WorldWideScience

Sample records for abundant molecular ions

  1. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamente, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O 2 + ( 4 π/sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the 4 π/sub 5/2/ and 4 π/sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the 4 π/sub 3/2/ and 4 π/sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms)

  2. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  4. Electron impact study of molecular ions of some benzyl derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, E.T.; Rabia, M.A.; Fahmy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization energies at threshold and values of higher energy levels for the molecular ions of benzyl alcohol, benzyl amine and benzyl cyanide are reported using electron impact technique. The first ionization energy values are found to be 8.26 eV (benzyl alcohol), 8.49 eV(benzyl amine)and 9.32 eV (benzyl cyanide). Some of the reported higher energy levels for the molecular ions are tentatively explained. The differences in the relative abundances for the main fragment ions are discussed and attributed to the effect of the different substituents - OH, -NH2 and -CN groups

  5. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  6. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering

  7. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungen, Ch. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, Université de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  8. Ionospheric sources for molecular ion outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Peterson, W. K.; Blelly, P. F.; Alcayde, D.; Semeter, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mass-resolved satellite observations have established the presence of molecular ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere, outer magnetosphere, and ring current. Associated molecular outflows originate from the auroral zone F-region ionosphere and, while normally several orders of magnitude less intense than the well-known O+ outflow, are perhaps more closely tied to intense geomagnetic disturbances. Molecular outflow is also fundamentally different from O+ outflow, since molecular ions must first be generated in large quantities in the F-region, and then are subject to very short recombination lifetimes as they escape. Owing to observational difficulties, very little detailed information exists on the generation, energization, and upward transport of molecular ions. Furthermore, the basic geographic and geomagnetic activity dependence of the ionospheric source and higher altitude outflow are only loosely constrained. This research synthesizes both observations and models to gain a better understanding of molecular ion generation and upflow, and the basic characteristics of the ionospheric molecular source during geomagnetic storms. To illustrate ionospheric dynamics associated with published satellite observations of molecular upflow, a 2D ionospheric model is driven by boundary conditions consistent with observed field-aligned currents. These simulations provide detailed information about expected species-dependent ion densities, temperatures, fluxes, and associated transients. Similar model results are also compared against PFISR radar estimates of molecular ions generated by auroral arc activity. A detailed case study of the 24-25 Sept. 1998 geomagnetic storm is presented in which the EISCAT ESR and Tromso radars suggested enhancements in F-region molecular ions and Polar satellite simultaneously observed moleculars in the magnetosphere. Finally, data from Sondrestrom and EISCAT radars during multiple storms are combined in an attempt to build a statistical

  9. Tissue molecular ion imaging by gold cluster ion bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul, David; Halgand, Fréderic; Brunelle, Alain; Kersting, Reinhard; Tallarek, Elke; Hagenhoff, Birgit; Laprévote, Olivier

    2004-03-15

    The use of gold cluster focused ion beams produced by a liquid metal ion gun in a TOF-SIMS mass spectrometer is shown to dramatically enhance secondary ion emission of phospholipids and peptides. The method has been successfully tested with cells grown onto plastic slips and with mouse brain slices, without any treatment of the samples. Very reliable time-of-flight mass spectra are acquired with a low primary ion dose of a few 10(7) ions, and high lateral resolution molecular ion images are obtained for heavy ions of great biological interest. This approach offers new opportunities in pharmacological and biological research fields by localizing compounds of interest such as drugs or metabolites in tissues.

  10. Channeling of molecular ions with relativistic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Muranaka, Tomoko; Kondo, Chikara; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Komaki, Kenichiro; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Takabayashi, Yuichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Takada, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    When energetic ions are injected into a single crystal parallel to a crystal axis or plane, they proceed in an open space guided by the crystal potential without colliding with atoms in the atomic plane or string, which is called channeling. We aimed to study dynamics of molecular ions, H 2 + , of 160 MeV/u and their fragment ions, H + ions in a Si crystal under the channeling condition. The molecular ions, H 2 + , are soon ionized, i.e. electron-stripped in the crystal, and a pair of bare nuclei, H + ions, travels in the crystal potential with mutual Coulomb repulsion. We developed a 2D position sensitive detector for the angular-distribution measurement of the H + ions transmitted through the crystal, and observed the detailed angular distribution. In addition we measured the case of H + on incidence for comparison. As a result, the channeled component and non-channeling were clearly separated. The incident angular divergence is critical to discuss the effect of Coulomb explosion of molecular H 2 + ions. (author)

  11. Dissociative recombination of small molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mul, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis an analysis is given of merged electron-ion beam experiment and work on dissociative recombination of molecular ions and electrons is described. Chapter II covers a brief introduction of the theory of dissociative recombination. In chapter III, a description is given of the merged electron-ion beam experiment and a method is described which allows the determination of the mean angle between the electron and ion trajectories in a merged electron-ion beam experiment. In chapter IV a paper on the three dominant atmospheric diatomic ions NO + , O 2 + and N 2 + is presented and in chapter V the dissociative recombination for N 2 H + and N 2 D + is discussed. In chapter VI two papers on the polyatomic ions of the carbon-containing molecular ions are presented, and in chapter VII a letter with some results of the work presented in more detail in the chapters IV, V and VI is presented. The magnitude and the energy dependence of the cross-section measured by the merged beam technique and by other techniques is compared and discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oddershede, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabin, John R., E-mail: sabin@qtp.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  13. Dissociative recombination of molecular ions H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarenov, A.V.; Marchenko, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The total cross sections of dissociation and dissociative recombination of slow electrons and molecular ions H 2 + have been calculated in terms of the quasiclassical and dipole approximations. In the calculations allowance was made for the quantum nature of vibrational motion of heavy particles and presence of autoionization of divergence states of the H 2 (Σ u , nl) molecules. It is shown that the H 2 + ion dissociation cross sections are dominant in increase of the electron energy in the ε >or approx. 2-3 eV region for H 2 + (v) ion distribution over the vibrational levels characteristic for the beam experiments. 15 refs.; 5 figs

  14. Isomerization of alkane molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.L.; Burgers, P.C.; Mollah, M.Y.A.; Wolkoff, P.

    1982-01-01

    The appearance energies of daughter ions for the major low-energy losses of C 2 H 6 , CH 4 , and CH 3 ., of pentane and methylbutane radical cations were measured. The behaviors of a variety of 13 C- and 2 H-labeled compounds were examined. For methylbutane, loss of C 2 H 6 and CH 3 . yielded ionized propene and 2-butyl cations, at their calculated thermochemical thresholds. Loss of CH 4 proceeded at an energy greater than that calculated for the production of ionized but-2-ene, methylpropene, but-1-ene, or methylcyclopropane. Ethane elimination is preceded partially (ca. 20 to 25%) by a 1 to 2 methyl shift and a concomitant 2 to 1 H shift; isotope effects associated with this reaction are discussed. For pentane, losses of CH 3 . and CH 4 take place at the same energy, corresponding to the calculated threshold for production of the secondary cations; 13 C labelling experiments showed that the penultimate C atoms are not lost but that C-3 is lost (46%) in these reactions, with an ease similar to terminal C atom losses (54%). 2 H labelling permitted the separation of the metastable peak for methane loss into components having different kinetic energy releases attributable to the production of different [C 4 H 8 ] + . daughter ions. Although C 2 H 6 loss was observed to take place at energies down to the calculated thermochemical threshold for generation of ionized propene, the appearance energy of the metastable peak was the same as that for CH 3 . and CH 4 losses. Labelling experiments showed that the central C atom is not lost in this reaction. Detailed analysis of the observations leads to the conclusion that the CH 3 ., CH 4 , and C 2 H 6 eliminations from pentane radical cations are preceded by an isomerization to energy-rich ionized methylbutane. 2 figures, 3 tables

  15. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Phillip W. K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2017-01-01

    with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state...

  16. Ion-ion correlation attraction in a molecular solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegado, Luís; Jönsson, Bo; Wennerström, Håkan

    2008-11-14

    We have performed Monte Carlo simulations for two like-charged infinite plates with counterions and solvent in between. The solvent is described at the primitive model (PM) level and also as a Stockmayer fluid. Both descriptions share the same qualitative ion correlation picture. At sufficiently high coupling, the pressure between the plates shows an attractive minimum, which is lost or reduced upon decreasing counterion valency, surface charge density, or increasing the screening. The pressure profiles become more oscillatory with higher density, which masks the ion-ion correlation attraction. An interpretation in terms of interaction free energies rather than pressures clarifies the picture. Analyzing the different contributions to the pressure gives further support to the conclusions; the same components are responsible for the same effect in the PM and in the molecular solvent.

  17. Ion channels: molecular targets of neuroactive insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond-Delpech, Valérie; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, Benedict M; Rauh, James J; Sattelle, David B

    2005-11-01

    Many of the insecticides in current use act on molecular targets in the insect nervous system. Recently, our understanding of these targets has improved as a result of the complete sequencing of an insect genome, i.e., Drosophila melanogaster. Here we examine the recent work, drawing on genetics, genomics and physiology, which has provided evidence that specific receptors and ion channels are targeted by distinct chemical classes of insect control agents. The examples discussed include, sodium channels (pyrethroids, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), dihydropyrazoles and oxadiazines); nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (cartap, spinosad, imidacloprid and related nitromethylenes/nitroguanidines); gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (cyclodienes, gamma-BHC and fipronil) and L-glutamate receptors (avermectins). Finally, we have examined the molecular basis of resistance to these molecules, which in some cases involves mutations in the molecular target, and we also consider the future impact of molecular genetic technologies in our understanding of the actions of neuroactive insecticides.

  18. Dissociation mechanisms of photoexcited molecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, L C

    2003-01-01

    Photoionisation of gas phase molecules, in the energy range 8 - 40 eV, and the subsequent dissociation mechanisms have been investigated using threshold photoelectron spectroscopy and ion time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The excitation source used was monochromatic radiation, delivered by station 3.2 at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source. These two techniques have also been combined in threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments, in order to record coincidence time-of-flight mass spectra and thereby determine breakdown curves. Such curves display the ion fragmentation as a function of internal energy. In addition, computer modelling techniques have been employed to gain some understanding of the unimolecular dissociations of energy selected molecular ions by establishing theoretical breakdown graphs, appearance energies, fragmentation pathways and dissociation rates. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out, generating ionisation and appearance energies, ...

  19. Comparative Absorption and Emission Abundance Analyses of Nebulae: Ion Emission Densities for IC 418

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert; Jenkins, Edward B.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Sharpee, Brian

    2003-02-01

    Recent analyses of nebular spectra have resulted in discrepant abundances from CNO forbidden and recombination lines. We consider independent methods of determining ion abundances for emission nebulae, comparing ion emission measures with column densities derived from resonance absorption lines viewed against the central star continuum. Separate analyses of the nebular emission lines and the stellar UV absorption lines yield independent abundances for ions, and their ratio can be expressed in terms of a parameter em, the ``emission density'' for each ion. Adequate data for this technique are still scarce, but separate analyses of spectra of the planetary nebula and central star of IC 418 do show discrepant abundances for several ions, especially Fe II. The discrepancies are probably due to the presence of absorbing gas that does not emit and/or to uncertain atomic data and excitation processes, and they demonstrate the importance of applying the technique of combining emission- and absorption-line data in deriving abundances for nebulae. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the STScI, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and on observations made at CTIO/NOAO, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  20. High energy radiation fluences in the ISS-USLab: Ion discrimination and particle abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaconte, Veronica; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; La Tessa, Chiara; Larosa, Marianna; Narici, Livio; Picozza, Piergiorgio

    2010-01-01

    The ALTEA (Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts) detector was used to characterize the radiation environment inside the USLab of the International Space Station (ISS), where it measured the abundances of ions from Be to Fe. We compare the ALTEA results with Alteino results obtained in the PIRS module of the Russian segment of the ISS, and normalize to the high energy Si abundances given by Simpson. These are the first particle spectral measurements, which include ions up to Fe, performed in the USLab. The small differences observed between those made inside the USLab and the Simpson abundances can be attributed to the transport through the spacecraft hull. However, the low abundance of Fe cannot be attributed to only this process.

  1. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H+), alkali metal cations (M+), calcium ions (Ca2+), and hydronium ions (H3O+) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C9H7NS2), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M+ + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M+ = H+, Li+, Na+, or K+. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from -0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  2. Trapped ion simulation of molecular spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    Boson sampling had been suggested as a classically intractable and quantum mechanically manageable problem via computational complexity theory arguments. Recently, Huh and co-workers proposed theoretically a modified version of boson sampling, which is designed to simulate a molecular problem, as a practical application. Here, we report the experimental implementation of the theoretical proposal with a trapped ion system. As a first demonstration, we perform the quantum simulation of molecular vibronic profile of SO2, which incorporates squeezing, rotation and coherent displacements operations, and the collective projection measurement on phonon modes. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, 11574002. Basic Science Research Program of Korea NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773.

  3. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...... method are applied in order to describe the target molecule and the collision process. It is shown that three perpendicular orientations of the molecular axis with respect to the trajectory are sufficient to accurately reproduce the ionization cross section calculated by Sakimoto [Phys. Rev. A 71, 062704...... (2005)] reducing the numerical effort drastically. The independent-event model is employed to approximate the cross section for double ionization and H+ production in antiproton collisions with H2....

  4. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Begg, Stephanie L.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Luo, Zhenyao; Cou?ago, Rafael M.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Maher, Megan J.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kobe, Bostjan; O?Mara, Megan L.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth?s crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occu...

  5. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions

  6. Formation and fragmentation of quadruply charged molecular ions by intense femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuhashi, Tomoyuki; Nakashima, Nobuaki

    2010-07-22

    We investigated the formation and fragmentation of multiply charged molecular ions of several aromatic molecules by intense nonresonant femtosecond laser pulses of 1.4 mum with a 130 fs pulse duration (up to 2 x 10(14) W cm(-2)). Quadruply charged states were produced for 2,3-benzofluorene and triphenylene molecular ion in large abundance, whereas naphthalene and 1,1'-binaphthyl resulted only in up to triply charged molecular ions. The laser wavelength was nonresonant with regard to the electronic transitions of the neutral molecules, and the degree of fragmentation was strongly correlated with the absorption of the singly charged cation radical. Little fragmentation was observed for naphthalene (off-resonant with cation), whereas heavy fragmentation was observed in the case of 1,1'-binaphthyl (resonant with cation). The degree of H(2) (2H) and 2H(2) (4H) elimination from molecular ions increased as the charge states increased in all the molecules examined. A striking difference was found between triply and quadruply charged 2,3-benzofluorene: significant suppression of molecular ions with loss of odd number of hydrogen was observed in the quadruply charged ions. The Coulomb explosion of protons in the quadruply charged state and succeeding fragmentation resulted in the formation of triply charged molecular ions with an odd number of hydrogens. The hydrogen elimination mechanism in the highly charged state is discussed.

  7. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Stephanie L; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M; Morey, Jacqueline R; Maher, Megan J; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; McEwan, Alastair G; Kobe, Bostjan; O'Mara, Megan L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2015-03-03

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth's crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17 mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress.

  8. Understanding Molecular Ion-Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    grant for Education , Research and Engineering: The number of undergraduates funded by your agreement who graduated during this period and intend to work...40Ca magneto-optical trap ( MOT ) co- located with a linear quadrupole radio- frequency ion trap (LQT) system. The 40Ca MOT laser...the linear quadrupole trap, while ultracold atoms are collected in a MOT . The ultracold atoms quickly cool the atomic/molecular ion’s

  9. Metal ion sequestration: An exciting dimension for molecularly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metal ion sequestration: An exciting dimension for molecularly imprinted polymer technology. DMS Mosha, LL Mkayula. Abstract. The use of a tight binding macrocyclic ligand to complex a metal ion so that this serves as receptee on the Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) receptor as described here affords a sequestration ...

  10. Production and sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chaobo

    2008-01-01

    This thesis reports on experimental and theoretical studies of the sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions demonstrating that this general method for cooling atomic and molecular ions is reliable and efficient. For this purpose, complex molecular ions and barium ions have been confined simultaneously in a linear Paul trap. The complex molecular ions are generated in an electrospray ionization system and transferred to the trap via a 2 m long octopole ion guide. These molecular ions are pre-cooled by room temperature helium buffer gas so that they can be captured by the trap. The atomic barium ions are loaded from a barium evaporator oven and are laser-cooled by a 493 nm cooling laser and a 650 nm repumping laser. Due to the mutual Coulomb interaction among these charged particles, the kinetic energy of the complex molecular ions can be reduced significantly. In our experiments we have demonstrated the sympathetic cooling of various molecules (CO 2 , Alexa Fluor 350, glycyrrhetinic acid, cytochrome c) covering a wide mass range from a few tens to 13000 amu. In every case the molecular ions could be cooled down to millikelvin temperatures. Photo-chemical reactions of the 138 Ba + ions in the ( 2 P 1/2 ) excited state with gases such as O 2 , CO 2 , or N 2 O, could be observed. If the initial 138 Ba + ion ensemble is cold, the produced 138 BaO + ions are cold as well, with a similar temperature as the laser-cooled barium ions (a few tens of millikelvin). The back-reaction of 138 BaO + ions with neutral CO to 138 Ba + is possible and was observed in our experiments as well. A powerful molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program has been developed. With this program dynamic properties of ion ensembles, such as sympathetic interactions or heating effects, have been investigated and experimental results have been analyzed to obtain, for example, ion numbers and temperatures. Additionally, the feasibility of nondestructive spectroscopy via an optical dipole excitation

  11. Production and sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chaobo

    2008-06-24

    This thesis reports on experimental and theoretical studies of the sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions demonstrating that this general method for cooling atomic and molecular ions is reliable and efficient. For this purpose, complex molecular ions and barium ions have been confined simultaneously in a linear Paul trap. The complex molecular ions are generated in an electrospray ionization system and transferred to the trap via a 2 m long octopole ion guide. These molecular ions are pre-cooled by room temperature helium buffer gas so that they can be captured by the trap. The atomic barium ions are loaded from a barium evaporator oven and are laser-cooled by a 493 nm cooling laser and a 650 nm repumping laser. Due to the mutual Coulomb interaction among these charged particles, the kinetic energy of the complex molecular ions can be reduced significantly. In our experiments we have demonstrated the sympathetic cooling of various molecules (CO{sub 2}, Alexa Fluor 350, glycyrrhetinic acid, cytochrome c) covering a wide mass range from a few tens to 13000 amu. In every case the molecular ions could be cooled down to millikelvin temperatures. Photo-chemical reactions of the {sup 138}Ba{sup +} ions in the ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) excited state with gases such as O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, or N{sub 2}O, could be observed. If the initial {sup 138}Ba{sup +} ion ensemble is cold, the produced {sup 138}BaO{sup +} ions are cold as well, with a similar temperature as the laser-cooled barium ions (a few tens of millikelvin). The back-reaction of {sup 138}BaO{sup +} ions with neutral CO to {sup 138}Ba{sup +} is possible and was observed in our experiments as well. A powerful molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program has been developed. With this program dynamic properties of ion ensembles, such as sympathetic interactions or heating effects, have been investigated and experimental results have been analyzed to obtain, for example, ion numbers and temperatures. Additionally, the

  12. Correlation between molecular secondary ion yield and cluster ion sputtering for samples with different stopping powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heile, A.; Muhmann, C.; Lipinsky, D.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2012-07-01

    In static SIMS, the secondary ion yield, defined as detected ions per primary ion, can be increased by altering several primary ion parameters. For many years, no quantitative predictions could be made for the secondary ion yield enhancement of molecular ions. For thick samples of organic compounds, a power dependency of the secondary ion yield on the sputtering yield was shown. For this article, samples with thick molecular layers and (sub-)monolayers composed of various molecules were prepared on inorganic substrates such as silicon, silver, and gold, and subsequently analyzed. For primary ion bombardment, monoatomic (Ne+, Ar+, Ga+, Kr+, Xe+, Bi+) as well as polyatomic (Bin+, Bin++) primary ions were used within an energy range of 10-50 keV. The power dependency was found to hold true for the different samples; however, the exponent decreased with increasing stopping power. Based on these findings, a rule of thumb is proposed for the prediction of the lower limit of the secondary ion yield enhancement as a function of the primary ion species. Additionally, effects caused by the variation of the energy deposition are discussed, including the degree of molecular fragmentation and the non-linear increase of the secondary ion yield when polyatomic primary ions are used.

  13. Determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions by ''Coulomb-explosion'' techniques with fast (MeV) molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the dissociation of fast (MeV) molecular ion beams in thin foils suggest a novel alternative approach to the determination of molecular ion structures. In this article we review some recent high-resolution studies on the interactions of fast molecular ion beams with solid and gaseous targets and indicate how such studies may be applied to the problem of determining molecular ion structures. The main features of the Coulomb explosion of fast-moving molecular ion projectiles and the manner in which Coulomb-explosion techniques may be applied to the problem (difficult to attack by more conventional means) of determining the stereochemical structures of molecular ions has been described in this paper. Examples have been given of early experiments designed to elicit structure information. The techniques are still in their infancy, and it is to be expected that as both the technology and the analysis are refined, the method will make valuable contributions to the determination of molecular ion structures

  14. The abundance and emission of H2O and O-2 in clumpy molecular clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, M; van Dishoeck, EF

    2001-01-01

    Recent observations with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) indicate abundances of gaseous H2O and O-2 in dense molecular clouds that are significantly lower than those found in standard homogeneous chemistry models. We present here results for the thermal and chemical balance of

  15. Relative abundance of Mycobacterium bovis molecular types in cattle: a simulation study of potential epidemiological drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewby, Hannah; Wright, David M; Skuce, Robin A; McCormick, Carl; Mallon, Thomas R; Presho, Eleanor L; Kao, Rowland R; Haydon, Daniel T; Biek, Roman

    2017-08-22

    The patterns of relative species abundance are commonly studied in ecology and epidemiology to provide insights into underlying dynamical processes. Molecular types (MVLA-types) of Mycobacterium bovis, the causal agent of bovine tuberculosis, are now routinely recorded in culture-confirmed bovine tuberculosis cases in Northern Ireland. In this study, we use ecological approaches and simulation modelling to investigate the distribution of relative abundances of MVLA-types and its potential drivers. We explore four biologically plausible hypotheses regarding the processes driving molecular type relative abundances: sampling and speciation; structuring of the pathogen population; historical changes in population size; and transmission heterogeneity (superspreading). Northern Irish herd-level MVLA-type surveillance shows a right-skewed distribution of MVLA-types, with a small number of types present at very high frequencies and the majority of types very rare. We demonstrate that this skew is too extreme to be accounted for by simple neutral ecological processes. Simulation results indicate that the process of MVLA-type speciation and the manner in which the MVLA-typing loci were chosen in Northern Ireland cannot account for the observed skew. Similarly, we find that pathogen population structure, assuming for example a reservoir of infection in a separate host, would drive the relative abundance distribution in the opposite direction to that observed, generating more even abundances of molecular types. However, we find that historical increases in bovine tuberculosis prevalence and/or transmission heterogeneity (superspreading) are both capable of generating the skewed MVLA-type distribution, consistent with findings of previous work examining the distribution of molecular types in human tuberculosis. Although the distribution of MVLA-type abundances does not fit classical neutral predictions, our simulations show that increases in pathogen population size and

  16. Atomic and molecular physics with ion storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, M.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in ion-source, accelerator and beam-cooling technology have made it possible to produce high-quality beams of atomic ions in arbitrary charged states as well as molecular and cluster ions are internally cold. Ion beams of low emittance and narrow momentum spread are obtained in a new generation of ion storage-cooler rings dedicated to atomic and molecular physics. The long storage times (∼ 5 s ≤ τ ≤ days) allow the study of very slow processes occurring in charged (positive and negative) atoms, molecules and clusters. Interactions of ions with electrons and/or photons can be studied by merging the stored ion beam with electron and laser beams. The physics of storage rings spans particles having a charge-to-mass ratio ranging from 60 + and C 70 + ) to 0.4 - 1.0 (H + , D + , He 2+ , ..., U 92+ ) and collision processes ranging from <1 meV to ∼ 70 GeV. It incorporates, in addition to atomic and molecular physics, tests of fundamental physics theories and atomic physics bordering on nuclear and chemical physics. This exciting development concerning ion storage rings has taken place within the last five to six years. (author)

  17. Understanding ion association states and molecular dynamics using infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Hanqing

    A molecular level understanding of the ion transport mechanism within polymer electrolytes is crucial to the further development for advanced energy storage applications. This can be achieved by the identification and quantitative measurement of different ion species in the system and further relating them to the ion conductivity. In the first part of this thesis, research is presented towards understanding the ion association states (free ions, ion pairs and ion aggregates) in ionomer systems, and the correlation of ion association states, ion conduction, polymer dynamics, and morphology. Ion conductivity in ionomers can be improved by lowering glass transition temperature, increasing polymer ion solvation ability, and adjusting ionomer structural variables such as ion content, cation type and side chain structure. These effects are studied in three ionomer systems respectively, using a combination of characterization methods. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) identifies and quantifies the ion association states. Dielectric Spectroscopy (DRS) characterizes ion conductivity and polymer and ion dynamics. X-ray scattering reveals changes in morphology. The influence of a cation solvating plasticizer on a polyester ionomer is systematically investigated with respect to ion association states, ion and polymer dynamics and morphology. A decrease in the number ratio of ion aggregates with increased plasticizer content and a slight increase at elevated temperature are observed in FTIR. Similar results are also detected by X-ray scattering. As determined from dielectric spectroscopy, ion conductivity increases with plasticizer content, in accordance with the decrease in glass transition temperature. Research on copolymer of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO) based ionomers further develops an understanding of the trade-off between ion solvation and segmental dynamics. Upon the incorporation of PTMO, the majority of the PTMO

  18. Graph Theory and Ion and Molecular Aggregation in Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Hochan; Choi, Hyung Ran; Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-04-20

    In molecular and cellular biology, dissolved ions and molecules have decisive effects on chemical and biological reactions, conformational stabilities, and functions of small to large biomolecules. Despite major efforts, the current state of understanding of the effects of specific ions, osmolytes, and bioprotecting sugars on the structure and dynamics of water H-bonding networks and proteins is not yet satisfactory. Recently, to gain deeper insight into this subject, we studied various aggregation processes of ions and molecules in high-concentration salt, osmolyte, and sugar solutions with time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation methods. It turns out that ions (or solute molecules) have a strong propensity to self-assemble into large and polydisperse aggregates that affect both local and long-range water H-bonding structures. In particular, we have shown that graph-theoretical approaches can be used to elucidate morphological characteristics of large aggregates in various aqueous salt, osmolyte, and sugar solutions. When ion and molecular aggregates in such aqueous solutions are treated as graphs, a variety of graph-theoretical properties, such as graph spectrum, degree distribution, clustering coefficient, minimum path length, and graph entropy, can be directly calculated by considering an ensemble of configurations taken from molecular dynamics trajectories. Here we show percolating behavior exhibited by ion and molecular aggregates upon increase in solute concentration in high solute concentrations and discuss compelling evidence of the isomorphic relation between percolation transitions of ion and molecular aggregates and water H-bonding networks. We anticipate that the combination of graph theory and molecular dynamics simulation methods will be of exceptional use in achieving a deeper understanding of the fundamental physical chemistry of dissolution and in describing the interplay between the self-aggregation of solute

  19. Molecular ion yield enhancement induced by gold deposition in static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehbe, Nimer; Delcorte, Arnaud; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.; Bertrand, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Static ToF-SIMS was used to evaluate the effect of gold condensation as a sample treatment prior to analysis. The experiments were carried out with a model molecular layer (Triacontane M = 422.4 Da), upon atomic (In + ) and polyatomic (Bi 3 + ) projectile bombardment. The results indicate that the effect of molecular ion yield improvement using gold metallization exists only under atomic projectile impact. While the quasi-molecular ion (M+Au) + signal can become two orders of magnitude larger than that of the deprotonated molecular ion from the pristine sample under In + bombardment, it barely reaches the initial intensity of (M-H) + when Bi 3 + projectiles are used. The differences observed for mono- and polyatomic primary ion bombardment might be explained by differences in near-surface energy deposition, which influences the sputtering and ionization processes.

  20. Molecular characterization of microbial mutations induced by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ichida@riken.jp; Matsuyama, Tomoki [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoriko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koba, Takato [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    A positive selection system for gene disruption using a sucrose-sensitive transgenic rhizobium was established and used for the molecular characterization of mutations induced by ion beam irradiations. Single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions were found to occur in the sucrose sensitivity gene, sacB, when the reporter line was irradiated with highly accelerated carbon and iron ion beams. In all of the insertion lines, fragments of essentially the same sequence and of approximately 1188 bp in size were identified in the sacB regions. In the deletion lines, iron ions showed a tendency to induce larger deletions than carbon ions, suggesting that higher LET beams cause larger deletions. We found also that ion beams, particularly 'heavier' ion beams, can produce single gene disruptions and may present an effective alternative to transgenic approaches.

  1. Molecular and cellular radiobiology of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative studies at the BEVALAC have demonstrated some of the physical and radiobiological factors that promise to make accelerated heavy ions important for the therapy of cancer. The measured physical dose-biological effect relationships allow the safe and effective delivery of therapeutic schedules of heavy ions. Among the charged particle beams available, carbon, neon and helium ions in the ''extended Bragg peak mode'' have optimal physical and biological effectiveness for delivery of therapy to deep seated tumors. The depth-dose profiles of these beams protect intervening and adjacent tissues as well as tissues beyond the range of the particles. For the treatment of hypoxic tumors, silicon and argon beams are being considered because they significantly depress the radiobiological oxygen effect in the region of the extended Bragg ionization peak. The depth-effectiveness of the argon beam is somewhat limited, however, because of primary particle fragmentation. Silicon beams have a depth-dose profile which is intermediate between that of neon and argon, and are candidates to become the particle of choice for maximizing high LET particle effects. Heavy accelerated ions depress enzymatic repair mechanisms, decrease variations of radiosensitivity during the cell division cycle, cause greater than expected delays in cell division, and decrease the protective effects of neighboring cells in organized systems. Near the Bragg peak, enhancement of heavy particle effects are observed in split dose schedules. Late and carcinogenic effects are being studied. With the newly developed Repair-Misrepair theory we can quantitatively model most observations

  2. (New molecular ions in the interstellar medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roueff Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the present knowledge on the molecular ionic content in the interstellar medium and in circumstellar envelopes. Emphasis is given on the most recent detections and the related chemical issues.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of ion mobility in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rui; Dodds, Eric D.; Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    A force field molecular dynamics method is developed to directly simulate ion drift in buffer gases driven by an electric field. The ion mobility and collision cross sections (CCSs) with relevance to ion mobility spectrometry can be obtained from the simulated drift velocity in high-density buffer gases (pressure ˜50 bars) and high electric fields (˜107 V/m). Compared to trajectory methods, the advantage of the molecular dynamics method is that it can simultaneously sample the internal dynamic motions of the ion and the ion-gas collisions. For ions with less than 100 atoms, the simulated collision cross section values can be converged to within ±1%-2% by running a 100 ns simulation for 5-19 h using one computer core. By using a set of element-based Lennard-Jones parameters that are not tuned for different atomic types in different molecules, the simulated collision cross sections for 15 small molecular ions (number of atoms ranging from 17 to 85, mass ranging from 74.1 to 609.4 g/mol) are consistent with experimental values: the mean unsigned error is 2.6 Å2 for He buffer gas and 4.4 Å2 for N2 buffer gas. The sensitivity of the simulated CCS values to random diffusion, drift velocity, electric field strength, temperature, and buffer gas density is examined.

  4. Low fragment polyatomic molecular ion source by using permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Kyouhei; Imanaka, Kousuke; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takaoka, Gikan H

    2014-02-01

    Electron-ionization-type polyatomic molecular ion source with low fragment was developed by using a pair of ring-shaped Sm-Co magnets. The magnets were placed forward and backward side of ionization part to confine electrons extracted from a thermionic cathode. Calculated electron trajectory of the developed ion source was 20 times longer than that of an ordinary outer filament configuration that has no magnetic confinement. Mass spectra of the molecular ions generated from n-tetradecane (C14H30) gas exhibited 4 times larger intensity than that of the ordinary configuration in a range of mass/charge from 93 to 210 u. This indicates that suppression of fragment ion was obtained by increase of low energy electrons resulted from the electron confinement.

  5. Calculations of some weakly bound diatomic molecular negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Lin, C.D.

    1999-01-01

    We examine the existence of stable bound states of some diatomic molecular ions where the neutral molecule itself is either unbound or barely bound. Two bound states have been found for the HeH - ion even though HeH is known to be unbound. We have found no bound states for He 2 - even though 4 He 2 is known to have one bound state. The predicted binding energies for HeH - are of the order of 1 K and depend sensitively on the isotope combinations. Other weakly bound negative ions such as NeH - and ArH - have also been investigated. These weakly bound molecular ions are good candidates for cold collision experiments. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  6. Use of molecular ion beams from a tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibis, A.; Goldring, G.; Hass, M.; Kaim, R.; Plesser, I.; Vager, Z.

    1981-01-01

    A large variety of positive molecular ion beams can be produced by gaseous charge exchange in the terminal of a tandem accelerator. After acceleration the molecules are usually dissociated by passage through a thin foil. Measurements of the break-up products provide a way to study both the structure of incident ions and the effects of electronic potentials on the internuclear interaction inside the foil. Beam intensities of a few picoamperes are quite adequate for these measurements, and the relatively high energy obtained by use of a tandem accelerator has the advantage of minimizing multiple scattering effects in the foil. The main difficulty in using the molecular beams lies in the large magnetic rigidity of singly-charged heavy molecular ions

  7. Chemical effects induced by ion implantation in molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foti, G.; Calcagno, L. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Struttura della Materia); Puglisi, O. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. Dipartimentale di Chimica e di Chimica Industriale)

    1983-05-01

    Ion implantation in molecular solids as ice, frozen noble gases, benzene and polymers produces a large amount of new molecules compared to the starting materials. Mass and energy analysis of ejected molecules together with the erosion yield, are discussed for several ion-target combinations at low temperature. The observed phenomena are analyzed in terms of deposited energy in electronic and nuclear collisions, for incoming beams, as helium or argon, in the range 10-2000 keV.

  8. Hydrogen molecular ion in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The energy of the ground electronic state of H 2 /sup ts+/ is studied as a function of the internuclear separation R 12 , the angle theta, between the molecular axis and the magnetic field, and the field strength B. For small B the molecular diamagnetism reaches its maximum value when theta = π/2 and R 12 approx. =5 Bohr radii. This maximum value is about 50% greater than the diamagnetism of an isolated H atom. At large B the molecule shrinks due to magnetic compression of the electron wave function, and the molecular vibration frequencies increase substantially. A strong diamagnetic torque appears which tends to align the molecular axis along the field. This gives rise to a zero-point rotational oscillation about theta = 0 whose energy can substantially exceed that of the zero-point vibrational oscillation. The calculations presented indicate that even if the protons had infinite mass, the molecule would become unstable to dissociation at theta = π/2 in fields > or approx. =1.6 x 10 11 G

  9. Humidity affects relative ion abundance in direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry of hexamethylene triperoxide diamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2014-12-16

    Unstable explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) is dangerous in quantity and benefits from the minimal sampling handling associated with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for mass spectral analysis. Seasonal variation observed in HMTD mass spectra suggested a humidity dependence. Therefore, direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization mass spectra were acquired at a range of humidity values. An enclosure was designed to fit around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet at atmospheric pressure. The enclosure was supplied with controlled amounts of humidified air from a test atmosphere generator to create programmable conditions for ambient analysis. The relative abundance and fragmentation of analyte ions were observed to change reliably with changing humidity values and, to a lesser degree, temperature. Humidity at such plasma-based ion sources should be regulated to avoid ∼90% shifts in relative ion abundance and provide stability and reproducibility of HMTD analysis.

  10. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    an excellent alternative to atomic qubits in the realization of a practical ion trap based quantum computer due to favourable internal state decoherence rates. In chemistry, state prepared molecular targets are an ideal starting point for uni-molecular reactions, including coherent control...... of photofragmentation through the application of various laser sources [5,6]. In cold bi-molecular reactions, where the effect of even tiny potential barriers becomes significant, experiments with state prepared molecules can yield important information on the details of the potential curves of the molecular complexes...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation...

  11. Microwave quantum logic spectroscopy and control of molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, M.; F. Herskind, P.; Drewsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    A general method for rotational microwave spectroscopy and control of polar molecular ions via direct microwave addressing is considered. Our method makes use of spatially varying AC Stark shifts, induced by far off-resonant, focused laser beams to achieve an effective coupling between...

  12. Hydrogen molecular ions for improved determination of fundamental constants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karr, J.-P.; Hilico, L.; Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Korobov, V.I.

    2016-01-01

    The possible use of high-resolution rovibrational spectroscopy of the hydrogen molecular ions H-2(+) and HD+ for an independent determination of several fundamental constants is analyzed. While these molecules had been proposed for the metrology of nuclear-to-electron mass ratios, we show that they

  13. Sorption of Molecular Oxygen by Metal-Ion Exchanger Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysanov, V. A.; Plotnikova, N. V.; Kravchenko, T. A.

    2018-03-01

    Kinetic features are studied of the chemisorption and reduction of molecular oxygen from water by metal-ion exchanger nanocomposites that differ in the nature of the dispersed metal and state of oxidation. In the Pd equilibrium sorption coefficient for oxygen dissolved in water ranges from 20 to 50, depending on the nature and oxidation state of the metal component.

  14. Adiabatic Cooling for Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Karin

    2017-01-01

    proposes to adiabatically relax the trapping potential, called adiabatic cooling, when performing rovibrational excitations of the molecular ion to reduce the energy spacing of the harmonic motional levels, thus increasing the likelihood of a motional transition. The work presented in this thesis covers...... the implementation of adiabatic cooling for the application of rovibrational spectroscopy on single molecular ions. This entailed constructing and testing a new DC supply capable of employing adiabatic ramps of the ion's axial frequency on the 100's of us timescale. The DC supply went through several iterations...... is possible with some optimization. Rovibrational transitions in 24MgH+ are only known to the 1.5 GHz level compared to their Hz-linewidths. Simulations for broadband spectroscopy aimed reducing this uncertainty are presented for a rovibrational transition in 24MgH+. This technique allows for illumination...

  15. Electronic structure of molecular Rydberg states of some small molecules and molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Biao; Li Jiaming

    1993-01-01

    Based on an independent-particle-approximation (i.e. the multiple scattering self-consistent-field theory), the electronic structures of Rydberg states of the small diatomic molecules H 2 , He 2 and the He 2 + molecular ion were studied. The principal quantum number of the first state of the Rydberg series is determined from a convention of the limit of the molecular electronic configuration. The dynamics of the excited molecules and molecular ion has been elucidated. The theoretical results are in fair agreement with the existing experimental measurements, thus they can serve as a reliable basis for future refined treatment such as the configuration interaction calculation

  16. A rotary nano ion pump: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrasebi, A; Feshanjerdi, M

    2012-09-01

    The dynamics of a rotary nano ion pump, inspired by the F (0) part of the F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase biomolecular motor, were investigated. This nanopump is composed of a rotor, which is constructed of two carbon nanotubes with benzene rings, and a stator, which is made of six graphene sheets. The molecular dynamics (MD) method was used to simulate the dynamics of the ion nanopump. When the rotor of the nanopump rotates mechanically, an ion gradient will be generated between the two sides of the nanopump. It is shown that the ion gradient generated by the nanopump is dependant on parameters such as the rotary frequency of the rotor, temperature and the amounts and locations of the positive and negative charges of the stator part of the nanopump. Also, an electrical potential difference is generated between the two sides of the pump as a result of its operation.

  17. Earth Abundant Fe/Mn-Based Layered Oxide Interconnected Nanowires for Advanced K-Ion Full Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuanpeng; Xu, Xiaoming; Niu, Chaojiang; Meng, Jiashen; Huang, Meng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Ziang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-01-11

    K-ion battery (KIB) is a new-type energy storage device that possesses potential advantages of low-cost and abundant resource of K precursor materials. However, the main challenge lies on the lack of stable materials to accommodate the intercalation of large-size K-ions. Here we designed and constructed a novel earth abundant Fe/Mn-based layered oxide interconnected nanowires as a cathode in KIBs for the first time, which exhibits both high capacity and good cycling stability. On the basis of advanced in situ X-ray diffraction analysis and electrochemical characterization, we confirm that interconnected K 0.7 Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 O 2 nanowires can provide stable framework structure, fast K-ion diffusion channels, and three-dimensional electron transport network during the depotassiation/potassiation processes. As a result, a considerable initial discharge capacity of 178 mAh g -1 is achieved when measured for KIBs. Besides, K-ion full batteries based on interconnected K 0.7 Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 O 2 nanowires/soft carbon are assembled, manifesting over 250 cycles with a capacity retention of ∼76%. This work may open up the investigation of high-performance K-ion intercalated earth abundant layered cathodes and will push the development of energy storage systems.

  18. Rotational excitation of interstellar molecular ions by electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, A [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, UMR 5571 CNRS, Universite Joseph-Fourier, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France); Tennyson, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kokoouline, V [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Greene, Chris H, E-mail: afaure@obs.ujf-grenoble.f [Department of Physics and JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Electrons are known to be efficient in rotationally exciting molecular ions in cold ionized media. Rotational effects have also been shown to affect the dissociative recombination (DR) process. Electron collisions are thus expected to play a significant role in the thermalization and dissociation dynamics of molecular ions, both in the laboratory and in space. Using the molecular R-matrix method combined with the Adiabatic-Nuclei-Rotation (ANR) approximation corrected for threshold and closed-channel effects, we have computed new rate coefficients for the rotational excitation of H{sup +}{sub 3} and HCO{sup +} by electrons at temperatures from 10 to 1 000K. At temperatures above rotational thresholds, rotational rates are found to compete or even dominate those of dissociative recombination, suggesting that electron collisions provide a possible source of rotational (de)excitation in DR measurements.

  19. Determination of ion quantity by using low-temperature ion density theory and molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Li-Jun; Song Hong-Fang; Li Hai-Xia; Chen Shao-Long; Chen Ting; Sun Huan-Yao; Huang Yao; Tong Xin; Guan Hua; Gao Ke-Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report a method by which the ion quantity is estimated rapidly with an accuracy of 4%. This finding is based on the low-temperature ion density theory and combined with the ion crystal size obtained from experiment with the precision of a micrometer. The method is objective, straightforward, and independent of the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The result can be used as the reference for the MD simulation, and the method can improve the reliability and precision of MD simulation. This method is very helpful for intensively studying ion crystal, such as phase transition, spatial configuration, temporal evolution, dynamic character, cooling efficiency, and the temperature limit of the ions. (paper)

  20. X-ray photochemistry of carbon hydride molecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Alessandra; Miteva, Tsveta; Kennedy, Eugene T; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Bizau, Jean-Marc; Cubaynes, Denis; Sisourat, Nicolas; Carniato, Stéphane

    2018-02-07

    Hydride molecular ions are key ingredients of the interstellar chemistry since they are precursors of more complex molecules. In regions located near a soft X-ray source these ions may resonantly absorb an X-ray photon which triggers a complex chain of reactions. In this work, we simulate ab initio the X-ray absorption spectrum, Auger decay processes and the subsequent fragmentation dynamics of two hydride molecular ions, namely CH 2 + and CH 3 + . We show that these ions feature strong X-ray absorption resonances which relax through Auger decay within 7 fs. The doubly-charged ions thus formed mostly dissociate into smaller ionic carbon fragments: in the case of CH 2 + , the dominant products are either C + /H + /H or CH + /H + . For CH 3 + , the system breaks primary into CH 2 + and H + , which provides a new route to form CH 2 + near a X-ray source. Furthermore, our simulations provide the branching ratios of the final products formed after the X-ray absorption as well as their kinetic and internal energy distributions. Such data can be used in the chemistry models of the interstellar medium.

  1. Micro structure processing on plastics by accelerated hydrogen molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Nishikawa, H.

    2017-08-01

    A proton has 1836 times the mass of an electron and is the lightest nucleus to be used for accelerator in material modification. We can setup accelerator with the lowest acceleration voltage. It is preferable characteristics of Proton Beam Writer (PBW) for industrial applications. On the contrary ;proton; has the lowest charge among all nuclei and the potential impact to material is lowest. The object of this research is to improve productivity of the PBW for industry application focusing on hydrogen molecular ions. These ions are generated in the same ion source by ionizing hydrogen molecule. There is no specific ion source requested and it is suitable for industrial use. We demonstrated three dimensional (3D) multilevel micro structures on polyester base FPC (Flexible Printed Circuits) using proton, H2+ and H3+. The reactivity of hydrogen molecular ions is much higher than that of proton and coincident with the level of expectation. We can apply this result to make micro devices of 3D multilevel structures on FPC.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  3. Transmission of fast molecular ions through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, W.J.; Gemmell, D.S.; Cooney, P.J.; Kanter, E.P.; Kurath, D.; Ratkowski, A.J.; Vager, Z.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    New results on the transmission of fast molecular ions through thin foils are presented and a mechanism for the transmission process is proposed. The main feature of the postulated mechanism is that a finite fraction of the incident molecular beam does not undergo a strong Coulomb explosion while traversing the foil. Because the emerging fragments are at large internuclear separations, there is an enhanced probability for the formation of bound, long-range, excited electronic states following electron capture at the rear surface of the target

  4. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  5. Quantifying the Impact of Spectral Coverage on the Retrieval of Molecular Abundances from Exoplanet Transmission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John W.; Zellem, Robert T.; Line, Michael R.; Vasisht, Gautam; Bryden, Geoff; Willacy, Karen; Iyer, Aishwarya R.; Bean, Jacob; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Kataria, Tiffany; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Kreidberg, Laura; Moses, Julianne I.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Swain, Mark R.

    2017-10-01

    Using forward models for representative exoplanet atmospheres and a radiometric instrument model, we generated synthetic observational data to explore how well the major C- and O-bearing chemical species (CO, CO2, CH4, and H2O), important for determining atmospheric opacity and radiation balance, can be constrained by transit measurements as a function of spectral wavelength coverage. This work features simulations for a notional transit spectroscopy mission and compares two cases for instrument spectral coverage (wavelength coverage from 0.5-2.5 μm and 0.5-5 μm). The simulation is conducted on a grid with a range of stellar magnitudes and incorporates a full retrieval of atmospheric model parameters. We consider a range of planets from sub-Neptunes to hot Jupiters and include both low and high mean molecular weight atmospheres. We find that including the 2.5-5 μm wavelength range provides a significant improvement in the degree of constraint on the retrieved molecular abundances: up to ˜3 orders of magnitude for a low mean molecular weight atmosphere (μ = 2.3) and up to a factor of ˜6 for a high mean molecular weight atmosphere (μ = 28). These decreased uncertainties imply that broad spectral coverage between the visible and the mid-infrared is an important tool for understanding the chemistry and composition of exoplanet atmospheres. This analysis suggests that the James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) 0.6-5 μm prism spectroscopy mode, or similar wavelength coverage with possible future missions, will be an important resource for exoplanet atmospheric characterization.

  6. Quantum logic for the control and manipulation of molecular ions using a frequency comb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, S; Matsukevich, D N

    2012-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the preparation, manipulation and detection of quantum states of single molecular ions. In this scheme, molecular and atomic ions are confined in radio-frequency Paul trap and share common modes of motion. A frequency comb laser field is used to drive stimulated Raman transitions that couple internal states of the molecular ion with the motion of ions. State transfer from the molecular ion to the atomic ion via the common mode of motion results in efficient state detection for the molecule. The coupling of molecular states to the motion and the subsequent sideband cooling of the ions provide a way to prepare the molecular ion in a well-defined state. (paper)

  7. Ionic fragmentation channels in electron collisions of small molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Dissociative Recombination (DR) is one of the most important loss processes of molecular ions in the interstellar medium (IM). Ion storage rings allow to investigate these processes under realistic conditions. At the Heidelberg test storage ring TSR a new detector system was installed within the present work in order to study the DR sub-process of ion pair formation (IPF). The new detector expands the existing electron target setup by the possibility to measure strongly deflected negative ionic fragments. At the TSR such measurements can be performed with a uniquely high energy resolution by independently merging two electron beams with the ion beam. In this work IPF of HD + , H 3 + and HF + has been studied. In the case of HD + the result of the high resolution experiment shows quantum interferences. Analysis of the quantum oscillations leads to a new understanding of the reaction dynamics. For H 3 + it was for the first time possible to distinguish different IPF channels and to detect quantum interferences in the data. Finally the IPF of HF + was investigated in an energy range, where in previous experiments no conclusive results could be obtained. (orig.)

  8. A fast soluble carbon-free molecular water oxidation catalyst based on abundant metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiushi; Tan, Jeffrey Miles; Besson, Claire; Geletii, Yurii V; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Kuznetsov, Aleksey E; Luo, Zhen; Hardcastle, Ken I; Hill, Craig L

    2010-04-16

    Traditional homogeneous water oxidation catalysts are plagued by instability under the reaction conditions. We report that the complex [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2]10-, comprising a Co4O4 core stabilized by oxidatively resistant polytungstate ligands, is a hydrolytically and oxidatively stable homogeneous water oxidation catalyst that self-assembles in water from salts of earth-abundant elements (Co, W, and P). With [Ru(bpy)3]3+ (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine) as the oxidant, we observe catalytic turnover frequencies for O2 production > or = 5 s(-1) at pH = 8. The rate's pH sensitivity reflects the pH dependence of the four-electron O2-H2O couple. Extensive spectroscopic, electrochemical, and inhibition studies firmly indicate that [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2]10- is stable under catalytic turnover conditions: Neither hydrated cobalt ions nor cobalt hydroxide/oxide particles form in situ.

  9. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    [7,8,9]. Furthermore, in order to learn more about the chemistry in interstellar clouds, astrochemists can benefit greatly from direct measurements on cold reactions in laboratories [9]. Working with MgH+ molecular ions in a linear Paul trap, we routinely cool their translational degree of freedom...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation......). [9] Smith, I. W. M., Low temperatures and cold molecules (Imperial College Press, London, 2008). [10] Staanum, P. F., Højbjerre, K., Skyt, P.S., Hansen, A. K. and Drewsen, M., Nat. Phys. 6, 271 (2010). [11] Vogelius, I. S., Madsen, L. B. and Drewsen, M., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 173003 (2002)....

