, between spouses, and across generations, among Hispanic families affected by ASD. The occurrence of preferential mating for QATs-the magnitude of which may vary across cultures-constitutes a mechanism by which background genetic liability

  1. Detection of parent-of-origin effects for quantitative traits using general pedigree data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hai-Qiang He; Wei-Gao Mao; Dongdong Pan; Ji-Yuan Zhou; Ping-Yan Chen; Wing Kam Fung

    2014-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is a genetic phenomenon in which certain alleles are differentially expressed in a parent-of-origin-specific manner, and plays an important role in the study of complex traits. For a diallelic marker locus in human, the parental-asymmetry tests Q-PAT() with any constant were developed to detect parent-of-origin effects for quantitative traits. However, these methods can only be applied to deal with nuclear families and thus are not suitable for extended pedigrees. In this study, by making no assumption about the distribution of the quantitative trait, we first propose the pedigree parental-asymmetry tests Q-PPAT() with any constant for quantitative traits to test for parent-of-origin effects based on nuclear families with complete information from general pedigree data, in the presence of association between marker alleles under study and quantitative traits. When there are any genotypes missing in pedigrees, we utilize Monte Carlo (MC) sampling and estimation and develop the Q-MCPPAT() statistics to test for parent-of-origin effects. Various simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of the proposed methods, for different sample sizes, genotype missing rates, degrees of imprinting effects and population models. Simulation results show that the proposed methods control the size well under the null hypothesis of no parent-of-origin effects and Q-PPAT() are robust to population stratification. In addition, the power comparison demonstrates that Q-PPAT() and Q-MCPPAT() for pedigree data are much more powerful than Q-PAT() only using two-generation nuclear families selected from extended pedigrees.

  2. Quantitative trait gene Slit2 positively regulates murine hematopoietic stem cell numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterstrat, Amanda; Rector, Kyle; Geiger, Hartmut; Liang, Ying

    2016-08-09

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) demonstrate natural variation in number and function. The genetic factors responsible for the variations (or quantitative traits) are largely unknown. We previously identified a gene whose differential expression underlies the natural variation of HSC numbers in C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 (D2) mice. We now report the finding of another gene, Slit2, on chromosome 5 that also accounts for variation in HSC number. In reciprocal chromosome 5 congenic mice, introgressed D2 alleles increased HSC numbers, whereas B6 alleles had the opposite effect. Using gene array and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we identified Slit2 as a quantitative trait gene whose expression was positively correlated with the number of HSCs. Ectopic expression of Slit2 not only increased the number of the long-term colony forming HSCs, but also enhanced their repopulation capacity upon transplantation. Therefore, Slit2 is a novel quantitative trait gene and a positive regulator of the number and function of murine HSCs. This finding suggests that Slit2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the effective in vitro and in vivo expansion of HSCs without compromising normal hematopoiesis.

  3. Quantitative Comparison of Abundance Structures of Generalized Communities: From B-Cell Receptor Repertoires to Microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedghalati, Mohammadkarim; Farahpour, Farnoush; Lange, Anja; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Seifert, Marc; Küppers, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The community, the assemblage of organisms co-existing in a given space and time, has the potential to become one of the unifying concepts of biology, especially with the advent of high-throughput sequencing experiments that reveal genetic diversity exhaustively. In this spirit we show that a tool from community ecology, the Rank Abundance Distribution (RAD), can be turned by the new MaxRank normalization method into a generic, expressive descriptor for quantitative comparison of communities in many areas of biology. To illustrate the versatility of the method, we analyze RADs from various generalized communities, i.e. assemblages of genetically diverse cells or organisms, including human B cells, gut microbiomes under antibiotic treatment and of different ages and countries of origin, and other human and environmental microbial communities. We show that normalized RADs enable novel quantitative approaches that help to understand structures and dynamics of complex generalized communities. PMID:28114391

  4. Molecular and quantitative trait variation within and among populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmands, Suzanne; Harrison, J Scott

    2003-10-01

    While molecular and quantitative trait variation may be theoretically correlated, empirical studies using both approaches frequently reveal discordant patterns, and these discrepancies can contribute to our understanding of evolutionary processes. Here, we assessed genetic variation in six populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus. Molecular variation was estimated using five polymorphic microsatellite loci, and quantitative variation was measured using 22-life history and morphometric characters. Within populations, no correlation was found between the levels of molecular variation (heterozygosity) and quantitative variation (heritability). Between populations, quantitative subdivision (Q(ST)) was correlated with molecular subdivision when measured as F(ST) but not when measured as R(ST). Unlike most taxa studied to date, the overall level of molecular subdivision exceeded the level of quantitative subdivision (F(ST) = 0.80, R(ST) = 0.89, Q(ST) = 0.30). Factors that could contribute to this pattern include stabilizing or fluctuating selection on quantitative traits or accelerated rates of molecular evolution.

  5. Quantitative trait loci markers derived from whole genome sequence data increases the reliability of genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Su, Guosheng; Janss, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect on the reliability of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data. The extra markers were selected...... itself. Depending on the trait’s economic weight, 15, 10, or 5 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were selected per trait per breed and 3 to 5 markers were selected to tag each QTL. After removing duplicate markers (same marker selected for more than one trait or breed) and filtering for high pairwise linkage...... was observed for mastitis, but only a 0.5 percentage point increase was seen for fertility. When using a Bayesian model accuracies were generally higher with only 54k data compared with the genomic BLUP approach, but increases in reliability were relatively smaller when QTL markers were included. Results from...

  6. Mapping and Analysis of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Seed Dormancy in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ling; ZHANG Wen-wei; ZHAI Hu-qu; WAN Jian-min

    2005-01-01

    Seed dormancy is one of the most important traits related to the rice grain quality and seeds application, because it is associated with pre-harvest sprouting, resulting in a downgrading of quality and severe limitations in end-use application.The recent development of DNA markers and linkage maps of rice has made possible mapping of individual genes associated with complex seed dormancy traits, analyzing the genetics effects of individual genes and genotype-byenvironment interactions. Up to now, numerous quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed dormancy in rice have been identified and mapped in the molecular genetic map by different populations. In this review, we focus on the genetic base of seed dormancy in rice, especially compare QTLs controlling seed dormancy reported up to now, analyze the expression and stability of QTLs controlling seed dormancy, and discuss the present problems. Finally we show a new pathway to further research on seed dormancy.

  7. Integrated genomics and molecular breeding approaches for dissecting the complex quantitative traits in crop plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alice Kujur; Maneesha S Saxena; Deepak Bajaj; Laxmi; Swarup K Parida

    2013-12-01

    The enormous population growth, climate change and global warming are now considered major threats to agriculture and world’s food security. To improve the productivity and sustainability of agriculture, the development of high-yielding and durable abiotic and biotic stress-tolerant cultivars and/climate resilient crops is essential. Henceforth, understanding the molecular mechanism and dissection of complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits is the prime objective in current agricultural biotechnology research. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in plant genomics and molecular breeding research pertaining to conventional and next-generation whole genome, transcriptome and epigenome sequencing efforts, generation of huge genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic resources and development of modern genomics-assisted breeding approaches in diverse crop genotypes with contrasting yield and abiotic stress tolerance traits. Unfortunately, the detailed molecular mechanism and gene regulatory networks controlling such complex quantitative traits is not yet well understood in crop plants. Therefore, we propose an integrated strategies involving available enormous and diverse traditional and modern –omics (structural, functional, comparative and epigenomics) approaches/resources and genomics-assisted breeding methods which agricultural biotechnologist can adopt/utilize to dissect and decode the molecular and gene regulatory networks involved in the complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits in crop plants. This would provide clues and much needed inputs for rapid selection of novel functionally relevant molecular tags regulating such complex traits to expedite traditional and modern marker-assisted genetic enhancement studies in target crop species for developing high-yielding stress-tolerant varieties.

  8. Quantitative trait loci analysis for leg weakness-related traits in a Duroc × Pietrain crossbred population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phatsara Chirawath

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leg weakness issues are a great concern for the pig breeding industry, especially with regard to animal welfare. Traits associated with leg weakness are partly influenced by the genetic background of the animals but the genetic basis of these traits is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting leg weakness in pigs. Methods Three hundred and ten F2 pigs from a Duroc × Pietrain resource population were genotyped using 82 genetic markers. Front and rear legs and feet scores were based on the standard scoring system. Osteochondrosis lesions were examined histologically at the head and the condylus medialis of the left femur and humerus. Bone mineral density, bone mineral content and bone mineral area were measured in the whole ulna and radius bones using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. A line-cross model was applied to determine QTL regions associated with leg weakness using the QTL Express software. Results Eleven QTL affecting leg weakness were identified on eight autosomes. All QTL reached the 5% chromosome-wide significance level. Three QTL were associated with osteochondrosis on the humerus end, two with the fore feet score and two with the rear leg score. QTL on SSC2 and SSC3 influencing bone mineral content and bone mineral density, respectively, reached the 5% genome-wide significance level. Conclusions Our results confirm previous studies and provide information on new QTL associated with leg weakness in pigs. These results contribute towards a better understanding of the genetic background of leg weakness in pigs.

  9. Identification of quantitative trait loci associated with bone traits and body weight in an F2 resource population of chickens*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiweis Melissa A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bone fractures at the end of lay are a significant problem in egg-laying strains of hens. The objective of the current study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL associated with bone mineralization and strength in a chicken resource population. Layer (White Leghorn hens and broiler (Cobb-Cobb roosters lines were crossed to generate an F2 population of 508 hens over seven hatches, and 26 traits related to bone integrity, including bone mineral density (BMD and content (BMC, were measured. Genotypes of 120 microsatellite markers on 28 autosomal groups were determined, and interval mapping was conducted to identify QTL regions. Twenty-three tests representing three chromosomal regions (chromosomes 4, 10 and 27 contained significant QTL that surpassed the 5% genome-wise threshold, and 47 tests representing 15 chromosomes identified suggestive QTL that surpassed the 5% chromosome-wise threshold. Although no significant QTL influencing BMD and BMC were detected after adjusting for variation in body weight and egg production, multiple suggestive QTL were found. These results support previous experiments demonstrating an important genetic regulation of bone strength in chickens, but suggest the regulation may be due to the effects of multiple genes that each account for relatively small amounts of variation in bone strength.

  10. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for oil content in cottonseed kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred, Quampah; Liu, Hai Ying; Xu, Hai Ming; Li, Jin Rong; Wu, Jian Guo; Zhu, Shui Jin; Shi, Chun Hai

    2012-01-01

    Oil content in cottonseed is a major quality trait which when improved through breeding could enhance the competitiveness of cottonseed oil among other vegetable oils. Cottonseed oil content is a quantitative trait controlled by genes in the tetraploid embryo and tetraploid maternal plant genomes, and the knowledge of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and the genetic effects related to oil content in both genomes could facilitate the improvement in its quality and quantity. However, till date, QTL mapping and genetic analysis related to this trait in cotton have only been conducted in the tetraploid embryo genome. In the current experiment, an IF(2) population of cottonseed kernels from the random crossing of 188 intraspecific recombinant inbred lines which were derived from the hybrid of two parents, HS46 and MARCABUCAG8US-1-88, were used to simultaneously locate QTLs for oil content in the embryo and maternal plant genomes. The four QTLs found to be associated with oil content in cottonseed were: qOC-18-1 on chromosome 18; qOC-LG-11 on linkage group 11; qOC-18-2 on chromosome 18; and qOC-22 on chromosome 22. At a high selection threshold of 0.05, there was strong evidence linking the QTLs above the oil content in cottonseed. Embryo additive and dominant effects from the tetraploid embryo genome, as well as maternal additive effects from the tetraploid maternal plant genome were found to be significant contributors to genetic variation in cottonseed oil content.

  11. Quantitative resistance can lead to evolutionary changes in traits not targeted by the resistance QTLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Femke; Lannou, Christian; Gilligan, Christopher A; van de Bosch, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the general concern in plant pathology that the introduction of quantitative resistance in the landscape can lead to increased pathogenicity. Hereto, we study the hypothetical case of a quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting on pathogen spore production per unit lesion area. To regain its original fitness, the pathogen can break the QTL, restoring its spore production capacity leading to an increased spore production per lesion. Or alternatively, it can increase its lesion size, also leading to an increased spore production per lesion. A data analysis shows that spore production per lesion (affected by the resistance QTL) and lesion size (not targeted by the QTL) are positively correlated traits, suggesting that a change in magnitude of a trait not targeted by the QTL (lesion size) might indirectly affect the targeted trait (spore production per lesion). Secondly, we model the effect of pathogen adaptation towards increased lesion size and analyse its consequences for spore production per lesion. The model calculations show that when the pathogen is unable to overcome the resistance associated QTL, it may compensate for its reduced fitness by indirect selection for increased pathogenicity on both the resistant and susceptible cultivar, but whereby the QTLs remain effective. PMID:24665339

  12. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for oil content in cottonseed kernel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quampah Alfred; Hai Ying Liu; Hai Ming Xu; Jin Rong Li; Jian Guo Wu; Shui Jin Zhu; Chun Hai Shi

    2012-12-01

    Oil content in cottonseed is a major quality trait which when improved through breeding could enhance the competitiveness of cottonseed oil among other vegetable oils. Cottonseed oil content is a quantitative trait controlled by genes in the tetraploid embryo and tetraploid maternal plant genomes, and the knowledge of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and the genetic effects related to oil content in both genomes could facilitate the improvement in its quality and quantity. However, till date, QTL mapping and genetic analysis related to this trait in cotton have only been conducted in the tetraploid embryo genome. In the current experiment, an IF2 population of cottonseed kernels from the random crossing of 188 intraspecific recombinant inbred lines which were derived from the hybrid of two parents, HS46 and MARCABUCAG8US-1-88, were used to simultaneously locate QTLs for oil content in the embryo and maternal plant genomes. The four QTLs found to be associated with oil content in cottonseed were: qOC-18-1 on chromosome 18; qOC-LG-11 on linkage group 11; qOC-18-2 on chromosome 18; and qOC-22 on chromosome 22. At a high selection threshold of 0.05, there was strong evidence linking the QTLs above the oil content in cottonseed. Embryo additive and dominant effects from the tetraploid embryo genome, as well as maternal additive effects from the tetraploid maternal plant genome were found to be significant contributors to genetic variation in cottonseed oil content.

  13. Comparative mapping reveals quantitative trait loci that affect spawning time in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Araneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spawning time in salmonids is a sex-limited quantitative trait that can be modified by selection. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, various quantitative trait loci (QTL that affect the expression of this trait have been discovered. In this study, we describe four microsatellite loci associated with two possible spawning time QTL regions in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch. The four loci were identified in females from two populations (early and late spawners produced by divergent selection from the same base population. Three of the loci (OmyFGT34TUF, One2ASC and One19ASC that were strongly associated with spawning time in coho salmon (p < 0.0002 were previously associated with QTL for the same trait in rainbow trout; a fourth loci (Oki10 with a suggestive association (p = 0.00035 mapped 10 cM from locus OmyFGT34TUF in rainbow trout. The changes in allelic frequency observed after three generations of selection were greater than expected because of genetic drift. This work shows that comparing information from closely-related species is a valid strategy for identifying QTLs for marker-assisted selection in species whose genomes are poorly characterized or lack a saturated genetic map.

  14. Quantitative resistance can lead to evolutionary changes in traits not targeted by the resistance QTLs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Femke; Lannou, Christian; Gilligan, Christopher A; van de Bosch, Frank

    2014-03-01

    This paper addresses the general concern in plant pathology that the introduction of quantitative resistance in the landscape can lead to increased pathogenicity. Hereto, we study the hypothetical case of a quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting on pathogen spore production per unit lesion area. To regain its original fitness, the pathogen can break the QTL, restoring its spore production capacity leading to an increased spore production per lesion. Or alternatively, it can increase its lesion size, also leading to an increased spore production per lesion. A data analysis shows that spore production per lesion (affected by the resistance QTL) and lesion size (not targeted by the QTL) are positively correlated traits, suggesting that a change in magnitude of a trait not targeted by the QTL (lesion size) might indirectly affect the targeted trait (spore production per lesion). Secondly, we model the effect of pathogen adaptation towards increased lesion size and analyse its consequences for spore production per lesion. The model calculations show that when the pathogen is unable to overcome the resistance associated QTL, it may compensate for its reduced fitness by indirect selection for increased pathogenicity on both the resistant and susceptible cultivar, but whereby the QTLs remain effective.

  15. Identification of quantitative trait loci for growth and carcass composition in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, E; Keele, J W; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M; Stone, R T

    2004-02-01

    A genomic screening to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting growth, carcass composition and meat quality traits was pursued. Two hundred nineteen microsatellite markers were genotyped on 176 of 620 (28%) progeny from a Brahman x Angus sire mated to mostly MARC III dams. Selective genotyping, based on retail product yield (%) and fat yield (%), was used to select individuals to be genotyped. Traits included in the study were birth weight (kg), hot carcass weight (kg), retail product yield, fat yield, marbling score (400 = slight00 and 500 = small00), USDA yield grade, and estimated kidney, heart and pelvic fat (%). The QTL were classified as significant when the expected number of false positives (ENFP) was less than 0.05 (F-statistic greater than 17.3), and suggestive when the ENFP was carcass weight at 49 cM, and for estimated kidney, heart and pelvic fat at 62 cM on chromosome 16, and for fat yield at 35 cM on chromosome 17. Two suggestive QTL for birth weight were identified, one at 12 cM on chromosome 20 and the other at 56 cM on chromosome 21. An additional suggestive QTL was detected for retail product yield, for fat yield, and for USDA yield grade at 26 cM on chromosome 26. Results presented here represent the initial search for quantitative trait loci in this family. Validation of detected QTL in other populations will be necessary.

  16. The F7 gene and clotting factor VII levels: dissection of a human quantitative trait locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Jose Manuel; Almasy, Laura; Souto, Juan Carlos; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Blangero, John

    2005-10-01

    Localization of human quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is now routine. However, identifying their functional DNA variants is still a formidable challenge. We present a complete dissection of a human QTL using novel statistical techniques to infer the most likely functional polymorphisms of a QTL that influence plasma levels of clotting factor VII (FVII), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Resequencing of 15 kb in and around the F7 gene identified 49 polymorphisms, which were then genotyped in 398 people. Using a Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide (BQTN) method, we identified four to seven functional variants that completely account for this QTL. These variants include both rare coding variants and more common, potentially regulatory polymorphisms in intronic and promoter regions.

  17. Slow erosion of a quantitative apple resistance to Venturia inaequalis based on an isolate-specific Quantitative Trait Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffier, Valérie; Le Cam, Bruno; Al Rifaï, Mehdi; Bellanger, Marie-Noëlle; Comby, Morgane; Denancé, Caroline; Didelot, Frédérique; Expert, Pascale; Kerdraon, Tifenn; Lemarquand, Arnaud; Ravon, Elisa; Durel, Charles-Eric

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative plant resistance affects the aggressiveness of pathogens and is usually considered more durable than qualitative resistance. However, the efficiency of a quantitative resistance based on an isolate-specific Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) is expected to decrease over time due to the selection of isolates with a high level of aggressiveness on resistant plants. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed scab incidence over an eight-year period in an orchard planted with susceptible and quantitatively resistant apple genotypes. We sampled 79 Venturia inaequalis isolates from this orchard at three dates and we tested their level of aggressiveness under controlled conditions. Isolates sampled on resistant genotypes triggered higher lesion density and exhibited a higher sporulation rate on apple carrying the resistance allele of the QTL T1 compared to isolates sampled on susceptible genotypes. Due to this ability to select aggressive isolates, we expected the QTL T1 to be non-durable. However, our results showed that the quantitative resistance based on the QTL T1 remained efficient in orchard over an eight-year period, with only a slow decrease in efficiency and no detectable increase of the aggressiveness of fungal isolates over time. We conclude that knowledge on the specificity of a QTL is not sufficient to evaluate its durability. Deciphering molecular mechanisms associated with resistance QTLs, genetic determinants of aggressiveness and putative trade-offs within pathogen populations is needed to help in understanding the erosion processes.

  18. Quantitative trait locus-specific genotype × alcoholism interaction on linkage for evoked electroencephalogram oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Williams Jeff T; Avery Christy L; Martin Lisa J; North Kari E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract We explored the evidence for a quantitative trait locus (QTL)-specific genotype × alcoholism interaction for an evoked electroencephalogram theta band oscillation (ERP) phenotype on a region of chromosome 7 in participants of the US Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Among 901 participants with both genotype and phenotype data available, we performed variance component linkage analysis (SOLAR version 2.1.2) in the full sample and stratified by DSM-III-R and Feighner-d...

  19. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci for milk production in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateescu, R G; Thonney, M L

    2010-10-01

    A backcross pedigree using dairy East Friesian rams and non-dairy Dorset ewes was established specifically to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting milk production in sheep. Ninety nine microsatellite markers of an initial set of 120 were successfully genotyped and informative on 188 animals of this backcross pedigree. Test-day milk records on individual ewes were used to estimate several milk yield related traits, including peak milk yield and cumulative milk yield to 50 (MY50), 100 (MY100) and 250 days (MY250). These traits, as well as estimated breeding value of backcross ewes extracted from the genetic evaluation file of the entire flock, were used in interval mapping. Ovine chromosomes 2, 12, 18, 20 and 24 were identified to harbour putative QTL for different measures of milk production. The QTL on Ovis aries chromosomes (OAR) 2 and 20 mapped to locations where similar trait QTL have already been mapped in other studies, whereas QTL on OAR 12, 18 and 24 were unique to our backcross pedigree and have not been reported previously. In addition, all identified QTL regions were syntenic with bovine chromosomal segments revealed to harbour QTL affecting milk production traits, providing supporting evidence for the QTL identified here.

  20. Allelic variations and differential expressions detected at quantitative trait loci for salt stress tolerance in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyiga, Benedict C; Sharma, Ram C; Baum, Michael; Ogbonnaya, Francis C; Léon, Jens; Ballvora, Agim

    2017-01-03

    The increasing salinization of agricultural lands is a threat to global wheat production. Understanding of the mechanistic basis of salt tolerance (ST) is essential for developing breeding and selection strategies that would allow for increased wheat production under saline conditions to meet the increasing global demand. We used a set that consists of 150 internationally derived winter and facultative wheat cultivars genotyped with a 90K SNP chip and phenotyped for ST across three growth stages and for ionic (leaf K(+) and Na(+)  contents) traits to dissect the genetic architecture regulating ST in wheat. Genome-wide association mapping revealed 187 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNPs) (R(2)  = 3.00-30.67%), representing 37 quantitative trait loci (QTL), significantly associated with the ST traits. Of these, four QTL on 1BS, 2AL, 2BS and 3AL were associated with ST across the three growth stages and with the ionic traits. Novel QTL were also detected on 1BS and 1DL. Candidate genes linked to these polymorphisms were uncovered, and expression analyses were performed and validated on them under saline and non-saline conditions using transcriptomics and qRT-PCR data. Expressed sequence comparisons in contrasting ST wheat genotypes identified several non-synonymous/missense mutation sites that are contributory to the ST trait variations, indicating the biological relevance of these polymorphisms that can be exploited in breeding for ST in wheat. © 2017 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genetic Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Contents of Mineral Nutrients in Rice Grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Luisa Garcia-Oliveira; Lubin Tan; Yongcai Fu; Chuanqing Sun

    2009-01-01

    In present study, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ca, Mg, P and K contents of 85 Introgression linee (ILs) derived from a cross between an elite indica cultivar Teqing and the wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) were measured by inductively coupled argon plasma (ICAP) spectrometry. Substantial variation was observed for all traits and most of the mineral elements were significantly positive correlated or independent except for Fe with Cu. A total of 31 putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected for these eight mineral elements by single point analysis. Wild rice (O. rufipogon) contributed favorable alleles for most of the QTLs (26 QTLs), and chromosomes 1, 9 and 12 exhibited 14 QTLs (45%) for these traits. One major effect of QTL for zinc content accounted for the largest proportion of phenotypic variation (11%-19%) was detected near the simple sequence repeats marker RM152 on chromosome 8. The co-locations of QTLs for some mineral elements observed in this mapping population suggested the relationship was at a molecular level among these traits and could be helpful for simultaneous improvement of these traits in rice grain by marker assisted selection.

  2. Detection of multiple quantitative trait loci and their pleiotropic effects in outbred pig populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pong-Wong Ricardo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simultaneous detection of multiple QTLs (quantitative trait loci may allow more accurate estimation of genetic effects. We have analyzed outbred commercial pig populations with different single and multiple models to clarify their genetic properties and in addition, we have investigated pleiotropy among growth and obesity traits based on allelic correlation within a gamete. Methods Three closed populations, (A 427 individuals from a Yorkshire and Large White synthetic breed, (B 547 Large White individuals and (C 531 Large White individuals, were analyzed using a variance component method with one-QTL and two-QTL models. Six markers on chromosome 4 and five to seven markers on chromosome 7 were used. Results Population A displayed a high test statistic for the fat trait when applying the two-QTL model with two positions on two chromosomes. The estimated heritabilities for polygenic effects and for the first and second QTL were 19%, 17% and 21%, respectively. The high correlation of the estimated allelic effect on the same gamete and QTL test statistics suggested that the two separate QTL which were detected on different chromosomes both have pleiotropic effects on the two fat traits. Analysis of population B using the one-QTL model for three fat traits found a similar peak position on chromosome 7. Allelic effects of three fat traits from the same gamete were highly correlated suggesting the presence of a pleiotropic QTL. In population C, three growth traits also displayed similar peak positions on chromosome 7 and allelic effects from the same gamete were correlated. Conclusion Detection of the second QTL in a model reduced the polygenic heritability and should improve accuracy of estimated heritabilities for both QTLs.

  3. Species traits and local abundance affect bird-window collision frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Wittig

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on bird-window collisions have generally drawn inferences about species' differential vulnerability from collision tallies. However, this common methodology is potentially biased because the number of collisions may simply reflect prevalence of species at the study site rather than species-specific vulnerability. Building on recent studies of abundance and collision rates, we offered a complementary methodology based on point count data that could be widely applied alongside carcass surveys. Additionally, we broadened our analysis beyond previously applied taxonomic and migratory classifications to include functional classifications of feeding guild, breeding status, and synanthropy. Our null hypothesis was that collision frequencies reflect a species' or classification group's prevalence at study sites. To test this possibility, we used collision data collected at three sites in the Research Triangle Area of North Carolina, United States. At one of these sites, Duke University's Main Campus, we also gathered relative abundances from the local bird community to develop a case study assessment of how background prevalence compared to number of collisions. Using the larger, three-site dataset, we developed an initial picture of collision susceptibility based solely on frequency, the standard practice. Then, by bootstrapping our Duke abundance data, we generated confidence intervals that simulated collision based on chance versus prevalence. We identified several instances where collision tallies produced misleading perception of species-specific vulnerability. In the most extreme case, frequencies from our Triangle Area dataset indicated locally breeding species were highly vulnerable to collisions while our abundance-based case study suggested this same group was actually adept at avoiding collisions. Through our case study, we also found that foliage gleaning was linked to increased risk, and omnivory and ground foraging were associated

  4. Variation in Plant Traits Explains Global Biogeographic Variation in the Abundance of Major Forest Functional Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Contrasting leaf types (needle vs. broadleaf) with different lifespans (annual vs. perennial) represent different adaptive strategies of plants under different environmental conditions. Previous studies explained adaptive advantages of different strategies using empirical models but cannot adequately explain the co-dominance of multiple plant functional types (PFTs) as observed in many parts of the world. Here we used a process-based model to explore whether observed inter- and intra-PFT variation in key plant traits can explain global biogeographic variation in co-dominance of major forest functional types. Using a parameter screening method, we identified the four most important plant traits for simulating annual net primary production (NPP) using the Australian Community Atmosphere-Biosphere-Land Exchange model (CABLE). Using ensemble CABLE simulations, we estimated the fraction of global land cover attributed to each PFT by comparing the simulated NPP for all three PFTs at each land point, globally. Our results were consistent with land area cover fractions of major forest types estimated from remote sensing data products; i.e., evergreen needle-leaf forests dominate in boreal regions, evergreen broadleaf forests dominate in tropical regions, and deciduous broadleaf forests are distributed widely across a broad range of environmental conditions. More importantly our approach successfully explained a paradox that has puzzled ecologists for over a century: why evergreen leaf types dominate in both boreal and tropical regions. We conclude that variation in and co-variation between key plant traits can explain significant fractions of global biogeographic variation of three major forest types, and should be taken into account when simulating global vegetation dynamics.

  5. Meta-analysis of results from quantitative trait loci mapping studies on pig chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, K M; Bastiaansen, J W M; Knol, E F; Merks, J W M; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F; van Arendonk, J A M

    2011-06-01

    Meta-analysis of results from multiple studies could lead to more precise quantitative trait loci (QTL) position estimates compared to the individual experiments. As the raw data from many different studies are not readily available, the use of results from published articles may be helpful. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of QTL on chromosome 4 in pig, using data from 25 separate experiments. First, a meta-analysis was performed for individual traits: average daily gain and backfat thickness. Second, a meta-analysis was performed for the QTL of three traits affecting loin yield: loin eye area, carcass length and loin meat weight. Third, 78 QTL were selected from 20 traits that could be assigned to one of three broad categories: carcass, fatness or growth traits. For each analysis, the number of identified meta-QTL was smaller than the number of initial QTL. The reduction in the number of QTL ranged from 71% to 86% compared to the total number before the meta-analysis. In addition, the meta-analysis reduced the QTL confidence intervals by as much as 85% compared to individual QTL estimates. The reduction in the confidence interval was greater when a large number of independent QTL was included in the meta-analysis. Meta-QTL related to growth and fatness were found in the same region as the FAT1 region. Results indicate that the meta-analysis is an efficient strategy to estimate the number and refine the positions of QTL when QTL estimates are available from multiple populations and experiments. This strategy can be used to better target further studies such as the selection of candidate genes related to trait variation.

  6. Detection of quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 1,2,3,12,14,15, X in pigs: performance characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paixao, D.M.; Carneiro, P.L.S.; Paiva, S.R.; Sousa, K.R.S.; Verardo, L.L.; Braccini Neto, J.; Pinto, A.P.G.; Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Nascimento, C.; Périssé, I.V.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, S.E.F.

    2013-01-01

    The accomplishment of the present study had the objective of mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) related to performance traits in a F2 pig population developed by mating two Brazilian Piau breed sires with 18 dams from a commercial line (Landrace × Large White × Pietrain). The linkage map for this

  7. Detection of quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 1,2,3,12,14,15, X in pigs: performance characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paixao, D.M.; Carneiro, P.L.S.; Paiva, S.R.; Sousa, K.R.S.; Verardo, L.L.; Braccini Neto, J.; Pinto, A.P.G.; Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Nascimento, C.; Périssé, I.V.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, S.E.F.

    2013-01-01

    The accomplishment of the present study had the objective of mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) related to performance traits in a F2 pig population developed by mating two Brazilian Piau breed sires with 18 dams from a commercial line (Landrace × Large White × Pietrain). The linkage map for this

  8. DRIFTSEL: an R package for detecting signals of natural selection in quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhunen, M; Merilä, J; Leinonen, T; Cano, J M; Ovaskainen, O

    2013-07-01

    Approaches and tools to differentiate between natural selection and genetic drift as causes of population differentiation are of frequent demand in evolutionary biology. Based on the approach of Ovaskainen et al. (2011), we have developed an R package (DRIFTSEL) that can be used to differentiate between stabilizing selection, diversifying selection and random genetic drift as causes of population differentiation in quantitative traits when neutral marker and quantitative genetic data are available. Apart from illustrating the use of this method and the interpretation of results using simulated data, we apply the package on data from three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to highlight its virtues. DRIFTSEL can also be used to perform usual quantitative genetic analyses in common-garden study designs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A comprehensive collection of experimentally validated primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction quantitation of murine transcript abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaowei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR is a widely applied analytical method for the accurate determination of transcript abundance. Primers for QPCR have been designed on a genomic scale but non-specific amplification of non-target genes has frequently been a problem. Although several online databases have been created for the storage and retrieval of experimentally validated primers, only a few thousand primer pairs are currently present in existing databases and the primers are not designed for use under a common PCR thermal profile. Results We previously reported the implementation of an algorithm to predict PCR primers for most known human and mouse genes. We now report the use of that resource to identify 17483 pairs of primers that have been experimentally verified to amplify unique sequences corresponding to distinct murine transcripts. The primer pairs have been validated by gel electrophoresis, DNA sequence analysis and thermal denaturation profile. In addition to the validation studies, we have determined the uniformity of amplification using the primers and the technical reproducibility of the QPCR reaction using the popular and inexpensive SYBR Green I detection method. Conclusion We have identified an experimentally validated collection of murine primer pairs for PCR and QPCR which can be used under a common PCR thermal profile, allowing the evaluation of transcript abundance of a large number of genes in parallel. This feature is increasingly attractive for confirming and/or making more precise data trends observed from experiments performed with DNA microarrays.

  10. Quantitative trait variation is revealed in a novel hypomethylated population of woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jihua; Tanino, Karen K; Horner, Kyla N; Robinson, Stephen J

    2016-11-04

    Phenotypic variation is determined by a combination of genotype, environment and their interactions. The realization that allelic diversity can be both genetic and epigenetic allows the environmental component to be further separated. Partitioning phenotypic variation observed among inbred lines with an altered epigenome can allow the epigenetic component controlling quantitative traits to be estimated. To assess the contribution of epialleles on phenotypic variation and determine the fidelity with which epialleles are inherited, we have developed a novel hypomethylated population of strawberry (2n = 2x = 14) using 5-azacytidine from which individuals with altered phenotypes can be identified, selected and characterized. The hypomethylated population was generated using an inbred strawberry population in the F. vesca ssp. vesca accession Hawaii 4. Analysis of whole genome sequence data from control and hypomethylated lines indicate that 5-azacytidine exposure does not increase SNP above background levels. The populations contained only Hawaii 4 alleles, removing introgression of alternate F. vesca alleles as a potential source of variation. Although genome sequencing and genetic marker data are unable to rule out 5-azacytidine induced chromosomal rearrangements as a potential source of the trait variation observed, none were detected in our survey. Quantitative trait variation focusing on flowering time and rosette diameter was scored in control and treated populations where expanded levels of variation were observed among the hypomethylated lines. Methylation sensitive molecular markers indicated that 5-azacytidine induced alterations in DNA methylation patterns and inheritance of methylation patterns were confirmed by bisulfite sequencing of targeted regions. It is possible that methylation polymorphisms might underlie or have induced genetic changes underlying the observable differences in quantitative phenotypes. This population developed in a uniform

  11. Large-scale in silico mapping of complex quantitative traits in inbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyuan Liu

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic basis of common disease and disease-related quantitative traits will aid in the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. The processs of gene discovery can be sped up by rapid and effective integration of well-defined mouse genome and phenome data resources. We describe here an in silico gene-discovery strategy through genome-wide association (GWA scans in inbred mice with a wide range of genetic variation. We identified 937 quantitative trait loci (QTLs from a survey of 173 mouse phenotypes, which include models of human disease (atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, cancer and obesity as well as behavioral, hematological, immunological, metabolic, and neurological traits. 67% of QTLs were refined into genomic regions <0.5 Mb with approximately 40-fold increase in mapping precision as compared with classical linkage analysis. This makes for more efficient identification of the genes that underlie disease. We have identified two QTL genes, Adam12 and Cdh2, as causal genetic variants for atherogenic diet-induced obesity. Our findings demonstrate that GWA analysis in mice has the potential to resolve multiple tightly linked QTLs and achieve single-gene resolution. These high-resolution QTL data can serve as a primary resource for positional cloning and gene identification in the research community.

  12. Familial aggregation of quantitative autistic traits in multiplex versus simplex autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkud, Yamini V; Todd, Richard D; Abbacchi, Anna M; Zhang, Yi; Constantino, John N

    2009-04-05

    Recent research has suggested that the mode of inheritance for simplex autism (SA, one individual in the family affected) may be distinct from that for multiplex autism (MA, two or more individuals affected). Since sub clinical autistic traits have been observed in "unaffected" relatives of children with autism, we explored whether the distributions of such traits in families supported differential modes of genetic transmission for SA and MA autism. We measured patterns of familial aggregation of quantitative autistic traits (QAT) in children and parents in 80 SA families and 210 MA families, using the Social Responsiveness Scale. When considering all SA and MA siblings who scored below a uniform quantitative (clinical-level) severity threshold, MA brothers exhibited a distinct pathological shift in the distribution, compared to SA brothers (P level of concordant elevation among spousal pairs in this volunteer sample. Among male first degree relatives, there exist distinct patterns of QAT manifestation for simplex versus multiplex autism. These findings are consistent with the results of molecular genetic studies that have suggested differential modes of intergenerational transmission for SA and MA. Characterization of QAT and other endophenotypes among close relatives may be useful for reducing sample heterogeneity in future genetic and neurobiologic studies of autism.

  13. Genetic influences on type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome related quantitative traits in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Jeremy B; Diego, Vincent P; Kotea, Navaratnam; Kowlessur, Sudhir; Chitson, Pierrot; Dyer, Thomas D; Zimmet, Paul; Blangero, John

    2009-02-01

    Epidemiological studies report a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome in the island nation of Mauritius. The Mauritius Family Study was initiated to examine heritable factors that contribute to these high rates of prevalence and consists of 400 individuals in 24 large extended multigenerational pedigrees. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements relating to the metabolic syndrome were undertaken in addition to family and lifestyle based information for each individual. Variance components methods were used to determine the heritability of the type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome related quantitative traits. The cohort was made up of 218 females (55%) and 182 males with 22% diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and a further 30% having impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. Notably BMI was not significantly increased in those with type 2 diabetes (P= .12), however a significant increase in waist circumference was observed in these groups (P= .02). The heritable proportion of trait variance was substantial and greater than values previously published for hip circumference, LDL and total cholesterol, diastolic and systolic blood pressure and serum creatinine. Height, weight and BMI heritabilities were all in the upper range of those previously reported. The phenotypic characteristics of the Mauritius family cohort are similar to those previously reported in the Mauritian population with a high observed prevalence rate of type 2 diabetes. A high heritability for key type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome related phenotypes (range 0.23 to 0.68), suggest the cohort will have utility in identifying genes that influence these quantitative traits.

  14. Growth mixture modeling as an exploratory analysis tool in longitudinal quantitative trait loci analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su-Wei; Choi, Seung Hoan; Li, Ke; Fleur, Rose Saint; Huang, Chengrui; Shen, Tong; Ahn, Kwangmi; Gordon, Derek; Kim, Wonkuk; Wu, Rongling; Mendell, Nancy R; Finch, Stephen J

    2009-12-15

    We examined the properties of growth mixture modeling in finding longitudinal quantitative trait loci in a genome-wide association study. Two software packages are commonly used in these analyses: Mplus and the SAS TRAJ procedure. We analyzed the 200 replicates of the simulated data with these programs using three tests: the likelihood-ratio test statistic, a direct test of genetic model coefficients, and the chi-square test classifying subjects based on the trajectory model's posterior Bayesian probability. The Mplus program was not effective in this application due to its computational demands. The distributions of these tests applied to genes not related to the trait were sensitive to departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The likelihood-ratio test statistic was not usable in this application because its distribution was far from the expected asymptotic distributions when applied to markers with no genetic relation to the quantitative trait. The other two tests were satisfactory. Power was still substantial when we used markers near the gene rather than the gene itself. That is, growth mixture modeling may be useful in genome-wide association studies. For markers near the actual gene, there was somewhat greater power for the direct test of the coefficients and lesser power for the posterior Bayesian probability chi-square test.

  15. Identification of donor lines containing favorable alleles for quantitative traits in Burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-adapted local lines might be used as donors to improve existing commercial hybrids. The objective of this study was to identify the best burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. line among a group of four lines (SA 130, Bols 334, Barlej T and TN 90 from germplasm collection, for improving an elite single hybrid Bols 335 x TN 86. Values of three quantitative traits (number of leaves, total leaf area and leaf yield were measured in two-year field experiments. Evaluation of donor lines as sources of new favorable alleles not present in the elite hybrid parent lines was conducted. According to Dudley (1984, 1987 the most significant class for improving quantitative traits is locus class G. Donor line TN 90 had positive values of the parameter μG for number of leaves and for total leaf area. Studied donor lines could not be use directly as the source of new alleles for the improvement of leaf yield in elite hybrid. The improvement of leaf yield in tobacco hybrid Bols 335 x TN 86 would be conducted indirectly via back crossing (TN 86 x TN 90 x TN 86. Significance of GxE interaction for studied traits indicates the same breeding method would be effective in broad range of environmental conditions.

  16. Joint Analysis Method for Major Genes Controlling Multiple Correlated Quantitative Traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the major gene and polygene mixed inheritance model for multiple correlated quantitative traits, the authors proposed a new joint segregation analysis method of major gene controlling multiple correlated quantitative traits, which include major gene detection and its effect and variation estimation. The effect and variation of major gene are estimated by the maximum likelihood method implemented via expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Major gene is tested with the likelihood ratio (LR) test statistic. Extensive simulation studies showed that joint analysis not only increases the statistical power of major gene detection but also improves the precision and accuracy of major gene effect estimates. An example of the plant height and the number of tiller of F2 population in rice cross Duonieai × Zhonghua 11 was used in the illustration. The results indicated that the genetic difference of these two traits in this cross refers to only one pleiotropic major gene. The additive effect and dominance effect of the major gene are estimated as -21.3 and 40.6 cm on plant height, and 22.7 and -25.3 on number of tiller, respectively. The major gene shows overdominance for plant height and close to complete dominance for number of tillers.

  17. Bayesian model choice and search strategies for mapping interacting quantitative trait Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Allison, David B

    2003-01-01

    Most complex traits of animals, plants, and humans are influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Interactions among multiple genes play fundamental roles in the genetic control and evolution of complex traits. Statistical modeling of interaction effects in quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis must accommodate a very large number of potential genetic effects, which presents a major challenge to determining the genetic model with respect to the number of QTL, their positions, and their genetic effects. In this study, we use the methodology of Bayesian model and variable selection to develop strategies for identifying multiple QTL with complex epistatic patterns in experimental designs with two segregating genotypes. Specifically, we develop a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to determine the number of QTL and to select main and epistatic effects. With the proposed method, we can jointly infer the genetic model of a complex trait and the associated genetic parameters, including the number, positions, and main and epistatic effects of the identified QTL. Our method can map a large number of QTL with any combination of main and epistatic effects. Utility and flexibility of the method are demonstrated using both simulated data and a real data set. Sensitivity of posterior inference to prior specifications of the number and genetic effects of QTL is investigated. PMID:14573494

  18. Fine mapping of multiple interacting quantitative trait loci using combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) and their additive, dominance and epistatic effects play a critical role in complex trait variation. It is often infeasible to detect multiple interacting QTL due to main effects often being confounded by interaction effects.Positioning interacting QTL within a small region is even more difficult. We present a variance component approach nested in an empirical Bayesian method, which simultaneously takes into account additive, dominance and epistatic effects due to multiple interacting QTL. The covariance structure used in the variance component approach is based on combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage (LDL) information. In a simulation study where there are complex epistatic interactions between QTL, it is possible to simultaneously fine map interacting QTL using the proposed approach. The present method combined with LDL information can efficiently detect QTL and their dominance and epistatic effects, making it possible to simultaneously fine map main and epistatic QTL.

  19. Identification of quantitative trait loci associated with salt tolerance at seedling stage from Oryza rufipogon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Tian; Lubin Tan; Fengxia Liu; Hongwei Cai; Chuanqing Sun

    2011-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant growth and crop production.In the present study,salt tolerance at rice seedling stage was evaluated using 87 introgression lines (ILs),which were derived from a cross between an elite indica cultivar Teqing and an accession of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).Substantial variation was observed for four traits including salt tolerance score (STS),relative root dry weight (RRW),relative shoot dry weight (RSW) and relative total dry weight (RTW).STS was significantly positively correlated with all other three traits.A total of 15 putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with these four traits were detected using single-point analysis,which were located on chromosomes 1,2,3,6,7,9 and 10 with 8%-26% explaining the phenotypic variance.The O.rufipogon-derived alleles at 13 QTLs (86.7%) could improve the salt tolerance in the Teqing background.Four QTL clusters affecting RRW,RSW and RTW were found on chromosomes 6,7,9 and 10,respectively.Among these four QTL clusters,a major cluster including three QTLs (qRRW10,qRSW10 and qRTW10) was found near the maker RM271 on the long arm of chromosome 10,and the O.rufipogon-derived alleles at these three loci increased RRW,RSW and RTW with additive effects of 22.7%,17.3% and 18.5%,respectively,while the phenotypic variance explained by these three individual QTLs for the three traits varied from 19% to 26%.In addition,several salt tolerant ILs were selected and could be used for identifying and utilizing favorable salt tolerant genes from common wild rice and used in the salt tolerant rice breeding program.

  20. Quantitative trait loci controlling cyanogenic glucoside and dry matter content in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyejusa Kizito, Elizabeth; Rönnberg-Wästljung, Ann-Christin; Egwang, Thomas; Gullberg, Urban; Fregene, Martin; Westerbergh, Anna

    2007-09-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a starchy root crop grown in the tropics mainly by small-scale farmers even though agro-industrial processing is rapidly increasing. For this processing market improved varieties with high dry matter root content (DMC) is required. Potentially toxic cyanogenic glucosides are synthesized in the leaves and translocated to the roots. Selection for varieties with low cyanogenic glucoside potential (CNP) and high DMC is among the principal objectives in cassava breeding programs. However, these traits are highly influenced by the environmental conditions and the genetic control of these traits is not well understood. An S(1) population derived from a cross between two bred cassava varieties (MCOL 1684 and Rayong 1) that differ in CNP and DMC was used to study the heritability and genetic basis of these traits. A broad-sense heritability of 0.43 and 0.42 was found for CNP and DMC, respectively. The moderate heritabilities for DMC and CNP indicate that the phenotypic variation of these traits is explained by a genetic component. We found two quantitative trait loci (QTL) on two different linkage groups controlling CNP and six QTL on four different linkage groups controlling DMC. One QTL for CNP and one QTL for DMC mapped near each other, suggesting pleiotrophy and/or linkage of QTL. The two QTL for CNP showed additive effects while the six QTL for DMC showed additive effect, dominance or overdominance. This study is a first step towards developing molecular marker tools for efficient breeding of CNP and DMC in cassava.

  1. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  2. Comparative mapping of Raphanus sativus genome using Brassica markers and quantitative trait loci analysis for the Fusarium wilt resistance trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaona; Choi, Su Ryun; Ramchiary, Nirala; Miao, Xinyang; Lee, Su Hee; Sun, Hae Jeong; Kim, Sunggil; Ahn, Chun Hee; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2013-10-01

    Fusarium wilt (FW), caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a serious disease in cruciferous plants, including the radish (Raphanus sativus). To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) or gene(s) conferring resistance to FW, we constructed a genetic map of R. sativus using an F2 mapping population derived by crossing the inbred lines '835' (susceptible) and 'B2' (resistant). A total of 220 markers distributed in 9 linkage groups (LGs) were mapped in the Raphanus genome, covering a distance of 1,041.5 cM with an average distance between adjacent markers of 4.7 cM. Comparative analysis of the R. sativus genome with that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa revealed 21 and 22 conserved syntenic regions, respectively. QTL mapping detected a total of 8 loci conferring FW resistance that were distributed on 4 LGs, namely, 2, 3, 6, and 7 of the Raphanus genome. Of the detected QTL, 3 QTLs (2 on LG 3 and 1 on LG 7) were constitutively detected throughout the 2-year experiment. QTL analysis of LG 3, flanked by ACMP0609 and cnu_mBRPGM0085, showed a comparatively higher logarithm of the odds (LOD) value and percentage of phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis using the linked markers to this QTL showed homology to A. thaliana chromosome 3, which contains disease-resistance gene clusters, suggesting conservation of resistance genes between them.

  3. Phylogenetic ANOVA: The Expression Variance and Evolution Model for Quantitative Trait Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs, Rori V; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2015-09-01

    A number of methods have been developed for modeling the evolution of a quantitative trait on a phylogeny. These methods have received renewed interest in the context of genome-wide studies of gene expression, in which the expression levels of many genes can be modeled as quantitative traits. We here develop a new method for joint analyses of quantitative traits within- and between species, the Expression Variance and Evolution (EVE) model. The model parameterizes the ratio of population to evolutionary expression variance, facilitating a wide variety of analyses, including a test for lineage-specific shifts in expression level, and a phylogenetic ANOVA that can detect genes with increased or decreased ratios of expression divergence to diversity, analogous to the famous Hudson Kreitman Aguadé (HKA) test used to detect selection at the DNA level. We use simulations to explore the properties of these tests under a variety of circumstances and show that the phylogenetic ANOVA is more accurate than the standard ANOVA (no accounting for phylogeny) sometimes used in transcriptomics. We then apply the EVE model to a mammalian phylogeny of 15 species typed for expression levels in liver tissue. We identify genes with high expression divergence between species as candidates for expression level adaptation, and genes with high expression diversity within species as candidates for expression level conservation and/or plasticity. Using the test for lineage-specific expression shifts, we identify several candidate genes for expression level adaptation on the catarrhine and human lineages, including genes putatively related to dietary changes in humans. We compare these results to those reported previously using a model which ignores expression variance within species, uncovering important differences in performance. We demonstrate the necessity for a phylogenetic model in comparative expression studies and show the utility of the EVE model to detect expression divergence

  4. Design database for quantitative trait loci (QTL) data warehouse, data mining, and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi-Liang; Reecy, James M; Wu, Xiao-Lin

    2012-01-01

    A database can be used to warehouse quantitative trait loci (QTL) data from multiple sources for comparison, genomic data mining, and meta-analysis. A robust database design involves sound data structure logistics, meaningful data transformations, normalization, and proper user interface designs. This chapter starts with a brief review of relational database basics and concentrates on issues associated with curation of QTL data into a relational database, with emphasis on the principles of data normalization and structure optimization. In addition, some simple examples of QTL data mining and meta-analysis are included. These examples are provided to help readers better understand the potential and importance of sound database design.

  5. [The study of tomato fruit weight quantitative trait locus and its application in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan

    2015-08-01

    The classical research cases, which have greatly promoted the development of genetics in history, can be combined with the content of courses in genetics teaching to train students' ability of scientific thinking and genetic analysis. The localization and clone of gene controlling tomato fruit weight is a pioneer work in quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies and represents a complete process of QTL research in plants. Application of this integrated case in genetics teaching, which showed a wonderful process of scientific discovery and the fascination of genetic research, has inspired students' interest in genetics and achieved a good teaching effect.

  6. [Seasonal dynamics of quantitative and morphological traits of poplar fine roots and their differences between successive rotation plantations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-ping; Xu, Tan; Zhu, Wan-rui; Wang, Qi-tong; Liu, Meng-ling; Wang, Hua-tian; Li, Chuan-rong; Dong, Yu-feng

    2016-02-01

    Based on the fine root samples of the first and second generations of poplar (Populus x euramericana ' Neva'), this study examined the response of quantitative and morphological traits of fine roots of different orders and the difference between generations. The results showed that, the quantitative traits of fine roots, such as root length, root surface area and root biomass, presented obvious seasonal variation, and the fine root traits had obvious difference among root orders. The quantitative traits of lower-order fine roots showed significant seasonal difference, and the fine root biomass increased in the growing season and then decreased significantly. The specific root length (SRL) of higher-order roots also showed significant change with season, while the root length density (RLD) and root tissue density (RTD) changed a little. The successive rotation resulted in the significant increase of root length, root biomass, SRL and RLD of 1-2 orders in the growing season. The quantitative traits of first order root significantly positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture, and significantly negatively correlated with the soil organic matter and soil available nitrogen content. However, the quantitative traits of second order root only showed significant correlation with soil nutrient content. The seasonal dynamics of poplar fine roots and the difference between successive rotation plantations implied carbon investment change of poplar to roots. Soil nutrient deficiency induced more carbon investment into roots, and this carbon allocation pattern might affect the aboveground productivity of poplar plantation.

  7. A quantitative review of pollination syndromes: do floral traits predict effective pollinators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Guerrero, Víctor; Aguilar, Ramiro; Martén-Rodríguez, Silvana; Ashworth, Lorena; Lopezaraiza-Mikel, Martha; Bastida, Jesús M; Quesada, Mauricio

    2014-03-01

    The idea of pollination syndromes has been largely discussed but no formal quantitative evaluation has yet been conducted across angiosperms. We present the first systematic review of pollination syndromes that quantitatively tests whether the most effective pollinators for a species can be inferred from suites of floral traits for 417 plant species. Our results support the syndrome concept, indicating that convergent floral evolution is driven by adaptation to the most effective pollinator group. The predictability of pollination syndromes is greater in pollinator-dependent species and in plants from tropical regions. Many plant species also have secondary pollinators that generally correspond to the ancestral pollinators documented in evolutionary studies. We discuss the utility and limitations of pollination syndromes and the role of secondary pollinators to understand floral ecology and evolution.

  8. Quantitative trait loci analysis of individual and total isoflavone contents in soybean seeds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hai Jun Zhang; Jing Wen Li; Ya Jing Liu; Wen Zhu Jiang; Xing Lin Du; Lin Li; Xiao Wei Li; Lian Tai Su; Qing Yu Wang; Ying Wang

    2014-08-01

    Soybean isoflavones play diverse roles in human health, including cancers, osteoporosis, heart disease, menopausal symptoms and pabulums. The objective of this study was to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the isoflavones daidzein (DC), genistein (GeC), glycitein (GlC) and total isoflavone contents (TIC) in soybean seeds. A population of 184 F2:10 recombinant inbred lines derived from a ‘Xiaoheidou’ × ‘GR8836’ cross was planted in pot and field conditions to evaluate soybean isoflavones. Twenty-one QTL were detected by composite interval mapping. Several QTL were associated with the traits for DC, GeC, GlC and TIC only. QDGeGlTIC4_1 and QDGlTIC12_1 are reported first in this study and were associated with the DC, GeC, GlC and TIC traits simultaneously. The QTL identified have potential value for marker-assisted selection to develop soybean varieties with desirable isoflavone content.

  9. Adaptive differentiation of quantitative traits in the globally distributed weed, wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, Heather F; Conner, Jeffrey K; Shaw, Frank H; Howe, Stephen; Lale, Allison

    2008-10-01

    Weedy species with wide geographical distributions may face strong selection to adapt to new environments, which can lead to adaptive genetic differentiation among populations. However, genetic drift, particularly due to founder effects, will also commonly result in differentiation in colonizing species. To test whether selection has contributed to trait divergence, we compared differentiation at eight microsatellite loci (measured as F(ST)) to differentiation of quantitative floral and phenological traits (measured as Q(ST)) of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) across populations from three continents. We sampled eight populations: seven naturalized populations and one from its native range. By comparing estimates of Q(ST) and F(ST), we found that petal size was the only floral trait that may have diverged more than expected due to drift alone, but inflorescence height, flowering time, and rosette formation have greatly diverged between the native and nonnative populations. Our results suggest the loss of a rosette and the evolution of early flowering time may have been the key adaptations enabling wild radish to become a major agricultural weed. Floral adaptation to different pollinators does not seem to have been as necessary for the success of wild radish in new environments.

  10. Quantitative trait loci × environment interactions for plant morphology vary over ontogeny in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechaine, Jennifer M; Brock, Marcus T; Iniguez-Luy, Federico L; Weinig, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Growth in plants occurs via the addition of repeating modules, suggesting that the genetic architecture of similar subunits may vary between earlier- and later-developing modules. These complex environment × ontogeny interactions are not well elucidated, as studies examining quantitative trait loci (QTLs) expression over ontogeny have not included multiple environments. Here, we characterized the genetic architecture of vegetative traits and onset of reproduction over ontogeny in recombinant inbred lines of Brassica rapa in the field and glasshouse. The magnitude of genetic variation in plasticity of seedling internodes was greater than in those produced later in ontogeny. We correspondingly detected that QTLs for seedling internode length were environment-specific, whereas later in ontogeny the majority of QTLs affected internode lengths in all treatments. The relationship between internode traits and onset of reproduction varied with environment and ontogenetic stage. This relationship was observed only in the glasshouse environment and was largely attributable to one environment-specific QTL. Our results provide the first evidence of a QTL × environment × ontogeny interaction, and provide QTL resolution for differences between early- and later-stage plasticity for stem elongation. These results also suggest potential constraints on morphological evolution in early vs later modules as a result of associations with reproductive timing.

  11. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Lipid Metabolism in Rice Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-Zheng Ying; Jun-Xiang Shan; Ji-Ping Gao; Mei-Zhen Zhu; Min Shi; Hong-Xuan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Plant seed oil is important for human dietary consumption and industrial application.The oil trait is controlled by quantitative trait loci(QTLs),but no QTLs for fatty acid composition are known in rice,the monocot model plant.QTL analysis was performed using F2 and F2∶3 progeny from a cross of an indica variety and a japonica variety.Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS)analysis revealed significant differences between parental lines in fatty acid composition of brown rice oil,and 29 associated QTLs in F2 and/or F2∶3 populations were identified throughout the rice genome,except chromosomes 9 and 10.Eight QTLs were repeatedly identified in both populations across different environments.Five loci pleiotropically controlled different traits,contributing to complex interactions of oil with fatty acids and between fatty acids.Nine rice orthologs of Arabidopsis genes encoding key enzymes in lipid metabolism co-localized with 11 mapped QTLs.A strong QTL for oleic(18:1)and linoleic(18:2)acid were associated with a rice ortholog of a gene encoding acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase(DGAT),and another for palmitic acid(16:0)mapped similarly to the acylACP thioesterase(FatB)gene ortholog.Our approach rapidly and efficiently identified candidate genes for mapped QTLs controlling fatty acid composition and oil concentration,providing information for improving rice grain quality by marker assisted selection.

  12. Detection of quantitative trait loci in Danish Holstein cattle affecting clinical mastitis, somatic cell score, udder conformation traits, and assessment of associated effects on milk yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M S; Guldbrandtsen, B; Buitenhuis, A J;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to 1) detect QTL across the cattle genome that influence the incidence of clinical mastitis and somatic cell score (SCS) in Danish Holsteins, and 2) characterize these QTL for pleiotropy versus multiple linked quantitative trait loci (QTL) when chromosomal regions...... affecting clinical mastitis were also affecting other traits in the Danish udder health index or milk production traits. The chromosomes were scanned using a granddaughter design where markers were typed for 19 to 34 grandsire families and 1,373 to 2,042 sons. A total of 356 microsatellites covering all 29...... autosomes were used in the scan. Among the across-family regression analyses, 16 showed chromosome-wide significance for the primary traits incidence of clinical mastitis in first (CM1), second (CM2), and third (CM3) lactations, and SCS. Regions of chromosomes 5, 6, 9, 11, 15, and 26 were found to affect CM...

  13. The genetic basis of adaptive population differentiation: A quantitative trait locus analysis of fitness traits in two wild barley populations from contrasting habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Vanhala, T.K.; Biere, A.; Nevo, E.; Damme, van J.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    We used a quantitative trait locus (QTL) approach to study the genetic basis of population differentiation in wild barley, Hordeum spontaneum. Several ecotypes are recognized in this model species, and population genetic studies and reciprocal transplant experiments have indicated the role of local

  14. The BovMAS Consortium: investigation of bovine chromosome 14 for quantitative trait loci affecting milk production and quality traits in the Italian Holstein Friesian breed

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, V.; Soller, M; Lipkin, E.; R. Davoli; Dall’Olio, S; D. Bigi; P. Zambonelli; Pecorari, D.; Scotti, E; Fontanesi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that quantitative trait loci (QTL) can be identified and mapped in commercial dairy cattle populations using genetic markers in daughter and granddaughter designs.The final objective of these studies is to identify genes or markers that can be used in breeding schemes via marker assisted selection (MAS).

  15. Alternative models for detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for growth and carcass traits in pigs chromosomes 4, 5 and 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moraes Gonçalves, de T.; Nunes de Oliveira, H.; Bovenhuis, H.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Genome scans can be used to identify chromosomal regions and eventually genes that control quantitative traits (QTL) of economic importance. In an experimental cross between Meishan (male) and Dutch Large White and Landrace lines (female), 298 F1 and 831 F2 animals were evaluated for intramuscular f

  16. Insight in genome-wide association of metabolite quantitative traits by exome sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkan, Ayşe; Henneman, Peter; Verhoeven, Aswin; Dharuri, Harish; Amin, Najaf; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Karssen, Lennart C; de Vries, Boukje; Meissner, Axel; Göraler, Sibel; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Deelder, André M; C 't Hoen, Peter A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite quantitative traits carry great promise for epidemiological studies, and their genetic background has been addressed using Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Thus far, the role of less common variants has not been exhaustively studied. Here, we set out a GWAS for metabolite quantitative traits in serum, followed by exome sequence analysis to zoom in on putative causal variants in the associated genes. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy experiments yielded successful quantification of 42 unique metabolites in 2,482 individuals from The Erasmus Rucphen Family (ERF) study. Heritability of metabolites were estimated by SOLAR. GWAS was performed by linear mixed models, using HapMap imputations. Based on physical vicinity and pathway analyses, candidate genes were screened for coding region variation using exome sequence data. Heritability estimates for metabolites ranged between 10% and 52%. GWAS replicated three known loci in the metabolome wide significance: CPS1 with glycine (P-value  = 1.27×10-32), PRODH with proline (P-value  = 1.11×10-19), SLC16A9 with carnitine level (P-value  = 4.81×10-14) and uncovered a novel association between DMGDH and dimethyl-glycine (P-value  = 1.65×10-19) level. In addition, we found three novel, suggestively significant loci: TNP1 with pyruvate (P-value  = 1.26×10-8), KCNJ16 with 3-hydroxybutyrate (P-value  = 1.65×10-8) and 2p12 locus with valine (P-value  = 3.49×10-8). Exome sequence analysis identified potentially causal coding and regulatory variants located in the genes CPS1, KCNJ2 and PRODH, and revealed allelic heterogeneity for CPS1 and PRODH. Combined GWAS and exome analyses of metabolites detected by high-resolution 1H-NMR is a robust approach to uncover metabolite quantitative trait loci (mQTL), and the likely causative variants in these loci. It is anticipated that insight in the genetics of intermediate phenotypes will provide additional insight into the

  17. Insight in genome-wide association of metabolite quantitative traits by exome sequence analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Demirkan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolite quantitative traits carry great promise for epidemiological studies, and their genetic background has been addressed using Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS. Thus far, the role of less common variants has not been exhaustively studied. Here, we set out a GWAS for metabolite quantitative traits in serum, followed by exome sequence analysis to zoom in on putative causal variants in the associated genes. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy experiments yielded successful quantification of 42 unique metabolites in 2,482 individuals from The Erasmus Rucphen Family (ERF study. Heritability of metabolites were estimated by SOLAR. GWAS was performed by linear mixed models, using HapMap imputations. Based on physical vicinity and pathway analyses, candidate genes were screened for coding region variation using exome sequence data. Heritability estimates for metabolites ranged between 10% and 52%. GWAS replicated three known loci in the metabolome wide significance: CPS1 with glycine (P-value  = 1.27×10-32, PRODH with proline (P-value  = 1.11×10-19, SLC16A9 with carnitine level (P-value  = 4.81×10-14 and uncovered a novel association between DMGDH and dimethyl-glycine (P-value  = 1.65×10-19 level. In addition, we found three novel, suggestively significant loci: TNP1 with pyruvate (P-value  = 1.26×10-8, KCNJ16 with 3-hydroxybutyrate (P-value  = 1.65×10-8 and 2p12 locus with valine (P-value  = 3.49×10-8. Exome sequence analysis identified potentially causal coding and regulatory variants located in the genes CPS1, KCNJ2 and PRODH, and revealed allelic heterogeneity for CPS1 and PRODH. Combined GWAS and exome analyses of metabolites detected by high-resolution 1H-NMR is a robust approach to uncover metabolite quantitative trait loci (mQTL, and the likely causative variants in these loci. It is anticipated that insight in the genetics of intermediate phenotypes will provide additional insight

  18. Little effect of HSP90 inhibition on the quantitative wing traits variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuo H

    2017-02-01

    Drosophila wings have been a model system to study the effect of HSP90 on quantitative trait variation. The effect of HSP90 inhibition on environmental buffering of wing morphology varies among studies while the genetic buffering effect of it was examined in only one study and was not detected. Variable results so far might show that the genetic background influences the environmental and genetic buffering effect of HSP90. In the previous studies, the number of the genetic backgrounds used is limited. To examine the effect of HSP90 inhibition with a larger number of genetic backgrounds than the previous studies, 20 wild-type strains of Drosophila melanogaster were used in this study. Here I investigated the effect of HSP90 inhibition on the environmental buffering of wing shape and size by assessing within-individual and among-individual variations, and as a result, I found little or very weak effects on environmental and genetic buffering. The current results suggest that the role of HSP90 as a global regulator of environmental and genetic buffering is limited at least in quantitative traits.

  19. Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Stripe Disease in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to map the quantitative trait loci for rice stripe resistance, a molecular linkage map was constructed based on the lines to rice stripe were investigated by both artificial inoculation at laboratory and natural infection in the field, and the ratios of ranged from 0 to 134.08 and from 6.25 to 133.6 under artificial inoculation at laboratory and natural infection in the field, respectively,and showed a marked bias towards resistant parent (Zhaiyeqing 8), indicating that the resistance to rice stripe was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL). QTL analysis showed that the QTLs detected by the two inoculation methods were completely different.Only one QTL, qSTV7, was detected under artificial inoculation, at which the Zhaiyeqing 8 allele increased the resistance to rice stripe, while two QTLs, qSTV5 and qSTV1, were detected under natural infection, in which resistant alleles came from Zhaiyeqing 8and Wuyujing 3, respectively. These results showed that resistant parent Zhaiyeqing 8 carried the alleles associated with the resistance to rice stripe virus and the small brown planthopper, and susceptible parent Wuyujing 3 also carried the resistant allele to rice stripe virus. In comparison with the results previously reported, QTLs detected in the study were new resistant genes to rice stripe disease. This will provide a new resistant resource for avoiding genetic vulnerability for single utilization of the resistant gene Stvb-i.

  20. Gene Level Meta-Analysis of Quantitative Traits by Functional Linear Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Boehnke, Michael; Chen, Wei; Li, Yun; Ren, Haobo; Lobach, Iryna; Xiong, Momiao

    2015-08-01

    Meta-analysis of genetic data must account for differences among studies including study designs, markers genotyped, and covariates. The effects of genetic variants may differ from population to population, i.e., heterogeneity. Thus, meta-analysis of combining data of multiple studies is difficult. Novel statistical methods for meta-analysis are needed. In this article, functional linear models are developed for meta-analyses that connect genetic data to quantitative traits, adjusting for covariates. The models can be used to analyze rare variants, common variants, or a combination of the two. Both likelihood-ratio test (LRT) and F-distributed statistics are introduced to test association between quantitative traits and multiple variants in one genetic region. Extensive simulations are performed to evaluate empirical type I error rates and power performance of the proposed tests. The proposed LRT and F-distributed statistics control the type I error very well and have higher power than the existing methods of the meta-analysis sequence kernel association test (MetaSKAT). We analyze four blood lipid levels in data from a meta-analysis of eight European studies. The proposed methods detect more significant associations than MetaSKAT and the P-values of the proposed LRT and F-distributed statistics are usually much smaller than those of MetaSKAT. The functional linear models and related test statistics can be useful in whole-genome and whole-exome association studies.

  1. Structural variation around prolactin gene linked to quantitative traits in an elite Holstein sire family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, C M; Dentine, M R; Ax, R L; Schuler, L A

    1990-05-01

    Digestion of genomic DNA with the restriction endonuclease Avail disclosed a probable insertion deletion of approximately 200 base pairs (bp) near the prolactin gene. Two alleles were apparent as three distinct hybridization patterns. These alleles were statistically associated with quantitative trait loci among sons of one elite Holstein sire family. The favorable genotype was correlated with the presence of a 1.15-kb hybridization band inherited from the sire when genomic DNA was probed with a full-length cDNA for prolactin. Pedigree estimates of genetic merit among genotypes were similar, differing by only 19.3 kg for milk in ancestor merit. Comparisons of genetic estimates for quantitative yield traits in offspring of this heterozygous sire showed significant (Pcheese yield dollars, and protein dollars. The estimated differences between homozygous genotypes for USDA Transmitting Abilities of PDM, PD$, Cheese Yield $ and Protein $ were 282.93 kg, $74.35, $48.58 and $53.67, respectively. However, the estimated breeding values from progeny ranged over 900 kg in transmitting ability for milk. Frequency of the favorable marker allele was estimated to be 0.231 in the elite cow population used as dams of sons. These results demonstrate the potential of molecular biological techniques to discriminate between individuals within a family and to predict breeding values for selection schemes.

  2. Quantitative trait loci markers derived from whole genome sequence data increases the reliability of genomic prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøndum, R F; Su, G; Janss, L; Sahana, G; Guldbrandtsen, B; Boichard, D; Lund, M S

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effect on the reliability of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data. The extra markers were selected with the aim of augmenting the custom low-density Illumina BovineLD SNP chip (San Diego, CA) used in the Nordic countries. The single-marker analysis was done breed-wise on all 16 index traits included in the breeding goals for Nordic Holstein, Danish Jersey, and Nordic Red cattle plus the total merit index itself. Depending on the trait's economic weight, 15, 10, or 5 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were selected per trait per breed and 3 to 5 markers were selected to tag each QTL. After removing duplicate markers (same marker selected for more than one trait or breed) and filtering for high pairwise linkage disequilibrium and assaying performance on the array, a total of 1,623 QTL markers were selected for inclusion on the custom chip. Genomic prediction analyses were performed for Nordic and French Holstein and Nordic Red animals using either a genomic BLUP or a Bayesian variable selection model. When using the genomic BLUP model including the QTL markers in the analysis, reliability was increased by up to 4 percentage points for production traits in Nordic Holstein animals, up to 3 percentage points for Nordic Reds, and up to 5 percentage points for French Holstein. Smaller gains of up to 1 percentage point was observed for mastitis, but only a 0.5 percentage point increase was seen for fertility. When using a Bayesian model accuracies were generally higher with only 54k data compared with the genomic BLUP approach, but increases in reliability were relatively smaller when QTL markers were included. Results from this study indicate that the reliability of genomic prediction can be increased by including markers significant in genome-wide association studies on whole genome

  3. Predicting complex quantitative traits with Bayesian neural networks: a case study with Jersey cows and wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okut Hayrettin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the study of associations between genomic data and complex phenotypes there may be relationships that are not amenable to parametric statistical modeling. Such associations have been investigated mainly using single-marker and Bayesian linear regression models that differ in their distributions, but that assume additive inheritance while ignoring interactions and non-linearity. When interactions have been included in the model, their effects have entered linearly. There is a growing interest in non-parametric methods for predicting quantitative traits based on reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces regressions on markers and radial basis functions. Artificial neural networks (ANN provide an alternative, because these act as universal approximators of complex functions and can capture non-linear relationships between predictors and responses, with the interplay among variables learned adaptively. ANNs are interesting candidates for analysis of traits affected by cryptic forms of gene action. Results We investigated various Bayesian ANN architectures using for predicting phenotypes in two data sets consisting of milk production in Jersey cows and yield of inbred lines of wheat. For the Jerseys, predictor variables were derived from pedigree and molecular marker (35,798 single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPS information on 297 individually cows. The wheat data represented 599 lines, each genotyped with 1,279 markers. The ability of predicting fat, milk and protein yield was low when using pedigrees, but it was better when SNPs were employed, irrespective of the ANN trained. Predictive ability was even better in wheat because the trait was a mean, as opposed to an individual phenotype in cows. Non-linear neural networks outperformed a linear model in predictive ability in both data sets, but more clearly in wheat. Conclusion Results suggest that neural networks may be useful for predicting complex traits using high

  4. Identification and Validation of a Major Quantitative Trait Locus for Slow-rusting Resistance to Stripe Rust in Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua Cao; Jianghong Zhou; Xiaoping Gong; Guangyao Zhao; Jizeng Jia; Xiaoquan Qi

    2012-01-01

    Stripe (yellow) rust,caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend.f.sp.tritici Eriks (Pst),is one of the most important wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) diseases and causes significant yield losses.A recombinant inbred (RI) population derived from a cross between Yanzhan 1 and Xichang 76-9 cultivars was evaluated for resistance to wheat stripe rust strain CYR32 at both the seedling and adult plant stages.Four resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected in this population,in which the major one,designated as Yrq1,was mapped on chromosome 2DS.The strategy of using the Brachypodium distachyon genome,wheat expressed sequence tags and a draft DNA sequences (scaffolds) of the D-genome (Aegilops tauschii Coss.) for the development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers was successfully used to identify 147 SSRs in hexaploid wheat.Of the 19 polymorphic SSRs in the RI population,17 SSRs were mapped in the homeologous group 2 chromosomes near Yrq1 region and eight SSRs were genetically mapped in the 2.7 cM region of Yrq1,providing abundant DNA markers for fine-mapping of Yrq1 and marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding program.The effectiveness of Yrq1 was validated in an independent population,indicating that this resistance QTL can be successfully transferred into a susceptible cultivar for improvement of stripe rust resistance.

  5. Genetic map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL detection of growth-related traits in Litopenaeus vannamei for selective breeding applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farafidy Andriantahina

    Full Text Available Growth is a priority trait from the point of view of genetic improvement. Molecular markers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL have been regarded as useful for marker-assisted selection (MAS in complex traits as growth. Using an intermediate F2 cross of slow and fast growth parents, a genetic linkage map of Pacific whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeusvannamei, based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP and simple sequence repeats (SSR markers was constructed. Meanwhile, QTL analysis was performed for growth-related traits. The linkage map consisted of 451 marker loci (429 AFLPs and 22 SSRs which formed 49 linkage groups with an average marker space of 7.6 cM; they spanned a total length of 3627.6 cM, covering 79.50% of estimated genome size. 14 QTLs were identified for growth-related traits, including three QTLs for body weight (BW, total length (TL and partial carapace length (PCL, two QTLs for body length (BL, one QTL for first abdominal segment depth (FASD, third abdominal segment depth (TASD and first abdominal segment width (FASW, which explained 2.62 to 61.42% of phenotypic variation. Moreover, comparison of linkage maps between L. vannamei and Penaeusjaponicus was applied, providing a new insight into the genetic base of QTL affecting the growth-related traits. The new results will be useful for conducting MAS breeding schemes in L. vannamei .

  6. Variation in CHI3LI in relation to type 2 diabetes and related quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Noelle Rathcke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CHI3LI encoding the inflammatory glycoprotein YKL-40 is located on chromosome 1q32.1. YKL-40 is involved in inflammatory processes and patients with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D have elevated circulating YKL-40 levels which correlate with their level of insulin resistance. Interestingly, it has been reported that rs10399931 (-329 G/A of CHI3LI contributes to the inter-individual plasma YKL-40 levels in patients with sarcoidosis, and that rs4950928 (-131 C/G is a susceptibility polymorphism for asthma and a decline in lung function. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs or haplotypes thereof the CHI3LI locus might influence risk of T2D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the putative association between SNPs and haplotype blocks of CHI3LI and T2D and T2D related quantitative traits. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eleven SNPs of CHI3LI were genotyped in 6514 individuals from the Inter99 cohort and 2924 individuals from the outpatient clinic at Steno Diabetes Center. In cas-control studies a total of 2345 T2D patients and 5302 individuals with a normal glucose tolerance test were examined. We found no association between rs10399931 (OR, 0.98 (CI, 0.88-1.10, p = 0.76, rs4950928 (0.98 (0.87-1.10, p = 0.68 or any of the other SNPs with T2D. Similarly, we found no significant association between any of the 11 tgSNPs and T2D related quantitative traits, all p>0.14. None of the identified haplotype blocks of CHI3LI showed any association with T2D, all p>0.16. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: None of the examined SNPs or haplotype blocks of CHI3LI showed any association with T2D or T2D related quantitative traits. Estimates of insulin resistance and dysregulated glucose homeostasis in T2D do not seem to be accounted for by the examined variations of CHI3LI.

  7. SeqSIMLA2: simulating correlated quantitative traits accounting for shared environmental effects in user-specified pedigree structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Hua; Tsai, Wei-Yun; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Hung, Kuan-Yi; Hsiung, Chao A; Hauser, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    Simulation tools that simulate sequence data in unrelated cases and controls or in families with quantitative traits or disease status are important for genetic studies. The simulation tools can be used to evaluate the statistical power for detecting the causal variants when planning a genetic epidemiology study, or to evaluate the statistical properties for new methods. We previously developed SeqSIMLA version 1 (SeqSIMLA1), which simulates family or case-control data with a disease or quantitative trait model. SeqSIMLA1, and several other tools that simulate quantitative traits, do not specifically model the shared environmental effects among relatives on a trait. However, shared environmental effects are commonly observed for some traits in families, such as body mass index. SeqSIMLA1 simulates a fixed three-generation family structure. However, it would be ideal to simulate prespecified pedigree structures for studies involving large pedigrees. Thus, we extended SeqSIMLA1 to create SeqSIMLA2, which can simulate correlated traits and considers the shared environmental effects. SeqSIMLA2 can also simulate prespecified large pedigree structures. There are no restrictions on the number of individuals that can be simulated in a pedigree. We used a blood pressure example to demonstrate that SeqSIMLA2 can simulate realistic correlation structures between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure among relatives. We also showed that SeqSIMLA2 can simulate large pedigrees with large chromosomal regions in a reasonable time frame. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Effect of the scale of quantitative trait data on the representativeness of a cotton germplasm sub-core collection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-cheng WANG; Jin HU; Ya-jing GUAN; Yan-fang ZHU

    2013-01-01

    A cotton germplasm collection with data for 20 quantitative traits was used to investigate the effect of the scale of quantitative trait data on the representativeness of plant sub-core collections.The relationship between the representativeness of a sub-core collection and two influencing factors,the number of traits and the sampling percentage,was studied.A mixed linear model approach was used to eliminate environmental errors and predict genotypic values of accessions.Sub-core collections were constructed using a least distance stepwise sampling(LDSS)method combining standardized Euclidean distance and an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA)cluster method.The mean difference percentage(MD),variance difference percentage(VD),coincidence rate of range(CR),and variable rate of coefficient of variation(VR)served as evaluation parameters.Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to study the relationship among the number of traits,the sampling percentage,and the four evaluation parameters.The results showed that the representativeness of a sub-core collection was affected greatly by the number of traits and the sampling percentage,and that these two influencing factors were closely connected.Increasing the number of traits improved the representativeness of a sub-core collection when the data of genotypic values were used.The change in the genetic diversity of sub-core collections with different sampling percentages showed a linear tendency when the number of traits was small,and a logarithmic tendency when the number of traits was large.However,the change in the genetic diversity of sub-core collections with different numbers of traits always showed a strong logarithmic tendency when the sampling percentage was changing.A CR threshold method based on Monte Carlo simulation is proposed to determine the rational number of traits for a relevant sampling percentage of a sub-core collection.

  9. Field-Based High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping Reveals the Temporal Patterns of Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Stress-Responsive Traits in Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Duke; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Gazave, Elodie; French, Andrew N; Heun, John; Hunsaker, Douglas J; Lipka, Alexander E; Setter, Tim L; Strand, Robert J; Thorp, Kelly R; Wang, Sam; White, Jeffrey W; Gore, Michael A

    2016-04-07

    The application of high-throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP) to continuously study plant populations under relevant growing conditions creates the possibility to more efficiently dissect the genetic basis of dynamic adaptive traits. Toward this end, we employed a field-based HTPP system that deployed sets of sensors to simultaneously measure canopy temperature, reflectance, and height on a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) recombinant inbred line mapping population. The evaluation trials were conducted under well-watered and water-limited conditions in a replicated field experiment at a hot, arid location in central Arizona, with trait measurements taken at different times on multiple days across 2010-2012. Canopy temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), height, and leaf area index (LAI) displayed moderate-to-high broad-sense heritabilities, as well as varied interactions among genotypes with water regime and time of day. Distinct temporal patterns of quantitative trait loci (QTL) expression were mostly observed for canopy temperature and NDVI, and varied across plant developmental stages. In addition, the strength of correlation between HTPP canopy traits and agronomic traits, such as lint yield, displayed a time-dependent relationship. We also found that the genomic position of some QTL controlling HTPP canopy traits were shared with those of QTL identified for agronomic and physiological traits. This work demonstrates the novel use of a field-based HTPP system to study the genetic basis of stress-adaptive traits in cotton, and these results have the potential to facilitate the development of stress-resilient cotton cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Pauli et al.

  10. Field-Based High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping Reveals the Temporal Patterns of Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Stress-Responsive Traits in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke Pauli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of high-throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP to continuously study plant populations under relevant growing conditions creates the possibility to more efficiently dissect the genetic basis of dynamic adaptive traits. Toward this end, we employed a field-based HTPP system that deployed sets of sensors to simultaneously measure canopy temperature, reflectance, and height on a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. recombinant inbred line mapping population. The evaluation trials were conducted under well-watered and water-limited conditions in a replicated field experiment at a hot, arid location in central Arizona, with trait measurements taken at different times on multiple days across 2010–2012. Canopy temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, height, and leaf area index (LAI displayed moderate-to-high broad-sense heritabilities, as well as varied interactions among genotypes with water regime and time of day. Distinct temporal patterns of quantitative trait loci (QTL expression were mostly observed for canopy temperature and NDVI, and varied across plant developmental stages. In addition, the strength of correlation between HTPP canopy traits and agronomic traits, such as lint yield, displayed a time-dependent relationship. We also found that the genomic position of some QTL controlling HTPP canopy traits were shared with those of QTL identified for agronomic and physiological traits. This work demonstrates the novel use of a field-based HTPP system to study the genetic basis of stress-adaptive traits in cotton, and these results have the potential to facilitate the development of stress-resilient cotton cultivars.

  11. Quantitative trait loci associated with androgenic responsiveness in triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm.) anther culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzewska, M; Czyczyło-Mysza, I; Dubas, E; Gołębiowska-Pikania, G; Golemiec, E; Stojałowski, S; Chrupek, M; Zur, I

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with androgenic responsiveness in triticale were analyzed using a population of 90 DH lines derived from the F1 cross between inbred line 'Saka 3006' and cv. 'Modus', which was used in a number of earlier studies on molecular mapping in this crop. Using Windows QTL Cartographer and MapQTL 5.0, composite interval mapping (CIM) and association studies (Kruskal-Wallis test; K-W) for five androgenesis parameters (androgenic embryo induction, total regeneration and green plant regeneration ability, and two characteristics describing final androgenesis efficiency) were conducted. For the studied components of androgenic response, CIM detected in total 28 QTLs which were localized on 5 chromosomes from A and R genomes. Effects of all QTLs that were identified at 2.0 or above of the LOD score explained 5.1-21.7 % of the phenotypic variation. Androgenesis induction was associated with seven QTLs (LOD between 2.0 and 5.8) detected on chromosomes 5A, 4R, 5R and 7R, all of them confirmed by K-W test as regions containing the markers significantly linked to the studied trait. What is more, K-W test revealed additional markers on chromosomes: 5A, 2BL, 7B and 5R. Both total and green regeneration ability were controlled by genes localized on chromosome 4A. Some of the QTLs that affected final androgenesis efficiency were identical with those associated with androgenic embryo induction efficiency, suggesting that the observed correlation may be either due to tight linkage or to pleiotropy. Key message Five regions of the triticale genome were indicated as revealing significant marker/trait association. Markers located in these regions are potentially useful for triticale breeding through marker-assisted selection.