  10. Measuring molecular abundances in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) using the APEX telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Milam, S. N.; Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Coulson, I. M.; Remijan, A. J.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2018-02-01

    Comet composition provides critical information on the chemical and physical processes that took place during the formation of the Solar system. We report here on millimetre spectroscopic observations of the long-period bright comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) band 1 receiver between 2015 January UT 16.948 and 18.120, when the comet was at heliocentric distance of 1.30 au and geocentric distance of 0.53 au. Bright comets allow for sensitive observations of gaseous volatiles that sublimate in their coma. These observations allowed us to detect HCN, CH3OH (multiple transitions), H2CO and CO, and to measure precise molecular production rates. Additionally, sensitive upper limits were derived on the complex molecules acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and formamide (NH2CHO) based on the average of the strongest lines in the targeted spectral range to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Gas production rates are derived using a non-LTE molecular excitation calculation involving collisions with H2O and radiative pumping that becomes important in the outer coma due to solar radiation. We find a depletion of CO in C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) with a production rate relative to water of 2.0 per cent, and relatively low abundances of Q(HCN)/Q(H2O), 0.1 per cent, and Q(H2CO)/Q(H2O), 0.2 per cent. In contrast, the CH3OH relative abundance Q(CH3OH)/Q(H2O), 2.2 per cent, is close to the mean value observed in other comets. The measured production rates are consistent with values derived for this object from other facilities at similar wavelengths taking into account the difference in the fields of view. Based on the observed mixing ratios of organic molecules in four bright comets including C/2014 Q2, we find some support for atom addition reactions on cold dust being the origin of some of the molecules.

  11. Rotational laser cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard

    2010-01-01

    -molecular reactions with coherent light fields 8, 9 , for quantum-state-selected bi-molecular reactions 10, 11, 12 and for astrochemistry 12 . Here, we demonstrate rotational ground-state cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold MgH+ ions, using a laser-cooling scheme based on excitation of a single...... rovibrational transition 13, 14 . A nearly 15-fold increase in the rotational ground-state population of the X  1Σ+ electronic ground-state potential has been obtained. The resulting ground-state population of 36.7±1.2% is equivalent to that of a thermal distribution at about 20 K. The obtained cooling results...

  12. He2+ molecular ion and the He- atomic ion in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieyra, J. C. Lopez; Turbiner, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    We study the question of existence, i.e., stability with respect to dissociation of the spin-quartet permutation- and reflection-symmetric 4(-3) +g (Sz=-3 /2 ,M =-3 ) state of the (α α e e e ) Coulomb system: the He2 + molecular ion, placed in a magnetic field 0 ≤B ≤10 000 a.u. We assume that the α particles are infinitely massive (Born-Oppenheimer approximation of zero order) and adopt the parallel configuration, when the molecular axis and the magnetic field direction coincide, as the optimal configuration. The study of the stability is performed variationally with a physically adequate trial function. To achieve this goal, we explore several helium-containing compounds in strong magnetic fields, in particular; we study the spin-quartet ground state of the He- ion and the ground (spin-triplet) state of the helium atom, both for a magnetic field in 100 ≤B ≤10 000 a.u. The main result is that the He2 + molecular ion in the state 4(-3) +g is stable towards all possible decay modes for magnetic fields B ≳120 a .u . and with the magnetic field increase the ion becomes more tightly bound and compact with a cigar-type form of electronic cloud. At B =1000 a .u . , the dissociation energy of He2 + into He-+α is ˜702 eV and the dissociation energy for the decay channel to He +α +e is ˜729 eV , and both energies are in the energy window for one of the observed absorption features of the isolated neutron star 1E1207.4-5209.

  13. The HeH+ molecular ion in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbiner, A V; Guevara, N L

    2007-01-01

    A detailed study of the low-lying electronic states 1 Σ, 3 Σ, 3 Π, 3 Δ of the HeH + molecular ion in parallel to a magnetic field configuration (when α-particle and proton are situated on the same magnetic line) is carried out for B = 0 - 4.414 x 10 13 G in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The variational method is employed using a physically adequate trial function. It is shown that for the Σ states the parallel configuration is stable with respect to small deviations. The quantum numbers of the ground state depend on the magnetic field strength. The ground state evolves from the spin-singlet 1 Σ state for small magnetic fields B ∼ 3 Σ (unbound or weakly bound) state for intermediate fields and to the spin-triplet strongly bound 3 Π state for B ∼> 15 au. When the HeH + molecular ion exists, it is stable with respect to dissociation

  14. Molecular Ions and Nanoparticles in RF and AC Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes recent advances in using innovative storage devices based on inhomogeneous, time-dependent electric fields. Electrode arrangements include quadrupoles, linear octopoles, higher-order multipoles, or a series of ring electrodes. Applying suitable oscillating voltages to such structures, with frequencies ranging from GHz via MHz to a few Hz, a variety of charged particles can be confined ranging from electrons via molecular ions to nanoparticles with masses of more than 10 10 u. This contribution give a short summary of the theory, especially the effective potential approximation. The features of the technique are illustrated by several examples such as trapped ion beams, buffer gas cooling of ions in a 22-pole trap, and nanoparticle mass spectrometry in a quadrupole. Recent experimental results include growth of structures, isotope enrichment, and submonolayer gas ad- and desorption on a stored 500 nm SiO 2 particle. In the summary a few hints concerning ongoing experiments are given such as laser induced reactions, combination of traps with atomic beams, state-selected perturbation of a trapped low temperature ensemble with an infrared laser, and future trends in nanoparticle research.

  15. Relative abundances of primary ion radicals in γ-irradiated DNA: Cytosine vs thymine anions and guanine vs adenine cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.; Becker, D.; Yan, Mengyao; Summerfield, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    An ESR study of the relative distribution of ion radicals formed in DNA equilibrated with D 2 O and γ-irradiated at 77 K is presented. The ESR spectra of irradiated DNA and polynucleotides (poly[dG]·poly[dC] and poly[dAdT]·poly[dAdT]) were obtained and employed in a computer-assisted analysis for the individual ion-radical distribution. Analysis of spectra as a function of power allowed the separation of the spectra of the pyrimidine anions (T sm-bullet- , C sm-bullet- ) from the spectra of the purine cations (G sm-bullet+ , A sm-bullet+ ). The spectra of the mononucleotide ion radicals, dCMP sm-bullet- , dTMP sm-bullet- , dGMP sm-bullet+ , and dAMP sm-bullet+ , were produced in 8 M LiCl glasses. In addition, the spectra of the ion radicals of all of the mononucleotide ion radicals except dAMP + were simulated by using hyperfine and g tensors from the literature. Basis spectra derived from (1) power saturation experiments, (2) polynucleotide and mononucleotide spectra, (3) spectra of mononucleotides alone, and (4) anisotropic simulations were used to fit the spectra of DNA by use of a linear least-squares analysis. Each of the four separate analyses confirms that the cytosine anion dominates the spectra of DNA at 100 K. Three analyses included the cationic composition, and they strongly favor the guanine cation over the adenine cation. An average of the authors results gives the DNA ion radicals' relative to abundances as ca. 77% C sm-bullet- , 23% T sm-bullet- for the anions and >90% G sm-bullet+ for the cations about equal amounts of anions and cations are present. No difference in results is found for DNA irradiated in frozen D 2 O solutions or simply exchanged at 100% D 2 O humidity

  16. Secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with alpha track detection for isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium-bearing particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used in combination with alpha track detection for the efficient analysis of uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances in environmental samples. A polycarbonate film containing particles was prepared and placed in contact with a CR-39 plastic detector. After exposure for 28 days, the detector was etched in a NaOH solution and each uranium-bearing particle was identified through observation of the alpha tracks recorded in the detector. A portion of the film containing each uranium-bearing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The films on the planchet were decomposed through plasma ashing for subsequent uranium abundance ratio analysis with SIMS. The alpha track-SIMS analysis of 10 uranium-bearing particles in a sample taken from a nuclear facility enabled n((235)U)/n((238)U) abundance ratios in the range 0.0072-0.25 to be detected, which were significantly higher than those obtained by SIMS without alpha track detection. The duration of the whole analytical process for analysis of 10 particles was about 32 days. The detection efficiency was calculated to be 27.1±6.5%, based on the analysis of the particles in uranium reference materials. The detection limits, defined as the diameter of the particle which produces alpha tracks more than one for a 28-days exposure, were estimated to be 0.8, 0.9, 1.1, 2.1 and 3.0 μm for the particles having the same uranium abundance ratios with NBL CRM U850, U500, U350, U050 and U010 reference materials, respectively. The use of alpha track detection for subsequent SIMS analysis is an inexpensive and an efficient way to measure uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Abundances of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde in hot molecular cloud cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummelin, A.; Dickens, J. E.; Bergman, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Irvine, W. M.; Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.

    1998-01-01

    We have searched for millimetre-wave line emission from ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) and its structural isomer acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) in 11 molecular clouds using SEST. Ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde were detected through multiple lines in the hot cores NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2. Acetaldehyde was also detected towards G10.47+0.03, G322.2+0.6, and Orion 3'N, and one ethylene oxide line was tentatively detected in G10.47+0.03. Column densities and rotational excitation temperatures were derived using a procedure which fits the observed line intensifies by finding the minimum chi 2-value. The resulting rotational excitation temperatures of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde are in the range 16-38 K, indicating that these species are excited in the outer, cooler parts of the hot cores or that the excitation is significantly subthermal. For an assumed source size of 20", the deduced column densities are (0.6-1)x10(14) cm-2 for ethylene oxide and (2-5)x10(14) cm-2 for acetaldehyde. The fractional abundances with respect to H2 are X[c-C2H4O]=(2-6)xl0(-10), and X[CH3CHO]=(0.8-3)x10(-9). The ratio X[CH3CHO]/X[c-C2H4O] varies between 2.6 (NGC 6334F) and 8.5 (G327.3-0.6). We also detected and analysed multiple transitions of CH3OH, CH3OCH3, C2H5OH, and HCOOH. The chemical, and possibly evolutionary, states of NGC 6334F, G327.3-0.6, G31.41+0.31, and G34.3+0.2 seem to be very similar.

  18. Origin of CH+ in diffuse molecular clouds. Warm H2 and ion-neutral drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Godard, Benjamin; Hennebelle, Patrick; Gerin, Maryvonne; Lesaffre, Pierre; Le Bourlot, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Context. Molecular clouds are known to be magnetised and to display a turbulent and complex structure where warm and cold phases are interwoven. The turbulent motions within molecular clouds transport molecules, and the presence of magnetic fields induces a relative velocity between neutrals and ions known as the ion-neutral drift (vd). These effects all together can influence the chemical evolution of the clouds. Aims: This paper assesses the roles of two physical phenomena which have previously been invoked to boost the production of CH+ under realistic physical conditions: the presence of warm H2 and the increased formation rate due to the ion-neutral drift. Methods: We performed ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations that include the heating and cooling of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM), and where we treat dynamically the formation of the H2 molecule. In a post-processing step we compute the abundances of species at chemical equilibrium using a solver that we developed. The solver uses the physical conditions of the gas as input parameters, and can also prescribe the H2 fraction if needed. We validate our approach by showing that the H2 molecule generally has a much longer chemical evolution timescale compared to the other species. Results: We show that CH+ is efficiently formed at the edge of clumps, in regions where the H2 fraction is low (0.3-30%) but nevertheless higher than its equilibrium value, and where the gas temperature is high (≳ 300 K). We show that warm and out of equilibrium H2 increases the integrated column densities of CH+ by one order of magnitude up to values still 3-10 times lower than those observed in the diffuse ISM. We balance the Lorentz force with the ion-neutral drag to estimate the ion-drift velocities from our ideal MHD simulations. We find that the ion-neutral drift velocity distribution peaks around 0.04 km s-1, and that high drift velocities are too rare to have a significant statistical impact on the

  19. Photoelectron spectroscopy via electronic spectroscopy of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.H.

    1990-01-01

    In this work, a new aspect of the correlation between optical and photoelectron spectra is discussed on the basis of which the first ionization potentials of condensed-ring aromatics can be estimated from certain features in the electronic spectra of their positive ions. Furthermore, it is noticed that the first IP's are very sensitive to molecular size as the latter's inclusion in the regression formulas improves the results considerably. Once the first ionization potential for a molecule is determined, its higher IP's may be computed if the lower-energy electronic bands for its cation are known. This procedure is especially useful for such systems whose uv photoelectron spectra are unknown. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  20. Target thickness dependent convoy electron production of aligned molecular HeH+-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemmler, J.; Groeneveld, K.O.; Heil, O.; Kroneberger, K.; Rothard, H.

    1990-01-01

    Many experiments have shown that the collective excitation of valence electrons effects the alignment and the stopping power of fast diatomic molecular ions penetrating thin solids. Collective excitations also seem to play an important role for the total electron emission induced by fast atomic and molecular ions. For a specific part of the overall electron distribution the convoy electrons, accompanying the projectile ion with equal speed and direction (v 0 ∼ v p ), production mechanism had been proposed which attach their origin to the wake-potential. The authors presented a simple method for the detection of aligned diatomic molecular ions penetrating thin foils. Their first experimental results gave hints that the molecular enhancement for the convoy electron production of molecular ions is not simply a direct effect of the wake potential, but more contributed to the correlated action of the fast projectile ions in the solid

  1. Fragmentation of molecular ions in slow electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation of positively charged hydrogen molecular ions by the capture of slow electrons, the so called dissociative recombination (DR), has been investigated in storage ring experiments at the TSR, Heidelberg, where an unique twin-electron-beam arrangement was combined with high resolution fragment imaging detection. Provided with well directed cold electrons the fragmentation kinematics were measured down to meV collision energies where pronounced rovibrational Feshbach resonances appear in the DR cross section. For thermally excited HD + the fragmentation angle and the kinetic energy release were studied at variable precisely controlled electron collision energies on a dense energy grid from 10 to 80 meV. The anisotropy described for the first time by Legendre polynomials higher 2 nd order and the extracted rotational state contributions were found to vary on a likewise narrow energy scale as the rotationally averaged DR rate coefficient. Ro-vibrationally resolved DR experiments were performed on H 2 + produced in distinct internal excitations by a novel ion source. Both the low-energy DR rate as well as the fragmentation dynamics at selected resonances were measured individually in the lowest two vibrational and first three excited rotational states. State-specific DR rates and angular dependences are reported. (orig.)

  2. Electron-Impact Dissociation of Hydrocarbon Molecular Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannister, M.E.; Schultz, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Absolute cross-sections for electron-impact dissociation of CH x + (x = 1, 2, 3) producing CH y + (y = 0, 1, 2) fragment ions were measured in the 3-100 eV range using a crossed electron-ion beams technique with total uncertainties of about 11% near the cross-section peaks. For CH + dissociation, although the measured energy dependence agrees well with two sets of storage ring measurements, the magnitude of the present results lies about 15%-25% lower at the cross-section peak near 40 eV. For dissociation of CH 2 + , the cross-sections are nearly identical for energies above 15 eV, but they are dramatically different at lower energies. The CH + channel exhibits a strong peak rising from an observed threshold of about 6 eV; the C + channel is relatively flat down to the lowest measured energy. For dissociation of CH 3 + and CD 3 + , good agreement is found with other results reported for the CH + fragment, but some differences are found for the CD 2 + and C + fragments. A pilot study has also been undertaken to assess the feasibility of applying a molecular dynamics approach to treat the full range of electron-hydrocarbon dissociation processes, especially for energies above a few eV, in order to provide an overarching theoretical model that can be readily applied. Comparison with the experimental data for CH + shows favourable agreement. (author)

  3. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, C.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the

  4. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia arethought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperaturesof the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation inthese regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlledlaboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here withdata obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets)chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. Theconditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrationsbet ween 5 × 105and 1 × 109cm3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally purebinary, to a maximum of ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation s...

  5. Model of the dissociative recombination of molecular ions based on the statistical 'phase-space theory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltin, M.; Lukac, P.; Morva, I.; Foltin, V.

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the statistical 'phase-space theory' extended for chemical reactions and for dissociative recombination of polyatomic ions is applied to the indirect and direct dissociative recombination of diatomic ions with electrons. Numerical calculations are made for molecular neon ion. The good agreement is obtained with experimental results (Authors)

  6. Stellar Abundances and Molecular Hydrogen in High-Redshift Galaxies: The Far-Ultraviolet View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, William C.

    2006-06-01

    FUSE spectra of star-forming regions in nearby galaxies are compared to composite spectra of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), binned by strength of Lyα emission and by mid-UV luminosity. Several far-UV spectral features, including lines dominated by stellar wind and by photospheric components, are very sensitive to stellar abundances. Their measurement in LBGs is compromised by the strong interstellar absorption features, allowing in some cases only upper limits to be determined. The derived C and N abundances in the LBGs are no higher than half solar (scaled to oxygen abundance for comparison with emission-line analyses), independent of the strength of Lyα emission. P V absorption indicates abundances as low as 0.1 solar, with an upper limit near 0.4 solar in the reddest and weakest emission galaxies. Unresolved interstellar absorption components would further lower the derived abundances. Trends of line strength and derived abundances are stronger with mid-UV luminosity than with Lyα strength. H2 absorption in the Lyman and Werner bands is very weak in the LBGs. Template H2 absorption spectra convolved to the appropriate resolution show that strict upper limits N(H2)values appropriate for the stronger emission composites and for mixes of H2 level populations like those on Milky Way sight lines. Since the UV-bright regions are likely to be widespread in these galaxies, these results rule out massive diffuse reservoirs of primordial H2 and suggest that the dust-to-gas ratio is already fairly large at z~3. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). FUSE is operated for NASA by The Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  7. Continued fractions and the hydrogen molecular ion H2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Bernie

    2011-09-01

    The Jaffé continued fraction solution for the hydrogen molecular ion has been the basis for most H2+ energy calculations at physically relevant nuclear separation R. I show that its slow convergence at small R can be overcome so it can also be used to obtain the power series expansion of the energy about the united atom limit R = 0. I restrict the discussion to the H2+ ground state and show, by a generalization of Wynn's accelerated convergence technique and an analytical calculation, that the continued fraction yields the O(R5) series term which is the first term in which log(R) makes an appearance. For higher order terms I apply the convergence method numerically to obtain very accurate energies at small R and, by fitting, numerical coefficients in the R series. The analytic representations of the coefficients are identified using the integer relation algorithm PSLQ. All terms to O(R14) are obtained exactly and to O(R20) in a mixed analytic/numeric form. Comparisons with previous work based on wavefunction perturbation theory are made.

  8. Continued fractions and the hydrogen molecular ion H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    The Jaffe continued fraction solution for the hydrogen molecular ion has been the basis for most H 2 + energy calculations at physically relevant nuclear separation R. I show that its slow convergence at small R can be overcome so it can also be used to obtain the power series expansion of the energy about the united atom limit R = 0. I restrict the discussion to the H 2 + ground state and show, by a generalization of Wynn's accelerated convergence technique and an analytical calculation, that the continued fraction yields the O(R 5 ) series term which is the first term in which log(R) makes an appearance. For higher order terms I apply the convergence method numerically to obtain very accurate energies at small R and, by fitting, numerical coefficients in the R series. The analytic representations of the coefficients are identified using the integer relation algorithm PSLQ. All terms to O(R 14 ) are obtained exactly and to O(R 20 ) in a mixed analytic/numeric form. Comparisons with previous work based on wavefunction perturbation theory are made. (paper)

  9. New solar carbon abundance based on non-LTE CN molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, G.H.; Linsky, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed non-LTE analysis of solar CN spectra strongly suggests a revised carbon abundance for the Sun. A value of log A/subc/=8.35plus-or-minus0.15 which is significantly lower than the presently accepted value of log A/subc/=8.55 is suggested. This revision may have important consequences in astrophysics

  10. Molecular recognition of organic ammonium ions in solution using synthetic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Späth

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium ions are ubiquitous in chemistry and molecular biology. Considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop synthetic receptors for their selective molecular recognition. The type of host compounds for organic ammonium ion binding span a wide range from crown ethers to calixarenes to metal complexes. Typical intermolecular interactions are hydrogen bonds, electrostatic and cation–π interactions, hydrophobic interactions or reversible covalent bond formation. In this review we discuss the different classes of synthetic receptors for organic ammonium ion recognition and illustrate the scope and limitations of each class with selected examples from the recent literature. The molecular recognition of ammonium ions in amino acids is included and the enantioselective binding of chiral ammonium ions by synthetic receptors is also covered. In our conclusion we compare the strengths and weaknesses of the different types of ammonium ion receptors which may help to select the best approach for specific applications.

  11. Study of the interaction of potassium ion channel protein with micelle by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, Anil; Talukdar, Keka

    2018-04-01

    Ion channels are proteins forming pore inside the body of all living organisms. This potassium ion channel known as KcsA channel and it is found in the each cell and nervous system. Flow of various ions is regulated by the function of the ion channels. The nerve ion channel protein with protein data bank entry 1BL8, which is basically an ion channel protein in Streptomyces Lividans and which is taken up to form micelle-protein system and the system is analyzed by using molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, ion channel pore is engineered by CHARMM potential and then Micelle-protein system is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. For some specific micelle concentration, the protein unfolding is observed.

  12. Profiling of the Molecular Weight and Structural Isomer Abundance of Macroalgae-Derived Phlorotannins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Natalie; Brunton, Nigel P.; FitzGerald, Richard J.; Smyth, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) unique to macroalgae. These phenolic compounds are integral structural components of the cell wall in brown algae, but also play many secondary ecological roles such as protection from UV radiation and defense against grazing. This study employed Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry to investigate isomeric complexity and observed differences in phlorotannins derived from macroalgae harvested off the Irish coast (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata and Cystoseira nodicaulis). Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content assays were used as an index for producing phlorotannin fractions, enriched using molecular weight cut-off dialysis with subsequent flash chromatography to profile phlorotannin isomers in these macroalgae. These fractions were profiled using UPLC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and the level of isomerization for specific molecular weight phlorotannins between 3 and 16 monomers were determined. The majority of the low molecular weight (LMW) phlorotannins were found to have a molecular weight range equivalent to 4–12 monomers of phloroglucinol. The level of isomerization within the individual macroalgal species differed, resulting in substantially different numbers of phlorotannin isomers for particular molecular weights. F. vesiculosus had the highest number of isomers of 61 at one specific molecular mass, corresponding to 12 phloroglucinol units (PGUs). These results highlight the complex nature of these extracts and emphasize the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds. PMID:25603345

  13. Profiling of the Molecular Weight and Structural Isomer Abundance of Macroalgae-Derived Phlorotannins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Heffernan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene unique to macroalgae. These phenolic compounds are integral structural components of the cell wall in brown algae, but also play many secondary ecological roles such as protection from UV radiation and defense against grazing. This study employed Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC with tandem mass spectrometry to investigate isomeric complexity and observed differences in phlorotannins derived from macroalgae harvested off the Irish coast (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata and Cystoseira nodicaulis. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content assays were used as an index for producing phlorotannin fractions, enriched using molecular weight cut-off dialysis with subsequent flash chromatography to profile phlorotannin isomers in these macroalgae. These fractions were profiled using UPLC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM and the level of isomerization for specific molecular weight phlorotannins between 3 and 16 monomers were determined. The majority of the low molecular weight (LMW phlorotannins were found to have a molecular weight range equivalent to 4–12 monomers of phloroglucinol. The level of isomerization within the individual macroalgal species differed, resulting in substantially different numbers of phlorotannin isomers for particular molecular weights. F. vesiculosus had the highest number of isomers of 61 at one specific molecular mass, corresponding to 12 phloroglucinol units (PGUs. These results highlight the complex nature of these extracts and emphasize the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds.

  14. IBiSA_Tools: A Computational Toolkit for Ion-Binding State Analysis in Molecular Dynamics Trajectories of Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels are a long-standing conundrum. Although the molecular dynamics (MD) method has been extensively used to simulate ion conduction dynamics at the atomic level, analysis and interpretation of MD results are not straightforward due to complexity of the dynamics. In our previous reports, we proposed an analytical method called ion-binding state analysis to scrutinize and summarize ion conduction mechanisms by taking advantage of a variety of analytical protocols, e.g., the complex network analysis, sequence alignment, and hierarchical clustering. This approach effectively revealed the ion conduction mechanisms and their dependence on the conditions, i.e., ion concentration and membrane voltage. Here, we present an easy-to-use computational toolkit for ion-binding state analysis, called IBiSA_tools. This toolkit consists of a C++ program and a series of Python and R scripts. From the trajectory file of MD simulations and a structure file, users can generate several images and statistics of ion conduction processes. A complex network named ion-binding state graph is generated in a standard graph format (graph modeling language; GML), which can be visualized by standard network analyzers such as Cytoscape. As a tutorial, a trajectory of a 50 ns MD simulation of the Kv1.2 channel is also distributed with the toolkit. Users can trace the entire process of ion-binding state analysis step by step. The novel method for analysis of ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels can be easily used by means of IBiSA_tools. This software is distributed under an open source license at the following URL: http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/~ktkshr/ibisa_tools/.

  15. Low pressure gas detectors for molecular-ion break up studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Zwang, N.

    1981-01-01

    Two detector systems for Molecular ions like OH + and CH 2 + and like H 2 + and H 3 + were developed and are described. The first detector is installed in a magnetic spectrometer. Both systems are made of various types of gas detectors operating at low pressures. In the study of the Coulomb explosion of molecular ions like OH + , CH 2 + or H 3 + these detectors provide the position and time coordinates of all the fragments of the molecular ion, in coincidence, in order to determine their energy and angular distribution. In the case of molecules containing atoms other than hydrogen, information on the electronic charge state is obtained. (H.K.)

  16. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and ion-beam analysis systems for functional materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Naramoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental systems for molecular beam epitaxial growth and ion beam analysis have been designed and constructed for the research of inorganic functional materials such as thin films and superlattices. (author)

  17. Calixarenes: Versatile molecules as molecular sensors for ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nition of various metal ions and anions and also different analytical techniques to monitor the recognition event. ... ratio with respect to potassium ion in the extract and association constant (Ka) for Na. + and K. + . Selectivity. Association ratioa constants (Ka). Compound. K ..... by stacked pyrene moieties to form complex.

  18. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Molecular Distributions in Cultured Neurons and Their Processes: Comparative Analysis of Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kevin R.; Li, Zhen; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-11-01

    Neurons often exhibit a complex chemical distribution and topography; therefore, sample preparation protocols that preserve structures ranging from relatively large cell somata to small neurites and growth cones are important factors in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging studies. Here, SIMS was used to investigate the subcellular localization of lipids and lipophilic species in neurons from Aplysia californica. Using individual neurons cultured on silicon wafers, we compared and optimized several SIMS sampling approaches. After an initial step to remove the high salt culturing media, formaldehyde, paraformaldehyde, and glycerol, and various combinations thereof, were tested for their ability to achieve cell stabilization during and after the removal of extracellular media. These treatments improved the preservation of cellular morphology as visualized with SIMS imaging. For analytes >250 Da, coating the cell surface with a 3.2 nm-thick gold layer increased the ion intensity; multiple analytes previously not observed or observed at low abundance were detected, including intact cholesterol and vitamin E molecular ions. However, once a sample was coated, many of the lower molecular mass (SIMS imaging of processes of individual cultured neurons over a broad mass range with enhanced image contrast.

  19. Toward the Use of Rydberg States for State-Selective Production of Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David; Barnum, Timothy J.; Coy, Stephen; Field, Robert W.

    2014-06-01

    The usual simplified view of Rydberg states of molecules as consisting of a single Rydberg electron loosely bound to a molecular ion core in a well-defined rotation-vibration state suggests an attractive possibility for state-selective production of molecular ions. A Rydberg electron excited above the energy of the ground state of the ion core will spontaneously autoionize, leaving behind a molecular ion. The autoionizing states are of strongly mixed character due to the ubiquitous nonadiabatic interactions between Rydberg series associated with different states of the ion core. Using our complete Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT) fit model for CaF, we have predicted the locations and strengths of special autoionizing resonances that decay into a single rotation-vibration state of a molecular ion. Few molecules are as well characterized as CaF, nor as elegantly simple. We additionally describe the use of core nonpenetrating states as a general method to produce an ensemble of molecular ions in a single, selectable quantum state.

  20. Molecular dynamics studies of the ion beam induced crystallization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, L.A.; Caturla, M.J.; Huang, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the ion bombardment induced amorphous-to-crystal transition in silicon using molecular dynamics techniques. The growth of small crystal seeds embedded in the amorphous phase has been monitored for several temperatures in order to get information on the effect of the thermal temperature increase introduced by the incoming ion. The role of ion-induced defects on the growth has been also studied

  1. Simultaneous ion and neutral evaporation in aqueous nanodrops: Experiment, theory, and molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Higashi, Hidenori; Tokumi, Takuya; Hogan, Christopher J. Jr.; Suda, Horoshi; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We use a combination of tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS-IMS, with differential mobility analyzers), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and analytical models to examine both neutral solvent (H2O) and ion (solvated Na+) evaporation from aqueous sodium chloride nanodrops. For experiments, nanodrops were produced via electrospray ionization (ESI) of an aqueous sodium chloride solution. Two nanodrops were examined in MD simulations: a 2500 water molecule nanodrop with 68 Na+ and 60 Cl- ion...

  2. Molecular identification in metabolomics using infrared ion spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, J.; Berden, G.; van Outersterp, R.E.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Engelke, U.F.; van Karnebeek, C.D.M.; Wevers, R.A.; Oomens, J.

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule identification is a continually expanding field of research and represents the core challenge in various areas of (bio) analytical science, including metabolomics. Here, we unequivocally differentiate enantiomeric N-acetylhexosamines in body fluids using infrared ion spectroscopy,

  3. Enhancing the sensitivity of molecular secondary ion mass spectrometry with C60+-O2+ cosputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Yang; Lin, Kang-Yi; Kao, Wei-Lun; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Huang, Chih-Chieh; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2013-04-02

    In the past decade, the C60-based ion gun has been widely utilized in the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of organic and biological materials because molecular secondary-ions of high masses could be generated by cluster-ion bombardment. This technique furthers the development of SIMS in bioanalysis by eliminating the need for either heteroatom or isotope labeling. However, the intensity of high-mass parent ions was usually low and limited the sensitivity of the analysis, thus requiring an enhancement in the intensity of these molecular ions to widen the application of SIMS. In this work, the aim was to preserve samples in their original state while using a low kinetic energy O2(+) beam cosputtered with high-energy C60(+) to enhance the ion intensity through the depth-profile. Although O2(+) is generally used to enhance ion intensities in positive SIMS, it is known to alter the chemical structure and primarily provide elemental information; hence, it is not suitable for profiling organic and biological specimens. Nevertheless, owing to its high sputtering yield, cluster C60(+) ion removes and masks the structural damage, hence O2(+) may be used to enhance the ion intensity. The characteristic molecular ions of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), trehalose, and a peptide (papain inhibitor) are enhanced by 35×, 12×, and 3.5× with the use of the auxiliary O2(+) beam, respectively. This significant enhancement in ionization yield is attributed to the oxidation of molecules and formation of a hydroxyl group that serves as a proton donator. In addition to enhancing molecular SIMS signals, C60(+)-O2(+) cosputtering could also alleviate several problems, including sputtering rate decay, carbon deposition, and surface roughening, that are associated with C60(+) bombardment and produced better depth profiles.

  4. Recent advances in biological effect and molecular mechanism of arabidopsis thaliana irradiated by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dali; Hou Suiwen; Li Wenjian

    2008-01-01

    Newly research progresses were summarized in effect of ion beams on seed surface, biological effect, growth, development, gravitropism and so on. Furthermore, mutation molecular mechanism of Arabidopsis thaliana was discussed, for example, alteration of DNA bases, DNA damage, chromosomal recombination, characteristics of mutant transmissibility, etc. Meanwhile, the achievements of transfer- ring extraneous gene to Arabidopsis thaliana by ion beams were reviewed in the paper. At last, the future prospective are also discussed here in mutation molecular mechanism and the potential application of biological effect of heavy ion beams. (authors)

  5. Tuning Li2MO3 phase abundance and suppressing migration of transition metal ions to improve the overall performance of Li- and Mn-rich layered oxide cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiming; Tang, Tian; Ma, Zhihua; Gu, Haitao; Du, Wubing; Gao, Mingxia; Liu, Yongfeng; Jian, Dechao; Pan, Hongge

    2018-03-01

    The poor cycling stability of Li- and Mn-rich layered oxide cathodes used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) has severely limited their practical application. Unfortunately, current strategies to improve their lifecycle sacrifice initial capacity. In this paper, we firstly report the synergistic improvement of the electrochemical performance of a Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 (LNCMO) cathode material, including gains for capacity, cycling stability, and rate capability, by the partial substitution of Li+ ions by Mg2+ ions. Electrochemical performance is evaluated by a galvanostatic charge and discharge test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Structure and morphology are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Compared with the substitution of transition metal (TM) ions with Mg2+ ions reported previously, the substitution of Li+ ions by Mg2+ ions not only drastically ameliorates the capacity retention and rate performance challenges of LNCMO cathodes but also markedly suppresses their voltage fading, due to the inhibition of the migration of TM ions during cycling, while also increasing the capacity of the cathode due to an increased abundance of the Li2MO3 phase.

  6. Thermal characterization of Ag and Ag + N ion implanted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokullu Urkac, E.; Oztarhan, A.; Tihminlioglu, F.; Kaya, N.; Ila, D.; Muntele, C.; Budak, S.; Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A.; Ezdesir, A.; Tek, Z.

    2007-08-01

    Most of total hip joints are composed of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). However, as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene is too stable in a body, wear debris may accumulate and cause biological response such as bone absorption and loosening of prosthesis. In this study, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples were Ag and Ag + N hybrid ion implanted by using MEVVA ion implantation technique to improve its surface properties. Samples were implanted with a fluence of 1017 ion/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Implanted and unimplanted samples were investigated by thermo-gravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy (OM) and contact Angle measurement. Thermal characterization results showed that the ion bombardment induced an increase in the % crystallinity, onset and termination degradation temperatures of UHMWPE.

  7. Thermal characterization of Ag and Ag + N ion implanted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokullu Urkac, E. [Department of Materials Science, Izmir High Technology Institute, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey)]. E-mail: emelsu@gmail.com; Oztarhan, A. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Tihminlioglu, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Izmir High Technology Institute, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Kaya, N. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Ila, D. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal AL 35762 (United States); Muntele, C. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal AL 35762 (United States); Budak, S. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal AL 35762 (United States); Oks, E. [H C Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, A. [H C Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Ezdesir, A. [R and D Department, PETKIM Holding A.S., Aliaga, Izmir 35801 (Turkey); Tek, Z. [Department of Physics, Celal Bayar University, Manisa (Turkey)

    2007-08-15

    Most of total hip joints are composed of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE ). However, as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene is too stable in a body, wear debris may accumulate and cause biological response such as bone absorption and loosening of prosthesis. In this study, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples were Ag and Ag + N hybrid ion implanted by using MEVVA ion implantation technique to improve its surface properties. Samples were implanted with a fluence of 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2} and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Implanted and unimplanted samples were investigated by thermo-gravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy (OM) and contact Angle measurement. Thermal characterization results showed that the ion bombardment induced an increase in the % crystallinity, onset and termination degradation temperatures of UHMWPE.

  8. Novel algorithm for simultaneous component detection and pseudo-molecular ion characterization in liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaoan; Wo, Siukwan; Ho, Hingman; Han, Quanbin; Fan, Xiaohui; Zuo, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel stepwise component detection algorithm (SCDA) for LC–MS datasets. • New isotopic distribution and adduct-ion models for mass spectra. • Automatic component classification based on adduct-ion and isotopic distributions. - Abstract: Resolving components and determining their pseudo-molecular ions (PMIs) are crucial steps in identifying complex herbal mixtures by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. To tackle such labor-intensive steps, we present here a novel algorithm for simultaneous detection of components and their PMIs. Our method consists of three steps: (1) obtaining a simplified dataset containing only mono-isotopic masses by removal of background noise and isotopic cluster ions based on the isotopic distribution model derived from all the reported natural compounds in dictionary of natural products; (2) stepwise resolving and removing all features of the highest abundant component from current simplified dataset and calculating PMI of each component according to an adduct-ion model, in which all non-fragment ions in a mass spectrum are considered as PMI plus one or several neutral species; (3) visual classification of detected components by principal component analysis (PCA) to exclude possible non-natural compounds (such as pharmaceutical excipients). This algorithm has been successfully applied to a standard mixture and three herbal extract/preparations. It indicated that our algorithm could detect components’ features as a whole and report their PMI with an accuracy of more than 98%. Furthermore, components originated from excipients/contaminants could be easily separated from those natural components in the bi-plots of PCA

  9. Novel algorithm for simultaneous component detection and pseudo-molecular ion characterization in liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaoan; Wo, Siukwan [School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Ho, Hingman; Han, Quanbin [School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, 7 Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Fan, Xiaohui [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zuo, Zhong, E-mail: joanzuo@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel stepwise component detection algorithm (SCDA) for LC–MS datasets. • New isotopic distribution and adduct-ion models for mass spectra. • Automatic component classification based on adduct-ion and isotopic distributions. - Abstract: Resolving components and determining their pseudo-molecular ions (PMIs) are crucial steps in identifying complex herbal mixtures by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. To tackle such labor-intensive steps, we present here a novel algorithm for simultaneous detection of components and their PMIs. Our method consists of three steps: (1) obtaining a simplified dataset containing only mono-isotopic masses by removal of background noise and isotopic cluster ions based on the isotopic distribution model derived from all the reported natural compounds in dictionary of natural products; (2) stepwise resolving and removing all features of the highest abundant component from current simplified dataset and calculating PMI of each component according to an adduct-ion model, in which all non-fragment ions in a mass spectrum are considered as PMI plus one or several neutral species; (3) visual classification of detected components by principal component analysis (PCA) to exclude possible non-natural compounds (such as pharmaceutical excipients). This algorithm has been successfully applied to a standard mixture and three herbal extract/preparations. It indicated that our algorithm could detect components’ features as a whole and report their PMI with an accuracy of more than 98%. Furthermore, components originated from excipients/contaminants could be easily separated from those natural components in the bi-plots of PCA.

  10. Molecular analysis of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Tanaka, Atsushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Yokota, Yukihiko

    1998-01-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of the mutations induced by ion particles at the molecular level in plants, mutated loci in carbon ion-induced mutants of Arabidopsis were investigated by PCR and Southern blot analyses. In the present study, two lines of gl1 mutant and two lines of tt4 mutant were isolated after carbon ion-irradiation. Out of four mutants, one had a deletion, other two contained rearrangements, and one had a point-like mutation. From the present result, it was suggested that ion particles induced different kinds of alterations of the DNA and therefore they could produce various types of mutant alleles in plants. (author)

  11. Solvation of ions in the gas-phase: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarcos, Orlando M.; Lisy, James M.

    1996-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the collision between a cesium ion and a cluster of twenty methanol molecules. This process, generating a solvated ion, was studied over a range (1 to 25 eV) of eight collision energies. Preliminary analysis of this gas phase solvation has included the distribution of final ion cluster sizes, fragmentation patterns, solvation timescales and energetics. Two distinct patterns have emerged: a ballistic penetration of the neutral cluster at the higher collision energies and an evaporative evolution of the cluster ion at lower collision energies.

  12. Experimental investigation of the formation of negative hydrogen ions in collisions between positive ions and atomic or molecular targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattouf, Elie

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H - ) in collisions between a positive ion and a neutral atomic or molecular target is studied experimentally at impact energies of a few keV. The doubly-differential cross sections for H - formation are measured as a function of the kinetic energy and emission angle for the collision systems OH + + Ar and O + + H 2 O at 412 eV/a.m.u. These H - ions can be emitted at high energies (keV) in hard quasi-elastic two-body collisions involving a large momentum transfer to the H center. However, H - anions are preferentially emitted at low energy (eV) due to soft many-body (≥ 2) collisions resulting in a low momentum transfer. The formation of H - ions by electron capture follows excitation or ionization of the molecule. The molecular fragmentation dynamics is modeled to simulate the emission of H - ions. The overall good agreement between the simulation and the experiment leads to the understanding of most of the experimental observations. (author) [fr

  13. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  14. Determination of molecular-ion structures through the use of accelerated beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this talk we report on recent research on molecular-ion structures using fast molecular-ion beams provided by Argonne's 5-MV Dynamitron accelerator. The method has become known as the ''Coulomb-explosion'' technique. When molecular-ion projectiles travelling at velocities of a few percent of the velocity of light strike a foil, the electrons that bind the molecular projectiles are almost always totally stripped off within the first few Angstroms of penetration into the solid target. This leaves a cluster of bare (or nearly bare) nuclei which separate rapidly as a result of their mutual Coulomb repulsion. This violent dissociation process in which the initial electrostatic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy of relative motion in the center-of-mass, has been termed a ''Coulomb explosion.'' 4 refs., 2 figs

  15. Charting molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines by fatty acid scanning and ion trap MS3 fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekroos, Kim; Ejsing, Christer S.; Bahr, Ute

    2003-01-01

    preliminary separation of lipid classes or of individual molecular species, enzymatic digestion, or chemical derivatization. The approach was validated by the comparative analysis of the molecular composition of PCs from human red blood cells. In the total lipid extract of Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells......The molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) in total lipid extracts was characterized by a combination of multiple precursor ion scanning on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and MS3 fragmentation on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Precursor ion spectra for 50 acyl...... spectrometer quantified the relative amount of their positional isomers, thus providing the most detailed and comprehensive characterization of the molecular composition of the pool of PCs at the low-picomole level. The method is vastly simplified, compared with conventional approaches, and does not require...

  16. Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels Biophysics of Molecular Excitability

    CERN Document Server

    Leuchtag, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive ion channels are macromolecules embedded in the membranes of nerve and muscle fibers of animals. Because of their physiological functions, biochemical structures and electrical switching properties, they are at an intersection of biology, chemistry and physics. Despite decades of intensive research under the traditional approach of gated structural pores, the relation between the structure of these molecules and their function remains enigmatic. This book critically examines physically oriented approaches not covered in other ion-channel books. It looks at optical and thermal as well as electrical data, and at studies in the frequency domain as well as in the time domain. Rather than presenting the reader with only an option of mechanistic models at an inappropriate pseudo-macroscopic scale, it emphasizes concepts established in organic chemistry and condensed state physics. The book’s approach to the understanding of these unique structures breaks with the unproven view of ion channels as...

  17. Morphological and molecular diversity and abundance of tomentelloid ectomycorrhizae in broad-leaved forests of the Hungarian Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Kovács, Gábor M; Szedlay, Gyöngyi; Eros-Honti, Zsolt

    2005-09-01

    The most common representatives of tomentelloid ectomycorrhizae (EM) collected in broad-leaved forests (Populus and Quercus) of the Hungarian Plain during a 4-year project are demonstrated. Eighteen specimens of nine tomentelloid EM morphotypes were investigated. Five of these, introduced here for the first time, were characterized by microscopical-morphological and anatomical methods. Molecular identification was carried out using sequence analysis of the nrDNA ITS region. Altogether, 54 ITS sequences (6 previously published and 12 new sequences from our mycorrhizae and 36 from GenBank derived from fruitbodies) were compared by phylogenetic analyses using neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. Identification to species level was successful in the case of six EM morphotypes (Tomentella galzinii, T. subtestacea, T. sublilacina, T. pilosa, T. ferruginea and T. stuposa), and the possible taxonomic position of the remaining three was approached. These results are supported by morphology, as compared with literature data. Relative abundance of the EM morphotypes within the soil samples was estimated. Our results confirm that tomentelloid EM are constant, diverse and abundant members of the EM communities in temperate-continental broad-leaved forests.

  18. Calixarenes: Versatile molecules as molecular sensors for ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the ionophores reported in this review have been characterized crystallographically, however no structural information (except one case) are incorporated in this article, as it will occupy space without significant enhancement of chemistry part. Different factors such as size of the ionophore cavity, size of metal ion, ...

  19. Fragmentation in heavy-ion collisions using quantum molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    approach for intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions [2,4,6]. On the other hand, semiclassical dynamical models [5] are very useful for studying the reaction from the start to final state where matter is fragmented and cold. In addition, these models also give a possibility to extract the information about the nuclear equation of ...

  20. Experiments on Interactions of Electrons with Molecular Ions in Fusion and Astrophysical Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, Mark E [ORNL; Aliabadi, Habib [ORNL; Bahati, Eric [ORNL; Fogle, Mark R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Ehlerding, A. [Stockholm University, Sweden; Geppert, W. [Stockholm University, Sweden; Hellberg, F. [Stockholm University, Sweden; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali [Stockholm University, Sweden; Larsson, Mats [Stockholm University, Sweden; Thomas, Richard D [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Through beam-beam experiments at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the CRYRING heavy ion storage ring at Stockholm University, we are seeking to formulate a more complete picture of electron-impact dissociation of molecular ions. These inelastic collisions play important roles in many low temperature plasmas such as in divertors of fusion devices and in astrophysical environments. An electron-ion crossed beams experiment at ORNL investigates the dissociative excitation and dissociative ionization of molecular ions from a few eV up to 100 eV. Measurements on dissociative recombination (DR) experiments are made at CRYRING, where chemical branching fractions and fragmentation dynamics are studied. Taking advantage of a 250-kV acceleration platform at the MIRF, a merged electron-ion beams energy loss apparatus is employed to study DR down to zero energy. Recent results on the dissociation of molecular ions of importance in fusion and astrophysics are presented.

  1. Methods for generating protein molecular ions in ToF-SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Sally L; Vendettuoli, Marie C; Ratner, Buddy D; Castner, David G

    2004-04-27

    One of the greatest challenges in mass spectrometry lies in the generation and detection of molecular ions that can be used to directly identify the protein from the molecular weight of the molecular ion. Typically, proteins are large (MW > 1000), nonvolatile, and/or thermally labile, but the vaporization process produced by many mass spectrometry techniques including time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is inherently limited to generating ions from smaller compounds or fragments of the parent molecule, making the identification of proteins complex. The application of specific molecules to aid in the generation of high molecular weight ions in ToF-SIMS has been recognized for some time. In this study we have developed a matrix-SAM substrate preparation technique based on the self-assembly of a matrix-like molecule, mercaptonicotinic acid (MNA), on gold. We then compare this substrate with two existing ToF-SIMS sample preparation techniques, cationized alkane thiol and matrix-enhanced SIMS (MESIMS). The results of this study illustrate that while there is a range of methods that can be used to improve the molecular ion yield of proteins in ToF-SIMS, their efficacy and reproducibility vary considerably and crucially are linked to the sample preparation and/or protein application methods used. Critically, the MNA modified substrate was able to simultaneously induce molecular ions for each protein present in a multicomponent solution, suggesting that this sample preparation technique may have future application in proteomics and DNA analysis.

  2. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams. Proceedings of workshop held at Argonne National Laboratory, August 20-21, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    The Workshop on Physics with Fast Molecular-Ion Beams was held in the Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory on August 20 and 21, 1979. The meeting brought together representatives from several groups studying the interactions of fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams with matter. By keeping the Workshop program sharply focussed on current work related to the interactions of fast molecular ions, it was made possible for the participants to engage in vigorous and detailed discussions concerning such specialized topics as molecular-ion dissociation and transmission, wake effects, ionic charge states, cluster stopping powers, beam-foil spectroscopy, electron-emissions studies with molecular-ion beams, and molecular-ion structure determinations

  3. Exploring Ion-Ion Interactions in Aqueous Solutions by a Combination of Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Pluhařová, E.; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 9 (2015), s. 1563-1567 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion pairing * molecular dynamics * neutron scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.539, year: 2015 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jpclett.5b00060

  4. Intrinsic bacterial biodegradation of petroleum contamination demonstrated in situ using natural abundance, molecular-level 14C analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.F.; Nelson, R.K.; Kile, B.M.; Reddy, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Natural abundance, molecular-level C 14 analysis was combined with comprehensive gas chromatography (GC x GC) to investigate, in situ, the role of intrinsic biodegradation in the loss of petroleum hydrocarbons from the rocky, inter-tidal zone impacted by the Bouchard 120 oil spill. GC x GC analysis indicated accelerated losses of n-alkane components of the residual petroleum hydrocarbons between day 40 and day 50 after the spill. 14 C analysis of bacterial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) from the impacted zone on day 44 showed that the polyunsaturated fatty acids attributed to the photoautotrophic component of the microbial community had the same ( 14 C as the local dissolved inorganic carbon (DIG), indicating that this DIG was their carbon source. In contrast there was significant (C depletion in the saturated and mono-unsaturated PLFA indicating incorporation of petroleum carbon. This correlation between the observed accelerated n-alkane losses and microbial incorporation of (C-depleted carbon directly demonstrated, in situ, that intrinsic biodegradation was affecting the petroleum. Since the majority of organic contaminants originate from petroleum feed-stocks, in situ molecular-level 14 C analysis of microbial PLFA can provide insights into the occurrence and pathways of biodegradation of a wide range of organic contaminants. (Author)

  5. Molecular decomposition of solid methane films and emission of molecular fragments under MeV ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.L.; Lanzerotti, L.J.; Bower, J.E.; Marcantonio, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Electronic and collisional excitation of thin films of condensed molecular gases (H 2 O, O 2 , N 2 , CO 2 , NH 3 , SO 2 , CH 4 , etc.) by MeV and keV ions results in sputtering of the primary molecules. In addition, new solid molecular species, formed from fragments of the original molecules, are also emittted. Solid methane is a particularly interesting case. Hydrogen is a principal emission product of methane as it is in the bombardment of all hydrocarbons. However, in methane electronically excited by MeV light ions, the major hydrogen release occurs only after a well defined threshold ion fluence. This suggests a percolation threshold for the escape of hydrogen: material modification of the solid methane must proceed to a point at which a continuous diffusion path of high diffusion coefficient exists to the surface from within the film before the major emission can take place. The threshold fluence depends on the excitation density along individual ion tracks in a non-linear way, higher stopping power ions being more ''efficient'' in reaching the threshold. Carbon is also lost from methane films but in a quantity which is a decreasing fraction in thicker films. (orig.)

  6. Molecular evidence of heavy-oil weathering following the M/V Cosco Busan spill: insights from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkau, Karin L; McKenna, Amy M; Podgorski, David C; Rodgers, Ryan P; Reddy, Christopher M

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a critical need to investigate oil weathering beyond the analytical window afforded by conventional gas chromatography (GC). In particular, techniques capable of detecting polar and higher molecular weight (HMW; > 400 Da) components abundant in crude and heavy fuel oils (HFOs) as well as transformation products. Here, we used atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APPI FT-ICR MS) to identify molecular transformations in oil-residue samples from the 2007 M/V Cosco Busan HFO spill (San Francisco, CA). Over 617 days, the abundance and diversity of oxygen-containing compounds increased relative to the parent HFO, likely from bio- and photodegradation. HMW, highly aromatic, alkylated compounds decreased in relative abundance concurrent with increased relative abundance of less alkylated stable aromatic structures. Combining these results with GC-based data yielded a more comprehensive understanding of oil spill weathering. For example, dealkylation trends and the overall loss of HMW species observed by FT-ICR MS has not previously been documented and is counterintuitive given losses of lower molecular weight species observed by GC. These results suggest a region of relative stability at the interface of these techniques, which provides new indicators for studying long-term weathering and identifying sources.

  7. Molecular depth profiling of trehalose using a C{sub 60} cluster ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected fullerene ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of depth profiles acquired on a 300-nm trehalose film on Si were studied as a function of the impact kinetic energy and charge state of the C{sub 60} projectile ions. We find that the achieved depth resolution depends only weakly upon energy.

  8. Recording of heavy ion tracks in silicates. Application to the determination of the abundance of ultra-heavy elements in old solar cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraud, J.-P.

    1978-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine the abundance A(Z) and energy spectrum of the elements of atomic number Z present in cosmic radiation, by means of fossil traces recorded in moon and meteorite minerals. The difficulties due amongst other things to natural annealing are examined in detail in part one, of this paper, the outcome being a thorough study of the processes responsible for the formation, chemical attack and annealing of heavy ion tracks. Part two describes an original approach used here and consisting of a combined analysis as a function of annealing for a given track, of the microscopic structure of the latent track and its attack rate. Part three uses the new rules established beforehand to propose a new method of studying the UH ion (Z>30) to VH ion (20 [fr

  9. A Molecular Mechanics Study of Monensin B Ion Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    well known knot theorist working with Jon Simon under the math part of the ONR stereochemical topology project. 2) The 5-rung THYME diol-ditosylate has...trefoil knot, which will posses 100 atoms in the ring. 3) The first molecular mechanics studies on the THYME system have been accomplished. 4) Preliminary

  10. Synthetic Ion Channels and DNA Logic Gates as Components of Molecular Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Ryuji

    2018-02-19

    A molecular robot is a next-generation biochemical machine that imitates the actions of microorganisms. It is made of biomaterials such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. Three prerequisites have been proposed for the construction of such a robot: sensors, intelligence, and actuators. This Minireview focuses on recent research on synthetic ion channels and DNA computing technologies, which are viewed as potential candidate components of molecular robots. Synthetic ion channels, which are embedded in artificial cell membranes (lipid bilayers), sense ambient ions or chemicals and import them. These artificial sensors are useful components for molecular robots with bodies consisting of a lipid bilayer because they enable the interface between the inside and outside of the molecular robot to function as gates. After the signal molecules arrive inside the molecular robot, they can operate DNA logic gates, which perform computations. These functions will be integrated into the intelligence and sensor sections of molecular robots. Soon, these molecular machines will be able to be assembled to operate as a mass microrobot and play an active role in environmental monitoring and in vivo diagnosis or therapy. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao; Yu, Jiachao; Hua, Xin; Evans, James E.; Yu, Xiaofei; Lao, David B.; Heldebrant, David J.; Nune, Satish K.; Cao, Bin; Bowden, Mark E.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xue-Lin; Zhu, Zihua

    2016-12-01

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecular signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable for use of in situ liquid SIMS to study solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces.

  12. Toward Molecular 4f Single-Ion Magnet Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kasper S; Ariciu, Ana-Maria; McAdams, Simon; Weihe, Høgni; Bendix, Jesper; Tuna, Floriana; Piligkos, Stergios

    2016-05-11

    Quantum coherence is detected in the 4f single-ion magnet (SIM) Yb(trensal), by isotope selective pulsed EPR spectroscopy on an oriented single crystal. At X-band, the spin-lattice relaxation (T1) and phase memory (Tm) times are found to be independent of the nuclei bearing, or not, a nuclear spin. The observation of Rabi oscillations of the spin echo demonstrates the possibility to coherently manipulate the system for more than 70 rotations. This renders Yb(trensal), a sublimable and chemically modifiable SIM, an excellent candidate for quantum information processing.

  13. Molecular interplay between ion channels and the regulation of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONA A RAZIK

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the programmed and deliberate destruction of specific cells. This process occurs during normal development and maintains cellular homeostasis. Disruption or malfunction of apoptosis is implicated in diseases like cancer, AIDS as well as neurodegenerative disorders. The movement of monovalent ions appears to set the stage for the induction of the self-destruction machinery by creating an intracellular environment that favors activation and coordinated execution of the apoptotic program. Understanding the components and steps involved in this intricate process can further our insight to diseases and reveal new approaches for therapeutic treatment

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations to examine structure, energetics, and evaporation/condensation dynamics in small charged clusters of water or methanol containing a single monatomic ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Christopher D; Cann, Natalie M

    2012-11-01

    We study small clusters of water or methanol containing a single Ca(2+), Na(+), or Cl(-) ion with classical molecular dynamics simulations, using models that incorporate polarizability via the Drude oscillator framework. Evaporation and condensation of solvent from these clusters is examined in two systems, (1) for isolated clusters initially prepared at different temperatures and (2) those with a surrounding inert (Ar) gas of varying temperature. We examine these clusters over a range of sizes, from almost bare ions up to 40 solvent molecules. We report data on the evaporation and condensation of solvent from the clusters and argue that the observed temperature dependence of evaporation in the smallest clusters demonstrates that the presence of heated gas alone cannot, in most cases, solely account for bare ion production in electrospray ionization (ESI), neglecting the key contribution of the electric field. We also present our findings on the structure and energetics of the clusters as a function of size. Our data agree well with the abundant literature on hydrated ion clusters and offer some novel insight into the structure of methanol and ion clusters, especially those with a Cl(-) anion, where we observe the presence of chain-like structures of methanol molecules. Finally, we provide some data on the reparameterizations necessary to simulate ions in methanol using the separately developed Drude oscillator models for methanol and for ions in water.

  15. Rotational dynamics of a diatomic molecular ion in a Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M., E-mail: claude.dion@umu.se [Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2015-11-28

    We present models for a heteronuclear diatomic molecular ion in a linear Paul trap in a rigid-rotor approximation, one purely classical and the other where the center-of-mass motion is treated classically, while rotational motion is quantized. We study the rotational dynamics and their influence on the motion of the center-of-mass, in the presence of the coupling between the permanent dipole moment of the ion and the trapping electric field. We show that the presence of the permanent dipole moment affects the trajectory of the ion and that it departs from the Mathieu equation solution found for atomic ions. For the case of quantum rotations, we also evidence the effect of the above-mentioned coupling on the rotational states of the ion.

  16. Rotational dynamics of a diatomic molecular ion in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present models for a heteronuclear diatomic molecular ion in a linear Paul trap in a rigid-rotor approximation, one purely classical and the other where the center-of-mass motion is treated classically, while rotational motion is quantized. We study the rotational dynamics and their influence on the motion of the center-of-mass, in the presence of the coupling between the permanent dipole moment of the ion and the trapping electric field. We show that the presence of the permanent dipole moment affects the trajectory of the ion and that it departs from the Mathieu equation solution found for atomic ions. For the case of quantum rotations, we also evidence the effect of the above-mentioned coupling on the rotational states of the ion.

  17. Monte Carlo study of molecular weight distribution changes induced by degradation of ion beam irradiated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappa, V.C., E-mail: chappa@tandar.cnea.gov.a [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Pastorino, C.; Grosso, M.F. dwel; Arbeitman, C.R. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Mueller, M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Georg-August-Universitaet, Goettingen (Germany); Garci' a Bermudez, G. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologi' a, UNSAM (Argentina)

    2010-10-01

    In this work we study a polymeric material that degrades upon irradiation due to the energy inhomogeneously deposited by heavy ion beams. Ion beam irradiation of polymers generates rather different effects than those induced by 'classical' low ionizing particles such as electrons or gamma rays. This is due to the high electronic stopping power and the inhomogeneous distribution of deposited energy. This energy is transferred to the material within a small volume along the ion path forming the so called 'nuclear track' or 'latent track'. The track size primarily depends on the ion velocity, and it is determined by the secondary electrons (delta rays) generated along the ion trajectory. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we first obtained equilibrated polymer configurations using a coarse-grained model, and then investigated the spatially inhomogeneous chain scission process due to the passage of the ions. The number average molecular weight, weight average molecular weight and the polydispersity were calculated as a function of track radius, scission probability within the ion track and irradiation fluence. Finally we compared our results with a numerical implementation of a model for random homogeneous degradation.

  18. Nanojets, Electrospray, and Ion Field Evaporation: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-22

    electric fields is a topic of continuing and growing interest. The associated phenomenology governs a number of venerable technological areas, most...centered at the expected mass positions. The derived normalized abun- dances are shown for the two concentrations in Figure 5a,b. The abundances of the...abun- dances are shown in Figure 6a—d. Similar to the Na+ solvated ion distributions, dilution results in only a minor change in the K+ solvation

  19. When electrons meet molecular ions and what happens next: dissociative recombination from interstellar molecular clouds to internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of matter with its environment is the driving force behind the evolution of 99% of the observed matter in the universe. The majority of the visible universe exists in a state of weak ionization, the so called fourth state of matter: plasma. Plasmas are ubiquitous, from those occurring naturally; interstellar molecular clouds, cometary comae, circumstellar shells, to those which are anthropic in origin; flames, combustion engines and fusion reactors. The evolution of these plasmas is driven by the interaction of the plasma constituents, the ions, and the electrons. One of the most important subsets of these reactions is electron-molecular ion recombination. This process is significant for two very important reasons. It is an ionization reducing reaction, removing two ionised species and producing neutral products. Furthermore, these products may themselves be reactive radical species which can then further drive the evolution of the plasma. The rate at which the electron reacts with the ion depends on many parameters, for examples the collision energy, the internal energy of the ion, and the structure of the ion itself. Measuring these properties together with the manner in which the system breaks up is therefore critical if the evolution of the environment is to be understood at all. Several techniques have been developed to study just such reactions to obtain the necessary information on the parameters. In this paper the focus will be on one the most recently developed of these, the Ion Storage Ring, together with the detection tools and techniques used to extract the necessary information from the reaction. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Properties of the Excited States of Molecular Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-13

    0P) (meV) With the analyzer centered at W = 0 (in this homo- 9 1. la 2.2 nuclear diatomic case, to pass ions of energy JT0), the 11 7.2 a 8.7 maximum...Sec. 111. D. year. 5 Associated with the Centre National de la Recherche Scien- Briefly, a single-mode tunable dye laser, pumped by tlflque, an Ar or Kr...quatu nube N s f mno Imor&=*hee, ine ’S.A. thr. T.M. Miller, P.* C. Cy H.~ 5 D.Zn .R thecrasng oit negy s aled it icrsaig i L.LotJ.T. Moseley

  1. Integration of molecular biology tools for identifying promoters and genes abundantly expressed in flowers of Oncidium Gower Ramsey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Shu-Yun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orchids comprise one of the largest families of flowering plants and generate commercially important flowers. However, model plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana do not contain all plant genes, and agronomic and horticulturally important genera and species must be individually studied. Results Several molecular biology tools were used to isolate flower-specific gene promoters from Oncidium 'Gower Ramsey' (Onc. GR. A cDNA library of reproductive tissues was used to construct a microarray in order to compare gene expression in flowers and leaves. Five genes were highly expressed in flower tissues, and the subcellular locations of the corresponding proteins were identified using lip transient transformation with fluorescent protein-fusion constructs. BAC clones of the 5 genes, together with 7 previously published flower- and reproductive growth-specific genes in Onc. GR, were identified for cloning of their promoter regions. Interestingly, 3 of the 5 novel flower-abundant genes were putative trypsin inhibitor (TI genes (OnTI1, OnTI2 and OnTI3, which were tandemly duplicated in the same BAC clone. Their promoters were identified using transient GUS reporter gene transformation and stable A. thaliana transformation analyses. Conclusions By combining cDNA microarray, BAC library, and bombardment assay techniques, we successfully identified flower-directed orchid genes and promoters.

  2. reSpect: software for identification of high and low abundance ion species in chimeric tandem mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Hoopmann, Michael R; Sun, Zhi; Schmidt, Frank; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Most shotgun proteomics data analysis workflows are based on the assumption that each fragment ion spectrum is explained by a single species of peptide ion isolated by the mass spectrometer; however, in reality mass spectrometers often isolate more than one peptide ion within the window of isolation that contribute to additional peptide fragment peaks in many spectra. We present a new tool called reSpect, implemented in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), which enables an iterative workflow whereby fragment ion peaks explained by a peptide ion identified in one round of sequence searching or spectral library search are attenuated based on the confidence of the identification, and then the altered spectrum is subjected to further rounds of searching. The reSpect tool is not implemented as a search engine, but rather as a post-search engine processing step where only fragment ion intensities are altered. This enables the application of any search engine combination in the iterations that follow. Thus, reSpect is compatible with all other protein sequence database search engines as well as peptide spectral library search engines that are supported by the TPP. We show that while some datasets are highly amenable to chimeric spectrum identification and lead to additional peptide identification boosts of over 30% with as many as four different peptide ions identified per spectrum, datasets with narrow precursor ion selection only benefit from such processing at the level of a few percent. We demonstrate a technique that facilitates the determination of the degree to which a dataset would benefit from chimeric spectrum analysis. The reSpect tool is free and open source, provided within the TPP and available at the TPP website. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Algal polysaccharides on lipid Langmuir–Blodgett films and molecular effects upon metal ion contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinouski de Brito, Audrey; Caseli, Luciano, E-mail: lcaseli@unifesp.br; Nordi, Cristina S.F.

    2013-05-01

    The capability of extracellular polysaccharides released from microorganisms to bind to metal ions is a potential molecular biotechnological tool to produce biosorbents as an alternative for the removal of heavy metals from aquatic environments. In this paper, we exploit the ability of polysaccharides from extracellular polymeric substances produced by phytoplankton adsorbed on lipid monolayers as Langmuir–Blodgett films to interact with silver ions in aqueous environments. The properties of the biomacromolecules after the interaction were investigated with polarisation modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The vibrational spectroscopy technique applied to the Langmuir–Blodgett films before and after contact with silver ions indicated significant changes for the bands related to the chemical groups present in polypeptides and polysaccharides. These changes point to the influence of the metal interaction on the molecular organisation and on the structure of the Langmuir–Blodgett film. Therefore, the behaviour of these biomacromolecules adsorbed at bioinspired interfaces is better understood in terms of properties at the molecular level. This understanding leads to a model in which metal incorporation affects the molecular structure of the ultrathin film. - Highlights: ► Extracellular material released from algae was adsorbed at a lipid monolayer. ► Monolayer changes its rheological properties with material incorporation. ► Changes in proteins and polysaccharides are identified with PM-IRRAS. ► Langmuir–Blodgett films of this composite are sensitive to metal ions in water.

  4. Molecular growth in clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induced by collisions with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    This thesis concerns the experimental study of the interaction between low energy ions (keV range) and neutral isolated molecules or clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the gas phase. The use of ionising radiations on these complex molecular systems of astrophysical interest allowed to highlight processes of statistical fragmentation, corresponding to the redistribution of the energy through the degrees of freedom of the target, and non-statistical fragmentation, linked to binary collisions of the ions on the nuclei of the target. A mechanism of intermolecular growth in clusters of PAH is observed. It is associated to the ultrafast (≤ ps) formation of fragments inside the clusters following binary collisions. The presence of a molecular environment around the fragments formed during the interaction may initiate a process of reactivity between the fragments and the molecules of the clusters. More precisely, the study focusses on the importance of the electronic stopping power SE and the nuclear stopping power SN of the projectile ion. It shows that the molecular growth is enhanced when SN is higher than SE. This can be explained by the fact that the deposit of energy is mainly due to the interaction with the nuclei of the target. The process of growth has been observed for all the molecules of PAH studied during this thesis and also for nitrogenated analogues of the molecule of anthracene. This demonstrates that molecular growth may be efficiently induced by collisions of low energy ions with clusters of PAH. (author) [fr

  5. Getting the ion-protein interactions right in molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl 1 (2017), S66 ISSN 0175-7571. [IUPAB congress /19./ and EBSA congress /11./. 16.07.2017-20.07.2017, Edinburgh] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion-protein interaction * molecular dynamics simulations * neutron scattering * insulin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. Vibrational excitation in molecule--surface collisions due to temporary negative molecular ion formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadzuk, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron scattering from gaseous and physisorbed diatomic molecules results in greatly enhanced vibrational overtone excitation if the incident electron has the appropriate energy to form a shape-resonance-induced temporary negative molecular ion. It is proposed here that due to the image potential lowering of the electron affinity level of a diatomic molecule in interaction with a metal surface, somewhere outside the surface an incident molecule would find its affinity level degenerate with or lower than the substrate Fermi level at which point a substrate electron could hop onto the molecule, in analogy with gas phase harpooning processes. A negative molecular ion is thus formed which remains until the molecular ion reflects from the surface and the affinity level rises above the Fermi level, thus permitting reverse electron hopping back into the metal. The lifetime of the molecular ion can be controlled by varying both the kinetic energy of the incident molecule and also the substrate work function. In analogy with the electron scattering events, greatly enhanced vibrational excitation of overtones is expected in the molecules of the scattered beam. Induced fluorescence probing of the vibrational state distribution should then yield fundamental information pertaining to the dynamics of charge transfer reactions and nonadiabatic effects in molecule--surface interactions. A theory of this phenomenon is here presented together with the numerical consequences for a model system designed to simulate N 2 or NO scattering from standard surface science metal surfaces

  7. Ab initio molecular dynamics approach to a quantitative description of ion pairing in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pluhařová, Eva; Maršálek, Ondřej; Schmidt, B.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 23 (2013), s. 4177-4181 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion pairing * charge transfer * water * ab initio molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.687, year: 2013

  8. Precision spectroscopy of molecular hydrogen ions : Towards frequency metrology of particle masses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roth, B.; Koelemeij, J.; Schiller, S.; Hilico, L.; Karr, Jean Philippe; Korobov, V.I.; Bakalov, D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the current status of high-precision ab initio calculations of the spectra of molecular hydrogen ions (H2+ and HD+) and of two experiments for vibrational spectroscopy. The perspectives for a comparison between theory and experiment at a level of 1 part in 109 are considered.

  9. Ion channels and their molecular environments--glimpses and insights from functional proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Uwe; Müller, Catrin S; Fakler, Bernd

    2011-04-01

    There is emerging evidence from functional analyses and molecular research that the role of ion channels in cell physiology is not only determined by the pore-forming subunits but also depends on their molecular environment. Accordingly, the local and temporal specificity of channel-mediated signal transduction is thought to result from association of these integral membrane proteins with distinct sets of partner proteins or from their assembly into stable macromolecular complexes. As yet, however, the molecular environments of most ion channels have escaped direct investigation, mostly because of technical limitations that precluded their comprehensive molecular analysis. Recent advances in proteomic technologies promoted an experimental workflow that combines affinity purification of readily solubilized protein complexes with quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry and that offers access to channel-associated protein environments. We will discuss advantages and limitations of this proteomic approach, as well as the results obtained from its application to several types of ion channels including Cav channels, Kv channels, HCN channels, AMPA-type glutamate receptors and GABA(B) receptors. The respective results indicate that the approach provides unbiased and comprehensive information on (i) the subunit composition of channel cores including identification of auxiliary subunits, on (ii) the assembly of channel cores into 'signaling entities' and on (iii) integration of channels into extended protein networks. Thus, quantitative proteomics opens a new window for the investigation of ion channels and their function in the context of various types of cell. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 42 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H/sub 2 /, CH/sub 4/, CO, Ar, and CO/sub 2/. (16 refs).

  11. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.; Díez Muiño, R.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2003-04-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to "projectile molecular effects" (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  12. Development of PNTDs synthesized from monomers with different molecular length and analysis of molecular damages by heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hajime; Kodaira, Satoshi; Ihara, Daisuke; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Kusumoto, Tamon; Mori, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Benton, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Our interests for years lay to investigate the reason why CR-39 polymer has such high sensitivity as plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) on chemical structural aspects. We developed three PNTDs from three diacrylate compounds as monomers bearing different molecular length as well as different numbers of internal ether bonds. The polymer products obtained were colorless and transparent with 3-D molecular structures as CR-39 and different lattice structures each other. Our purpose of the current study was to investigate structural damages caused in newly prepared PNTDs and CR-39 by irradiation of Nitrogen ion (6 MeV/n, fluence of 5 x 10 11 cm -2 ). The structural damage by irradiation was analyzed by the magnitude of the relative absorbance of specific functional groups such as ester, C=O, ether and C-H bonds by means of FT-IR (ATR) method. The correlation between the relative absorbance and the molecular length of the monomers were discussed. (author)

  13. Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions in the Mid-Infrared with Up-Conversion Detection and Brewster-Plate Spoilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Charles R.; McCollum, Jefferson E.; Hodges, James Neil; Perry, Adam J.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2017-06-01

    Molecular ions are challenging to study with conventional spectroscopic methods. Laboratory discharges produce ions in trace quantities which can be obscured by the abundant neutral molecules present. The technique Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (NICE-OHVMS) overcomes these challenges by combining the ion-neutral discrimination of velocity modulation spectroscopy with the sensitivity of Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS), and has been able to determine transition frequencies of molecular ions in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) with sub-MHz uncertainties when calibrated with an optical frequency comb. However, the extent of these studies was limited by the presence of fringes due to parasitic etalons and the speed and noise characteristics of mid-IR detectors. Recently, we have overcome these limitations by implementing up-conversion detection and dithered optics. We performed up-conversion using periodically poled lithium niobate to convert light from the mid-IR to the visible to be within the coverage of sensitive and fast silicon detectors while maintaining our heterodyne and velocity modulation signals. The parasitic etalons were removed by rapidly rotating CaF_2 windows with galvanometers, which is known as a Brewster-plate spoiler, which averaged out the fringes in detection. Together, these improved the sensitivity by more than an order of magnitude and have enabled extended spectroscopic surveys of molecular ions in the mid-IR. J. N. Hodges, A. J. Perry, P. A. Jenkins II, B. M. Siller, and B. J. McCall, J. Chem. Phys. (2013), 139, 164201. C. R. Webster, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B (1985), 2, 1464. C. R. Markus, A. J. Perry, J. N. Hodges, and B. J. McCall, Opt. Express (2017), 25, 3709-3721.

  14. The molecular mechanism of multi-ion conduction in K{sup +} channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwan, J.F.

    2007-01-19

    Steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation method is applied to a fully solvated membrane-channel model for studying the ion permeation process in potassium channels. The channel model is based on the crystallographic structure of a prokaryotic K{sup +} channel- the KcsA channel, which is a representative of most known eukaryotic K{sup +} channels. It has long been proposed that the ion transportation in a conventional K{sup +}-channel follows a multi-ion fashion: permeating ions line in a queue in the channel pore and move in a single file through the channel. The conventional view of multi-ion transportation is that the electrostatic repulsion between ions helps to overcome the attraction between ions and the channel pore. In this study, we proposed two SMD simulation schemes, referred to 'the single-ion SMD' simulations and 'the multi-ion SMD' simulations. Concerted movements of a K-W-K sequence in the selectivity filter were observed in the single-ion SMD simulations. The analysis of the concerted movement reveals the molecular mechanism of the multi-ion transportation. It shows that, rather than the long range electrostatic interaction, the short range polar interaction is a more dominant factor in the multi-ion transportation. The polar groups which play a role in the concerted transportation are the water molecules and the backbone carbonyl groups of the selectivity filter. The polar interaction is sensitive to the relative orientation of the polar groups. By changing the orientation of a polar group, the interaction may switch from attractive to repulsive or vice versa. By this means, the energy barrier between binding sites in the selectivity filter can be switched on and off, and therefore the K{sup +} may be able to move to the neighboring binding site without an external driving force. The concerted transportation in the selectivity filter requires a delicate cooperation between K{sup +}, waters, and the backbone carbonyl groups. To

  15. Molecular carbon nitride ion beams for enhanced corrosion resistance of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwitz, A.; Kennedy, J.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach is presented for molecular carbon nitride beams to coat stainless surfaces steel using conventional safe feeder gases and electrically conductive sputter targets for surface engineering with ion implantation technology. GNS Science's Penning type ion sources take advantage of the breaking up of ion species in the plasma to assemble novel combinations of ion species. To test this phenomenon for carbon nitride, mixtures of gases and sputter targets were used to probe for CN+ ions for simultaneous implantation into stainless steel. Results from mass analysed ion beams show that CN+ and a variety of other ion species such as CNH+ can be produced successfully. Preliminary measurements show that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel surfaces increased sharply when implanting CN+ at 30 keV compared to reference samples, which is interesting from an application point of view in which improved corrosion resistance, surface engineering and short processing time of stainless steel is required. The results are also interesting for novel research in carbon-based mesoporous materials for energy storage applications and as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost.

  16. Observation of visible emission from the molecular helium ion in the afterglow of a dense helium Z-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present the results of axial and radial time resolved visible emission spectroscopy from the afterglow of a dense helium Z-pinch. These results show that the visible emissions in the pinch afterglow are dominated by line emissions from molecular helium and He II. Axial spectroscopy measurements show the occurrence of several absorption bands which cannot be identified as molecular or atomic helium nor impurities from the discharge chamber materials. The authors believe that these absorption bands are attributable to the molecular helium ion which is present in the discharge. The molecular ion has been observed by others in low pressure and temperature helium discharges directly by means of mass spectrometry and indirectly by the presence of helium atoms in the 2/sup 3/S state, (the He 2/sup 3/S state is believed to result from molecular helium ion recombination). However, the molecular helium ion has not previously been observed spectroscopically

  17. Dansyl-naphthalimide dyads as molecular probes: effect of spacer group on metal ion binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Balaraman H; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2011-11-17

    Interaction of a few dansyl-naphthalimide conjugates 1a-e linked through polymethylene spacer groups with various metal ions was investigated through absorption, fluorescence, NMR, isothermal calorimetric (ITC), and laser flash photolysis techniques. The characteristic feature of these dyads is that they exhibit competing singlet-singlet energy transfer (SSET) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) processes, both of which decrease with the increase in spacer length. Depending on the spacer group, these dyads interact selectively with divalent Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions, as compared to other mono- and divalent metal ions. Jobs plot analysis showed that these dyads form 2:3 complexes with Cu(2+) ions, while 1:1 complexes were observed with Zn(2+) ions. The association constants for the Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) complexes were determined and are found to be in the order 10(3)-10(5) M(-1). Irrespective of the length of the spacer group, these dyads interestingly act as fluorescence ratiometric molecular probes for Cu(2+) ions by altering the emission intensity of both dansyl and naphthalimide chromophores. In contrast, only the fluorescence intensity of the naphthalimide chromophore of the lower homologues (n = 1-3) was altered by Zn(2+) ions. (1)H NMR and ITC measurements confirmed the involvement of both sulfonamide and dimethylamine groups in the complexation with Cu(2+) ions, while only the latter group was involved with Zn(2+) ions. Laser excitation of the dyads 1a-e showed formation of a transient absorption which can be attributed to the radical cation of the naphthalimide chromophore, whereas only the triplet excited state of the dyads 1a-e was observed in the presence of Cu(2+) ions. Uniquely, the complexation of 1a-e with Cu(2+) ions affects both PET and SSET processes, while only the PET process was partially inhibited by Zn(2+) ions in the lower homologues (n = 1-3) and the higher homologues exhibited negligible changes in their emission properties. Our results

  18. Ion-beam-induced aggregation in polystyrene: The influence of the molecular parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, O.; Licciardello, A.; Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of an insoluble gel under ion-beam bombardment is governed by ion-beam parameters and target parameters. Here reported is a study of the influence of the target molecular parameters on the sol--gel transition of ion-bombarded polystyrene with particular emphasis for the number-average molecular weight M-bar/sub n/. It is shown that the main parameter is the number of macromolcules of the film so that by adopting a ''corrected'' fluence F/n (ions per macromolecule), the different curves of the various polymers collapse in only one universal curve. The importance of the ''corrected'' fluence is shown also at molecular level and the MWD of the various polymers is similar at equal F/n values. An experimental model is outlined which explains the sol--gel transition on the basis of transition from an isolated-track regime to an overlap regime where the formation of insoluble giant macromolecules occurs.

  19. Biomimetic supercontainers for size-selective electrochemical sensing of molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Nathan L.; Must, Indrek; Qiao, Yupu; Zhang, Shi-Li; Wang, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    New ionophores are essential for advancing the art of selective ion sensing. Metal-organic supercontainers (MOSCs), a new family of biomimetic coordination capsules designed using sulfonylcalix[4]arenes as container precursors, are known for their tunable molecular recognition capabilities towards an array of guests. Herein, we demonstrate the use of MOSCs as a new class of size-selective ionophores dedicated to electrochemical sensing of molecular ions. Specifically, a MOSC molecule with its cavities matching the size of methylene blue (MB+), a versatile organic molecule used for bio-recognition, was incorporated into a polymeric mixed-matrix membrane and used as an ion-selective electrode. This MOSC-incorporated electrode showed a near-Nernstian potentiometric response to MB+ in the nano- to micro-molar range. The exceptional size-selectivity was also evident through contrast studies. To demonstrate the practical utility of our approach, a simulated wastewater experiment was conducted using water from the Fyris River (Sweden). It not only showed a near-Nernstian response to MB+ but also revealed a possible method for potentiometric titration of the redox indicator. Our study thus represents a new paradigm for the rational design of ionophores that can rapidly and precisely monitor molecular ions relevant to environmental, biomedical, and other related areas.

  20. Atomistic simulation of damage production by atomic and molecular ion irradiation in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, M. W.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Karaseov, P. A.; Titov, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied defect production during single atomic and molecular ion irradiation having an energy of 50 eV/amu in GaN by molecular dynamics simulations. Enhanced defect recombination is found in GaN, in accordance with experimental data. Instantaneous damage shows non-linearity with different molecular projectile and increasing molecular mass. Number of instantaneous defects produced by the PF 4 molecule close to target surface is four times higher than that for PF 2 molecule and three times higher than that calculated as a sum of the damage produced by one P and four F ion irradiation (P+4×F). We explain this non-linearity by energy spike due to molecular effects. On the contrary, final damage created by PF 4 and PF 2 shows a linear pattern when the sample cools down. Total numbers of defects produced by Ag and PF 4 having similar atomic masses are comparable. However, defect-depth distributions produced by these species are quite different, also indicating molecular effect.

  1. Solvation of calcium ion in methanol: Comparison of diffraction studies and molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megyes, Tuende; Balint, Szabolcs; Bako, Imre; Grosz, Tamas; Radnai, Tamas; Palinkas, Gabor

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation and diffraction (X-ray and neutron) studies were compared on 1 and 2 M methanol solutions of calcium chloride with aiming at the determination of the solution structures. Beyond that, the capabilities of the methods to describe solution structure are discussed. It has been found that diffraction methods are performing very well in determination of Ca 2+ -O distances (2.39 A in average). Further on, by applying the X-ray diffraction method ion pairs could be observed easily for higher concentrated solution, but for neutron diffraction study, the most adequate isotope substitution method has to be chosen with care in order to be able to detect ion pairs in solution. The results of molecular dynamic simulation were found to be in general accordance with the experimental findings. The smaller discrepancies between simulation and experimental results are coming from small differences in the ion-methanol and ion-ion distances, and they may be due to both the potential model applied in the simulation and to the experimental uncertainties

  2. Acceleration of cluster and molecular ions by TIARA 3 MV tandem accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Y; Tajima, S

    2000-01-01

    We succeeded in accelerating molecular and cluster ions (B sub 2 sub - sub 4 , C sub 2 sub - sub 1 sub 0 , O sub 2 , Al sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Si sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Cu sub 2 sub - sub 3 , Au sub 2 sub - sub 3 , LiF, and AlO) to MeV energies with high-intensity beam currents by means of a 3 MV tandem accelerator in the TIARA facility. These cluster ions were generated by a cesium sputter-type negative ion source. We tested three types of carbon sputter cathodes in which graphite powder was compressed with different pressures. The pressure difference affected the generating ratio of clusters generated to single atom ions extracted from the source and it appeared that the high-density cathode was suitable. We also investigated the optimum gas pressure for charge exchange in the tandem high-voltage terminal. Clusters of larger size tend to require lower pressure than do smaller ones. In addition, we were able to obtain doubly charged AlO molecular ions. (authors)

  3. Molecular dynamics for ion-tuned wettability in oil/brine/rock systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Tian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of wettability on brine ionic composition in oil/brine/rock systems, which is denoted as ion-tuned wettability, has important applications in geoscience. Due to the involvement of non-continuum effects, molecular dynamics (MD simulation is necessary to improve understanding of its mechanism. This work establishes a reliable molecular dynamics (MD framework to study ion-tuned wettability. We prove that our model system can well represent the wettability of the real oil/brine/rock system, and that the wettability alteration from the MD results is qualitatively consistent with the EDL repulsion theory when ion-binding does not exist. In the process to establish the MD framework, our work suggests that adding counter ions to balance interface charges is good for studying concentration effect on wettability, and the contact angle defined from mass center coordinates is effective to measure the wettability of the nano-scale MD system. This work provides the basis for on-going studies using MD simulation to reveal the mechanism of ion-tuned wettability.

  4. Molecular dynamics for ion-tuned wettability in oil/brine/rock systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huanhuan; Wang, Moran

    2017-12-01

    The dependence of wettability on brine ionic composition in oil/brine/rock systems, which is denoted as ion-tuned wettability, has important applications in geoscience. Due to the involvement of non-continuum effects, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is necessary to improve understanding of its mechanism. This work establishes a reliable molecular dynamics (MD) framework to study ion-tuned wettability. We prove that our model system can well represent the wettability of the real oil/brine/rock system, and that the wettability alteration from the MD results is qualitatively consistent with the EDL repulsion theory when ion-binding does not exist. In the process to establish the MD framework, our work suggests that adding counter ions to balance interface charges is good for studying concentration effect on wettability, and the contact angle defined from mass center coordinates is effective to measure the wettability of the nano-scale MD system. This work provides the basis for on-going studies using MD simulation to reveal the mechanism of ion-tuned wettability.

  5. Identification and analysis of low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon in subglacial basal ice ecosystems by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, E. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Lis, G. P.; Tranter, M.; Pickard, A. E.; Stibal, M.; Dewsbury, P.; Fitzsimons, S.

    2015-08-01

    Glacial runoff is an important source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for downstream heterotrophic activity, despite the low overall DOC concentrations. This is because of the abundance of bioavailable, low molecular weight (LMW) DOC species. However, the provenance and character of LMW-DOC is not fully understood. We investigated the abundance and composition of DOC in subglacial environments via a molecular level DOC analysis of basal ice, which forms by water/sediment freeze-on to the glacier sole. Spectrofluorometry and a novel ion chromatographic method, which has been little utilised in glacial science for LMW-DOC determinations, were employed to identify and quantify the major LMW fractions (free amino acids, carbohydrates and carboxylic acids) in basal ice from four glaciers, each with a different basal debris type. Basal ice from Joyce Glacier (Antarctica) was unique in that 98 % of the LMW-DOC was derived from the extremely diverse FAA pool, comprising 14 FAAs. LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice were dependent on the bioavailability of the overridden organic carbon (OC), which in turn, was influenced by the type of overridden material. Mean LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice from Russell Glacier (Greenland), Finsterwalderbreen (Svalbard) and Engabreen (Norway) were low (0-417 nM C), attributed to the relatively refractory nature of the OC in the overridden paleosols and bedrock. In contrast, mean LMW-DOC concentrations were an order of magnitude higher (4430 nM C) in basal ice from Joyce Glacier, a reflection of the high bioavailability of the overridden lacustrine material (>17 % of the sediment OC comprised extractable carbohydrates, a proxy for bioavailable OC). We find that the overridden material may act as a direct (via abiotic leaching) and indirect (via microbial cycling) source of DOC to the subglacial environment and provides a range of LMW-DOC compounds that may stimulate microbial activity in wet sediments in current subglacial

  6. A molecular-gap device for specific determination of mercury ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zheng; Liu, Zhong-Gang; Yao, Xian-Zhi; Zhang, Kai-Sheng; Chen, Xing; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2013-11-01

    Specific determination/monitoring of trace mercury ions (Hg2+) in environmental water is of significant importance for drinking safety. Complementarily to conventional inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission/absorption spectroscopy, several methods, i.e., electrochemical, fluorescent, colorimetric, and surface enhanced Raman scattering approaches, have been developed recently. Despite great success, many inevitably encounter the interferences from other metal ions besides the complicated procedures and sophisticated equipments. Here we present a molecular-gap device for specific determination of trace Hg2+ in both standardized solutions and environmental samples based on conductivity-modulated glutathione dimer. Through a self-assembling technique, a thin film of glutathione monolayer capped Au nanoparticles is introduced into 2.5 μm-gap-electrodes, forming numerous double molecular layer gaps. Notably, the fabricated molecular-gap device shows a specific response toward Hg2+ with a low detection limit actually measured down to 1 nM. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that the specific sensing mechanism greatly depends on the electron transport ability of glutathione dimer bridged by heavy metal ions, which is determined by its frontier molecular orbital, not the binding energy.

  7. Spectrofluorometric and Molecular Modeling Studies on Binding of Nitrite Ion with Bovine Hemoglobin: Effect of Nitrite Ion on Amino Acid Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, T.; Bagheri, H.; Afkhami, A.

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between nitrite ion and bovine hemoglobin was investigated by a spectrofluorometric technique. The experimental results indicated that the interaction causes a static quenching of the fluorescence of bovine hemoglobin, that the binding reaction is spontaneous, and that H-bonding interactions play a major role in binding of this ion to bovine hemoglobin. The formation constant for this interaction was calculated. Based on Förster's theory of nonradiative energy transfer, the binding distance between this ion and bovine hemoglobin was determined. Furthermore, the interaction of nitrite ion with tyrosine and tryptophan was investigated with synchronous fluorescence. There was no significant shift of the maximum emission wavelength with interactions of the mentioned ion with bovine hemoglobin, which implies that interaction of nitrite ion with bovine hemoglobin does not affect the microenvironment around the tryptophan and tyrosine residues. Furthermore, the effect of nitrite ion on amino acid residues of bovine hemoglobin was studied by a molecular docking technique.

  8. Ejection of solvated ions from electrosprayed methanol/water nanodroplets studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Elias; Konermann, Lars

    2011-06-22

    The ejection of solvated small ions from nanometer-sized droplets plays a central role during electrospray ionization (ESI). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can provide insights into the nanodroplet behavior. Earlier MD studies have largely focused on aqueous systems, whereas most practical ESI applications involve the use of organic cosolvents. We conduct simulations on mixed water/methanol droplets that carry excess NH(4)(+) ions. Methanol is found to compromise the H-bonding network, resulting in greatly increased rates of ion ejection and solvent evaporation. Considerable differences in the water and methanol escape rates cause time-dependent changes in droplet composition. Segregation occurs at low methanol concentration, such that layered droplets with a methanol-enriched periphery are formed. This phenomenon will enhance the partitioning of analyte molecules, with possible implications for their ESI efficiencies. Solvated ions are ejected from the tip of surface protrusions. Solvent bridging prior to ion secession is more extensive for methanol/water droplets than for purely aqueous systems. The ejection of solvated NH(4)(+) is visualized as diffusion-mediated escape from a metastable basin. The process involves thermally activated crossing of a ~30 kJ mol(-1) free energy barrier, in close agreement with the predictions of the classical ion evaporation model.

  9. An algorithm to correct saturated mass spectrometry ion abundances for enhanced quantitation and mass accuracy in omic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbao, Aivett; Gibbons, Bryson C.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Baker, Erin S.

    2018-04-01

    The mass accuracy and peak intensity of ions detected by mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are essential to facilitate compound identification and quantitation. However, high concentration species can easily cause problems if their ion intensities reach beyond the limits of the detection system, leading to distorted and non-ideal detector response (e.g. saturation), and largely precluding the calculation of accurate m/z and intensity values. Here we present an open source computational method to correct peaks above a defined intensity (saturated) threshold determined by the MS instrumentation such as the analog-to-digital converters or time-to-digital converters used in conjunction with time-of-flight MS. In this method, the isotopic envelope for each observed ion above the saturation threshold is compared to its expected theoretical isotopic distribution. The most intense isotopic peak for which saturation does not occur is then utilized to re-calculate the precursor m/z and correct the intensity, resulting in both higher mass accuracy and greater dynamic range. The benefits of this approach were evaluated with proteomic and lipidomic datasets of varying complexities. After correcting the high concentration species, reduced mass errors and enhanced dynamic range were observed for both simple and complex omic samples. Specifically, the mass error dropped by more than 50% in most cases with highly saturated species and dynamic range increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude for peptides in a blood serum sample.

  10. Electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions in high energy collisions with molecular oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, P; Nielsen, SB; Sørensen, M

    2001-01-01

    We report on the electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions Lys-Hn(n)+ (n = 7 - 17) and the concomitant formation of Lys-Hn(n+1)+. in high-energy collisions with molecular oxygen (laboratory kinetic energy = 50 x n keV). The cross section for electron loss increases with the charge state...... of the precursor from n = 7 to n = 11 and then remains constant when n increases further. The absolute size of the cross section ranges from 100 to 200 A2. The electron loss is modeled as an electron transfer process between lysozyme cations and molecular oxygen....

  11. R-matrix calculation of electron collisions with the BF{sup +} molecular ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, K [Department of Mathematics, Scottish Church College, 1 and 3 Urquhart Sq, Kolkata 700006 (India); Tennyson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-28

    Electron collisions with the BF{sup +} molecular ion are studied using the framework of the diatomic version of the UK molecular R-matrix codes. A configuration-interaction calculation is performed for BF{sup +} to obtain potential energy curves and target properties for 14 lowest doublet and quartet states. Scattering calculations are performed which yield resonance parameters and excitation cross sections in the energy range 0-20 eV. Cross sections for rotational excitations and an approximate calculation for the electron impact dissociation cross section for BF{sup +} are also presented.

  12. Three-stage classical molecular dynamics model for simulation of heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godre Subodh S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage Classical Molecular Dynamics (3S-CMD approach for heavy-ion fusion is developed. In this approach the Classical Rigid-Body Dynamics simulation for heavy-ion collision involving light deformed nucleus is initiated on their Rutherford trajectories at very large initial separation. Collision simulation is then followed by relaxation of the rigid-body constrains for one or both the colliding nuclei at distances close to the barrier when the trajectories of all the nucleons are obtained in a Classical Molecular Dynamics approach. This 3S-CMD approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but also the internal vibrational excitations of one or both the nuclei at distances close to the barrier. The results of the dynamical simulation for 24Mg+208Pb collision show significant modification of the fusion barrier and calculated fusion cross sections due to internal excitations.

  13. Simultaneous ion and neutral evaporation in aqueous nanodrops: experiment, theory, and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Tokumi, Takuya; Hogan, Christopher J; Suda, Hiroshi; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2015-06-28

    We use a combination of tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS-IMS, with differential mobility analyzers), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and analytical models to examine both neutral solvent (H2O) and ion (solvated Na(+)) evaporation from aqueous sodium chloride nanodrops. For experiments, nanodrops were produced via electrospray ionization (ESI) of an aqueous sodium chloride solution. Two nanodrops were examined in MD simulations: a 2500 water molecule nanodrop with 68 Na(+) and 60 Cl(-) ions (an initial net charge of z = +8), and (2) a 1000 water molecule nanodrop with 65 Na(+) and 60 Cl(-) ions (an initial net charge of z = +5). Specifically, we used MD simulations to examine the validity of a model for the neutral evaporation rate incorporating both the Kelvin (surface curvature) and Thomson (electrostatic) influences, while both MD simulations and experimental measurements were compared to predictions of the ion evaporation rate equation of Labowsky et al. [Anal. Chim. Acta, 2000, 406, 105-118]. Within a single fit parameter, we find excellent agreement between simulated and modeled neutral evaporation rates for nanodrops with solute volume fractions below 0.30. Similarly, MD simulation inferred ion evaporation rates are in excellent agreement with predictions based on the Labowsky et al. equation. Measurements of the sizes and charge states of ESI generated NaCl clusters suggest that the charge states of these clusters are governed by ion evaporation, however, ion evaporation appears to have occurred with lower activation energies in experiments than was anticipated based on analytical calculations as well as MD simulations. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  14. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO + ) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO + and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO + /NO, HCO + /CO, and NO + /NO.

  15. Detailed calculation of low-energy positron scattering by the hydrogen molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.; Carr, J.M.; Franklin, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed calculations are made using the Kohn method of positron scattering by the hydrogen molecular ion below the positronium formation threshold at 9.45 eV. Phase shifts from the two-centre Coulomb value are obtained for the lowest partial wave of Σ g + symmetry using a very flexible trial function containing a large number of short-range correlation functions. The convergence of the results with respect to both the linear and non-linear parameters is explored. (author)

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Antiamoebin Ion Channel: Linking Structure and Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Wei, Chenyu; Bjelkmar, Paer; Wallace, B. A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to ascertain which of the potential multimeric forms of the transmembrane peptaibol channel, antiamoebin, is consistant with its measured conductance. Estimates of the conductance obtained through counting ions that cross the channel and by solving the Nernst-Planck equation yield consistent results, indicating that the motion of ions inside the channel can be satisfactorily described as diffusive.The calculated conductance of octameric channels is markedly higher than the conductance measured in single channel recordings, whereas the tetramer appears to be non-conducting. The conductance of the hexamer was estimated to be 115+/-34 pS and 74+/-20 pS, at 150 mV and 75 mV, respectively, in satisfactory agreement with the value of 90 pS measured at 75 mV. On this basis we propose that the antiamoebin channel consists of six monomers. Its pore is large enough to accommodate K(+) and Cl(-) with their first solvation shells intact. The free energy barrier encountered by K(+) is only 2.2 kcal/mol whereas Cl(-) encounters a substantially higher barrier of nearly 5 kcal/mol. This difference makes the channel selective for cations. Ion crossing events are shown to be uncorrelated and follow Poisson statistics. keywords: ion channels, peptaibols, channel conductance, molecular dynamics

  17. Effect of molecular weight on ion diffusion and transference number in poly(ethylene oxide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timachova, Ksenia; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes are of great interest for their potential use in high specific energy, solid-state batteries, however, salt transport properties in polymer electrolytes have not been comprehensively addressed over a wide range of molecular weights. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) has been the most widely studied polymer electrolyte due to its high solvation of lithium salts and low glass transition temperature. This study presents measurements of the transport properties of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone)imide (LiTFSI) in PEO at both the high concentration present in functional electrolytes and in the dilute limit for a large range of PEO molecular weights. Individual diffusion coefficients of the Li + and TFSI- ions were measured using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance and the cation transference number was calculated. The diffusion coefficients, transference number, and conductivity as a function of molecular weight and salt concentration provide a complete set of transport properties for PEO.

  18. H2+ molecular ion in a strong magnetic field: Ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbiner, A. V.; Lopez Vieyra, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed quantitative analysis of the system of two protons and one electron (ppe) placed in magnetic field ranging from 10 9 -4.414x10 13 G is presented. The present study is focused on the question of the existence of the molecular ion H 2 + in a magnetic field. A variational method with an optimization of the form of the vector potential (optimal gauge fixing) is used as a tool. It is shown that in the domain of applicability of the nonrelativistic approximation the (ppe) system in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation has a well-pronounced minimum in the total energy at a finite interproton distance for B(less-or-similar sign)10 11 G, thus manifesting the existence of H 2 + . For B(greater-or-similar sign)10 11 G and large inclinations (of the molecular axis with respect to the magnetic line) the minimum disappears and hence the molecular ion H 2 + does not exist. It is shown that the most stable configuration of H 2 + always corresponds to protons situated along the magnetic line. With magnetic field growth the H 2 + ion becomes more and more tightly bound and compact, and the electronic distribution evolves from a two-peak to a one-peak pattern. The domain of inclinations where the H 2 + ion exists reduces with magnetic field increase and finally becomes 0 degree sign -25 degree sign at B=4.414x10 13 G. Phase-transition-type behavior of variational parameters for some interproton distances related to the beginning of the chemical reaction H 2 + ↔H+p is found

  19. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  20. Ion-Exchange Sample Displacement Chromatography as a Method for Fast and Simple Isolation of Low- and High-Abundance Proteins from Complex Biological Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Srajer Gajdosik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sample displacement chromatography (SDC in reversed phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced at the end of 1980s. This chromatographic method was first used for preparative purification of synthetic peptides, and subsequently adapted for protein fractionation, mainly in anion-exchange mode. In the past few years, SDC has been successfully used for enrichment of low- and medium-abundance proteins from complex biological fluids on both monolithic and bulk chromatographic supports. If aqueous mobile phase is used with the application of mild chromatographic conditions, isolated proteins are not denatured and can also keep their biological activity. In this paper, the use of SDC in anion-exchange mode on a high-capacity chromatographic resin for separation of proteins from complex biological mixtures such as human plasma is demonstrated. By use of three and more columns coupled in series during sample application, and subsequent parallel elution of detached columns, additional separation of bound proteins was achieved. Highly enriched human serum albumin fraction and a number of physiologically active medium- and low-abundance proteins could be fractionated and detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The use of the aforementioned columns that can be sanitized with 1 M sodium hydroxide for further application of SDC in biotechnology and food technology was discussed.

  1. Chemometric exploration of the abundance of trace metals and ions in desalinated and bottled drinking water in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mudhaf, Humood F; Astel, Aleksander M; Al-Hayan, Mohammad N; Abu-Shady, Abdel-Sattar I

    2014-01-01

    Chemometric exploration of desalinated and bottled water in Kuwait was employed to interpret the spatial variation in the physicochemical parameters. The data set consisted of the concentrations of principal macronutrient elements, ions, trace elements, temperature, pH, electrolytic conductivity, and total dissolved solids measured in indoor, outdoor, and bottled water samples. Quantitative assessment of the Cd, Hg, and Sb contents revealed rare cases of elevated concentrations; however, these concentrations were always below international health agency standards. Two general clusters of similar parameters were discovered in the variables mode and were associated with "natural" water characteristics or "conditions" of the pipeline system. We found that an increase in temperature facilitates the leaching of metals from the metallic equipment in the system. Spatial variation in the water quality was discovered, which indicates that residential areas fed from the Az-Zoor plant are supplied with water that contains lower concentrations of Ca, Cr, Mg, Mo, Ni, Na, TDS, and SO4 (2-) than the desalinated water produced and fed from the Doha plant. However, on the basis of the aluminum concentration in the water, cement mortar lining is assumed to be prevalent in the pipeline systems of the Mubarak Al-Kabeer, Ahmadi, Umm Al-Haiman, and Sorra areas.