  12. Impact of measurement error on testing genetic association with quantitative traits.

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    Jiemin Liao

    Full Text Available Measurement error of a phenotypic trait reduces the power to detect genetic associations. We examined the impact of sample size, allele frequency and effect size in presence of measurement error for quantitative traits. The statistical power to detect genetic association with phenotype mean and variability was investigated analytically. The non-centrality parameter for a non-central F distribution was derived and verified using computer simulations. We obtained equivalent formulas for the cost of phenotype measurement error. Effects of differences in measurements were examined in a genome-wide association study (GWAS of two grading scales for cataract and a replication study of genetic variants influencing blood pressure. The mean absolute difference between the analytic power and simulation power for comparison of phenotypic means and variances was less than 0.005, and the absolute difference did not exceed 0.02. To maintain the same power, a one standard deviation (SD in measurement error of a standard normal distributed trait required a one-fold increase in sample size for comparison of means, and a three-fold increase in sample size for comparison of variances. GWAS results revealed almost no overlap in the significant SNPs (p<10(-5 for the two cataract grading scales while replication results in genetic variants of blood pressure displayed no significant differences between averaged blood pressure measurements and single blood pressure measurements. We have developed a framework for researchers to quantify power in the presence of measurement error, which will be applicable to studies of phenotypes in which the measurement is highly variable.

  13. Detection of quantitative trait loci for growth and carcass composition in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, E; Shackelford, S D; Keele, J W; Koohmaraie, M; Smith, T P L; Stone, R T

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to detect quantitative trait loci for economically important traits in a family from a Bos indicus x Bos taurus sire. A Brahman x Hereford sire was used to develop a half-sib family (n = 547). The sire was mated to Bos taurus cows. Traits analyzed were birth (kg) and weaning weights (kg); hot carcass weight (kg); marbling score; longissimus area (cm2); USDA yield grade; estimated kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (%); fat thickness (cm); fat yield (%); and retail product yield (%). Meat tenderness was measured as Warner-Bratzler shear force (kg) at 3 and 14 d postmortem. Two hundred and thirty-eight markers were genotyped in 185 offspring. One hundred and thirty markers were used to genotype the remaining 362 offspring. A total of 312 markers were used in the final analysis. Seventy-four markers were common to both groups. Significant QTL (expected number of false-positives carcass weight, QTL were detected on chromosomes 10, 18, and 29. Four QTL for yield grade were identified on chromosomes 2, 11, 14, and 19. Three QTL for fat thickness were detected on chromosomes 2, 3, 7, and 14. For marbling score, QTL were identified on chromosomes 3, 10, 14, and 27. Four QTL were identified for retail product yield on chromosomes 12, 18, 19, and 29. A QTL for estimated kidney, pelvic, and heart fat was detected on chromosome 15, and a QTL for meat tenderness measured as Warner-Bratzler shear force at 3 d postmortem was identified on chromosome 20. Two QTL were detected for meat tenderness measured as Warner-Bratzler shear force at 14 d postmortem on chromosomes 20 and 29. These results present a complete scan in all available progeny in this family. Regions underlying QTL need to be assessed in other populations.

  14. Use of Major Quantitative Trait Loci to Improve Grain Yield of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Long-biao; YE Guo-you

    2014-01-01

    Further improvement of rice productivity remains a challenge. Breeding is perceived as an important option to increase rice yield. However, the genetic progress of grain yield in most rice breeding programs was slow in the last decades. Although great progress in rice genomics and molecular biology has been achieved, the effect of such technological innovations on rice breeding is far small. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) for a few target quantitative trait loci (QTLs) has significant effects in improving qualitative traits, such as disease resistance. The success of MAS has therefore motivated breeders to identify and use major QTLs for yield and yield component traits. In this review, we summarized the recent methods in QTL identification, including novel statistical methods for linkage and association mapping, special population types, and whole-genome sequencing. We reviewed the successful application of marker-assisted gene introgression and gene pyramiding to improve grain yield and discussed the design of efficient MAS schemes to further increase the success rate of breeding programs. The use of well-characterized major QTLs through introgression and gene pyramiding is proven effective in improving grain yield, particularly yield under abiotic stress. Major QTLs that are stable across genetic background and growing environments are often found in less adapted germplasms, such as landraces and wild relatives. Advanced backcross QTL analysis and introgression lines, which integrate QTL discovery and utilization, are important methods for exploiting major QTLs contained in such germplasms. Next-generation sequencing substantially increases mapping resolution and accelerates the identification of casual genes underlying major QTLs. Practical guidelines derived from theoretical and empirical studies are given to guide the design of efficient marker-assisted gene introgression and pyramiding schemes.

  15. Using molecular markers to map multiple quantitative trait loci: models for backcross, recombinant inbred, and doubled haploid progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, S J

    1991-03-01

    To maximize parameter estimation efficiency and statistical power and to estimate epistasis, the parameters of multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) must be simultaneously estimated. If multiple QTL affect a trait, then estimates of means of QTL genotypes from individual locus models are statistically biased. In this paper, I describe methods for estimating means of QTL genotypes and recombination frequencies between marker and quantitative trait loci using multilocus backcross, doubled haploid, recombinant inbred, and testcross progeny models. Expected values of marker genotype means were defined using no double or multiple crossover frequencies and flanking markers for linked and unlinked quantitative trait loci. The expected values for a particular model comprise a system of nonlinear equations that can be solved using an interative algorithm, e.g., the Gauss-Newton algorithm. The solutions are maximum likelihood estimates when the errors are normally distributed. A linear model for estimating the parameters of unlinked quantitative trait loci was found by transforming the nonlinear model. Recombination frequency estimators were defined using this linear model. Certain means of linked QTLs are less efficiently estimated than means of unlinked QTLs.

  16. Comparisons of photosynthesis-related traits of 27 abundant or subordinate bryophyte species in a subalpine old-growth fir forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Bader, Maaike Y; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Zhangming; Bao, Weikai

    2017-09-01

    Bryophyte communities can exhibit similar structural and taxonomic diversity as vascular plant communities, just at a smaller scale. Whether the physiological diversity can be similarly diverse, and whether it can explain local abundance patterns is unknown, due to a lack of community-wide studies of physiological traits. This study re-analyzed data on photosynthesis-related traits (including the nitrogen, phosphorus and chlorophyll concentrations, photosynthetic capacities, and photosynthetic nutrient use efficiencies) of 27 bryophyte species in a subalpine old-growth fir forest on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. We explored differences between taxonomic groups and hypothesized that the most abundant bryophyte species had physiological advantages relative to other subdominant species. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to summarize the differences among species and trait values of the most abundant and other co-occurring subdominant species. Species from the Polytrichaceae were separated out on both PCA axes, indicating their high chlorophyll concentrations and photosynthetic capacities (axis 1) and relatively high-light requirements (axis 2). Mniaceae species also had relatively high photosynthetic capacities, but their light saturation points were low. In contrast, Racomitrium joseph-hookeri and Lepidozia reptans, two species with a high shoot mass per area, had high-light requirements and low nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations and photosynthetic capacities. The nutrient concentrations, photosynthetic capacities, and photosynthetic nutrient use efficiencies of the most abundant bryophyte species did not differ from co-occurring subdominant species. Our research confirms the links between the photosynthesis-related traits and adaptation strategies of bryophytes. However, species relative abundance was not related to these traits.

  17. Identification of quantitative trait loci for four morphologic traits under water stress in rice(Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Late season drought coinciding with the rice booting to heading stage affects the development of plant height,panicle exsertion,and flag leaf size,and causes significant yield loss.In this study,a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between paddy and upland cultivars was used for data collection of the morphologic traits under well water and drought stress conditions.bought stress was applied at the stage of panicle initiation in the field in 2002 and at the booting stage in PVC pipes in 2003.The data from stress con ditions and their ratios(tait measured under stress condition/trait measured under well water condition)or differences(trait measured under stress condition minus trait measured under well water condition)were used for OTL analysis.Totally,17 and 36 QTLs for these traits were identified in 2002 and 2003,respectively,which explained a range of 2.58%-29.82%Of the phenotypic variation.Among them,six QTLs were commonly identified in the two years,suggesting that the drought stress in the two years was different.The genetic basis of these traits will provide useful information for improving rice late season drought resistance,and their application as indirect indices in rice late season drought resistance screening was also discussed.

  18. Ecological interaction between insect pests, climatic factors and plant traits on abundance of beneficial insects in paddy field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazliza, R.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The presences of beneficial insects in the paddy field are very important for the ecological systems of paddy field as those insects could help managing the population of the pests. Hence, it will reduce the dependence on pesticides usage to combat the population of insect pests. This study was aimed to study on ecological interaction between environmental factors such as insect pests, plant height, rainfall, temperature and humidity with abundance of beneficial insects in paddy field of Sungai Burong, Tanjung Karang, Selangor for two seasons of paddy planting. Low number of insects composition were recorded in paddy field at Sungai Burong during the vegetative phase and highest during the reproductive and maturity phases for two seasons of paddy planting. The trend of mean composition of insects were gradually increasing from vegetative to maturity phases while, the ecological interaction between insect pests, climatic factors and plant traits were acceptable as good predictor for all beneficial insects collected in this study namely Zygoptera, Gerridae, Coccinellidae and Staphylinidae except for Anisoptera. Therefore, consideration on several stated factors by maintaining or conserving ecology and controlling practices in good manner in paddy field has high potential and more reliable to control insect pests effectively using beneficial insects.

  19. Characterization of Quantitative Trait Loci for Grain Minerals in Hexaploid Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Rong-li; TONG Yi-ping; JING Rui-lian; ZHANG Fu-suo; ZOU Chun-qin

    2013-01-01

    Wheat is an important source of essential minerals for human body. Breeding wheat with high grain mineral concentration thus benefits human health. The objective of present study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling grain mineral concentration and to evaluate the relation between nitrogen (N) and other essential minerals in winter wheat. Wheat grains were harvested from field experiment which conducted in China and analyzed for this purpose. Forty-three QTLs controlling grain mineral concentration and nitrogen-related traits were detected by using a double haploid (DH) population derived from winter wheat varieties Hanxuan 10 and Lumai 14. Chromosomes 4D and 5A might be very important in controlling mineral status in wheat grains. Significant positive correlations were found between grain nitrogen concentration (GNC) and nutrients Fe, Mn, Cu, Mg concentrations (FeGC, MnGC, CuGC, MgGC). Flag leaf N concentration at anthesis (FLNC) significantly and positively correlated with GNC, FeGC, MnGC, and CuGC. The study extended our knowledge on minerals in wheat grains and suggested which interactions between minerals should be considered in future breeding program.

  20. The action of stabilizing selection, mutation, and drift on epistatic quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Victoria; Pérez-Figueroa, Andrés; Caballero, Armando; Hill, William G; García-Dorado, Aurora; López-Fanjul, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    For a quantitative trait under stabilizing selection, the effect of epistasis on its genetic architecture and on the changes of genetic variance caused by bottlenecking were investigated using theory and simulation. Assuming empirical estimates of the rate and effects of mutations and the intensity of selection, we assessed the impact of two-locus epistasis (synergistic/antagonistic) among linked or unlinked loci on the distribution of effects and frequencies of segregating loci in populations at the mutation-selection-drift balance. Strong pervasive epistasis did not modify substantially the genetic properties of the trait and, therefore, the most likely explanation for the low amount of variation usually accounted by the loci detected in genome-wide association analyses is that many causal loci will pass undetected. We investigated the impact of epistasis on the changes in genetic variance components when large populations were subjected to successive bottlenecks of different sizes, considering the action of genetic drift, operating singly (D), or jointly with mutation (MD) and selection (MSD). An initial increase of the different components of the genetic variance, as well as a dramatic acceleration of the between-line divergence, were always associated with synergistic epistasis but were strongly constrained by selection.

  1. Quantitative trait loci analysis for rice seed vigor during the germination stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhou-fei; Wang, Jian-fei; Bao, Yong-mei; Wang, Fu-hua; Zhang, Hong-sheng

    2010-12-01

    Seed vigor is an important characteristic of seed quality, and rice cultivars with strong seed vigor are desirable in direct-sowing rice production for optimum stand establishment. In the present study, the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of three traits for rice seed vigor during the germination stage, including germination rate, final germination percentage, and germination index, were investigated using one recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between japonica Daguandao and indica IR28, and using the multiple interval mapping (MIM) approach. The results show that indica rice presented stronger seed vigor during the germination stage than japonica rice. A total of ten QTLs, and at least five novel alleles, were detected to control rice seed vigor, and the amount of variation (R(2)) explained by an individual QTL ranged from 7.5% to 68.5%, with three major QTLs with R(2)>20%. Most of the QTLs detected here are likely to coincide with QTLs for seed weight, seed size, or seed dormancy, suggesting that the rice seed vigor might be correlated with seed weight, seed size, and seed dormancy. At least five QTLs are novel alleles with no previous reports of seed vigor genes in rice, and those major or minor QTLs could be used to significantly improve the seed vigor by marker-assisted selection (MAS) in rice.

  2. Mapping of imprinted quantitative trait loci using immortalized F2 populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxian Wen

    Full Text Available Mapping of imprinted quantitative trait loci (iQTLs is helpful for understanding the effects of genomic imprinting on complex traits in animals and plants. At present, the experimental designs and corresponding statistical methods having been proposed for iQTL mapping are all based on temporary populations including F2 and BC1, which can be used only once and suffer some other shortcomings respectively. In this paper, we propose a framework for iQTL mapping, including methods of interval mapping (IM and composite interval mapping (CIM based on conventional low-density genetic maps and point mapping (PM and composite point mapping (CPM based on ultrahigh-density genetic maps, using an immortalized F2 (imF2 population generated by random crosses between recombinant inbred lines or doubled haploid lines. We demonstrate by simulations that imF2 populations are very desirable and the proposed statistical methods (especially CIM and CPM are very powerful for iQTL mapping, with which the imprinting effects as well as the additive and dominance effects of iQTLs can be unbiasedly estimated.

  3. A Sequential Quantitative Trait Locus Fine-Mapping Strategy Using Recombinant-Derived Progeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yang; Dongfeng Zhang; Mingliang Xu

    2012-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that underlie agronomically important traits in crops would greatly increase agricultural productivity.Although advances have been made in QTL cloning,the majority of QTLs remain unknown because of their low heritability and minor contributions to phenotypic performance.Here we summarize the key advantages and disadvantages of current QTL fine-mapping methodologies,and then introduce a sequential QTL fine-mapping strategy based on both genotypes and phenotypes of progeny derived from recombinants.With this mapping strategy,experimental errors could be dramatically diminished so as to reveal the authentic genetic effect of target QTLs.The number of progeny required to detect QTLs at various R2 values was calculated,and the backcross generation suitable to start QTL fine-mapping was also estimated.This mapping strategy has proved to be very powerful in narrowing down QTL regions,particularly minor-effect QTLs,as revealed by fine-mapping of various resistance QTLs in maize.Application of this sequential QTL mapping strategy should accelerate cloning of agronomically important QTLs,which is currently a substantial challenge in crops.

  4. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Phytic Acid Concentration in Maize Grain Under Two Nitrogen Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-chao; HUANG Ya-qun; MA Wen-qi; ZHOU Jin-feng; BIAN Fen-ru; CHEN Fan-jun; MI Guo-hua

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) is the main storage form of phosphorus (P) in seeds. It can form insoluble complexes with microelements, thereby reducing their bioavailability for animals. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with grain PA concentration (PAC) is essential to improve this trait without affecting other aspects of grain nutrition such as protein content. Using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, we mapped QTL for grain PAC, as well as grain nitrogen concentration (NC) and P concentration (PC) in maize under two N conditions in 2 yr. We detected six QTLs for PAC. The QTL for PAC on chromosome 4 (phi072-umc1276) was identified under both low-N and high-N treatments, and explained 13.2 and 15.4%of the phenotypic variance, respectively. We identified three QTLs for grain NC, none of which were in the same region as the QTLs for PAC. We identified two QTLs for PC in the low-N treatment, one of which (umc1710-umc2197) was in the same interval as the QTL for PAC under high-N conditions. These results suggested that grain PAC can be improved without affecting grain NC and inorganic PC.

  5. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping for Bacterial Blight Resistance in Rice Using Bulked Segregant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Han

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana is highly resistant to rice bacterial blight (BB and this resistance trait has been transferred to cultivated rice (O. sativa using asymmetric somatic hybridization. However, no resistance genes have yet been cloned. In the present study, a progeny of the somatic hybridization with high BB resistance was crossed with a rice cultivar with high BB susceptibility to develop an F2 population. Using bulked segregant analysis (BSA, 17 polymorphic markers that were linked to rice BB resistance were obtained through scanning a total of 186 simple sequence repeats (SSR and sequence-tagged site (STS markers, evenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. A genetic linkage map was then constructed based on the 17 linkage markers and the F2 segregating population, which was followed by mapping for quantitative trait loci (QTLs for BB resistance. Three QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5, respectively, and the alleles of the resistant parent at any of the QTLs increased BB resistance. All of the three QTLs had a strong effect on resistance, explaining about 21.5%, 12.3% and 39.2% of the resistance variance, respectively. These QTLs were different from the loci of the BB resistance genes that have been identified in previous studies. The QTLs mapped in this work will facilitate the isolation of novel BB resistance genes and their utilization in rice resistance breeding.

  6. Generation mean analysis for quantitative traits in sesame (Sesamum indicum L. crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayarajan Sharmila

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the nature and magnitude of gene effects for yield and its components in sesame (Sesamum indicum L. we carried out generation mean analysis using the following four crosses of different sesame cultivars: VS 9510 x Co1; NIC 7907 x TMV 3; Cianno 13/10x VRI 1; and Si 1115/1 x TMV 3. The P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1 and BC2 of these generations were studied for seven quantitative traits. The analysis showed the presence of additive, dominance and epistatic gene interactions. The additive dominance model was adequate for plant height in the NIC 7907 x TMV3 and Si 1115/1x TMV 3 crosses and for capsule length in the VS 9510 x Co1, NIC 7907 x TMV 3 and Si 1115/1 x TMV 3 crosses. An epistatic digenic model was assumed for the remaining crosses. Duplicate-type epistasis played a greater role than complementary epistasis. The study revealed the importance of both additive and non-additive types of gene action for all the traits studied.

  7. Quantitative trait locus analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Akiyoshi; Gondo, Takahiro; Akashi, Ryo; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Arima, Susumu; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2012-05-01

    Many legumes form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. An elevation of nitrogen fixation in such legumes would have significant implications for plant growth and biomass production in agriculture. To identify the genetic basis for the regulation of nitrogen fixation, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted with recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross Miyakojima MG-20 × Gifu B-129 in the model legume Lotus japonicus. This population was inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 and grown for 14 days in pods containing vermiculite. Phenotypic data were collected for acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per plant (ARA/P), ARA per nodule weight (ARA/NW), ARA per nodule number (ARA/NN), NN per plant, NW per plant, stem length (SL), SL without inoculation (SLbac-), shoot dry weight without inoculation (SWbac-), root length without inoculation (RLbac-), and root dry weight (RWbac-), and finally 34 QTLs were identified. ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL showed strong correlations and QTL co-localization, suggesting that several plant characteristics important for symbiotic nitrogen fixation are controlled by the same locus. QTLs for ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL, co-localized around marker TM0832 on chromosome 4, were also co-localized with previously reported QTLs for seed mass. This is the first report of QTL analysis for symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity traits.

  8. Mapping and Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis of Verticillium Wilt Resistance Genes in Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Wang; Zhong-Xu Lin; Xian-Long Zhang; Wei Chen; Xiao-Ping Guo; Yi-Chun Nie; Yun-Hai Li

    2008-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is one of the most serious constraints to cotton production in almost all of the cotton-growing countries. In this study, "XinLuZao1" (XLZ1), a susceptible cultivar Gossypium hirsutum L. and "Hai7124" (H7124), a resistant line G. barbadense, and their F2:3 families were used to map and study the disease Index induced by verticillium wilt. A total of 430 SSR loci were mapped into 41 linkage groups; the map spanned 3 745.9 cM and the average distance between adjacent loci was 8.71 cM. Four and five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected based on the disease index investigated on July 22 and August 24 in 2004, respectively. These nine QTLs explained 10.63-28.83% of the phenotypic variance, six of them were located on the D sub-genome. Two QTLs located In the same marker intervals may partly explain the significant correlation of the two traits. QTLs explaining large phenotypic variation were identified in this study, which may be quite useful in cotton anti-disease breeding.

  9. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  10. Quantitative trait locus mapping for seed mineral concentrations in two Arabidopsis thaliana recombinant inbred populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian M; Grusak, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Biofortification of foods, achieved by increasing the concentrations of minerals such as iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), is a goal of plant scientists. Understanding genes that influence seed mineral concentration in a model plant such as Arabidopsis could help in the development of nutritionally enhanced crop cultivars. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for seed concentrations of calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), Fe, potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), and Zn was performed using two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations, Columbia (Col) x Landsberg erecta (Ler) and Cape Verde Islands (Cvi) x Ler, grown on multiple occasions. QTL mapping was also performed using data from silique hulls and the ratio of seed:hull mineral concentration of the Cvi x Ler population. Over 100 QTLs that affected seed mineral concentration were identified. Twenty-nine seed QTLs were found in more than one experiment, and several QTLs were found for both seed and hull mineral traits. A number of candidate genes affecting seed mineral concentration are discussed. These results indicate that A. thaliana is a suitable and convenient model for discovery of genes that affect seed mineral concentration. Some strong QTLs had no obvious candidate genes, offering the possibility of identifying unknown genes that affect mineral uptake and translocation to seeds.

  11. Linkage of DNA Methylation Quantitative Trait Loci to Human Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Heyn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation and, in particular, DNA methylation have been linked to the underlying genetic sequence. DNA methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTL have been identified through significant associations between the genetic and epigenetic codes in physiological and pathological contexts. We propose that interrogating the interplay between polymorphic alleles and DNA methylation is a powerful method for improving our interpretation of risk alleles identified in genome-wide association studies that otherwise lack mechanistic explanation. We integrated patient cancer risk genotype data and genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of 3,649 primary human tumors, representing 13 solid cancer types. We provide a comprehensive meQTL catalog containing DNA methylation associations for 21% of interrogated cancer risk polymorphisms. Differentially methylated loci harbor previously reported and as-yet-unidentified cancer genes. We suggest that such regulation at the DNA level can provide a considerable amount of new information about the biology of cancer-risk alleles.

  12. Genome-wide identification of expression quantitative trait loci for human telomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanseol; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A genome-wide association study was conducted to identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) for human telomerase. We tested the genetic associations of nucleotide variants with expression of the genes encoding human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase RNA components (TERC) in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 373 Europeans. Our results revealed 6 eQTLs associated with hTERT (P planar cell polarity protein 2 (PRICKLE2) gene important for the Wnt signaling pathway. This concurs with previous studies in which significant expressional relationships between hTERT and some genes (β-catenin and Wnt-3a) in the Wnt signaling pathway have been observed. This study suggested 6 novel eQTLs for hTERT and the association of hTERT with the Wnt signaling pathway. Further studies are needed to understand their underlying mechanisms to improve our understanding of the role of hTERT in cancer. PMID:27759658

  13. Quantitative trait loci pyramiding can improve the nutritional potential of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigano, Maria Manuela; Raiola, Assunta; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Monti, Daria Maria; Del Giudice, Rita; Frusciante, Luigi; Barone, Amalia

    2014-11-26

    Solanum lycopersicum represents an important source of antioxidants and other bioactive compounds. Previously two Solanum pennellii introgression lines (IL 7-3 and IL 12-4) were identified as carrying quantitative trait loci (QTL) increasing fruit ascorbic acid and phenolics content. Novel tomato lines were obtained by pyramiding these selected QTLs in the genetic background of the cultivated line M82. Pyramided lines revealed significant increases of total phenolics, phenolic acids, ascorbic acid, and total antioxidant activity compared to parental lines IL 7-3 and IL 12-4 and the cultivated line M82. In addition, tomato extracts obtained from the pyramided lines had no cytotoxic effect on normal human cells while exhibiting a selective cytotoxic effect on aggressive cancer cells. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that it is possible to incorporate favorable wild-species QTLs in the cultivated genetic background to obtain genotypes with higher nutritional value.

  14. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Milk Production in Dairy Cattle by Exploiting Progeny Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Pasquino, A. T.; Sargeant, L. S.; Sorensen, A.; Steele, M. R.; Zhao, X.; Womack, J. E.; Hoeschele, I.

    1995-01-01

    We have exploited ``progeny testing'' to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of > 150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score >/= 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. PMID:7713441

  15. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling milk production in dairy cattle by exploiting progeny testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Sargeant, L.S.; Steele, M.R.; Zhao, X. [Genmark Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Pasquino, A.T. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have exploited {open_quotes}progeny testing{close_quotes} to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of >150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score {ge} 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Inheritance of 18 quantitative dermatoglyphic traits based on factors in MZ and DZ twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Bibha; Malkin, Ida; Kobyliansky, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    18 quantitative finger and palmar dermatoglyphic traits were analyzed with the aim of determining genetic effects and common familial environmental influences on a large (358 nuclear pedigrees) number of twins (MZ and DZ). Genetic analysis based on principal factors includes variance and bivariate variance decomposition analysis. Especially, Factor 1 (digital pattern size) is remarkable, due to its degree of universality. The results of genetic analysis revealed all three extracted factors have significant proportion of additive genetic variance (93.5% to 72.9%). The main results of bivariate variance decomposition analysis appears significant correlation in residual variance between digital pattern size factor (Factor 1) versus finger pattern intensity factor (Factor 4), and palmar main lines factor (Factor 2) verses a-b ridge count (Factor 3), but there was no significant correlation in the genetic variance of factors.

  17. Evolution of Quantitative Traits under a Migration-Selection Balance: When Does Skew Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Débarre, Florence; Yeaman, Sam; Guillaume, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative-genetic models of differentiation under migration-selection balance often rely on the assumption of normally distributed genotypic and phenotypic values. When a population is subdivided into demes with selection toward different local optima, migration between demes may result in asymmetric, or skewed, local distributions. Using a simplified two-habitat model, we derive formulas without a priori assuming a Gaussian distribution of genotypic values, and we find expressions that naturally incorporate higher moments, such as skew. These formulas yield predictions of the expected divergence under migration-selection balance that are more accurate than models assuming Gaussian distributions, which illustrates the importance of incorporating these higher moments to assess the response to selection in heterogeneous environments. We further show with simulations that traits with loci of large effect display the largest skew in their distribution at migration-selection balance.

  18. Developmental Patterning as a Quantitative Trait: Genetic Modulation of the Hoxb6 Mutant Skeletal Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Kappen

    Full Text Available The process of patterning along the anterior-posterior axis in vertebrates is highly conserved. The function of Hox genes in the axis patterning process is particularly well documented for bone development in the vertebral column and the limbs. We here show that Hoxb6, in skeletal elements at the cervico-thoracic junction, controls multiple independent aspects of skeletal pattern, implicating discrete developmental pathways as substrates for this transcription factor. In addition, we demonstrate that Hoxb6 function is subject to modulation by genetic factors. These results establish Hox-controlled skeletal pattern as a quantitative trait modulated by gene-gene interactions, and provide evidence that distinct modifiers influence the function of conserved developmental genes in fundamental patterning processes.

  19. Estimation of genetic parameters and detection of quantitative trait loci for metabolites in Danish Holstein milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Sundekilde, Ulrik; Poulsen, Nina Aagaard;

    2013-01-01

    Small components and metabolites in milk are significant for the utilization of milk, not only in dairy food production but also as disease predictors in dairy cattle. This study focused on estimation of genetic parameters and detection of quantitative trait loci for metabolites in bovine milk....... For this purpose, milk samples were collected in mid lactation from 371 Danish Holstein cows in first to third parity. A total of 31 metabolites were detected and identified in bovine milk by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Cows were genotyped using a bovine high-density single nucleotide...... polymorphism (SNP) chip. Based on the SNP data, a genomic relationship matrix was calculated and used as a random factor in a model together with 2 fixed factors (herd and lactation stage) to estimate the heritability and breeding value for individual metabolites in the milk. Heritability was in the range of 0...

  20. Fine mapping quantitative trait loci under selective phenotyping strategies based on linkage and linkage disequilibrium criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansari-Mahyari, S; Berg, P; Lund, M S

    2009-01-01

    In fine mapping of a large-scale experimental population where collection of phenotypes are very expensive, difficult to record or time-demanding, selective phenotyping could be used to phenotype the most informative individuals. Linkage analyses based sampling criteria (LAC) and linkage...... disequilibrium-based sampling criteria (LDC) for selecting individuals to phenotype are compared to random phenotyping in a quantitative trait loci (QTL) verification experiment using stochastic simulation. Several strategies based on LAC and LDC for selecting the most informative 30%, 40% or 50% of individuals...... for phenotyping to extract maximum power and precision in a QTL fine mapping experiment were developed and assessed. Linkage analyses for the mapping was performed for individuals sampled on LAC within families and combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage analyses was performed for individuals sampled across...

  1. Effector-Triggered Immune Response in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Quantitative Trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovidis, Michail; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; Exposito-Alonso, Moises; Cowper, Matthew G.; Law, Theresa F.; Liu, Qingli; Vu, Minh Chau; Dang, Troy Minh; Corwin, Jason A.; Weigel, Detlef; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Grant, Sarah R.

    2016-01-01

    We identified loci responsible for natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) responses to a bacterial pathogen virulence factor, HopAM1. HopAM1 is a type III effector protein secreted by the virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain Pto DC3000. Delivery of HopAM1 from disarmed Pseudomonas strains leads to local cell death, meristem chlorosis, or both, with varying intensities in different Arabidopsis accessions. These phenotypes are not associated with differences in bacterial growth restriction. We treated the two phenotypes as quantitative traits to identify host loci controlling responses to HopAM1. Genome-wide association (GWA) of 64 Arabidopsis accessions identified independent variants highly correlated with response to each phenotype. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in a recombinant inbred population between Bur-0 and Col-0 accessions revealed genetic linkage to regions distinct from the top GWA hits. Two major QTL associated with HopAM1-induced cell death were also associated with HopAM1-induced chlorosis. HopAM1-induced changes in Arabidopsis gene expression showed that rapid HopAM1-dependent cell death in Bur-0 is correlated with effector-triggered immune responses. Studies of the effect of mutations in known plant immune system genes showed, surprisingly, that both cell death and chlorosis phenotypes are enhanced by loss of EDS1, a regulatory hub in the plant immune-signaling network. Our results reveal complex genetic architecture for response to this particular type III virulence effector, in contrast to the typical monogenic control of cell death and disease resistance triggered by most type III effectors. PMID:27412712

  2. Effector-Triggered Immune Response in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Quantitative Trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovidis, Michail; Teixeira, Paulo J P L; Exposito-Alonso, Moises; Cowper, Matthew G; Law, Theresa F; Liu, Qingli; Vu, Minh Chau; Dang, Troy Minh; Corwin, Jason A; Weigel, Detlef; Dangl, Jeffery L; Grant, Sarah R

    2016-09-01

    We identified loci responsible for natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) responses to a bacterial pathogen virulence factor, HopAM1. HopAM1 is a type III effector protein secreted by the virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain Pto DC3000. Delivery of HopAM1 from disarmed Pseudomonas strains leads to local cell death, meristem chlorosis, or both, with varying intensities in different Arabidopsis accessions. These phenotypes are not associated with differences in bacterial growth restriction. We treated the two phenotypes as quantitative traits to identify host loci controlling responses to HopAM1. Genome-wide association (GWA) of 64 Arabidopsis accessions identified independent variants highly correlated with response to each phenotype. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in a recombinant inbred population between Bur-0 and Col-0 accessions revealed genetic linkage to regions distinct from the top GWA hits. Two major QTL associated with HopAM1-induced cell death were also associated with HopAM1-induced chlorosis. HopAM1-induced changes in Arabidopsis gene expression showed that rapid HopAM1-dependent cell death in Bur-0 is correlated with effector-triggered immune responses. Studies of the effect of mutations in known plant immune system genes showed, surprisingly, that both cell death and chlorosis phenotypes are enhanced by loss of EDS1, a regulatory hub in the plant immune-signaling network. Our results reveal complex genetic architecture for response to this particular type III virulence effector, in contrast to the typical monogenic control of cell death and disease resistance triggered by most type III effectors.

  3. Radial basis function regression methods for predicting quantitative traits using SNP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nanye; Gianola, Daniel; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Weigel, Kent A; Kranis, Andreas; González-Recio, Oscar

    2010-06-01

    A challenge when predicting total genetic values for complex quantitative traits is that an unknown number of quantitative trait loci may affect phenotypes via cryptic interactions. If markers are available, assuming that their effects on phenotypes are additive may lead to poor predictive ability. Non-parametric radial basis function (RBF) regression, which does not assume a particular form of the genotype-phenotype relationship, was investigated here by simulation and analysis of body weight and food conversion rate data in broilers. The simulation included a toy example in which an arbitrary non-linear genotype-phenotype relationship was assumed, and five different scenarios representing different broad sense heritability levels (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 0.9) were created. In addition, a whole genome simulation was carried out, in which three different gene action modes (pure additive, additive+dominance and pure epistasis) were considered. In all analyses, a training set was used to fit the model and a testing set was used to evaluate predictive performance. The latter was measured by correlation and predictive mean-squared error (PMSE) on the testing data. For comparison, a linear additive model known as Bayes A was used as benchmark. Two RBF models with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific (RBF I) and common (RBF II) weights were examined. Results indicated that, in the presence of complex genotype-phenotype relationships (i.e. non-linearity and non-additivity), RBF outperformed Bayes A in predicting total genetic values using SNP markers. Extension of Bayes A to include all additive, dominance and epistatic effects could improve its prediction accuracy. RBF I was generally better than RBF II, and was able to identify relevant SNPs in the toy example.

  4. Statistical distributions of test statistics used for quantitative trait association mapping in structured populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyssèdre Simon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spurious associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and phenotypes are a major issue in genome-wide association studies and have led to underestimation of type 1 error rate and overestimation of the number of quantitative trait loci found. Many authors have investigated the influence of population structure on the robustness of methods by simulation. This paper is aimed at developing further the algebraic formalization of power and type 1 error rate for some of the classical statistical methods used: simple regression, two approximate methods of mixed models involving the effect of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and a random polygenic effect (GRAMMAR and FASTA and the transmission/disequilibrium test for quantitative traits and nuclear families. Analytical formulae were derived using matrix algebra for the first and second moments of the statistical tests, assuming a true mixed model with a polygenic effect and SNP effects. Results The expectation and variance of the test statistics and their marginal expectations and variances according to the distribution of genotypes and estimators of variance components are given as a function of the relationship matrix and of the heritability of the polygenic effect. These formulae were used to compute type 1 error rate and power for any kind of relationship matrix between phenotyped and genotyped individuals for any level of heritability. For the regression method, type 1 error rate increased with the variability of relationships and with heritability, but decreased with the GRAMMAR method and was not affected with the FASTA and quantitative transmission/disequilibrium test methods. Conclusions The formulae can be easily used to provide the correct threshold of type 1 error rate and to calculate the power when designing experiments or data collection protocols. The results concerning the efficacy of each method agree with simulation results in the literature but were

  5. A consensus map of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) based on diversity array technology markers: applications in genetic dissection of qualitative and quantitative traits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Kilian, Andrzej; Detering, Frank; Long, Yan; Edwards, David; Parkin, Isobel A P; Sharpe, Andrew G; Nelson, Matthew N; Larkan, Nick; Zou, Jun; Meng, Jinling; Aslam, M Naveed; Batley, Jacqueline; Cowling, Wallace A; Lydiate, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Dense consensus genetic maps based on high-throughput genotyping platforms are valuable for making genetic gains in Brassica napus through quantitative trait locus identification, efficient predictive...

  6. Quantitative Genetics and Functional-Structural Plant Growth Models: Simulation of Quantitative Trait Loci Detection for Model Parameters and Application to Potential Yield Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Letort, Veronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry; De Reffye, Philippe; Courtois, Brigitte; 10.1093/aob/mcm197

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: Prediction of phenotypic traits from new genotypes under untested environmental conditions is crucial to build simulations of breeding strategies to improve target traits. Although the plant response to environmental stresses is characterized by both architectural and functional plasticity, recent attempts to integrate biological knowledge into genetics models have mainly concerned specific physiological processes or crop models without architecture, and thus may prove limited when studying genotype x environment interactions. Consequently, this paper presents a simulation study introducing genetics into a functional-structural growth model, which gives access to more fundamental traits for quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection and thus to promising tools for yield optimization. Methods: The GreenLab model was selected as a reasonable choice to link growth model parameters to QTL. Virtual genes and virtual chromosomes were defined to build a simple genetic model that drove the settings ...

  7. Identifying quantitative trait loci and determining closely related stalk traits for rind penetrometer resistance in a high-oil maize population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haixiao; Meng, Yujie; Wang, Hongwu; Liu, Hai; Chen, Shaojiang

    2012-05-01

    Stalk lodging in maize causes annual yield losses between 5 and 20% worldwide. Many studies have indicated that maize stalk strength significantly negatively correlates with lodging observed in the field. Rind penetrometer resistance (RPR) measurements can be used to effectively evaluate maize stalk strength, but little is known about the genetic basis of this parameter. The objective of this study was to explore a genetic model and detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) of RPR and determine relationships between RPR and other stalk traits, especially cell wall chemical components. RPR is quantitative trait in nature, and both additive and non-additive effects may be important to consider for the improvement of RPR. Nine additive-effect QTLs covering nine chromosomes, except chromosome 5, and one pair of epistatic QTLs were detected for RPR. CeSA11 involved in cellulose synthesis and colorless2 involved in lignin synthesis were identified as possible candidate genes for RPR. Internode diameter (InD), fresh weight of internode (FreW), dry weight of internode (DryW), fresh weight and dry weight as well as cell wall components per unit volume significantly positively correlated with RPR. The internode water content (InW) significantly negatively correlated with RPR. Notably, these traits significantly correlated with RPR, and the QTLs of these traits co-localized with those of RPR. The corresponding results obtained from correlation analysis and QTL mapping suggested the presence of pleitropism or linkage between genes and indicated that these different approaches may be used for cross authentication of relationships between different traits.

  8. Quantitative trait loci map for growth and morphometric traits using a channel catfish x blue catfish interspecific hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, A M; Liu, Z; Kucuktas, H; Umali-Maceina, G; Su, B; Dunham, R A

    2014-05-01

    Head length, head depth, head width, body depth, body width, caudal depth, and caudal width and total length and BW were measured for 71 backcross full sibs between the interspecific backcross F1 (female channel catfish [Ictalurus punctatus] × male blue catfish [Ictalurus furcatus]) female × blue catfish male. Body measurements were corrected for both size and the relationship between relative body shape and size, which is critical but usually ignored in fish research. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis was used for construction of a QTL map with 44 linkage groups. Eleven of 44 linkage groups had at least 1 significant QTL (P ≤ 0.05) and 11 of 44 at P = 0.10. Linkage group 19 was unique as it had multiple QTL for every trait measured, except for caudal width for which no QTL was identified on any linkage group. Approximately half of the markers measured were associated with positive effects (increase in size) on the traits and half had negative effects (decrease in size). Linkage groups 5, 9, 18, 20, 39, and 40 were significant for multiple traits and always had a trait negative effect. Total length is represented on the map by the most linkage groups and the most markers. The linkage relationships found among BW, total length, and the 7 morphometric traits indicated that multiple trait marker-assisted selection to simultaneously increase BW body depth, body width, and caudal depth while decreasing the head traits with the goal to increase body weight and carcass yield would be very difficult. Multiple genetic enhancement approaches would likely be needed to simultaneously improve BW and body conformation.

  9. The genetic architecture of heterochronsy as a quantitative trait: lessons from a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lidan; Sang, Mengmeng; Zheng, Chenfei; Wang, Dongyang; Shi, Hexin; Liu, Kaiyue; Guo, Yanfang; Cheng, Tangren; Zhang, Qixiang; Wu, Rongling

    2017-05-30

    Heterochrony is known as a developmental change in the timing or rate of ontogenetic events across phylogenetic lineages. It is a key concept synthesizing development into ecology and evolution to explore the mechanisms of how developmental processes impact on phenotypic novelties. A number of molecular experiments using contrasting organisms in developmental timing have identified specific genes involved in heterochronic variation. Beyond these classic approaches that can only identify single genes or pathways, quantitative models derived from current next-generation sequencing data serve as a more powerful tool to precisely capture heterochronic variation and systematically map a complete set of genes that contribute to heterochronic processes. In this opinion note, we discuss a computational framework of genetic mapping that can characterize heterochronic quantitative trait loci that determine the pattern and process of development. We propose a unifying model that charts the genetic architecture of heterochrony that perceives and responds to environmental perturbations and evolves over geologic time. The new model may potentially enhance our understanding of the adaptive value of heterochrony and its evolutionary origins, providing a useful context for designing new organisms that can best use future resources. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Fabp7 maps to a quantitative trait locus for a schizophrenia endophenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Watanabe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI are a biological marker for schizophrenia. To unravel the mechanisms that control PPI, we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis on 1,010 F2 mice derived by crossing C57BL/6 (B6 animals that show high PPI with C3H/He (C3 animals that show low PPI. We detected six major loci for PPI, six for the acoustic startle response, and four for latency to response peak, some of which were sex-dependent. A promising candidate on the Chromosome 10-QTL was Fabp7 (fatty acid binding protein 7, brain, a gene with functional links to the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor and expression in astrocytes. Fabp7-deficient mice showed decreased PPI and a shortened startle response latency, typical of the QTL's proposed effects. A quantitative complementation test supported Fabp7 as a potential PPI-QTL gene, particularly in male mice. Disruption of Fabp7 attenuated neurogenesis in vivo. Human FABP7 showed altered expression in schizophrenic brains and genetic association with schizophrenia, which were both evident in males when samples were divided by sex. These results suggest that FABP7 plays a novel and crucial role, linking the NMDA, neurodevelopmental, and glial theories of schizophrenia pathology and the PPI endophenotype, with larger or overt effects in males. We also discuss the results from the perspective of fetal programming.

  11. Quantitative plant ecology:statistical and ecological modelling of plant abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Damgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This e-book is written in the Wolfram' CDF format (download free CDF player from Wolfram.com)The objective of this e-book is to introduce the population ecological concepts for measuring and predicting the ecological success of plant species. This will be done by focusing on the measurement and statistical modelling of plant species abundance and the relevant ecological processes that control species abundance. The focus on statistical modelling and likelihood function based methods also mean...

  12. Gene set analyses of genome-wide association studies on 49 quantitative traits measured in a single genetic epidemiology dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Kwon, Ji-Sun; Kim, Sangsoo

    2013-09-01

    Gene set analysis is a powerful tool for interpreting a genome-wide association study result and is gaining popularity these days. Comparison of the gene sets obtained for a variety of traits measured from a single genetic epidemiology dataset may give insights into the biological mechanisms underlying these traits. Based on the previously published single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data on 8,842 individuals enrolled in the Korea Association Resource project, we performed a series of systematic genome-wide association analyses for 49 quantitative traits of basic epidemiological, anthropometric, or blood chemistry parameters. Each analysis result was subjected to subsequent gene set analyses based on Gene Ontology (GO) terms using gene set analysis software, GSA-SNP, identifying a set of GO terms significantly associated to each trait (pcorr neuronal or nerve systems.

  13. Quantitative trait loci affecting growth-related traits in wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) grown under different levels of nutrient supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elberse, I.A.M.; Vanhala, T.K.; Turin, J.H.B.; Stam, P.; Van Damme, J.M.M.; van Tienderen, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity of relative growth rate (RGR), its components and associated morphological traits was studied in relation to nutrient limitation. In all, 140 F3 lines from a cross, made between two Hordeum spontaneum (wild barley) accessions sampled in Israel, were subject

  14. Three Combined Quantitative Trait Loci from Nonhost Lactuca saligna Are Sufficient to Provide Complete Resistance of Lettuce Against Bremia lactucae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, N.; Pelgrom, K.T.B.; Niks, R.E.; Visser, R.G.F.; Jeuken, M.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The nonhost resistance of wild lettuce (Lactuca saligna) to downy mildew (Bremia lactucae) is based on at least 15 quantitative trait loci (QTL), each effective at one or more plant developmental stages. We used QTL pyramiding (stacking) to determine how many of these QTL from L. saligna are suffici

  15. Mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with partial resistance to phytophthora sojae and flooding tolerance in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufm. & Gerd. and flooding can limit growth and productivity, of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], especially on poorly drained soils. The primary objective of this research project was to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with f...

  16. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35: 296-30

  17. Effects of long-term averaging of quantitative blood pressure traits on the detection of genetic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.G. Larson (Martin); X. Guo (Xiuqing); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); J.C. Bis (Joshua); X. Gu (Xiangjun); G.D. Smith; M.-L. Yang (Min-Lee); Y. Zhang (Yan); G.B. Ehret (Georg); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S.J. Hwang; G.J. Papanicolau (George); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); K. Rice (Kenneth); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Pihur (Vasyl); P.M. Ridker (Paul); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); N. Amin (Najaf); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); K. Liu (Kiang); L.J. Launer (Lenore); M. Xu (Ming); M. Caulfield (Mark); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D. Vaidya (Dhananjay); A. Dehghan (Abbas); G. Li (Guo); C. Bouchard (Claude); T.B. Harris (Tamara); H. Zhang (He); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.S. Siscovick (David); W. Gao (Wei); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Hofman (Albert); E.M. Schmidt (Ellen); O.H. Franco (Oscar); Y. Huo (Yong); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); P. Munroe (Patricia); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); W. Palmas (Walter); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M. Fornage (Myriam); D. Levy (Daniel); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBlood pressure (BP) is a heritable, quantitative trait with intraindividual variability and susceptibility to measurement error. Genetic studies of BP generally use single-visit measurements and thus cannot remove variability occurring over months or years. We leveraged the idea that ave

  18. Genetic mapping and confirmation of quantitative trait loci for seed protein and oil contents and seed weight in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demand for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] meal has increased worldwide and soybean importers often offer premiums for soybean containing higher contents of protein and oil. Objectives were to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with soybean seed protein, oil, and seed weight in a soyb...

  19. Comparison of single-marker and multi-marker tests in rare variant association studies of quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konigorski, Stefan; Yilmaz, Yildiz E; Pischon, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    In genetic association studies of rare variants, low statistical power and potential violations of established estimator properties are among the main challenges of association tests. Multi-marker tests (MMTs) have been proposed to target these challenges, but any comparison with single-marker tests (SMTs) has to consider that their aim is to identify causal genomic regions instead of variants. Valid power comparisons have been performed for the analysis of binary traits indicating that MMTs have higher power, but there is a lack of conclusive studies for quantitative traits. The aim of our study was therefore to fairly compare SMTs and MMTs in their empirical power to identify the same causal loci associated with a quantitative trait. The results of extensive simulation studies indicate that previous results for binary traits cannot be generalized. First, we show that for the analysis of quantitative traits, conventional estimation methods and test statistics of single-marker approaches have valid properties yielding association tests with valid type I error, even when investigating singletons or doubletons. Furthermore, SMTs lead to more powerful association tests for identifying causal genes than MMTs when the effect sizes of causal variants are large, and less powerful tests when causal variants have small effect sizes. For moderate effect sizes, whether SMTs or MMTs have higher power depends on the sample size and percentage of causal SNVs. For a more complete picture, we also compare the power in studies of quantitative and binary traits, and the power to identify causal genes with the power to identify causal rare variants. In a genetic association analysis of systolic blood pressure in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19 data, SMTs yielded smaller p-values compared to MMTs for most of the investigated blood pressure genes, and were least influenced by the definition of gene regions.

  20. Network-based group variable selection for detecting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuegong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL aims to identify the genetic loci associated with the expression level of genes. Penalized regression with a proper penalty is suitable for the high-dimensional biological data. Its performance should be enhanced when we incorporate biological knowledge of gene expression network and linkage disequilibrium (LD structure between loci in high-noise background. Results We propose a network-based group variable selection (NGVS method for QTL detection. Our method simultaneously maps highly correlated expression traits sharing the same biological function to marker sets formed by LD. By grouping markers, complex joint activity of multiple SNPs can be considered and the dimensionality of eQTL problem is reduced dramatically. In order to demonstrate the power and flexibility of our method, we used it to analyze two simulations and a mouse obesity and diabetes dataset. We considered the gene co-expression network, grouped markers into marker sets and treated the additive and dominant effect of each locus as a group: as a consequence, we were able to replicate results previously obtained on the mouse linkage dataset. Furthermore, we observed several possible sex-dependent loci and interactions of multiple SNPs. Conclusions The proposed NGVS method is appropriate for problems with high-dimensional data and high-noise background. On eQTL problem it outperforms the classical Lasso method, which does not consider biological knowledge. Introduction of proper gene expression and loci correlation information makes detecting causal markers more accurate. With reasonable model settings, NGVS can lead to novel biological findings.

  1. Collapsed methylation quantitative trait loci analysis for low frequency and rare variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G; Shihab, Hashem A; Hemani, Gibran; Zheng, Jie; Hannon, Eilis; Mill, Jonathan; Carnero-Montoro, Elena; Bell, Jordana T; Lyttleton, Oliver; McArdle, Wendy L; Ring, Susan M; Rodriguez, Santiago; Campbell, Colin; Smith, George Davey; Relton, Caroline L; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gaunt, Tom R

    2016-10-01

    Single variant approaches have been successful in identifying DNA methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTL), although as with complex traits they lack the statistical power to identify the effects from rare genetic variants. We have undertaken extensive analyses to identify regions of low frequency and rare variants that are associated with DNA methylation levels. We used repeated measurements of DNA methylation from five different life stages in human blood, taken from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort. Variants were collapsed across CpG islands and their flanking regions to identify variants collectively associated with methylation, where no single variant was individually responsible for the observed signal. All analyses were undertaken using the sequence kernel association test. For loci where no individual variant mQTL was observed based on a single variant analysis, we identified 95 unique regions where the combined effect of low frequency variants (MAF ≤ 5%) provided strong evidence of association with methylation. For loci where there was previous evidence of an individual variant mQTL, a further 3 regions provided evidence of association between multiple low frequency variants and methylation levels. Effects were observed consistently across 5 different time points in the lifecourse and evidence of replication in the TwinsUK and Exeter cohorts was also identified. We have demonstrated the potential of this novel approach to mQTL analysis by analysing the combined effect of multiple low frequency or rare variants. Future studies should benefit from applying this approach as a complementary follow up to single variant analyses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Genotype-environment interactions for quantitative traits in Korea Associated Resource (KARE) cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the lack of statistical power and confounding effects of population structure in human population data, genotype-environment interaction studies have not yielded promising results and have provided only limited knowledge for exploring how genotype and environmental factors interact to in their influence onto risk. Results We analyzed 49 human quantitative traits in 7,170 unrelated Korean individuals on 326,262 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) collected from the KARE (Korean Association Resource) project, and we estimated the statistically significant proportion of variance that could be explained by genotype-area interactions in the supra-iliac skinfold thickness trait (hGE2 = 0.269 and P = 0.00032), which is related to abdominal obesity. Data suggested that the genotypes could have different effects on the phenotype (supra-iliac skinfold thickness) in different environmental settings (rural vs. urban areas). We then defined the genotype groups of individuals with similar genetic profiles based on the additive genetic relationships among individuals using SNPs. We observed the norms of reaction, and the differential phenotypic response of a genotype to a change in environmental exposure. Interestingly, we also found that the gene clusters responsible for cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions were enriched significantly for genotype-area interaction. Conclusions This significant heritability estimate of genotype-environment interactions will lead to conceptual advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying genotype-environment interactions, and could be ultimately applied to personalized preventative treatments based on environmental exposures. PMID:24491211

  3. Detection of quantitative trait loci for growth and fatness in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gellin Joël

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis of growth and fatness data from a three-generation experimental cross between Meishan (MS and Large White (LW pig breeds is presented. Six boars and 23 F1 sows, the progeny of six LW boars and six MS sows, produced 530 F2 males and 573 F2 females. Nine growth traits, i.e. body weight at birth and at 3, 10, 13, 17 and 22 weeks of age, average daily gain from birth to 3 weeks, from 3 to 10 weeks and from 10 to 22 weeks of age, as well as backfat thickness at 13, 17 and 22 weeks of age and at 40 and 60 kg live weight were analysed. Animals were typed for a total of 137 markers covering the entire porcine genome. Analyses were performed using two interval mapping methods: a line-cross (LC regression method where founder lines were assumed to be fixed for different QTL alleles and a half-/full-sib (HFS maximum likelihood method where allele substitution effects were estimated within each half-/full-sib family. Both methods revealed highly significant gene effects for growth on chromosomes 1, 4 and 7 and for backfat thickness on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7 and X, and significant gene effects on chromosome 6 for growth and backfat thickness. Suggestive QTLs were also revealed by both methods on chromosomes 2 and 3 for growth and 2 for backfat thickness. Significant gene effects were detected for growth on chromosomes 11, 13, 14, 16 and 18 and for backfat thickness on chromosome 8, 10, 13 and 14. LW alleles were associated with high growth rate and low backfat thickness, except for those of chromosome 7 and to a lesser extent early-growth alleles on chromosomes 1 and 2 and backfat thickness alleles on chromosome 6.

  4. Genome-Assisted Prediction of Quantitative Traits Using the R Package sommer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanny Covarrubias-Pazaran

    Full Text Available Most traits of agronomic importance are quantitative in nature, and genetic markers have been used for decades to dissect such traits. Recently, genomic selection has earned attention as next generation sequencing technologies became feasible for major and minor crops. Mixed models have become a key tool for fitting genomic selection models, but most current genomic selection software can only include a single variance component other than the error, making hybrid prediction using additive, dominance and epistatic effects unfeasible for species displaying heterotic effects. Moreover, Likelihood-based software for fitting mixed models with multiple random effects that allows the user to specify the variance-covariance structure of random effects has not been fully exploited. A new open-source R package called sommer is presented to facilitate the use of mixed models for genomic selection and hybrid prediction purposes using more than one variance component and allowing specification of covariance structures. The use of sommer for genomic prediction is demonstrated through several examples using maize and wheat genotypic and phenotypic data. At its core, the program contains three algorithms for estimating variance components: Average information (AI, Expectation-Maximization (EM and Efficient Mixed Model Association (EMMA. Kernels for calculating the additive, dominance and epistatic relationship matrices are included, along with other useful functions for genomic analysis. Results from sommer were comparable to other software, but the analysis was faster than Bayesian counterparts in the magnitude of hours to days. In addition, ability to deal with missing data, combined with greater flexibility and speed than other REML-based software was achieved by putting together some of the most efficient algorithms to fit models in a gentle environment such as R.

  5. Quantitative trait loci mapping reveals candidate pathways regulating cell cycle duration in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwo Geoffrey

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated parasite biomass in the human red blood cells can lead to increased malaria morbidity. The genes and mechanisms regulating growth and development of Plasmodium falciparum through its erythrocytic cycle are not well understood. We previously showed that strains HB3 and Dd2 diverge in their proliferation rates, and here use quantitative trait loci mapping in 34 progeny from a cross between these parent clones along with integrative bioinformatics to identify genetic loci and candidate genes that control divergences in cell cycle duration. Results Genetic mapping of cell cycle duration revealed a four-locus genetic model, including a major genetic effect on chromosome 12, which accounts for 75% of the inherited phenotype variation. These QTL span 165 genes, the majority of which have no predicted function based on homology. We present a method to systematically prioritize candidate genes using the extensive sequence and transcriptional information available for the parent lines. Putative functions were assigned to the prioritized genes based on protein interaction networks and expression eQTL from our earlier study. DNA metabolism or antigenic variation functional categories were enriched among our prioritized candidate genes. Genes were then analyzed to determine if they interact with cyclins or other proteins known to be involved in the regulation of cell cycle. Conclusions We show that the divergent proliferation rate between a drug resistant and drug sensitive parent clone is under genetic regulation and is segregating as a complex trait in 34 progeny. We map a major locus along with additional secondary effects, and use the wealth of genome data to identify key candidate genes. Of particular interest are a nucleosome assembly protein (PFL0185c, a Zinc finger transcription factor (PFL0465c both on chromosome 12 and a ribosomal protein L7Ae-related on chromosome 4 (PFD0960c.

  6. Prioritizing quantitative trait loci for root system architecture in tetraploid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaferri, Marco; El-Feki, Walid; Nazemi, Ghasemali; Salvi, Silvio; Canè, Maria Angela; Colalongo, Maria Chiara; Stefanelli, Sandra; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Optimization of root system architecture (RSA) traits is an important objective for modern wheat breeding. Linkage and association mapping for RSA in two recombinant inbred line populations and one association mapping panel of 183 elite durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum Desf.) accessions evaluated as seedlings grown on filter paper/polycarbonate screening plates revealed 20 clusters of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root length and number, as well as 30 QTLs for root growth angle (RGA). Divergent RGA phenotypes observed by seminal root screening were validated by root phenotyping of field-grown adult plants. QTLs were mapped on a high-density tetraploid consensus map based on transcript-associated Illumina 90K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) developed for bread and durum wheat, thus allowing for an accurate cross-referencing of RSA QTLs between durum and bread wheat. Among the main QTL clusters for root length and number highlighted in this study, 15 overlapped with QTLs for multiple RSA traits reported in bread wheat, while out of 30 QTLs for RGA, only six showed co-location with previously reported QTLs in wheat. Based on their relative additive effects/significance, allelic distribution in the association mapping panel, and co-location with QTLs for grain weight and grain yield, the RSA QTLs have been prioritized in terms of breeding value. Three major QTL clusters for root length and number (RSA_QTL_cluster_5#, RSA_QTL_cluster_6#, and RSA_QTL_cluster_12#) and nine RGA QTL clusters (QRGA.ubo-2A.1, QRGA.ubo-2A.3, QRGA.ubo-2B.2/2B.3, QRGA.ubo-4B.4, QRGA.ubo-6A.1, QRGA.ubo-6A.2, QRGA.ubo-7A.1, QRGA.ubo-7A.2, and QRGA.ubo-7B) appear particularly valuable for further characterization towards a possible implementation of breeding applications in marker-assisted selection and/or cloning of the causal genes underlying the QTLs.

  7. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs for fatty acid composition in an interspecific cross of oil palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Mukesh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marker Assisted Selection (MAS is well suited to a perennial crop like oil palm, in which the economic products are not produced until several years after planting. The use of DNA markers for selection in such crops can greatly reduce the number of breeding cycles needed. With the use of DNA markers, informed decisions can be made at the nursery stage, regarding which individuals should be retained as breeding stock, which are satisfactory for agricultural production, and which should be culled. The trait associated with oil quality, measured in terms of its fatty acid composition, is an important agronomic trait that can eventually be tracked using molecular markers. This will speed up the production of new and improved oil palm planting materials. Results A map was constructed using AFLP, RFLP and SSR markers for an interspecific cross involving a Colombian Elaeis oleifera (UP1026 and a Nigerian E. guinneensis (T128. A framework map was generated for the male parent, T128, using Joinmap ver. 4.0. In the paternal (E. guineensis map, 252 markers (199 AFLP, 38 RFLP and 15 SSR could be ordered in 21 linkage groups (1815 cM. Interval mapping and multiple-QTL model (MQM mapping (also known as composite interval mapping, CIM were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs controlling oil quality (measured in terms of iodine value and fatty acid composition. At a 5% genome-wide significance threshold level, QTLs associated with iodine value (IV, myristic acid (C14:0, palmitic acid (C16:0, palmitoleic acid (C16:1, stearic acid (C18:0, oleic acid (C18:1 and linoleic acid (C18:2 content were detected. One genomic region on Group 1 appears to be influencing IV, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1 content. Significant QTL for C14:0, C16:1, C18:0 and C18:1 content was detected around the same locus on Group 15, thus revealing another major locus influencing fatty acid composition in oil palm. Additional QTL for C18:0 was detected on Group 3

  8. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci underlying sensory meat quality traits in three French beef cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, S; Levéziel, H; Hocquette, J F; Rousset, S; Denoyelle, C; Journaux, L; Renand, G

    2014-10-01

    Improving the traits that underlie meat quality is a major challenge in the beef industry. The objective of this paper was to detect QTL linked to sensory meat quality traits in 3 French beef cattle breeds. We genotyped 1,059, 1,219, and 947 young bulls and their sires belonging to the Charolais, Limousin, and Blonde d'Aquitaine breeds, respectively, using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). After estimating relevant genetic parameters using VCE software, we performed a linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis on 4 meat traits: intramuscular fat content, muscle lightness, shear force, and tenderness score. Heritability coefficients largely ranged between 0.10 and 0.24; however, they reached a maximum of 0.44 and 0.50 for intramuscular fat content and tenderness score, respectively, in the Charolais breed. The 2 meat texture traits, shear force and tenderness score, were strongly genetically correlated (-0.91 in the Charolais and Limousin breed and -0.86 in the Blonde d'Aquitaine breed), indicating that they are 2 different measures of approximately the same trait. The genetic correlation between tenderness and intramuscular fat content differed across breeds. Using a significance threshold of 5 × 10(-4) for QTL detection, we found more than 200 significant positions across the 29 autosomal chromosomes for the 4 traits in the Charolais and Blonde d'Aquitaine breeds; in contrast, there were only 78 significant positions in the Limousin breed. Few QTL were common across breeds. We detected QTL for intramuscular fat content located near the myostatin gene in the Charolais and Blonde d'Aquitaine breeds. No mutation in this gene has been reported for the Blonde d'Aquitaine breed; therefore, it suggests that an unknown mutation could be segregating in this breed. We confirmed that, in certain breeds, markers in the calpastatin and calpain 1 gene regions affect tenderness. We also found new QTL as several QTL on chromosome 3 that are

  9. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL in sheep. II. Meta-assembly and identification of novel QTL for milk production traits in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Mary K

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An (Awassi × Merino × Merino backcross family of 172 ewes was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL for different milk production traits on a framework map of 200 loci across all autosomes. From five previously proposed mathematical models describing lactation curves, the Wood model was considered the most appropriate due to its simplicity and its ability to determine ovine lactation curve characteristics. Derived milk traits for milk, fat, protein and lactose yield, as well as percentage composition and somatic cell score were used for single and two-QTL approaches using maximum likelihood estimation and regression analysis. A total of 15 significant (P P http://crcidp.vetsci.usyd.edu.au/cgi-bin/gbrowse/oaries_genome/. Many of the QTL for milk production traits have been reported on chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 16 and 20. Those on chromosomes 3 and 20 are in strong agreement with the results reported here. In addition, novel QTL were found on chromosomes 7, 8, 9, 14, 22 and 24. In a cross-species comparison, we extended the meta-assembly by comparing QTL regions of sheep and cattle, which provided strong evidence for synteny conservation of QTL regions for milk, fat, protein and somatic cell score data between cattle and sheep.

  10. Impact of the D genome and quantitative trait loci on quantitative traits in a spring durum by spring bread wheat cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desirable agronomic traits are similar for common hexaploid (6X) bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, 2n = 6x = 42, genome, AABBDD) and tetraploid (4X) durum wheat (Triticum turgidum durum, 2n = 4x = 28, genome, AABB). However, they are genetically isolated from each other due to an unequal number of ge...

  11. The adaptation rate of a quantitative trait in an environmental gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, R.

    2016-12-01

    The spatial range of a species habitat is generally determined by the ability of the species to cope with biotic and abiotic variables that vary in space. Therefore, the species range is itself an evolvable property. Indeed, environmental gradients permit a mode of evolution in which range expansion and adaptation go hand in hand. This process can contribute to rapid evolution of drug resistant bacteria and viruses, because drug concentrations in humans and livestock treated with antibiotics are far from uniform. Here, we use a minimal stochastic model of discrete, interacting organisms evolving in continuous space to study how the rate of adaptation of a quantitative trait depends on the steepness of the gradient and various population parameters. We discuss analytical results for the mean-field limit as well as extensive stochastic simulations. These simulations were performed using an exact, event-driven simulation scheme that can deal with continuous time-, density- and coordinate-dependent reaction rates and could be used for a wide variety of stochastic systems. The results reveal two qualitative regimes. If the gradient is shallow, the rate of adaptation is limited by dispersion and increases linearly with the gradient slope. If the gradient is steep, the adaptation rate is limited by mutation. In this regime, the mean-field result is highly misleading: it predicts that the adaptation rate continues to increase with the gradient slope, whereas stochastic simulations show that it in fact decreases with the square root of the slope. This discrepancy underscores the importance of discreteness and stochasticity even at high population densities; mean-field results, including those routinely used in quantitative genetics, should be interpreted with care.

  12. Inheritance and quantitative trait locus analysis of low-light tolerance in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D D; Qin, Z W; Lian, H; Yu, G B; Sheng, Y Y; Liu, F

    2015-09-09

    The low-light tolerance index was investigated in a set of 123 F2:3 lines during the seedling stage across 2 seasons, and the heredity of low-light tolerance was assessed via different ge-netic analysis methods. The results of the classical analysis showed that low-light tolerance is controlled by an additive-dominant poly-gene, and the polygenic inheritance rate of separate generations was >30%. In addition, 5 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) exhibited a low-light tolerance index across both seasons, including 2 QTLs (Llti1.1 and Llti1.2) on the 1st linkage group (variances of 6.0 and 9.5%) and 3 QTLs (Llti2.1, Llti2.1, and Llti2.1) on the 2nd linkage group (variances of 10.1-14.0%). The classical analysis method and QTL information on the heredity of low-light tolerance showed that it is controlled by several major genes and a mini-polygene. The results will facilitate the breeding of resistance to low-light stress in cucumber.

  13. Quantitative trait loci associated with reversal learning and latent inhibition in honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S B; Hunt, G J; Cobey, S; Smith, B H

    2001-05-01

    A study was conducted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that affect learning in honeybees. Two F1 supersister queens were produced from a cross between two established lines that had been selected for differences in the speed at which they reverse a learned discrimination between odors. Different families of haploid drones from two of these F1 queens were evaluated for two kinds of learning performance--reversal learning and latent inhibition--which previously showed correlated selection responses. Random amplified polymorphic DNA markers were scored from recombinant, haploid drone progeny that showed extreme manifestations of learning performance. Composite interval mapping procedures identified two QTLs for reversal learning (lrn2 and lrn3: LOD, 2.45 and 2.75, respectively) and one major QTL for latent inhibition (lrn1: LOD, 6.15). The QTL for latent inhibition did not map to either of the linkage groups that were associated with reversal learning. Identification of specific genes responsible for these kinds of QTL associations will open up new windows for better understanding of genes involved in learning and memory.

  14. Genetic modifier loci of mouse Mfrp(rd6) identified by quantitative trait locus analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jungyeon; Charette, Jeremy R; Philip, Vivek M; Stearns, Timothy M; Zhang, Weidong; Naggert, Jürgen K; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes that modify pathological ocular phenotypes in mouse models may improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and lead to new treatment strategies. Here, we identify modifier loci affecting photoreceptor cell loss in homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice, which exhibit a slowly progressive photoreceptor degeneration. A cohort of 63 F2 homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice from a (B6.C3Ga-Mfrp(rd6)/J × CAST/EiJ) F1 intercross exhibited a variable number of cell bodies in the retinal outer nuclear layer at 20 weeks of age. Mice were genotyped with a panel of single nucleotide polymorphism markers, and genotypes were correlated with phenotype by quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis to map modifier loci. A genome-wide scan revealed a statistically significant, protective candidate locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 and suggestive modifier loci on Chromosomes 6 and 11. Multiple regression analysis of a three-QTL model indicated that the modifier loci on Chromosomes 1 and 6 together account for 26% of the observed phenotypic variation, while the modifier locus on Chromosome 11 explains only an additional 4%. Our findings indicate that the severity of the Mfrp(rd6) retinal degenerative phenotype in mice depends on the strain genetic background and that a significant modifier locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 protects against Mfrp(rd6)-associated photoreceptor loss.

  15. The first genetic map of the American cranberry: exploration of synteny conservation and quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Laura; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Honig, Josh; Das, Sushma Parankush; Rajah, Veeran D; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Bassil, Nahla; Rowland, Lisa J; Polashock, James; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2013-03-01

    The first genetic map of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) has been constructed, comprising 14 linkage groups totaling 879.9 cM with an estimated coverage of 82.2 %. This map, based on four mapping populations segregating for field fruit-rot resistance, contains 136 distinct loci. Mapped markers include blueberry-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) and cranberry-derived sequence-characterized amplified region markers previously used for fingerprinting cranberry cultivars. In addition, SSR markers were developed near cranberry sequences resembling genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis or defense against necrotrophic pathogens, or conserved orthologous set (COS) sequences. The cranberry SSRs were developed from next-generation cranberry genomic sequence assemblies; thus, the positions of these SSRs on the genomic map provide information about the genomic location of the sequence scaffold from which they were derived. The use of SSR markers near COS and other functional sequences, plus 33 SSR markers from blueberry, facilitates comparisons of this map with maps of other plant species. Regions of the cranberry map were identified that showed conservation of synteny with Vitis vinifera and Arabidopsis thaliana. Positioned on this map are quantitative trait loci (QTL) for field fruit-rot resistance (FFRR), fruit weight, titratable acidity, and sound fruit yield (SFY). The SFY QTL is adjacent to one of the fruit weight QTL and may reflect pleiotropy. Two of the FFRR QTL are in regions of conserved synteny with grape and span defense gene markers, and the third FFRR QTL spans a flavonoid biosynthetic gene.

  16. Congenital sensorineural deafness in dalmatian dogs associated with quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Susanne; Distl, Ottmar

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for 235 Dalmatian dogs using the canine Illumina high density bead chip to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with canine congenital sensorineural deafness (CCSD). Data analysis was performed for all Dalmatian dogs and in addition, separately for brown-eyed and blue-eyed dogs because of the significant influence of eye colour on CCSD in Dalmatian dogs. Mixed linear model analysis (MLM) revealed seven QTL with experiment-wide significant associations (-log10P>5.0) for CCSD in all Dalmatian dogs. Six QTL with experiment-wide significant associations for CCSD were found in brown-eyed Dalmatian dogs and in blue-eyed Dalmatian dogs, four experiment-wide significant QTL were detected. The experiment-wide CCSD-associated SNPs explained 82% of the phenotypic variance of CCSD. Five CCSD-loci on dog chromosomes (CFA) 6, 14, 27, 29 and 31 were in close vicinity of genes shown as causative for hearing loss in human and/or mouse.

  17. Genome-wide association study of a quantitative disordered gambling trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Penelope A; Zhu, Gu; Montgomery, Grant W; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G; Slutske, Wendy S

    2013-05-01

    Disordered gambling is a moderately heritable trait, but the underlying genetic basis is largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for disordered gambling using a quantitative factor score in 1312 twins from 894 Australian families. Association was conducted for 2 381 914 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the family-based association test in Merlin followed by gene and pathway enrichment analyses. Although no SNP reached genome-wide significance, six achieved P-values Secondary case-control analyses found two SNPs on chromosome 9 (rs1106076 and rs12305135 near VLDLR) and rs10812227 near FZD10 on chromosome 12 to be significantly associated with lifetime Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition pathological gambling and South Oaks Gambling Screen classified probable pathological gambling status. Furthermore, several addiction-related pathways were enriched for SNPs associated with disordered gambling. Finally, gene-based analysis of 24 candidate genes for dopamine agonist-induced gambling in individuals with Parkinson's disease suggested an enrichment of SNPs associated with disordered gambling. We report the first GWAS of disordered gambling. While further replication is required, the identification of susceptibility loci and biological pathways will be important in characterizing the biological mechanisms that underpin disordered gambling.

  18. A computational approach for functional mapping of quantitative trait loci that regulate thermal performance curves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stephen Yap

    Full Text Available Whether and how thermal reaction norm is under genetic control is fundamental to understand the mechanistic basis of adaptation to novel thermal environments. However, the genetic study of thermal reaction norm is difficult because it is often expressed as a continuous function or curve. Here we derive a statistical model for dissecting thermal performance curves into individual quantitative trait loci (QTL with the aid of a genetic linkage map. The model is constructed within the maximum likelihood context and implemented with the EM algorithm. It integrates the biological principle of responses to temperature into a framework for genetic mapping through rigorous mathematical functions established to describe the pattern and shape of thermal reaction norms. The biological advantages of the model lie in the decomposition of the genetic causes for thermal reaction norm into its biologically interpretable modes, such as hotter-colder, faster-slower and generalist-specialist, as well as the formulation of a series of hypotheses at the interface between genetic actions/interactions and temperature-dependent sensitivity. The model is also meritorious in statistics because the precision of parameter estimation and power of QTLdetection can be increased by modeling the mean-covariance structure with a small set of parameters. The results from simulation studies suggest that the model displays favorable statistical properties and can be robust in practical genetic applications. The model provides a conceptual platform for testing many ecologically relevant hypotheses regarding organismic adaptation within the Eco-Devo paradigm.

  19. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Mating Behavior and Male Sex Pheromones in Nasonia Wasps

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    Wenwen Diao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A major focus in speciation genetics is to identify the chromosomal regions and genes that reduce hybridization and gene flow. We investigated the genetic architecture of mating behavior in the parasitoid wasp species pair Nasonia giraulti and Nasonia oneida that exhibit strong prezygotic isolation. Behavioral analysis showed that N. oneida females had consistently higher latency times, and broke off the mating sequence more often in the mounting stage when confronted with N. giraulti males compared with males of their own species. N. oneida males produce a lower quantity of the long-range male sex pheromone (4R,5S-5-hydroxy-4-decanolide (RS-HDL. Crosses between the two species yielded hybrid males with various pheromone quantities, and these males were used in mating trials with females of either species to measure female mate discrimination rates. A quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis involving 475 recombinant hybrid males (F2, 2148 reciprocally backcrossed females (F3, and a linkage map of 52 equally spaced neutral single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers plus SNPs in 40 candidate mating behavior genes revealed four QTL for male pheromone amount, depending on partner species. Our results demonstrate that the RS-HDL pheromone plays a role in the mating system of N. giraulti and N. oneida, but also that additional communication cues are involved in mate choice. No QTL were found for female mate discrimination, which points at a polygenic architecture of female choice with strong environmental influences.

  20. Two developmentally temporal quantitative trait loci underlie convergent evolution of increased branchial bone length in sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Priscilla A; Glazer, Andrew M; Cleves, Phillip A; Smith, Alyson S; Miller, Craig T

    2014-08-07

    In convergent evolution, similar phenotypes evolve repeatedly in independent populations, often reflecting adaptation to similar environments. Understanding whether convergent evolution proceeds via similar or different genetic and developmental mechanisms offers insight towards the repeatability and predictability of evolution. Oceanic populations of threespine stickleback fish, Gasterosteus aculeatus, have repeatedly colonized countless freshwater lakes and streams, where new diets lead to morphological adaptations related to feeding. Here, we show that heritable increases in branchial bone length have convergently evolved in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations. In both populations, an increased bone growth rate in juveniles underlies the convergent adult phenotype, and one population also has a longer cartilage template. Using F2 crosses from these two freshwater populations, we show that two quantitative trait loci (QTL) control branchial bone length at distinct points in development. In both populations, a QTL on chromosome 21 controls bone length throughout juvenile development, and a QTL on chromosome 4 controls bone length only in adults. In addition to these similar developmental profiles, these QTL show similar chromosomal locations in both populations. Our results suggest that sticklebacks have convergently evolved longer branchial bones using similar genetic and developmental programmes in two independently derived populations. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional properties and expression quantitative trait loci for phosphate transporter GmPT1 in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haina; Yin, Zhitong; Chao, Maoni; Ning, Lihua; Zhang, Dan; Yu, Deyue

    2014-02-01

    Phosphate (Pi) remobilization within a plant is critical for plant survival under Pi-limiting conditions. In this paper, a soybean Pi transporter gene, GmPT1, was characterized. A marked induction of GmPT1 transcript was observed in young leaves, mature leaves and lateral roots during long-term Pi starvation. Transgenic tobacco plants containing the GmPT1 gene were obtained using an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system. Compared with wild-type plants, transgenic plants showed significant increases in phosphorus-use efficiency (PUE), photosystem II (PSII) function, total dry weight and seed weight under Pi-deficient conditions. GmPT1 expression levels and PUE were determined in a soybean recombinant inbred line population during a pot experiment that was conducted to measure chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic rate (PN ) and seed yield. Correlation analysis revealed that GmPT1 expression levels had significantly positive correlations with seed yield, PUE, PN and the quantum yield of PSII primary photochemistry (ΦPSII ). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping for GmPT1 revealed two eQTLs, one of which coincided with both the physical location of GmPT1 and a QTL associated with seed yield. These results suggest that GmPT1 plays a role in Pi remobilization, and it may be possible to improve soybean seed yields under Pi-limiting conditions by modulating GmPT1 expression levels.

  2. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting tolerance to low phosphorus in rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Phosphorus (P)-deficiency in rice (Oryza.Sativa.L) may cause yield reductions.This research has been conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for tolerance to low phosphorus stress in a doubled haploid (DH) population.By using the linkage map of this population,the QTLs for relative dry weight,relative P content and relative P utilization efficiency have been located.The results indicate that one RFLP marker located on chromosome 6 is closely associated with relative root dry weight,relative shoot dry weight and relative total dry weight,which explain 24.9%,20.5% and 25.2% of the total phenotypic variations,respectively.Two QTLs affect relative P uptake content,which account for 20.7% of the total phenotypic variations.One micro-effect QTL has been found to be associated with relative P utilization efficiency.It is suggested that the P uptake efficiency is more associated with P efficiency.Among the secondary physiological indices of P uptake efficiency,the root dry weight is more important than others.

  3. Clines in quantitative traits: the role of migration patterns and selection scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroldinger, Ludwig; Bürger, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    The existence, uniqueness, and shape of clines in a quantitative trait under selection toward a spatially varying optimum is studied. The focus is on deterministic diploid two-locus n-deme models subject to various migration patterns and selection scenarios. Migration patterns may exhibit isolation by distance, as in the stepping-stone model, or random dispersal, as in the island model. The phenotypic optimum may change abruptly in a single environmental step, more gradually, or not at all. Symmetry assumptions are imposed on phenotypic optima and migration rates. We study clines in the mean, variance, and linkage disequilibrium (LD). Clines result from polymorphic equilibria. The possible equilibrium configurations are determined as functions of the migration rate. Whereas for weak migration, many polymorphic equilibria may be simultaneously stable, their number decreases with increasing migration rate. Also for intermediate migration rates polymorphic equilibria are in general not unique, however, for loci of equal effects the corresponding clines in the mean, variance, and LD are unique. For sufficiently strong migration, no polymorphism is maintained. Both migration pattern and selection scenario exert strong influence on the existence and shape of clines. The results for discrete demes are compared with those from models in which space varies continuously and dispersal is modeled by diffusion. Comparisons with previous studies, which investigated clines under neutrality or under linkage equilibrium, are performed. If there is no long-distance migration, the environment does not change abruptly, and linkage is not very tight, populations are almost everywhere close to linkage equilibrium.

  4. Quantitative trait loci for mercury accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) identified using a RIL population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Qinbin; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Song, Guiliang; Fu, Zhiyuan; Ding, Dong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the genetic mechanism of mercury accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.), a population of 194 recombinant inbred lines derived from an elite hybrid Yuyu 22, was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for mercury accumulation at two locations. The results showed that the average Hg concentration in the different tissues of maize followed the order: leaves > bracts > stems > axis > kernels. Twenty-three QTLs for mercury accumulation in five tissues were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10, which explained 6.44% to 26.60% of the phenotype variance. The QTLs included five QTLs for Hg concentration in kernels, three QTLs for Hg concentration in the axis, six QTLs for Hg concentration in stems, four QTLs for Hg concentration in bracts and five QTLs for Hg concentration in leaves. Interestingly, three QTLs, qKHC9a, qKHC9b, and qBHC9 were in linkage with two QTLs for drought tolerance. In addition, qLHC1 was in linkage with two QTLs for arsenic accumulation. The study demonstrated the concentration of Hg in Hg-contaminated paddy soil could be reduced, and maize production maintained simultaneously by selecting and breeding maize Hg pollution-safe cultivars (PSCs).

  5. Quantitative trait loci for mercury accumulation in maize (Zea mays L. identified using a RIL population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjun Fu

    Full Text Available To investigate the genetic mechanism of mercury accumulation in maize (Zea mays L., a population of 194 recombinant inbred lines derived from an elite hybrid Yuyu 22, was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs for mercury accumulation at two locations. The results showed that the average Hg concentration in the different tissues of maize followed the order: leaves > bracts > stems > axis > kernels. Twenty-three QTLs for mercury accumulation in five tissues were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10, which explained 6.44% to 26.60% of the phenotype variance. The QTLs included five QTLs for Hg concentration in kernels, three QTLs for Hg concentration in the axis, six QTLs for Hg concentration in stems, four QTLs for Hg concentration in bracts and five QTLs for Hg concentration in leaves. Interestingly, three QTLs, qKHC9a, qKHC9b, and qBHC9 were in linkage with two QTLs for drought tolerance. In addition, qLHC1 was in linkage with two QTLs for arsenic accumulation. The study demonstrated the concentration of Hg in Hg-contaminated paddy soil could be reduced, and maize production maintained simultaneously by selecting and breeding maize Hg pollution-safe cultivars (PSCs.

  6. Linkage disequilibrium fine mapping of quantitative trait loci: A simulation study

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    Pérez-Enciso Miguel

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, the use of linkage disequilibrium (LD to locate genes which affect quantitative traits (QTL has received an increasing interest, but the plausibility of fine mapping using linkage disequilibrium techniques for QTL has not been well studied. The main objectives of this work were to (1 measure the extent and pattern of LD between a putative QTL and nearby markers in finite populations and (2 investigate the usefulness of LD in fine mapping QTL in simulated populations using a dense map of multiallelic or biallelic marker loci. The test of association between a marker and QTL and the power of the test were calculated based on single-marker regression analysis. The results show the presence of substantial linkage disequilibrium with closely linked marker loci after 100 to 200 generations of random mating. Although the power to test the association with a frequent QTL of large effect was satisfactory, the power was low for the QTL with a small effect and/or low frequency. More powerful, multi-locus methods may be required to map low frequent QTL with small genetic effects, as well as combining both linkage and linkage disequilibrium information. The results also showed that multiallelic markers are more useful than biallelic markers to detect linkage disequilibrium and association at an equal distance.