  2. Molecular depth profiling and imaging using cluster ion beams with femtosecond laser postionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, D.; Kucher, A.; Winograd, N.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of cluster ion sources as viable SIMS probes has opened new possibilities for detection of neutral molecules by laser postionization. Previous studies have shown that with atomic bombardment multiphoton ionization using high-power femtosecond pulses leads to photofragmentation. The large amount of photofragmentation can be mostly attributed to high amounts of internal energy imparted to the sputtered molecules during the desorption process. Several pieces of preliminary data suggest that molecules subjected to cluster beam bombardment are desorbed with lower internal energies than those subjected to atomic beam bombardment. Lower energy molecules may then be less likely to photodissociate creating less photofragments in the laser postionization spectra. Here we present data taken from coronene films prepared by physical vapor deposition comparing a 40 keV C 60 + ion source with a 20 keV Au + ion source, which supports this hypothesis. Furthermore, the depth profiling capabilities of cluster beams may be combined with laser postionization to obtain molecular depth profiles by monitoring the neutral flux. In addition, imaging and depth profiling may be combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to provide three-dimensional molecular images.

  3. Scattering of atomic and molecular ions from single crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoest, J.M. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with analysis of crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe with Low Energy Ion scattering Spectroscopy (LEIS). Different atomic and molecular ions with fixed energies below 7 keV are scattered by a metal single crystal (with adsorbates). The energy and direction of the scattered particles are analysed for different selected charge states. In that way information can be obtained concerning the composition and atomic and electronic structure of the single crystal surface. Energy spectra contain information on the composition of the surface, while structural atomic information is obtained by direction measurements (photograms). In Ch.1 a description is given of the experimental equipment, in Ch.2 a characterization of the LEIS method. Ch.3 deals with the neutralization of keV-ions in surface scattering. Two different ways of data interpretation are presented. First a model is treated in which the observed directional dependence of neutralization action of the first atom layer of the surface is presented by a laterally varying thickness of the neutralizing layer. Secondly it is shown that the data can be reproduced by a more realistic, physical model based on atomic transition matrix elements. In Ch.4 the low energy hydrogen scattering is described. The study of the dissociation of H 2 + at an Ag surface r0230ted in a model based on electronic dissociation, initialized by electron capture into a repulsive (molecular) state. In Ch.5 finally the method is applied to the investigation of the surface structure of oxidized Fe. (Auth.)

  4. Determination of the abundance of delta15N in nitrate ion in contaminated groundwater samples using an elemental analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y; Nishikawa, M; Nakasugi, O; Ii, H; Hirata, T

    2001-07-01

    A rapid method for measuring the delta15N of nitrate ion in water samples using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer coupled to an elemental analyzer system (EA-MS) was investigated. The water should be removed from the analytical sample before measurement with this system. We investigated the application of a super-absorbent polymer resin powder to various water samples. Each 1 mg of polymer resin powder can absorb about 50-100 mg of solution depending on the concentrations of major ions. Only samples which contain more than 100 mg l(-1) of nitrate-nitrogen are suitable to be absorbed by the polymer resin for the determination of delta15N of nitrate. Preconcentration by rotary evaporation was necessary for dilute samples but the temperature should be kept below 60 degrees C. The polymer resin (about 8 mg) containing the nitrate was directly analyzed using an EA-MS after being oven-dried at 80 degrees C. Good accuracy (precision +/- 0.3%) for delta15N measurements of nitrate-nitrogen in a sample without any isotope fractionation effects during pre-treatment was observed. Results for delta15N of nitrate in contaminated groundwater samples collected in the spring at a tea plantation area in Shizuoka, Japan, were from 9.8 to 10.6%, which were close to the delta15N abundance in organic fertilizers.

  5. Photoionization of ions and the general program in atomic and molecular physics at Daresbury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    The current program in Atomic and Molecular Science is focused on photoionization of atoms and small molecules. On the atomic side, experiments on the double ionization of helium were completed recently, verifying the Wannier threshold law for double photoionization. Also, the angular distribution of the electrons has just been measured, and these results show a marked divergence form theoretical expectations. Other experiments include fluorescence polarization measurements for the atomic ions calcium and strontium, which, when combined with photoelectron angular distribution measurements, form the complete photoionization experiment. A sizeable part of the program is devoted to studying molecular fragmentation. The triple coincidence technique, in which the two fragment ions are detected in coincidence with the photoelectron after the parent molecule has been doubly ionized, was developed at Daresbury, and experiments in this area continue with the addition of fluorescence measurements. Looking to the future, the atomic and molecular science program at Daresbury will move closer to applied science areas, with metal clusters and transient species becoming more prominent. Much of this work will require a source with two to three orders of magnitude advantage in photon intensity over the SRS, and a design study is presently under way for a VUV/Soft X-ray source to meet these requirements

  6. Quantum optical emulation of molecular vibronic spectroscopy using a trapped-ion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2018-01-28

    Molecules are one of the most demanding quantum systems to be simulated by quantum computers due to their complexity and the emergent role of quantum nature. The recent theoretical proposal of Huh et al. (Nature Photon., 9, 615 (2015)) showed that a multi-photon network with a Gaussian input state can simulate a molecular spectroscopic process. Here, we present the first quantum device that generates a molecular spectroscopic signal with the phonons in a trapped ion system, using SO 2 as an example. In order to perform reliable Gaussian sampling, we develop the essential experimental technology with phonons, which includes the phase-coherent manipulation of displacement, squeezing, and rotation operations with multiple modes in a single realization. The required quantum optical operations are implemented through Raman laser beams. The molecular spectroscopic signal is reconstructed from the collective projection measurements for the two-phonon-mode. Our experimental demonstration will pave the way to large-scale molecular quantum simulations, which are classically intractable, but would be easily verifiable by real molecular spectroscopy.

  7. Nano-memory-element applications of carbon nanocapsule encapsulating potassium ions: molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the internal dynamics of ionic fluidic shuttle memory elements consisting of potassium ions encapsulated in C 640 nanocapsules. The systems proposed were the encapsulated-ion shuttle memory devices such as (13 K + ) at C 640 , (3 K + -C 60 -2 K + ) at C 640 and (5 K + -C 60 ) at C 640 . The energetics and the operating responses of ionic fluidic shuttle memory devices, such as transitions between the two states of the C 640 capsule, were examined by using classical molecular dynamics simulations of the shuttle media in the C 640 capsule under external force fields. The operating force fields for stable operations of the shuttle memory device were investigated.

  8. Interaction of the model alkyltrimethylammonium ions with alkali halide salts: an explicit water molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an explicit water molecular dynamics simulation of dilute solutions of model alkyltrimethylammonium surfactant ions (number of methylene groups in the tail is 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12 in mixture with NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI salts, respectively. The SPC/E model is used to describe water molecules. Results of the simulation at 298 K are presented in form of the radial distribution functions between nitrogen and carbon atoms of CH2 groups on the alkyltrimethylammonium ion, and the counterion species in the solution. The running coordination numbers between carbon atoms of surfactants and counterions are also calculated. We show that I- counterion exhibits the highest, and F- the lowest affinity to "bind" to the model surfactants. The results are discussed in view of the available experimental and simulation data for this and similar solutions.

  9. Generation of “bastard” molecular ions from van der Waals clusters: Arn(C2Cl4)m+ ions, suspected interlopers in collection of solar neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Buelow, S. J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Gaseous molecular ions containing argon and perchlorethylene, Arn(C2Cl4)m+ in which n ≥ 1-29 and m ≥ 1-4, are produced by electron bombardment of van der Waals clusters formed by expanding an Ar/C2Cl4 mixture through a supersonic nozzle. Previous attempts to observe such ions in a high-pressure mass spectrometer were not successful, as with many other (“bastard”) ions that similarly lack a stable chemically bound neutral parent molecule. This is probably due to dissociation induced by the lar...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of aluminium ions neurotoxicity in brain cells of fish from various pelagic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sukharenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurotoxic effects of aluminum chloride in higher than usual environment concentration (10 mg/L were studied in brains of fishes from various pelagic areas, especially in sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, 1819, roach (Rutilus rutilus Linnaeus, 1758, crucian carp (Carasius carasius Linnaeus, 1758, goby (Neogobius fluviatilis Pallas, 1811. The intensity of oxidative stress and the content of both cytoskeleton protein GFAP and cytosol Ca-binding protein S100β were determined. The differences in oxidative stress data were observed in the liver and brain of fish during 45 days of treatment with aluminum chloride. The data indicated that in the modeling of aluminum intoxication in mature adult fishes the level of oxidative stress was noticeably higher in the brain than in the liver. This index was lower by1.5–2.0 times on average in the liver cells than in the brain. The obtained data evidently demonstrate high sensitivity to aluminum ions in neural tissue cells of fish from various pelagic areas. Chronic intoxication with aluminum ions induced intense astrogliosis in the fish brain. Astrogliosis was determined as result of overexpression of both cytoskeleton and cytosole markers of astrocytes – GFAP and protein S100β (on 75–112% and 67–105% accordingly. Moreover, it was shown that the neurotixic effect of aluminum ions is closely related to metabolism of astroglial intermediate filaments. The results of western blotting showed a considerable increase in the content of the lysis protein products of GFAP with a range of molecular weight from 40–49 kDa. A similar metabolic disturbance was determined for the upregulation protein S100β expression and particularly in the increase in the content of polypeptide fragments of this protein with molecular weight 24–37 kDa. Thus, the obtained results allow one to presume that aluminum ions activate in the fish brain intracellular proteases which have a capacity to destroy the proteins of

  11. Construction of nanostructures for selective lithium ion conduction using self-assembled molecular arrays in supramolecular solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    In the development of innovative molecule-based materials, the identification of the structural features in supramolecular solids and the understanding of the correlation between structure and function are important factors. The author investigated the development of supramolecular solid electrolytes by constructing ion conduction paths using a supramolecular hierarchical structure in molecular crystals because the ion conduction path is an attractive key structure due to its ability to generate solid-state ion diffusivity. The obtained molecular crystals exhibited selective lithium ion diffusion via conduction paths consisting of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (LiTFSA) and small molecules such as ether or amine compounds. In the present review, the correlation between the crystal structure and ion conductivity of the obtained molecular crystals is addressed based on the systematic structural control of the ionic conduction paths through the modification of the component molecules. The relationship between the crystal structure and ion conductivity of the molecular crystals provides a guideline for the development of solid electrolytes based on supramolecular solids exhibiting rapid and selective lithium ion conduction.

  12. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cernusca, S; Aumayr, F; Diez-Muino, R; Juaristi, J I

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  13. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, H.P.; Aumayr, F.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials

  14. Laser-stimulated electric quadrupole transitions in the molecular hydrogen ion H2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobov, V. I.; Danev, P.; Bakalov, D.; Schiller, S.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular hydrogen ions are of metrological relevance due to the possibility of precise theoretical evaluation of their spectrum and of external-field-induced shifts. We report the results of the calculations of the rate of laser-induced electric quadrupole transitions between a large set of ro-vibrational states of H2+. The hyperfine and Zeeman structure of the E 2 transition spectrum and the effects of the laser polarization are treated in detail. The treatment is generally applicable to molecules in 2Σ states. We also present the nuclear spin-electron spin-coupling constants, computed with a precision ten times higher than previously obtained.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of ion-beam-amorphization of Si, Ge and GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Nord, J D; Keinonen, J

    2002-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study ion-irradiation-induced amorphization in Si, Ge and GaAs using several different interatomic force models. We find that the coordination number is higher, and the average bond length longer, for the irradiated amorphous structures than for the molten ones in Si and Ge. For amorphous GaAs, we suggest that longer Ga-Ga bonds, also present in pure Ga, are produced during the irradiation. In Si the amorphization is found to proceed via growth of amorphous regions, and low energy recoils are found to induce athermal recrystallization during irradiation.

  16. Vibrational Excitation of Diatomic Molecular Ions in Strong Field Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjeldsen, Thomas K.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2005-01-01

    A model based on the strong-field and Born-Oppenheimer approximations qualitatively describes the distribution over vibrational states formed in a diatomic molecular ion following ionization of the neutral molecule by intense laser pulses. Good agreement is found with a recent experiment [X. Urbain et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 163004 (2004)]. In particular, the observed deviation from a Franck-Condon-like distribution is reproduced. Additionally, we demonstrate control of the vibrational distribution by a variation of the peak intensity or a change of frequency of the laser pulse

  17. Fabrication of carbon nanotube nanogap electrodes by helium ion sputtering for molecular contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, Cornelius; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Hennrich, Frank; Muñoz Torres, David; Eaton, Thomas R.; Mayor, Marcel; Kappes, Manfred M.; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotube nanogaps have been used to contact individual organic molecules. However, the reliable fabrication of a truly nanometer-sized gap remains a challenge. We use helium ion beam lithography to sputter nanogaps of only (2.8 ± 0.6) nm size into single metallic carbon nanotubes embedded in a device geometry. The high reproducibility of the gap size formation provides a reliable nanogap electrode testbed for contacting small organic molecules. To demonstrate the functionality of these nanogap electrodes, we integrate oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecular rods, and measure resistance before and after gap formation and with and without contacted molecules

  18. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2  MeV/u lead ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2  MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H_{2}, CH_{4}, CO, Ar, and CO_{2}. Unexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2×10^{4} molecules/ion have been observed. The reduction of the ion-induced desorption yield due to continuous bombardment with lead ions (beam cleaning has been investigated for five different stainless steel vacuum chambers. The implications of these results for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring and possible remedies to reduce the vacuum degradation are discussed.

  19. Coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Giovanni; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    We performed simulations for solid molecular hydrogen at high pressures (250 GPa ≤ P ≤ 500 GPa) along two isotherms at T = 200 K (phase III) and at T = 414 K (phase IV). At T = 200 K, we considered likely candidates for phase III, the C2c and Cmca12 structures, while at T = 414 K in phase IV, we studied the Pc48 structure. We employed both Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo (CEIMC) and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). The latter is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the van der Waals approximation (vdW-DF). The comparison between the two methods allows us to address the question of the accuracy of the exchange-correlation approximation of DFT for thermal and quantum protons without recurring to perturbation theories. In general, we find that atomic and molecular fluctuations in PIMD are larger than in CEIMC which suggests that the potential energy surface from vdW-DF is less structured than the one from quantum Monte Carlo. We find qualitatively different behaviors for systems prepared in the C2c structure for increasing pressure. Within PIMD, the C2c structure is dynamically partially stable for P ≤ 250 GPa only: it retains the symmetry of the molecular centers but not the molecular orientation; at intermediate pressures, it develops layered structures like Pbcn or Ibam and transforms to the metallic Cmca-4 structure at P ≥ 450 GPa. Instead, within CEIMC, the C2c structure is found to be dynamically stable at least up to 450 GPa; at increasing pressure, the molecular bond length increases and the nuclear correlation decreases. For the other two structures, the two methods are in qualitative agreement although quantitative differences remain. We discuss various structural properties and the electrical conductivity. We find that these structures become conducting around 350 GPa but the metallic Drude-like behavior is reached only at around 500 GPa, consistent with recent experimental claims.

  20. A molecular line survey toward the nearby galaxies NGC 1068, NGC 253, and IC 342 at 3 mm with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope: Impact of an AGN on 1 kpc scale molecular abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Taku; Takano, Shuro; Kohno, Kotaro; Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2018-01-01

    It is important to investigate the relationships between the power sources and the chemical compositions of galaxies in order to understand the scenario of galaxy evolution. We carried out an unbiased molecular line survey towards active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxy NGC1068, and prototypical starburst galaxies, NGC 253 and IC 342, with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope in the 3 mm band. The advantage of this line survey is that the obtained spectra have the highest angular resolution ever obtained with single-dish telescopes. In particular, the beam size of this telescope is ˜15″-19″, which is able to separate spatially the nuclear molecular emission from that of the starburst ring (d ˜ 30″) in NGC 1068. We successfully detected approximately 23 molecular species in each galaxy, and calculated rotation temperatures and column densities. We estimate the molecular fractional abundances with respect to 13CO and CS molecules and compare them among three galaxies in order to investigate the chemical signatures of an AGN environment. As a result, we found clear trends in the abundances of molecules surrounding the AGN on a 1-kpc scale. HCN, H13CN, CN, 13CN, and HC3N are more abundant, and CH3CCH is deficient in NGC 1068 compared with the starburst galaxies. High abundances of HCN, H13CN, and HC3N suggest that the circumnuclear disk in NGC 1068 is in a high-temperature environment. The reason for the non-detection of CH3CCH is likely to be dissociation by high-energy radiation or less sublimation of a precursor of CH3CCH from grains.

  1. Molecular size-dependent abundance and composition of dissolved organic matter in river, lake and sea waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huacheng; Guo, Laodong

    2017-06-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in natural waters. The ecological role and environmental fate of DOM are highly related to the chemical composition and size distribution. To evaluate size-dependent DOM quantity and quality, water samples were collected from river, lake, and coastal marine environments and size fractionated through a series of micro- and ultra-filtrations with different membranes having different pore-sizes/cutoffs, including 0.7, 0.4, and 0.2 μm and 100, 10, 3, and 1 kDa. Abundance of dissolved organic carbon, total carbohydrates, chromophoric and fluorescent components in the filtrates decreased consistently with decreasing filter/membrane cutoffs, but with a rapid decline when the filter cutoff reached 3 kDa, showing an evident size-dependent DOM abundance and composition. About 70% of carbohydrates and 90% of humic- and protein-like components were measured in the properties of DOM, such as specific ultraviolet absorbance, spectral slope, and biological and humification indices also varied significantly with membrane cutoffs. In addition, different ultrafiltration membranes with the same manufacture-rated cutoff also gave rise to different DOM retention efficiencies and thus different colloidal abundances and size spectra. Thus, the size-dependent DOM properties were related to both sample types and membranes used. Our results here provide not only baseline data for filter pore-size selection when exploring DOM ecological and environmental roles, but also new insights into better understanding the physical definition of DOM and its size continuum in quantity and quality in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Measuring NH3 and other molecular abundance profiles from 5 microns ground-based spectroscopy in support of JUNO investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Doriann; Fouchet, Thierry; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Bézard, Bruno; Encrenaz, Therese; Lacy, John H.; Drossart, Pierre

    2017-10-01

    We report on results of an observational campaign to support the Juno mission. At the beginning of 2016, using TEXES (Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained data cubes of Jupiter in the 1930--1943 cm-1 and 2135--2153 cm-1 spectral ranges (around 5 μm), which probe the atmosphere in the 1--4 bar region, with a spectral resolution of ≈0.3 cm-1 (R≈7000) and an angular resolution of ≈1.5''.This dataset is analyzed by a code that combines a line-by-line radiative transfer model with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method. The inversion retrieves the abundance profiles of NH3 and PH3, which are the main conbtributors at these wavelengths, as well as the cloud transmittance. This retrieval is performed over more than one thousand pixels of our data cubes, producing effective maps of the disk, where all the major belts are visible (NEB, SEB, NTB, STB, NNTB and SSTB).We will present notably our retrieved NH3 abundance maps which can be compared with the unexpected latitudinal distribution observed by Juno's MWR (Bolton et al., 2017 and Li et al. 2017), as well as our other species retrieved abundance maps and discuss on their significance for the understanding of Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics.References:Bolton, S., et al. (2017), Jupiter’s interior and deep atmosphere: The first close polar pass with the Juno spacecraft, Science, doi:10.1126/science.aal2108, in press.Li, C., A. P. Ingersoll, S. Ewald, F. Oyafuso, and M. Janssen (2017), Jupiter’s global ammonia distribution from inversion of Juno Microwave Radiometer observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1002/2017GL073159, in press.

  3. Rotational Spectra of N2OH+ and CH2CHCNH+ Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Oscar; , Jr.; Lattanzi, Valerio; McCarthy, Michael C.; Thorwirth, Sven

    2011-06-01

    Protonated molecular ions of nitrous oxide (N2OH+) and acrylonitrile (CH2CHCNH+) have been detected at high spectral resolution in the molecular beam of a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer on the basis of high-level ab initio calculations. The ions were synthesized in the throat of a pulsed supersonic nozzle by discharging in a flow of the corresponding precursor gas (either N2O or CH2CHCN) heavily diluted in H2. Two isomers of N2OH+ were identified, corresponding to protonation at either the N or O end of NNO. This work contributes precise nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants to existing measurements of ground state NNOH+, and represents the first detection of the higher energy HNNO+ isomer, which is calculated to lie 4.4 kcal/mol above ground. In addition, protonated acrylonitrile has been detected for the first time at high spectral resolution, yielding spectroscopic constants that are in excellent agreement with high-level quantum-chemical calculations. Owing to sizable calculated dipole moments of protonated nitrous oxide and acrylonitrile and the relatively high proton affinities of their neutral counterparts, both cations are plausible candidates for astronomical detection with radio telescopes. At CCSD(T)/cc-pwCVQZ level of theory with zero-point vibrational effects at CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ. J. M. L. Martin & T. J. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 98, 7951 (1993)

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation in Dense Hydrogen: Electronic Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-10-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation is an important non-equilibrium process in the generation of dense plasmas, particularly in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Classical molecular dynamics considers electrons as point charges, ignoring important quantum processes. We use an Electron Force Field (EFF) method to study the temperature relaxation processes, considering the nuclei as semi-classical point charges and assume electrons as Gaussian wave packets which includes the influences of the size and the radial motion of electrons. At the same time, a Pauli potential is used to describe the electronic exchange effect. At this stage, quantum effects such as exchange, tunneling can be included in this model. We compare the results from EFF and classical molecular dynamics, and find that the relaxation time is much longer with including quantum effects, which can be explained directly by the deference of collision cross sections between quantum particles and classical particles. Further, the final thermal temperature of electron and ion is different compared with classical results that the electron quantum effects cannot be neglected.

  5. Molecular-Scale Investigation of Heavy Metal Ions at a Charged Langmuir Monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, William; Qiao, Baofu; Uysal, Ahmet; Bu, Wei; Lin, Binhua

    Solvent extraction - the surfactant-aided preferential transfer of a species from an aqueous to an organic phase - is an important technique used in heavy and precious metal refining and reprocessing. Solvent extraction requires transfer through an oil/water interface, and interfacial interactions are expected to control transfer kinetics and phase stability, yet these key interactions are poorly understood. Langmuir monolayers with charged headgroups atop concentrated salt solutions containing heavy metal ions act as a model of solvent extraction interfaces; studies of ions at a charged surface are also fundamentally important to many other phenomena including protein solvation, mineral surface chemistry, and electrochemistry. We probe these charged interfaces using a variety of surface-sensitive techniques - vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity (XRR), x-ray fluorescence near total reflection (XFNTR), and grazing incidence diffraction (GID). We integrate experiments with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to uncover the molecular-level interfacial structure. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, BES, Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. ChemMatCARS is supported by NSF/CHE-1346572.

  6. Influence of temperature on the molecular composition of ions and charged clusters during pure biogenic nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frege, Carla; Ortega, Ismael K.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Steiner, Gerhard; Heinritzi, Martin; Ahonen, Lauri; Amorim, António; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Brilke, Sophia; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dada, Lubna; Dias, António; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; El-Haddad, Imad; Fischer, Lukas; Fuchs, Claudia; Garmash, Olga; Gonin, Marc; Hansel, Armin; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Mauldin, Roy Lee; Molteni, Ugo; Nichman, Leonid; Petäjä, Tuukka; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stolzenburg, Dominik; Tomé, António; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Robert; Xiao, Mao; Yan, Chao; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Winkler, Paul M.; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2018-01-01

    It was recently shown by the CERN CLOUD experiment that biogenic highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) form particles under atmospheric conditions in the absence of sulfuric acid, where ions enhance the nucleation rate by 1-2 orders of magnitude. The biogenic HOMs were produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene at 5 °C. Here we extend this study to compare the molecular composition of positive and negative HOM clusters measured with atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometers (APi-TOFs), at three different temperatures (25, 5 and -25 °C). Most negative HOM clusters include a nitrate (NO3-) ion, and the spectra are similar to those seen in the nighttime boreal forest. On the other hand, most positive HOM clusters include an ammonium (NH4+) ion, and the spectra are characterized by mass bands that differ in their molecular weight by ˜ 20 C atoms, corresponding to HOM dimers. At lower temperatures the average oxygen to carbon (O : C) ratio of the HOM clusters decreases for both polarities, reflecting an overall reduction of HOM formation with decreasing temperature. This indicates a decrease in the rate of autoxidation with temperature due to a rather high activation energy as has previously been determined by quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, at the lowest temperature (-25 °C), the presence of C30 clusters shows that HOM monomers start to contribute to the nucleation of positive clusters. These experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the binding energies of representative neutral and charged clusters.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the "stay or leave" problem for two magnesium ions in gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaogui

    2017-06-01

    Two magnesium ions play important roles in nucleotide addition cycle (NAC) of gene transcription. However, at the end of each NAC, why does one ion stay in the active site while the other ion leaves with product pyrophosphate (PP i )? This problem still remains obscure. In this work, we studied the problem using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with steered molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulation methods. Our simulations reveal that although both ions are located in the active site after chemistry, their detailed positions are not symmetrical, leading to their different forces from surrounding groups. One ion makes weaker contacts with PP i than the whole protein. Hence, PP i release is less likely to take it away. The other one forms tighter contacts with PP i relative to the protein. The formed (Mg 2+ -PP i ) 2- complex is found to break the contacts with surrounding protein residues one by one so as to dissociate from the active site. This effectively avoids the coexistence of two ions in the active site after PP i release and guarantees a reasonable Mg 2+ ion number in the active site for the next NAC. The observations from this work can provide valuable information for comprehensively understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription. Proteins 2017; 85:1002-1007. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Anomalies in the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties of correlated ions in complex molecular environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahakrishnan, Sathiya; Chakraborty, Subrata; Vijay, Amrendra

    2017-11-01

    Emergent statistical attributes, and therefore the equations of state, of an assembly of interacting charge carriers embedded within a complex molecular environment frequently exhibit a variety of anomalies, particularly in the high-density (equivalently, the concentration) regime, which are not well understood, because they do not fall under the low-concentration phenomenologies of Debye-Hückel-Onsager and Poisson-Nernst-Planck, including their variants. To go beyond, we here use physical concepts and mathematical tools from quantum scattering theory, transport theory with the Stosszahlansatz of Boltzmann, and classical electrodynamics (Lorentz gauge) and obtain analytical expressions both for the average and the frequency-wave vector-dependent longitudinal and transverse current densities, diffusion coefficient, and the charge density, and therefore the analytical expressions for (a) the chemical potential, activity coefficient, and the equivalent conductivity for strong electrolytes and (b) the current-voltage characteristics for ion-transport processes in complex molecular environments. Using a method analogous to the notion of Debye length and thence the electrical double layer, we here identify a pair of characteristic length scales (longitudinal and the transverse), which, being wave vector and frequency dependent, manifestly exhibit nontrivial fluctuations in space-time. As a unifying theme, we advance a quantity (inverse length dimension), gscat(a ), which embodies all dynamical interactions, through various quantum scattering lengths, relevant to molecular species a, and the analytical behavior which helps us to rationalize the properties of strong electrolytes, including anomalies, in all concentration regimes. As an example, the behavior of gscat(a ) in the high-concentration regime explains the anomalous increase of the Debye length with concentration, as seen in a recent experiment on electrolyte solutions. We also put forth an extension of the

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticle-micelles (ION-micelles for sensitive (molecular magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas W E Starmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs are a promising nanoplatform for contrast-enhanced MRI. Recently, magnetic particle imaging (MPI was introduced as a new imaging modality, which is able to directly visualize magnetic particles and could serve as a more sensitive and quantitative alternative to MRI. However, MPI requires magnetic particles with specific magnetic properties for optimal use. Current commercially available iron oxide formulations perform suboptimal in MPI, which is triggering research into optimized synthesis strategies. Most synthesis procedures aim at size control of iron oxide nanoparticles rather than control over the magnetic properties. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel ION platform for sensitive MPI and MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS: IONs were synthesized using a thermal-decomposition method and subsequently phase-transferred by encapsulation into lipidic micelles (ION-Micelles. Next, the material and magnetic properties of the ION-Micelles were analyzed. Most notably, vibrating sample magnetometry measurements showed that the effective magnetic core size of the IONs is 16 nm. In addition, magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS measurements were performed. MPS is essentially zero-dimensional MPI and therefore allows to probe the potential of iron oxide formulations for MPI. ION-Micelles induced up to 200 times higher signal in MPS measurements than commercially available iron oxide formulations (Endorem, Resovist and Sinerem and thus likely allow for significantly more sensitive MPI. In addition, the potential of the ION-Micelle platform for molecular MPI and MRI was showcased by MPS and MRI measurements of fibrin-binding peptide functionalized ION-Micelles (FibPep-ION-Micelles bound to blood clots. CONCLUSIONS: The presented data underlines the potential of the ION-Micelle nanoplatform for sensitive (molecular MPI and warrants further investigation of the FibPep-ION

  10. The rise of 3-d single-ion magnets in molecular magnetism: towards materials from molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jamie M; Harriman, Katie L M; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-04-21

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) that contain one spin centre (so-called single-ion magnets) theoretically represent the smallest possible unit for spin-based electronic devices. The realisation of this and related technologies, depends on first being able to design systems with sufficiently large energy barriers to magnetisation reversal, U eff , and secondly, on being able to organise these molecules into addressable arrays. In recent years, significant progress has been made towards the former goal - principally as a result of efforts which have been directed towards studying complexes based on highly anisotropic lanthanide ions, such as Tb(iii) and Dy(iii). Since 2013 however, and the remarkable report by Long and co-workers of a linear Fe(i) system exhibiting U eff = 325 K, single-ion systems of transition metals have undergone something of a renaissance in the literature. Not only do they have important lessons to teach us about anisotropy and relaxation dynamics in the quest to enhance U eff , the ability to create strongly coupled spin systems potentially offers access to a whole of host of 1, 2 and 3-dimensional materials with interesting structural and physical properties. This perspective summarises recent progress in this rapidly expanding sub-genre of molecular magnetism from the viewpoint of the synthetic chemist, with a particular focus on the lessons that have so far been learned from single-ion magnets of the d-block, and, the future research directions which we feel are likely to emerge in the coming years.

  11. Characterization of low molecular weight dissolved natural organic matter along the treatment trait of a waterworks using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yahe; Shi, Quan; Ren, Shuoyi; Yu, Jianwei; Ji, Feng; Luo, Wenbin; Yang, Min

    2012-10-15

    Dissolved natural organic matter (DOM), particularly the low molecular weight DOM, can affect the performance of water treatment processes and serve as a main precursor of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination. In this study, electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize the low molecular weight DOM along the treatment trait of a conventional drinking water treatment plant. The ESI FT-ICR MS data showed that various C, H, O-only class species were the major components in the source water. According to the van Krevelen diagram analysis, lignin- and tannin-like compounds were the most abundant components. Within an isobaric group, the DOM molecules with a high degree of oxidation (high O/C value) were preferentially removed during coagulation, while those with low degree of oxidation were found to be more reactive toward chlorine. In addition, 357 one-chlorine containing products and 199 two-chlorine containing products formed during chlorination were detected in the chlorination effluent sample at a high confidence level. The chlorinated products can be arranged into series, suggesting that they were originated from C, H, O-only precursor compounds, which were in series related by the replacement of CH(4) against oxygen. For the first time, this study explored the behavior of low molecular weight DOM along a drinking water treatment trait on the molecular level, and revealed the presence of abundant unknown chlorinated products, which are probably rich in carboxylic and phenolic groups, in drinking water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metal Oxide Nanosensors Using Polymeric Membranes, Enzymes and Antibody Receptors as Ion and Molecular Recognition Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices.

  13. Ionization of molecular hydrogen by 5 MeV/u bare fluorine ion and electron interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Misra, D.; Kelkar, A. H.; Fainstein, P. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2010-06-01

    Electrons emitted from H2 in collisions with 5 MeV/u F9 + ions were measured in the energy range from 1 to 300 eV and a wide range of emission angles between 20° and 160°. The measured energy and angular distributions of double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) of these electrons are compared with the molecular continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) calculation. The observed energy and angular distributions can be explained, in general, with the help of the two-centre effect which is included in the CDW-EIS model. In addition, the DDCS ratios of molecular-to-atomic hydrogen exhibit an oscillatory structure which is discussed in terms of Young-type electron interference. We have obtained the frequencies of such oscillations and studied their angular dependence. The single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) are deduced by integrating the DDCSs over solid angle and emission energy. We demonstrate that the SDCS ratio spectra also preserve the signature of interference to some extent. The asymmetry parameter, derived only from the molecular cross sections for forward and backward angles, shows an oscillatory behaviour as a function of electron velocity. This is understood in terms of the interference effect superimposed with the post-collisional two-centre effect.

  14. Ionization of molecular hydrogen by 5 MeV/u bare fluorine ion and electron interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S; Misra, D; Kelkar, A H; Tribedi, L C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Fainstein, P D, E-mail: lokesh@tifr.res.i [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2010-06-28

    Electrons emitted from H{sub 2} in collisions with 5 MeV/u F{sup 9} {sup +} ions were measured in the energy range from 1 to 300 eV and a wide range of emission angles between 20{sup 0} and 160{sup 0}. The measured energy and angular distributions of double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) of these electrons are compared with the molecular continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) calculation. The observed energy and angular distributions can be explained, in general, with the help of the two-centre effect which is included in the CDW-EIS model. In addition, the DDCS ratios of molecular-to-atomic hydrogen exhibit an oscillatory structure which is discussed in terms of Young-type electron interference. We have obtained the frequencies of such oscillations and studied their angular dependence. The single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) are deduced by integrating the DDCSs over solid angle and emission energy. We demonstrate that the SDCS ratio spectra also preserve the signature of interference to some extent. The asymmetry parameter, derived only from the molecular cross sections for forward and backward angles, shows an oscillatory behaviour as a function of electron velocity. This is understood in terms of the interference effect superimposed with the post-collisional two-centre effect.

  15. Photofragmentation spectroscopy of stored molecular ions at the dissociation limit; Photofragmentationsspektroskopie gespeicherter Molekuelionen an der Dissoziationsschwelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hechtfischer, U.

    2000-07-01

    Photofragmentation spectroscopy is a sensitive probe for nonadiabatic interactions in molecular dissociation, but for molecular ions detection and analysis of spectra are often hampered by the internal excitations of the ion beam. Therefore, near-threshold photofragmentation of CH{sup +} and OH{sup +} was studied in a heavy-ion storage ring where the ions rovibronically relax to room temperature within a few seconds. In the CH{sup +} spectrum, the Feshbach resonances between the fine-structure levels of the C{sup +} fragment were observed for the first time, the complex lineshapes indicating strong nonadiabatic couplings between the potentials. By a standard single-channel analysis, the spectrum was partially assigned and a more precise dissociation energy was deduced. The complete analysis was possible by multichannel close-coupling calculations only and yielded the vibrational defects of all coupled potentials. Furthermore, improved empirical potentials were constructed by an IPA approach, and conclusions on the reverse radiative association process in interstellar clouds were drawn. In OH{sup +}, numerous photofragmentation resonances were observed for both neutral and ionic oxygen fragments and assigned to the highest bound levels of the A{sup 3}II curve. In contrast to CH{sup +}, OH{sup +} hardly shows any multichannel behavior. (orig.) [German] Photofragmentationsspektroskopie ist eine empfindliche Sonde fuer nichtadiabatische Wechselwirkungen bei der Dissoziation von Molekuelen, aber bei Molekuelionen erschweren haeufig die internen Anregungen des Ionenstrahls Messung und Analyse der Spektren. Deshalb wurde hier die schwellennahe Photofragmentation von CH{sup +}- und OH{sup +}-Molekuelionen in einem Schwerionenspeicherring untersucht, wo die Ionen rovibronisch innerhalb von Sekunden Raumtemperatur annehmen. Im CH{sup +}-Spektrum wurden so erstmals die Feshbach-Resonanzen zwischen den Feinstrukturniveaus des C{sup +}-Fragments direkt beobachtet, deren

  16. Number distribution of multiply emitted secondary electrons (MUSE) produced by atomic and molecular ion impacts on thin foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, K. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Physics)

    1991-09-01

    The number distribution of secondary electrons emitted through energetic ion impact on a thin carbon foil was measured. Projectile ions of 1-MeV/u He{sub 2} {sup +} or He{sup +} passed through a carbon foil with thickness of 1 {mu} g/cm{sup 2} in a direction of 45{sup o} to its surface. Electrons emitted in the forward and backward directions were accelerated by a potential applied to the foil and detected by two solid state detectors (SSDs) in which pulses proportional to the electron number were formed. Transmitted ions were charge analyzed by an electrostatic deflector and detected by the third SSD. The measurement was performed in coincidence with transmitted He{sup 2+} ions and in the event-recording mode. For molecular ions, Coulomb explosion fragments, i.e., two He{sup 2+} ions were detected after passing an annular slit or conventional circular slit which selects incident molecules with molecular axes perpendicular to or parallel to the ion velocity. The average numbers of electrons emitted in the forward direction are about 1.5 times as large as those in the backward direction for atomic and molecular ions with both orientations. The width of the number distribution is generally wider than that of Poisson distribution with the same average number. Orientation dependence is not recognized in the backward direction but a slight enhancement is found for parallel orientation in the forward direction. The fact that the vicinage effect is observed only for the parallel orientation seems consistent with the density enhancement of the target electrons behind the leading ion. A negative correlation between numbers of electrons emitted in the forward and backward directions is found. (Author).

  17. Experimental Investigation of Impact-Induced Molecular Desorption by 4.2 MeV/u Pb ions

    CERN Document Server

    Chanel, M; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N; Mahner, E

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the LHC, accumulation and cooling test with lead ion beams have been performed in the LEAR storage ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected, large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO and CO2. Unpexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2x104 molecules/ion have been observed. The implications of these results for the vacuum system of the future ion accumulator ring (LEIR) and possi...

  18. Molecular identification and relative abundance of cryptic Lophodermium species in natural populations of Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reignoux, Sabrina N A; Green, Sarah; Ennos, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The multi-locus phylogenetic species recognition approach and population genetic analysis of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to delineate Lophodermium taxa inhabiting needles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) in native pinewoods within Scotland. These analyses revealed three major lineages corresponding to the morphological species Lophodermium seditiosum and Lophodermium conigenum, fruiting on broken branches, and Lophodermium pinastri, fruiting on naturally fallen needles. Within L. pinastri three well supported sister clades were found representing cryptic taxa designated L. pinastri I, L. pinastri II, and L. pinastri III. Significant differences in mean growth rate in culture were found among the cryptic taxa. Taxon-specific primers based on ITS sequences were designed and used to classify over 500 Lophodermium isolates, derived from fallen needles of P. sylvestris in three Scottish and one French pinewood site, into the three L. pinastri cryptic taxa. Highly significant differences in the relative abundance of the three taxa were found among the Scottish pinewood sites, and between the French and all of the Scottish sites. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rosetta/Alice Measurements of Atomic and Molecular Abundances in the Coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Knight, M. M.; Feldman, P.; Stern, A.; Parker, J. W.; Feaga, L. M.; Steffl, A.; Bertaux, J. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Keeney, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    During the Rosetta orbital phase from August 2014 through September 2016, the Alice far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph routinely monitored the FUV emission from the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). These data, spanning 700-2050 Å, provide both spatial and temporal information on the evolution of the coma composition throughout the encounter. Emissions from hydrogen (Lyman beta at 1025 Å), oxygen (1304 Å triplet, 1356 Å), sulfur (1429 Å and 1479 Å multiplets, 1814 Å triplet), and carbon (1561 Å, 1657 Å) were regularly observed, as well as emission from the CO Fourth Positive and Cameron bands. We present a preliminary analysis of these emissions with a focus on the abundances in the coma and a mapping of the temporal and spatial variations. Both short-term (days) and long-term (months) variations will be discussed in the context of rotational and seasonal timeframes. We also present ratios among various species with the goal of identifying the dominant processes at work in the coma as a function of time. Rosetta is an ESA mission with contributions from its member states and NASA. The Alice team acknowledges continuing support from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory through contract 1336850 to the Southwest Research Institute. RJV's work was supported by a subcontract from Southwest Research Institute to the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

  20. Simple molecular model for the binding of antibiotic molecules to bacterial ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafé, Salvador; Ramírez, Patricio; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2003-10-01

    A molecular model aimed at explaining recent experimental data by Nestorovich et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 9789 (2002)] on the interaction of ampicillin molecules with the constriction zone in a channel of the general bacterial porin, OmpF (outer membrane protein F), is presented. The model extends T. L. Hill's theory for intermolecular interactions in a pair of binding sites [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 78, 3330 (1956)] by incorporating two binding ions and two pairs of interacting sites. The results provide new physical insights on the role of the complementary pattern of the charge distributions in the ampicillin molecule and the narrowest part of the channel pore. Charge matching of interacting sites facilitates drug binding. The dependence of the number of ampicillin binding events per second with the solution pH and salt concentration is explained qualitatively using a reduced number of fundamental concepts.

  1. Investigation of the intermediate LK molecular orbital radiation in heavy ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, W.; Kaun, K.-H.; Manfrass, P.

    1981-01-01

    The continuum consisting of an intensive low-energy and a high-energy components in heavy-ion atom collision systems with atomic numbers Z 1 , Z 2 > 28 is studied. The aim of the study is to prove that the C1 continuum cannot be caused by ridiative electron capture (REC) being molecular orbital (MO) radiation to the 2ptau level. It is shown that the comparison of the C1 yields obtained in Kr+Nb asymmetric collisions in gas and solid targets is associated with the formation of vacancies in the lower-Z collision partner and can be interpreted as quasimolecular radiation to the 2ptau orbital level. The strong suppression of the C2 component in the gas target experimets indicates that the MO radiation to the 1stau orbit is emitted preferentially in the two-collision process in symmetric and near-symmetric systems with Z 1 , Z 2 [ru

  2. H32+ molecular ion in a strong magnetic field: Triangular configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Vieyra, J.C.; Turbiner, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    The existence of the molecular ion H 3 2+ in a magnetic field in a triangular configuration is revised. A variational method with an optimization of the form of the vector potential (gauge fixing) is used. It is shown that in the range of magnetic fields 10 8 11 G the system (pppe), with the protons forming an equilateral triangle perpendicular to the magnetic line, has a well-pronounced minimum in the total energy. This configuration is unstable under the decays (H atom)+p+p and H 2 + +p. The triangular configuration of H 3 2+ complements H 3 2+ in the linear configuration that exists for B > or approx. 10 10 G

  3. Molecular Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1a by Ibuprofen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy; Romero-Rojo, José Luis; Lund, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence links certain aspects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) pharmacology with acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a small family of excitatory neurotransmitter receptors implicated in pain and neuroinflammation. The molecular basis of NSAID inhibition of ASICs has......-clamp fluorometry. Our results show that ibuprofen is an allosteric inhibitor of ASIC1a, which binds to a crucial site in the agonist transduction pathway and causes conformational changes that oppose channel activation. Ibuprofen inhibits several ASIC subtypes, but certain ibuprofen derivatives show some...... selectivity for ASIC1a over ASIC2a and vice versa. These results thus define the NSAID/ASIC interaction and pave the way for small-molecule drug design targeting pain and inflammation....

  4. Tethering metal ions to photocatalyst particulate surfaces by bifunctional molecular linkers for efficient hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2014-08-19

    A simple and versatile method for the preparation of photocatalyst particulates modified with effective cocatalysts is presented; the method involves the sequential soaking of photocatalyst particulates in solutions containing bifunctional organic linkers and metal ions. The modification of the particulate surfaces is a universal and reproducible method because the molecular linkers utilize strong covalent bonds, which in turn result in modified monolayer with a small but controlled quantity of metals. The photocatalysis results indicated that the CdS with likely photochemically reduced Pd and Ni, which were initially immobilized via ethanedithiol (EDT) as a linker, were highly efficient for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from Na2S-Na2SO3-containing aqueous solutions. The method developed in this study opens a new synthesis route for the preparation of effective photocatalysts with various combinations of bifunctional linkers, metals, and photocatalyst particulate materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Influence of galactic arm scale dynamics on the molecular composition of the cold and dense ISM. I. Observed abundance gradients in dense clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaud, M.; Wakelam, V.; Gratier, P.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. We study the effect of large scale dynamics on the molecular composition of the dense interstellar medium during the transition between diffuse to dense clouds. Methods: We followed the formation of dense clouds (on sub-parsec scales) through the dynamics of the interstellar medium at galactic scales. We used results from smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations from which we extracted physical parameters that are used as inputs for our full gas-grain chemical model. In these simulations, the evolution of the interstellar matter is followed for 50 Myr. The warm low-density interstellar medium gas flows into spiral arms where orbit crowding produces the shock formation of dense clouds, which are held together temporarily by the external pressure. Results: We show that depending on the physical history of each SPH particle, the molecular composition of the modeled dense clouds presents a high dispersion in the computed abundances even if the local physical properties are similar. We find that carbon chains are the most affected species and show that these differences are directly connected to differences in (1) the electronic fraction, (2) the C/O ratio, and (3) the local physical conditions. We argue that differences in the dynamical evolution of the gas that formed dense clouds could account for the molecular diversity observed between and within these clouds. Conclusions: This study shows the importance of past physical conditions in establishing the chemical composition of the dense medium.

  6. Coherent manipulation of three-qubit states in a molecular single-ion magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M. D.; Duan, Y.; Diosdado, B.; García-Ripoll, J. J.; Gaita-Ariño, A.; Giménez-Saiz, C.; Alonso, P. J.; Coronado, E.; Luis, F.

    2017-02-01

    We study the quantum spin dynamics of nearly isotropic Gd3 + ions entrapped in polyoxometalate molecules and diluted in crystals of a diamagnetic Y3 + derivative. The full energy-level spectrum and the orientations of the magnetic anisotropy axes have been determined by means of continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, using X-band (9-10 GHz) cavities and on-chip superconducting waveguides and 1.5-GHz resonators. The results show that seven allowed transitions between the 2 S +1 spin states can be separately addressed. Spin coherence T2 and spin-lattice relaxation T1 rates have been measured for each of these transitions in properly oriented single crystals. The results suggest that quantum spin coherence is limited by residual dipolar interactions with neighbor electronic spins. Coherent Rabi oscillations have been observed for all transitions. The Rabi frequencies increase with microwave power and agree quantitatively with predictions based on the spin Hamiltonian of the molecular spin. We argue that the spin states of each Gd3 + ion can be mapped onto the states of three addressable qubits (or, alternatively, of a d =8 -level "qudit"), for which the seven allowed transitions form a universal set of operations. Within this scheme, one of the coherent oscillations observed experimentally provides an implementation of a controlled-controlled-NOT (or Toffoli) three-qubit gate.

  7. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  8. Towards understanding the molecular basis of ion channel modulation by lipids: Mechanistic models and current paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, José A; Marcela Giudici, A; Lourdes Renart, M; Morales, Andrés; González-Ros, José M

    2017-09-01

    Research on ion channel modulation has become a hot topic because of the key roles these membrane proteins play in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In this respect, lipid modulation adds to the overall modulatory mechanisms as a potential via to find new pharmacological targets for drug design based on interfering with lipid/channel interactions. However, our knowledge in this field is scarce and often circumscribed to the sites where lipids bind and/or its final functional consequences. To fully understand this process it is necessary to improve our knowledge on its molecular basis, from the binding sites to the signalling pathways that derive in structural and functional effects on the ion channel. In this review, we have compiled information about such mechanisms and established a classification into four different modes of action. Afterwards, we have revised in more detail the lipid modulation of Cys-loop receptors and of the potassium channel KcsA, which were chosen as model channels modulated by specific lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A recoil ion momentum spectrometer for molecular and atomic fragmentation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arnab; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Misra, Deepankar

    2015-04-01

    We report the development and performance studies of a newly built recoil ion momentum spectrometer for the study of atomic and molecular fragmentation dynamics in gas phase upon the impact of charged particles and photons. The present design is a two-stage Wiley-McLaren type spectrometer which satisfies both time and velocity focusing conditions and is capable of measuring singly charged ionic fragments up-to 13 eV in all directions. An electrostatic lens has been introduced in order to achieve velocity imaging. Effects of the lens on time-of-flight as well as on the position have been investigated in detail, both, by simulation and in experiment. We have used 120 keV proton beam on molecular nitrogen gas target. Complete momentum distributions and kinetic energy release distributions have been derived from the measured position and time-of-flight spectra. Along with this, the kinetic energy release spectra of fragmentation of doubly ionized nitrogen molecule upon various projectile impacts are presented.

  10. A recoil ion momentum spectrometer for molecular and atomic fragmentation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Arnab; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Misra, Deepankar, E-mail: dmisra@tifr.res.in [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2015-04-15

    We report the development and performance studies of a newly built recoil ion momentum spectrometer for the study of atomic and molecular fragmentation dynamics in gas phase upon the impact of charged particles and photons. The present design is a two-stage Wiley-McLaren type spectrometer which satisfies both time and velocity focusing conditions and is capable of measuring singly charged ionic fragments up-to 13 eV in all directions. An electrostatic lens has been introduced in order to achieve velocity imaging. Effects of the lens on time-of-flight as well as on the position have been investigated in detail, both, by simulation and in experiment. We have used 120 keV proton beam on molecular nitrogen gas target. Complete momentum distributions and kinetic energy release distributions have been derived from the measured position and time-of-flight spectra. Along with this, the kinetic energy release spectra of fragmentation of doubly ionized nitrogen molecule upon various projectile impacts are presented.

  11. Impact ionization of molecular oxygen by 3.5-MeV/u bare carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Saikat; Agnihotri, Aditya N.; Kasthurirangan, S.; Kumar, Ajay; Tachino, Carmen A.; Rivarola, Roberto D.; Martín, F.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2012-06-01

    We have measured the absolute double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) for electron emission in ionization of O2 molecules under the impact of 3.5-MeV/u C6+ ions. The data were collected between 10 and 600 eV, in an angular range of 30∘ to 150∘. The single-differential cross sections (SDCSs) in emission angle and electron energy are deduced from the electron DDCS spectra. Also, the total cross section has been obtained from the SDCS spectra. The DDCS spectra as well as the SDCS spectra are compared with continuum distorted-wave eikonal initial-state calculations which employ molecular wave functions built as linear combinations of atomic orbitals. The DDCS ratio i.e. σO2/2σO, derived by dividing the experimental DDCS for molecular oxygen with the theoretical DDCS for atomic oxygen, does not show any primary or secondary oscillations arising from Young-type interference, which is apparently in contrast to what has been observed earlier for H2 and in agreement with the model calculation. Similarly, the forward-backward angular asymmetry increases monotonically with the velocity of the emitted electrons. However, the results on the DDCSs, SDCSs, the asymmetry parameter, and the nonexistence of oscillations are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the model used.

  12. Electron collisions with the BeH{sup +} molecular ion in the R-matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, K. [Department of Mathematics, Scottish Church College, 1-3 Urquhart Sq., 700006 Kolbata (India); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physicas and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    BeH{sup +} is formed when fusion plasma interacts with beryllium first walls, so the interaction of electrons in the plasma with BeH{sup +} needs to be understood. The R-matrix method is used to study electron collisions with the BeH{sup +} molecular ion. The diatomic version of the UK Molecular R-matrix codes is used and a configuration-interaction calculation is first performed for the BeH{sup +} target to obtain its potential energy curves for 19 lowest singlet and triplet states. Scattering calculations are then done to yield excitation and rotational excitation cross sections in the energy range 0 - 14 eV. Additionally we also obtain bound states of BeH and their quantum defects at the BeH equilibrium bond length 2.5369*a{sub 0}. Resonance positions and widths for Feshbach resonances in the e-BeH{sup +} system are also obtained and presented at the equilibrium bond length 2.5369*a{sub 0}

  13. Structural and molecular basis for the novel catalytic mechanism and evolution of DddP, an abundant peptidase-like bacterial Dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase: a new enzyme from an old fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Li, Chun-Yang; Gao, Xiang; Zhu, De-yu; Xie, Bin-Bin; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Xun, Lu-ying; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-10-01

    The microbial cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) generates volatile dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and is an important step in global sulfur and carbon cycles. DddP is a DMSP lyase in marine bacteria, and the deduced dddP gene product is abundant in marine metagenomic data sets. However, DddP belongs to the M24 peptidase family according to sequence alignment. Peptidases hydrolyze C-N bonds, but DddP is deduced to cleave C-S bonds. Mechanisms responsible for this striking functional shift are currently unknown. We determined the structures of DMSP lyase RlDddP (the DddP from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI_1157) bound to inhibitory 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid or PO4 (3-) and of two mutants of RlDddP bound to acrylate. Based on structural, mutational and biochemical analyses, we characterized a new ion-shift catalytic mechanism of RlDddP for DMSP cleavage. Furthermore, we suggested the structural mechanism leading to the loss of peptidase activity and the subsequent development of DMSP lyase activity in DddP. This study sheds light on the catalytic mechanism and the divergent evolution of DddP, leading to a better understanding of marine bacterial DMSP catabolism and global DMS production. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A First Principles Molecular Dynamics Study Of Calcium Ion In Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lightstone, F; Schwegler, E; Allesch, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2005-01-28

    In this work we report on Car-Parrinello simulations of the divalent calcium ion in water, aimed at understanding the structure of the hydration shell and at comparing theoretical results with a series of recent experiments. Our paper shows some of the progress in the investigation of aqueous solutions brought about by the advent of ab initio molecular dynamics and highlights the importance of accessing subtle details of ion-water interactions from first-principles. Calcium plays a vital role in many biological systems, including signal transduction, blood clotting and cell division. In particular, calcium ions are known to interact strongly with proteins as they tend to bind well to both negatively charged (e.g. in aspartate and glutamate) and uncharged oxygens (e.g. in main-chain carbonyls). The ability of calcium to coordinate multiple ligands (from 6 to 8 oxygen atoms) with an asymmetric coordination shell enables it to cross-link different segments of a protein and induce large conformational changes. The great biochemical importance of the calcium ion has led to a number of studies to determine its hydration shell and its preferred coordination number in water. Experimental studies have used a variety of techniques, including XRD, EXAFS, and neutron diffraction to elucidate the coordination of Ca{sup 2+} in water. The range of coordination numbers (n{sub C}) inferred by X-ray diffraction studies varies from 6 to 8, and is consistent with that reported in EXAFS experiments (8 and 7.2). A wider range of values (6 to 10) was found in early neutron diffraction studies, depending on concentration, while a more recent measurement by Badyal, et al. reports a value close to 7. In addition to experimental measurements, many theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the solvation of Ca{sup 2+} in water and have also reported a wide range of coordination numbers. Most of the classical molecular dynamics (MD) and QM/MM simulations report n{sub C} in the

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the first charge of a Li-ion-Si-anode nanobattery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Aranda, Diego E; Ponce, Victor; Seminario, Jorge M

    2017-04-01

    Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are the most popular devices for energy storage but still a lot of research needs to be done to improve their cycling and storage capacity. Silicon has been proposed as an anode material because of its large theoretical capacity of ∼3600 mAh/g. Therefore, focus is needed on the lithiation process of silicon anodes where it is known that the anode increases its volume more than 300%, producing cracking and other damages. We performed molecular dynamics atomistic simulations to study the swelling, alloying, and amorphization of a silicon nanocrystal anode in a full nanobattery model during the first charging cycle. A dissolved salt of lithium hexafluorophosphate in ethylene carbonate was chosen as the electrolyte solution and lithium cobalt oxide as cathode. External electric fields are applied to emulate the charging, causing the migration of the Li-ions from the cathode to the anode, by drifting through the electrolyte solution, thus converting pristine Si gradually into Li 14 Si 5 when fully lithiated. When the electric field is applied to the nanobattery, the temperature never exceeds 360 K due to a temperature control imposed resembling a cooling mechanism. The volume of the anode increases with the amorphization of the silicon as the external field is applied by creating a layer of LiSi alloy between the electrolyte and the silicon nanocrystal and then, at the arrival of more Li-ions changing to an alloy, where the drift velocity of Li-ions is greater than the velocity in the initial nanocrystal structure. Charge neutrality is maintained by concerted complementary reduction-oxidation reactions at the anode and cathode, respectively. In addition, the nanobattery model developed here can be used to study charge mobility, current density, conductance and resistivity, among several other properties of several candidate materials for rechargeable batteries and constitutes the initial point for further studies on the formation of

  16. Molecular characteristics of a fluorescent chemosensor for the recognition of ferric ion based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhen; Ran, Xia; Shi, Lili; Lou, Jie; Kuang, Yanmin; Guo, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Metal ion recognition is of great significance in biological and environmental detection. So far, there is very few research related to the ferric ion sensing based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivatives. In this work, we report a highly selective fluorescent "turn-off" sensor for Fe3 + ions and the molecular sensing characteristics based on an azobenzene derivative, N-(3,4,5-octanoxyphenyl)-N‧-4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azophenyl]1,3,4-oxadiazole (AOB-t8). The binding association constant was determined to be 6.07 × 103 M- 1 in ethanol and the stoichiometry ratio of 2:2 was obtained from Job's plot and MS spectra. The AOB-t8 might be likely to form the dimer structure through the chelation of ferric ion with the azobenzene moiety. Meanwhile, it was found that the photoisomerization property of AOB-t8 was regulated by the binding with Fe3 +. With the chelation of Fe3 +, the regulated molecular rigidity and the perturbed of electronic state and molecular geometry was suggested to be responsible for the accelerated isomerization of AOB-t8 to UV irradiation and the increased fluorescence lifetime of both trans- and cis-AOB-t8-Fe(III). Moreover, the reversible sensing of AOB-t8 was successfully observed by releasing the iron ion from AOB-t8-Fe(III) with the addition of citric acid.

  17. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow-discharges, non-evaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, Ar and CO2. Unexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2 104 molecules/ion have been observed. The red...

  18. Dependence of the Rate of LiF Ion-Pairing on the Description of Molecular Interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pluhařová, Eva; Baer, M. D.; Schenter, G. K.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Mundy, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 8 (2016), s. 1749-1758 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * ion pairing kinetics * lithium fluoride Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.177, year: 2016

  19. Mid-infrared continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy of molecular ions using an optical parametric oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbraak, H.; Ngai, A.K.Y.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Linnartz, H.

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive infrared detection scheme is presented in which continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy is used to record rovibrational spectra of molecular ions in direct absorption through supersonically expanding planar plasma. A cw optical parametric oscillator is used as a light source and

  20. Metal Ion Coordination Essential for Specific Molecular Interactions of Butea monosperma Lectin: ITC and MD Simulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, J; Haridas, M

    2015-05-01

    Crystal structure of Butea monosperma seed lectin (BML) was analyzed and the metal ion geometry identified. In order to understand the role of metal ions for the structural stability and ligand binding, studies of demetallized protein were carried out. Binding of different ligands like GalNAc, lactose, and galactose onto native and demetallized protein was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry as well as molecular simulation methods. Molecular dynamics was applied to the structure after removing the coordinates of metal ions, to identify the effect of demetallization in silico. Docking studies of different sugar molecules as well as the fungal α-amylase was carried out and compared the interactions in the native and apo states. It was found that metal ions are important for the ligand binding with increased affinity. However, their absence did not make any alteration to the secondary structure. Though the metal ions were not coordinated to the loops contacting the α-amylase, the absence of metal ions reduced the protein-protein binding strength due to long-range changes in irregular structures of the lectin.

  1. Different routes, same pathways: Molecular mechanisms under silver ion and nanoparticle exposures in the soil sentinel Eisenia fetida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novo, Marta; Lahive, Elma; Díez-Ortiz, María; Matzke, Marianne; Morgan, Andrew J.; Spurgeon, David J.; Svendsen, Claus; Kille, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Use of nanotechnology products is increasing; with silver (Ag) nanoparticles particularly widely used. A key uncertainty surrounding the risk assessment of AgNPs is whether their effects are driven through the same mechanism of action that underlies the toxic effects of Ag ions. We present the first full transcriptome study of the effects of Ag ions and NPs in an ecotoxicological model soil invertebrate, the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Gene expression analyses indicated similar mechanisms for both silver forms with toxicity being exerted through pathways related to ribosome function, sugar and protein metabolism, molecular stress, disruption of energy production and histones. The main difference seen between Ag ions and NPs was associated with potential toxicokinetic effects related to cellular internalisation and communication, with pathways related to endocytosis and cilia being significantly enriched. These results point to a common final toxicodynamic response, but initial internalisation driven by different exposure routes and toxicokinetic mechanisms. - Highlights: • Molecular effects underlying Ag ions and NPs exposure were studied in Eisenia fetida. • Full transcriptomic study of a genetically characterised lineage. • NPs and ions presented a similar toxicodynamic response. • Internalisation of the two Ag forms by different toxicokinetic mechanisms. - Transcriptomic analyses after exposure of earthworms to silver NPs or ions showed a final common toxicodynamic response, but internalisation by different toxicokinetic mechanisms

  2. A possible role of alkali metal ions in the synthesis of pure-silica molecular sieves

    OpenAIRE

    Goepper, Michelle; Li, Hong-Xin; Davis, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Pure-silica ZSM-12 is synthesized in the presence and absence of alkali metal ions; addition of alkali metal ions at constant hydroxide ion concentration increases the crystallization rate of ZSM-12, and it is suggested that alkali metal ions participate in both the nucleation and crystal growth processes.

  3. Rotational state resolved photodissociation spectroscopy of translationally and vibrationally cold MgH+ ions: toward rotational cooling of molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Klaus; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard

    2009-01-01

    and vibrationally cold MgH+ ions are presented, with and without the optical pumping laser being present. While rotational cooling is as yet not evident, first results showed evidence of a change in the rotational distribution in the presence of the optical pumping laser.......The first steps toward the implementation of a simple scheme for rotational cooling of MgH+ ions based on rotational state optical pumping is considered. The various aspects of such an experiment are described in detail, and the rotational state-selective dissociation spectra of translationally...

  4. Charge transport and magnetoresistance of G4-DNA molecular device modulated by counter ions and dephasing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Da-wei; Sun, Meng-le; Zuo, Zheng-wei; Wang, Hui-xian; Lv, Shi-jie; Li, Xin-zhong; Li, Li-ben

    2016-01-01

    The charge transport properties of the G4-DNA molecular device in the presence of counter ions and dephasing effect are investigated based on the Green function method and Landauer–Büttiker theory. The currents through the G4-DNA molecular device depend on the interference patterns at different coupling configurations. There is an effective electrostatic interaction between the counter ions and the G4-DNA molecule which introduces disorder into the on-site energies of G bases. The current through the device can be enhanced by the small disorder which avoids the strong interference of electrons at the same energy in some coupling configurations, however the diagonal disorder can suppress the overall current due to the Anderson localization of charge carriers when the disorder is large. In the presence of dephasing effect the current through the device at all coupling configurations can be enhanced as a result of the phase coherence losing of electron. As for the magnetic field response, the magnetoresistance of the device is always suppressed by the counter ions and dephasing effect. - Highlights: • The counter ions can some times enhance the current through G4-DNA molecule. • The dephasing effect can enhance the current of the device at all four coupling configurations. • The magnetoresistance is always suppressed by the counter ions and dephasing effect.

  5. Molecular and microscopic analysis of the gut contents of abundant rove beetle species (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae in the boreal balsam fir forest of Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Klimaszewski

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research on beetle responses to removal of logging residues following clearcut harvesting in the boreal balsam fir forest of Quebec revealed several abundant rove beetle (Staphylinidae species potentially important for long-term monitoring. To understand the trophic affiliations of these species in forest ecosystems, it was necessary to analyze their gut contents. We used microscopic and molecular (DNA methods to identify the gut contents of the following rove beetles: Atheta capsularis Klimaszew­ski, Atheta klagesi Bernhauer, Oxypoda grandipennis (Casey, Bryophacis smetanai Campbell, Ischnosoma longicorne (Mäklin, Mycetoporus montanus Luze, Tachinus frigidus Erichson, Tachinus fumipennis (Say, Tachinus quebecensis Robert, and Pseudopsis subulata Herman. We found no apparent arthropod fragments within the guts; however, a number of fungi were identified by DNA sequences, including filamentous fungi and budding yeasts [Ascomycota: Candida derodonti Suh & Blackwell (accession number FJ623605, Candida mesenterica (Geiger Diddens & Lodder (accession number FM178362, Candida railenensis Ramirez and Gonzáles (accession number JX455763, Candida sophie-reginae Ramirez & González (accession number HQ652073, Candida sp. (accession number AY498864, Pichia delftensis Beech (accession number AY923246, Pichia membranifaciens Hansen (accession number JQ26345, Pichia misumaiensis Y. Sasaki and Tak. Yoshida ex Kurtzman 2000 (accession number U73581, Pichia sp. (accession number AM261630, Cladosporium sp. (accession number KF367501, Acremonium psammosporum W. Gams (accession number GU566287, Alternaria sp. (accession number GU584946, Aspergillus versicolor Bubak (accession number AJ937750, and Aspergillus amstelodami (L. Mangin Thom and Church (accession number HQ728257]. In addition, two species of bacteria [Bradyrhizobium japonicum (KirchnerJordan (accession number BA000040 and Serratia marcescens Bizio accession number CP003942] were found in

  6. A four-component Dirac theory of ionization of a hydrogen molecular ion in a super-intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, F H M

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, a four-component Dirac theory of ionization of a hydrogen molecular ion, H + 2 , in a super-intense laser field is presented. Analytic expressions for the spin-specific as well as the total ionization currents emitted from the ground state of the ion are derived. The results are given for arbitrary intensity, frequency, wavenumber and polarization of the field, and for the up or down spin of the bound and ionized states of the electron. They also apply for the case of inner-shell ionization of analogous heavier diatomic molecular ions. The presence of molecular two-slit interference effect, first found in the non-relativistic case, the spin-flip ionization current, and an asymmetry of the up- and down-spin currents similar to that predicted in the atomic case, is found to hold for the present relativistic molecular ionic case as well. The possibility of controlling the spin of the dominant ionization current in any direction by simply selecting the handedness of a circularly polarized incident laser field is pointed out. Finally, we note that the present results obtained within the strong field 'KFR' ansatz open up the way for an analogous fully relativistic four-component treatment for ionization of polyatomic molecules and clusters in super-intense laser fields. (fast track communication)

  7. Ion assisted structural collapse of a single stranded DNA: A molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Dixit, Himanshu; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi, E-mail: rajarshi@chem.iitb.ac.in

    2015-09-28

    Highlights: • The dynamics of a single-stranded DNA in presence of different concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} is investigated. • The initial DNA chain collapse is characterized by the formation of non-sequentially stacked base pairs. • The DNA chain re-swells at high concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} as a consequence of overcharging. - Abstract: The structure and dynamics of negatively charged nucleic acids strongly correlate with the concentration and charge of the oppositely charged counterions. It is well known that the structural collapse of DNA is favoured in the presence of additional salt, a source of excess oppositely charged ions. Under such conditions single stranded DNA adopts a collapsed coil like conformation, typically characterized by stacking base pairs. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulation, we demonstrate that in the presence of additional divalent salt (MgCl{sub 2}) single stranded DNA with base sequence 5′-CGCGAATTCGCG-3′ (Dickerson Drew dodecamer) initially collapses and then expands with increasing salt concentration. This is due to the overcharging induced DNA chain swelling, a dominant factor at a higher divalent salt concentration. In a nutshell, our simulations show how in the presence of divalent salt, non-sequential base stacking and overcharging competes and affect single stranded DNA dynamics unlike a monovalent salt.

  8. H3+ molecular ion in a magnetic field: Linear parallel configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbiner, A. V.; Guevara, N. L.; Lopez Vieyra, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed study of the ground state of the H 3 + molecular ion in linear configuration, parallel to the magnetic field direction, and its low-lying Σ, Π, and Δ states is carried out for magnetic fields B=0-4.414x10 13 G in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The variational method is employed with a single trial function which includes electronic correlation in the form exp(γr 12 ), where γ is a variational parameter. It is shown that the quantum numbers of the state of the lowest total energy (ground state) depend on the magnetic field strength. The ground state evolves from the spin-singlet 1 Σ g state for weak magnetic fields B(less-or-similar sign)5x10 8 G to a weakly bound spin-triplet 3 Σ u state for intermediate fields and, eventually, to a spin-triplet 3 Π u state for 5x10 10 (less-or-similar sign)B(less-or-similar sign)4.414x10 13 G. Local stability of the linear parallel configuration with respect to possible small deviations is checked

  9. Mapping of low molecular weight heparins using reversed phase ion pair liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daoyuan; Chi, Lequan; Jin, Lan; Xu, Xiaohui; Du, Xuzhao; Ji, Shengli; Chi, Lianli

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are structurally complex, highly sulfated and negatively charged, linear carbohydrate polymers prepared by chemical or enzymatic depolymerization of heparin. They are widely used as anticoagulant drugs possessing better bioavailability, longer half-life, and lower side effects than heparin. Comprehensive structure characterization of LMWHs is important for drug quality assurance, generic drug application, and new drug research and development. However, fully characterization of all oligosaccharide chains in LMWHs is not feasible for current available analytical technologies due to their structure complexity and heterogeneity. Fingerprinting profiling is an efficient way for LMWHs' characterization and comparison. In this work, we present a simple, sensitive, and powerful analytical approach for structural characterization of LMWHs. Two different LMWHs, enoxaparin and nadroparin, were analyzed using reversed phase ion pair electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (RPIP-ESI-MS). More than 200 components were identified, including major structures, minor structures, and process related impurities. This approach is robust for high resolution and complementary fingerprinting analysis of LMWHs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lithium ion conductivity of molecularly compatibilized chitosan-poly(aminopropyltriethoxysilane)-poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, S.; Retuert, P.J.; Gonzalez, G.

    2007-01-01

    Films of composites of chitosan/poly(aminopropyltriethoxysilane)/poly(ethylene oxide) (CHI/pAPS/PEO) containing a fixed amount of lithium salt are studied. The ternary composition diagram of the composites, reporting information on the mechanic stability, the transparence and the electrical conductivity of the films, shows there is a window in which the molecular compatibility of the components is optimal. In this window, defined by the components ratios CHI/PEO 3:2, pAPS/PEO 2:3 and CHI/PEO 1:2, there is a particular composition Li x (CHI) 1 (PEO) 2 (pAPS) 1.2 for which the conductivity reaches a value of 1.7 x 10 -5 S cm -1 at near room temperature. Considering the balance between the Lewis acid and basic sites available in the component and the observed stoichiometry limits of formed polymer complexes, the conductivity values of these products may be understood by the formation of a layered structure in which the lithium ions, stabilized by the donors, poly(ethylene oxide) and/or poly(aminopropyltriethoxysilane), are intercalated in a chitosan matrix

  11. Atomic and molecular physics - Ions in solids - Laser systems. Courses, corrected exercises and problems Level M1/M2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, Georgette-Laura; Moncorge, Richard; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Adoui, Lamri; Lelievre, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    This document proposes the table of contents and a brief presentation of a course book for students in atomic and molecular physics. After some generalities on energy quantification and on photon momentum / Compton Effect, the different chapters address topics like hydrogen and helium atoms, alkalis, alkaline-earth, atoms with several valence electrons, the atom-radiation interaction, molecule and ion spectroscopy in solids, and the most significant laser systems using an active media based on atoms, ions or molecules in a diluted environment. Each chapter contains exercises and problems

  12. Determination of low molecular weight monocarboxylic Acid gases in the atmosphere by parallel plate diffusion scrubber-ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bokyoung; Hwangbo, Yown; Lee, Dong Soo

    2009-08-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of the concentration of low molecular weight monocarboxylic acid gases in the atmosphere. The method involves quantitative collection of analyte gases using a parallel plate diffusion scrubber and subsequent ion analysis by ion chromatography. Among the gases are formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, and n-valeric acid. Method detection limits are on the order of sub to low parts-per-trillion by volume. The method has been successfully applied to ambient air analysis.

  13. Oxygen and hydrogen ion abundance in the near-Earth magnetosphere: Statistical results on the response to the geomagnetic and solar wind activity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, E. A.; Haaland, S. E.; Daly, P. W.; Grigorenko, E. E.; Kistler, L. M.; FräNz, M.; Dandouras, I.

    2012-12-01

    The composition of ions plays a crucial role for the fundamental plasma properties in the terrestrial magnetosphere. We investigate the oxygen-to-hydrogen ratio in the near-Earth magnetosphere from -10 RE magnetic field changes. They are best correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure and density, which is an expected effect of the magnetospheric compression; (2) ˜10 keV O+ ion intensities are more strongly affected during disturbed phase of a geomagnetic storm or substorm than >274 keV O+ ion intensities, relative to the corresponding hydrogen intensities; (3) In contrast to ˜10 keV ions, the >274 keV O+ions show the strongest acceleration during growth phase and not during the expansion phase itself. This suggests a connection between the energy input to the magnetosphere and the effective energization of energetic ions during growth phase; (4) The ratio between quiet and disturbed times for the intensities of ion ionospheric outflow is similar to those observed in the near-Earth magnetosphere at >274 keV. Therefore, the increase of the energetic ion intensity during disturbed time is likely due to the intensification and the effective acceleration of the ionospheric source. In conclusion, the energization process in the near-Earth magnetosphere is mass dependent and it is more effective for the heavier ions.

  14. Abundance of questing ticks and molecular evidence for pathogens in ticks in three parks of Emilia-Romagna region of Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Aureli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. Infectious and parasitic diseases transmitted by ticks, such as Lyme diseases, granulocytic anaplasmosis and piroplasmosis, have been frequently reported in Europe, with increasing attention to them as an emerging zoonotic problem. The presented study was performed to assess the distribution and the density of questing ticks in three regional parks of Emilia-Romagna region of Northern Italy, and to seek molecular evidence of potential human pathogens in tick populations. Materials and Methods. In the period April-October 2010, 8,139 questing ticks were collected: 6,734 larvae, 1,344 nymphs and only a few adults – 28 females and 33 males. The abundance of[i] Ixodes ricinus[/i] questing ticks was compared among different sampling sites and related to microclimate parameters. 1,544 out of 8,139 ticks were examined for the presence of pathogens: PCR was used to detect piroplasms DNA and Real time Taqman PCR for [i]Anaplasma phagocytophilum[/i] and [i]Borrelia burgdorferi[/i] s.l. Results. The predominant species was [i]I. ricinus[/i] (overall abundance 1,075.9/100 m[sup]2[/sup] ; more rarely, [i]Dermacentor marginatus[/i] (n = 37 – 0.45%, [i]Scaphixodes frontalis[/i] (n = 13 – 0.16%, [i]Hyalomma[/i] spp. (n = 6 – 0.07% and [i]Ixodes acuminatus[/i] (n = 3 – 0.04% were also found. 28 out of 324 (8.6% samples of ticks were PCR-positive for piroplasm DNA. 11 amplicons of 18S rRNA gene were identical to each other and had 100% identity with[i] Babesia[/i] EU1 ([i]Babesia venatorum[/i] using BLAST analysis. Real time Taqman PCR gave positive results for [i]A. phagocytophilum[/i] in 23 out of 292 samples (7.9%, and for [i]B. burgdorferi[/i] s.l. in 78 out of 292 samples (26.7%. [i]I. ricinu[/i]s was the only species found positive for pathogens by molecular analysis; 16 tick samples were co-infected with at least 2 pathogens. Discussion. The peak of nymph presence was in May, and the higher prevalence of pathogens

  15. ions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MP2 B2). In order to draw the final conclusion about the content of the isomers of pentaatomic ions in saturated vapor over cesium chloride, we have taken into account the entropy factor. We considered the isomerization reactions which are given below: Cs3Cl2. + (V-shaped) = Cs3Cl2. + (cyclic or bipyramidal). (1). Cs2Cl3.

  16. Direct determination of recoil ion detection efficiency for coincidence time-of-flight studies of molecular fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Carnes, K. D.; Ginther, S. G.; Johnson, D. T.; Norris, P. J.; Weaver, O. L.

    1993-06-01

    Molecular fragmentation of diatomic and small polyatomic molecules caused by fast ion impact has been studied. The evaluation of the cross sections of the different fragmentation channels depends strongly on the recoil ion detection efficiency, ɛ r (single ions proportional to ɛ r, and ion pairs to ɛ r2, etc.). A method is suggested for the direct determination of this detection efficiency. This method is based on the fact that fast H + + CH 4 collisions produce C 2+ fragments only in coincidence with H + and H +2 fragments, that is, there is a negligible number of C 2+ singles, if any. The measured yield of C 2+ singles is therefore due to events in which the H +m of the H +m +C 2+ ion pair was not detected and thus is proportional to 1-ɛ r. Methane fragmentation caused by 1 MeV proton impact is used to evaluate directly the recoil ion detection efficiency and to demonstrate the method of deriving the cross sections of all breakup channels.

  17. Radiochemical study of ion-molecular reactions of free phenyl-vinyl cations with some oxygen-containing compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, V.D.; Sinotova, E.N.; Kuzhelev, L.P.; Lebedev, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-molecular reactions of free phenyl-vinyl cations with water, ethanol and diethyl ether in different aggregate states are studied by radiochemical method. Free cations were produced by nuclear-chemical method (in the result of β-decay of tritium atoms in styrene composition - C 6 H 5 CT=CHT). It is shown that such electrophilic addition products as acetophenone, phenylethenol and isomeric ethoxy styrene appear to be the main. Competing process - cation deprotonation - leads to phenylacetylene formation. Quantum-chemical interpretation of the results obtained is given within the framework of molecular orbital perturbation theory

  18. Permeating disciplines: Overcoming barriers between molecular simulations and classical structure-function approaches in biological ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Delemotte, Lucie; Hellmich, Ute A; Rothberg, Brad S

    2018-04-01

    Ion translocation across biological barriers is a fundamental requirement for life. In many cases, controlling this process-for example with neuroactive drugs-demands an understanding of rapid and reversible structural changes in membrane-embedded proteins, including ion channels and transporters. Classical approaches to electrophysiology and structural biology have provided valuable insights into several such proteins over macroscopic, often discontinuous scales of space and time. Integrating these observations into meaningful mechanistic models now relies increasingly on computational methods, particularly molecular dynamics simulations, while surfacing important challenges in data management and conceptual alignment. Here, we seek to provide contemporary context, concrete examples, and a look to the future for bridging disciplinary gaps in biological ion transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of physico-chemical modifications induced by heavy ions in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappa, V.C.; Grosso, M.F. del; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Mazzei, R.O.

    2006-01-01

    Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy was carried out on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The polyethylene was irradiated using Li, C, N, S and I heavy ion beams with different fluences. The analysis showed that the absorbance of the C=C stretching vibration from trans-vinylene groups containing hydroperoxides presents a maximum at certain ion fluence and is correlated with the ion stopping power. The results were analyzed by a Monte Carlo simulation program that models the irradiation process from a geometrical point of view, in which the latent tracks consist in a central core zone surrounded by a larger perturbed region. This study suggests that it is possible to estimate the core dimension from absorbance measurements as a function of fluence. A possible relationship between this C=C structure with the cross-link of two polymeric chains is discussed

  20. Secondary electron emission of thin carbon foils under the impact of hydrogen atoms, ions and molecular ions, under energies within the MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovic, Z.

    1997-06-01

    This work focuses on the study of the emission statistics of secondary electrons from thin carbon foils bombarded with H 0 , H 2 + and H 3 + projectiles in the 0.25-2.2 MeV energy range. The phenomenon of secondary electron emission from solids under the impact of swift ions is mainly due to inelastic interactions with target electrons. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions, as well as a summary of the main theoretical models are the subject of the first chapter. The experimental set-up used to measure event by event the electron emission of the two faces of a thin carbon foil traversed by an energetic projectile is described in the chapter two. In this chapter are also presented the method and algorithms used to process experimental spectra in order to obtain the statistical distribution of the emitted electrons. Chapter three presents the measurements of secondary electron emission induced by H atoms passing through thin carbon foils. The secondary electron yields are studied in correlation with the emergent projectile charge state. We show the peculiar role of the projectile electron, whether it remains or not bound to the incident proton. The fourth chapter is dedicated to the secondary electron emission induced by H 2 + and H 3 + polyatomic ions. The results are interpreted in terms of collective effects in the interactions of these ions with solids. The role of the proximity of the protons, molecular ion fragments, upon the amplitude of these collective effects is evidenced from the study of the statistics of forward emission. These experiences allowed us to shed light on various aspects of atom and polyatomic ion inter-actions with solid surfaces. (author)

  1. Accurate static and dynamic properties of liquid electrolytes for Li-ion batteries from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, P; Jiang, De-en; Kent, P R C

    2011-03-31

    Lithium-ion batteries have the potential to revolutionize the transportation industry, as they did for wireless communication. A judicious choice of the liquid electrolytes used in these systems is required to achieve a good balance among high-energy storage, long cycle life and stability, and fast charging. Ethylene-carbonate (EC) and propylene-carbonate (PC) are popular electrolytes. However, to date, almost all molecular-dynamics simulations of these fluids rely on classical force fields, while a complete description of the functionality of Li-ion batteries will eventually require quantum mechanics. We perform accurate ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of ethylene- and propylene-carbonate with LiPF(6) at experimental concentrations to build solvation models which explain available neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results and to compute Li-ion solvation energies and diffusion constants. Our results suggest some similarities between the two liquids as well as some important differences. Simulations also provide useful insights into formation of solid-electrolyte interphases in the presence of electrodes in conventional Li-ion batteries.

  2. Electric potential invariants and ions-in-molecules effective potentials for molecular Rydberg states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Stephen L; Grimes, David D; Zhou, Yan; Field, Robert W; Wong, Bryan M

    2016-12-21

    The dependence of multipole moments and polarizabilities on external fields appears in many applications including biomolecular molecular mechanics, optical non-linearity, nanomaterial calculations, and the perturbation of spectroscopic signatures in atomic clocks. Over a wide range of distances, distributed multipole and polarizability potentials can be applied to obtain the variation of atom-centered atoms-in-molecules electric properties like bonding-quenched polarizability. For cylindrically symmetric charge distributions, we examine single-center and atom-centered effective polarization potentials in a non-relativistic approximation for Rydberg states. For ions, the multipole expansion is strongly origin-dependent, but we note that origin-independent invariants can be defined. The several families of invariants correspond to optimized representations differing by origin and number of terms. Among them, a representation at the center of dipole polarizability optimizes the accuracy of the potential with terms through 1/r 4 . We formulate the single-center expansion in terms of polarization-modified effective multipole moments, defining a form related to the source-multipole expansion of Brink and Satchler. Atom-centered potentials are an origin independent alternative but are limited both by the properties allowed at each center and by the neglected effects like bond polarizability and charge flow. To enable comparisons between single-center effective potentials in Cartesian or spherical form and two-center effective potentials with differing levels of mutual induction between atomic centers, we give analytical expressions for the bond-length and origin-dependence of multipole and polarizability terms projected in the multipole and polarizability expansion of Buckingham. The atom-centered potentials can then be used with experimental data and ab initio calculations to estimate atoms-in-molecules properties. Some results are given for BaF + and HF showing the

  3. Radiative properties of molecular nitrogen ions produced by helium Penning ionization and argon effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, George, III; Song, Kyo-Dong

    1994-01-01

    The development of hypersonic aerospace vehicles requires a better understanding on the thermal and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics of participating species in shock layers. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes developed for such flowfields overestimate the radiation in the spectral region of 300 - 600 nm. A speculation for this overestimation is that inclusion of Ar, CO2, and H2O at the upper atmosphere flight region makes a significant impact on radiative kinetics of molecular nitrogen ions. To define the effects of minority species on the radiative kinetics of N2(+), an experimental setup was made by using the helium Penning ionization. The vibrational and rotational temperature were measured by mapping the vibrational and rotational distributions of N2(+) emission with high spectroscopic resolution and absolute intensity measurements. Measured vibrational temperatures were in the range from 18,000 to 36,000 K, and rotational temperatures were in the range from 300 to 370 K. The irradiance of 391.44 nm line and rotational and vibrational temperatures were analyzed to define argon and CO2 effects on the N2(+) emission. When Ar or CO2 is injected with N2, the rotational temperature did not change. The irradiances were reduced by 34 percent and 78 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. The vibrational temperatures were increased by 24.1 percent and 82.9 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. It appears that there are no significant effects from small concentrations of Ar and CO2 at the upper atmosphere flight region.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  5. Stability, Molecular Sieving, and Ion Diffusion Selectivity of a Lamellar Membrane from Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mengmeng; Kwac, Kijeong; Li, Meng; Jung, Yousung; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-04-12

    Two-dimensional (2D) subnanometer channels allow unique mass transport promising for molecular sieving. New 2D channels of MoS 2 nanosheets allow one to understand molecular transmission and separation, unlike the graphene oxide counterpart containing various defects and cationic metal contaminants. Membranes from layered MoS 2 platelets show extraordinary stability in an aqueous environment and compatibility with polymer filters, both beneficial to efficient manufacturing. Sharing gas-tightness and unimpeded water vapor permeation with a graphene oxide membrane, our lamellar MoS 2 membrane demonstrates a molecular sieving property for organic vapor for the first time. The MoS 2 membrane also reveals diffusion selectivity of aqueous ions, attributable to the energy penalty in bulk-to-2D dimensional transition. These newly revealed properties of the lamellar membrane full of angstrom-sized 2D channels point to membrane technology applications for energy and environment.

  6. Structure and dynamics of hydrated Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions. Quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsungnen, T.

    2002-11-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) and combined em ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics (QM/MM-MD) simulations have been performed to investigate structural, dynamical and energetical properties of Fe(II), and Fe(III) transition metal ions in aqueous solution. In the QM/MM-MD simulations the ion and its first hydration sphere were treated at the Hartree-Fock ab initio quantum mechanical level, while ab initio generated pair plus three-body potentials were employed for the remaining system. For the classical MD simulation the pair plus three-body potential were employed for all ion-water interactions. The coordination number of the first hydration shell is 100 % of 6 in both cases. The number of waters in the second hydration shell obtained from classical simulations are 13.4 and 15.1 for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively, while QM/MM-MD gives the values of 12.4 and 13.4 for Fe(II) and Fe(III). The energies of hydration obtained from MD and QM/MM-MD for Fe(II) are 520 and 500 kcal/mol, and for Fe(III) 1160 and 1100 kcal/mol respectively. The mean residence times of water in the second shell obtained from QM/MM-MD are 24 and 48 ps for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively. In contrast to the data obtained from classical MD simulation, the QM/MM-MD values are all in good agreement with the experimental data available. These investigations and results clearly indicate that many-body effects are essential for the proper description of all properties of the aqueous solution of both Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions. (author)

  7. Quantification of ion-induced molecular fragmentation of isolated 2-deoxy-D-ribose molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarado Chacon, F.; Bari, S.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Schlathölter, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments on low energy ion-induced damage to DNA building blocks indicate that ion induced DNA damage is dominated by deoxyribose disintegration (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 95, 153201). We have studied interactions of keV H+ and Heq+ with isolated deoxyribose molecules by means of high

  8. DFT Study of the effects of counter ions on bonding, molecular and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structures and properties of pentaflourophenyl xenonium diflouride cation (PFF) have been studied in their salts with 12 different counter ions using DFT calculations. The results demonstrated the huge effect of counter ion on all properties. The hybridization values, obtained from the NBO calculations, showed.

  9. Atomic and molecular processes with lithium in peripheral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Kato, D.; Hirooka, Y.; Sawada, K.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic and molecular processes for Li chemistry are examined for low temperature plasma such as peripheral plasmas in fusion research laboratory devices. Particle abundances of Li, Li ions, LiH and LiH ion are calculated by solving rate equations in which all reactions of the Li chemistry are considered for low temperature plasma.

  10. Gold-thiolate cluster emission from SAMs under keV ion bombardment: Experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arezki, B.; Delcorte, A.; Chami, A.C.; Garrison, B.J.; Bertrand, P.

    2003-01-01

    In this contribution the emission of gold-molecule cluster ions from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold is investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Layers of alkanethiols [CH 3 (CH 2 ) n SH] with various chain lengths (n=8, 12, 16) have been chosen because they form well-ordered molecular monolayers on gold. First, we compare and interpret the yields and energy spectra of gold-thiolate cluster ions, obtained for different thiol sizes. Our results show that the unimolecular dissociation of larger aggregates in the acceleration section of the spectrometer constitutes a significant formation channel for gold-molecule clusters. Second, we present preliminary results of molecular dynamics simulations performed in order to improve our understanding of the cluster emission processes. These calculations have been conducted using 8 keV projectiles and a long-range term in the hydrocarbon potential in order to account for the van der Waals forces between the thiol chains

  11. Biophysical characterization of the molecular orientation of an antibody-immobilized layer using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Won; Lee, Tae Geol; Lee, Haiwon; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2011-04-07

    The molecular orientation of antibody layers formed on separate solid matrices (e.g., gold-coated glass substrate) was characterized by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in static mode. For comparison, three different antibody species, IgG, F(ab')(2), and Fab, were prepared, biotinylated in random and site-directed fashions, and immobilized on distinct streptavidin-coated surfaces. ToF-SIMS analyses of each antibody layer revealed that the secondary ion intensity peaks measured at the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio 253, 325, and 647 were unique to the site-directly immobilized antibodies. The ions in the three peaks were detected neither from the streptavidin layer nor from the randomly prepared antibody, indicating that the insolubilized antibody layers constructed in the two different manners had distinct molecular arrangements. The antibody preparations were further tested for their binding characteristics in sandwich-type immunoassays, which showed that the site-directed antibodies consistently enhanced the detection capability comparing to those randomly prepared. Based on the analytical results of both the ToF-SIMS analysis and sandwich-type immunoassays, the site-directed antibody species were immobilized on the surfaces in a more orientated manner, with their antigen binding sites exposed to the bulk solution, than when random immobilization was used. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  12. Interpretation of the vibrational energy level structure of the astructural molecular ion H5 + and all of its deuterated isotopomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarka, János; Császár, Attila G.

    2016-04-01

    Variational nuclear motion computations, employing an exact kinetic energy operator and two different potential energy surfaces, are performed to study the first 60 vibrational states of the molecular ion H 5+ ≡ [H2-H-H2]+ and all of its deuterated isotopologues and isotopomers, altogether 12 species. Detailed investigation of the vibrational wavefunctions mostly results in physically intuitive labels not only for the fundamentals but also for the overtone and combination states computed. The torsional motion associated with the left and right diatomics appears to be well separated from the other vibrational degrees of freedom for all species. The unusual structure of the higher-lying bending states and the heavy mixing of the internal motions is partly due to the astructural character of all these molecular ions. The existence of distinct isotopomers in the H 5 - n Dn + , n = 1-4 cases, in the energy range studied, is confirmed. Two rules determine the stability order of the isotopomers: first, when possible, H prefers to stay in the middle of the ions rather than at the sides, and, second, the isotopomer with a homonuclear diatomic at the side is always lower in energy. The large number of precise vibrational energies of the present study, as well as the detailed assignment of the states, should serve as benchmarks for future studies by more approximate nuclear-motion treatments, such as diffusion Monte Carlo and multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree.

  13. Vicinage effects in energy loss and electron emission during grazing scattering of heavy molecular ions from a solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian; Miskovic, Z.L.

    2005-01-01

    Vicinage effects in the energy loss and the electron emission spectra are studied in the presence of Coulomb explosion of swift, heavy molecular ions, during their grazing scattering from a solid surface. The dynamic response of the surface is treated by means of the dielectric theory within the specular reflection model using the plasmon pole approximation for the bulk dielectric function, whereas the angle-resolved energy spectra of the electrons emitted from the surface are obtained on the basis of the first-order, time-dependent perturbation theory. The evolution of the charge states of the constituent ions in the molecule during scattering is described by a nonequilibrium extension of the Brandt-Kitagawa model. The molecule scattering trajectories and the corresponding Coulomb explosion dynamics are evaluated for the cases of the internuclear axis being either aligned in the beam direction or randomly oriented in the directions parallel to the surface. Our calculations show that the vicinage effect in the energy loss is generally weaker for heavy molecules than for light molecules. In addition, there is clear evidence of the negative vicinage effect in both the energy loss and the energy spectra of the emitted electrons for molecular ions at lower speeds and with the axis aligned in the direction of motion

  14. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  15. A molecular dynamics study for the extraction of Cs+ and Na+ ions using dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 with octanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Rima; Ghosh, Pallab; Banerjee, Tamal; Ali, Sk. Musharaf

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report a molecular dynamics study of the interfacial behavior involved in the cesium and sodium ion extraction by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6). Thereafter to understand the mechanism of complexation and the behavior of crown ether ligand, crown ether (CE) molecules, Cs + NO 3 - and Na + NO 3 - ions were inserted randomly in the Octanol-water biphasic system. In case of Na + NO 3 and Cs + NO 3 mixed system, it was observed that Cs + ion was extracted from water phase to octanol phase. The Na + ion was found to prefer to remain at the interface without complexation with DCH18C6. For the individual systems consisting of only Na + NO 3 , the complexed moiety (Na + -CE) formed during the simulation was found to diffuse slowly as compared to other free species. The binding energies during complexation of Na + cations with crown ether (DCH18C6) were further computed. The RDF peak height of 80 suggesting a high stability and a strong interaction for the complexed species is shown. The large magnitude of the RDF peak between sodium and oxygen is similar to that obtained by Pooja et al. and Maerzke et.al. The non bonded interaction energies during complexation of Na + cation with DCH18C6 were also analyzed. (author)

  16. Electronic absorption spectra and geometry of molecular ions generated from stilbene and related compounds, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Keiichiro; Shida, Tadamasa; Kira, Akira.

    1983-01-01

    The radical ions of (Z)-stilbene and its α,β-dialkyl derivatives were produced by γ-ray irradiation of the parent compounds in frozen matrices at 77 K, and their geometries were investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. While the relaxed geometries of the radical ions of (Z)-stilbene are probably similar to that of the neutral molecule, those of the radical ions of the α,β-dialkyl derivatives are appreciably different from those of the neutral molecules: The torsion angle of the central ethylenic bond is distinctly larger and that of each C-Ph bond is probably smaller in the radical ions than in the neutral molecules. On illumination the radical ions of (Z)-stilbene isomerize to the E isomers, but those of the α,β-dialkyl derivatives do not. A mechanism of the photoisomerization is proposed, and an interpretation of the difference in the photochemical behavior between the unsubstituted stilbene radical ions and the α,β-dialkyl derivatives is given. (author)

  17. Ion association in concentrated NaCl brines from ambient to supercritical conditions: results from classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collings Matthew D

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly concentrated NaCl brines are important geothermal fluids; chloride complexation of metals in such brines increases the solubility of minerals and plays a fundamental role in the genesis of hydrothermal ore deposits. There is experimental evidence that the molecular nature of the NaCl–water system changes over the pressure–temperature range of the Earth's crust. A transition of concentrated NaCl–H2O brines to a "hydrous molten salt" at high P and T has been argued to stabilize an aqueous fluid phase in the deep crust. In this work, we have done molecular dynamic simulations using classical potentials to determine the nature of concentrated (0.5–16 m NaCl–water mixtures under ambient (25°C, 1 bar, hydrothermal (325°C, 1 kbar and deep crustal (625°C, 15 kbar conditions. We used the well-established SPCE model for water together with the Smith and Dang Lennard-Jones potentials for the ions (J. Chem. Phys., 1994, 100, 3757. With increasing temperature at 1 kbar, the dielectric constant of water decreases to give extensive ion-association and the formation of polyatomic (NanClmn-m clusters in addition to simple NaCl ion pairs. Large polyatomic (NanClmn-m clusters resemble what would be expected in a hydrous NaCl melt in which water and NaCl were completely miscible. Although ion association decreases with pressure, temperatures of 625°C are not enough to overcome pressures of 15 kbar; consequently, there is still enhanced Na–Cl association in brines under deep crustal conditions.

  18. Molecular nature of mutations induced by high-LET irradiation with argon and carbon ions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke; Ohbu, Sumie; Shirakawa, Yuki; Liu Yang; Kambara, Tadashi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an important parameter to be considered in heavy-ion mutagenesis. However, in plants, no quantitative data are available on the molecular nature of the mutations induced with high-LET radiation above 101–124 keV μm −1 . In this study, we irradiated dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana with Ar and C ions with an LET of 290 keV μm −1 . We analyzed the DNA alterations caused by the higher-LET radiation. Mutants were identified from the M 2 pools. In total, 14 and 13 mutated genes, including bin2, egy1, gl1, gl2, hy1, hy3–5, ttg1, and var2, were identified in the plants derived from Ar- and C-ions irradiation, respectively. In the mutants from both irradiations, deletion was the most frequent type of mutation; 13 of the 14 mutated genes from the Ar ion-irradiated plants and 11 of the 13 mutated genes from the C ion-irradiated plants harbored deletions. Analysis of junction regions generated by the 2 types of irradiation suggested that alternative non-homologous end-joining was the predominant pathway of repair of break points. Among the deletions, the proportion of large deletions (>100 bp) was about 54% for Ar-ion irradiation and about 64% for C-ion irradiation. Both current results and previously reported data revealed that the proportions of the large deletions induced by 290-keV μm −1 radiations were higher than those of the large deletions induced by lower-LET radiations (6% for 22.5–30.0 keV μm −1 and 27% for 101–124 keV μm −1 ). Therefore, the 290 keV μm −1 heavy-ion beams can effectively induce large deletions and will prove useful as novel mutagens for plant breeding and analysis of gene functions, particularly tandemly arrayed genes.

  19. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 1. An Advanced Protocol for Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Collision Cross-Section Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; J. Valentine, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    Collision cross-section (CCS) measurements with a linear drift tube have been utilized to study the gas-phase conformers of a model peptide (acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK). Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted to derive an advanced protocol for the generation of a comprehensive pool of in-silico structures; both higher energy and more thermodynamically stable structures are included to provide an unbiased sampling of conformational space. MD simulations at 300 K are applied to the in-silico structures to more accurately describe the gas-phase transport properties of the ion conformers including their dynamics. Different methods used previously for trajectory method (TM) CCS calculation employing the Mobcal software [1] are evaluated. A new method for accurate CCS calculation is proposed based on clustering and data mining techniques. CCS values are calculated for all in-silico structures, and those with matching CCS values are chosen as candidate structures. With this approach, more than 300 candidate structures with significant structural variation are produced; although no final gas-phase structure is proposed here, in a second installment of this work, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange data will be utilized as a second criterion to select among these structures as well as to propose relative populations for these ion conformers. Here the need to increase conformer diversity and accurate CCS calculation is demonstrated and the advanced methods are discussed.

  20. Solid State Structures of Alkali Metal Ion Complexes Formed by Low-Molecular-Weight Ligands of Biological Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka; Hu, Ning-Hai

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides structural data, mainly metal binding sites/modes, observed in crystal structures of alkali metal ion complexes containing low-molecular-weight ligands of biological relevance, mostly obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database (the CSD version 5.35 updated to February 2014). These ligands include (i) amino acids and small peptides, (ii) nucleic acid constituents (excluding quadruplexes and other oligonucleotides), (iii) simple carbohydrates, and (iv) naturally occurring antibiotic ionophores. For some representative complexes of these ligands, some details on the environment of the metal coordination and structural characteristics are described.

  1. Molecular treatment of the ion-pair formation reaction in H(1s) + H(1s) collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borondo, F.; Martin, F.; Yaez, M.

    1987-01-01

    All the available theoretical calculations of the cross section for the ion-pair formation reaction H(1s)+H(1s)..-->..H/sup +/H/sup -/(1s/sup 2/) have been performed using methods that are only valid at high collision energies. They get good agreement with the experiments for impact energies greater than 25 keV, but fail completely at smaller energies. In this work we report the cross section for this reaction at impact energies less than 10 keV, calculated in the framework of the impact-parameter approximation and using the molecular method with a common translation factor.