  7. A quantitative trait loci analysis of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of metal hyperaccumulation are still not understood, so we conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, in a cross between this and its sister species, A. petraea, in order to determine the number and approximate location of the genomic regions significantly contributing to this adaptation. An F2 cross between the two species was made, and the leaf Zn concentration of 92 individuals was measured at both low (10 microm) and high (100 microm) Zn concentrations. Twenty-five markers were established that were distributed on all of the eight chromosomes. Mapping of the markers established that they were essentially collinear with previous studies. QTLs exceeding a logarithm to the base 10 of the odds (LOD) value of 3 were found on chromosomes 4 (low Zn), 6 (high Zn) and 7 (both high and low Zn). Evidence for a QTL on chromosome 3 (low Zn) was also found. This analysis validates a previously used method of QTL analysis, based on microarray analysis of segregating families. Genes that have altered during the evolution of this character should also be QTL: this analysis calls into question a number of candidate genes from consideration as such primary genes because they do not appear to be associated with QTLs.

  8. Detection and parameter estimation for quantitative trait loci using regression models and multiple markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schook Lawrence B

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A strategy of multi-step minimal conditional regression analysis has been developed to determine the existence of statistical testing and parameter estimation for a quantitative trait locus (QTL that are unaffected by linked QTLs. The estimation of marker-QTL recombination frequency needs to consider only three cases: 1 the chromosome has only one QTL, 2 one side of the target QTL has one or more QTLs, and 3 either side of the target QTL has one or more QTLs. Analytical formula was derived to estimate marker-QTL recombination frequency for each of the three cases. The formula involves two flanking markers for case 1, two flanking markers plus a conditional marker for case 2, and two flanking markers plus two conditional markers for case 3. Each QTL variance and effect, and the total QTL variance were also estimated using analytical formulae. Simulation data show that the formulae for estimating marker-QTL recombination frequency could be a useful statistical tool for fine QTL mapping. With 1 000 observations, a QTL could be mapped to a narrow chromosome region of 1.5 cM if no linked QTL is present, and to a 2.8 cM chromosome region if either side of the target QTL has at least one linked QTL.

  9. Model selection for quantitative trait loci mapping in a full-sib family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfa Tong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical methods for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs in full-sib forest trees, in which the number of alleles and linkage phase can vary from locus to locus, are still not well established. Previous studies assumed that the QTL segregation pattern was fixed throughout the genome in a full-sib family, despite the fact that this pattern can vary among regions of the genome. In this paper, we propose a method for selecting the appropriate model for QTL mapping based on the segregation of different types of markers and QTLs in a full-sib family. The QTL segregation patterns were classified into three types: test cross (1:1 segregation, F2 cross (1:2:1 segregation and full cross (1:1:1:1 segregation. Akaike's information criterion (AIC, the Bayesian information criterion (BIC and the Laplace-empirical criterion (LEC were used to select the most likely QTL segregation pattern. Simulations were used to evaluate the power of these criteria and the precision of parameter estimates. A Windows-based software was developed to run the selected QTL mapping method. A real example is presented to illustrate QTL mapping in forest trees based on an integrated linkage map with various segregation markers. The implications of this method for accurate QTL mapping in outbred species are discussed.

  10. Modifying the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion to locate multiple interacting quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Malgorzata; Ghosh, Jayanta K; Doerge, R W

    2004-06-01

    The problem of locating multiple interacting quantitative trait loci (QTL) can be addressed as a multiple regression problem, with marker genotypes being the regressor variables. An important and difficult part in fitting such a regression model is the estimation of the QTL number and respective interactions. Among the many model selection criteria that can be used to estimate the number of regressor variables, none are used to estimate the number of interactions. Our simulations demonstrate that epistatic terms appearing in a model without the related main effects cause the standard model selection criteria to have a strong tendency to overestimate the number of interactions, and so the QTL number. With this as our motivation we investigate the behavior of the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion (BIC) by explaining the phenomenon of the overestimation and proposing a novel modification of BIC that allows the detection of main effects and pairwise interactions in a backcross population. Results of an extensive simulation study demonstrate that our modified version of BIC performs very well in practice. Our methodology can be extended to general populations and higher-order interactions.

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci and Epistatic Analysis of Seed Anoxia Germinability in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi-ming; JIANG Ling; ZHAI Hu-qu; HOU Ming-yu; WAN Jian-min; WANG Chun-ming; MA Liang-yong; WAN Jian-min; ZHUANG Jie-yun; LIU Guang-jie; YANG Chang-deng

    2004-01-01

    Anoxia germinability (AG) of 35 rice varieties was evaluated under different temperature and water submergence conditions.The shoot (including coleoptile) length of seedlings germinating under 30℃, 0.2 m water submergence for 5 days could be used as an optimal criterion for the AG evaluation of all the varieties. Differences were observed among the AGs of 359 varieties from different regions and subspecies with the optimized method. Moreover, 81 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross of Kinmaze(japonica)/DV85 (indica) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring AG. A total of five QTLs for AG in the recombinant inbred population were detected on chromosomes 1, 2, 5 and 7, respectively. Phenotypic variations explained by each QTL ranged from 10.5% to 19.6%. Based on the directions of the additive effects, the alleles at three loci qAG-1, qAG-2 and qAG-7from Kinmaze increased AG, while alleles at loci qAG-5a and qAG-5b from DV85 increased AG. Meanwhile, three pairs of epistatic loci were found to be located on chromosomes 2, 3, 5 and 11 with significant effects ranging from 16.7% to 48.8%, and the highest one 48.78%, was detected between C563-X182 on chromosome 3 and R830-X208 on chromosome 5.

  12. Multi-QTL mapping for quantitative traits using epistatic distorted markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Qian Xie

    Full Text Available The interaction between segregation distortion loci (SDL has been often observed in all kinds of mapping populations. However, little has been known about the effect of epistatic SDL on quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping. Here we proposed a multi-QTL mapping approach using epistatic distorted markers. Using the corrected linkage groups, epistatic SDL was identified. Then, these SDL parameters were used to correct the conditional probabilities of QTL genotypes, and these corrections were further incorporated into the new QTL mapping approach. Finally, a set of simulated datasets and a real data in 304 mouse F2 individuals were used to validate the new method. As compared with the old method, the new one corrects genetic distance between distorted markers, and considers epistasis between two linked SDL. As a result, the power in the detection of QTL is higher for the new method than for the old one, and significant differences for estimates of QTL parameters between the two methods were observed, except for QTL position. Among two QTL for mouse weight, one significant difference for QTL additive effect between the above two methods was observed, because epistatic SDL between markers C66 and T93 exists (P = 2.94e-4.

  13. Mapping of quantitative trait loci using the skew-normal distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In standard interval mapping (IM) of quantitative trait loci (QTL), the QTL effect is described by a normal mixture model. When this assumption of normality is violated, the most commonly adopted strategy is to use the previous model after data transformation. However, an appropriate transformation may not exist or may be difficult to find. Also this approach can raise interpretation issues. An interesting alternative is to consider a skew-normal mixture model in standard IM, and the resulting method is here denoted as skew-normal IM. This flexible model that includes the usual symmetric normal distribution as a special case is important, allowing continuous variation from normality to non-normality. In this paper we briefly introduce the main peculiarities of the skew-normal distribution. The maximum likelihood estimates of parameters of the skew-normal distribution are obtained by the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The proposed model is illustrated with real data from an intercross experiment that shows a significant departure from the normality assumption. The performance of the skew-normal IM is assessed via stochastic simulation. The results indicate that the skew-normal IM has higher power for QTL detection and better precision of QTL location as compared to standard IM and nonparametric IM.

  14. Overview of LASSO-related penalized regression methods for quantitative trait mapping and genomic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zitong; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2012-08-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL)/association mapping aims at finding genomic loci associated with the phenotypes, whereas genomic selection focuses on breeding value prediction based on genomic data. Variable selection is a key to both of these tasks as it allows to (1) detect clear mapping signals of QTL activity, and (2) predict the genome-enhanced breeding values accurately. In this paper, we provide an overview of a statistical method called least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and two of its generalizations named elastic net and adaptive LASSO in the contexts of QTL mapping and genomic breeding value prediction in plants (or animals). We also briefly summarize the Bayesian interpretation of LASSO, and the inspired hierarchical Bayesian models. We illustrate the implementation and examine the performance of methods using three public data sets: (1) North American barley data with 127 individuals and 145 markers, (2) a simulated QTLMAS XII data with 5,865 individuals and 6,000 markers for both QTL mapping and genomic selection, and (3) a wheat data with 599 individuals and 1,279 markers only for genomic selection.

  15. RAS1, a quantitative trait locus for salt tolerance and ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Zhonghai

    2010-03-08

    Soil salinity limits agricultural production and is a major obstacle for feeding the growing world population. We used natural genetic variation in salt tolerance among different Arabidopsis accessions to map a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for salt tolerance and abscisic acid (ABA) sensitivity during seed germination and early seedling growth. A recombinant inbred population derived from Landsberg erecta (Ler; salt and ABA sensitive) x Shakdara (Sha; salt and ABA resistant) was used for QTL mapping. High-resolution mapping and cloning of this QTL, Response to ABA and Salt 1 (RAS1), revealed that it is an ABA- and salt stress-inducible gene and encodes a previously undescribed plant-specific protein. A premature stop codon results in a truncated RAS1 protein in Sha. Reducing the expression of RAS1 by transfer-DNA insertion in Col or RNA interference in Ler leads to decreased salt and ABA sensitivity, whereas overexpression of the Ler allele but not the Sha allele causes increased salt and ABA sensitivity. Our results suggest that RAS1 functions as a negative regulator of salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling growth by enhancing ABA sensitivity and that its loss of function contributes to the increased salt tolerance of Sha.

  16. Quantitative trait loci and comparative genomics of cereal cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Samuel P; Hawley, Robin M; Davis, Georgia L; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Jonathan D

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting sugar composition of the cell walls of maize (Zea mays) pericarp were mapped as an approach to the identification of genes involved in cereal wall biosynthesis. Mapping was performed using the IBM (B73 x Mo17) recombinant inbred line population. There were statistically significant differences between B73 and Mo17 in content of xylose (Xyl), arabinose (Ara), galactose (Gal), and glucose. Thirteen QTLs were found, affecting the content of Xyl (two QTLs), Ara (two QTLs), Gal (five QTLs), Glc (two QTLs), Ara + Gal (one QTL), and Xyl + Glc (one QTL). The chromosomal regions corresponding to two of these, affecting Ara + Gal and Ara on maize chromosome 3, could be aligned with a syntenic region on rice (Oryza sativa) chromosome 1, which has been completely sequenced and annotated. The contiguous P1-derived artificial chromosome rice clones covering the QTLs were predicted to encode 117 and 125 proteins, respectively. Two of these genes encode putative glycosyltransferases, displaying similarity to carbohydrate-active enzyme database family GT4 (galactosyltransferases) or to family GT64 (C-terminal domain of animal heparan synthases). The results illustrate the potential of using natural variation, emerging genomic resources, and homeology within the Poaceae to identify candidate genes involved in the essential process of cell wall biosynthesis.

  17. A computational approach for functional mapping of quantitative trait loci that regulate thermal performance curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, John Stephen; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Rongling

    2007-06-20

    Whether and how thermal reaction norm is under genetic control is fundamental to understand the mechanistic basis of adaptation to novel thermal environments. However, the genetic study of thermal reaction norm is difficult because it is often expressed as a continuous function or curve. Here we derive a statistical model for dissecting thermal performance curves into individual quantitative trait loci (QTL) with the aid of a genetic linkage map. The model is constructed within the maximum likelihood context and implemented with the EM algorithm. It integrates the biological principle of responses to temperature into a framework for genetic mapping through rigorous mathematical functions established to describe the pattern and shape of thermal reaction norms. The biological advantages of the model lie in the decomposition of the genetic causes for thermal reaction norm into its biologically interpretable modes, such as hotter-colder, faster-slower and generalist-specialist, as well as the formulation of a series of hypotheses at the interface between genetic actions/interactions and temperature-dependent sensitivity. The model is also meritorious in statistics because the precision of parameter estimation and power of QTLdetection can be increased by modeling the mean-covariance structure with a small set of parameters. The results from simulation studies suggest that the model displays favorable statistical properties and can be robust in practical genetic applications. The model provides a conceptual platform for testing many ecologically relevant hypotheses regarding organismic adaptation within the Eco-Devo paradigm.

  18. Identification of two quantitative trait loci involved in antibody production on mouse chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puel, A; Mevel, J C; Bouthillier, Y; Decreusefond, C; Fridman, W H; Feingold, N; Mouton, D

    1998-03-01

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to the extreme phenotypes of the selected high (H) and low (L) antibody-responder lines of mice were mapped on distinct chromosomes. Successive backcrosses were bred to reduce the length of the QTL-bearing segment detected on chromosome 8 and to produce congenic lines to test gene effect independently of the other QTLs. An increase in antibody responses was repeatedly found to be associated with inheritance of the H-line allele at two markers separated by 30 cM on that chromosome. In the successive backcrosses, background and unlinked involved genes of H-line origin were progressively eliminated; however, unexpected within-progeny variations persisted in the third and even fourth backcross. Nevertheless, the presence of two QTLs within the considered interval was definitely demonstrated in distinct progenies of the fourth backcross which separately inherited one of the two gene-marker H-line alleles. The previously identified chromosome 8 segment therefore contains at least two QTLs involved in antibody responsiveness.

  19. Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Micronutrient Concentrations in Two Recombinant Inbred Wheat Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Zhi-en; WEI Yu-ming; ZHENG You-liang; YU Ma; HE Qiu-yi; CHEN Guo-yue; WANG Ji-rui; LIU Ya-xi; JIANG Qian-tao; LI Wei; DAI Shou-fen

    2014-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition affects over three billion people worldwide, especially women and children in developing countries. Increasing the bioavailable concentrations of essential elements in the edible portions of crops is an effective resolution to address this issue. To determine the genetic factors controlling micronutrient concentration in wheat, the quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for iron, zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium concentrations in two recombinant inbred line populations was performed. In all, 39 QTLs for ifve micronutrient concentrations were identiifed in this study. Of these, 22 alleles from synthetic wheat SHW-L1 and seven alleles from the progeny line of the synthetic wheat Chuanmai 42 showed an increase in micronutrient concentrations. Five QTLs on chromosomes 2A, 3D, 4D, and 5B found in both the populations showed signiifcant phenotypic variation for 2-3 micronutrient concentrations. Our results might help understand the genetic control of micronutrient concentration and allow the utilization of genetic resources of synthetic hexaploid wheat for improving micronutrient efifciency of cultivated wheat by using molecular marker-assisted selection.

  20. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to Haemonchus contortus artificial challenge in Red Maasai and Dorper sheep of East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, K; Mugambi, J M; Nagda, S; Sonstegard, T S; Van Tassell, C P; Baker, R L; Gibson, J P

    2013-06-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to the gastrointestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep. The mapping population comprised six sire families, with 1026 lambs in total. The lambs were artificially challenged with H. contortus at about 6.5 months of age, and nine phenotypes were measured: fecal egg count, packed cell volume decline, two weight traits and five worm traits. A subset of the population (342 lambs) was selectively genotyped for 172 microsatellite loci covering 25 of the 26 autosomes. QTL mapping was performed for models which assumed that the QTL alleles were either fixed or segregating within each breed, combined with models with only an additive QTL effect fitted or both additive and dominance QTL effects fitted. Overall, QTL significant at the 1% chromosome-wide level were identified for 22 combinations of trait and chromosome. Of particular interest are a region of chromosome 26 with putative QTL for all nine traits and a region of chromosome 2 with putative QTL for three traits. Favorable QTL alleles for disease resistance originated in both the Red Maasai and Dorper breeds, were not always fixed within breed and had significant dominance effects in some cases. We anticipate that this study, in combination with follow-up work and other relevant studies, will help elucidate the biology of disease resistance.

  1. Transcriptome discovery in non-model wild fish species for the development of quantitative transcript abundance assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Cassidy M.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Cornman, Robert S.; Mazik, Patricia M.; Blazer, Vicki S.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental studies increasingly identify the presence of both contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and legacy contaminants in aquatic environments; however, the biological effects of these compounds on resident fishes remain largely unknown. High throughput methodologies were employed to establish partial transcriptomes for three wild-caught, non-model fish species; smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) and brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). Sequences from these transcriptome databases were utilized in the development of a custom nCounter CodeSet that allowed for direct multiplexed measurement of 50 transcript abundance endpoints in liver tissue. Sequence information was also utilized in the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) primers. Cross-species hybridization allowed the smallmouth bass nCounter CodeSet to be used for quantitative transcript abundance analysis of an additional non-model species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). We validated the nCounter analysis data system with qPCR for a subset of genes and confirmed concordant results. Changes in transcript abundance biomarkers between sexes and seasons were evaluated to provide baseline data on transcript modulation for each species of interest.

  2. ACCURATE QUANTITATIVE SPECTROSCOPY OF OB STARS: C AND N ABUNDANCES NEAR THE MAIN SEQUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Nieva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a state-of-the-art analysis technique able to simultaneously reproduce the entire H and He spectra of OB-type stars in the visual and the near-IR and to derive highly accurate metal abundances (so far C and N. The spectrum synthesis relies on a hybrid non-LTE approach involving our most recent model atoms. Accurate atmospheric parameters, practically free of systematic errors, are derived spectroscopically (from Stark-broadened H lines and ionization equilibria of He i/ii and Cii-iv for a sample of randomly distributed stars in the solar vicinity. Highly consistent abundances are found in contrast to previous reports indicating broad scatter and large uncertainties. The improvements result from avoidance of systematic errors in the parameter determination, which may be larger than expected in previous work, and a critical evaluation of atomic data for the model atom construction

  3. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL Analysis for Production Traits of Birth Weight and Weight 360 days in Backcross Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENDANG TRI MARGAWATI

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Four half-sib families (n = 382 consisting predominantly of ITT x Merino x Merino backcross progeny, including some F2 progeny were used to analyze QTL for two production traits (Birth weight = BW1 and Body weight at 360 days = BW360. The study exploited differences in weight performance between the Merino and ITT sheep. A total of 141 informative microsatellite markers were used in a genome-wide scan covering the 26 autosomal sheep chromosomes. QTL analysis was conducted online using QTL Express. This study reports the effect of QTL for birth weight on Chromosomes 5 (p < 0.05 at 112cM (0cM-128cM. Location of candidate genes for birth weight was predicted at the region of flanking markers MCM527-BMS1247. A QTL for BW360 days existed on Chromosome 18 (p < 0.01 at 104cM (25.0-125cM. Location of candidate genes related to production traits for body weight 360 days was predicted at the segment of flanking markers of CSSM018-TMR1. Only the QTL on Chromosome 18 retained significance (p < 0.01 under experiment-wide significance testing. This QTL region is being examined for candidate genes by investigating to the homologous human chromosomal segments.

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF A MAJOR QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCUS CONFERRING RICE BLAST RESISTANCE USING RECOMBINANT INBRED LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobrizal Sobrizal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Blast disease caused by Pyricularia oryzae is one of the limiting factors for rice production world wide. The use of resistant varieties for managing blast disease is considered as the most eco-friendly approaches. However, their resistances may be broken down within a few years due to the appearance of new virulent blast races in the field. The objective of the present study was to identify the quantitative trait locus (QTL conferring resistance to blast disease using 126 recombinant inbred (RI lines originated from a crossing of a durably resistant upland rice genotype (Laka and a highly susceptible rice accession cultivar (Kencana Bali. The RI population was developed through a single seed descent method from 1997 to 2004. Resistance of the RI lines was evaluated for blast in an endemic area of Sukabumi, West Java, in 2005. Disease intensity of the blast was examined following the standard evaluation system developed by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI. At the same year the RI lines were analyzed with 134 DNA markers. Results of the study showed that one major QTL was found to be associated with blast resistance, and this QTL was located near RM2136 marker on the long arm of chromosome 11. This QTL explained 87% of the phenotypic variation with 37% additive effect. The map position of this QTL differed from that of a partial resistant gene, Pi34, identified previously on chromosome 11 in the Japanese durably resistant variety, Chubu 32. The QTL, however, was almost at the same position as that of the multiple allele-resistant gene, Pik. Therefore, an allelic test should be conducted to clarify the allelic relationship between QTL identified in this study and the Pik. The RI lines are the permanent segregating population that could be very useful for analysing phenotypic variations of important agronomic traits possibly owned by the RI lines. The major QTL identified in this study could be used as a genetic resource in

  5. High-throughput SNP genotyping in Cucurbita pepo for map construction and quantitative trait loci mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteras Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cucurbita pepo is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family, the second- most important horticultural family in terms of economic importance after Solanaceae. The "summer squash" types, including Zucchini and Scallop, rank among the highest-valued vegetables worldwide. There are few genomic tools available for this species. The first Cucurbita transcriptome, along with a large collection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP, was recently generated using massive sequencing. A set of 384 SNP was selected to generate an Illumina GoldenGate assay in order to construct the first SNP-based genetic map of Cucurbita and map quantitative trait loci (QTL. Results We herein present the construction of the first SNP-based genetic map of Cucurbita pepo using a population derived from the cross of two varieties with contrasting phenotypes, representing the main cultivar groups of the species' two subspecies: Zucchini (subsp. pepo × Scallop (subsp. ovifera. The mapping population was genotyped with 384 SNP, a set of selected EST-SNP identified in silico after massive sequencing of the transcriptomes of both parents, using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. The global success rate of the assay was higher than 85%. In total, 304 SNP were mapped, along with 11 SSR from a previous map, giving a map density of 5.56 cM/marker. This map was used to infer syntenic relationships between C. pepo and cucumber and to successfully map QTL that control plant, flowering and fruit traits that are of benefit to squash breeding. The QTL effects were validated in backcross populations. Conclusion Our results show that massive sequencing in different genotypes is an excellent tool for SNP discovery, and that the Illumina GoldenGate platform can be successfully applied to constructing genetic maps and performing QTL analysis in Cucurbita. This is the first SNP-based genetic map in the Cucurbita genus and is an invaluable new tool for biological research

  6. Mapping quantitative trait loci for nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency in rice (Oryza sativa L.) at different nitrogen fertilizer levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, G J; Cheng, S H; Hua, Z T; Zhang, M L; Jiang, H B; Feng, Y; Shen, X H; Su, Y A; He, N; Ma, Z B; Ma, X Q; Hou, S G; Wang, Y R

    2015-09-08

    Genetic improvement is the fundamental basis for improving nitrogen-use efficiency. A better understanding of genetic factors controlling nitrogen uptake and utilization is required for crop genetic improvement. In this study, we identified the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with traits of nitrogen uptake and utilization by using the single-sequence repeat marker method and a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a super hybrid Xieyou9308. All the traits investigated were inherited quantitatively by continuous variation and showed normal distribution in phenotype with transgressive segregation in the RIL population. Most of the traits were significantly correlated with each other except for nitrogen absorption ability (NAA) with nitrogen harvest index (NHI) and NHI with agricultural nitrogen-absorption efficiency (ANAE). At logarithmic odds value of 2.3, total 13 candidate QTLs, including 4 for NAA, 2 for NHI, 2 for physiological nitrogen-use efficiency, 1 for agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency (ANUE), and 4 for ANAE, were detected and mapped on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, and 12. Significant pleiotropic effect or neighboring expression of QTLs was observed among traits. At position 64.8 cM on chromosome 4 near the marker RM5757, there was a QTL cluster of NAA, ANUE, and ANAE, and at chromosome 5 near the marker RM5968, there was a QTL cluster of NAA and ANUE. The QTL clusters might provide partial explanation and genetic mechanism for the observed correlations between nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency traits and might form a basis for future breeding programs.

  7. Abundance and diversity of bacteria in oxygen minimum drinking water reservoir sediments studied by quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-han; Huang, Ting-lin; Chen, Sheng-nan; Yang, Xiao; Lv, Kai; Sekar, Raju

    2015-04-01

    Reservoir sediment is one of the most stressful environments for microorganisms due to periodically oxygen minimum conditions. In this study, the abundance and composition of bacteria associated with sediments from three drinking water reservoirs (Zhoucun, ZCR; Shibianyu, SBYR; and Jinpen, JPR) were investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 16S rRNA-based 454 pyrosequencing. The results of physico-chemical analysis of sediments showed that the organic matter and total nitrogen were significantly higher in ZCR as compared to JPR (P oxygen minimum and stressful freshwater environments.

  8. Strategies on Sample Size Determination and Qualitative and Quantitative Traits Integration to Construct Core Collection of Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ling; LU Yong-gen; LI Jin-quan; Xu Hai-ming; Muhammad Qasim SHAHID

    2011-01-01

    The development of a core collection could enhance the utilization of germplasm collections in crop improvement programs and simplify their management.Selection of an appropriate sampling strategy is an important prerequisite to construct a core collection with appropriate size in order to adequately represent the genetic spectrum and maximally capture the genetic diversity in available crop collections.The present study was initiated to construct nested core collections to determine the appropriate sample size to represent the genetic diversity of rice landrace collection based on 15 quantitative traits and 34 qualitative traits of 2 262 rice accessions.The results showed that 50-225 nested core collections,whose sampling rate was 2.2%-9.9%,were sufficient to maintain the maximum genetic diversity of the initial collections.Of these,150 accessions (6.6%) could capture the maximal genetic diversity of the initial collection.Three data types,i.e.qualitative traits (QT1),quantitative traits (QT2) and integrated qualitative and quantitative traits (QTT),were compared for their efficiency in constructing core collections based on the weighted pair-group average method combined with stepwise clustering and preferred sampling on adjusted Euclidean distances.Every combining scheme constructed eight rice core collections (225,200,175,150,125,100,75 and 50).The results showed that the QTT data was the best in constructing a core collection as indicated by the genetic diversity of core collections.A core collection constructed only on the information of QT1 could not represent the initial collection effectively.QTT should be used together to construct a productive core collection.

  9. Quantitative NMR Approach to Optimize the Formation of Chemical Building Blocks from Abundant Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Samuel Gilbert; Tolborg, Søren; Sádaba, Irantzu

    2017-01-01

    The future role of biomass-derived chemicals relies on the formation of diverse functional monomers in high yields from carbohydrates. Recently, it has become clear that a series of α-hydroxy acids, esters and lactones can be formed from carbohydrates in alcohols and water using tin......-containing catalysts such as Sn-Beta. These compounds are potential building blocks for polyesters with additional olefin and alcohol functionalities. We employ an NMR approach to identify, quantify and optimize the formation these building blocks in the chemocatalytic transformation of abundant carbohydrates by Sn...

  10. Mapping quantitative trait loci from a single-tail sample of the phenotype distribution including survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Mikko J; Hoti, Fabian

    2007-12-01

    A new effective Bayesian quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approach for the analysis of single-tail selected samples of the phenotype distribution is presented. The approach extends the affected-only tests to single-tail sampling with quantitative traits such as the log-normal survival time or censored/selected traits. A great benefit of the approach is that it enables the utilization of multiple-QTL models, is easy to incorporate into different data designs (experimental and outbred populations), and can potentially be extended to epistatic models. In inbred lines, the method exploits the fact that the parental mating type and the linkage phases (haplotypes) are known by definition. In outbred populations, two-generation data are needed, for example, selected offspring and one of the parents (the sires) in breeding material. The idea is to statistically (computationally) generate a fully complementary, maximally dissimilar, observation for each offspring in the sample. Bayesian data augmentation is then used to sample the space of possible trait values for the pseudoobservations. The benefits of the approach are illustrated using simulated data sets and a real data set on the survival of F(2) mice following infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

  11. Meta-analysis of quantitative pleiotropic traits for next-generation sequencing with multivariate functional linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-Yang; Jung, Jeesun; Chen, Wei; Weeks, Daniel E; Ren, Haobo; Boehnke, Michael; Amos, Christopher I; Liu, Aiyi; Mills, James L; Ting Lee, Mei-Ling; Xiong, Momiao; Fan, Ruzong

    2017-02-01

    To analyze next-generation sequencing data, multivariate functional linear models are developed for a meta-analysis of multiple studies to connect genetic variant data to multiple quantitative traits adjusting for covariates. The goal is to take the advantage of both meta-analysis and pleiotropic analysis in order to improve power and to carry out a unified association analysis of multiple studies and multiple traits of complex disorders. Three types of approximate F -distributions based on Pillai-Bartlett trace, Hotelling-Lawley trace, and Wilks's Lambda are introduced to test for association between multiple quantitative traits and multiple genetic variants. Simulation analysis is performed to evaluate false-positive rates and power of the proposed tests. The proposed methods are applied to analyze lipid traits in eight European cohorts. It is shown that it is more advantageous to perform multivariate analysis than univariate analysis in general, and it is more advantageous to perform meta-analysis of multiple studies instead of analyzing the individual studies separately. The proposed models require individual observations. The value of the current paper can be seen at least for two reasons: (a) the proposed methods can be applied to studies that have individual genotype data; (b) the proposed methods can be used as a criterion for future work that uses summary statistics to build test statistics to meta-analyze the data.

  12. Quantitative trait locus affecting birth weight on bovine chromosome 5 in a F2 Gyr x Holstein population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gasparin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Segregation between a genetic marker and a locus influencing a quantitative trait in a well delineated population is the basis for success in mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL. To detect bovine chromosome 5 (BTA5 birth weight QTL we genotyped 294 F2 Gyr (Bos indicus x Holstein (Bos taurus crossbreed cattle for five microsatellite markers. A linkage map was constructed for the markers and an interval analysis for the presence of QTL was performed. The linkage map indicated differences in the order of two markers relative to the reference map (http://www.marc.usda.gov. Interval analysis detected a QTL controlling birth weight (p < 0.01 at 69 centimorgans (cM from the most centromeric marker with an effect of 0.32 phenotypic standard-error. These results support other studies with crossbred Bos taurus x Bos indicus populations.

  13. Development of a Genomic Resource and Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Male Calling Traits in the Lesser Wax Moth, Achroia grisella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Gleason

    Full Text Available In the study of sexual selection among insects, the Lesser Waxmoth, Achroia grisella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, has been one of the more intensively studied species over the past 20 years. Studies have focused on how the male calling song functions in pair formation and on the quantitative genetics of male song characters and female preference for the song. Recent QTL studies have attempted to elucidate the genetic architecture of male song and female preference traits using AFLP markers. We continued these QTL studies using SNP markers derived from an EST library that allowed us to measure both DNA sequence variation and map loci with respect to the lepidopteran genome. We report that the level of sequence variation within A. grisella is typical among other Lepidoptera that have been examined, and that comparison with the Bombyx mori genome shows that macrosynteny is conserved. Our QTL map shows that a QTL for a male song trait, pulse-pair rate, is situated on the Z chromosome, a prediction for sexually selected traits in Lepidoptera. Our findings will be useful for future studies of genetic architecture of this model species and may help identify the genetics associated with the evolution of its novel acoustic communication.

  14. A whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for gestation length and sow maternal ability related traits in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 resource population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Guo, Y M; Zhang, Z Y; Ren, J; Huang, L S

    2010-06-01

    Gestation length and maternal ability are important to improve the sow reproduction efficiency and their offspring survival. To map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for gestation length and maternal ability related traits including piglet survival rate and average body weight of piglets at weaning, more than 200 F2 sows from a White Duroc × Erhualian resource population were phenotyped. A genome-wide scan was performed with 194 microsatellite markers covering the whole pig genome. QTL analysis was carried out using a composite regression interval mapping method via QTL express. The results showed that total number of born piglets was significantly correlated with gestation length (r = -0.13, P gestation length. The QTL on SSC2 achieved the 5% genome-wide significant level and the QTL on SSC8 was consistent with previous reports. Four suggestive QTL were identified for maternal ability related traits including 1 QTL for survival rate of piglets at weaning on SSC8, 3 QTL for average body weight of piglet at weaning on SSC3, 11 and 13.

  15. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for bovine milk protein composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopen, G C B; Koks, P D; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H; Visker, M H P W

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk protein composition in 849 Holstein-Friesian cows originating from seven sires. One morning milk sample was analysed for the major milk proteins using capillary zone electrophoresis. A genetic map was constructed with 1341 single nucleotide polymorphisms, covering 2829 centimorgans (cM) and 95% of the cattle genome. The chromosomal regions most significantly related to milk protein composition (P(genome) casein, alpha(S2)-casein, beta-casein and kappa-casein. The QTL on BTA11 was found at 124 cM, and affected beta-lactoglobulin, and the QTL on BTA14 was found at 0 cM, and affected protein percentage. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTL was 3.6% for beta-casein and 7.9% for kappa-casein on BTA6, 28.3% for beta-lactoglobulin on BTA11, and 8.6% for protein percentage on BTA14. The QTL affecting alpha(S2)-casein on BTA6 and 17 showed a significant interaction. We investigated the extent to which the detected QTL affecting milk protein composition could be explained by known polymorphisms in beta-casein, kappa-casein, beta-lactoglobulin and DGAT1 genes. Correction for these polymorphisms decreased the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTL previously found on BTA6, 11 and 14. Thus, several significant QTL affecting milk protein composition were found, of which some QTL could partially be explained by polymorphisms in milk protein genes.

  16. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping reveals a role for unstudied genes in Aspergillus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian K Christians

    Full Text Available Infections caused by the fungus Aspergillus are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised populations. To identify genes required for virulence that could be used as targets for novel treatments, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting virulence in the progeny of a cross between two strains of A. nidulans (FGSC strains A4 and A91. We genotyped 61 progeny at 739 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP spread throughout the genome, and constructed a linkage map that was largely consistent with the genomic sequence, with the exception of one potential inversion of ∼527 kb on Chromosome V. The estimated genome size was 3705 cM and the average intermarker spacing was 5.0 cM. The average ratio of physical distance to genetic distance was 8.1 kb/cM, which is similar to previous estimates, and variation in recombination rate was significantly positively correlated with GC content, a pattern seen in other taxa. To map QTL affecting virulence, we measured the ability of each progeny strain to kill model hosts, larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella. We detected three QTL affecting in vivo virulence that were distinct from QTL affecting in vitro growth, and mapped the virulence QTL to regions containing 7-24 genes, excluding genes with no sequence variation between the parental strains and genes with only synonymous SNPs. None of the genes in our QTL target regions have been previously associated with virulence in Aspergillus, and almost half of these genes are currently annotated as "hypothetical". This study is the first to map QTL affecting the virulence of a fungal pathogen in an animal host, and our results illustrate the power of this approach to identify a short list of unknown genes for further investigation.

  17. Quantitative Trait Loci from Two Genotypes of Oat (Avena sativa) Conditioning Resistance to Puccinia coronata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Ebrahiem M; Gordon, Tyler C; Jackson, Eric W; Chao, Shiaoman; Harrison, Stephen A; Carson, Martin L; Obert, Don E; Bonman, J Michael

    2015-02-01

    Developing oat cultivars with partial resistance to crown rust would be beneficial and cost-effective for disease management. Two recombinant inbred-line populations were generated by crossing the susceptible cultivar Provena with two partially resistant sources, CDC Boyer and breeding line 94197A1-9-2-2-2-5. A third mapping population was generated by crossing the partially resistant sources to validate the quantitative trait locus (QTL) results. The three populations were evaluated for crown rust severity in the field at Louisiana State University (LSU) in 2009 and 2010 and at the Cereal Disease Laboratory (CDL) in St. Paul, MN, in 2009, 2010, and 2011. An iSelect platform assay containing 5,744 oat single nucleotide polymorphisms was used to genotype the populations. From the 2009 CDL test, linkage analyses revealed two QTLs for partial resistance in the Provena/CDC Boyer population on chromosome 19A. One of the 19A QTLs was also detected in the 2009 LSU test. Another QTL was detected on chromosome 12D in the CDL 2009 test. In the Provena/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population, only one QTL was detected, on chromosome 13A, in the CDL 2011 test. The 13A QTL from the Provena/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population was validated in the CDC Boyer/94197A1-9-2-2-2-5 population in the CDL 2010 and 2011 tests. Comparative analysis of the significant marker sequences with the rice genome database revealed 15 candidate genes for disease resistance on chromosomes 4 and 6 of rice. These genes could be potential targets for cloning from the two resistant parents.

  18. Quantitative trait loci mapping and genetic dissection for lint percentage in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Min Wang; Chengqi Li; Qinglian Wang

    2014-08-01

    Lint percentage is an important character of cotton yield components and it is also correlated with cotton fibre development. In this study, we used a high lint percentage variety, Baimian1, and a low lint percentage, TM-1 genetic standard for Gossypium hirsutum, as parents to construct a mapping populations in upland cotton (G. hirsutum). A quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) analysis of lint percentage was performed by using two mapping procedures; composite interval mapping (CIM), inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) and the F2:3 populations in 2 years. Six main-effect QTL (M-QTL) for lint percentage (four significant and two suggestive) were detected in both years by CIM, and were located on chr. 3, chr. 19, chr. 26 and chr. 5 /chr. 19. Of the six QTL, marker intervals and favourable gene sources of the significant M-QTL, qLP-3(2010) and qLP-3(2011) were consistent. These QTL were also detected by ICIM, and therefore, should preferentially be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of lint percentage. Another M-QTL, qLP-19(2010), was detected by two mapping procedures, and it could also be a candidate for MAS. We detected the interaction between two M-QTL and environment, and 11 epistatic QTL (E-QTL) and their interaction with environment by using ICIM. The study also found two EST-SSRs, NAU1187 and NAU1255, linked to M-QTL for lint percentage that could be candidate markers affecting cotton fibre development.

  19. A narrow quantitative trait locus in C. elegans coordinately affects longevity, thermotolerance, and resistance to paraquat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony eVertino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By linkage mapping of quantitative trait loci, we previously identified at least 11 natural genetic variants that significantly modulate C. elegans lifespan, many of which would have eluded discovery by knockdown or mutation screens. A region on chromosome IV between markers stP13 and stP35 had striking effects on longevity in three interstrain crosses (each P < 1E–9. In order to define the limits of that interval, we have now constructed two independent lines by marker-based selection during 20 backcross generations, isolating the stP13–stP35 interval from strain Bergerac-BO in a CL2a background. These congenic lines differed significantly from CL2a in lifespan, assayed in two environments (each P<0.001. We then screened for exchange of flanking markers to isolate recombinants that partition this region, because fine mapping the boundaries for overlapping heteroallelic spans can greatly narrow the implicated interval. Recombinants carrying the CL2a allele at stP35 were consistently long-lived compared to those retaining the Bergerac-BO allele (P<0.001, and more resistant to temperature elevation and paraquat (each ~1.7-fold, P<0.0001, but gained little protection from ultraviolet or peroxide stresses. Two rounds of recombinant screening, followed by fine-mapping of break-points and survival testing, narrowed the interval to 0.18 Mb (13.35–13.53 Mb containing 26 putative genes and 6 small-nuclear RNAs – a manageable number of targets for functional assessment.

  20. Dynamic quantitative trait locus analysis of seed vigor at three maturity stages in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangfeng; Lai, Yanyan; Cheng, Jinping; Wang, Ling; Du, Wenli; Wang, Zhoufei; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Seed vigor is an important characteristic of seed quality. In this study, one rice population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was used to determine the genetic characteristics of seed vigor, including the germination potential, germination rate, germination index and time for 50% of germination, at 4 (early), 5 (middle) and 6 weeks (late) after heading in two years. A total of 24 additive and 9 epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed vigor were identified using QTL Cartographer and QTLNetwork program respectively in 2012; while 32 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with seed vigor were detected using bulked segregant analysis (BSA) in 2013. The additive, epistatic and QTL × development interaction effects regulated the dry maturity developmental process to improve seed vigor in rice. The phenotypic variation explained by each additive, epistatic QTL and QTL × development interaction ranged from 5.86 to 40.67%, 4.64 to 11.28% and 0.01 to 1.17%, respectively. The QTLs were rarely co-localized among the different maturity stages; more QTLs were expressed at the early maturity stage followed by the late and middle stages. Twenty additive QTLs were stably expressed in two years which might play important roles in establishment of seed vigor in different environments. By comparing chromosomal positions of these stably expressed additive QTLs with those previously identified, the regions of QTL for seed vigor are likely to coincide with QTL for grain size, low temperature germinability and seed dormancy; while 5 additive QTL might represent novel genes. Using four selected RILs, three cross combinations of seed vigor for the development of RIL populations were predicted; 19 elite alleles could be pyramided by each combination.

  1. Quantitative trait loci associated with longevity of lettuce seeds under conventional and controlled deterioration storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-10-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds have poor shelf life and exhibit thermoinhibition (fail to germinate) above ∼25°C. Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature, but reduces lettuce seed longevity. Controlled deterioration (CD) or accelerated ageing storage conditions (i.e. elevated temperature and relative humidity) are used to study seed longevity and to predict potential seed lifetimes under conventional storage conditions. Seeds produced in 2002 and 2006 of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas×L. serriola accession UC96US23 were utilized to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed longevity under CD and conventional storage conditions. Multiple longevity-associated QTLs were identified under both conventional and CD storage conditions for control (non-primed) and primed seeds. However, seed longevity was poorly correlated between the two storage conditions, suggesting that deterioration processes under CD conditions are not predictive of ageing in conventional storage conditions. Additionally, the same QTLs were not identified when RIL populations were grown in different years, indicating that lettuce seed longevity is strongly affected by production environment. Nonetheless, a major QTL on chromosome 4 [Seed longevity 4.1 (Slg4.1)] was responsible for almost 23% of the phenotypic variation in viability of the conventionally stored control seeds of the 2006 RIL population, with improved longevity conferred by the Salinas allele. QTL analyses may enable identification of mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of primed seeds to CD conditions and breeding for improved seed longevity.