  2. Molecular analyses reveal an abundant diversity of ticks and rickettsial agents associated with wild birds in two regions of primary Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Faccini, João Luiz Horacio; McIntosh, Douglas

    2017-06-01

    Brazilian wild birds are recognized as frequent and important hosts for immature stages of more than half of the 32 recognized species of Amblyomma ticks recorded in that country. Several species of Amblyomma harbor rickettsial agents, including members of the spotted fever group (SFG). Most studies on this topic relied primarily on morphological characterization and reported large portions of the collected ticks at the genus rather than species level. Clearly, this factor may have contributed to an underestimation of tick diversity and distribution and makes comparisons between studies difficult. The current investigation combined morphological and molecular analyses to assess the diversity of ticks and rickettsial agents associated with wild birds, captured in two regions of native Atlantic rainforest, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A total of 910 birds were captured, representing two orders, 34 families and 106 species, among which 93 specimens (10.2%), were parasitized by 138 immature ticks (60 larvae and 78 nymphs), representing 10 recognized species of the genus Amblyomma; together with two reasonably well classified haplotypes (Amblyomma sp. haplotype Nazaré and Amblyomma sp. strain USNTC 6792). Amplification by PCR and sequencing of rickettsial genes (htrA, gltA, ompA and ompB), demonstrated the presence of Rickettsia DNA in 48 (34%) of the ticks. Specifically, Rickettsia bellii was detected in a single larva and a single nymph of A. aureolatum; R. amblyomatis was found in 16 of 37 A. longirostre and was recorded for the first time in three nymphs of A. calcaratum; R. rhipicephali was detected in 9 (47%) of 19 Amblyomma sp. haplotype Nazaré ticks. The remaining ticks were infected with genetic variants of R. parkeri, namely strain ApPR in 12 A. parkeri and seven Amblyomma sp. haplotype Nazaré ticks, with the strain NOD found in two specimens of A. nodosum. Interestingly, a single larvae of A. ovale was shown to be infected with the emerging

  3. Susceptible genes and molecular pathways related to heavy ion irradiation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Kazuaki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Ishigami, Takashi; Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Kawata, Tetsuya; Shibahara, Takahiko; Ito, Hisao; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Heavy ion beams are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by a higher relative biologic effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the difference of gene expression between heavy ion beams and X-rays in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)-derived cells. Materials and methods: The OSCC cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon or neon ion irradiation or X-rays using three different doses. We sought to identify genes the expression of which is affected by carbon and neon ion irradiation using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. The identified genes were analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool to investigate the functional network and gene ontology. Changes in mRNA expression in the genes were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results: The microarray analysis identified 84 genes that were modulated by carbon and neon ion irradiation at all doses in OSCC cells. Among the genes, three genes (TGFBR2, SMURF2, and BMP7) and two genes (CCND1 and E2F3), respectively, were found to be involved in the transforming growth factor β-signaling pathway and cell cycle:G1/S checkpoint regulation pathway. The qRT-PCR data from the five genes after heavy ion irradiation were consistent with the microarray data (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our findings should serve as a basis for global characterization of radiation-regulated genes and pathways in heavy ion-irradiated OSCC

  4. Rotational Coherence Encoded in an “Air-Laser” Spectrum of Nitrogen Molecular Ions in an Intense Laser Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisu Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate lasing action in aligned nitrogen molecular ions (N_{2}^{+} produced in an intense laser field. We find that, besides the population inversion between the B^{2}Σ_{u}^{+}-X^{2}Σ_{g}^{+} states, which is responsible for the observed simulated amplification of a seed pulse, a rotational wave packet in the ground vibrational state (v=0 of the excited electronic B^{2}Σ_{u}^{+} state has been created in N_{2}^{+}. The rotational coherence can faithfully encode its characteristics into the amplified seed pulses, enabling reconstruction of rotational wave packets of molecules in a single-shot detection manner from the frequency-resolved laser spectrum. Our results suggest that the air laser can potentially provide a promising tool for remote characterization of coherent molecular rotational wave packets.

  5. Physico-chemical characterization of polyethylene of ultra high molecular weight modified with gamma irradiation and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagarde, M; Del Grosso, M; Fasce, D; Dommarco, R; Laino, S; Fasce, L.A

    2012-01-01

    The ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a biomaterial widely used in total joint replacement. In this work, the effect of two different irradiation techniques on UHMWPE is analyzed. One technique involves gamma irradiation (γ) followed by a thermal treatment, thus modifying the material bulk. The other implies swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI), which have an effect only on the near surface layers. The surface nanomechanical properties are evaluated from depth sensing indentation experiments, while changes in crystallinity and chemical structure are determined by DSC and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that even when both techniques are able to improve the UHMWPE wear behavior, the effect on other mechanical properties and molecular structure modification is different. The γ irradiated sample exhibits lower crystallinity, hardness and modulus than the pristine UHMWPE, while the SHI irradiated sample exhibits higher crystallinity and enhanced mechanical properties than the later

  6. The molecular mechanism of ion-dependent gating in secondary transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfeng Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available LeuT-like fold Na-dependent secondary active transporters form a large family of integral membrane proteins that transport various substrates against their concentration gradient across lipid membranes, using the free energy stored in the downhill concentration gradient of sodium ions. These transporters play an active role in synaptic transmission, the delivery of key nutrients, and the maintenance of osmotic pressure inside the cell. It is generally believed that binding of an ion and/or a substrate drives the conformational dynamics of the transporter. However, the exact mechanism for converting ion binding into useful work has yet to be established. Using a multi-dimensional path sampling (string-method followed by all-atom free energy simulations, we established the principal thermodynamic and kinetic components governing the ion-dependent conformational dynamics of a LeuT-like fold transporter, the sodium/benzyl-hydantoin symporter Mhp1, for an entire conformational cycle. We found that inward-facing and outward-facing states of Mhp1 display nearly the same free energies with an ion absent from the Na2 site conserved across the LeuT-like fold transporters. The barrier separating an apo-state from inward-facing or outward-facing states of the transporter is very low, suggesting stochastic gating in the absence of ion/substrate bound. In contrast, the binding of a Na2 ion shifts the free energy stabilizing the outward-facing state and promoting substrate binding. Our results indicate that ion binding to the Na2 site may also play a key role in the intracellular thin gate dynamics modulation by altering its interactions with the transmembrane helix 5 (TM5. The Potential of Mean Force (PMF computations for a substrate entrance displays two energy minima that correspond to the locations of the main binding site S1 and proposed allosteric S2 binding site. However, it was found that substrate's binds to the site S1 ∼5 kcal/mol more favorable

  7. Mutual interference of Cu and Zn ions in Alzheimer's disease: perspectives at the molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrián-Blasco, Elena; Conte-Daban, Amandine

    2017-01-01

    While metal ions such as copper and zinc are essential in biology, they are also linked to several amyloid-related diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Zinc and copper can indeed modify the aggregation pathways of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, the key component encountered in AD. In addition, the redox active copper ions do produce Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) when bound to the Aβ peptide. While Cu(i) or Cu(ii) or Zn(ii) coordination to the Aβ has been extensively studied in the last ten years, characterization of hetero-bimetallic Aβ complexes is still scarce. This is also true for the metal induced Aβ aggregation and ROS production, for which studies on the mutual influence of the copper and zinc ions are currently appearing. Last but not least, zinc can strongly interfere in therapeutic approaches relying on copper detoxification. This will be exemplified with a biological lead, namely metallothioneins, and with synthetic ligands. PMID:28937157

  8. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena; Khotimchenko, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems. - Highlights: • Low molecular nanoscaled pectin was obtained using original hydrolysis method • Metal binding activity of pectin compounds was studied in a batch sorption system • Pectins exert highest metal binding activity at pH 6.0 • Metal binding isotherms of all pectins are best described by the Langmuir equation • Low molecular pectin from seagrasses is more effective than high-molecular pectins

  9. Study of the interaction of multiply charged ions and complex systems of biological interest: effects of the molecular environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis describes the experimental study of the interaction between slow multiply charged ions (tens of keV) and molecular systems of biological interest (amino acids and nucleobases). It is the aim to identify and to better understand the effect of a molecular environment on different collision induced phenomena. To do so, the time of flight spectra of cationic products emerging from collisions with isolated molecules as well as clusters are compared. It is shown that the molecular environment protects the molecule as it allows to distribute the transferred energies and charges over the whole system (global decrease of the fragmentation and quenching of some fragmentation channels). Furthermore, in the case of adenine clusters, the molecular environment weakens some intramolecular bonds. Moreover, products of chemical reactions are observed concerning proton transfer processes in hydrated cluster of adenine and the formation of peptides bonds between beta-alanine molecules in a cluster. The latter finding is studied as a function of the cluster size and type of the projectile. Some criteria for peptide bond formation, such as flexibility and geometry of the molecule, are investigated for different amino acids. (author)

  10. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khozhaenko, Elena [Far Eastern Federal University, School of Biomedicine, 8, Sukhanova str., Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation); A.V. Zhirmunsky Institute of Marine Biology Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 17, Palchevskgo str., Vladivostok 690059 (Russian Federation); Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena [A.V. Zhirmunsky Institute of Marine Biology Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 17, Palchevskgo str., Vladivostok 690059 (Russian Federation); Khotimchenko, Maksim, E-mail: maxkhot@yandex.ru [Far Eastern Federal University, School of Biomedicine, 8, Sukhanova str., Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation); A.V. Zhirmunsky Institute of Marine Biology Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 17, Palchevskgo str., Vladivostok 690059 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems. - Highlights: • Low molecular nanoscaled pectin was obtained using original hydrolysis method • Metal binding activity of pectin compounds was studied in a batch sorption system • Pectins exert highest metal binding activity at pH 6.0 • Metal binding isotherms of all pectins are best described by the Langmuir equation • Low molecular pectin from seagrasses is more effective than high-molecular pectins.

  11. Thermodynamics of Small Alkali Metal Halide Cluster Ions: Comparison of Classical Molecular Simulations with Experiment and Quantum Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcek, Lukas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uhlik, Filip [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Moucka, Filip [Purkinje Univ. (Czech Republic); Nezbeda, Ivo [Purkinje Univ. (Czech Republic); Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), Prague (Czech Republic); Chialvo, Ariel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-16

    We evaluate the ability of selected classical molecular models to describe the thermodynamic and structural aspects of gas-phase hydration of alkali halide ions and the formation of small water clusters. To understand the effect of many-body interactions (polarization) and charge penetration effects on the accuracy of a force field, we perform Monte Carlo simulations with three rigid water models using different functional forms to account for these effects: (i) point charge non-polarizable SPC/E, (ii) Drude point charge polarizable SWM4- DP, and (iii) Drude Gaussian charge polarizable BK3. Model predictions are compared with experimental Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of ion hydration, and with microscopic structural properties obtained from quantum DFT calculations. We find that all three models provide comparable predictions for pure water clusters and cation hydration, but differ significantly in their description of anion hydration. None of the investigated classical force fields can consistently and quantitatively reproduce the experimental gas phase hydration thermodynamics. The outcome of this study highlights the relation between the functional form that describes the effective intermolecular interactions and the accuracy of the resulting ion hydration properties.

  12. Computational simulation of electron and ion beams interaction with solid high-molecular dielectrics and inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyavskiy, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical investigation of interaction of electron beams (with the energy within the limits 100 keV--20 MeV) and ion beams (with the energy over the range 1 keV--50 MeV) with solid high-molecular dielectrics and inorganic glasses is performed. Note that the problem of interaction of electron beams with glass optical covers is especially interesting in connection with the problem of radiation protection of solar power elements on cosmic satellites and stations. For computational simulation of the above-mentioned processes a mathematical model was developed, describing the propagation of particle beams through the sample thickness, the accumulation and relaxation of volume charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. The calculation of energy deposition by electron beam in a target in the presence of nonuniform electric field was calculated with the assistance of the semiempirical procedure, formerly proposed by author of this work. Propagation of the low energy ions through the sample thickness was simulated using Pearson IV distribution. Damage distribution, ionization distribution and range distribution was taken into account. Propagation of high energy ions was calculated in the approximation of continuous deceleration. For description of hydrodynamic processes the system of equations of continuum mechanics in elastic-plastic approximation and the wide-range equation of state were used

  13. Affine-response model of molecular solvation of ions: Accurate predictions of asymmetric charging free energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bardhan, J. P.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Makowski, L.

    Roč. 137, č. 12 ( 2012 ), 124101/1-124101/6 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ion solvation * continuum models * linear response Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.164, year: 2012

  14. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/μm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to 137 Cs γ-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/μm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/μm showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among γ-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not

  15. Ion Adsorption at the Rutile-Water Interface: Linking Molecular and Macroscopic Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Sturchio, N. C.; Bedzyk, M. J.; Předota, Milan; Bandura, A.; Kubicki, J. D.; Lvov, S. N.; Cummings, P. T.; Chialvo, A. A.; Ridley, M. K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 12 (2004), s. 4954-4969 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/03/P083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : ion adsorption rutile Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.295, year: 2004

  16. C2-Symmetric Benzene-based Low Molecular Weight Hydrogel Modified Electrode for Highly Sensitive Detection of Copper Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Wenshu; Feng, Chuanliang; Ma, Xiaoyu; Chen, Mengni; Liu, Jianyun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of low molecular weight gelators (LMWGs), C2-symmetric benzene-based hydrogel (C2-BHG) with a 1,4-dimine benzene was self-assembled on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and mica surface based on the hydrogen bond or hydrophobic interaction. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization demonstrated the formation process of the C2-BHG hydrogel layer from particles to clusters, and finally to interconnected fiber network gel. The C2-BHG hydrogel layer resulted in the increase of the hydrophilicity of GCE surface. The C2-BHG modified GCEs (C2-BHG/GCE) with different assembly time were studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of Fe(CN) 6 4−/3− redox probe. The rich amide and hydroxyl groups in the gel film make the C2-BHG/GCE suitable as ultrasensitive sensor for the detection of Cu(II) ions by stripping voltammetry with the limit of detection of 5×10 −10 g/L (S/N>3). Under the optimal conditions, the two linear ranges of Cu(II) ions were found to be 1×10 −9 ∼1×10 −7 g/L and 1×10 −7 ∼1×10 −4 g/L. The strong coordination interaction of C2-BHG with Cu(II) ions was confirmed by UV-Visible characterization. This new type of C2-BHG modified electrode was promising for highly sensitive Cu(II) ions sensor application due to high stability and excellent selectivity of the analytical signal

  17. Molecular dynamics investigation of desorption and ion separation following picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) ablation of an ionic aqueous protein solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J.; Wu, C.; Robertson, W. D.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to characterize the ablation process induced by a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) operating in the regime of desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) of a model peptide (lysozyme)/counter-ion system in aqueous solution. The simulations were performed for ablation under typical experimental conditions found within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), that is in vacuum with an applied electric field (E = ± 107 V/m), for up to 2 ns post-ablation and compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE ablation condition (E = 0 V/m). Further, a simulation of ablation under an extreme field condition (E = 1010 V/m) was performed for comparison to extend the effective dynamic range of the effect of the field on charge separation. The results show that the plume dynamics were retained under a typical TOF-MS condition within the first 1 ns of ablation. Efficient desorption was observed with more than 90% of water molecules interacting with lysozyme stripped off within 1 ns post-ablation. The processes of ablation and desolvation of analytes were shown to be independent of the applied electric field and thus decoupled from the ion separation process. Unlike under the extreme field conditions, the electric field inside a typical TOF-MS was shown to modify the ions' motion over a longer time and in a soft manner with no enhancement to fragmentation observed as compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE. The study indicates that the PIRL-DIVE ablation mechanism could be used as a new, intrinsically versatile, and highly sensitive ion source for quantitative mass spectrometry.

  18. Molecular effect on equilibrium charge-state distributions. [of nitrogen ions injected through carbon foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickholm, D.; Bickel, W. S.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an experiment consisting of the acceleration of N(+) and N2(+) ions to energies between 0.25 and 1.75 MeV and their injection through a thin carbon foil, whereupon they were charge-state analyzed with an electrostatic analyzer. A foil-covered electrically suppressed Faraday cup, connected to a stepping motor, moved in the plane of the dispersed beams. The Faraday cup current, which was proportional to the number of incident ions, was sent to a current digitizer and computer programmed as a multiscaler. The energy-dependent charge-state fractions, the mean charge and the distribution width were calculated. It was shown that for incident atoms, the charge state distribution appeared to be spread over more charge states, while for the incident molecules, there was a greater fraction of charge states near the mean charge.

  19. Benchmark Comparison for a Multi-Processing Ion Mobility Calculator in the Free Molecular Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, Vaibhav; Nahin, Minal; Hogan, Christopher J.; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    A benchmark comparison between two ion mobility and collision cross-section (CCS) calculators, MOBCAL and IMoS, is presented here as a standard to test the efficiency and performance of both programs. Utilizing 47 organic ions, results are in excellent agreement between IMoS and MOBCAL in He and N2, when both programs use identical input parameters. Due to a more efficiently written algorithm and to its parallelization, IMoS is able to calculate the same CCS (within 1%) with a speed around two orders of magnitude faster than its MOBCAL counterpart when seven cores are used. Due to the high computational cost of MOBCAL in N2, reaching tens of thousands of seconds even for small ions, the comparison between IMoS and MOBCAL is stopped at 70 atoms. Large biomolecules (>10000 atoms) remain computationally expensive when IMoS is used in N2 (even when employing 16 cores). Approximations such as diffuse trajectory methods (DHSS, TDHSS) with and without partial charges and projected area approximation corrections can be used to reduce the total computational time by several folds without hurting the accuracy of the solution. These latter methods can in principle be used with coarse-grained model structures and should yield acceptable CCS results.

  20. Initiating Molecular Growth in the Interstellar Medium via Dimeric Complexes of Observed Ions and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    A feasible initiation step for particle growth in the interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by means of ab quantum chemistry methods. The systems studied are dimer ions formed by pairing nitrogen containing small molecules known to exist in the ISM with ions of unsaturated hydrocarbons or vice versa. Complexation energies, structures of ensuing complexes and electronic excitation spectra of the encounter complexes are estimated using various quantum chemistry methods. Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAP2), coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples corrections (CCSD(T)), and density functional theory (DFT) methods (B3LYP) were employed along with the correlation consistent cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. Two types of complexes are predicted. One type of complex has electrostatic binding with moderate (7-20 kcal per mol) binding energies, that are nonetheless significantly stronger than typical van der Waals interactions between molecules of this size. The other type of complex develops strong covalent bonds between the fragments. Cyclic isomers of the nitrogen containing complexes are produced very easily by ion-molecule reactions. Some of these complexes show intense ultraviolet visible spectra for electronic transitions with large oscillator strengths at the B3LYP, omegaB97, and equations of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) levels. The open shell nitrogen containing carbonaceous complexes especially exhibit a large oscillator strength electronic transition in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  1. One-electron atomic-molecular ions containing lithium in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares-Pilon, H; Turbiner, A V; Vieyra, J C Lopez; Baye, D

    2010-01-01

    The one-electron lithium-containing Coulomb systems of atomic type Li 2+ and molecular type Li 5+ 2 , LiHe 4+ and LiH 3+ are studied in the presence of a strong magnetic field B ≤ 10 7 au in a non-relativistic framework. They are considered at the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of zero order (infinitely massive centres) within the parallel configuration (molecular axis parallel to the magnetic field). The variational and Lagrange-mesh methods are employed, complementing each other. It is demonstrated that the molecular systems LiH 3+ , LiHe 4+ and Li 5+ 2 can exist for sufficiently strong magnetic fields B ∼> 10 4 au and that Li 5+ 2 can even be stable at magnetic fields typical of magnetars.

  2. Photoelectron and UV absorption spectroscopy for determination of electronic configurations of negative molecular ions: Chlorophenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseplin, E.E.; Tseplina, S.N.; Tuimedov, G.M.; Khvostenko, O.G.

    2009-01-01

    The photoelectron and UV absorption spectra of p-, m-, and o-chlorophenols in the gas phase have been obtained. On the basis of DFT B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations, the photoelectron bands have been assigned to occupied molecular orbitals. From the TDDFT B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculation results, the UV absorption bands have been assigned to excited singlet states of the molecules under investigation. For each excited state a dominant transition was found. It has been shown that the energies of these singlet transitions correlate with the energy differences between the ground-state molecular orbitals participating in them. Using the UV spectra interpretation, the electronic states of molecular anions detected earlier for the same compounds by means of the resonant electron capture mass-spectrometry have been determined.

  3. Molecular resonances, fusion reactions and surface transparency of interaction between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the Band Crossing Model is given, including recent results on the 16 O + 16 O system. Surface Transparency is discussed in the light of the recent development in our understanding of the fusion reaction mechanisms and by calculating the number of open channels available to direct reactions. The existence of the Molecular Resonance Region is suggested in several systems by the fact that Band Crossing Region overlaps with the Transparent Region. A systematic study predicts molecular resonances in the 14 C + 14 C and 12 C + 14 C systems as prominent as those observed in the 16 O + 16 O and 12 C + 16 O systems

  4. High-precision laser and rf spectroscopy of atomic, molecular, and slow ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.J.; Steimle, T.C.; Sen, A.; Azuma, Y.

    1988-01-01

    We have obtained extensive new structural information on the light diatomic radical ScO since the last report in this series. The new studies complete our systematic investigation of the fine and hyperfine structure (hfs) of the group IIIa monoxides LaO, YO, and ScO. The studies of the molecular X 2 Σ + electronic ground state were carried out using the molecular-beam laser-rf double-resonance method, and the excited electronic state information was obtained by complementing this data with Doppler-free laser fluorescence studies

  5. The observation of quasi-molecular ions from a tiger snake venom component (Msub(r) 13309) using 252Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamensky, I.; Haakansson, P.; Kjellberg, J.; Sundqvist, B.; Fohlman, J.; Peterson, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    A method involving fast heavy-ion bombardment of a solid sample called 252 Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry has been used to study a non-enzymatic, non-toxic phospholipase homolog from Australian tiger snake (Notechis scutatus) venom. The protein consists of 119 amino acids in a single polypeptide chain cross-linked by 7 disulfide bridges. The isotopically averaged molecular mass as determined by protein sequence analysis is 13309 atomic mass units (amu). The mass distributions were studied by means of time-of-flight measurements. Quasi-molecular ions associated to the molecule and its dimer were observed. The mass of the quasi-molecular ion corresponding to the molecule was determined to be 13285 +- 25 amu. (Auth.)

  6. Ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of single-core and multi-core polyaromatic hydrocarbons under variable conditions of collisional cooling: insights into the generation of molecular ions, fragments and oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Francisco; Hortal, Ana R; Martínez-Haya, Bruno; Soltwisch, Jens; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been investigated under different background pressures of an inert gas (up to 1.2 mbar of N2) in the ion source of a hybrid, orthogonal-extracting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oTOF-MS). The study includes an ensemble of six model PAHs with isolated single polyaromatic cores and four ones with multiple cross-linked aromatic and polyaromatic cores. In combination with a weak ion extraction field, the variation of the buffer gas pressure allowed to control the degree of collisional cooling of the desorbed PAHs and, thus, to modulate their decomposition into fragments. The dominant fragmentation channels observed are related to dehydrogenation of the PAHs, in most cases through the cleavage of even numbers of C-H bonds. Breakage of C-C bonds leading to the fragmentation of rings, side chains and core linkages is also observed, in particular, at low buffer gas pressures. The precise patterns of the combined fragmentation processes vary significantly between the PAHs. The highest abundances of molecular PAH ions and cleanest mass spectra were consistently obtained at the highest buffer gas pressure of 1.2 mbar. The effective quenching of the fragmentation pathways at this elevated pressure improves the sensitivity and data interpretation for analytical applications, although the fragmentation of side chains and of bonds between (poly)aromatic cores is not completely suppressed in all cases. Moreover, these results suggest that the detected fragments are generated through thermal equilibrium processes rather than as a result of rapid photolysis. This assumption is further corroborated by a laser desorption/ionization post-source decay analysis using an axial time-of-flight MS. In line with these findings, covalent oligomers of the PAHs, which are presumably formed by association of two or more dehydrogenated fragments, are detected with higher abundances at the lower buffer gas

  7. Potentiometric studies on ternary complexes involving some divalent transition metal ions, gallic acid and biologically abundant aliphatic dicarboxylic acids in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelatty Mohamed Radalla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation of binary and ternary complexes of the divalent transition metal ions, Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ with gallic acid and the biologically important aliphatic dicarboxylic acids (adipic, succinic, malic, malonic, maleic, tartaric and oxalic acids were investigated by means of the potentiometric technique at 25 °C and I = 0.10 mol dm−3 NaNO3. The acid-base properties of the ligands were investigated and discussed. The acidity constants of gallic acid and aliphatic dicarboxylic acids were determined and used for determining the stability constants of the binary and ternary complexes formed in the aqueous medium under the above experimental conditions. The formation of the different 1:1 and 1:2 binary complexes and 1:1:1 ternary complexes are inferred from the corresponding potentiometric pH-metric titration curves. The ternary complex formation was found to occur in a stepwise manner. The stability constants of these binary and ternary systems were calculated. The values of Δ log K, percentage of relative stabilization (%R.S. and log X were evaluated and discussed. The concentration distribution of the various complex species formed in solution was evaluated and discussed. The mode of chelation of ternary complexes formed was ascertained by conductivity measurements.

  8. Multiaperture source for the production of low energy neutral beams using molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupland, J.R.; Thompson, E.

    1974-01-01

    The construction and performance of a quasi dc multiaperture ion source and extraction system which has been developed for use on the Culham Superconducting Levitron experiment are described. Unlike other experiments utilizing neutral injection heating, which operate at energies greater than or equal to 20 keV with time scales approximately 10's of ms, the requirements for the levitron include relatively low energy less than or equal to 10 keV long plus length greater than or equal to 1 sec, and furthermore the input geometry is somewhat restrictive

  9. Molecular dynamics study of the effect of calcium ions on the monolayer of SDC and SDSn surfactants at the vapor/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Guo, Xin-Li; Yuan, Shi-Ling; Liu, Cheng-Bu

    2011-05-17

    The effect of Ca(2+) ions on the hydration shell of sodium dodecyl carboxylate (SDC) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDSn) monolayer at vapor/liquid interfaces was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. For each surfactant, two different surface concentrations were used to perform the simulations, and the aggregation morphologies and structural details have been reported. The results showed that the aggregation structures relate to both the surface coverage and the calcium ions. The divalent ions can screen the interaction between the polar head and Na(+) ions. Thus, Ca(2+) ions locate near the vapor/liquid interface to bind to the headgroup, making the aggregations much more compact via the salt bridge. The potential of mean force (PMF) between Ca(2+) and the headgroups shows that the interaction is decided by a stabilizing solvent-separated minimum in the PMF. To bind to the headgroup, Ca(2+) should overcome the energy barrier. Among contributions to the PMF, the major repulsive interaction was due to the rearrangement of the hydration shell after the calcium ions entered into the hydration shell of the headgroup. The PMFs between the headgroup and Ca(2+) in the SDSn systems showed higher energy barriers than those in the SDC systems. This result indicated that SDSn binds the divalent ions with more difficulty compared with SDC, so the ions have a strong effect on the hydration shell of SDC. That is why sulfonate surfactants have better efficiency in salt solutions with Ca(2+) ions for enhanced oil recovery.

  10. Strategy to improve the quantitative LC-MS analysis of molecular ions resistant to gas-phase collision induced dissociation: application to disulfide-rich cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccimaro, Eugene; Ranasinghe, Asoka; D'Arienzo, Celia; Xu, Carrie; Onorato, Joelle; Drexler, Dieter M; Josephs, Jonathan L; Poss, Michael; Olah, Timothy

    2014-12-02

    Due to observed collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation inefficiency, developing sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assays for CID resistant compounds is especially challenging. As an alternative to traditional LC-MS/MS, we present here a methodology that preserves the intact analyte ion for quantification by selectively filtering ions while reducing chemical noise. Utilizing a quadrupole-Orbitrap MS, the target ion is selectively isolated while interfering matrix components undergo MS/MS fragmentation by CID, allowing noise-free detection of the analyte's surviving molecular ion. In this manner, CID affords additional selectivity during high resolution accurate mass analysis by elimination of isobaric interferences, a fundamentally different concept than the traditional approach of monitoring a target analyte's unique fragment following CID. This survivor-selected ion monitoring (survivor-SIM) approach has allowed sensitive and specific detection of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides extracted from plasma.

  11. Molecular dynamics with phase-shift-based electronic stopping for calibration of ion implantation profiles in crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.Y.; Nordlund, K.; Gossmann, H.-J.L.; Harris, M.; Montgomery, N.J.; Mulcahy, C.P.A.; Biswas, S.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Benistant, F.; Ng, C.M.; Chan, Lap

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of the final dopant positions after ion implantation has always been strongly influenced by the choice of stopping models. A molecular dynamics (MD) method is used in this work; the nuclear stopping is treated by accurate pair potentials calculated by density functional theory (DFT). The slowing down due to collisions with electrons will be described by both a non-local semi-empirical model and a local model based on Fermi level phase shift factors. Comparisons with experimental data using both models show that a local pair-specific electronic stopping model is essential in accurately predicting range profiles for any element even at low implant energies where nuclear effects are dominant

  12. Fireball as the result of self-organization of an ensemble of diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles in molecular gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopasov, V. P., E-mail: lopas@iao.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zuev Institute for Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The conditions for dissipative self-organization of a fireball (FB) is a molecular gas by means of a regular correction of an elastic collision of water and nitrogen molecules by the field of a coherent bi-harmonic light wave (BLW) are presented. The BWL field is generated due to conversion of energy of a linear lightning discharge into light energy. A FB consists of two components: an ensemble of optically active diamagnetic electron-ion nanoparticles and a standing wave of elliptical polarization (SWEP). It is shown that the FB lifetime depends on the energies accumulated by nanoparticles and the SWEP field and on the stability of self-oscillations of the energy between nanoparticles and SWEP.

  13. Metastable Innershell Molecular State (MIMS II: K-shell X-ray satellites in heavy ion impact on solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young K. Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastable Innershell Molecular State (MIMS, an innershell-bound ultra-high-energy molecule, was previously proposed to explain a ∼40% efficiency of soft-X-ray generation in ∼0.05 keV/amu nanoparticle impact on solids. Here, the MIMS model has been extended and applied to interpreting the experimental K-shell X-ray satellite spectra for more than 40 years in keV-MeV/amu heavy-ion impact on solids. The binding energies of the K-shell MIMS of elements from Al to Ti were determined to be 80–200 eV. The successful extension of the model to the K-shell MIMS confirms that all elements in the periodic table and their combinations are subjected to the MIMS formation.

  14. Cytological damage and molecular biology effect of 12C6+ heavy ions on allium fistulosum L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuwen; Wang Xiaojun; Duan Yiyuan; Qian Pingping; Hou Suiwen

    2010-01-01

    The Allium fistulosum L. seeds were irradiated by 12 C 6+ heavy ions to the dosages of 30, 90, 180 Gy, the mutagenic effect in the aspect of the cell level and the agronomy was studied and the RAPD analysis was carried out. Comparison with the conclusion of M1 generation indicates that the Cytological damage, micronucleus and chromosomal aberration caused by radiation formed in the cells of Allium fistulosum L., and this kind of effect still existed in the M2 generation. There is a negative correlation between some of the growth indexes such as plant height, diameter of onion white and irradiation dosage to a certain extent, the growth indexes in the 30 Gy dosage exposure group are better than those in control group. The Allium fistulosum L. nutrients, including the total water-soluble protein and the Vitamin C content are the highest for the 30 Gy group and the lowest in 90 Gy group. Consistent with the M1 generation, the chromosomal aberrations, micronucleus and the DNA polymorphism rate by RAPD analysis are still positive correlations with the radiation dose in M2 generation respectively. However, the overall rates decline. The result indicated that the DNA variation induced by the high energy heavy ion exposure is repaired and eliminated to a certain extent in the M2 generation. (authors)

  15. Waterborne polyurethane single-ion electrolyte from aliphatic diisocyanate and various molecular length of polyethylene glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The waterborne polyurethane (WPU dispersions from the reaction of cycloaliphatic diisocyanates [4,4’-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate (H12MDI and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI] and polyethylene glycol (PEG with various molecular lengths were synthesized using our modified acetone process. Differetial scanning calorimeter (DSC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR were utilized to characterize WPU films for the behavior of their crystallinity and H-bonding of WPU films. The Tg value of WPU increases with increasing the molecular length of PEG, whereas the Tm of WPU decreases with increasing PEG length. Alternating current (AC impedance experiments were performed to determine the ionic conductivities of WPU films. The WPU gel electrolytes exhibits an ionic conductivity as high as ~ 10-5 S/cm at room temperature.

  16. A comprehensive molecular dynamics approach to protein retention modeling in ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Katharina M H; Kittelmann, Jörg; Dürr, Cathrin; Osberghaus, Anna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-02-13

    In downstream processing, the underlying adsorption mechanism of biomolecules to adsorbent material are still subject of extensive research. One approach to more mechanistic understanding is simulating this adsorption process and hereby the possibility to identify the parameters with strongest impact. So far this method was applied with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two model proteins on one cation exchanger. In this work we developed a molecular dynamics tool to simulate protein-adsorber interaction for various proteins on an anion exchanger and ran gradient elution experiments to relate the simulation results to experimental data. We were able to show that simulation results yield similar results as experimental data regarding retention behavior as well as binding orientation. We could identify arginines in case of cation exchangers and aspartic acids in case of anion exchangers as major contributors to binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Seasonal abundance and molecular identification of West Nile virus vectors, Culex pipens and Culex quinquefasciatus (diptera: culicidae) in Abeokuta, South-West, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motayo, Babatunde Olanrewaju; Onoja, Bernard Aneibe; Faneye, Adedayo Omotayo; Adeniji, Johnson Adekunle

    2016-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection, is an arbovirus infection with high morbidity and mortality, the vector responsible for both human and animal transmission is Culex pipens complex. To determine the species distribution and seasonal abundance of Culex pipens and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipens complex were captured in three different locations located within Abeokuta Metropolis between March 2012 and January 2013. Individual species were identified using morphometric methods. Amplification of the Ace2 gene by PCR confirmed morphormetric identification of the mosquitoes. A total of 751 mosquitoes were captured. Culex quinquefaciatus recorded the highest distribution of vectors with 56.6% and Culex pipens 43.4% (P > 0.05). Idi aba community recorded the highest distribution of mosquito vectors with 42.9% (n=322) and Culex quinqueaciatus was more abundantly distributed with 183 mosquitoes. Aro community recorded 32% (n=240) of captured mosquitoes with Culex quinquefaciatus having a higher level of abundance and lastly Kemta with a distribution of 25.1% (n=189). Results from this study show that potential vectors of WNV abound within Abeokuta, putting residents at high risk of West Nile infection. We advocate for introduction of routine testing of WNV in Abeokuta and Nigeria.

  18. Hydration of the chloride ion in concentrated aqueous solutions using neutron scattering and molecular dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pluhařová, Eva; Fischer, H. E.; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 112, 9/10 (2014), s. 1230-1240 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LH12001 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : lithium * solution * molecular dynamics * chloride * neutron scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.720, year: 2014

  19. He 2++ molecular ion in a strong time-dependent magnetic field: a current-density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas

    2011-08-01

    The He 2++ molecular ion exposed to a strong ultrashort time-dependent (TD) magnetic field of the order of 10(9) G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and current-density functional theory (CDFT) based approach using vector exchange-correlation (XC) potential and energy density functional that depend not only on the electronic charge-density but also on the current density. The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed in a parallel internuclear-axis and magnetic field-axis configuration at the field-free equilibrium internuclear separation R = 1.3 au with the field-strength varying between 0 and 10(11) G. The TD behavior of the exchange- and correlation energy of the He 2++ is analyzed and compared with that obtained using a [B-TD-QFD-density functional theory (DFT)] approach based on the conventional TD-DFT under similar computational constraints but using only scalar XC potential and energy density functional dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The CDFT based approach yields TD exchange- and correlation energy and TD electronic charge-density significantly different from that obtained using the conventional TD-DFT based approach, particularly, at typical magnetic field strengths and during a typical time period of the TD field. This peculiar behavior of the CDFT-based approach is traced to the TD current-density dependent vector XC potential, which can induce nonadiabatic effects causing retardation of the oscillating electronic charge density. Such dissipative electron dynamics of the He 2++ molecular ion is elucidated by treating electronic charge density as an electron-"fluid" in the terminology of QFD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Charge state of protons emerging from solids bombarded with molecular ions and atomic projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.J.; Poizat, J.C.; Ratkowski, A.; Remillieux, J.; Auzas, M.

    1977-09-01

    Non equilibrated neutral fractions in hydrogen beams emerging from solids are investigated with MeV H 2 + , H 3 + and H 0 projectiles bombarding thin carbon foils. It is observed that molecular beams produce more neutral atoms per nucleon than same velocity proton beams. The overproduction of neutrals exhibits two different regimes for long and for short transit times of the proton clusters inside the target. The long transit time effect is shown to be compatible with a neutralization through a two-step process in which a target electron gets correlated with one proton before being captured by another proton of the same cluster. Measurements performed with H 0 projectiles show that the short transit effect observed with molecular beams is dominated by the role played by projectile electrons, the approach to charge equilibrium following essentially the same law for H 0 , H 2 + and H 3 + projectiles. This measurement gives a direct determination of the charge exchange cross sections for fast protons in solids. Experimental cross sections measured in solid targets are compared with the corresponding gas cross sections and with existing theories. Angular distributions of the neutral atoms emerging from the target are compatible with the formation of a repulsive molecular state on

  1. MARVEL analysis of the rotational-vibrational states of the molecular ions H2D+ and D2H+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Fábri, Csaba; Császár, Attila G

    2013-07-07

    Critically evaluated rotational-vibrational line positions and energy levels, with associated critically reviewed labels and uncertainties, are reported for two deuterated isotopologues of the H3(+) molecular ion: H2D(+) and D2H(+). The procedure MARVEL, standing for Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels, is used to determine the validated levels and lines and their self-consistent uncertainties based on the experimentally available information. The spectral ranges covered for the isotopologues H2D(+) and D2H(+) are 5.2-7105.5 and 23.0-6581.1 cm(-1), respectively. The MARVEL energy levels of the ortho and para forms of the ions are checked against ones determined from accurate variational nuclear motion computations employing the best available adiabatic ab initio potential energy surfaces of these isotopologues. The number of critically evaluated, validated and recommended experimental (levels, lines) are (109, 185) and (104, 136) for H2D(+) and D2H(+), respectively. The lists of assigned MARVEL lines and levels and variational levels obtained for H2D(+) and D2H(+) as part of this study are deposited in the ESI to this paper.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations with electronic stopping can reproduce experimental sputtering yields of metals impacted by large cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiting; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian

    2018-03-01

    An unsolved problem in research of sputtering from metals induced by energetic large cluster ions is that molecular dynamics (MD) simulations often produce sputtering yields much higher than experimental results. Different from the previous simulations considering only elastic atomic interactions (nuclear stopping), here we incorporate inelastic electrons-atoms interactions (electronic stopping, ES) into MD simulations using a friction model. In this way we have simulated continuous 45° impacts of 10-20 keV C60 on a Ag(111) surface, and found that the calculated sputtering yields can be very close to the experimental results when the model parameter is appropriately assigned. Conversely, when we ignore the effect of ES, the yields are much higher, just like the previous studies. We further expand our research to the sputtering of Au induced by continuous keV C60 or Ar100 bombardments, and obtain quite similar results. Our study indicates that the gap between the experimental and the simulated sputtering yields is probably induced by the ignorance of ES in the simulations, and that a careful treatment of this issue is important for simulations of cluster-ion-induced sputtering, especially for those aiming to compare with experiments.

  3. Molecular Spring Enabled High-Performance Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyue Zheng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Flexible butyl interconnection segments are synthetically incorporated into an electronically conductive poly(pyrene methacrylate homopolymer and its copolymer. The insertion of butyl segment makes the pyrene polymer more flexible, and can better accommodate deformation. This new class of flexible and conductive polymers can be used as a polymer binder and adhesive to facilitate the electrochemical performance of a silicon/graphene composite anode material for lithium ion battery application. They act like a “spring” to maintain the electrode mechanical and electrical integrity. High mass loading and high areal capacity, which are critical design requirements of high energy batteries, have been achieved in the electrodes composed of the novel binders and silicon/graphene composite material. A remarkable area capacity of over 5 mAh/cm2 and volumetric capacity of over 1700 Ah/L have been reached at a high current rate of 333 mA/g.

  4. Solubility of Gliclazide and Ion-Molecular Interactions with Aminopropanol in Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Imad I.; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abu-Dahab, Rana

    2018-01-01

    A new salt of gliclazide (GZD) was prepared and was shown to have a significantly higher aqueous solubility at physiological pH together with superior dissolution profiles in comparison to GZD employing an organic amino-alcohol base. Characterization by NMR, IR, DSC, conductometry and HPLC techniques concluded that an ion pair salt is formed between acidic GZD and basic aminopropanol (AMP). In addition to the presence of about 5% tightly bound water, hydrogen bonds appeared to form extensively between GZD, AMP and water molecules. Unlike many of solubility enhancing approaches, the salt did not hamper the permeability of GZD as shown by transport through Caco-2 cells model. In vivo studies on rats confirmed that the blood glucose lowering effect of GZD-AMP was significantly higher and more rapid compared to parent GZD indicating an enhanced overall performance of the prepared salt.

  5. Weathering trend characterization of medium-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic disulfur heterocycles by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Abdelrahman H; Fathalla, Eiman M; Andersson, Jan T

    2014-09-01

    Different weathering factors act to change petroleum composition once it is spilled into the environment. n-Alkanes, biomarkers, low-molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles compositional changing in the environment have been extensively studied by different researchers and many parameters have been used for oil source identification and monitoring of weathering and biological degradation processes. In this work, we studied the fate of medium-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic disulfur heterocycles (PAS2Hs), up to ca. 900Da, of artificially weathered Flotta North Sea crude oil by ultra high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. It was found that PAS2Hs in studied crude oil having double bond equivalents (DBE) from 5 to 8 with a mass range from ca 316 to 582Da were less influenced even after six months artificial weathering experiment. However, compounds having DBEs 12, 11 and 10 were depleted after two, four and six months weathering, respectively. In addition, DBE 9 series was more susceptible to weathering than those of DBE 7 and 8. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular basis for convergent evolution of glutamate recognition by pentameric ligand-gated ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy; Beech, Robin N.; Lalande, Maryline J.

    2015-01-01

    that glutamate recognition requires an arginine residue in the base of the binding site, which originated at least three distinct times according to phylogenetic analysis. Most remarkably, the arginine emerged on the principal face of the binding site in the Lophotrochozoan lineage, but 65 amino acids upstream......Glutamate is an indispensable neurotransmitter, triggering postsynaptic signals upon recognition by postsynaptic receptors. We questioned the phylogenetic position and the molecular details of when and where glutamate recognition arose in the glutamate-gated chloride channels. Experiments revealed......, on the complementary face, in the Ecdysozoan lineage. This combined experimental and computational approach throws new light on the evolution of synaptic signalling....

  7. Spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular simulation studies on the interaction of catalase with copper ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Fang; Jing, Mingyang; Zhao, Xingchen; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    In this research, the binding mechanism of Cu(2+) to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking methods. The cellar experiment was firstly carried out to investigate the inhibition effect of catalase. During the fluorescence quenching study, after correcting the inner filter effect (IFE), the fluorescence of BLC was found to be quenched by Cu(2+). The quenching mechanism was determined by fluorescence lifetime measurement, and was confirmed to be the dynamic mode. The secondary structure content of BLC was changed by the addition of Cu(2+), as revealed by UV-vis absorption and CD spectra, which further induces the decrease in BLC activity. Molecular simulation study indicates that Cu(2+) is located between two β-sheets and two random coils of BLC near to the heme group, and interacts with His 74 and Ser 113 residues near a hydrophilic area. The decrease of α-helix and the binding of His 74 are considered to be the major reason for the inhibition of BLC activity caused by Cu(2+). The ITC results indicate that the binding stoichiometry of Cu(2+) to catalase is 11.4. Moreover, the binding of Cu(2+) to BLC destroyed H-bonds, which was confirmed by the CD result. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up and ion-pair LC with diode array UV detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaric acid is a phytotoxin and mycotoxin occasionally found in maize contaminated with Fusarium fungi. A selective sample clean-up procedure was developed to detect fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up coupled with ion-pair liquid chromatography...

  9. Sequence-dependent separation of trinucleotides by ion-interaction reversed-phase liquid chromatography A structure-retention study assisted by soft-modelling and molecular dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulášek, K.; Jaroň, Kamil S.; Kulhánek, P.; Bittová, M.; Havliš, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1469, October (2016), s. 88-95 ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Sequence-dependent separation * Ion-interaction reversed-phase liquid chromatography * Trinucleotides * Oligonucleotide sequence isomers * QSRR * Molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  10. Theoretical Investigation of the Effect of the Rare Gas Matrices on the Vibrational Spectra of Solvated Molecular Ions: Cu+CO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bludský, Ota; Šilhan, Martin; Nachtigall, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 20 (2002), s. 9298-9305 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : vibrational spectra * solvated molecular ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.998, year: 2002

  11. Molecular dynamics investigation of water-exchange reactions on lanthanide ions in water/1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethylsufate ([EMIm][OTf])

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yi-Jung; Lin, Zhijin; Allen, Matthew J.; Cisneros, G. Andrés

    2018-01-01

    We report a kinetic study of the water exchange on lanthanide ions in water/[1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium][trifluoromethylsufate] (water/[EMIm][OTf]). The results from 17O-NMR measurements show that the water-exchange rates in water/[EMIm][OTf] increase with decreasing size of the lanthanide ions. This trend for water-exchange is similar to the previously reported trend in water/1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate (water/[EMIm][EtSO4]) but opposite to that in water. To gain atomic-level insight into these water-exchange reactions, molecular dynamics simulations for lanthanide ions in water/[EMIm][OTf] have been performed using the atomic-multipole-optimized-energetics-for-biomolecular-application polarizable force field. Our molecular dynamics simulations reproduce the experimental water-exchange rates in terms of the trend and provide possible explanations for the observed experimental behavior. The smaller lanthanide ions in water/[EMIm][OTf] undergo faster water exchange because the smaller lanthanide ions coordinate to the first shell [OTf]- anions more tightly, resulting in a stronger screening effect for the second-shell water. The screening effect weakens the interaction of the lanthanide ions with the second-shell water molecules, facilitating the dissociation of water from the second-shell and subsequent association of water molecules from the outer solvation shells.

  12. Single-electron capture collisions of ground and metastable Ne2+ ions with molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A.; Abu-Haija, O.; Harris, J.; Elkafrawy, T.; Kayani, A.; Kamber, E. Y.

    2013-09-01

    Using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy technique, we have measured the energy-gain spectra and absolute total cross sections for single-electron capture in collisions of Ne2+ with N2, CO2 and H2O at laboratory impact energies between 50 and 400 eV and 0° scattering angles. In all the collision systems studied here, reaction channels have been observed which indicate the presence of the long-lived metastable states of (2s2 2p4 1D and 1S) in the Ne2+ incident beam. These measurements also indicate that capture from the metastable states into excited states of the projectile product ions is the most important inelastic process. Contributions from capture accompanied by the excitation and ionization of the target product are also detected. In addition, the energy dependence of the total single-electron capture cross sections is studied and found to slowly increase with increasing impact energy. The present data are compared with the theoretical calculations of the classical over the barrier, extended classical over the barrier and Landau-Zener models.

  13. The role of association of ions in ionic liquid/molecular solvent mixtures on metal extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andanson, J-M; Papaiconomou, N; Cable, P-A; Traïkia, M; Billard, I; Husson, P

    2017-11-01

    Several mixtures of butyl acetate (BA) and an ionic liquid (1-methyl-3-octylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C 1 C 8 Pyrro][NTf 2 ], 1-octyl-pyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C 8 Pyr][NTf 2 ], 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C 1 C 4 Im][NTf 2 ] or 1-octyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C 1 C 8 Im][NTf 2 ]) have been characterized by measuring density, viscosity and conductivity, from pure BA to pure ILs at 298.15 K. The ionicity of these mixtures has been determined on the basis of electrical conductivity and NMR spectroscopy. IR spectra of these mixtures were used to examine the interactions between ions. In parallel, Pt(iv) was extracted from the acidic aqueous phase towards mixtures of BA and [C 1 C 8 Im][NTf 2 ] over the entire composition range. A drastic modification in the distribution coefficient of Pt(iv) was observed at ca x AB = 0.8. A drop was also observed in the ionicity of the extracting phase (IL + BA) at a similar composition. The variation of the distribution coefficient is ascribed to changes in the interactions in the mixtures, which in turn could induce changes in the extraction mechanism.

  14. The effect of interatomic potential in molecular dynamics simulation of low energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.Y.; Nordlund, K.; Peltola, J.; Gossmann, H.-J.L.; Ma, N.L.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Benistant, F.; Chan, Lap

    2005-01-01

    Being able to accurately predict dopant profiles at sub-keV implant energies is critical for the microelectronic industry. Molecular Dynamics (MD), with its capability to account for multiple interactions as energy lowers, is an increasingly popular simulation method. We report our work on sub-keV implantation using MD and investigate the effect of different interatomic potentials on the range profiles. As an approximation, only pair potentials are considered in this work. Density Functional Theory (DFT) is used to calculate the pair potentials for a wide range of dopants (B, C, N, F, Si, P, Ga, Ge, As, In and Sb) in single crystalline silicon. A commonly used repulsive potential is also included in the study. Importance of the repulsive and attractive regions of the potential has been investigated with different elements and we show that a potential depicting the right attractive forces is especially important for heavy elements at low energies

  15. Mechanism of Formation of the Major Estradiol Product Ions Following Collisional Activation of the Molecular Anion in a Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, Kerry M.; Barkley, Robert M.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Johnson, Christopher A.; Bradford, Andrew P.; Santoro, Nanette; Murphy, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the mass spectral product ion structure is highlighted in quantitative assays, which typically use MRM (multiple reaction monitoring), and in the discovery of novel metabolites. Estradiol is an important sex steroid whose quantitation and metabolite identification using tandem mass spectrometry has been widely employed in numerous clinical studies. Negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of estradiol (E2) results in several product ions, including the abundant m/z 183 and m/z 169. While m/z 183 is one of the most abundant product ions used in many quantitative assays, the structure of m/z 183 has not been rigorously examined. We suggest a structure for m/z 183 and a mechanism of formation consistent with collision induced dissociation (CID) of E2 and several stable isotopes ([D4]-E2, [13C6]-E2, and [D1]-E2). An additional product ion from E2, namely m/z 169, has also been examined. MS3 experiments indicated that both m/z 183 and m/z 169 originate from only E2 [M-H]− m/z 271. These ions, m/z 183 and m/z 169, were also present in the collision induced decomposition mass spectra of other prominent estrogens, estrone (E1) and estriol (E3), indicating that these two product ions could be used to elucidate the estrogenic origin of novel metabolites. We propose two fragmentation schemes to explain the CID data and suggested a structure of m/z 183 and m/z 169 consistent with several isotopic variants and high resolution mass spectrometric measurements. PMID:23955001

  16. Towards Molecular Characterization of Mineral-Organic Matter Interface Using In Situ Liquid Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Yu, X. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Organo-Mineral-Microbe interactions in terrestrial ecosystems are of great interest. Quite a few models have been developed through extensive efforts in this field. However, predictions from current models are far from being accurate, and many debates still exist. One of the major reasons is that most experimental data generated from bulk analysis, and the information of molecular dynamics occurring at mineral-organic matter interface is rare. Such information has been difficult to obtain, due to lack of suitable in situ analysis tools. Recently, we have developed in situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory1, and it has shown promise to provide both elemental and molecular information at vacuum-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces.2 In this presentation, we demonstrate that in situ liquid SIMS can provide critical molecular information at solid substrate-live biofilm interface.3 Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model micro-organism and silicon nitride as a model mineral surface. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the living biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be molecularly examined. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments were found to respond after the biofilm is treated with Cr(VI), leading to biofilm dispersal. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environment were observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibition of riboflavin production. The Cr(VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr(III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for in-situ understanding of mineral-organo or mineral-microbe interfaces using in situ liquid SIMS and super resolution fluorescence

  17. Octahedral magnesium manganese oxide molecular sieves as the cathode material of aqueous rechargeable magnesium-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Ye, Ke; Shao, Shuangxi; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Kui; Xiao, Xue; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The mico-sheet Mg-OMS-1 is synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. • The mechanism of Mg 2+ insertion/deinsertion from Mg-OMS-1 is explored. • The electrode exhibits a good electrochemical performance in MgCl 2 electrolyte. - Abstract: Aqueous magnesium-ion batteries have shown the desired properties of high safety characteristics, similar electrochemical properties to lithium and low cost for energy storage applications. The micro-sheet morphology of todorokite-type magnesium manganese oxide molecular sieve (Mg-OMS-1) material, which applies as a novel cathode material for magnesium-ion battery, is obtained by the simple hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the particles are confirmed by X-ray power diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical performance of Mg-OMS-1 is researched by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and constant current charge-discharge measurement. Mg-OMS-1 shows a good battery behavior for Mg 2+ insertion and deinsertion in the aqueous electrolyte. When discharging at 10 mA g −1 in 0.2 mol dm −3 MgCl 2 aqueous electrolyte, the initial discharge capacity reaches 300 mAh g −1 . The specific capacity retention rate is 83.7% after cycling 300 times at 100 mA g −1 in 0.5 mol dm −3 MgCl 2 electrolyte with a columbic efficiency of nearly 100%.

  18. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Bjelkmar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure and dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels, in particular the motion of the S4 helix, is a highly interesting and hotly debated topic in current membrane protein research. It has critical implications for insertion and stabilization of membrane proteins as well as for finding how transitions occur in membrane proteins-not to mention numerous applications in drug design. Here, we present a full 1 micros atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel, comprising 120,000 atoms. By applying 0.052 V/nm of hyperpolarization, we observe structural rearrangements, including up to 120 degrees rotation of the S4 segment, changes in hydrogen-bonding patterns, but only low amounts of translation. A smaller rotation ( approximately 35 degrees of the extracellular end of all S4 segments is present also in a reference 0.5 micros simulation without applied field, which indicates that the crystal structure might be slightly different from the natural state of the voltage sensor. The conformation change upon hyperpolarization is closely coupled to an increase in 3(10 helix contents in S4, starting from the intracellular side. This could support a model for transition from the crystal structure where the hyperpolarization destabilizes S4-lipid hydrogen bonds, which leads to the helix rotating to keep the arginine side chains away from the hydrophobic phase, and the driving force for final relaxation by downward translation is partly entropic, which would explain the slow process. The coordinates of the transmembrane part of the simulated channel actually stay closer to the recently determined higher-resolution Kv1.2 chimera channel than the starting structure for the entire second half of the simulation (0.5-1 micros. Together with lipids binding in matching positions and significant thinning of the membrane also observed in experiments, this provides additional support for the predictive power of microsecond-scale membrane

  19. Fragment profiling of low molecular weight heparins using reversed phase ion pair liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Li, Daoyuan; Chi, Lequan; Du, Xuzhao; Bai, Xue; Chi, Lianli

    2015-04-30

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are linear and highly charged carbohydrate polymers prepared by chemical or enzymatic depolymerization of heparin. Compared to unfractionated heparin (UFH), LMWHs are prevalently used as clinical anticoagulant drugs due to their lower side effects and better bioavailability. The work presented herein provides a rapid and powerful fragment mapping method for structural characterization of LMWHs. The chain fragments of two types of LMWHs, enoxaparin and nadroparin, were generated by controlled enzymatic digestion with each of heparinase I (Hep I, Enzyme Commission (EC) # 4.2.2.7), heparinase II (Hep II, no EC # assigned) and heparinase III (Hep III, EC # 4.2.2.8). Reversed phase ion pair high performance liquid chromatography (RPIP-HPLC) coupled with electrospray ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-TOF-MS) was used to profile the oligosaccharide chains ranging from disaccharides to decasaccharides. A database containing all theoretical structural compositions was established to assist the mass spectra interpretation. The six digests derived by three enzymes from two types of LMWHs exhibited distinguishable fingerprinting patterns. And a total of 94 enoxaparin fragments and 109 nadroparin fragments were detected and identified. Besides the common LMWH oligosaccharides, many components containing characteristic LMWH structures such as saturated L-idopyranosuronic acid, 2,5-anhydro-D-mannitol, 1,6-anhydro-D-aminopyranose, as well as odd number oligosaccharides were also revealed. Quantitative comparison of major components derived from innovator and generic nadroparin products was presented. This approach to profile LMWHs' fragments offers a highly reproducible, high resolution and information-rich tool for evaluating the quality of this category of anticoagulant drugs or comparing structural similarities among samples from various sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biophysics and Molecular Biology of Cardiac Ion Channels for the Safety Pharmacologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, Michael K; Curtis, Michael J; Hayes, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac safety pharmacology is a continuously evolving discipline that uses the basic principles of pharmacology in a regulatory-driven process to generate data to inform risk/benefit assessment of a new chemical entity (NCE). The aim of cardiac safety pharmacology is to characterise the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) relationship of a drug's adverse effects on the heart using continuously evolving methodology. Unlike Toxicology, safety pharmacology includes within its remit a regulatory requirement to predict the risk of rare cardiotoxic (potentially lethal) events such as torsades de pointes (TdP), which is statistically associated with drug-induced changes in the QT interval of the ECG due to blockade of I Kr or K v11.1 current encoded by hERG. This gives safety pharmacology its unique character. The key issues for the safety pharmacology assessment of a drug on the heart are detection of an adverse effect liability, projection of the data into safety margin calculation and clinical safety monitoring. This chapter will briefly review the current cardiac safety pharmacology paradigm outlined in the ICH S7A and ICH S7B guidance documents and the non-clinical models and methods used in the evaluation of new chemical entities in order to define the integrated risk assessment for submission to regulatory authorities. An overview of how the present cardiac paradigm was developed will be discussed, explaining how it was based upon marketing authorisation withdrawal of many non-cardiovascular compounds due to unanticipated proarrhythmic effects. The role of related biomarkers (of cardiac repolarisation, e.g. prolongation of the QT interval of the ECG) will be considered. We will also provide an overview of the 'non-hERG-centric' concepts utilised in the evolving comprehensive in vitro proarrhythmia assay (CIPA) that details conduct of the proposed ion channel battery test, use of human stem cells and application of in silico models to early cardiac safety

  1. Phycodnavirus potassium ion channel proteins question the virus molecular piracy hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Kay; Greiner, Timo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Van Etten, James L; Gebhardt, Manuela; Villarreal, Luis P; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K(+) channels. To determine if these viral K(+) channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K(+) channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K(+) channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K(+) channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K(+) channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K(+) channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K(+) channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms.

  2. Phycodnavirus potassium ion channel proteins question the virus molecular piracy hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Hamacher

    Full Text Available Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K(+ channels. To determine if these viral K(+ channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K(+ channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K(+ channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K(+ channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K(+ channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K(+ channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K(+ channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms.

  3. Molecular Investigation of the Short-term Sequestration of Natural Abundance 13C -labelled Cow Dung in the Surface Horizons of a Temperate Grassland Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungait, J.; Bol, R.; Evershed, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    An adequate understanding of the carbon (C) sequestration potential of grasslands requires that the quantity and residence times of C inputs be measured. Herbivore dung is largely comprised of plant cell wall material, a significant source of stable C in intensively grazed temperate grassland ecosystems that contributes to the soil carbon budget. Our work uses compound-specific isotope analysis to identify the pattern of input of dung-derived compounds from natural abundance 13C/-labelled cow dung into the surface horizons of a temperate grassland soil over one year. C4 dung (δ 13C \\-12.6 ‰ ) from maize fed cows was applied to a temperate grassland surface (δ 13C \\-29.95 ‰ ) at IGER-North Wyke (Devon, UK), and dung remains and soil cores beneath the treatments collected at ŧ = 7, 14, 28, 56, 112, 224 and 372 days. Bulk dung carbon present in the 0\\-1 cm and 1\\-5 cm surface horizons of a grassland soil over one year was estimated using Δ 13C between C4 dung and C3 dung, after Bol {\\et al.} (2000). The major biochemical components of dung were quantified using proximate forage fibre analyses, after Goering and Van Soest (1970) and identified using `wet' chemical and GC-MS methods. Plant cell wall polysaccharides and lignin were found to account for up to 67 {%} of dung dry matter. Hydrolysed polysaccharides were prepared as alditol acetates for analyses (after Docherty {\\et al.}, 2001), and a novel application of an off-line pyrolysis method applied to measure lignin-derived phenolic compounds (after Poole & van Bergen, 2002). This paper focuses on major events in the incorporation of dung carbon, estimated using natural abundance 13C&-slash;labelling technique. This revealed a major bulk input of dung carbon after a period of significant rainfall with a consequent decline in bulk soil δ 13C values until the end of the experiment (Dungait {\\et al.}, submitted). Findings will be presented revealing contribution of plant cell wall polysaccharides and

  4. Collision cross section prediction of deprotonated phenolics in a travelling-wave ion mobility spectrometer using molecular descriptors and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Smagghe, Guy; Coelus, Sofie; Adriaenssens, Dieter; De Winter, Karel; Desmet, Tom; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John

    2016-06-14

    The combination of ion mobility and mass spectrometry (MS) affords significant improvements over conventional MS/MS, especially in the characterization of isomeric metabolites due to the differences in their collision cross sections (CCS). Experimentally obtained CCS values are typically matched with theoretical CCS values from Trajectory Method (TM) and/or Projection Approximation (PA) calculations. In this paper, predictive models for CCS of deprotonated phenolics were developed using molecular descriptors and chemometric tools, stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR), principal components regression (PCR), and partial least squares regression (PLS). A total of 102 molecular descriptors were generated and reduced to 28 after employing a feature selection tool, composed of mass, topological descriptors, Jurs descriptors and shadow indices. Therefore, the generated models considered the effects of mass, 3D conformation and partial charge distribution on CCS, which are the main parameters for either TM or PA (only 3D conformation) calculations. All three techniques yielded highly predictive models for both the training (R(2)SMLR = 0.9911; R(2)PCR = 0.9917; R(2)PLS = 0.9918) and validation datasets (R(2)SMLR = 0.9489; R(2)PCR = 0.9761; R(2)PLS = 0.9760). Also, the high cross validated R(2) values indicate that the generated models are robust and highly predictive (Q(2)SMLR = 0.9859; Q(2)PCR = 0.9748; Q(2)PLS = 0.9760). The predictions were also very comparable to the results from TM calculations using modified mobcal (N2). Most importantly, this method offered a rapid (predictive ability. These methods could therefore be used in routine analysis and could be easily integrated to metabolite identification platforms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular characterization of inhibiting biochar water-extractable substances using electrospray ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cameron R; Sleighter, Rachel L; Hatcher, Patrick G; Lee, James W

    2013-01-01

    Biochar has gained significant interest worldwide for its potential use as both a carbon sequestration technique and soil amendment. Recently, research has shown that pinewood-derived biochar water extracts inhibited the growth of aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae, while chicken litter- and peanut shell-derived biochar water extracts showed no growth inhibition. With the use of electrodialysis, the pinewood-derived biochar water extract is separated into 3 fractions (anode-isolated, center chamber retained, and cathode-isolated substances) all with varying toxic effects. Because of its ultrahigh resolution and mass precision, electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is utilized in this study to analyze biochar water extracts at a molecular level to enhance our understanding of the toxic nature of pinewood-derived biochar water extracts as compared to benign peanut shell-derived biochar water extracts. The molecular composition of pinewood-derived biochar water extracts shows unique carbohydrate ligneous components and sulfur containing condensed ligneous components that are both absent from the peanut shell water extracts and more prevalent in the anode-isolated substances. Using Kendrick mass defect analysis, we also determine that the most likely inhibitor species contain carboxyl and hydroxyl homologous series, both of which are characteristic functional groups hypothesized in our previous research for the inhibitor species. We have suggested that inhibition of aquatic photosynthetic microorganism growth is most likely due to degraded lignin-like species rich in oxygen containing functionalities. From the study conducted here, we show the potential of ultrahigh resolution FTICR-MS as a valuable analytical technique for determining whether certain biochars are safe and benign for use as carbon sequestration and soil amendment.

  6. Alkali Metal Ion Partitioning with Calix[4]arene-benzo-crown-6 Ionophore in Acidic Medium: Insights from Experiments, Statistical Mechanical Framework, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rima; Malviya, Abhigyan; Banerjee, Tamal; Ghosh, Pallab; Ali, Sk Musharaf

    2018-02-22

    The current work reports the experimental and predicted interfacial behavior of metal ion extraction from aqueous phase-diluent system using a newly synthesized calix-benzo-crown-6 (CBCBGA) ionophore. Conductor-like screening model for real solvents was used to predict the selectivity at infinite dilution for the metal ion complexes in both aqueous and diluent phases. The selectivity for Cs + -CBCBGA extraction was found to be higher than that of other metal ions, namely, K + , Na + , and Rb + . This was confirmed by the experimental distribution coefficients obtained in the diluents system at 3 M HNO 3 along with 0.01 M CBCBGA/organic solvents. The high selectivity of Cs + -CBCBGA complex over other complexes (K + , Rb + , and Na + ) in nitrobenzene was also confirmed and validated by the highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gap (i.e., 0.13114 > 0.12411 > 0.11719 > 0.11561 eV) and interaction energy (i.e., -68.25 > -57.11 > -55.52 > -52.37 kcal/mol). The interaction and free energies of the extraction were found to increase with the dielectric constant of the organic solvents, namely, nitrobenzene > o-nitrophenyl hexyl ether > 1-octanol > chloroform. Overall, a higher selectivity of Cs + ion over that of other metal ions (K + , Na + , and Rb + ) was obtained for the newly synthesized CBCBGA ionophore in a radioactive waste solution.

  7. Energetics of the rearrangement of neutral and ionized perfluorocyclopropane to perfluoropropylene. Use of infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra to identify structural isomers of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomse, D.S.; Berman, D.W.; Beauchamp, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy is used to compare the structure of gas-phase C 3 F 6 + ions obtained by electron-impact ionization of two isomeric precursors: perfluoropropylene and perfluorocyclopropane. Photodissociation spectra are obtained by observing the extent of multiphoton dissociation as the CO 2 laser is tuned across the 925 to 1080 cm -1 wavelength range. Ions are formed, stored, and detected with the use of techniques of ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy. Infrared multiphoton excitation is effected by using low-power, continuous-wave laser radiation. The fingerprint spectrum of the molecular ion of perfluorocyclopropane is identical with that obtained from perfluoropropylene, indicating rearrangement of the former to the latter. Photodissociation kinetics indicate that the entire perfluorocyclopropane molecular ion population isomerizes to the more stable perfluoropropylene structure. Thermochemistry of C 3 F 6 and C 3 F 6 + isomers is discussed. Comparisons are made with the analogous C 3 H 6 system. Photoionization mass spectroscopy results yield ΔH/sub f/(c-C 3 F 6 ) = -233.8 kcal/mol. 4 figures

  8. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena; Khotimchenko, Maksim

    2016-09-15

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular dynamics studies of electron-ion temperature equilibration in hydrogen plasmas within the coupled-mode regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Lorin X; Surh, Michael P; Stanton, Liam G; Scullard, Christian R; Correa, Alfredo A; Castor, John I; Graziani, Frank R; Collins, Lee A; Čertík, Ondřej; Kress, Joel D; Murillo, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics (MD) to study electron-ion temperature equilibration in two-component plasmas in regimes for which the presence of coupled collective modes has been predicted to substantively reduce the equilibration rate. Guided by previous kinetic theory work, we examine hydrogen plasmas at a density of n=10^{26}cm^{-3}, T_{i}=10^{5}K, and 10^{7}K

  10. Volumetric intensity dependence on the formation of molecular and atomic ions within a high intensity laser focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Lynne; Ledingham, Kenneth W D; McKenna, Paul; McCanny, Thomas; Shimizu, Seiji; Yang, Jiamin M; Wahlström, Claes-Göran; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Varju, Katalin; Johnsson, Per; Mauritsson, Johan

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of atomic and molecular ionization in intense, ultra-short laser fields is a subject which continues to receive considerable attention. An inherent difficulty with techniques involving the tight focus of a laser beam is the continuous distribution of intensities contained within the focus, which can vary over several orders of magnitude. The present study adopts time of flight mass spectrometry coupled with a high intensity (8 x 10(15) Wcm(-2)), ultra-short (20 fs) pulse laser in order to investigate the ionization and dissociation of the aromatic molecule benzene-d1 (C(6)H(5)D) as a function of intensity within a focused laser beam, by scanning the laser focus in the direction of propagation, while detecting ions produced only in a "thin" slice (400 and 800 microm) of the focus. The resultant TOF mass spectra varies significantly, highlighting the dependence on the range of specific intensities accessed and their volumetric weightings on the ionization/dissociation pathways accessed.

  11. Chiral micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CMEKC)-atmospheric pressure photoionization of benzoin derivatives using mixed molecular micelles

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jun; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we report, for the first time, the successful on-line coupling of chiral micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CMEKC) to atmospheric pressure photo-ionization mass spectrometry (APPI-MS). Four structurally similar neutral test solutes (e.g., benzoin derivatives) were successfully ionized by APPI-MS. The mass spectra in the positive ion mode showed that the protonated molecular ions of benzoins are not the most abundant fragment ions. Simultaneous enantioseparation by CME...

  12. Changes in Soil Organic Matter Abundance, Molecular Composition, and Diversity in an Arid Ecosystem in Response to Long-term Elevated CO2 Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, N. J.; Tfaily, M.; Evans, R. D.; Koyama, A.

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about how soils in arid ecosystems will respond to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration yet arid and semi-arid ecosystems cover more than 40% of Earth's land surface. Previous work in the Mojave Desert (Evans et al., 2014 Nature Climate Change) reported higher soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (N) concentrations following 10 years exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 at the Nevada Desert Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment (FACE) Facility (NDFF). In this study, we investigated potential mechanisms that resulted in increased SOC and total N accumulation and stabilization using high resolution mass spectrometry at the NDFF site. Samples were collected from soil profiles to 1 m in depth with a 0.2 m a increment under the dominant evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata. The differences in the molecular composition and diversity of soil organic matter (SOM) were more evident in surface soils and declined with depth, and were consistent with higher SOC and total N concentrations under elevated than ambient CO2. Our molecular analysis also suggested increased root exudation and/or microbial necromass from stabilization of labile C and N contributed to SOM and N stocks. Increased microbial activity and metabolism under elevated CO2 compared to ambient plots suggested that elevated CO2 altered microbial carbon (C) use patterns, reflecting changes in the quality and quantity of SOC inputs. We found that plant-derived compounds were primary substrates for microbial activity under elevated CO2 and microbial products were the main constituents of stabilized SOM. Our results suggest that arid ecosystems are a potential large C sink under elevated CO2, give the extensive coverage of the land surface, and that labile compounds are transformed to stable SOM via microbial processes. Arid systems are limited by water, and thus may have a different C storage potential under changing climates than other ecosystems that are limited by nitrogen or phosphorus.

  13. Insight into the molecular basis of pathogen abundance: group A Streptococcus inhibitor of complement inhibits bacterial adherence and internalization into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Nancy P; Ireland, Robin M; DeLeo, Frank R; Gowen, Brian B; Dorward, David W; Voyich, Jovanka M; Liu, Mengyao; Burns, Eugene H; Culnan, Derek M; Bretscher, Anthony; Musser, James M

    2002-05-28

    Streptococcal inhibitor of complement (Sic) is a secreted protein made predominantly by serotype M1 Group A Streptococcus (GAS), which contributes to persistence in the mammalian upper respiratory tract and epidemics of human disease. Unexpectedly, an isogenic sic-negative mutant adhered to human epithelial cells significantly better than the wild-type parental strain. Purified Sic inhibited the adherence of a sic negative serotype M1 mutant and of non-Sic-producing GAS strains to human epithelial cells. Sic was rapidly internalized by human epithelial cells, inducing cell flattening and loss of microvilli. Ezrin and moesin, human proteins that functionally link the cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, were identified as Sic-binding proteins by affinity chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Sic colocalized with ezrin inside epithelial cells and bound to the F-actin-binding site region located in the carboxyl terminus of ezrin and moesin. Synthetic peptides corresponding to two regions of Sic had GAS adherence-inhibitory activity equivalent to mature Sic and inhibited binding of Sic to ezrin. In addition, the sic mutant was phagocytosed and killed by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes significantly better than the wild-type strain, and Sic colocalized with ezrin in discrete regions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The data suggest that binding of Sic to ezrin alters cellular processes critical for efficient GAS contact, internalization, and killing. Sic enhances bacterial survival by enabling the pathogen to avoid the intracellular environment. This process contributes to the abundance of M1 GAS in human infections and their ability to cause epidemics.

  14. Characteristics of transitory multi-charged molecular ions produced by an intense femtosecond laser impulse; Etats electroniques des ions moleculaires multicharges transitoires produits par une impulsion laser femtoseconde intense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaglia, L

    2001-12-01

    The study of the molecular multi-ionization is narrowly linked to the dynamics of excitation and fragmentation for which the experimental observables rest on the characteristics of the fragmentation products, these characteristics are: intern energy, kinetic energy and charge states. The first chapter sets the problem. The second chapter presents the experimental tools used and developed in this work, the technologies of the detection of ions or of fluorescence are also described. The chapter 3 gathers the theoretical aspects: quantum chemistry and CASSCF (complete active space self consistent field) methods have been used to compute the potential energy curves of multi-charged ions, the two-dimensional hydrodynamic model derived from the Thomas-Fermi model is introduced to tackle the molecular re-orientation. The chapter 4 presents the experimental study of highly excited states by using fluorescence detection methods. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the study of low excited states by measuring kinetic energy spectra and by comparison with potential energy curves of molecular multi-charged ions. The chapter 6 presents experiments with 2 impulses and the results given by the Thomas-Fermi model applied to the re-orientation of the N{sub 2}O molecule. (A.C.)

  15. Combination of statistical methods and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for more comprehensive, molecular-level interpretations of petroleum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Manhoi; Yeo, Injoon; Park, Eunsuk; Kim, Young Hwan; Yoo, Jongshin; Kim, Eunkyoung; No, Myoung-han; Koh, Jaesuk; Kim, Sunghwan

    2010-01-01

    Complex petroleum mass spectra obtained by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) were successfully interpreted at the molecular level by applying principle component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). A total of 40 mass spectra were obtained from 20 crude oil samples using both positive and negative atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Approximately 400,000 peaks were identified at the molecular level. Conventional data analyses would have been impractical with so much data. However, PCA grouped samples into score plots based on their molecular composition. In this way, the overall compositional difference between samples could be easily displayed and identified by comparing score and loading plots. HCA was also performed to group and compare samples based on selected peaks that had been grouped by PCA. Subsequent heat map analyses revealed detailed compositional differences among grouped samples. This study demonstrates a promising new approach for studying multiple, complex petroleum samples at the molecular level.

  16. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation to assess the effect of temperature on diffusion coefficients of different ions and water molecules in C-S-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehtab, B.; Tarighat, A.

    2017-10-01

    Diffusion is a particle transportation process beginning from one point of a system to another through random molecular motion. This process depends on various parameters like temperature, concentration gradient, and particle size. The objective of this article is to assess the variation of diffusion coefficients of water molecules, chloride and sodium ions against different temperatures in calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) through molecular dynamics simulation. A uniform sodium chloride solution is modeled between cement hydrate layers with no concentration gradient. In such a solution, temperature could affect diffusion process in a significant manner. The two most important crystalline mineral analogues of C-S-H, tobermorite and jennite, are applied in this simulation. Diffusion coefficients of different ions and water molecules are found in different temperatures. It is revealed that diffusion coefficient is higher at high temperatures. Activation energies of chloride and sodium ions transport in cement hydrates are calculated through Arrhenius law. Output values of diffusion coefficients and activation energies are compared to previous experimental and simulation results in the related literature. A multi-scale analysis is run to estimate the penetration depth of Cl- ions in cement paste through Fick's second law.

  18. Microphase separation and the formation of ion conductivity channels in poly(ionic liquid)s: A coarse-grained molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyman, Alexander; Bier, Markus; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2018-05-01

    We study generic properties of poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) via coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations in bulk solution and under confinement. The influence of different side chain lengths on the spatial properties of the PIL systems and on the ionic transport mechanism is investigated in detail. Our results reveal the formation of apolar and polar nanodomains with increasing side chain length in good agreement with previous results for molecular ionic liquids. The ion transport numbers are unaffected by the occurrence of these domains, and the corresponding values highlight the potential role of PILs as single-ion conductors in electrochemical devices. In contrast to bulk behavior, a pronounced formation of ion conductivity channels in confined systems is initiated in close vicinity to the boundaries. We observe higher ion conductivities in these channels for increasing PIL side chain lengths in comparison with bulk values and provide an explanation for this effect. The appearance of these domains points to an improved application of PILs in modern polymer electrolyte batteries.

  19. Collision cross section prediction of deprotonated phenolics in a travelling-wave ion mobility spectrometer using molecular descriptors and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Smagghe, Guy; Coelus, Sofie; Adriaenssens, Dieter; De Winter, Karel; Desmet, Tom; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John

    2016-01-01

    The combination of ion mobility and mass spectrometry (MS) affords significant improvements over conventional MS/MS, especially in the characterization of isomeric metabolites due to the differences in their collision cross sections (CCS). Experimentally obtained CCS values are typically matched with theoretical CCS values from Trajectory Method (TM) and/or Projection Approximation (PA) calculations. In this paper, predictive models for CCS of deprotonated phenolics were developed using molecular descriptors and chemometric tools, stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR), principal components regression (PCR), and partial least squares regression (PLS). A total of 102 molecular descriptors were generated and reduced to 28 after employing a feature selection tool, composed of mass, topological descriptors, Jurs descriptors and shadow indices. Therefore, the generated models considered the effects of mass, 3D conformation and partial charge distribution on CCS, which are the main parameters for either TM or PA (only 3D conformation) calculations. All three techniques yielded highly predictive models for both the training (R 2 SMLR  = 0.9911; R 2 PCR  = 0.9917; R 2 PLS  = 0.9918) and validation datasets (R 2 SMLR  = 0.9489; R 2 PCR  = 0.9761; R 2 PLS  = 0.9760). Also, the high cross validated R 2 values indicate that the generated models are robust and highly predictive (Q 2 SMLR  = 0.9859; Q 2 PCR  = 0.9748; Q 2 PLS  = 0.9760). The predictions were also very comparable to the results from TM calculations using modified mobcal (N2). Most importantly, this method offered a rapid (<10 min) alternative to TM calculations without compromising predictive ability. These methods could therefore be used in routine analysis and could be easily integrated to metabolite identification platforms. - Highlights: • CCS for deprotonated phenolics were measured using TWIMS. • Isomeric phenolics were separated in the IMS based on their CCS. • SMLR, PLS and

  20. Collision cross section prediction of deprotonated phenolics in a travelling-wave ion mobility spectrometer using molecular descriptors and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, Gerard Bryan, E-mail: gerard.gonzales@ugent.be [Food Chemistry and Human Nutrition (NutriFOODChem), Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); Laboratory of Agrozoology, Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); Department of Applied Biological Science, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); Smagghe, Guy [Laboratory of Agrozoology, Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); Coelus, Sofie; Adriaenssens, Dieter [Food Chemistry and Human Nutrition (NutriFOODChem), Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); De Winter, Karel; Desmet, Tom [Center for Industrial Biotechnology and Biocatalysis, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); Raes, Katleen [Department of Applied Biological Science, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); Van Camp, John, E-mail: john.vancamp@ugent.be [Food Chemistry and Human Nutrition (NutriFOODChem), Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2016-06-14

    The combination of ion mobility and mass spectrometry (MS) affords significant improvements over conventional MS/MS, especially in the characterization of isomeric metabolites due to the differences in their collision cross sections (CCS). Experimentally obtained CCS values are typically matched with theoretical CCS values from Trajectory Method (TM) and/or Projection Approximation (PA) calculations. In this paper, predictive models for CCS of deprotonated phenolics were developed using molecular descriptors and chemometric tools, stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR), principal components regression (PCR), and partial least squares regression (PLS). A total of 102 molecular descriptors were generated and reduced to 28 after employing a feature selection tool, composed of mass, topological descriptors, Jurs descriptors and shadow indices. Therefore, the generated models considered the effects of mass, 3D conformation and partial charge distribution on CCS, which are the main parameters for either TM or PA (only 3D conformation) calculations. All three techniques yielded highly predictive models for both the training (R{sup 2}{sub SMLR} = 0.9911; R{sup 2}{sub PCR} = 0.9917; R{sup 2}{sub PLS} = 0.9918) and validation datasets (R{sup 2}{sub SMLR} = 0.9489; R{sup 2}{sub PCR} = 0.9761; R{sup 2}{sub PLS} = 0.9760). Also, the high cross validated R{sup 2} values indicate that the generated models are robust and highly predictive (Q{sup 2}{sub SMLR} = 0.9859; Q{sup 2}{sub PCR} = 0.9748; Q{sup 2}{sub PLS} = 0.9760). The predictions were also very comparable to the results from TM calculations using modified mobcal (N2). Most importantly, this method offered a rapid (<10 min) alternative to TM calculations without compromising predictive ability. These methods could therefore be used in routine analysis and could be easily integrated to metabolite identification platforms. - Highlights: • CCS for deprotonated phenolics were measured using TWIMS.

  1. He{sup 3+}{sub 2} and HeH{sup 2+} molecular ions in a strong magnetic field: The Lagrange-mesh approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares Pilón, Horacio, E-mail: holivare@ulb.ac.be [Physique Quantique, CP 165/82, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-04-09

    Accurate calculations for the ground state of the molecular ions He{sup 3+}{sub 2} and HeH{sup 2+} placed in a strong magnetic field B≳10{sup 2} a.u. (≈2.35×10{sup 11} G) using the Lagrange-mesh method are presented. The Born–Oppenheimer approximation of zero order (infinitely massive centers) and the parallel configuration (molecular axis parallel to the magnetic field) are considered. Total energies are found with 9–10 s.d. The obtained results show that the molecular ions He{sup 3+}{sub 2} and HeH{sup 2+} exist at B>100 a.u. and B>1000 a.u., respectively, as predicted in Turbiner and López Vieyra (2007) while a saddle point in the potential curve appears for the first time at B∼80 a.u. and B∼740 a.u., respectively. -- Highlights: ► Application of the Lagrange-mesh method to two exotic molecular systems. ► He{sup 3+}{sub 2} and HeH{sup 2+} exist at B>100 a.u. and B>1000 a.u., respectively. ► Accurate results for the total energy. ► A saddle point in the potential appears at B∼80 a.u. and B∼740 a.u., respectively.

  2. Kinetic energy distributions of molecular and cluster ions sputtered from self-assembled monolayers of octanethiol on gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arezki, Bahia; Delcorte, Arnaud; Bertrand, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols are an ideal model system to study the mechanisms that lead to emission of organic species under keV ion bombardment. In this contribution, we focus on the emission processes of gold-molecule cluster ions, which are not fully understood yet. To gain insights into these processes, monolayers of octanethiol CH 3 (CH 2 ) 7 SH adsorbed on gold are investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). First, the static SIMS conditions are verified using the degradation of the SAM signals as a function of ion fluence. Second, the kinetic energy distributions (KEDs) of fragment, parent and cluster ions ejected upon 15 keV Ga + ion bombardment are measured. The peak maxima, FWHMs and high energy tails of the distributions are analyzed for Au-thiolate clusters, as well as thiol fragments. After calibration of the energy spectra using monoatomic ions, we find that the KEDs of all the clusters containing the thiolate molecule peak at about 1.2 eV. Besides, the distributions of the gold-molecule cluster ions including Au(M-H) 2 - , the most intense cluster peak in the spectrum, are significantly narrower than that of the hydrocarbon fragments

  3. Molecular characterization of three Rhesus glycoproteins from the gills of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens, and effects of aestivation on their mRNA expression levels and protein abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You R Chng

    Full Text Available African lungfishes are ammonotelic in water. They can aestivate for long periods on land during drought. During aestivation, the gills are covered with dried mucus and ammonia excretion ceases. In fishes, ammonia excretion through the gills involves Rhesus glycoproteins (RhGP/Rhgp. This study aimed to obtain the complete cDNA coding sequences of rhgp from the gills of Protopterus annectens, and to determine their branchial mRNA and protein expression levels during the induction, maintenance and arousal phases of aestivation. Three isoforms of rhgp (rhag, rhbg and rhcg were obtained in the gills of P. annectens. Their complete cDNA coding sequences ranged between 1311 and 1398 bp, coding for 436 to 465 amino acids with estimated molecular masses between 46.8 and 50.9 kDa. Dendrogramic analyses indicated that Rhag was grouped closer to fishes, while Rhbg and Rhcg were grouped closer to tetrapods. During the induction phase, the protein abundance of Rhag, but not its transcript level, was down-regulated in the gills, suggesting that there could be a decrease in the release of ammonia from the erythrocytes to the plasma. Furthermore, the branchial transcript levels of rhbg and rhcg decreased significantly, in preparation for the subsequent shutdown of gill functions. During the maintenance phase, the branchial expression levels of rhag/Rhag, rhbg/Rhbg and rhcg/Rhcg decreased significantly, indicating that their transcription and translation were down-regulated. This could be part of an overall mechanism to shut down branchial functions and save metabolic energy used for transcription and translation. It could also be regarded as an adaptive response to stop ammonia excretion. During the arousal phase, it is essential for the lungfish to regain the ability to excrete ammonia. Indeed, the protein abundance of Rhag, Rhbg and Rhcg recovered to the corresponding control levels after 1 day or 3 days of recovery from 6 months of aestivation.

  4. Hydrogen and copper ion induced molecular reorganizations in two new scorpiand-like ligands appended with pyridine rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Salvador; Verdejo, Begoña; Clares, M Paz; Castillo, Carmen E; Algarra, Andrés G; Latorre, Julio; Máñez, M Angeles; Basallote, Manuel G; Soriano, Conxa; García-España, Enrique

    2010-08-02

    The synthesis of two new ligands constituted of a tris(2-aminoethyl)amine moiety linked to the 2,6 positions of a pyridine spacer through methylene groups in which the hanging arm is further functionalized with a 2-pycolyl (L1) or 3-pycolyl (L2) group is presented. The protonation of L1 and L2 and formation of Cu(2+) complexes have been studied using potentiometric, NMR, X-ray, and kinetic experiments. The results provide new information about the relevance of molecular movements in the chemistry of this kind of so-called scorpiand ligand. The comparison between these two ligands that only differ in the position of the substituent at the arm reveals important differences in both thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The Cu(2+) complex with L1 is several orders of magnitude more stable than that with L2, surely because in the latter case the pyridine nitrogen at the pendant arm is unable to coordinate to the metal ion with the ligand acting as hexadentate, a possibility that occurs in the case of [CuL1](2+), as demonstrated by its crystal structure. Significant differences are also found between both ligands in the kinetic studies of complex formation and decomposition. For L1, those processes occur in a single kinetic step, whereas for L2 they occur with the formation of a detectable reaction intermediate whose structure corresponds to that resulting from the movement typical of scorpiands. Another interesting conclusion derived from kinetic studies on complex formation is that the reactive form of the ligand is H(3)L(3+) for L1 and H(2)L(2+) for L2. DFT calculations are also reported, and they allow a rationalization of the kinetic results relative to the reactive forms of the ligands in the process of complex formation. In addition, they provide a full picture of the mechanistic pathway leading to the formation of the first Cu-N bond, including outer-sphere complexation, water dissociation, and reorganization of the outer-sphere complex.

  5. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Maria M.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-01

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006), 10.1529/biophysj.106.083667; M. M. Reif and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) and halide (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998), 10.1021/jp982638r; Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] = -1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol-1, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets LE, ME, and HE for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective ionic radius entering into the calculation of the correction terms is

  6. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  7. Ionization in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization: singly charged molecular ions are the lucky survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, M; Glückmann, M; Schäfer, J

    2000-01-01

    A new model for the ionization processes in UV matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) which accounts for the major phenomena observed is presented and discussed. The model retains elements of earlier approaches, such as photoionization and photochemical reactions, but it redefines these in the light of new working questions, most importantly why only singly charged ions are detected. Based on experimental evidence, the formation of singly and multiply charged clusters by a deficiency/excess of ions and also by photoionization and subsequent photochemical processes is pointed out to be the major ionization processes, which typically occur in parallel. The generation of electrons and their partial loss into the surrounding vacuum and solid, on the one hand, results in a positively charged ion-neutral plume facilitating a high overall ionization yield. On the other hand, these electrons, and also the large excess of protonated matrix ions in the negative ion mode, induce effective ion reneutralization in the plume. These neutralization processes are most effective for the highly charged cluster ions initially formed. Their fragmentation behaviour is evidenced in fast metastable fragmentation characteristics and agrees well with an electron capture dissociation mechanism and the enthalpy transfer upon neutralization forms the rationale for the prominent fragmentation and intense chemical noise accompanying successful MALDI. Within the course of the paper, cross-correlations with other desorption/ionization techniques and with earlier discussions on their mechanisms are drawn. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Origin of Asymmetric Solvation Effects for Ions in Water and Organic Solvents Investigated Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations: The Swain Acity-Basity Scale Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Maria M; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2016-08-25

    The asymmetric solvation of ions can be defined as the tendency of a solvent to preferentially solvate anions over cations or cations over anions, at identical ionic charge magnitudes and effective sizes. Taking water as a reference, these effects are quantified experimentally for many solvents by the relative acity (A) and basity (B) parameters of the Swain scale. The goal of the present study is to investigate the asymmetric solvation of ions using molecular dynamics simulations, and to connect the results to this empirical scale. To this purpose, the charging free energies of alkali and halide ions, and of their hypothetical oppositely charged counterparts, are calculated in a variety of solvents. In a first set of calculations, artificial solvent models are considered that present either a charge or a shape asymmetry at the molecular level. The solvation asymmetry, probed by the difference in charging free energy between the two oppositely charged ions, is found to encompass a term quadratic in the ion charge, related to the different solvation structures around the anion and cation, and a term linear in the ion charge, related to the solvation structure around the uncharged ion-sized cavity. For these simple solvent models, the two terms are systematically counteracting each other, and it is argued that only the quadratic term should be retained when comparing the results of simulations involving physical solvents to experimental data. In a second set of calculations, 16 physical solvents are considered. The theoretical estimates for the acity A are found to correlate very well with the Swain parameters, whereas the correlation for B is very poor. Based on this observation, the Swain scale is reformulated into a new scale involving an asymmetry parameter Σ, positive for acitic solvents and negative for basitic ones, and a polarity parameter Π. This revised scale has the same predictive power as the original scale, but it characterizes asymmetry in an

  9. Extraction of Gd3+and UO22+Ions Using Polystyrene Grafted Dibenzo Crown Ether (DB18C6) with Octanol and Nitrobenzene: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappidi, Praveenkumar; Namsani, Sadanandam; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Singh, Jayant Kumar

    2018-01-25

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed in order to derive thermodynamic properties important to understand the extraction of gadolinium (Gd 3+ ) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) with dibenzo crown ether (DBCE) in nitrobenzene (NB) and octanol (OCT) solvents. The effect of polystyrene graft length, on DBCE, on the binding behavior of Gd 3+ and UO 2 2+ is investigated for the first time. Our simulation results demonstrate that the binding of Gd 3+ and UO 2 2+ onto the oxygens of crown ethers is favorable for polystyrene grafted crown ether in the organic solvents OCT and NB. The metal ion binding free energy (ΔG Binding ) in different solvent environments is calculated using the thermodynamic integration (TI) method. ΔG Binding becomes more favorable in both solvents, NB and OCT, with an increase in the polystyrene monomer length. The metal ion transferability from an aqueous phase to an organic phase is estimated by calculating transfer free-energy calculations (ΔG Transfer ). ΔG Transfer is significantly favorable for both Gd 3+ and UO 2 2+ for the transfer from the aqueous phase to the organic phase (i.e., NB and OCT) via ion-complexation to DBCE with an increase in polystyrene length. The partition coefficient (log P) values for Gd 3+ and UO 2 2+ show a 5-fold increase in separation capacity with polystyrene grafted DBCE. We corroborate the observed behavior by further analyzing the structural and dynamical properties of the ions in different phases.

  10. Nanostructure conducting molecularly imprinted polypyrrole film as a selective sorbent for benzoate ion and its application in spectrophotometric analysis of beverage samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manbohi, Ahmad; Shamaeli, Ehsan; Alizadeh, Naader

    2014-07-15

    The benzoate anion was selectively extracted by electrochemically controlled solid-phase microextraction (EC-SPME) using a electro-synthesised nanostructure conducting molecularly imprinted polypyrrole (CMIP) film that imprinted for benzoate ions (template ion). The sorbent behaviors of CMIP were characterised using spectrophotometry analysis. The effect of pH, uptake and released times and potentials, template ion concentration, and interference were investigated, and experimental conditions optimised. The film exhibited excellent selectivity in the presence of potential interference from anions including salicylate, sorbate, citrate, phosphate, acetate and chloride ions. The calibration graph was linear (R(2)⩾ 0.993) in the range 1.1 × 10(-5)-5.5 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) and detection limit was 5.2 × 10(-6) mol L(-1). The relative standard deviation was less than 4.5% (n=3). The CMIP film, as a solid-phase micro-extraction absorbent, was applied for the selective clean up and quantification of benzoate in beverage samples using the EC-SPME-spectrophotometric method. The results were in agreement with those obtained using HPLC analysis. This method has a good selectivity and mechanical stability and is disposable simple to construct. However, HPLC method is more selective for determination of benzoate in some food products which have interference compounds such as vanilla and flavoring agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electron binding energies of aqueous alkali and halide ions: EUV photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid solutions and combined ab initio and molecular dynamics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Bernd; Weber, Ramona; Hertel, Ingolf V; Faubel, Manfred; Jungwirth, Pavel; Brown, Eric C; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2005-05-18

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with the liquid microjet technique enables the direct probing of the electronic structure of aqueous solutions. We report measured and calculated lowest vertical electron binding energies of aqueous alkali cations and halide anions. In some cases, ejection from deeper electronic levels of the solute could be observed. Electron binding energies of a given aqueous ion are found to be independent of the counterion and the salt concentration. The experimental results are complemented by ab initio calculations, at the MP2 and CCSD(T) level, of the ionization energies of these prototype ions in the aqueous phase. The solvent effect was accounted for in the electronic structure calculations in two ways. An explicit inclusion of discrete water molecules using a set of snapshots from an equilibrium classical molecular dynamics simulations and a fractional charge representation of solvent molecules give good results for halide ions. The electron binding energies of alkali cations computed with this approach tend to be overestimated. On the other hand, the polarizable continuum model, which strictly provides adiabatic binding energies, performs well for the alkali cations but fails for the halides. Photon energies in the experiment were in the EUV region (typically 100 eV) for which the technique is probing the top layers of the liquid sample. Hence, the reported energies of aqueous ions are closely connected with both structures and chemical reactivity at the liquid interface, for example, in atmospheric aerosol particles, as well as fundamental bulk solvation properties.

  12. Sputtering of copper atoms by keV atomic and molecular ions A comparison of experiment with analytical and computer based models

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, D R; Goelich,

    2002-01-01

    Non-resonant multiphoton ionisation combined with quadrupole and time-of-flight analysis has been used to measure energy distributions of sputtered copper atoms. The sputtering of a polycrystalline copper target by 3.6 keV Ar sup + , N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + and 1.8 keV N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + ion bombardment at 45 deg. has been investigated. The linear collision model in the isotropic limit fails to describe the high energy tail of the energy distributions. However the TRIM.SP computer simulation has been shown to provide a good description. The results indicate that an accurate description of sputtering by low energy, molecular ions requires the use of computer simulation rather than analytical approaches. This is particularly important when considering plasma-surface interactions in plasma etching and deposition systems.

  13. The Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane: A Model of Molecular, Structural, and Functional Adaptation to Transepithelial Ion Transport and Barrier Function during Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriella Gabrielli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The chick chorioallantoic membrane is a very simple extraembryonic membrane which serves multiple functions during embryo development; it is the site of exchange of respiratory gases, calcium transport from the eggshell, acid-base homeostasis in the embryo, and ion and H2O reabsorption from the allantoic fluid. All these functions are accomplished by its epithelia, the chorionic and the allantoic epithelium, by differentiation of a wide range of structural and molecular peculiarities which make them highly specialized, ion transporting epithelia. Studying the different aspects of such a developmental strategy emphasizes the functional potential of the epithelium and offers an excellent model system to gain insights into questions partly still unresolved.

  14. The Gaussian Atomic Orbital Multiplied by a Field-Dependent Gauge Phase for the Hydrogen Molecular Ion in Non-aligned Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xuanyu; Li, Cun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    We multiply the anisotropic Gaussian atomic orbital by a field-dependent gauge phase to describe the wave function for the hydrogen molecular ion in non-aligned magnetic fields. With the kind of basis set, the convergence of the total energy at the equilibrium distance for the 1 u state is much improved compared to the same atomic orbital without the gauge phase. For 2.35 × 10 4 ≤ B ≤ 10 7 T, better total energies of the 1 u state at the corresponding equilibrium are obtained for the deviations 15°–90° of the magnetic field relative to the molecular axis. The result also shows that, there is a transition of the equilibrium configuration from the vertical orientation to the parallel orientation with increasing field strength. (author)

  15. Ion and water transport in a Nafion{reg_sign} membrane pore: A statistical mechanical model with molecular structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddison, S.J.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Electronic and Electrochemical Materials and Devices Group; Paul, R. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    With the well established importance of the coupling of water and protons through electroosmotic drag in operating PEFCs the authors present here a derivation of a mathematical model that focuses on the computation of the mobility of an hydronium ion through an arbitrary cylindrical pore of a PEM with a non-uniform charge distribution on the walls of the pore. The total Hamiltonian is derived for the hydronium ion as it moves through the hydrated pore and is effected by the net potential due to interaction with the solvent molecules and the pendant side chains. The corresponding probability density is derived through solution of the Liouville equation. This probability density is then used to compute the friction tensor for the hydronium ion. The authors find two types of contributions: (a) due to the solvent-ion interactions for which they adopt the conventional continuum model; (b) due to the interaction between the pendant charges and the hydronium ion. The latter is a new result and displays the role of the non-uniform nature of the charge distribution on the pore wall.

  16. Charge exchange, surface-induced dissociation and reactions of doubly charged molecular ions SF42+ upon impact on a stainless steel surface: A comparison with surface-induced dissociation of singly charged SF4+ molecular ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feketeová, L.; Grill, V.; Zappa, F.; Endstrasser, N.; Rasul, B.; Herman, Zdeněk; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 1 (2008), s. 37-42 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : doubly charged ion * surface-induced dissociations * surface-induced reaction * charge exchange Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.445, year: 2008

  17. Ion Mobility and Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Phosphatidylglycerol and Bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate (BMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Murphy, Robert C.; Barkley, Robert M.; Gijón, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The tandem mass spectrometry, ion mobility, and normal phase HPLC of isomeric phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate (BMP) have been investigated in this study with the objective of differentiating these unique classes of lipids. Measurement of ion mobility using the traveling wave method for negative molecular and product ions from isomeric PG and BMP yielded identical results, but different ion mobilities were observed for positive product ions arising from collision-induced dissociation (CID). The fastest moving positive product ions from the ion mobility analysis of BMP(18:1/18:1) were monoglyceride-like, and the slowest moving product ions from this BMP corresponded to [M+H-2H2O]+, which were readily observed for BMP but were only at very low abundance in the CID spectra of PG. The major product ions observed from the sodium adduct of PG(18:1/18:1) were consistent with diglyceride-like ion formation, but for BMP(18:1/18:1) only monoglyceride-like product ions were formed. The usefulness of ion mobility separation was tested with the selection of positive product ions derived from the isomeric PG and BMP molecular species in the lipid extract of RAW 264.7 cells. The ion mobility spectra of monoglyceride-like ions derived from BMP species with various esterified fatty acyl groups displayed some separation in ion mobility based on fatty acyl chain length and presence of a double bond in the acyl chain. The mechanism of ion formation of the diglyceride- and monoglyceride-like ions from PG and BMP respectively was examined using deuterium-labeled species including PG(D3116:0/18:1) and PG and BMP labeled by deuterium exchange. PMID:25883529

  18. The Effect of Crystal Packing and Re(IV) Ions on the Magnetisation Relaxation of [Mn6 ]-Based Molecular Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Brechin, Euan K

    2015-01-01

    The energy barrier to magnetisation relaxation in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) proffers potential technological applications in high-density information storage and quantum computation. Leading candidates amongst complexes of 3d metals ions are the hexametallic family of complexes of formula [Mn6 O2 (R-sao)6 (X)2 (solvent)y ] (saoH2 =salicylaldoxime; X=mono-anion; y=4-6; R=H, Me, Et, and Ph). The recent synthesis of cationic [Mn6 ][ClO4 ]2 family members, in which the coordinating X ions we...

  19. Improvement in the assessment of direct and facilitated ion transfers by electrochemically induced redox transformations of common molecular probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min; Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie

    2012-01-01

    the interface and the charge neutrality of the organic film (containing an extremely hydrophobic electrolyte) can only be maintained by the injection of ions from the aqueous phase. Taking advantage of this fact, common redox probes, such as ferrocene (Fc) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), which...... potential window (ppw) in the aqueous phase and, as a result, this allowed the assessment of weakly assisted ion transfers, which appear at the terminal of the ppw at single polarized interfaces; (ii) without introducing the tetraphenylarsonium–tetraphenylborate (TPAs–TPB) thermodynamic assumption, one can...