  2. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Resistance to Late Blight in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Dilip R; Piotrowski, Ann; Ibrahem, Ragy

    2017-07-22

    Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans (Montagne, Bary) is a devastating disease of tomato worldwide. There are three known major genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-3, conferring resistance to late blight. In addition to these three genes, it is also believed that there are additional factors or quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to late blight. Precise molecular mapping of all those major genes and potential QTL is important in the development of suitable molecular markers and hence, marker-assisted selection (MAS). The objective of the present study was to map the genes and QTL associated with late blight resistance in a tomato population derived from intra-specific crosses. To achieve this objective, a population, derived from the crossings of NC 1CELBR × Fla. 7775, consisting of 250 individuals at F2 and F2-derived families, were evaluated in replicated trials. These were conducted at Mountain Horticultural Crops Reseach & Extension Center (MHCREC) at Mills River, NC, and Mountain Research Staion (MRS) at Waynesville, NC in 2011, 2014, and 2015. There were two major QTL associated with late blight resistance located on chromosomes 9 and 10 with likelihood of odd (LOD) scores of more than 42 and 6, explaining 67% and 14% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. The major QTLs are probably caused by the Ph-2 and Ph-3 genes. Furthermore, there was a minor QTL on chromosomes 12, which has not been reported before. This minor QTL may be novel and may be worth investigating further. Source of resistance to Ph-2, Ph-3, and this minor QTL traces back to line L3707, or Richter's Wild Tomato. The combination of major genes and minor QTL may provide a durable resistance to late blight in tomato.

  3. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL for Resistance to Late Blight in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip R. Panthee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans (Montagne, Bary is a devastating disease of tomato worldwide. There are three known major genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-3, conferring resistance to late blight. In addition to these three genes, it is also believed that there are additional factors or quantitative trait loci (QTL conferring resistance to late blight. Precise molecular mapping of all those major genes and potential QTL is important in the development of suitable molecular markers and hence, marker-assisted selection (MAS. The objective of the present study was to map the genes and QTL associated with late blight resistance in a tomato population derived from intra-specific crosses. To achieve this objective, a population, derived from the crossings of NC 1CELBR × Fla. 7775, consisting of 250 individuals at F2 and F2-derived families, were evaluated in replicated trials. These were conducted at Mountain Horticultural Crops Reseach & Extension Center (MHCREC at Mills River, NC, and Mountain Research Staion (MRS at Waynesville, NC in 2011, 2014, and 2015. There were two major QTL associated with late blight resistance located on chromosomes 9 and 10 with likelihood of odd (LOD scores of more than 42 and 6, explaining 67% and 14% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. The major QTLs are probably caused by the Ph-2 and Ph-3 genes. Furthermore, there was a minor QTL on chromosomes 12, which has not been reported before. This minor QTL may be novel and may be worth investigating further. Source of resistance to Ph-2, Ph-3, and this minor QTL traces back to line L3707, or Richter’s Wild Tomato. The combination of major genes and minor QTL may provide a durable resistance to late blight in tomato.

  4. Quantitative trait loci mapping and genetic dissection for lint percentage in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Li, Chengqi; Wang, Qinglian

    2014-08-01

    Lint percentage is an important character of cotton yield components and it is also correlated with cotton fibre development. In this study, we used a high lint percentage variety, Baimian1, and a low lint percentage, TM-1 genetic standard for Gossypium hirsutum, as parents to construct a mapping populations in upland cotton (G. hirsutum). A quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) analysis of lint percentage was performed by using two mapping procedures; composite interval mapping (CIM), inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) and the F2:3 populations in 2 years. Six main-effect QTL (M-QTL) for lint percentage (four significant and two suggestive) were detected in both years by CIM, and were located on chr. 3, chr. 19, chr. 26 and chr. 5/chr. 19. Of the six QTL, marker intervals and favourable gene sources of the significant M-QTL, qLP-3(2010) and qLP-3(2011) were consistent. These QTL were also detected by ICIM, and therefore, should preferentially be used for markerassisted selection (MAS) of lint percentage. Another M-QTL, qLP-19(2010), was detected by two mapping procedures, and it could also be a candidate for MAS. We detected the interaction between two M-QTL and environment, and 11 epistatic QTL (E-QTL) and their interaction with environment by using ICIM. The study also found two EST-SSRs, NAU1187 and NAU1255, linked to M-QTL for lint percentage that could be candidate markers affecting cotton fibre development.

  5. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Seed Germination and Seedling Vigor in Brassica rapa Reveals QTL Hotspots and Epistatic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Ram K; Duwal, Anita; Tiwari, Dev N; Xiao, Dong; Monakhos, Sokrat; Bucher, Johan; Visser, Richard G F; Groot, Steven P C; Bonnema, Guusje; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of seed germination and seedling vigor is largely unknown in Brassica species. We performed a study to evaluate the genetic basis of these important traits in a B. rapa doubled haploid population from a cross of a yellow-seeded oil-type yellow sarson and a black-seeded vegetable-type pak choi. We identified 26 QTL regions across all 10 linkage groups for traits related to seed weight, seed germination and seedling vigor under non-stress and salt stress conditions illustrating the polygenic nature of these traits. QTLs for multiple traits co-localized and we identified eight hotspots for quantitative trait loci (QTL) of seed weight, seed germination, and root and shoot lengths. A QTL hotspot for seed germination on A02 mapped at the B. rapa Flowering Locus C (BrFLC2). Another hotspot on A05 with salt stress specific QTLs co-located with the B. rapa Fatty acid desaturase 2 (BrFAD2) locus. Epistatic interactions were observed between QTL hotspots for seed germination on A02 and A10 and with a salt tolerance QTL on A05. These results contribute to the understanding of the genetics of seed quality and seeding vigor in B. rapa and can offer tools for Brassica breeding.

  6. Quantitative Trait Loci for Light Sensitivity, Body Weight, Body Size, and Morphological Eye Parameters in the Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Maebe

    Full Text Available Bumblebees such as Bombus terrestris are essential pollinators in natural and managed ecosystems. In addition, this species is intensively used in agriculture for its pollination services, for instance in tomato and pepper greenhouses. Here we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis on B. terrestris using 136 microsatellite DNA markers to identify genes linked with 20 traits including light sensitivity, body size and mass, and eye and hind leg measures. By composite interval mapping (IM, we found 83 and 34 suggestive QTLs for 19 of the 20 traits at the linkage group wide significance levels of p = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. Furthermore, we also found five significant QTLs at the genome wide significant level of p = 0.05. Individual QTLs accounted for 7.5-53.3% of the phenotypic variation. For 15 traits, at least one QTL was confirmed with multiple QTL model mapping. Multivariate principal components analysis confirmed 11 univariate suggestive QTLs but revealed three suggestive QTLs not identified by the individual traits. We also identified several candidate genes linked with light sensitivity, in particular the Phosrestin-1-like gene is a primary candidate for its phototransduction function. In conclusion, we believe that the suggestive and significant QTLs, and markers identified here, can be of use in marker-assisted breeding to improve selection towards light sensitive bumblebees, and thus also the pollination service of bumblebees.

  7. Quantitative Trait Loci for Light Sensitivity, Body Weight, Body Size, and Morphological Eye Parameters in the Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebe, Kevin; Meeus, Ivan; De Riek, Jan; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Bumblebees such as Bombus terrestris are essential pollinators in natural and managed ecosystems. In addition, this species is intensively used in agriculture for its pollination services, for instance in tomato and pepper greenhouses. Here we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on B. terrestris using 136 microsatellite DNA markers to identify genes linked with 20 traits including light sensitivity, body size and mass, and eye and hind leg measures. By composite interval mapping (IM), we found 83 and 34 suggestive QTLs for 19 of the 20 traits at the linkage group wide significance levels of p = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. Furthermore, we also found five significant QTLs at the genome wide significant level of p = 0.05. Individual QTLs accounted for 7.5-53.3% of the phenotypic variation. For 15 traits, at least one QTL was confirmed with multiple QTL model mapping. Multivariate principal components analysis confirmed 11 univariate suggestive QTLs but revealed three suggestive QTLs not identified by the individual traits. We also identified several candidate genes linked with light sensitivity, in particular the Phosrestin-1-like gene is a primary candidate for its phototransduction function. In conclusion, we believe that the suggestive and significant QTLs, and markers identified here, can be of use in marker-assisted breeding to improve selection towards light sensitive bumblebees, and thus also the pollination service of bumblebees.

  8. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for fiber and lignin contents from an interspecific cross Oryza sativa×Oryza rufipogon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-kun XIE; Xiang-li KONG; Jie CHEN; Biao-lin HU; Piao WEN; Jie-yun ZHUANG; Jin-song BAO

    2011-01-01

    Rice straw is always regarded as a by-product of rice production,but it could be a significant energy source for ruminant animals.Knowledge of the genetic variation and genetic architecture of cell wall traits will facilitate rice breeders by improving relevant traits through selective breeding and genetic engineering.The common wild rice,Oryza rufipogon Griff.,which is considered to be the progenitor of Oryza sativa,has been widely utilized for the identification of genes of agronomic importance for rice genetic improvement.In the present study,the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for acid detergent fiber (ADF),neutral detergent fiber (NDF),acid detergent lignin (ADL),and ADL/NDF ratio was carried out in two environments using a backcrossed inbred line (BIL) population derived from a cross between the recurrent parent Xieqingzao B (XB) and an accession of Dongxiang wild rice (DWR).The results indicated that all four traits tested were continuously distributed among the BILs,but many BILs showed transgressive segregation.A total of 16 QTLs were identified for the four traits,but no QTLs were in common in two environments,suggesting that environment has dramatic effects on fiber and lignin syntheses.Compared to the QTL positions for grain yield-related traits,there were no unfavorable correlations between grain yield components and cell wall traits in this population.The QTLs identified in this study are useful for the development of dual-purpose rice varieties that are high in grain yield and are also high in straw quality.

  9. Quantitative traits correlative analysis and growth comparison among different populations of bay scallop,Argopecten irradians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUBaozhong; LIANGYubo; LIUXiaolin; DONGBo; XIANGJianhai

    2004-01-01

    The shell traits and weight traits are measured in cultured populations of bay scallop, Argopecten irradians. The results of regression analysis show that the regression relationships for all the traits are significant (P0.05). The multiple regression equation is obtained to estimate live body weight and tissue weight. The above traits except anterior and posterior auricle length are used for the growth and production comparison among three cultured populations, Duncan's new multiple range procedure analysis shows that all the traits in the Lingshuiqiao (LSQ) population are much more significant than those of the other two populations (P0.05). The results indicate that the LSQ population has a higher growth rate and is expected to be more productive than the other two populations.

  10. Quantitative trait loci for plant height in Maresi × CamB barley population and their associations with yield-related traits under different water regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikołajczak, Krzysztof; Kuczyńska, Anetta; Krajewski, Paweł; Sawikowska, Aneta; Surma, Maria; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Adamski, Tadeusz; Krystkowiak, Karolina; Górny, Andrzej G; Kempa, Michał; Szarejko, Iwona; Guzy-Wróbelska, Justyna; Gudyś, Kornelia

    2017-02-01

    High-yielding capacity of the modern barley varieties is mostly dependent on the sources of semi-dwarfness associated with the sdw1/denso locus. The objective of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with the plant height and yield potential of barley recombinant inbred lines (RILs) grown under various soil moisture regimes. The plant material was developed from a hybrid between the Maresi (European cv.) and CamB (Syrian cv.). A total of 103 QTLs affecting analysed traits were detected and 36 of them showed stable effects over environments. In total, ten QTLs were found to be significant only under water shortage conditions. Nine QTLs affecting the length of main stem were detected on 2H-6H chromosomes. In four of the detected QTLs, alleles contributed by Maresi had negative effects on that trait, the most significant being the QLSt-3H.1-1 in the 3H.1 linkage group. The close linkage between QTLs identified around the sdw1/denso locus, with positive alleles contributed by Maresi, indicates that the semi-dwarf cv. Maresi could serve as a donor of favourable traits resulting in grain yield improvement, also under water scarcity. Molecular analyses revealed that the Syrian cv. also contributed alleles which increased the yield potential. Available barley resources of genomic annotations were employed to the biological interpretation of detected QTLs. This approach revealed 26 over-represented Gene Ontology terms. In the projected support intervals of QGWSl-5H.3-2 and QLSt-5H.3 on the chromosome 5H, four genes annotated to 'response to stress' were found. It suggests that these QTL-regions may be involved in a response of plant to a wide range of environmental disturbances.

  11. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling root and shoot traits associated with drought tolerance in a lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. recombinant inbred line population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Idrissi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 % and 28.9 % for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labour-intensive conventional breeding methods.

  12. Quantitative trait locus analysis for spikelet shape-related traits in wild wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii: Implications for intraspecific diversification and subspecies differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Hitoshi; Takumi, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Wild diploid wheat Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome progenitor of common wheat, carries large genetic variation in spikelet and grain morphology. Two differentiated subspecies of Ae. tauschii, subspecies tauschii and strangulata, have been traditionally defined based on differences in spikelet morphology. Here, we first assessed six spikelet shape-related traits among 199 Ae. tauschii accessions, and found that the accessions belonging to TauL1major lineage produced significantly longer spikes, higher spikelet density, and shorter, narrower spikelets than another major lineage, TauL2, in which the strangulata accessions are included. Next, we performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of the spikelet and grain shape using three mapping populations derived from interlineage crosses between TauL1 and TauL2 to identify the genetic loci for the morphological variations of the spikelet and grain shape in Ae. tauschii. Three major QTL regions for the examined traits were detected on chromosomes 3D, 4D and 7D. The 3D and 4D QTL regions for several spikelet shape-related traits were conserved in the three mapping populations, which indicated that the 3D and 4D QTLs contribute to divergence of the two major lineages. The 7D QTLs were found only in a mapping population from a cross of the two subspecies, suggesting that these 7D QTLs may be closely related to subspecies differentiation in Ae. tauschii. Thus, QTL analysis for spikelet and grain morphology may provide useful information to elucidate the evolutionary processes of intraspecific differentiation. PMID:28264068

  13. Quantitative NMR Approach to Optimize the Formation of Chemical Building Blocks from Abundant Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Samuel G; Tolborg, Søren; Sádaba, Irantzu; Taarning, Esben; Meier, Sebastian

    2017-07-21

    The future role of biomass-derived chemicals relies on the formation of diverse functional monomers in high yields from carbohydrates. Recently, it has become clear that a series of α-hydroxy acids, esters, and lactones can be formed from carbohydrates in alcohol and water solvents using tin-containing catalysts such as Sn-Beta. These compounds are potential building blocks for polyesters bearing additional olefin and alcohol functionalities. An NMR approach was used to identify, quantify, and optimize the formation of these building blocks in the Sn-Beta-catalyzed transformation of abundant carbohydrates. Record yields of the target molecules can be achieved by obstructing competing reactions through solvent selection. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparison of quantitative trait loci for adaptive traits between oak and chestnut based on an expressed sequence tag consensus map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasoli, Manuela; Derory, Jeremy; Morera-Dutrey, Caroline; Brendel, Oliver; Porth, Ilga; Guehl, Jean-Marc; Villani, Fiorella; Kremer, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    A comparative genetic and QTL mapping was performed between Quercus robur L. and Castanea sativa Mill., two major forest tree species belonging to the Fagaceae family. Oak EST-derived markers (STSs) were used to align the 12 linkage groups of the two species. Fifty-one and 45 STSs were mapped in oak and chestnut, respectively. These STSs, added to SSR markers previously mapped in both species, provided a total number of 55 orthologous molecular markers for comparative mapping within the Fagaceae family. Homeologous genomic regions identified between oak and chestnut allowed us to compare QTL positions for three important adaptive traits. Colocation of the QTL controlling the timing of bud burst was significant between the two species. However, conservation of QTL for height growth was not supported by statistical tests. No QTL for carbon isotope discrimination was conserved between the two species. Putative candidate genes for bud burst can be identified on the basis of colocations between EST-derived markers and QTL.

  15. Quantitative trait loci analysis of flowering time related traits identified in recombinant inbred lines of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andargie, Mebeasealassie; Pasquet, Remy S; Muluvi, Geoffrey M; Timko, Michael P

    2013-05-01

    Flowering time is a major adaptive trait in plants and an important selection criterion in the breeding for genetic improvement of crop species. QTLs for the time of flower opening and days to flower were identified in a cross between a short duration domesticated cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety, 524B, and a relatively long duration wild accession, 219-01. A set of 159 F7 lines was grown under greenhouse conditions and scored for the flowering time associated phenotypes of time of flower opening and days to flower. Using a LOD threshold of 2.0, putative QTLs were identified and placed on a linkage map consisting of 202 SSR markers and four morphological loci. A total of five QTLs related to the time of flower opening were identified, accounting for 8.8%-29.8% of the phenotypic variation. Three QTLs for days to flower were detected, accounting for 5.7%-18.5% of the phenotypic variation. The major QTL of days to flower and time of flower opening were both mapped on linkage group 1. The QTLs identified in this study provide a strong foundation for further validation and fine mapping for developing an efficient way to restrain the gene flow between the cultivated and wild plants.

  16. Identification of a Putative Quantitative Trait Gene for Resistance to Obesity in Mice Using Transcriptome Analysis and Causal Inference Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Akira

    2017-01-01

    It is still challenging to identify causal genes governing obesity. Pbwg1.5, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance to obesity, was previously discovered from wild Mus musculus castaneus mice and was fine-mapped to a 2.1-Mb genomic region of mouse chromosome 2, where no known gene with an effect on white adipose tissue (WAT) has been reported. The aim of this study was to identify a strong candidate gene for Pbwg1.5 by an integration approach of transcriptome analysis (RNA-sequencing followed by real-time PCR analysis) and the causal inference test (CIT), a statistical method to infer causal relationships between diplotypes, gene expression and trait values. Body weight, body composition and biochemical traits were measured in F2 mice obtained from an intercross between the C57BL/6JJcl strain and a congenic strain carrying Pbwg1.5 on the C57BL/6JJcl background. The F2 mice showed significant diplotype differences in 12 traits including body weight, WAT weight and serum cholesterol/triglyceride levels. The transcriptome analysis revealed that Ly75, Pla2r1, Fap and Gca genes were differentially expressed in the liver and that Fap, Ifih1 and Grb14 were differentially expressed in WAT. However, CITs indicated statistical evidence that only the liver Ly75 gene mediated between genotype and WAT. Ly75 expression was negatively associated with WAT weight. The results suggested that Ly75 is a putative quantitative trait gene for the obesity-resistant Pbwg1.5 QTL discovered from the wild M. m. castaneus mouse. The finding provides a novel insight into a better understanding of the genetic basis for prevention of obesity.

  17. Abundance and distribution of ultramafic microbreccia in Moses Rock Dike: Quantitative application of AIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1987-01-01

    Moses Rock dike is a Tertiary diatreme containing serpentinized ultramafic microbreccia (SUM). Field evidence indicates the SUM was emplaced first followed by breccias derived from the Permian strata exposed in the walls of the diatreme and finally by complex breccias containing basement and mantle derived rocks. SUM is found primarily dispersed throughout the matrix of the diatreme. Moses Rock dike was examined with Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) to map the distribution and excess of SUM in the matrix and to better understand the nature of the eruption which formed this explosive volcanic feature. AIS data was calibrated by dividing the suite of AIS data by data from an internal standard area and then multiplying this relative reflectance data by the absolute bidirectional reflectance of a selected sample from the standard area which was measured in the lab. From the calibrated AIS data the minerals serpentine, gypsum, and illite as well as desert varnish and the lithologies SUM and other sandstones were identified. SUM distribution and abundance in the matrix of the diatreme were examined in detail and two distinct styles of SUM dispersion were observed. The two styles are discussed in detail.

  18. Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae abundance in Austrian saline lakes, assessed with quantitative solid-phase cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Sonja; Jakwerth, Stefan; Bliem, Rupert; Baudart, Julia; Lebaron, Philippe; Huhulescu, Steliana; Kundi, Michael; Herzig, Alois; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Sommer, Regina; Kirschner, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In order to elucidate the main predictors of Vibrio cholerae dynamics and to estimate the risk of Vibrio cholera-related diseases, a recently developed direct detection approach based on fluorescence in situ hybridization and solid-phase cytometry (CARD-FISH/SPC) was applied in comparison to cultivation for water samples from the lake Neusiedler See, Austria and three shallow alkaline lakes over a period of 20 months. Vibrio cholerae attached to crustacean zooplankton was quantified via FISH and epifluorescence microscopy. Concentrations obtained by CARD-FISH/SPC were significantly higher than those obtained by culture in 2011, but were mostly of similar magnitude in 2012. Maximum cell numbers were 1.26 × 10(6) V. cholerae per L in Neusiedler See and 7.59 × 10(7) V. cholerae per L in the shallow alkaline lakes. Only on a few occasions during summer was the crustacean zooplankton the preferred habitat for V. cholerae. In winter, V. cholerae was not culturable but could be quantified at all sites with CARD-FISH/SPC. Beside temperature, suspended solids, zooplankton and ammonium were the main predictors of V. cholerae abundance in Neusiedler See, while in the shallow alkaline lakes it was organic carbon, conductivity and phosphorus. Based on the obtained concentrations a first estimation of the health risk for visitors of the lake could be performed. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Quantitative trait loci and candidate genes associated with starch pasting viscosity characteristics in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanyasiriwat, T; Sraphet, S; Whankaew, S; Boonseng, O; Bao, J; Lightfoot, D A; Tangphatsornruang, S; Triwitayakorn, K

    2014-01-01

    Starch pasting viscosity is an important quality trait in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars. The aim here was to identify loci and candidate genes associated with the starch pasting viscosity. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for seven pasting viscosity parameters was carried out using 100 lines of an F1 mapping population from a cross between two cassava cultivars Huay Bong 60 and Hanatee. Starch samples were obtained from roots of cassava grown in 2008 and 2009 at Rayong, and in 2009 at Lop Buri province, Thailand. The traits showed continuous distribution among the F1 progeny with transgressive variation. Fifteen QTL were identified from mean trait data, with Logarithm of Odds (LOD) values from 2.77-13.01 and phenotype variations explained (PVE) from10.0-48.4%. In addition, 48 QTL were identified in separate environments. The LOD values ranged from 2.55-8.68 and explained 6.6-43.7% of phenotype variation. The loci were located on 19 linkage groups. The most important QTL for pasting temperature (PT) (qPT.1LG1) from mean trait values showed largest effect with highest LOD value (13.01) and PVE (48.4%). The QTL co-localised with PT and pasting time (PTi) loci that were identified in separate environments. Candidate genes were identified within the QTL peak regions. However, the major genes of interest, encoding the family of glycosyl or glucosyl transferases and hydrolases, were located at the periphery of QTL peaks. The loci identified could be effectively applied in breeding programmes to improve cassava starch quality. Alleles of candidate genes should be further studied in order to better understand their effects on starch quality traits.

  20. Genetic diversity of upland rice germplasm in Malaysia based on quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, M; Rafii, M Y; Hanafi, M M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Latif, M A

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity is prerequisite for any crop improvement program as it helps in the development of superior recombinants. Fifty Malaysian upland rice accessions were evaluated for 12 growth traits, yield and yield components. All of the traits were significant and highly significant among the accessions. The higher magnitudes of genotypic and phenotypic coefficients of variation were recorded for flag leaf length-to-width ratio, spikelet fertility, and days to flowering. High heritability along with high genetic advance was registered for yield of plant, days to flowering, and flag leaf length-to-width ratio suggesting preponderance of additive gene action in the gene expression of these characters. Plant height showed highly significant positive correlation with most of the traits. According to UPGMA cluster analysis all accessions were clustered into six groups. Twelve morphological traits provided around 77% of total variation among the accessions.

  1. Genetic Diversity of Upland Rice Germplasm in Malaysia Based on Quantitative Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sohrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is prerequisite for any crop improvement program as it helps in the development of superior recombinants. Fifty Malaysian upland rice accessions were evaluated for 12 growth traits, yield and yield components. All of the traits were significant and highly significant among the accessions. The higher magnitudes of genotypic and phenotypic coefficients of variation were recorded for flag leaf length-to-width ratio, spikelet fertility, and days to flowering. High heritability along with high genetic advance was registered for yield of plant, days to flowering, and flag leaf length-to-width ratio suggesting preponderance of additive gene action in the gene expression of these characters. Plant height showed highly significant positive correlation with most of the traits. According to UPGMA cluster analysis all accessions were clustered into six groups. Twelve morphological traits provided around 77% of total variation among the accessions.

  2. Estimates of genetic variability and association studies in quantitative plant traits of Eruca spp. landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozokalfa Kadri Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing of economical importance of rocket plant limited information is available on genetic variability for the agronomic traits among Eruca spp. Hence, heritability and association studies of plant properties are necessities for a successful further rocket breeding programme. The objective of this study was to examine phenotypic and genotypic variability, broad sense heritability, genetic advance, genotypic and phenotypic correlation and mean for agronomic traits of rocket plant. The magnitude of phenotypic coefficient of variation values for all the traits were higher than the corresponding values and broad sense heritability estimates exceeded 65% for all traits. Phenotypic coefficients of variability (PCV ranged from 7.60 to 34.34% and genotypic coefficients of variability (GCV ranged between 5.58% for petiole thickness and 34.30% for plant weight. The results stated that plant weight, siliqua width, seed per siliqua and seed weight could be useful character for improved Eruca spp. breeding programme.

  3. Identifying quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to congenital hypothyroidism in 129/SvJcl strain mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Hosoda

    Full Text Available Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase 2 (TPST2 is one of the enzymes responsible for tyrosine O-sulfation and catalyzes the sulfation of the specific tyrosine residue of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR. Since this modification is indispensable for the activation of TSH signaling, a non-functional TPST2 mutation (Tpst2(grt in DW/J-grt mice leads to congenital hypothyroidism (CH characterized by severe thyroid hypoplasia and dwarfism related to TSH hyporesponsiveness. Previous studies indicated that the genetic background of the 129(+Ter/SvJcl (129 mouse strain ameliorates Tpst2(grt-induced CH. To identify loci responsible for CH resistance in 129 mice, we performed quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis using backcross progenies from susceptible DW/J and resistant 129 mice. We used the first principal component calculated from body weights at 5, 8 and 10 weeks as an indicator of CH, and QTL analysis mapped a major QTL showing a highly significant linkage to the distal portion of chromosome (Chr 2; between D2Mit62 and D2Mit304, particularly close to D2Mit255. In addition, two male-specific QTLs showing statistically suggestive linkage were also detected on Chrs 4 and 18, respectively. All QTL alleles derived from the 129 strain increased resistance to growth retardation. There was also a positive correlation between recovery from thyroid hypoplasia and the presence of the 129 allele at D2Mit255 in male progenies. These results suggested that the major QTL on Chr 2 is involved in thyroid development. Moreover, since DW/J congenic strain mice carrying both a Tpst2(grt mutation and 129 alleles in the major QTL show resistance to dwarfism and thyroid hypoplasia, we confirmed the presence of the resistant gene in this region, and that it is involved in thyroid development. Further genetical analysis should lead to identification of genes for CH tolerance and, from a better understanding of thyroid organogenesis and function, the subsequent

  4. Qualitative and quantitative dermatoglyphic traits in patients with breast cancer: a prospective clinical study

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    Tuteja Amita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most extensively studied cancers and its genetic basis is well established. Dermatoglyphic traits are formed under genetic control early in development but may be affected by environmental factors during first trimester of pregnancy. They however do not change significantly thereafter, thus maintaining stability not greatly affected by age. These patterns may represent the genetic make up of an individual and therefore his/her predisposition to certain diseases. Patterns of dermatoglyphics have been studied in various congenital disorders like Down's syndrome and Kleinfelter syndrome. The prints can thus represent a non-invasive anatomical marker of breast cancer risk and thus facilitate early detection and treatment. Methods The study was conducted on 60 histo-pathologically confirmed breast cancer patients and their digital dermatoglyphic patterns were studied to assess their association with the type and onset of breast cancer. Simultaneously 60 age-matched controls were also selected that had no self or familial history of a diagnosed breast cancer and the observations were recorded. The differences of qualitative (dermatoglyphic patterns data were tested for their significance using the chi-square test, and for quantitative (ridge counts and pattern intensity index data using the t- test. Results It was observed that six or more whorls in the finger print pattern were statistically significant among the cancer patients as compared to controls. It was also seen that whorls in the right ring finger and right little finger were found increased among the cases as compared to controls. The differences between mean pattern intensity index of cases and controls were found to be statistically significant. Conclusion The dermatoglyphic patterns may be utilized effectively to study the genetic basis of breast cancer and may also serve as a screening tool in the high-risk population. In a developing

  5. Quantitative trait Loci for resistance to the congenital nephropathy in tensin 2-deficient mice.

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    Hayato Sasaki

    Full Text Available The ICR-derived glomerulonephritis (ICGN mouse is a chronic kidney disease (CKD model that is characterized histologically by glomerulosclerosis, vascular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and clinically by proteinuria and anemia, which are common symptoms and pathological changes associated with a variety of kidney diseases. Previously, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis to identify the causative genes for proteinuria in ICGN mice, and found a deletion mutation of the tensin 2 gene (Tns2nph, MGI no: 2447990. Interestingly, the congenic strain carrying the Tns2nph mutation on a C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background exhibited milder phenotypes than did ICGN mice, indicating the presence of several modifier genes controlling the disease phenotype. In this study, to identify the modifier/resistant loci for CKD progression in Tns2-deficient mice, we performed QTL analysis using backcross progenies from susceptible ICGN and resistant B6 mice. We identified a significant locus on chromosome (Chr 2 (LOD = 5.36; 31 cM and two suggestive loci on Chrs 10 (LOD = 2.27; 64 cM and X (LOD = 2.65; 67 cM with linkage to the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. One significant locus on Chr 13 (LOD = 3.49; approximately 14 cM and one suggestive locus on Chr 2 (LOD = 2.41; 51 cM were identified as QTLs for the severity of glomerulosclerosis. Suggestive locus in BUN was also detected in the same Chr 2 region (LOD = 2.34; 51 cM. A locus on Chr 2 (36 cM was significantly linked with HGB (LOD = 4.47 and HCT (LOD = 3.58. Four novel epistatic loci controlling either HGB or tubulointerstitial injury were discovered. Further genetic analysis should lead to identification of CKD modifier gene(s, aiding early diagnosis and providing novel approaches to the discovery of drugs for the treatment and possible prevention of kidney disease.

  6. A genome-wide association study identifies protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Melzer

    2008-05-01

    locations. The identification of protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs may be a powerful complementary method of improving our understanding of disease pathways.

  7. The sensitivity of murine spermiogenesis to miglustat is a quantitative trait: a pharmacogenetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomkamp Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    parental strains. Conclusion The effects of miglustat on spermatogenesis in mice are strain-dependent, while in rabbits the drug is ineffective. Evaluation of interstrain hybrid mice indicated that the sensitivity of spermatogenesis to miglustat is a quantitative trait. These studies pave the way for identifying the genetic factors underlying the strain/species differences in the effect of miglustat.

  8. Cis-Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Reveals Replicable Associations with Heroin Addiction in OPRM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Dana B.; Levy, Joshua L.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L.; Page, Grier P.; Hulse, Gary; Wildenauer, Dieter; Kelty, Erin; Schwab, Sibylle; Degenhardt, Louisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J.; Bierut, Laura J.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Kral, Alex; Johnson, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Background No opioid receptor, mu 1 (OPRM1) gene polymorphisms, including the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1799971, have been conclusively associated with heroin/other opioid addiction, despite their biological plausibility. We used evidence of polymorphisms altering OPRM1 expression in normal human brain tissue to nominate and then test associations with heroin addiction. Methods We tested 103 OPRM1 SNPs for association with OPRM1 mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex from 224 European Americans and African Americans of the BrainCloud cohort. We then tested the 16 putative cis-quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) SNPs for association with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study and two replication cohorts, totaling 16,729 European Americans, African Americans, and Australians of European ancestry. Results Four putative cis-eQTL SNPs were significantly associated with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study (smallest P=8.9×10−5): rs9478495, rs3778150, rs9384169, and rs562859. Rs3778150, located in OPRM1 intron 1, was significantly replicated (P=6.3×10−5). Meta-analysis across all case-control cohorts resulted in P=4.3×10−8: the rs3778150-C allele (frequency=16%-19%) being associated with increased heroin addiction risk. Importantly, the functional SNP allele rs1799971-A was associated with heroin addiction only in the presence of rs3778150-C (P=1.48×10−6 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-C and P=0.79 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-T haplotypes). Lastly, replication was observed for six other intron 1 SNPs which had prior suggestive associations with heroin addiction (smallest P=2.7×10−8 for rs3823010). Conclusions Our findings show that common OPRM1 intron 1 SNPs have replicable associations with heroin addiction. The haplotype structure of rs3778150 and nearby SNPs may underlie the inconsistent associations between rs1799971 and heroin addiction. PMID:25744370

  9. An integrated genetic map based on four mapping populations and quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; McGregor, Cecilia; Zhang, Yan; Gong, Guoyi; Zhang, Haiying; Guo, Shaogui; Sun, Honghe; Cai, Wantao; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Yong

    2014-01-20

    Modern watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) cultivars share a narrow genetic base due to many years of selection for desirable horticultural qualities. Wild subspecies within C. lanatus are important potential sources of novel alleles for watermelon breeding, but successful trait introgression into elite cultivars has had limited success. The application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in watermelon is yet to be realized, mainly due to the past lack of high quality genetic maps. Recently, a number of useful maps have become available, however these maps have few common markers, and were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making integration and comparative analysis among maps difficult. The objective of this research was to use single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) anchor markers to construct an integrated genetic map for C. lanatus. Under the framework of the high density genetic map, an integrated genetic map was constructed by merging data from four independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines, which included three subspecies of watermelon. The 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel), 36 structure variation (SV) and 386 SNP markers from the four maps were used to construct an integrated map. This integrated map contained 1339 markers, spanning 798 cM with an average marker interval of 0.6 cM. Fifty-eight previously reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 12 traits in these populations were also integrated into the map. In addition, new QTL identified for brix, fructose, glucose and sucrose were added. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in different genetic backgrounds mapped to similar genomic regions of the integrated map, suggesting that such QTL are responsible for the phenotypic variability observed in a broad array of watermelon germplasm. The integrated map described herein enhances the utility of genomic tools over previous watermelon genetic maps. A

  10. A consensus linkage map for molecular markers and Quantitative Trait Loci associated with economically important traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaffer Arthur

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of molecular marker linkage maps have been developed for melon (Cucumis melo L. over the last two decades. However, these maps were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making comparative analysis among maps difficult. In order to solve this problem, a consensus genetic map in melon was constructed using primarily highly transferable anchor markers that have broad potential use for mapping, synteny, and comparative quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis, increasing breeding effectiveness and efficiency via marker-assisted selection (MAS. Results Under the framework of the International Cucurbit Genomics Initiative (ICuGI, http://www.icugi.org, an integrated genetic map has been constructed by merging data from eight independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines. The consensus map spans 1150 cM across the 12 melon linkage groups and is composed of 1592 markers (640 SSRs, 330 SNPs, 252 AFLPs, 239 RFLPs, 89 RAPDs, 15 IMAs, 16 indels and 11 morphological traits with a mean marker density of 0.72 cM/marker. One hundred and ninety-six of these markers (157 SSRs, 32 SNPs, 6 indels and 1 RAPD were newly developed, mapped or provided by industry representatives as released markers, including 27 SNPs and 5 indels from genes involved in the organic acid metabolism and transport, and 58 EST-SSRs. Additionally, 85 of 822 SSR markers contributed by Syngenta Seeds were included in the integrated map. In addition, 370 QTL controlling 62 traits from 18 previously reported mapping experiments using genetically diverse parental genotypes were also integrated into the consensus map. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in separate studies mapped to similar genomic positions. For example, independently identified QTL controlling fruit shape were mapped on similar genomic positions, suggesting that such QTL are possibly responsible for the phenotypic variability

  11. A consensus linkage map for molecular markers and Quantitative Trait Loci associated with economically important traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of molecular marker linkage maps have been developed for melon (Cucumis melo L.) over the last two decades. However, these maps were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making comparative analysis among maps difficult. In order to solve this problem, a consensus genetic map in melon was constructed using primarily highly transferable anchor markers that have broad potential use for mapping, synteny, and comparative quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, increasing breeding effectiveness and efficiency via marker-assisted selection (MAS). Results Under the framework of the International Cucurbit Genomics Initiative (ICuGI, http://www.icugi.org), an integrated genetic map has been constructed by merging data from eight independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines. The consensus map spans 1150 cM across the 12 melon linkage groups and is composed of 1592 markers (640 SSRs, 330 SNPs, 252 AFLPs, 239 RFLPs, 89 RAPDs, 15 IMAs, 16 indels and 11 morphological traits) with a mean marker density of 0.72 cM/marker. One hundred and ninety-six of these markers (157 SSRs, 32 SNPs, 6 indels and 1 RAPD) were newly developed, mapped or provided by industry representatives as released markers, including 27 SNPs and 5 indels from genes involved in the organic acid metabolism and transport, and 58 EST-SSRs. Additionally, 85 of 822 SSR markers contributed by Syngenta Seeds were included in the integrated map. In addition, 370 QTL controlling 62 traits from 18 previously reported mapping experiments using genetically diverse parental genotypes were also integrated into the consensus map. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in separate studies mapped to similar genomic positions. For example, independently identified QTL controlling fruit shape were mapped on similar genomic positions, suggesting that such QTL are possibly responsible for the phenotypic variability observed for this trait in

  12. Optical characterization of red blood cells from individuals with sickle cell trait and disease in Tanzania using quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaehwang; Matemba, Lucas E.; Lee, Kyeoreh; Kazyoba, Paul E.; Yoon, Jonghee; Massaga, Julius J.; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common across Sub-Saharan Africa. However, the investigation of SCD in this area has been significantly limited mainly due to the lack of research facilities and skilled personnel. Here, we present optical measurements of individual red blood cells from healthy individuals and individuals with SCD and sickle cell trait in Tanzania using the quantitative phase imaging technique. By employing a quantitative phase imaging unit, an existing microscope in a clinic is transformed into a powerful quantitative phase microscope providing measurements on the morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties of individual cells. The present approach will open up new opportunities for cost-effective investigation and diagnosis of several diseases in low resource environments.

  13. Optical characterization of red blood cells from individuals with sickle cell trait and disease in Tanzania using quantitative phase imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, KyeoReh; Kazyoba, Paul E; Yoon, Jonghee; Massaga, Julius J; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common across Sub-Saharan Africa. However, the investigation of SCD in this area has been significantly limited mainly due to the lack of research facilities and skilled personnel. Here, we present optical measurements of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from healthy individuals and individuals with SCD and sickle cell trait in Tanzania using the quantitative phase imaging technique. By employing a quantitative phase imaging unit (QPIU), an existing microscope in a clinic is transformed into a powerful quantitative phase microscope providing measurements on the morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties of individual cells. The present approach will open up new opportunities for cost-effective investigation and diagnosis of several diseases in low resource environments.

  14. Estimation of genetic parameters and their sampling variances for quantitative traits in the type 2 modified augmented design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank M. You; Qijian Song; Gaofeng Jia; Yanzhao Cheng; Scott Duguid; Helen Booker; Sylvie Cloutier

    2016-01-01

    The type 2 modified augmented design (MAD2) is an efficient unreplicated experimental design used for evaluating large numbers of lines in plant breeding and for assessing genetic variation in a population. Statistical methods and data adjustment for soil heterogeneity have been previously described for this design. In the absence of replicated test genotypes in MAD2, their total variance cannot be partitioned into genetic and error components as required to estimate heritability and genetic correlation of quantitative traits, the two conventional genetic parameters used for breeding selection. We propose a method of estimating the error variance of unreplicated genotypes that uses replicated controls, and then of estimating the genetic parameters. Using the Delta method, we also derived formulas for estimating the sampling variances of the genetic parameters. Computer simulations indicated that the proposed method for estimating genetic parameters and their sampling variances was feasible and the reliability of the estimates was positively associated with the level of heritability of the trait. A case study of estimating the genetic parameters of three quantitative traits, iodine value, oil content, and linolenic acid content, in a biparental recombinant inbred line population of flax with 243 individuals, was conducted using our statistical models. A joint analysis of data over multiple years and sites was suggested for genetic parameter estimation. A pipeline module using SAS and Perl was developed to facilitate data analysis and appended to the previously developed MAD data analysis pipeline (http://probes.pw.usda.gov/bioinformatics_ tools/MADPipeline/index.html).

  15. Estimation of genetic parameters and their sampling variances for quantitative traits in the type 2 modified augmented design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank M.You; Qijian Song; Gaofeng Jia; Yanzhao Cheng; Scott Duguid; Helen Booker; Sylvie Cloutier

    2016-01-01

    The type 2 modified augmented design(MAD2) is an efficient unreplicated experimental design used for evaluating large numbers of lines in plant breeding and for assessing genetic variation in a population. Statistical methods and data adjustment for soil heterogeneity have been previously described for this design. In the absence of replicated test genotypes in MAD2, their total variance cannot be partitioned into genetic and error components as required to estimate heritability and genetic correlation of quantitative traits, the two conventional genetic parameters used for breeding selection. We propose a method of estimating the error variance of unreplicated genotypes that uses replicated controls, and then of estimating the genetic parameters. Using the Delta method, we also derived formulas for estimating the sampling variances of the genetic parameters.Computer simulations indicated that the proposed method for estimating genetic parameters and their sampling variances was feasible and the reliability of the estimates was positively associated with the level of heritability of the trait. A case study of estimating the genetic parameters of three quantitative traits, iodine value, oil content, and linolenic acid content, in a biparental recombinant inbred line population of flax with 243 individuals, was conducted using our statistical models. A joint analysis of data over multiple years and sites was suggested for genetic parameter estimation. A pipeline module using SAS and Perl was developed to facilitate data analysis and appended to the previously developed MAD data analysis pipeline(http://probes.pw.usda.gov/bioinformatics_ tools/MADPipeline/index.html).

  16. Estimation of genetic parameters and their sampling variances for quantitative traits in the type 2 modified augmented design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank M. You

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The type 2 modified augmented design (MAD2 is an efficient unreplicated experimental design used for evaluating large numbers of lines in plant breeding and for assessing genetic variation in a population. Statistical methods and data adjustment for soil heterogeneity have been previously described for this design. In the absence of replicated test genotypes in MAD2, their total variance cannot be partitioned into genetic and error components as required to estimate heritability and genetic correlation of quantitative traits, the two conventional genetic parameters used for breeding selection. We propose a method of estimating the error variance of unreplicated genotypes that uses replicated controls, and then of estimating the genetic parameters. Using the Delta method, we also derived formulas for estimating the sampling variances of the genetic parameters. Computer simulations indicated that the proposed method for estimating genetic parameters and their sampling variances was feasible and the reliability of the estimates was positively associated with the level of heritability of the trait. A case study of estimating the genetic parameters of three quantitative traits, iodine value, oil content, and linolenic acid content, in a biparental recombinant inbred line population of flax with 243 individuals, was conducted using our statistical models. A joint analysis of data over multiple years and sites was suggested for genetic parameter estimation. A pipeline module using SAS and Perl was developed to facilitate data analysis and appended to the previously developed MAD data analysis pipeline (http://probes.pw.usda.gov/bioinformatics_ tools/MADPipeline/index.html.

  17. A genome-screen experiment to detect quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to facial eczema disease in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, S H; Dodds, K G; Morris, C A; Henry, H M; Beattie, A E; Garmonsway, H G; Towers, N R; Crawford, A M

    2009-02-01

    Facial eczema (FE) is a secondary photosensitization disease arising from liver cirrhosis caused by the mycotoxin sporidesmin. The disease affects sheep, cattle, deer and goats, and costs the New Zealand sheep industry alone an estimated NZ$63M annually. A long-term sustainable solution to this century-old FE problem is to breed for disease-resistant animals by marker-assisted selection. As a step towards finding a diagnostic DNA test for FE sensitivity, we have conducted a genome-scan experiment to screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting this trait in Romney sheep. Four F(1) sires, obtained from reciprocal matings of FE resistant and susceptible selection-line animals, were used to generate four outcross families. The resulting half-sib progeny were artificially challenged with sporidesmin to phenotype their FE traits measured in terms of their serum levels of liver-specific enzymes, namely gamma-glutamyl transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase. In a primary screen using selective genotyping on extreme progeny of each family, a total of 244 DNA markers uniformly distributed over all 26 ovine autosomes (with an autosomal genome coverage of 79-91%) were tested for linkage to the FE traits. Data were analysed using Haley-Knott regression. The primary screen detected one significant and one suggestive QTL on chromosomes 3 and 8 respectively. Both the significant and suggestive QTL were followed up in a secondary screen where all progeny were genotyped and analysed; the QTL on chromosome 3 was significant in this analysis.

  18. Construction of a genetic linkage map of Thlaspi caerulescens and quantitative trait loci analysis of zinc accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Ana G L; Pieper, Bjorn; Vromans, Jaap; Lindhout, Pim; Aarts, Mark G M; Schat, Henk

    2006-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation seems to be a constitutive species-level trait in Thlaspi caerulescens. When compared under conditions of equal Zn availability, considerable variation in the degree of hyperaccumulation is observed among accessions originating from different soil types. This variation offers an excellent opportunity for further dissection of the genetics of this trait. A T. caerulescens intraspecific cross was made between a plant from a nonmetallicolous accession [Lellingen (LE)], characterized by relatively high Zn accumulation, and a plant from a calamine accession [La Calamine (LC)], characterized by relatively low Zn accumulation. Zinc accumulation in roots and shoots segregated in the F3 population. This population was used to construct an LE/LC amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based genetic linkage map and to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Zn accumulation. Two QTL were identified for root Zn accumulation, with the trait-enhancing alleles being derived from each of the parents, and explaining 21.7 and 16.6% of the phenotypic variation observed in the mapping population. Future development of more markers, based on Arabidopsis orthologous genes localized in the QTL regions, will allow fine-mapping and map-based cloning of the genes underlying the QTL.

  19. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of resistance to strongyles and coccidia in the free-living Soay sheep (Ovis aries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldi, Dario; McRae, Allan F; Gratten, Jacob; Pilkington, Jill G; Slate, Jon; Visscher, Peter M; Pemberton, Josephine M

    2007-01-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to gastrointestinal parasites and ectoparasitic keds segregating in the free-living Soay sheep population on St. Kilda (UK). The mapping panel consisted of a single pedigree of 882 individuals of which 588 were genotyped. The Soay linkage map used for the scans comprised 251 markers covering the whole genome at average spacing of 15cM. The traits here investigated were the strongyle faecal egg count (FEC), the coccidia faecal oocyst count (FOC) and a count of keds (Melophagus ovinus). QTL mapping was performed by means of variance component analysis so that the genetic parameters of the study traits were also estimated and compared with previous studies in Soay and domestic sheep. Strongyle FEC and coccidia FOC showed moderate heritability (h(2)=0.26 and 0.22, respectively) in lambs but low heritability in adults (h(2)scans were performed for the traits with moderate heritability and two genomic regions reached the level of suggestive linkage for coccidia FOC in lambs (logarithm of the odds=2.68 and 2.21 on chromosomes 3 and X, respectively). We believe this is the first study to report a QTL search for parasite resistance in a free-living animal population and therefore may represent a useful reference for similar studies aimed at understanding the genetics of host-parasite co-evolution in the wild.

  20. Quantitative trait loci mapping of pubescence density and flowering time of insect-resistant soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Komatsu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of antibiosis resistance to common cutworm (Spodoptera litura Fabricius in soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. has progressed significantly, but the immediate cause remains unknown. We performed quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis of pubescence density and plant development stage because these factors are assumed to be the immediate cause of resistance to cutworm. The QTLs for pubescence appeared to be identical to the previously detected the Pd1 and Ps loci controlling pubescence density. We found no candidate loci for flowering time QTLs, although one could be identical to the gene governing the long-juvenile trait or to the E6 loci controlling maturity. None of the QTLs overlapped with the QTLs for antibiosis resistance.

  1. A compilation of quantitative functional traits for marine and freshwater crustacean zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Marie-Pier; Beisner, Beatrix E; Maranger, Roxane

    2016-04-01

    This data compilation synthesizes 8609 individual observations and ranges of 13 traits from 201 freshwater and 191 marine crustacean taxa belonging to either Copepoda or Cladocera, two important zooplankton groups across all major aquatic habitats. Most data were gathered from the literature, with the balance being provided by zooplankton ecologists. With the aim of more fully assessing zooplankton effects on elemental processes such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) stocks and fluxes in aquatic ecosystems, this data set provides information on the following traits: body size (length and mass), trophic group, elemental and biochemical corporal composition (N, P, C, lipid and protein content), respiration rates, N- and P-excretion rates, as well as stoichiometric ratios. Although relationships for zooplankton metabolism as a function of body mass or requirements have been explored in the past three decades, data have not been systematically compiled nor examined from an integrative and large-scale perspective across crustacean taxa and habitat types. While this contribution likely represents the most comprehensive assembly of traits for both marine and freshwater species, this data set is not exhaustive either. As a result, this compilation also identifies knowledge gaps: a fact that should encourage researchers to disclose information they may have to help complete such databases. This trait matrix is made available for the first time in this data paper; prior to its release, the data set has been analyzed in a meta-analysis published as a companion paper. This data set should prove extremely valuable for aquatic ecologists for trait-based characterization of plankton community structure as well as biogeochemical modeling. These data are also well-suited for deriving shortcut relationships that predict more difficult to measure trait values, most of which can be directly related to ecosystem properties (i.e., effect traits), from simpler traits (e

  2. Linkage analysis of quantitative traits for obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia on the island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmulewitz, Dvora; Heath, Simon C; Blundell, Maude L; Han, Zhihua; Sharma, Ratnendra; Salit, Jacqueline; Auerbach, Steven B; Signorini, Stefano; Breslow, Jan L; Stoffel, Markus; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2006-03-07

    Obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease are highly heritable conditions that in aggregate are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world and are growing problems in developing countries. To map the causal genes, we conducted a population screen for these conditions on the Pacific Island of Kosrae. Family history and genetic data were used to construct a pedigree for the island. Analysis of the pedigree showed highly significant heritability for the metabolic traits under study. DNA samples from 2,188 participants were genotyped with 405 microsatellite markers with an average intermarker distance of 11 cM. A protocol using loki, a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method, was developed to analyze the Kosraen pedigree for height, a model quantitative trait. Robust quantitative trait loci for height were found on 10q21 and 1p31. This protocol was used to map a set of metabolic traits, including plasma leptin to chromosome region 5q35; systolic blood pressure to 20p12; total cholesterol to 19p13, 12q24, and 16qter; hip circumference to 10q25 and 4q23; body mass index to 18p11 and 20q13; apolipoprotein B to 2p24-25; weight to 18q21; and fasting blood sugar to 1q31-1q43. Several of these same chromosomal regions have been identified in previous studies validating the use of loki. These studies add information about the genetics of the metabolic syndrome and establish an analytical approach for linkage analysis of complex pedigrees. These results also lay the foundation for whole genome scans with dense sets of SNPs aimed to identifying causal genes.

  3. Genetic interrelationship among nutritional and quantitative traits in the vegetable amaranth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Shukla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was conducted to elucidate the interrelationship among various agronomic andquality traits and their direct and indirect effect on foliage yield in 39 distinct cultivars of vegetable amaranth (A. tricolor.Among the agronomic traits, plant height and number of inflorescence exhibited significant positive association with foliageyield, while chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, fiber and ascorbic acid were positively correlated with foliage yield.Chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b exhibited significant positive association with carotenoid, fiber and ascorbic acid. Ascorbicacid was positively correlated with fiber and carotenoid. Protein was associated with plant height, branches per plant and 500seed weight. Chlorophyll a, carotenoid and inflorescence length revealed high positive direct effect on foliage yield, whilebranches plant-1, leaf size, seed yield, chlorophyll b, moisture content and ascorbic acid showed negative path coefficient withfoliage yield. Suitable traits have been marked out to enhance foliage yield in vegetable amaranth.

  4. Mapping of quantitative trait loci determining agronomic important characters in hexaploid wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, A.; Schumann, E.; Fürste, A.; Cöster, H.; Leithold, B.; Röder, S.; Weber, E.

    2002-11-01

    A set of 114 recombinant inbred lines of the 'International Triticeae Mapping Initiative' mapping population was grown during the seasons 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000 under several environments. Twenty morphological (glume colour, awn colour, waxiness, leaf erectness, peduncle length), agronomical (ear emergence time, flowering time, grain filling time, ear length, plant height, lodging, grain number, thousand-grain-weight, grain weight per ear, grain protein content, winter hardiness) and disease resistance (powdery mildew, yellow rust, leaf rust, fusarium) traits were studied. Not all traits were scored in each experiment. In total 210 QTLs with a LOD threshold of >2.0 (minor QTLs) were detected of which 64 reached a LOD score of >3.0 (major QTLs). Often QTLs were detected in comparable positions in different experiments. Homologous and homoeologous relationships of the detected QTLs, and already described major genes or QTLs determining the same traits in wheat or other Triticeae members, are discussed.

  5. The quantitative genetics of incipient speciation: heritability and genetic correlations of skeletal traits in populations of diverging Favia fragum ecomorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlon, David B; Budd, Ann F; Lippé, Catherine; Andrew, Rose L

    2011-12-01

    Recent speciation events provide potential opportunities to understand the microevolution of reproductive isolation. We used a marker-based approach and a common garden to estimate the additive genetic variation in skeletal traits in a system of two ecomorphs within the coral species Favia fragum: a Tall ecomorph that is a seagrass specialist, and a Short ecomorph that is most abundant on coral reefs. Considering both ecomorphs, we found significant narrow-sense heritability (h(2) ) in a suite of measurements that define corallite architecture, and could partition additive and nonadditive variation for some traits. We found positive genetic correlations for homologous height and length measurements among different types of vertical plates (costosepta) within corallites, but negative correlations between height and length within, as well as between costosepta. Within ecomorphs, h(2) estimates were generally lower, compared to the combined ecomorph analysis. Marker-based estimates of h(2) were comparable to broad-sense heritability (H) obtained from parent-offspring regressions in a common garden for most traits, and similar genetic co-variance matrices for common garden and wild populations may indicate relatively small G × E interactions. The patterns of additive genetic variation in this system invite hypotheses of divergent selection or genetic drift as potential evolutionary drivers of reproductive isolation.

  6. A flexible approach for the analysis of rare variants allowing for a mixture of effects on binary or quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine M Clarke

    Full Text Available Multiple rare variants either within or across genes have been hypothesised to collectively influence complex human traits. The increasing availability of high throughput sequencing technologies offers the opportunity to study the effect of rare variants on these traits. However, appropriate and computationally efficient analytical methods are required to account for collections of rare variants that display a combination of protective, deleterious and null effects on the trait. We have developed a novel method for the analysis of rare genetic variation in a gene, region or pathway that, by simply aggregating summary statistics at each variant, can: (i test for the presence of a mixture of effects on a trait; (ii be applied to both binary and quantitative traits in population-based and family-based data; (iii adjust for covariates to allow for non-genetic risk factors and; (iv incorporate imputed genetic variation. In addition, for preliminary identification of promising genes, the method can be applied to association summary statistics, available from meta-analysis of published data, for example, without the need for individual level genotype data. Through simulation, we show that our method is immune to the presence of bi-directional effects, with no apparent loss in power across a range of different mixtures, and can achieve greater power than existing approaches as long as summary statistics at each variant are robust. We apply our method to investigate association of type-1 diabetes with imputed rare variants within genes in the major histocompatibility complex using genotype data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium.

  7. Power to detect trends in abundance of secretive marsh birds: effects of species traits and sampling effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Robert J.; Conway, Courtney J.; Litt, Andrea R.

    2013-01-01

    Standardized protocols for surveying secretive marsh birds have been implemented across North America, but the efficacy of surveys to detect population trends has not been evaluated. We used survey data collected from populations of marsh birds across North America and simulations to explore how characteristics of bird populations (proportion of survey stations occupied, abundance at occupied stations, and detection probability) and aspects of sampling effort (numbers of survey routes, stations/route, and surveys/station/year) affect statistical power to detect trends in abundance of marsh bird populations. In general, the proportion of survey stations along a route occupied by a species had a greater relative effect on power to detect trends than did the number of birds detected per survey at occupied stations. Uncertainty introduced by imperfect detection during surveys reduced power to detect trends considerably, but across the range of detection probabilities for most species of marsh birds, variation in detection probability had only a minor influence on power. For species that occupy a relatively high proportion of survey stations (0.20), have relatively high abundances at occupied stations (2.0 birds/station), and have high detection probability (0.50), ≥40 routes with 10 survey stations per route surveyed 3 times per year would provide an 80% chance of detecting a 3% annual decrease in abundance after 20 years of surveys. Under the same assumptions but for species that are less common, ≥100 routes would be needed to achieve the same power. Our results can help inform the design of programs to monitor trends in abundance of marsh bird populations, especially with regards to the amount of sampling effort necessary to meet programmatic goals.

  8. Comparison of potentials between genotype-based selection and genotypic value-based selection of quantitative traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    According to the difference of selection criteria, methods of marker-assisted selection (MAS) of quantitative traits can be divided into genotype-based selection (GS) and genotypic value-based selection (GVS). By means of computer simulation, potentials of the two methods were compared. Results showed that the two methods had similar basic laws and their efficiencies were not significantly different except that GS behaved better in the case where the number of QTLs was large and QTL effects were equal. From the application point of view, combination of GS and GVS should be the development direction of MAS research in the future.

  9. Detection of a quantitative trait locus associated with resistance to infection with Trichuris suis in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher;

    2015-01-01

    Whipworms (Trichuris spp.) infect a variety of hosts, including domestic animals and humans. Of considerable interest is the porcine whipworm, T. suis, which is particularly prevalent in outdoor production systems. High infection levels may cause growth retardation, anaemia and haemorrhagic...... a whole-genome scan of an F1 resource population (n=195) trickle-infected with T. suis. A measured genotype analysis revealed a putative quantitative trait locus (QTL) for T. suis FEC on chromosome 13 covering ∼4.5Mbp, although none of the SNPs reached genome-wide significance. We tested the hypothesis...

  10. Discovery of quantitative trait loci for resistance to parasitic nematode infection in sheep: I. Analysis of outcross pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer Gordon J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently most pastoral farmers rely on anthelmintic drenches to control gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes in sheep. Resistance to anthelmintics is rapidly increasing in nematode populations such that on some farms none of the drench families are now completely effective. It is well established that host resistance to nematode infection is a moderately heritable trait. This study was undertaken to identify regions of the genome, quantitative trait loci (QTL that contain genes affecting resistance to parasitic nematodes. Results Rams obtained from crossing nematode parasite resistant and susceptible selection lines were used to derive five large half-sib families comprising between 348 and 101 offspring per sire. Total offspring comprised 940 lambs. Extensive measurements for a range of parasite burden and immune function traits in all offspring allowed each lamb in each pedigree to be ranked for relative resistance to nematode parasites. Initially the 22 most resistant and 22 most susceptible progeny from each pedigree were used in a genome scan that used 203 microsatellite markers spread across all sheep autosomes. This study identified 9 chromosomes with regions showing sufficient linkage to warrant the genotyping of all offspring. After genotyping all offspring with markers covering Chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 13, 22 and 23, the telomeric end of chromosome 8 was identified as having a significant QTL for parasite resistance as measured by the number of Trichostrongylus spp. adults in the abomasum and small intestine at the end of the second parasite challenge. Two further QTL for associated immune function traits of total serum IgE and T. colubiformis specific serum IgG, at the end of the second parasite challenge, were identified on chromosome 23. Conclusion Despite parasite resistance being a moderately heritable trait, this large study was able to identify only a single significant QTL associated with it. The QTL

  11. Quantitative studies of DNA methylation and gene expression in neuropsychiatric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, K.R.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that besides genes and environment, epigenetic factors are also playing a role in the development of traits and diseases. Epigenetic changes do not affect the underlying DNA sequence, but affect its structure and is thought to play a major role in regulation of gene expression. DN

  12. Genome-wide identification of quantitative trait loci in a cross between Hampshire and Landrace II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markljung, Ellen; Braunschweig, Martin H.; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    to identifying markers that can be used in MAS. In this study, Landrace and Hampshire intercross and backcross families were used to investigate meat quality traits. Hampshire pigs are commonly used as sthe sire line in commercial pig breeding. This is the first time a pedigree including Hampshire pigs has been...

  13. Quantitative trait loci associated with pre-weaning growth in South African Angora goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C.; Marle-Koster, van E.; Snyman, M.A.; Bovenhuis, H.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify chromosomal regions associated with genetic variation in pre-weaning growth traits in Angora goats. A genome-wide scan was performed by genotyping 1042 offspring from 12 half-sib families using 88 microsatellite caprine markers covering 1368cM. Phenotypes were recorded a

  14. Mapping quantitative trait loci in plant breeding populations : Use of parental haplotype sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Beavis, William D.

    2003-01-01

    Applied breeding programs evaluate large numbers of progeny derived from multiple related crosses for a wide range of agronomic traits and for tens to hundreds of molecular markers. This study was conducted to determine how these phenotypic and genetic data could be used for routinely mapping quanti

  15. Quantitative trait loci for cell wall components in recombinant inbred lines of maize (Zea mays L.) II: leaf sheath tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowsky, M D; Lee, M; Coors, J G

    2006-02-01

    While maize silage is a significant feed component in animal production operations, little information is available on the genetic bases of fiber and lignin concentrations in maize, which are negatively correlated with digestibility. Fiber is composed largely of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, which are the primary components of plant cell walls. Variability for these traits in maize germplasm has been reported, but the sources of the variation and the relationships between these traits in different tissues are not well understood. In this study, 191 recombinant inbred lines of B73 (low-intermediate levels of cell wall components, CWCs) x De811 (high levels of CWCs) were analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with CWCs in the leaf sheath. Samples were harvested from plots at two locations in 1998 and one in 1999 and assayed for neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and acid detergent lignin (ADL). QTL were detected on all ten chromosomes, most in tissue specific clusters in concordance with the high genotypic correlations for CWCs within the same tissue. Adjustment of NDF for its subfraction, ADF, revealed that most of the genetic variation in NDF was probably due to variation in ADF. The low to moderate genotypic correlations for the same CWC across leaf sheath and stalk tissues indicate that some genes for CWCs may only be expressed in certain tissues. Many of the QTL herein were detected in other populations, and some are linked to candidate genes for cell wall carbohydrate biosynthesis.

  16. Arms race between selfishness and policing: two-trait quantitative genetic model for caste fate conflict in eusocial Hymenoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobata, Shigeto

    2012-12-01

    Policing against selfishness is now regarded as the main force maintaining cooperation, by reducing costly conflict in complex social systems. Although policing has been studied extensively in social insect colonies, its coevolution against selfishness has not been fully captured by previous theories. In this study, I developed a two-trait quantitative genetic model of the conflict between selfish immature females (usually larvae) and policing workers in eusocial Hymenoptera over the immatures' propensity to develop into new queens. This model allows for the analysis of coevolution between genomes expressed in immatures and workers that collectively determine the immatures' queen caste fate. The main prediction of the model is that a higher level of polyandry leads to a smaller fraction of queens produced among new females through caste fate policing. The other main prediction of the present model is that, as a result of arms race, caste fate policing by workers coevolves with exaggerated selfishness of the immatures achieving maximum potential to develop into queens. Moreover, the model can incorporate genetic correlation between traits, which has been largely unexplored in social evolution theory. This study highlights the importance of understanding social traits as influenced by the coevolution of conflicting genomes. © 2012 The Author. Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Quantitative trait loci mapping for leaf length and leaf width in rice cv. IR64 derived lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Tagle, Analiza G; Santos, Rizza E; Ebron, Leodegario A; Fujita, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Nobuya

    2010-06-01

    The present study was conducted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for leaf size traits in IR64 introgression lines (INLs). For this purpose, selected F(2) populations derived from crosses between recurrent parent IR64 and its derived INLs, unique for leaf length and leaf width, were used to confirm QTLs. A total of eight QTLs, mapped on three chromosomes, were identified for the four leaf size traits in six F(2) populations. A QTL for leaf length, qLLnpt-1, in HKL69 was identified around simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker RM3709 on chromosome 1. Two QTLs for flag leaf length, qFLLnpt-2 and qFLLnpt-4, in HFG39 were indentified on chromosomes 2 and 4, respectively. For flag leaf width, a QTL, qFLWnpt-4, in HFG39 was identified around RM17483 on chromosome 4. While another QTL for flag leaf width, qFLWnpt-1, in HFG27 was identified around RM3252 on chromosome 1. A QTL for leaf width, qLWnpt-2, in HKL75 was identified around RM7451 on chromosome 2. For leaf width, two QTLs, qLWnpt-4a, qLWnpt-4b, in HKL48 and HKL99 were identified around RM7208 and RM6909, respectively on chromosome 4. Results from this study suggest the possibilities to use marker-assisted selection and pyramiding these QTLs to improve rice water productivity.

  18. Genome scan for quantitative trait loci influencing HDL levels: evidence for multilocus inheritance in familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, France; Jarvik, Gail P; Badzioch, Michael D; Motulsky, Arno G; Brunzell, John D; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2005-09-01

    Several genome scans in search of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been performed. However, to date the actual identification of genes implicated in the regulation of common forms of HDL abnormalities remains unsuccessful. This may be due, in part, to the oligogenic and multivariate nature of HDL regulation, and potentially, pleiotropy affecting HDL and other lipid-related traits. Using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach, we recently provided evidence of linkage of HDL level variation to the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex, in familial combined hyperlipidemia pedigrees, with an estimated number of two to three large QTLs remaining to be identified. We also presented results consistent with pleiotropy affecting HDL and triglycerides at the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex. Here we use the same MCMC analytic strategy, which allows for oligogenic trait models, as well as simultaneous incorporation of covariates, in the context of multipoint analysis. We now present results from a genome scan in search for the additional HDL QTLs in these pedigrees. We provide evidence of linkage for additional HDL QTLs on chromosomes 3p14 and 13q32, with results on chromosome 3 further supported by maximum parametric and variance component LOD scores of 3.0 and 2.6, respectively. Weaker evidence of linkage was also obtained for 7q32, 12q12, 14q31-32 and 16q23-24.

  19. Challenges and prospects in genome-wide quantitative trait loci mapping of standing genetic variation in natural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schielzeth, Holger; Husby, Arild

    2014-07-01

    A considerable challenge in evolutionary genetics is to understand the genetic mechanisms that facilitate or impede evolutionary adaptation in natural populations. For this, we must understand the genetic loci contributing to trait variation and the selective forces acting on them. The decreased costs and increased feasibility of obtaining genotypic data on a large number of individuals have greatly facilitated gene mapping in natural populations, particularly because organisms whose genetics have been historically difficult to study are now within reach. Here we review the methods available to evolutionary ecologists interested in dissecting the genetic basis of traits in natural populations. Our focus lies on standing genetic variation in outbred populations. We present an overview of the current state of research in the field, covering studies on both plants and animals. We also draw attention to particular challenges associated with the discovery of quantitative trait loci and discuss parallels to studies on crops, livestock, and humans. Finally, we point to some likely future developments in genetic mapping studies.

  20. Analysis of quantitative trait loci affecting chlorophyll content of rice leaves in a double haploid population and two backcross populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gonghao; Zeng, Jing; He, Yuqing

    2014-02-25

    Chlorophyll content, one of the most important physiological parameters related to plant photosynthesis, is usually used to predict yield potential. To map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying the chlorophyll content of rice leaves, a double haploid (DH) population was developed from an indica/japonica (Zhenshan 97/Wuyujing 2) crossing and two backcross populations were established subsequently by backcrossing DH lines with each of their parents. The contents of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b were determined by using a spectrophotometer to directly measure the leaf chlorophyll extracts. To determine the leaf chlorophyll retention along with maturation, all measurements were performed on the day of heading and were repeated 30 days later. A total of 60 QTLs were resolved for all the traits using these three populations. These QTLs were distributed on 10 rice chromosomes, except chromosomes 5 and 10; the closer the traits, the more clustering of the QTLs residing on common rice chromosomal regions. In general, the majority of QTLs that specify chlorophyll a content also play a role in determining chlorophyll b content. Strangely, chlorophyll content in this study was found mostly to be lacking or to have a negative correlation with yield. In both backcross F1 populations, overdominant (or underdominant) loci were more important than complete or partially dominant loci for main-effect QTLs and epistatic QTLs, thereby supporting previous findings that overdominant effects are the primary genetic basis for depression in inbreeding and heterosis in rice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-wide association mapping of quantitative traits in a breeding population of sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racedo, Josefina; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Perera, María Francisca; Ostengo, Santiago; Pardo, Esteban Mariano; Cuenya, María Inés; Welin, Bjorn; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro

    2016-06-24

    Molecular markers associated with relevant agronomic traits could significantly reduce the time and cost involved in developing new sugarcane varieties. Previous sugarcane genome-wide association analyses (GWAS) have found few molecular markers associated with relevant traits at plant-cane stage. The aim of this study was to establish an appropriate GWAS to find molecular markers associated with yield related traits consistent across harvesting seasons in a breeding population. Sugarcane clones were genotyped with DArT (Diversity Array Technology) and TRAP (Target Region Amplified Polymorphism) markers, and evaluated for cane yield (CY) and sugar content (SC) at two locations during three successive crop cycles. GWAS mapping was applied within a novel mixed-model framework accounting for population structure with Principal Component Analysis scores as random component. A total of 43 markers significantly associated with CY in plant-cane, 42 in first ratoon, and 41 in second ratoon were detected. Out of these markers, 20 were associated with CY in 2 years. Additionally, 38 significant associations for SC were detected in plant-cane, 34 in first ratoon, and 47 in second ratoon. For SC, one marker-trait association was found significant for the 3 years of the study, while twelve markers presented association for 2 years. In the multi-QTL model several markers with large allelic substitution effect were found. Sequences of four DArT markers showed high similitude and e-value with coding sequences of Sorghum bicolor, confirming the high gene microlinearity between sorghum and sugarcane. In contrast with other sugarcane GWAS studies reported earlier, the novel methodology to analyze multi-QTLs through successive crop cycles used in the present study allowed us to find several markers associated with relevant traits. Combining existing phenotypic trial data and genotypic DArT and TRAP marker characterizations within a GWAS approach including population structure as

  2. Statistical correction of the Winner's Curse explains replication variability in quantitative trait genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Palmer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified hundreds of SNPs responsible for variation in human quantitative traits. However, genome-wide-significant associations often fail to replicate across independent cohorts, in apparent inconsistency with their apparent strong effects in discovery cohorts. This limited success of replication raises pervasive questions about the utility of the GWAS field. We identify all 332 studies of quantitative traits from the NHGRI-EBI GWAS Database with attempted replication. We find that the majority of studies provide insufficient data to evaluate replication rates. The remaining papers replicate significantly worse than expected (p < 10-14, even when adjusting for regression-to-the-mean of effect size between discovery- and replication-cohorts termed the Winner's Curse (p < 10-16. We show this is due in part to misreporting replication cohort-size as a maximum number, rather than per-locus one. In 39 studies accurately reporting per-locus cohort-size for attempted replication of 707 loci in samples with similar ancestry, replication rate matched expectation (predicted 458, observed 457, p = 0.94. In contrast, ancestry differences between replication and discovery (13 studies, 385 loci cause the most highly-powered decile of loci to replicate worse than expected, due to difference in linkage disequilibrium.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Quantitative Trait Loci for Shattering in Rice Landrace Jiucaiqing from Taihu Lake Valley, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jinping; He, Yongqi; Zhan, Chengfang; Yang, Bin; Xu, Enshun; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Zhoufei

    2016-11-01

    Easy shattering reduces yield from grain loss during rice ( L.) harvest. We characterized a nonshattering rice landrace Jiucaiqing from Taihu Lake valley in China. The breaking tensile strength (BTS; grams force, gf) of the grain pedicel was measured using a digital force gauge to evaluate the degree of shattering at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 d after heading (DAH). The BTS of Jiucaiqing did not significantly decrease with increasing DAH, maintaining a level of 152.2 to 195.9 gf, while that of IR26 decreased greatly during 0 to 14 DAH and finally stabilized at ∼100 gf. Then the chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) and near isogenic lines (NILs) of Jiucaiqing in IR26 background were developed for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Four putative QTL (, , , and ) for shattering were detected, and the was confirmed on chromosome 1. We further mapped to a 98.4-kb region, which contains 14 genes. Os01g62920 was considered to be a strong candidate for , which colocated with . Further quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses confirmed that the QTL can significantly decrease the expression of shattering related genes (, , , , and ) especially at the middle development stage at 10 and 15 cm panicle length, which causes rice shattering decrease. The elite allele and the NIL with desirable agronomic traits identified in this study could be useful for rice breeding.

  4. "Are we there yet?": Deciding when one has demonstrated specific genetic causation in complex diseases and quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Grier P; George, Varghese; Go, Rodney C; Page, Patricia Z; Allison, David B

    2003-10-01

    Although mathematical relationships can be proven by deductive logic, biological relationships can only be inferred from empirical observations. This is a distinct disadvantage for those of us who strive to identify the genes involved in complex diseases and quantitative traits. If causation cannot be proven, however, what does constitute sufficient evidence for causation? The philosopher Karl Popper said, "Our belief in a hypothesis can have no stronger basis than our repeated unsuccessful critical attempts to refute it." We believe that to establish causation, as scientists, we must make a serious attempt to refute our own hypotheses and to eliminate all known sources of bias before association becomes causation. In addition, we suggest that investigators must provide sufficient data and evidence of their unsuccessful efforts to find any confounding biases. In this editorial, we discuss what "causation" means in the context of complex diseases and quantitative traits, and we suggest guidelines for steps that may be taken to address possible confounders of association before polymorphisms may be called "causative."

  5. Identification and Characterization of Quantitative Trait Loci for Shattering in Japonica Rice Landrace Jiucaiqing from Taihu Lake Valley, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Easy shattering reduces yield from grain loss during rice ( L. harvest. We characterized a nonshattering rice landrace Jiucaiqing from Taihu Lake valley in China. The breaking tensile strength (BTS; grams force, gf of the grain pedicel was measured using a digital force gauge to evaluate the degree of shattering at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 d after heading (DAH. The BTS of Jiucaiqing did not significantly decrease with increasing DAH, maintaining a level of 152.2 to 195.9 gf, while that of IR26 decreased greatly during 0 to 14 DAH and finally stabilized at ∼100 gf. Then the chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs and near isogenic lines (NILs of Jiucaiqing in IR26 background were developed for quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping. Four putative QTL (, , , and for shattering were detected, and the was confirmed on chromosome 1. We further mapped to a 98.4-kb region, which contains 14 genes. Os01g62920 was considered to be a strong candidate for , which colocated with . Further quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses confirmed that the QTL can significantly decrease the expression of shattering related genes (, , , , and especially at the middle development stage at 10 and 15 cm panicle length, which causes rice shattering decrease. The elite allele and the NIL with desirable agronomic traits identified in this study could be useful for rice breeding.

  6. Identification and fine mapping of quantitative trait loci for seed vigor in germination and seedling establishment in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lixia; Tan, Zhengwei; Zhou, Yuan; Xu, Rongbao; Feng, Laibao; Xing, Yongzhong; Qi, Xiaoquan

    2014-08-01

    Seed vigor is an index of seed quality that is used to describe the rapid and uniform germination and the establishment of strong seedlings in any environmental conditions. Strong seed vigor in low-temperature germination conditions is particularly important in direct-sowing rice production systems. However, seed vigor has not been selected as an important breeding trait in traditional breeding programs due to its quantitative inherence. In this study, we identified and mapped eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seed vigor by using a recombinant inbred population from a cross between rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica) cultivars ZS97 and MH63. Conditional QTL analysis identified qSV-1, qSV-5b, qSV-6a, qSV-6b, and qSV-11 influenced seedling establishment and that qSV-5a, qSV-5c, and qSV-8 influenced only germination. Of these, qSV-1, qSV-5b, qSV-6a, qSV-6b, and qSV-8 were low-temperature-specific QTLs. Two major-effective QTLs, qSV-1, and qSV-5c were narrowed down to 1.13-Mbp and 400-kbp genomic regions, respectively. The results provide tightly linked DNA markers for the marker-assistant pyramiding of multiple positive alleles for increased seed vigor in both normal and low-temperature germination environments.

  7. Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping of quantitative trait loci for malaria parasite susceptibility in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, D.W.; Thathy, V.; Mori, A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Susceptibility of the mosquito Aedes aegypti to the malarial parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum was investigated as a quantitative trait using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). Two F{sub 2} populations of mosquitoes were independently prepared from pairwise matings between a highly susceptible and a refractory strain of A. aegypti. RFLP were tested for association with oocyst development on the mosquito midgut. Two putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified that significantly affect susceptibility. One QTL, pgs [2,LF98], is located on chromosome 2 and accounted for 65 and 49% of the observed phenotypic variance in the two populations, respectively. A second QTL, pgs[3,MalI], is located on chromosome 3 and accounted for 14 and 10% of the observed phenotypic variance in the two populations, respectively. Both QTL exhibit a partial dominance effect on susceptibility, wherein the dominance effect is derived from the refractory parent. No indication of epistasis between these QTL was detected. Evidence suggests that either a tightly linked cluster of independent genes or a single locus affecting susceptibility to various mosquito-borne parasites and pathogens has evolved near the LF98 locus; in addition to P. gallinaceum susceptibility, this general genome region has previously been implicated in susceptibility to the filaria nematode Brugia malayi and the yellow fever virus. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Identification and fine mapping of quantitative trait loci for seed vigor in germination and seedling establishment in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixia Xie; Zhengwei Tan; Yuan Zhou; Rongbao Xu; Laibao Feng; Yongzhong Xing; Xiaoquan Qi

    2014-01-01

    Seed vigor is an index of seed quality that is used to describe the rapid and uniform germination and the establish-ment of strong seedlings in any environmental conditions. Strong seed vigor in low-temperature germination conditions is particularly important in direct-sowing rice production systems. However, seed vigor has not been selected as an important breeding trait in traditional breeding programs due to its quantitative inherence. In this study, we identified and mapped eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seed vigor by using a recombinant inbred population from a cross between rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica) cultivars ZS97 and MH63. Conditional QTL analysis identified qSV-1, qSV-5b, qSV-6a, qSV-6b, and qSV-11 influenced seedling establishment and that qSV-5a, qSV-5c, and qSV-8 influenced only germination. Of these, qSV-1, qSV-5b, qSV-6a, qSV-6b, and qSV-8 were low-tempera-ture-specific QTLs. Two major-effective QTLs, qSV-1, and qSV-5c were narrowed down to 1.13-Mbp and 400-kbp genomic regions, respectively. The results provide tightly linked DNA markers for the marker-assistant pyramiding of multiple positive al eles for increased seed vigor in both normal and low-temperature germination environments.

  9. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple-QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize.

  10. Detection of quantitative trait loci for growth and beef carcass fatness traits in a cross between Bos taurus (Angus) and Bos indicus (Brahman) cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J J; Farnir, F; Savell, J; Taylor, J F

    2003-08-01

    This study was conducted to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting growth and beef carcass fatness traits in an experimental population of Angus and Brahman crossbreds. The three-generation mapping population was generated with 602 progeny from 29 reciprocal backcross and three F2 full-sib families, and 417 genetic markers were used to produce a sex-averaged map of the 29 autosomes spanning 2,642.5 Kosambi cM. Alternative interval-mapping approaches were applied under line-cross (LC) and random infinite alleles (RA) models to detect QTL segregating between and within breeds. A total of 35 QTL (five with genomewide significant and 30 with suggestive evidence for linkage) were found on 19 chromosomes. One QTL affecting yearling weight was found with genomewide significant evidence for linkage in the interstitial region of bovine autosome (BTA) 1, and an additional 19 QTL were detected with suggestive evidence for linkage under the LC model. Many of these QTL had a dominant (complete or overdominant) mode of gene action, and only a few of the QTL were primarily additive, which reflects the fact that heterosis for growth is known to be appreciable in crosses among Brahman and British breeds. Four QTL affecting growth were detected with genomewide significant evidence for linkage under the RA model on BTA 2 and BTA 6 for birth weight, BTA 5 for yearling weight, and BTA 23 for hot carcass weight. An additional 11 QTL were detected with suggestive evidence for linkage under the RA model. None of the QTL (except for yearling weight on BTA 5) detected under the RA model were found by the LC analyses, suggesting the segregation of alternate alleles within one or both of the parental breeds. Our results reveal the utility of implementing both the LC and RA models to detect dominant QTL and also QTL with similar allele frequency distributions within parental breeds.

  11. Quantitative trait loci analysis of chlorophyll content for flag leaf in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Chlorophyll contents are one of important physiological traits, which affect photosynthesis in plants. There were significant differences in chlorophyll contents between Zhaiyeqing 8(ZYQ 8), an indica variety and Jingxi 17(JX 17), a japonica variety (Table 1). In 117 DH lines of the cross of ZYQ 8/ JX 17, these parameters distributed conTwo neutral alleles of improving male gamete abortion in indica-japonica hybrid rice LU Chuangen and ZOU Jiangshi, Jiangsu Acad of Agri Sci, Nanjing 210014, China

  12. Quantitative trait loci (QTL study identifies novel genomic regions associated to Chiari-like malformation in Griffon Bruxellois dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lemay

    Full Text Available Chiari-like malformation (CM is a developmental abnormality of the craniocervical junction that is common in the Griffon Bruxellois (GB breed with an estimated prevalence of 65%. This disease is characterized by overcrowding of the neural parenchyma at the craniocervical junction and disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow. The most common clinical sign is pain either as a direct consequence of CM or neuropathic pain as a consequence of secondary syringomyelia. The etiology of CM remains unknown but genetic factors play an important role. To investigate the genetic complexity of the disease, a quantitative trait locus (QTL approach was adopted. A total of 14 quantitative skull and atlas measurements were taken and were tested for association to CM. Six traits were found to be associated to CM and were subjected to a whole-genome association study using the Illumina canine high density bead chip in 74 GB dogs (50 affected and 24 controls. Linear and mixed regression analyses identified associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on 5 Canis Familiaris Autosomes (CFAs: CFA2, CFA9, CFA12, CFA14 and CFA24. A reconstructed haplotype of 0.53 Mb on CFA2 strongly associated to the height of the cranial fossa (diameter F and an haplotype of 2.5 Mb on CFA14 associated to both the height of the rostral part of the caudal cranial fossa (AE and the height of the brain (FG were significantly associated to CM after 10 000 permutations strengthening their candidacy for this disease (P = 0.0421, P = 0.0094 respectively. The CFA2 QTL harbours the Sall-1 gene which is an excellent candidate since its orthologue in humans is mutated in Townes-Brocks syndrome which has previously been associated to Chiari malformation I. Our study demonstrates the implication of multiple traits in the etiology of CM and has successfully identified two new QTL associated to CM and a potential candidate gene.

  13. Comprehensive phenotypic analysis and quantitative trait locus identification for grain mineral concentration, content, and yield in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Riliang; Chen, Fanjun; Liu, Bingran; Wang, Xin; Liu, Jianchao; Li, Pengcheng; Pan, Qingchun; Pace, Jordon; Soomro, Ayaz-Ali; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Mi, Guohua; Yuan, Lixing

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the correlations of seven minerals for concentration, content and yield in maize grain, and exploring their genetic basis will help breeders to develop high grain quality maize. Biofortification by enhanced mineral accumulation in grain through genetic improvement is an efficient way to solve global nutrient malnutrition, in which one key step is to detect the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL). Herein, a maize recombinant inbred population (RIL) was field grown to maturity across four environments (two locations × two years). Phenotypic data for grain mineral concentration, content and yield were determined for copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K) and phosphorus (P). Significant effects of genotype, location and year were observed for all investigated traits. The strongest location effects were found for Zn accumulation traits probably due to distinct soil Zn availabilities across locations. Heritability (H (2)) of different traits varied with higher H (2) (72-85 %) for mineral concentration and content, and lower (48-63 %) for mineral yield. Significant positive correlations for grain concentration were revealed between several minerals. QTL analysis revealed 28, 25, and 12 QTL for mineral concentration, content and yield, respectively; and identified 8 stable QTL across at least two environments. All these QTL were assigned into 12 distinct QTL clusters. A cluster at chromosome Bin 6.07/6.08 contained 6 QTL for kernel weight, mineral concentration (Mg) and content (Zn, K, Mg, P). Another cluster at Bin 4.05/4.06 contained a stable QTL for Mn concentration, which were previously identified in other maize and rice RIL populations. These results highlighted the phenotypic and genetic performance of grain mineral accumulation, and revealed two promising chromosomal regions for genetic improvement of grain biofortification in maize.

  14. Linkage Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis for Bolting Based on a Double Haploid Population of Brassica rapa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yang; Yang-Jun Yu; Feng-Lan Zhang; Zhi-Rong Zou; Xiu-Yun Zhao; De-Shuang Zhang; Jia-Bing Xu

    2007-01-01

    Early bolting of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.) during spring cultivation often has detrimental effects on the yield and quality of the harvested products. Breeding late bolting varieties is a major objective of Chinese cabbage breeding programs. in order to analyze the genetic basis of bolting traits, a genetic map of B. rapa was constructed based on amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP), sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), simple sequence repeat (SSR), random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and isozyme markers. Marker analysis was carried out on 81 double haploid (DH) lines obtained by mlcrospore culture from F1 progeny of two homozygous parents: B. rapa L. ssp. pekinensis (BY) (an extra-early bolting Chinese cabbage line) and B. rapa L. ssp. rapifera (MM) (an extra-late bolting European turnip line). A total of 326 markers including 130 AFLPs, 123 SRAPs, 16 SSRs, 43RAPDs and 14 isozymes were used to construct a linkage map with 10 linkage groups covering 882 cM with an average distance of 2.71 cM between loci. The bolting trait of each DH line was evaluated by the bolting index under controlled conditions. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was conducted using multiple QTL model mapping with MapQTL5.0 software. Eight QTLs controlling bolting resistance were identified. These QTLs, accounting for 14.1% to 25.2% of the phenotyplc variation with positive additive effects, were distributed into three linkage groups. These results provide useful information for molecular marker-assisted selection of late bolting traits in Chinese cabbage breeding programs.

  15. Quantitative trait loci mapping of phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions in plant and insect performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétard-Jones, C; Kertesz, M A; Preziosi, R F

    2011-05-12

    Community genetic studies generally ignore the plasticity of the functional traits through which the effect is passed from individuals to the associated community. However, the ability of organisms to be phenotypically plastic allows them to rapidly adapt to changing environments and plasticity is commonly observed across all taxa. Owing to the fitness benefits of phenotypic plasticity, evolutionary biologists are interested in its genetic basis, which could explain how phenotypic plasticity is involved in the evolution of species interactions. Two current ideas exist: (i) phenotypic plasticity is caused by environmentally sensitive loci associated with a phenotype; (ii) phenotypic plasticity is caused by regulatory genes that simply influence the plasticity of a phenotype. Here, we designed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping experiment to locate QTL on the barley genome associated with barley performance when the environment varies in the presence of aphids, and the composition of the rhizosphere. We simultaneously mapped aphid performance across variable rhizosphere environments. We mapped main effects, QTL × environment interaction (QTL×E), and phenotypic plasticity (measured as the difference in mean trait values) for barley and aphid performance onto the barley genome using an interval mapping procedure. We found that QTL associated with phenotypic plasticity were co-located with main effect QTL and QTL×E. We also located phenotypic plasticity QTL that were located separately from main effect QTL. These results support both of the current ideas of how phenotypic plasticity is genetically based and provide an initial insight into the functional genetic basis of how phenotypically plastic traits may still be important sources of community genetic effects.

  16. Genetic Parameters and Combining Ability Effects of Parents for Seed Yield and other Quantitative Traits in Black Gram [Vigna mungo (L. Hepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo CHAKRABORTY

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Line x tester analysis was carried out in black gram [Vigna mungo (L. Hepper], an edible legume, to estimate the gca (general combining ability effects of parents (3 lines and 3 testers and the SCA (specific combining ability effects of 9 crosses for seed yield and other eleven quantitative traits. Though additive and nonadditive gene actions governed the expression of quantitative traits, the magnitude of nonadditive gene action was higher than that of additive gene action for each quantitative trait. Two parents viz. UG157 and DPU915 were good general combiners. Two crosses namely PDB 88-31/DPU 915 and PLU 277/KAU7 had high per se performance along with positive significant SCA effect for seed yield/plant. The degree of dominance revealed overdominance for all the traits except clusters/plant with partial dominance. The predictability ratio also revealed the predominant role of nonadditive gene action in the genetic control of quantitative traits. Narrow sense heritability was also low for each trait. Recurrent selection or biparental mating followed by selection which can exploit both additive and nonadditive gene actions would be of interest for yield improvement in black gram. Due to presence of high magnitude of nonadditive gene action, heterosis breeding could also be attempted to develop low cost hybrid variety using genetic male sterility system in black gram.

  17. Genetic Parameters and Combining Ability Effects of Parents for Seed Yield and other Quantitative Traits in Black Gram [Vigna mungo (L. Hepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo CHAKRABORTY

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Line x tester analysis was carried out in black gram [Vigna mungo (L. Hepper], an edible legume, to estimate the gca (general combining ability effects of parents (3 lines and 3 testers and the SCA (specific combining ability effects of 9 crosses for seed yield and other eleven quantitative traits. Though additive and nonadditive gene actions governed the expression of quantitative traits, the magnitude of nonadditive gene action was higher than that of additive gene action for each quantitative trait. Two parents viz. �UG157� and �DPU915� were good general combiners. Two crosses namely �PDB 88-31�/�DPU 915� and �PLU 277�/�KAU7� had high per se performance along with positive significant SCA effect for seed yield/plant. The degree of dominance revealed overdominance for all the traits except clusters/plant with partial dominance. The predictability ratio also revealed the predominant role of nonadditive gene action in the genetic control of quantitative traits. Narrow sense heritability was also low for each trait. Recurrent selection or biparental mating followed by selection which can exploit both additive and nonadditive gene actions would be of interest for yield improvement in black gram. Due to presence of high magnitude of nonadditive gene action, heterosis breeding could also be attempted to develop low cost hybrid variety using genetic male sterility system in black gram.

  18. Heritability and gene effects for yield related quantitative traits in eggplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintan Mistry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of gene actions and their relative contribution in expression of characters is of great importance. Therefore, four crosses were made among the six parents viz., Doli-5 × GBL-1 (cross 1, Doli-5 × KS-331 (cross 2, Pusa Uttam × KS-331 (cross 3 and AB 07-02 × GOB 1 (cross 4 to study gene actions responsible for inheritance of twelve fruit yield traits. The generation mean analysis in six populations revealed significant digenic interactions for all the characters in majority of the crosses studied. Character-cross combination revealed the adequacy of simple additive dominance model for plant height (in cross 1, primary branches per plant (in cross 2, secondary branches per plant (in cross 3, fruit length (in cross 2, fruit girth (in cross 3 and pedicel length (in cross 3 indicating the absence of non-allelic interactions. Most of the crosses for all the yield traits showed low magnitude of dominance and environmental variances, revealing higher heritabilities. Duplicate epistasis effects controlled all traits in different cross-combinations suggesting the mild selection intensity in the earlier generations while intense in later generations. However, in few cases average dominance ratio was more than unity indicated the importance of dominance gene effects. These results indicated that for eggplant improvement, additive variation is of great importance and makes it possible to successfully select better individuals in segregating populations, since the selective gains will depend only on gametic variation. For this reason, backcross, pedigree, single-seed descent or gametic selection methods are recommended for advancing the segregating populations.

  19. Whole-genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci associated with milk protein composition in 3 French dairy cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M P; Govignon-Gion, A; Ferrand, M; Gelé, M; Pourchet, D; Amigues, Y; Fritz, S; Boussaha, M; Capitan, A; Rocha, D; Miranda, G; Martin, P; Brochard, M; Boichard, D

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the PhénoFinLait project, a genome-wide analysis was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect milk protein composition estimated using mid-infrared spectrometry in the Montbéliarde (MO), Normande (NO), and Holstein (HO) French dairy cattle breeds. The 6 main milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and αS1-, αS2-, β-, and κ-caseins) expressed as grams per 100g of milk (% of milk) or as grams per 100g of protein (% of protein) were estimated in 848,068 test-day milk samples from 156,660 cows. Genotyping was performed for 2,773 MO, 2,673 NO, and 2,208 HO cows using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Individual test-day records were adjusted for environmental effects and then averaged per cow to define the phenotypes analyzed. Quantitative trait loci detection was performed within each breed using a linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis approach. A total of 39 genomic regions distributed on 20 of the 29 Bos taurus autosomes (BTA) were significantly associated with milk protein composition at a genome-wide level of significance in at least 1 of the 3 breeds. The 9 most significant QTL were located on BTA2 (133 Mbp), BTA6 (38, 47, and 87 Mbp), BTA11 (103 Mbp), BTA14 (1.8 Mbp), BTA20 (32 and 58 Mbp), and BTA29 (8 Mbp). The BTA6 (87 Mbp), BTA11, and BTA20 (58 Mbp) QTL were found in all 3 breeds, and they had highly significant effects on κ-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and α-lactalbumin, expressed as a percentage of protein, respectively. Each of these QTL explained between 13% (BTA14) and 51% (BTA11) of the genetic variance of the trait. Many other QTL regions were also identified in at least one breed. They were located on 14 additional chromosomes (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, and 27), and they explained 2 to 8% of the genetic variance of 1 or more protein composition traits. Concordance analyses, performed between QTL status and sequence-derived polymorphisms from

  20. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Variants on Quantitative Glycemic Traits Reveals Mechanistic Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Antigone S.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Barker, Adam; Knowles, Joshua W.; Mägi, Reedik; Hivert, Marie-France; Benazzo, Andrea; Rybin, Denis; Jackson, Anne U.; Stringham, Heather M.; Song, Ci; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Boesgaard, Trine Welløv; Grarup, Niels; Abbasi, Fahim A.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hao, Ke; Yang, Xia; Lecoeur, Cécile; Barroso, Inês; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Chines, Peter S.; Erdos, Michael R.; Graessler, Jurgen; Kovacs, Peter; Morken, Mario A.; Narisu, Narisu; Payne, Felicity; Stancakova, Alena; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Cauchi, Stéphane; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Smith, Ulf; Boehnke, Michael; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Quertemous, Thomas; Lind, Lars; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Walker, Mark; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Spranger, Joachim; Stumvoll, Michael; Meigs, James B.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Dupuis, Josée; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Ingelsson, Erik; McCarthy, Mark I.; Prokopenko, Inga

    2014-01-01

    Patients with established type 2 diabetes display both β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. To define fundamental processes leading to the diabetic state, we examined the relationship between type 2 diabetes risk variants at 37 established susceptibility loci, and indices of proinsulin processing, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. We included data from up to 58,614 nondiabetic subjects with basal measures and 17,327 with dynamic measures. We used additive genetic models with adjustment for sex, age, and BMI, followed by fixed-effects, inverse-variance meta-analyses. Cluster analyses grouped risk loci into five major categories based on their relationship to these continuous glycemic phenotypes. The first cluster (PPARG, KLF14, IRS1, GCKR) was characterized by primary effects on insulin sensitivity. The second cluster (MTNR1B, GCK) featured risk alleles associated with reduced insulin secretion and fasting hyperglycemia. ARAP1 constituted a third cluster characterized by defects in insulin processing. A fourth cluster (TCF7L2, SLC30A8, HHEX/IDE, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B) was defined by loci influencing insulin processing and secretion without a detectable change in fasting glucose levels. The final group contained 20 risk loci with no clear-cut associations to continuous glycemic traits. By assembling extensive data on continuous glycemic traits, we have exposed the diverse mechanisms whereby type 2 diabetes risk variants impact disease predisposition. PMID:24296717

  1. Kernel Approach for Modeling Interaction Effects in Genetic Association Studies of Complex Quantitative Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadaway, K Alaine; Duncan, Richard; Conneely, Karen N; Almli, Lynn M; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Epstein, Michael P

    2015-07-01

    The etiology of complex traits likely involves the effects of genetic and environmental factors, along with complicated interaction effects between them. Consequently, there has been interest in applying genetic association tests of complex traits that account for potential modification of the genetic effect in the presence of an environmental factor. One can perform such an analysis using a joint test of gene and gene-environment interaction. An optimal joint test would be one that remains powerful under a variety of models ranging from those of strong gene-environment interaction effect to those of little or no gene-environment interaction effect. To fill this demand, we have extended a kernel machine based approach for association mapping of multiple SNPs to consider joint tests of gene and gene-environment interaction. The kernel-based approach for joint testing is promising, because it incorporates linkage disequilibrium information from multiple SNPs simultaneously in analysis and permits flexible modeling of interaction effects. Using simulated data, we show that our kernel machine approach typically outperforms the traditional joint test under strong gene-environment interaction models and further outperforms the traditional main-effect association test under models of weak or no gene-environment interaction effects. We illustrate our test using genome-wide association data from the Grady Trauma Project, a cohort of highly traumatized, at-risk individuals, which has previously been investigated for interaction effects. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Quantitative analysis of production traits in saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus): IV. number of scale rows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isberg, S R; Thomson, P C; Nicholas, F W; Webb, G J W; Manolis, S C; Barker, S G; Moran, C

    2006-02-01

    A total of 3156 scale row records, comprising 1739 full-sibling records from 30 families from Janamba Croc Farm (NT, Australia) and 1417 parent-offspring records from 19 families from Wildlife Management International, Pty Ltd (NT, Australia), collected at each facility using a different method, were analysed using ASReml. The full-sibling heritability estimate for the Janamba data was 0.37 (SE 0.03). The animal model estimate of heritability for the Wildlife Management International (WMI) data, also based predominantly on full-sibling data, was 0.42 (SE 0.04). The counts from three counting methods were evaluated by regression analysis on 100 individuals and were found to be highly correlated. Using the regression relationship, the WMI data were transformed and pooled with the Janamba data to give an animal model heritability estimate of 0.42 (SE 0.04). A multitrait analysis revealed negligible correlations (both phenotypical and genetical) between hatchling size traits and the number of scale rows. There is ample genetic variation to incorporate this trait into a genetic improvement programme for farmed saltwater crocodiles.

  3. Quantitative analysis of production traits in saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus): II. age at slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isberg, S R; Thomson, P C; Nicholas, F W; Barker, S G; Moran, C

    2005-12-01

    Crocodile morphometric (head, snout-vent and total length) measurements were recorded at three stages during the production chain: hatching, inventory [average age (+/-SE) is 265.1 +/- 0.4 days] and slaughter (average age is 1037.8 +/- 0.4 days). Crocodile skins are used for the manufacture of exclusive leather products, with the most common-sized skin sold having 35-45 cm in belly width. One of the breeding objectives for inclusion into a multitrait genetic improvement programme for saltwater crocodiles is the time taken for a juvenile to reach this size or age at slaughter. A multivariate restricted maximum likelihood analysis provided (co)variance components for estimating the first published genetic parameter estimates for these traits. Heritability (+/-SE) estimates for the traits hatchling snout-vent length, inventory head length and age at slaughter were 0.60 (0.15), 0.59 (0.12) and 0.40 (0.10) respectively. There were strong negative genetic (-0.81 +/- 0.08) and phenotypic (-0.82 +/- 0.02) correlations between age at slaughter and inventory head length.

  4. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Maize Yield and Its Components Under Different Water Treatments at Flowering Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-He Lu; Yi-Rong Zhang; Jing-Rui Dai; Ji-Hua Tang; Jian-Bing Yan; Xi-Qing Ma; Jian-Sheng Li; Shao-Jiang Chen; Jian-Cang Ma; Zhan-Xian Liu; Li-Zhu E

    2006-01-01

    Drought or water stress is a serious agronomic problem resulting in maize (Zea mays L.) yield loss throughout the world. Breeding hybrids with drought tolerance is one important approach for solving this problem. However, lower efficiency and a longer period of breeding hybrids are disadvantages of traditional breeding programs. It is generally recognized that applying molecular marker techniques to traditional breeding programs could improve the efficiency of the breeding of drought-tolerant maize. To provide useful information for use in studies of maize drought tolerance,the mapping and tagging of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yield and its components were performed in the present study on the basis of the principle of a mixed linear model. Two hundred and twenty-one recombinant inbred lines (RIL) of Yuyu 22 were grown under both well-watered and water-stressed conditions. In the former treatment group, plants were well irrigated, whereas those in the latter treatment group were stressed at flowering time.Ten plants of each genotype were grown in a row that was 3.00 m×0.67 m (length×width). The results show that a few of the QTL were the same (one additive QTL for ear length, two additive QTL and one pair of epistatic QTL for kernel number per row, one additive QTL for kernel weight per plant), whereas most of other QTL were different between the two different water treatment groups. It may be that genetic expression differs under the two different water conditions. Furthermore, differences in the additive and epistatic QTL among the traits under water-stressed conditions indicate that genetic expression also differs from trait to trait.Major and minor QTL were detected for the traits,except for kernel number per row, under water-stressed conditions. Thus, the genetic mechanism of drought tolerance in maize is complex because the additive and epistatic QTL exist at the same time and the major and minor QTL all contribute to phenotype under water

  5. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Beatty Mary; Luck Stanley; Holloway Beth; Rafalski J-Antoni; Li Bailin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Expression QTL analyses have shed light on transcriptional regulation in numerous species of plants, animals, and yeasts. These microarray-based analyses identify regulators of gene expression as either cis-acting factors that regulate proximal genes, or trans-acting factors that function through a variety of mechanisms to affect transcript abundance of unlinked genes. Results A hydroponics-based genetical genomics study in roots of a Zea mays IBM2 Syn10 double haploid pop...

  6. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Holloway, Beth; Luck, Stanley; Beatty, Mary; Rafalski, J-Antoni; Li, Bailin

    2011-01-01

    Background Expression QTL analyses have shed light on transcriptional regulation in numerous species of plants, animals, and yeasts. These microarray-based analyses identify regulators of gene expression as either cis-acting factors that regulate proximal genes, or trans-acting factors that function through a variety of mechanisms to affect transcript abundance of unlinked genes. Results A hydroponics-based genetical genomics study in roots of a Zea mays IBM2 Syn10 double haploid population i...

  7. Identification of quantitative trait loci for the dead leaf rate and the seedling dead rate under alkaline stress in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongling Qi; Guizhen Guo; Myung-chul Lee; Junguo Zhang; Guilan Cao; Sanyuan Zhang; Seok-cheol Suh; Qingyang Zhou; Longzhi Han

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the dead leaf rate (DLR) and the dead seedling rate (DSR) at the different rice growing periods after transplanting under alkaline stress were identified using an F2:3 population, which included 200 individuals and lines derived from a cross betweea two japonica rice cultivars Gaochan 106 and Changbai 9 with microsatellite markers. The DLR detected at 20 days to 62 days after transplanting under alkaline stress showed continuous normal or near normal distributions in F3 lines, which was the quantita-tive trait controlled by multiple genes. The DSR showed a continuous distribution with 3 or 4 peaks and was the quantitative trait con-trolled by main and multiple genes when rice was grown for 62 days after transplanting under alkaline stress. Thirteen QTLs associated with DLR were detected at 20 days to 62 days after transplanting under alkaline stress. Among these, qDLR9-2 located in RM5786-RMI60 on chromosome 9 was detected at 34 days, 41 days, 48 days, 55 days, and 62 days, respectively; qDLR4 located in RM3524-RM3866 on chromosome 4 was detected at 34 days, 41 days, and 48 days, respectively; qDLR7-1 located in RM3859-RM320 on chromosome 7 was detected at 20 days and 27 days; and qDLR6-2 in RM1340-RM5957 on chromosome 6 was detected at 55 days and 62 days, respectively. The alleles of both qDLR9-2 and qDLR4 were derived from alkaline sensitive parent "Gaochan 106". The alleles of both qDLR7-1 and qDLR6-2 were from alkaline tolerant parent Changbai 9. These geue actions showed dominance and over dominance primarily. Six QTLs associated with DSR were detected at 62 days after transplanting under alkaline stress. Among these, qDSR6-2 and qDSR8 were located in RM1340-RM5957 on chromosome 6 and in RM3752-RM404 on chromosome 8, respectively, which were asso-ciated with DSR and accounted for 20.32% and 18.86% of the observed phenotypic variation, respectively; qDSR11-2 and qDSR11-3 were located in RM536-RM479 and RM2596-RM286 on

  8. Isolation and manipulation of quantitative trait loci for disease resistance in rice using a candidate gene approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke-Ming; Qiu, De-Yun; Shen, Xiang-Ling; Li, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and fungal blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea result in heavy production losses in rice, a main staple food for approximately 50% of the world's population. Application of host resistance to these pathogens is the most economical and environment-friendly approach to solve this problem. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling quantitative resistance are valuable sources for broad-spectrum and durable disease resistance. Although large numbers of QTLs for bacterial blight and blast resistance have been identified, these sources have not been used effectively in rice improvement because of the complex genetic control of quantitative resistance and because the genes underlying resistance QTLs are unknown. To isolate disease resistance QTLs, we established a candidate gene strategy that integrates linkage map, expression profile, and functional complementation analyses. This strategy has proven to be applicable for identifying the genes underlying minor resistance QTLs in rice-Xoo and rice-M. grisea systems and it may also help to shed light on disease resistance QTLs of other cereals. Our results also suggest that a single minor QTL can be used in rice improvement by modulating the expression of the gene underlying the QTL. Pyramiding two or three minor QTL genes, whose expression can be managed and that function in different defense signal transduction pathways, may allow the breeding of rice cultivars that are highly resistant to bacterial blight and blast.

  9. On the detection of imprinted quantitative trait loci in experimental crosses of outbred species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de D.J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the quantitative genetic aspects of imprinted genes and statistical properties of methods to detect imprinted QTL are studied. Different models to detect imprinted QTL and to distinguish between imprinted and Mendelian QTL were compared in a simulation study. Mendelian and imprinted

  10. On the detection of imprinting quantitative trait loci in experimental crosses of outbred species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de D.J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the quantitative genetic aspects of imprinted genes and statistical properties of methods to detect imprinted QTL are studied. Different models to detect imprinted QTL and to distinguish between imprinted and Mendelian QTL were compared in a simulation study. Mendelian and imprinted

  11. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting cyanogenic potential of cassava root in an outbred population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonseng Opas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz can produce cyanide, a toxic compound, without self-injury. That ability was called the cyanogenic potential (CN. This project aimed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL associated with the CN in an outbred population derived from 'Hanatee' × 'Huay Bong 60', two contrasting cultivars. CN was evaluated in 2008 and in 2009 at Rayong province, and in 2009 at Lop Buri province, Thailand. CN was measured using a picrate paper kit. QTL analysis affecting CN was performed with 303 SSR markers. Results The phenotypic values showed continuous variation with transgressive segregation events with more (115 ppm and less CN (15 ppm than either parent ('Hanatee' had 33 ppm and 'Huay Bong 60' had 95 ppm. The linkage map consisted of 303 SSR markers, on 27 linkage groups with a map that encompassed 1,328 cM. The average marker interval was 5.8 cM. Five QTL underlying CN were detected. CN08R1from 2008 at Rayong, CN09R1and CN09R2 from 2009 at Rayong, and CN09L1 and CN09L2 from 2009 at Lop Buri were mapped on linkage group 2, 5, 10 and 11, respectively. Among all the identified QTL, CN09R1 was the most significantly associated with the CN trait with LOD score 5.75 and explained the greatest percentage of phenotypic variation (%Expl. of 26%. Conclusions Five new QTL affecting CN were successfully identified from 4 linkage groups. Discovery of these QTL can provide useful markers to assist in cassava breeding and studying genes affecting the trait.

  12. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting cyanogenic potential of cassava root in an outbred population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) can produce cyanide, a toxic compound, without self-injury. That ability was called the cyanogenic potential (CN). This project aimed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the CN in an outbred population derived from 'Hanatee' × 'Huay Bong 60', two contrasting cultivars. CN was evaluated in 2008 and in 2009 at Rayong province, and in 2009 at Lop Buri province, Thailand. CN was measured using a picrate paper kit. QTL analysis affecting CN was performed with 303 SSR markers. Results The phenotypic values showed continuous variation with transgressive segregation events with more (115 ppm) and less CN (15 ppm) than either parent ('Hanatee' had 33 ppm and 'Huay Bong 60' had 95 ppm). The linkage map consisted of 303 SSR markers, on 27 linkage groups with a map that encompassed 1,328 cM. The average marker interval was 5.8 cM. Five QTL underlying CN were detected. CN08R1from 2008 at Rayong, CN09R1and CN09R2 from 2009 at Rayong, and CN09L1 and CN09L2 from 2009 at Lop Buri were mapped on linkage group 2, 5, 10 and 11, respectively. Among all the identified QTL, CN09R1 was the most significantly associated with the CN trait with LOD score 5.75 and explained the greatest percentage of phenotypic variation (%Expl.) of 26%. Conclusions Five new QTL affecting CN were successfully identified from 4 linkage groups. Discovery of these QTL can provide useful markers to assist in cassava breeding and studying genes affecting the trait. PMID:21609492

  13. Effects of long-term averaging of quantitative blood pressure traits on the detection of genetic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Santhi K; Chasman, Daniel I; Larson, Martin G; Guo, Xiuqing; Verwoert, Germain; Bis, Joshua C; Gu, Xiangjun; Smith, Albert V; Yang, Min-Lee; Zhang, Yan; Ehret, Georg; Rose, Lynda M; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Papanicolau, George J; Sijbrands, Eric J; Rice, Kenneth; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Pihur, Vasyl; Ridker, Paul M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Raffel, Leslie J; Amin, Najaf; Rotter, Jerome I; Liu, Kiang; Launer, Lenore J; Xu, Ming; Caulfield, Mark; Morrison, Alanna C; Johnson, Andrew D; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Dehghan, Abbas; Li, Guo; Bouchard, Claude; Harris, Tamara B; Zhang, He; Boerwinkle, Eric; Siscovick, David S; Gao, Wei; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Willer, Cristen J; Franco, Oscar H; Huo, Yong; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Munroe, Patricia B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Palmas, Walter; van Duijn, Cornelia; Fornage, Myriam; Levy, Daniel; Psaty, Bruce M; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2014-07-03

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable, quantitative trait with intraindividual variability and susceptibility to measurement error. Genetic studies of BP generally use single-visit measurements and thus cannot remove variability occurring over months or years. We leveraged the idea that averaging BP measured across time would improve phenotypic accuracy and thereby increase statistical power to detect genetic associations. We studied systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP) averaged over multiple years in 46,629 individuals of European ancestry. We identified 39 trait-variant associations across 19 independent loci (p < 5 × 10(-8)); five associations (in four loci) uniquely identified by our LTA analyses included those of SBP and MAP at 2p23 (rs1275988, near KCNK3), DBP at 2q11.2 (rs7599598, in FER1L5), and PP at 6p21 (rs10948071, near CRIP3) and 7p13 (rs2949837, near IGFBP3). Replication analyses conducted in cohorts with single-visit BP data showed positive replication of associations and a nominal association (p < 0.05). We estimated a 20% gain in statistical power with long-term average (LTA) as compared to single-visit BP association studies. Using LTA analysis, we identified genetic loci influencing BP. LTA might be one way of increasing the power of genetic associations for continuous traits in extant samples for other phenotypes that are measured serially over time. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. How selection fashions morphological variation in Cakile maritima: A comparative analysis of population structure using random amplified polymorphic DNA and quantitative traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gandour MHEMMED; Hessini KAMEL; Abdelly CHEDLY

    2012-01-01

    It is a long-standing debate in evolutionary biology whether natural selection can generate divergence in the face of gene flow.Comparative studies of quantitative genetic and neutral marker differentiation have provided means for detecting the action of selection and random genetic drift in natural populations.We estimated the degree of population divergence in several quantitative traits and compared these estimates with that based on presumably neutral molecular markers (random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD]).This approach allowed us to disentangle the effects of divergent selection from that of other evolutionary forces.Nine populations of Cakile maritima,which encompasses the complete range of distribution of this species in Tunisia,were examined.We found a high proportion of total genetic variance to be among populations and among ecoregions for quantitative traits (range of QsT:0.44-0.88) and a moderate one for RAPD markers (GsT:0.081).In addition,almost all characters displayed a significant higher QsT than GsT,indicating occurrence of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation.The latter is explicable as there is no reason to expect that natural selection would affect in similar fashion all traits and affect all populations at a similar level.We also found a negative and significant correlation between genetic variation in molecular marker loci and quantitative traits at the multitrait scale.This result attests that the evolution of these markers in C.maritima were not paralleled,suggesting that the degree of genetic differentiation in neutral marker loci is closely predictive of the degree of differentiation in loci coding quantitative traits and the majority of these neutral markers negatively controlled the studied quantitative traits.

  15. Positional cloning of the human quantitative trait locus underlying taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un-kyung; Jorgenson, Eric; Coon, Hilary; Leppert, Mark; Risch, Neil; Drayna, Dennis

    2003-02-21

    The ability to taste the substance phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has been widely used for genetic and anthropological studies, but genetic studies have produced conflicting results and demonstrated complex inheritance for this trait. We have identified a small region on chromosome 7q that shows strong linkage disequilibrium between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and PTC taste sensitivity in unrelated subjects. This region contains a single gene that encodes a member of the TAS2R bitter taste receptor family. We identified three coding SNPs giving rise to five haplotypes in this gene worldwide. These haplotypes completely explain the bimodal distribution of PTC taste sensitivity, thus accounting for the inheritance of the classically defined taste insensitivity and for 55 to 85% of the variance in PTC sensitivity. Distinct phenotypes were associated with specific haplotypes, which demonstrates that this gene has a direct influence on PTC taste sensitivity and that sequence variants at different sites interact with each other within the encoded gene product.

  16. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  17. Multilocus association testing of quantitative traits based on partial least-squares analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhang

    Full Text Available Because of combining the genetic information of multiple loci, multilocus association studies (MLAS are expected to be more powerful than single locus association studies (SLAS in disease genes mapping. However, some researchers found that MLAS had similar or reduced power relative to SLAS, which was partly attributed to the increased degrees of freedom (dfs in MLAS. Based on partial least-squares (PLS analysis, we develop a MLAS approach, while avoiding large dfs in MLAS. In this approach, genotypes are first decomposed into the PLS components that not only capture majority of the genetic information of multiple loci, but also are relevant for target traits. The extracted PLS components are then regressed on target traits to detect association under multilinear regression. Simulation study based on real data from the HapMap project were used to assess the performance of our PLS-based MLAS as well as other popular multilinear regression-based MLAS approaches under various scenarios, considering genetic effects and linkage disequilibrium structure of candidate genetic regions. Using PLS-based MLAS approach, we conducted a genome-wide MLAS of lean body mass, and compared it with our previous genome-wide SLAS of lean body mass. Simulations and real data analyses results support the improved power of our PLS-based MLAS in disease genes mapping relative to other three MLAS approaches investigated in this study. We aim to provide an effective and powerful MLAS approach, which may help to overcome the limitations of SLAS in disease genes mapping.

  18. Identification of quantitative trait loci underlying milk traits in Spanish dairy sheep using linkage plus combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gámez, E; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Suarez-Vega, A; de la Fuente, L F; Arranz, J J

    2013-09-01

    In this study, 2 procedures were used to analyze a data set from a whole-genome scan, one based on linkage analysis information and the other combing linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis (LDLA), to determine the quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing milk production traits in sheep. A total of 1,696 animals from 16 half-sib families were genotyped using the OvineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA) and analysis was performed using a daughter design. Moreover, the same data set has been previously investigated through a genome-wide association (GWA) analysis and a comparison of results from the 3 methods has been possible. The linkage analysis and LDLA methodologies yielded different results, although some significantly associated regions were common to both procedures. The linkage analysis detected 3 overlapping genome-wise significant QTL on sheep chromosome (OAR) 2 influencing milk yield, protein yield, and fat yield, whereas 34 genome-wise significant QTL regions were detected using the LDLA approach. The most significant QTL for protein and fat percentages was detected on OAR3, which was reported in a previous GWA analysis. Both the linkage analysis and LDLA identified many other chromosome-wise significant associations across different sheep autosomes. Additional analyses were performed on OAR2 and OAR3 to determine the possible causality of the most significant polymorphisms identified for these genetic effects by the previously reported GWA analysis. For OAR3, the analyses demonstrated additional genetic proof of the causality previously suggested by our group for a single nucleotide polymorphism located in the α-lactalbumin gene (LALBA). In summary, although the results shown here suggest that in commercial dairy populations, the LDLA method exhibits a higher efficiency to map QTL than the simple linkage analysis or linkage disequilibrium methods, we believe that comparing the 3 analysis methods is the best approach to obtain a global

  19. Mapping adipose and muscle tissue expression quantitative trait loci in African Americans to identify genes for type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajuthi, Satria P; Sharma, Neeraj K; Chou, Jeff W; Palmer, Nicholette D; McWilliams, David R; Beal, John; Comeau, Mary E; Ma, Lijun; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Demons, Jamehl; Rogers, Samantha; Cherry, Kristina; Menon, Lata; Kouba, Ethel; Davis, Donna; Burris, Marcie; Byerly, Sara J; Ng, Maggie C Y; Maruthur, Nisa M; Patel, Sanjay R; Bielak, Lawrence F; Lange, Leslie A; Guo, Xiuqing; Sale, Michèle M; Chan, Kei Hang K; Monda, Keri L; Chen, Gary K; Taylor, Kira; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L; North, Kari E; Haiman, Christopher A; Bowden, Donald W; Freedman, Barry I; Langefeld, Carl D; Das, Swapan K

    2016-08-01

    Relative to European Americans, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans (AAs). Genetic variation may modulate transcript abundance in insulin-responsive tissues and contribute to risk; yet, published studies identifying expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in African ancestry populations are restricted to blood cells. This study aims to develop a map of genetically regulated transcripts expressed in tissues important for glucose homeostasis in AAs, critical for identifying the genetic etiology of T2D and related traits. Quantitative measures of adipose and muscle gene expression, and genotypic data were integrated in 260 non-diabetic AAs to identify expression regulatory variants. Their roles in genetic susceptibility to T2D, and related metabolic phenotypes, were evaluated by mining GWAS datasets. eQTL analysis identified 1971 and 2078 cis-eGenes in adipose and muscle, respectively. Cis-eQTLs for 885 transcripts including top cis-eGenes CHURC1, USMG5, and ERAP2 were identified in both tissues. 62.1 % of top cis-eSNPs were within ±50 kb of transcription start sites and cis-eGenes were enriched for mitochondrial transcripts. Mining GWAS databases revealed association of cis-eSNPs for more than 50 genes with T2D (e.g. PIK3C2A, RBMS1, UFSP1), gluco-metabolic phenotypes (e.g. INPP5E, SNX17, ERAP2, FN3KRP), and obesity (e.g. POMC, CPEB4). Integration of GWAS meta-analysis data from AA cohorts revealed the most significant association for cis-eSNPs of ATP5SL and MCCC1 genes, with T2D and BMI, respectively. This study developed the first comprehensive map of adipose and muscle tissue eQTLs in AAs (publically accessible at https://mdsetaa.phs.wakehealth.edu ) and identified genetically regulated transcripts for delineating genetic causes of T2D, and related metabolic phenotypes.

  20. High-Density Genetic Linkage Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Su, Kai; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Liping; Zhang, Jijun; Li, Junpeng; Guo, Yinshan

    2017-07-14

    Genetic linkage maps are an important tool in genetic and genomic research. In this study, two hawthorn cultivars, Qiujinxing and Damianqiu, and 107 progenies from a cross between them were used for constructing a high-density genetic linkage map using the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) sequencing method, as well as for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) for flavonoid content. In total, 206,411,693 single-end reads were obtained, with an average sequencing depth of 57× in the parents and 23× in the progeny. After quality trimming, 117,896 high-quality 2b-RAD tags were retained, of which 42,279 were polymorphic; of these, 12,951 markers were used for constructing the genetic linkage map. The map contained 17 linkage groups and 3,894 markers, with a total map length of 1,551.97 cM and an average marker interval of 0.40 cM. QTL mapping identified 21 QTLs associated with flavonoid content in 10 linkage groups, which explained 16.30-59.00% of the variance. This is the first high-density linkage map for hawthorn, which will serve as a basis for fine-scale QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection of important traits in hawthorn germplasm and will facilitate chromosome assignment for hawthorn whole-genome assemblies in the future.

  1. A composite method for mapping quantitative trait loci without interference of female achiasmatic and gender effects in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Zuo, W; Tong, X; Hu, H; Qiao, L; Song, J; Xiong, G; Gao, R; Dai, F; Lu, C

    2015-08-01

    The silkworm, Bombyx mori, is an economically important insect that was domesticated more than 5000 years ago. Its major economic traits focused on by breeders are quantitative traits, and an accurate and efficient QTL mapping method is necessary to explore their genetic architecture. However, current widely used QTL mapping models are not well suited for silkworm because they ignore female achiasmate and gender effects. In this study, we propose a composite method combining rational population selection and special mapping methods to map QTL in silkworm. By determining QTL for cocoon shell weight (CSW), we demonstrated the effectiveness of this method. In the CSW mapping process, only 56 markers were used and five loci or chromosomes were detected, more than in previous studies. Additionally, loci on chromosomes 1 and 11 dominated and accounted for 35.10% and 15.03% of the phenotypic variance respectively. Unlike previous studies, epistasis was detected between loci on chromosomes 11 and 22. These mapping results demonstrate the power and convenience of this method for QTL mapping in silkworm, and this method may inspire the development of similar approaches for other species with special genetic characteristics.

  2. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  3. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling early growth in a (longleaf pine x slash pine) x slash pine BC(1) family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, C.; Kubisiak, L.; Nelson, D.; Stine, M.

    2002-04-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were employed to map the genome and quantitative trait loci controlling the early growth of a pine hybrid F(1) tree ( Pinus palustris Mill. x P. elliottii Engl.) and a recurrent slash pine tree ( P. elliottii Engl.) in a (longleaf pine x slash pine) x slash pine BC(1) family consisting of 258 progeny. Of the 150 hybrid F(1) parent-specific RAPD markers, 133 were mapped into 17 linkage groups covering a genetic distance of 1,338.2 cM. Of the 116 slash pine parent-specific RAPD markers, 83 were mapped into 19 linkage groups covering a genetic distance of 994.6 cM. A total of 11 different marker intervals were found to be significantly associated with 13 of the 20 traits on height and diameter growth using MAPMAKER/QTL. Nine of the eleven marker intervals were unique to the hybrid parent 488 genome, and two were unique to the recurrent parent 18-27 genome. The amount of phenotypic variance explained by the putative QTLs ranged from 3.6% to 11.0%. Different QTLs were detected at different ages. Two marker intervals from the hybrid parent 488 were found to have QTL by environment interactions.

  4. Bayesian methods for quantitative trait loci mapping based on model selection: approximate analysis using the Bayesian information criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, R D

    2001-11-01

    We describe an approximate method for the analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) based on model selection from multiple regression models with trait values regressed on marker genotypes, using a modification of the easily calculated Bayesian information criterion to estimate the posterior probability of models with various subsets of markers as variables. The BIC-delta criterion, with the parameter delta increasing the penalty for additional variables in a model, is further modified to incorporate prior information, and missing values are handled by multiple imputation. Marginal probabilities for model sizes are calculated, and the posterior probability of nonzero model size is interpreted as the posterior probability of existence of a QTL linked to one or more markers. The method is demonstrated on analysis of associations between wood density and markers on two linkage groups in Pinus radiata. Selection bias, which is the bias that results from using the same data to both select the variables in a model and estimate the coefficients, is shown to be a problem for commonly used non-Bayesian methods for QTL mapping, which do not average over alternative possible models that are consistent with the data.

  5. Confirmatory factor analytic structure and measurement invariance of quantitative autistic traits measured by the social responsiveness scale-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Thomas W; Ratliff, Kristin R; Gruber, Chris; Zhang, Yi; Law, Paul A; Constantino, John N

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factor structure of autistic symptomatology is critical to the discovery and interpretation of causal mechanisms in autism spectrum disorder. We a