  20. Switching between porphyrin, porphodimethene and porphyrinogen using cyanide and fluoride ions mimicking volatile molecular memory and the 'NOR' logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Mandeep K; Sankar, Muniappan

    2016-10-18

    β-Functionalization of meso-tetrakis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin with electron acceptors such as formyl and dicyanovinyl has been reported for the first time. 2-Formyl-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3',5'-di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrinatocopper(ii) (Cu-TDtBHPP-CHO) crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1[combining macron], [a = 10.8479(4) Å, b = 14.6207(5) Å, c = 15.9745(5) Å, V = 2198.97(13) Å 3 ] and exhibits an almost planar structure and a square planar geometry. β-Formyl/dicyanovinyl substituted porphyrins such as Cu-TDtBHPP-CHO, Ni-TDtBHPP-CHO, Cu-TDtBHPP-MN (1), Ni-TDtBHPP-MN (2) and H 2 -TDtBHPP-MN (3) exhibited red-shifted optical absorption features (Δλ max = 13-40 nm) in CH 2 Cl 2 compared to the corresponding MTPPs. β-Dicyanovinyl substituted porphyrins were developed as a quantitatively operating 'lab-on-a-molecule' for the visual detection of F - and CN - ions. Having a CN - ion responsive dicyanovinyl moiety and a F - ion responsive redox-active 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl groups, they detect F - and CN - ions simultaneously by switching unique structural changes between porphyrin, porphodimethene and porphyrinogen along with distinct colour changes which were monitored by UV-Vis-NIR, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopic techniques.

  1. Electric Double Layer at the Rutile (110) Surface. 2. Adsorption of Ions from Molecular Dynamics and X-ray Experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Předota, Milan; Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Cummings, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 32 (2004), s. 12061-12072 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/03/P083; GA ČR GA203/02/0805 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : ion * adsorption * rutile Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.834, year: 2004

  2. Molecular enhancement of Balmer emissions following foil-induced dissociation of fast H2+ and H3+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Oda, N.

    1984-01-01

    Relative emission yields of Balmer lines as functions of the dwell time (t/sub D/ = 0.97--54.1 fs) in thin carbon foils (2--68 μg/cm 2 ) have been measured with (0.2--0.8)-MeV/amu H + , H 2 + , and H 3 + incident on thin carbon foils. Large molecular effects for emission yields of Balmer lines have been observed for H 2 + and H 3 + , where the molecular effect for H 3 + is larger than that for H 2 + . The molecular effects for H 2 + and H 3 + depend on the principal quantum number (n = 3--6), but this n dependence disappears at the largest t/sub D/ ( = 54.1 fs). The molecular effects rapidly decrease with increasing t/sub D/ in the small-t/sub D/ ( or approx. =2 fs) region. The magnitudes of the molecular effects at the largest t/sub D/ ( = 54.1 fs) are in good agreement with those by Andresen et al. [Phys. Scr. 19, 335 (1979)]. Relative populations of n-state hydrogens in the large-t/sub D/ (> or approx. =2 fs) region have been derived from the relative yields of Balmer lines as functions of n and t/sub D/. The molecular enhancement for relative populations of n-state hydrogens for H 2 + depends on n and t/sub D/, and decreases with increasing t/sub D/ and increases with increasing n

  3. Organic solvent and temperature-enhanced ion chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for the determination of low molecular weight organic and inorganic anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchrist, Elizabeth S.; Nesterenko, Pavel N.; Smith, Norman W.; Barron, Leon P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • IC selectivity at high contents of organic solvent in eluent and elevated temperature is studied. • Solvent-enhanced IC coupled to high resolution MS is beneficial for sensitive detection of ions. • The first application of IC-HRMS to the detection of low explosives in fingermarks is shown. - Abstract: There has recently been increased interest in coupling ion chromatography (IC) to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to enable highly sensitive and selective analysis. Herein, the first comprehensive study focusing on the direct coupling of suppressed IC to HRMS without the need for post-suppressor organic solvent modification is presented. Chromatographic selectivity and added HRMS sensitivity offered by organic solvent-modified IC eluents on a modern hyper-crosslinked polymeric anion-exchange resin (IonPac AS18) are shown using isocratic eluents containing 5–50 mM hydroxide with 0–80% methanol or acetonitrile for a range of low molecular weight anions (<165 Da). Comprehensive experiments on IC thermodynamics over a temperature range between 20–45 °C with the eluent containing up to 60% of acetonitrile or methanol revealed markedly different retention behaviour and selectivity for the selected analytes on the same polymer based ion-exchange resin. Optimised sensitivity with HRMS was achieved with as low as 30–40% organic eluent content. Analytical performance characteristics are presented and compared with other IC-MS based works. This study also presents the first application of IC-HRMS to forensic detection of trace low-order anionic explosive residues in latent human fingermarks

  4. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    inference that increased recruitment was largely responsible for the improvements in population status and growth. However, various data sources also indicated that this increase in recruitment was likely a result of increased immigration rather than improved reproduction on the area. This latter inference is important from a conservation perspective in indicating the importance of birds in other locations to growth and health of the study population. Lukacs and Burnham presented material to be published elsewhere that dealt with the use of genetic markers in capture–recapture studies. The data sources for such studies are samples of hair or feces, which are then analyzed using molecular genetic techniques in order to determine individual genotypes with respect to a usually small number of loci. Two types of classification error can arise in such analyses. First, if only a small number of loci is examined, then there may be nonnegligible probabilities that multiple individual animals will have the same genotypes. The second type of error arises during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process and can result from failure of alleles to amplify (allelic dropout) or from PCR inhibitors in hair and feces that produce the appearance of false alleles or misprinting (Creel et al., 2003). Lukacs and Burnham developed models that formally incorporate possible misclassification of samples resulting from these errors. These models permit estimation of parameters such as abundance and survival in a manner that properly incorporates this uncertainty of individual identity. We anticipate that noninvasive sampling based on molecular genetic analyses of hair or feces will become extremely important for some species, and that the models of Lukacs and Burnham will become very popular for such analyses. MacKenzie & Nichols (2004) discuss the use of occupancy (proportion of patches or habitat area that is occupied) as a surrogate for abundance. In cases of territorial species and where

  5. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    led to the inference that increased recruitment was largely responsible for the improvements in population status and growth. However, various data sources also indicated that this increase in recruitment was likely a result of increased immigration rather than improved reproduction on the area. This latter inference is important from a conservation perspective in indicating the importance of birds in other locations to growth and health of the study population. Lukacs and Burnham presented material to be published elsewhere that dealt with the use of genetic markers in capture–recapture studies. The data sources for such studies are samples of hair or feces, which are then analyzed using molecular genetic techniques in order to determine individual genotypes with respect to a usually small number of loci. Two types of classification error can arise in such analyses. First, if only a small number of loci is examined, then there may be nonnegligible probabilities that multiple individual animals will have the same genotypes. The second type of error arises during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR process and can result from failure of alleles to amplify (allelic dropout or from PCR inhibitors in hair and feces that produce the appearance of false alleles or misprinting (Creel et al., 2003. Lukacs and Burnham developed models that formally incorporate possible misclassification of samples resulting from these errors. These models permit estimation of parameters such as abundance and survival in a manner that properly incorporates this uncertainty of individual identity. We anticipate that noninvasive sampling based on molecular genetic analyses of hair or feces will become extremely important for some species, and that the models of Lukacs and Burnham will become very popular for such analyses. MacKenzie & Nichols (2004 discuss the use of occupancy (proportion of patches or habitat area that is occupied as a surrogate for abundance. In cases of territorial species

  6. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining

  7. Technical Note: Molecular characterization of aerosol-derived water soluble organic carbon using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Dickhut

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the acknowledged relevance of aerosol-derived water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC to climate and biogeochemical cycling, characterization of aerosol WSOC has been limited. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS was utilized in this study to provide detailed molecular level characterization of the high molecular weight (HMW; m/z>223 component of aerosol-derived WSOC collected from rural sites in Virginia and New York, USA. More than 3000 peaks were detected by ESI FT-ICR MS within a m/z range of 223–600 for each sample. Approximately 86% (Virginia and 78% (New York of these peaks were assigned molecular formulas using only carbon (C, hydrogen (H, oxygen (O, nitrogen (N, and sulfur (S as elemental constituents. H/C and O/C molar ratios were plotted on van Krevelen diagrams and indicated a strong contribution of lignin-like and lipid-like compounds to the aerosol-derived WSOC samples. Approximately 1–4% of the peaks in the aerosol-derived WSOC mass spectra were classified as black carbon (BC on the basis of double bond equivalents calculated from the assigned molecular formulas. In addition, several high-magnitude peaks in the mass spectra of samples from both sites corresponded to molecular formulas proposed in previous secondary organic aerosol (SOA laboratory investigations indicating that SOAs are important constituents of the WSOC. Overall, ESI FT-ICR MS provides a level of resolution adequate for detailed compositional and source information of the HMW constituents of aerosol-derived WSOC.

  8. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Fisher, L W; Hansma, P K

    2008-01-01

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface, and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence. PMID:18843380

  9. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of dentin matrix protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Hansma, P K [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Fisher, L W [Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases Branch, NIDCR, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)], E-mail: adams@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: fantner@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: lfisher@dir.nidcr.nih.gov, E-mail: prasant@physics.ucsb.edu

    2008-09-24

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use atomic force microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence.

  10. Crystal and molecular structures of sulfonato complexes of dioxouranium(VI) ion: role of steric effects on coordination structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, N.W.; Kemp, T.J.; Leciejewicz, J.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structures of three sulfonato complexes of uranyl ion are described. All have linear UO 2 groups pentagonally coordinated by sulfonato or aquo ligands. In [(UO 2 )(H 2 O)(EtSO 3 ) 2 ] the coordination about UO 2 is provided by four O donated by two EtSO 3 - ligands and one O by water: a sulfonate group links the pentagonal bipyramids into chains propagating along the a axis. p-Toluenesulfonato and mesitylenesulfonato complexes of uranyl ion are monomeric and in each complex two O are donated by monodentate sulfonate and three O by water molecules. The tendencies for complexes with small ligands to form polymeric structures, and for those with bulky ligands to give monomeric structures, which we have observed with carboxylate ligands, seem to extend to sulfonate ligands. (orig.)

  11. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V., E-mail: luck@fafnir.astr.cwru.edu, E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua [Department of Astronomy and Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, Shevchenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  12. High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry compared with ion chromatography for quantitative determination of dissolved fluoride in river water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Philip; Sturm, Manfred; Ternes, Thomas A; Meermann, Björn

    2017-12-01

    In addition to beneficial health effects, fluoride can also have adverse effects on humans, animals, and plants if the daily intake is strongly elevated. One main source of fluoride uptake is water, and thus several ordinances exist in Germany that declare permissible concentrations of fluoride in, for example, drinking water, mineral water, and landfill seepage water. Controlling the fluoride concentrations in aqueous matrices necessitate valid and fast analytical methods. In this work an alternative method for the determination of fluoride in surface waters based on high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied. Fluoride detection was made possible by the formation of a diatomic molecule, GaF, and detection of characteristic molecular absorption. On HR-CS-GFMAS parameter optimization, the method was adapted to surface water sample analysis. The influence of potential main matrix constituents such as Na + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , and Cl - as well as surface water sampling/storage conditions on the molecular absorption signal of GaF was investigated. Method validation demonstrated a low limit of detection (8.1 μg L -1 ) and a low limit of quantification (26.9 μg L -1 ), both sufficient for direct river water sample analysis after 0.45-μm filtration. The optimized HR-CS-GFMAS method was applied for the analysis of real water samples from the rivers Rhine and Moselle. For method validation, samples were also analyzed by an ion chromatography (IC) method. IC and HR-CS-GFMAS results both agreed well. In comparison with IC, HR-CS-GFMAS has higher sample throughput, a lower limit of detection and a lower limit of quantification, and higher selectivity, and is a very suitable method for the analysis of dissolved fluoride in river water. Graphical abstract High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied for the quantitative analysis of dissolved

  13. The Effect of Alkali and Ce(III Ions on the Response Properties of Benzoxazine Supramolecules Prepared via Molecular Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apirat Laobuthee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of benzoxazine monomer supramolecules with different substituted groups on their benzene ring was prepared with a Mannich reaction and characterized by FTIR, 1H-NMR and MS. The obtained products were 3,4-dihydro-3-(2’-hydroxyethylene-6-methyl-2H-benzoxazine (BM1, 3,4-dihydro-3-(2’-hydroxyethylene-6-ethyl-2H-benz-oxazine (BM2, and 3,4-dihydro-3-(2’-hydroxyethylene-6-methoxy-2H-benzoxazine (BM3. The efficiency of alkali metal ion extraction from the products was determined with Pedersen’s technique, while the complexation of the Ce(III ion was confirmed by the Job’s and the mole ratio methods. The evidence of complex formation between benzoxazine monomers and Ce(III ions was obtained with FTIR and a computational simulation. Single phase ceria (CeO2 as observed with XRD was successfully prepared by calcinating the Ce(III-benzoxazine monomer complexes at 600 °C for 2 h. In addition, the geometry of the ceria nanoparticles confirmed by TEM is spherical, with an average diameter of 10‑20 nm.

  14. Collision-induced dissociation pathways of yeast sphingolipids and their molecular profiling in total lipid extracts: a study by quadrupole TOF and linear ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Christer S.; Moehring, Thomas; Bahr, Ute

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthesizes three classes of sphingolipids: inositolphosphoceramides (IPCs), mannosyl-inositolphosphoceramides (MIPCs), and mannosyl-diinositolphosphoceramides (M(IP)2C). Tandem mass spectrometry of their molecular anions on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (Qq......TOF) instrument produced fragments of inositol-containing head groups, which were specific for each lipid class. MS(n) analysis performed on a hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap (LTQ Orbitrap) mass spectrometer with better than 3 ppm mass accuracy identified fragment ions specific for the amide-linked fatty acid...... and the long chain base moieties in individual molecular species. By selecting m/z of class-specific fragment ions for multiple precursor ion scanning, we profiled yeast sphingolipids in total lipid extracts on a QqTOF mass spectrometer. Thus, a combination of QqTOF and LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry lends...

  15. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver, E-mail: jasmina@physics.ucf.edu [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  16. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  17. Simultaneous ion removal and quantitation of low-molecular-weight dietary fiber from high-molecular-weight dietary fiber filtrates using liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Brett E; Marshak, Michael R; DeVries, Jonathan W

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fiber and its quantitation in foods have been of significant interest in the nutrition community for over 50 years. A number of AOAC Official Methods of Analysis have been adopted for the analysis of dietary fiber and some of its fractions and components commensurate with the evolving discoveries of dietary fiber nutrition research. Quantitation of low-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (LMWSDF) has been difficult due to high solubility in a precipitating solvent mixture of four parts alcohol and one part water. AOAC Method 2001.03 effectively quantitates LWMSDF subsequent to gravimetric removal of high-molecular-weight dietary fiber using LC. However, deionization and concentration of the enzymatic digestate, necessary to assure accurate LC quantitation, requires substantial time and manual labor. A modification to the method and resulting method performance is presented that describes a means of simultaneously deionizing the digestate and quantitating the LMWSDF in a single LC injection, eliminating a number of time-consuming manual preparation steps.

  18. Influence of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids on Transport of Cadmium and Copper Ions across Model Phospholipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parisová, Martina; Navrátil, Tomáš; Šestáková, Ivana; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Mareček, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013), s. 27-44 ISSN 1452-3981 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : cadmium * copper * low molecular weight organic acid Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.956, year: 2013

  19. Aqueous Guanidinium-Carbonate Interactions by Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering: Relevance to Ion-Protein Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vazdar, Mario; Jungwirth, Pavel; Mason, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 6 (2013), s. 1844-1848 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : guanidinium * neutron scattering * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  20. Thermodynamics of Small Alkali Metal Halide Cluster Ions: Comparison of Classical Molecular Simulations with Experiment and Quantum Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, L.; Uhlík, F.; Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo; Chialvo, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 3 (2015), s. 488-500 ISSN 1089-5639 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : monte-carlo simulations * molecular-dynamic simulations * classical drude oscillators Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.883, year: 2015

  1. Difference-frequency laser spectroscopy of molecular ions with a hollow-cathode cell: extended analysis of the ν1 band of H2D+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, T.

    1985-01-01

    A cooled hollow-cathode cell was used for observation of the infrared spectra of positive ions in the 3-μm region with a difference-frequency laser as a radiation source. About an order-of-magnitude enhancement of the signal intensity was attained, compared with the similar signals obtained with our previous glow-discharge cell. Ten more weaker lines of the ν 1 fundamental band of H 2 D + , which could not be observed in our previous experiment [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 2869 (1984)] were measured. Improved molecular constants were obtained from a least-squares fit including the infrared lines and the two millimeter-and submillimeter-wave lines in the ground state

  2. Ion pump as molecular ratchet and effects of noise: electric activation of cation pumping by Na,K-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, T. Y.; Xie, T. D.

    2002-08-01

    Na,K-ATPase is a universal ion pump of the biological cell. Under physiological conditions, it uses the γ-phosphorus bond energy of ATP during hydrolysis to pump 2 K+ inward and 3 Na+ outward; both being uphill transports. The experiment presented here demonstrates that the protein transporter can also use electric energy to fuel its pump activity. A theory of electroconformational coupling (TEC) is described and an experiment performed to verify several predictions of the model. Analysis based on the TEC model suggests that Na,K-ATPase is a Brownian ratchet. The enzyme harvests energy from the applied field by means of the field-induced conformational oscillation or fluctuation. However, high efficiency of energy transduction can only be achieved with an electric field of certain intensities, frequencies and waveforms. This property of the enzyme allows us to define an electric signal and differentiate it from electric noise on the basis of the analysis by the TEC model. Data show that electric noise alone does not induce pump activity. However, an appropriate power level of noise imposed on a signal can enhance the pump efficiency. The effect of noise on the signal transduction of Na,K-ATPase is reminiscent of the stochastic resonance phenomenon reported in other biological systems [3, 35]. The TEC model embodies many common features of enzymes and biological motors. It is potentially energy-efficient, much more so than models based on the ion-rectification mechanism.

  3. The 1sσ molecular orbital ionisation in asymmetric ion-atom collisions by direct Coulomb interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, E.C.; Sigaud, G.M.

    1984-11-01

    The adiabatic perturbation theory is applied to the ionisation of the 1sσ molecular orbital (MO) and extended to less adiabatic collisions by imposing an asymptotic matching with the semi-classical approximation. The transient molecular state wavefunction is modelled using the concept of an 'effective' charge for the colliding system. Through this procedure, the transition amplitudes are evaluated simulating both the relaxation of the passive electrons and the modification of the active electron wave-function, as well as their connection with the motion of the centre of charge during the collision. The direct Coulomb ionisation of the 1sσ MO is calculated for projectiles following hyperbolic paths, in terms of this 'effective' charge, using the current-vector formalism. Comparison is made with a large amount of experimental data showing good agreement. (Author) [pt

  4. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  5. Molecular imaging of in vivo calcium ion expression in area postrema of total sleep deprived rats: Implications for cardiovascular regulation by TOF-SIMS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Ling, Yong-Chien; Chen, Bo-Jung; Wu, Un-In; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2010-05-01

    Excessive calcium influx in chemosensitive neurons of area postrema (AP) is detrimental for sympathetic activation and participates in the disruption of cardiovascular activities. Since total sleep deprivation (TSD) is a stressful condition known to harm the cardiovascular function, the present study is aimed to determine whether the in vivo calcium expression in AP would significantly alter following TSD by the use of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and calretinin (a specific calcium sensor protein in AP neurons) immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that in normal rats, the calcium intensity was estimated to be 0.5 × 10 5 at m/ z 40.08. However, following TSD, the intensity for calcium ions was greatly increased to 1.2 × 10 5. Molecular imaging revealed that after TSD, various strongly expressed calcium signals were distributed throughout AP with clear identified profiles instead of randomly scattered within this region in normal rats. Immunohistochemical staining corresponded well with ionic image in which a majority of calcium-enriched gathering co-localized with calretinin positive neurons. The functional significance of TSD-induced calcium augmentation was demonstrated by increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, clinical markers for cardiovascular dysfunction. Considering AP-mediated sympathetic activation is important for cardiovascular regulation, exaggerated calcium influx in AP would render this neurocircuitry more vulnerable to over-excitation, which might serve as the underlying mechanism for the development of TSD-relevant cardiovascular deficiency.

  6. How Does the Addition of a Third Ion Affect the Molecular Interactions and the Thermodynamic Properties of Acetate-Based Ionic Liquids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, I; Lepre, L F; Dequidt, A; Husson, P; Costa Gomes, M F

    2017-10-19

    The effect of the addition of a third ion to the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [C 4 C 1 Im][OAc] was studied through the measurement of the enthalpy of mixing and of the excess molar volume of its mixtures with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate [C 4 C 1 Im][CF 3 CO 2 ], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C 4 C 1 Im][NTf 2 ], and tetrabutylphosphonium acetate [P 4444 ][OAc]. Negative enthalpies of mixing (Δ mix H molar volumes (V E > 0) were observed in all cases. The infrared and NMR studies of the pure ionic liquids and their mixtures show that the presence of a third ion with a weaker affinity with the common counterion contributes to prevailing the more favorable hydrogen-bond, herein always between the imidazolium cation and the acetate anion. Both radial and spatial distribution functions calculated by molecular simulation confirm this behavior. The remarkable enhancement of the viscosities of the [C 4 C 1 Im][OAc] + [P 4444 ][OAc] mixtures could be discussed in light of the calculated friction coefficients.

  7. Effects of Ga ion irradiation on growth of GaN on SiN substrates by electron cyclotron resonance-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, J. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan) and Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan) and CREST-JST, Kawaguchi Center Building, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)]. E-mail: yanagisawa@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Fukuyama, T. [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Shiraishi, Y. [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Yodo, T. [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Akasaka, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    The possibility of forming GaN layers on Ga-implanted SiN surfaces was investigated using electron cyclotron resonance-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the GaN layer initially formed on the SiN surface by Ga implantation at room temperature was amorphous-like, but become to polycrystalline after annealing at 650 deg. C for 3 min in vacuum. After the MBE growth of GaN, a grain structure of h-GaN was observed on the Ga-implanted SiN surface. The crystallinity of the GaN grown was, however, decreased upon increasing the Ga ion fluence on the SiN surface, which might be due, at least partly, to the formation of Ga clusters by the excess Ga implanted. The present results indicate the possibility of forming patterned GaN layers on SiN by selective Ga implantation on the SiN substrate, using a focused ion beam.

  8. Influence of molecular structure on stopping power of chemical species for He+ ions from a low-energy particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.

    1980-01-01

    Results are reported of a 10-year study of the stopping power of approx. 70 compounds in the vapor state for He + ions of energy 0.3-2.0 MeV. The compounds include alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, n-alchols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, organic ring compounds, sulfur-containing organic and inorganic compounds, and halogen-containing organic and inorganic compounds, and simple gases, such as H 2 , O 2 , N 2 , NH 3 , CO, and CO 2 . The technique of the application of the Bragg Rule, which defines the stopping power of a 2-element compound as the additive sum of the atomic stopping power of the elements, was used to interpret the results. It is demonstrated in both measured and calculated atomic stopping power that the measured hierarchy of double bond ring structure single bond holds for C, O, and S with maximum differences of approx. 28%, 17%, and 5%, respectively

  9. Doubly differential cross sections of low-energy electrons emitted in the ionization of molecular hydrogen by bare carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribedi, L.C.; Richard, P.; Ling, D.; Wang, Y.D.; Lin, C.D.; Moshammer, R.; Kerby, G.W. III; Gealy, M.W.; Rudd, M.E. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601 (United States)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 (Federal Republic of Germany)]|[Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0111 (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We have measured the double differential cross sections (DDCS) ({ital d}{sup 2}{sigma}/{ital d}{var_epsilon}{sub {ital ed}}{Omega}{sub {ital e}}) of low-energy electron emission in the ionization of H{sub 2} bombarded by bare carbon ions of energy 30 MeV. The energy and angular distributions of the electron DDCS have been obtained for 12 different emission angles and for electron energies varying between 0.1 and 300 eV. We have also deduced the single differential and total ionization cross section from the measured DDCS. The data have been compared with the predictions of first Born approximations and the CDW-EIS (continuum distorted wave{endash}eikonal initial state) model. The CDW-EIS model provides an excellent agreement with the data. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Luminescent molecular hybrid system derived from 2-furancarboxylic acid and silylated monomer coordinated to rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Yulong; Yan Bing

    2006-01-01

    In this study, silica-based organic-inorganic hybrids were prepared by the sol-gel method. Tetraethoxysilane (abbreviated as TEOS) and a kind of monomer (abbreviated as FA-APES) derived from modified 2-furancarboxylic acid (abbreviated as FA) with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (abbreviated as APES) were used as the inorganic and organic fragments, respectively. Coordination reaction between lanthanides (europium and terbium ions) and -C=O group of the monomer happened simultaneously. And after days of aging process the resultant materials showed characteristic luminescence of lanthanides. The enhancement of luminescence can be seen by the comparison with simply doped lanthanide hybrid systems. And it can be explained by the coordination ability of the organic counterpart. IR, NMR, UV-vis absorption, low-temperature phosphorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy were applied to characterize and the above spectroscopic data revealed that the triplet state energy of organic ligand matches with the emissive energy level of lanthanides (especially of Tb 3+ )

  11. Method for characterization of low molecular weight organic acids in atmospheric aerosols using ion chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Lacey C; Reiner, Jessica L; Dickerson, Russell R; Sander, Lane C

    2014-08-05

    The structural composition of PM2.5 monitored in the atmosphere is usually divided by the analysis of organic carbon, black (also called elemental) carbon, and inorganic salts. The characterization of the chemical composition of aerosols represents a significant challenge to analysts, and studies are frequently limited to determination of aerosol bulk properties. To better understand the potential health effects and combined interactions of components in aerosols, a variety of measurement techniques for individual analytes in PM2.5 need to be implemented. The method developed here for the measurement of organic acids achieves class separation of aliphatic monoacids, aliphatic diacids, aromatic acids, and polyacids. The selective ion monitoring capability of a triple quadropole mass analyzer was frequently capable of overcoming instances of incomplete separations. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649b Urban Dust was characterized; 34 organic acids were qualitatively identified, and 6 organic acids were quantified.

  12. Chloride Ion Transport by the E. coli CLC Cl−/H+ Antiporter: A Combined Quantum-Mechanical and Molecular-Mechanical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD and umbrella sampling simulations of Cl− ion migration through the transmembrane domain of a prototypical E. coli CLC Cl−/H+ antiporter by employing combined quantum-mechanical (QM and molecular-mechanical (MM calculations. The SMD simulations revealed interesting conformational changes of the protein. While no large-amplitude motions of the protein were observed during pore opening, the side chain rotation of the protonated external gating residue Glu148 was found to be critical for full access of the channel entrance by Cl−. Moving the anion into the external binding site (Sext induced small-amplitude shifting of the protein backbone at the N-terminal end of helix F. As Cl− traveled through the pore, rigid-body swinging motions of helix R separated it from helix D. Helix R returned to its original position once Cl− exited the channel. Population analysis based on polarized wavefunction from QM/MM calculations discovered significant (up to 20% charge loss for Cl− along the ion translocation pathway inside the pore. The delocalized charge was redistributed onto the pore residues, especially the functional groups containing π bonds (e.g., the Tyr445 side chain, while the charges of the H atoms coordinating Cl− changed almost negligibly. Potentials of mean force computed from umbrella sampling at the QM/MM and MM levels both displayed barriers at the same locations near the pore entrance and exit. However, the QM/MM PMF showed higher barriers (~10 kcal/mol than the MM PMF (~2 kcal/mol. Binding energy calculations indicated that the interactions between Cl− and certain pore residues were overestimated by the semi-empirical PM3 Hamiltonian and underestimated by the CHARMM36 force fields, both of which were employed in the umbrella sampling simulations. In particular, CHARMM36 underestimated binding interactions for the functional groups containing π bonds, missing the stabilizations of

  13. Simultaneous molecular formula determinations of natural compounds in a plant extract using 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Min Sun; Baek, Sun Jong; Bae, Ik Hyun; Seo, Sang-Wan; Kim, Jongjin; Shin, Yong Kook; Lee, Yong-Moon; Kim, Hyun Sik

    2013-01-01

    Plant extracts are a reservoir of pharmacologically active substances; however, conventional analytical methods can analyze only a small portion of an extract. Here, we report a high-throughput analytical method capable of determining most phytochemicals in a plant extract and of providing their molecular formulae from a single experiment using ultra-high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (UHR ESI MS). UHR mass profiling was used to analyze natural compounds in a 70% ethanol ginseng extract, which was directly infused into a 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer for less than 10 min without a separation process. The UHR FT-ICR MS yielded a mass accuracy of 0.5 ppm and a mass resolving power (m/Δm) of 1,000,000-270,000 for the range m/z 290-1,100. The mass resolution was sufficient to resolve the isotopic fine structure (IFS) of many compounds in the extract. After noise removal from 1,552 peaks, 405 compounds were detected. The molecular formulae of 123 compounds, including 33 ginsenosides, were determined using the observed IFS, exact monoisotopic mass, and exact mass difference. Liquid chromatography (LC)/FT-ICR MS of the extract was performed to compare the high-throughput performance of UHR ESI FT-ICR MS. The LC/FT-ICR MS detected only 129 compounds, including 19 ginsenosides. The result showed that UHR ESI FT-ICR MS identified three times more compounds than LC/FT-ICR MS and in a relatively shorter time. The molecular formula determination by UHR FT-ICR MS was validated by LC and tandem MS analyses of three known ginsenosides. UHR mass profiling of a plant extract by 15 T FT-ICR MS showed that multiple compounds were simultaneously detected and their molecular formulae were decisively determined by a single experiment with ultra-high mass resolution and mass accuracy. Simultaneous molecular determination of multiple natural products by UHR ESI FT-ICR MS would be a powerful method to profile a wide

  14. Use of positive ion fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for rapid identification of a bile alcohol glucuronide isolated from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, B.; Salen, G.; Tint, G.S.; Shefer, S.; Benz, S.W.

    1990-01-01

    The identification of a major biliary and plasma bile alcohol glucuronide, 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha, 25-tetrol-3-0-beta-D-glucuronide, present in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) patients, was investigated by positive ion fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The spectrum was characterized by abundant ions formed by attachment of a proton, [M + H]+, or of alkali ions, [M + Na]+ and [M + 39K]+, to the glucuronide salt. These ions allowed an unambiguous deduction of the molecular weight of the sample. It is suggested that FAB-MS could be used in the rapid diagnosis of CTX

  15. Influence of a Counterion on the Ion Atmosphere of an Anion: A Molecular Dynamics Study of LiX and CsX (X = F(-), Cl(-), I(-)) in Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parveen; Kulkarni, Anant D; Yashonath, S

    2015-08-27

    We report molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the influence of a counterion on the structure and dynamics of cationic and anionic solvation shells for various ions in methanol at 298 K. We show that the variation in ionic size of either the cation or the anion in an ion pair influences the solvation structure of the other ion as well as the diffusivity in an electrolyte solution of methanol. The extent of ionic association between the cation and its counteranion of different ionic sizes has been investigated by analyzing the radial distribution functions (RDFs) and the orientation of methanol molecules in the first solvation shell (FSS) of ions. It is shown that the methanol in the FSS of the anion as well the cation exhibit quite different radial and orientational structures as compared to methanol which lie in the FSS of either the anion or the cation but not both. We find that the coordination number (CN) of F(-), Cl(-), and I(-) ions decreases with increasing size of the anion which is contrary to the trend reported for the anions in H2O. The mean residence time (MRT) of methanol molecules in the FSS of ions has been calculated using the stable states picture (SSP) approach. It is seen that the ion-counterion interaction has a considerable influence on the MRT of methanol molecules in the FSS of ions. We also discuss the stability order of the ion-counterion using the potentials of mean force (PMFs) for ion pairs with ions of different sizes. The PMF plots reveal that the Li(+)-F(-) pair (small-small) is highly stable and the Li(+)-I(-) pair is least stable (small-large) in electrolyte solutions.

  16. Systematic investigation of negative Cooper-Frye contributions in heavy ion collisions using coarse-grained molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliinychenko, D.; Huovinen, P.; Petersen, H.

    2015-02-01

    In most heavy ion collision simulations involving relativistic hydrodynamics, the Cooper-Frye formula is applied to transform the hydrodynamical fields to particles. In this article the so-called negative contributions in the Cooper-Frye formula are studied using a coarse-grained transport approach. The magnitude of negative contributions is investigated as a function of hadron mass, collision energy in the range of Elab=5 -160 A GeV, collision centrality, and the energy density transition criterion defining the hypersurface. The microscopic results are compared to negative contributions expected from hydrodynamical treatment assuming local thermal equilibrium. The main conclusion is that the number of actual microscopic particles flying inward is smaller than the negative contribution one would expect in an equilibrated scenario. The largest impact of negative contributions is found to be on the pion rapidity distribution at midrapidity in central collisions. For this case negative contributions in equilibrium constitute 8-13% of positive contributions, depending on collision energy, but only 0.5-4% in cascade calculation. The dependence on the collision energy itself is found to be nonmonotonous with a maximum at 10 - 20 A GeV.

  17. Ammonia abundances in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  18. Distribution, Abundance and Assemblages

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E-mail: luis.silva@cd.ieo.es. Cephalopod Species in Mozambican Waters Caught in the. “Mozambique 0307” Survey: Distribution, Abundance and. Assemblages. Luis Silva1, Eduardo Balguerías2, Paula Santana Afonso3, Ignacio Sobrino1, Juan Gil1 and. Candelaria Burgos1. 1Instituto Español de Oceanografía Unidad de ...

  19. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN PLUMES AND INTERPLUMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes

  20. ICT-Isomerization-Induced Turn-On Fluorescence Probe with a Large Emission Shift for Mercury Ion: Application in Combinational Molecular Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Sushil Ranjan; Mondal, Bijan; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Thakur, Arunabha

    2017-10-02

    A unique turn-on fluorescent device based on a ferrocene-aminonaphtholate derivative specific for Hg 2+ cation was developed. Upon binding with Hg 2+ ion, the probe shows a dramatic fluorescence enhancement (the fluorescence quantum yield increases 58-fold) along with a large red shift of 68 nm in the emission spectrum. The fluorescence enhancement with a red shift may be ascribed to the combinational effect of C═N isomerization and an extended intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanism. The response was instantaneous with a detection limit of 2.7 × 10 -9 M. Upon Hg 2+ recognition, the ferrocene/ferrocenium redox peak was anodically shifted by ΔE 1/2 = 72 mV along with a "naked eye" color change from faint yellow to pale orange for this metal cation. Further, upon protonation of the imine nitrogen, the present probe displays a high fluorescence output due to suppression of the C═N isomerization process. Upon deprotonation using strong base, the fluorescence steadily decreases, which indicates that H + and OH - can be used to regulate the off-on-off fluorescence switching of the present probe. Density functional theory studies revealed that the addition of acid leads to protonation of the imine N (according to natural bond orbital analysis), and the resulting iminium proton forms a strong H-bond (2.307 Å) with one of the triazole N atoms to form a five-membered ring, which makes the molecule rigid; hence, enhancement of the ICT process takes place, thereby leading to a fluorescence enhancement with a red shift. The unprecedented combination of H + , OH - , and Hg 2+ ions has been used to generate a molecular system exhibiting the INHIBIT-OR combinational logic operation.

  1. Single photon simultaneous K-shell ionization and K-shell excitation. II. Specificities of hollow nitrogen molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2015-01-01

    The formalism developed in the companion Paper I is used here for the interpretation of spectra obtained recently on the nitrogen molecule. Double core-hole ionization K −2 and core ionization-core excitation K −2 V processes have been observed by coincidence electron spectroscopy after ionization by synchrotron radiation at different photon energies. Theoretical and experimental cross sections reported on an absolute scale are in satisfactory agreement. The evolution with photon energy of the relative contribution of shake-up and conjugate shake-up processes is discussed. The first main resonance in the K −2 V spectrum is assigned to a K −2 π ∗ state mainly populated by the 1s→ lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dipolar excitation, as it is in the K −1 V NEXAFS (Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) signals. Closer to the K −2 threshold Rydberg resonances have been also identified, and among them a K −2 σ ∗ resonance characterized by a large amount of 2s/2p hybridization, and double K −2 (2σ ∗ /1π/3σ) −1 1π ∗2 shake-up states. These resonances correspond in NEXAFS spectra to, respectively, the well-known σ ∗ shape resonance and double excitation K −1 (2σ ∗ /1π/3σ) −1 1π ∗2 resonances, all being positioned above the threshold

  2. Novel molecular-level evidence of iodine binding to natural organic matter from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chen, E-mail: xuchen66@tamu.edu [Laboratory for Environmental and Oceanographic Research, Department of Marine Sciences, Texas A and M University, Building 3029, Galveston, TX 77551 (United States); Chen, Hongmei [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Sugiyama, Yuko [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); University of Hyogo, 1-1-12, Shinzaike-honcho, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0092 (Japan); Zhang, Saijin; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Chuang, Chia-ying; Schwehr, Kathleen A. [Laboratory for Environmental and Oceanographic Research, Department of Marine Sciences, Texas A and M University, Building 3029, Galveston, TX 77551 (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Yeager, Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Roberts, Kimberly A. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Hatcher, Patrick G. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Santschi, Peter H. [Laboratory for Environmental and Oceanographic Research, Department of Marine Sciences, Texas A and M University, Building 3029, Galveston, TX 77551 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Major fractions of radioiodine ({sup 129}I) are associated with natural organic matter (NOM) in the groundwater and surface soils of the Savannah River Site (SRS). Electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) was applied to elucidate the interactions between inorganic iodine species (iodide and iodate) and a fulvic acid (FA) extracted from a SRS surface soil. Iodate is likely reduced to reactive iodine species by the lignin- and tannin-like compounds or the carboxylic-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM), during which condensed aromatics and lignin-like compounds were generated. Iodide is catalytically oxidized into reactive iodine species by peroxides, while FA is oxidized by peroxides into more aliphatic and less aromatic compounds. Only 9% of the total identified organo-iodine compounds derived from molecules originally present in the FA, whereas most were iodine binding to newly-produced compounds. The resulting iodinated molecules were distributed in three regions in the van Krevelen diagrams, denoting unsaturated hydrocarbons, lignin and protein. Moreover, characteristics of these organo-iodine compounds, such as their relatively low O/C ratios (< 0.2 or < 0.4) and yet some degree of un-saturation close to that of lignin, have multiple important environmental implications concerning possibly less sterically-hindered aromatic ring system for iodine to get access to and a lower hydrophilicity of the molecules thus to retard their migration in the natural aquatic systems. Lastly, ∼ 69% of the identified organo-iodine species contains nitrogen, which is presumably present as -NH{sub 2} or -HNCOR groups and a ring-activating functionality to favor the electrophilic substitution. The ESI-FTICR-MS technique provides novel evidence to better understand the reactivity and scavenging properties of NOM towards radioiodine and possible influence of NOM on {sup 129}I migration. Highlights: ► IO{sub 3}{sup

  3. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Single photon simultaneous K-shell ionization and K-shell excitation. II. Specificities of hollow nitrogen molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carniato, S., E-mail: stephane.carniato@upmc.fr; Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, UMR 7614, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University of Paris 6, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); LCPMR(UMR 7614), CNRS, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K. [Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Nakano, M. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hikosaka, Y. [Department of Environmental Science, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ito, K. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-01-07

    The formalism developed in the companion Paper I is used here for the interpretation of spectra obtained recently on the nitrogen molecule. Double core-hole ionization K{sup −2} and core ionization-core excitation K{sup −2}V processes have been observed by coincidence electron spectroscopy after ionization by synchrotron radiation at different photon energies. Theoretical and experimental cross sections reported on an absolute scale are in satisfactory agreement. The evolution with photon energy of the relative contribution of shake-up and conjugate shake-up processes is discussed. The first main resonance in the K{sup −2}V spectrum is assigned to a K{sup −2}π{sup ∗} state mainly populated by the 1s→ lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dipolar excitation, as it is in the K{sup −1}V NEXAFS (Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) signals. Closer to the K{sup −2} threshold Rydberg resonances have been also identified, and among them a K{sup −2}σ{sup ∗} resonance characterized by a large amount of 2s/2p hybridization, and double K{sup −2}(2σ{sup ∗}/1π/3σ){sup −1}1π{sup ∗2} shake-up states. These resonances correspond in NEXAFS spectra to, respectively, the well-known σ{sup ∗} shape resonance and double excitation K{sup −1}(2σ{sup ∗}/1π/3σ){sup −1}1π{sup ∗2} resonances, all being positioned above the threshold.

  5. Advanced Ion Mass Spectrometer for Giant Planet Ionosphere, Magnetospheres and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward; Cooper, John; Paschalidis, Nick; Jones, Sarah; Brinkerhoff, William; Paterson, William; Ali, Ashraf; Coplan, Michael; Chornay, Dennis; Sturner, Steve; Benna, Mehdi; Bateman, Fred; Fontaine, Dominique; Verdeil, Christophe; Andre, Nicolas; Blanc, Michel; Wurz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present our Advanced Ion Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) for outer planet missions which has been under development from various NASA sources (NASA Living with a Star Instrument Development (LWSID), NASA Astrobiology Instrument Development (ASTID), NASA Goddard Internal Research and Development (IRAD)s) to measure elemental, isotopic, and simple molecular composition abundances of 1 V to 25 kV hot ions with wide field-of-view (FOV) in the 1 - 60 amu mass range at mass resolution M/ ΔM Jupiter and Saturn to the outer magnetospheric boundary regions and the upstream solar wind. This instrument will work for both spinning spacecraft and 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. AIMS will measure the ion velocity distribution functions (VDF) for the individual ion species from which velocity moments will give their ion density, flow velocity and temperature.

  6. Conformational sensitivity of conjugated poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(amidoamine) molecules to cations adducted upon electrospray ionization – A mass spectrometry, ion mobility and molecular modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tintaru, Aura [Aix-Marseille Université – CNRS, UMR 7273, Institut de Chimie Radicalaire, Marseille (France); Chendo, Christophe [Aix-Marseille Université – CNRS, FR 1739, Fédération des Sciences Chimiques de Marseille, Spectropole, Marseille (France); Wang, Qi [Aix-Marseille Université – CNRS, UMR 6114, Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanosciences de Marseille, Marseille (France); Viel, Stéphane [Aix-Marseille Université – CNRS, UMR 7273, Institut de Chimie Radicalaire, Marseille (France); Quéléver, Gilles; Peng, Ling [Aix-Marseille Université – CNRS, UMR 6114, Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanosciences de Marseille, Marseille (France); Posocco, Paola [University of Trieste, Molecular Simulation Engineering (MOSE) Laboratory, Department of Engineering and Architecture (DEA), Trieste (Italy); National Interuniversity Consortium for Material Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit MOSE-DEA, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Pricl, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.pricl@di3.units.it [University of Trieste, Molecular Simulation Engineering (MOSE) Laboratory, Department of Engineering and Architecture (DEA), Trieste (Italy); National Interuniversity Consortium for Material Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit MOSE-DEA, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Charles, Laurence, E-mail: laurence.charles@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université – CNRS, UMR 7273, Institut de Chimie Radicalaire, Marseille (France)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •ESI-MS/MS, IMS and molecular modeling were combined to study PEO-PAMAM conformation. •Protonated and lithiated molecules were studied, with charge states from 2 to 4. •Protonation mostly occurred on PAMAM, with PEO units enclosing the protonated group. •Lithium adduction on PEO units lead to more expanded conformations. •Charge location strongly influenced PEO-PAMAM dissociation behavior. -- Abstract: Tandem mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry experiments were performed on multiply charged molecules formed upon conjugation of a poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer with a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) linear polymer to evidence any conformational modification as a function of their charge state (2+ to 4+) and of the adducted cation (H{sup +}vs Li{sup +}). Experimental findings were rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations. The G0 PAMAM head-group could accommodate up to three protons, with protonated terminal amine group enclosed in a pseudo 18-crown-6 ring formed by the PEO segment. This particular conformation enabled a hydrogen bond network which allowed long-range proton transfer to occur during collisionally activated dissociation. In contrast, lithium adduction was found to mainly occur onto oxygen atoms of the polyether, each Li{sup +} cation being coordinated by a 12-crown-4 pseudo structure. As a result, for the studied polymeric segment (M{sub n} = 1500 g mol{sup −1}), PEO-PAMAM hybrid molecules exhibited a more expanded shape when adducted to lithium as compared to proton.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Thiols in Fossil Fuels by Michael Addition Reaction Derivatization and Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Suoqi; Liu, Xuxia; Shi, Quan

    2016-10-04

    Thiols widely occur in sediments and fossil fuels. However, the molecular composition of these compounds is unclear due to the lack of appropriate analytical methods. In this work, a characterization method for thiols in fossil fuels was developed on the basis of Michael addition reaction derivatization followed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS). Model thiol compound studies showed that thiols were selectively reacted with phenylvinylsulfone and transformed to sulfones with greater than 98% conversions. This method was applied to a coker naphtha, light and heavy gas oils, and crude oils from various geological sources. The results showed that long alkyl chain thiols are readily present in petroleum, which have up to 30 carbon atoms. Large DBE dispersity of thiols indicates that naphthenic and aromatic thiols are also present in the petroleum. This method is capable of detecting thiol compounds in the part per million range by weight. This method allows characterization of thiols in a complex hydrocarbon matrix, which is complementary to the comprehensive analysis of sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

  8. The existence of optimal molecular weight for poly(acrylic acid) binders in silicon/graphite composite anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Linghong; Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Yan; Liao, Chen; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Lu, Wenquan; Zhang, Lu

    2018-02-01

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) based binders have been widely used for the high capacity silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries. While numerous promising progress has been reported, there is no general guideline for choosing the right PAA binders for optimized cycling performance. In this report, aiming to optimize the cycling performance of the Si/graphite composite anodes (15 wt% Si), we systemically investigated a series of PAA binders by validating their molecular weights (MWs) and correlating them to the cycling performance of the anodes fabricated with such binders. The gel permeation chromatography (GPC) was used to validate the MWs of six PAA binders (PAA1 to PAA6). Those binders then underwent a series of characterizations, including rheology study, half-cell cycling, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It is observed that the MWs of PAA binders not only affected the viscosities of the binder solutions but also impacted the cycling performance, possibly due to the cohesion changes. A range of 24-150 kDa is found to be optimal for minimizing the rate and extent of capacity fade and maintaining the cohesion in the electrode matrix despite the dramatic volumetric changes due to Si alloying.

  9. Accurate one-centre method for hydrogen molecular ion calculation using B-spline-type basis sets in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuexia; Liu Qiang; Shi Tingyun

    2012-01-01

    An accurate one-centre method is here applied to the calculation of the equilibrium distances and the energies for the hydrogen molecular ion in magnetic fields ranging from 10 9 G to 4.414 × 10 13 G. Both the radial and angular wavefunctions were expanded in terms of optimization B-splines. The slow convergence problem in the general one-centre method and singularities at the nuclear positions of the H + 2 were solved well. The accuracy of the one-centre method has been improved in this way. We compared our results with those generated by high-precision methods from published studies. Equilibrium distances of the 1σ g,u , 1π g,u , 1δ g,u and 2σ g states of the H + 2 in strong magnetic fields were found to be accurate to three to four significant digits at least up to 2.35 × 10 12 G, even for the antibonding states 1σ u , 1π g and 1δ u , whose equilibrium distances R eq are very large. (paper)

  10. β-NMR measurements of molecular-scale lithium-ion dynamics in poly(ethylene oxide)-lithium-salt thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Iain; Cortie, David L.; Harada, Masashi; Kiefl, Robert F.; Levy, C. D. Philip; MacFarlane, W. Andrew; McFadden, Ryan M. L.; Morris, Gerald D.; Ogata, Shin-Ichi; Pearson, Matthew R.; Sugiyama, Jun

    2017-06-01

    β -detected NMR (β -NMR) has been used to study the molecular-scale dynamics of lithium ions in thin films of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) containing either lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) or lithium trifluoroacetate (LiTFA) salts at monomer-to-salt ratios (EO/Li) of 8.3. The results are compared with previous β -NMR measurements on pure PEO and PEO with lithium triflate (LiOTf) at the same loading [McKenzie et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 7833 (2014)]. Activated hopping of 8Li+ was observed in all of the films above ˜250 K, with the hopping parameters strongly correlated with the ionicity of the lithium salt rather than the polymer glass transition temperature. The pre-exponential factor increases exponentially with ionicity, while the activation energy for hopping increases approximately linearly, going from 6.3 ±0.2 kJ mol-1 in PEO:LiTFA to 17.8 ±0.2 kJ mol-1 in PEO:LiTFSI. The more rapid increase in the pre-exponential factor outweighs the effect of the larger activation energy and results in 8Li+ hopping being fastest in PEO followed by PEO:LiTFSI, PEO:LiOTf, and PEO:LiTFA.

  11. Influence of the pH on molecular hydrogen primary yields in He{sup 2+} ion tracks in liquid water. A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, Vincent [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 Mail Gay-Lussac, Neuville/Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)]. E-mail: vincent.cobut@chim.u-cergy.fr; Corbel, Catherine [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DRECAM/SCM/Laboratoire de Radiolyse, Bat. 546, Piece 5, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Patau, Jean Paul [Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Paul-Sabatier, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2005-02-01

    Monte Carlo calculations are performed to investigate how the acidity of aqueous solutions at room temperature affects the molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) yield as a function of time in 20 MeV-He{sup 2+} ion track segments. For pH values varying from 1 to 13, the time dependence of the calculated yields is nearly independent of pH in the time range 10{sup -12}-10{sup -8} s and only weakly dependent in the time range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} s. To understand this behaviour, the kinetic mechanisms governing H{sub 2} formation are examined as a function of time. It is found that the main reactions responsible for the H{sub 2} yield as a function of time are strongly pH-dependent at low and high pH values. The pH-dependences of the reaction yields are however such that the variations in the yields compensate each other. This is why the time dependence of the H{sub 2} yield is only weakly pH-dependent.

  12. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography ? Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H.; Wang, Haixing H.; Livesay, Eric A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a ''universal'' stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion

  13. Genetic variants, seasonal abundance and man-biting rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The abundance of Anopheles gambiae s.l and presence of the molecular species and hybrid in the study-area is of epidemiological importance since the genetic variants are found to differ in ecological preference and susceptibility to pyrethroids. Keywords: Anopheles gambiae s.l.; molecular forms; sibling species; vector ...

  14. Investigations towards multi-step laser spectroscopy of stored H{sub 3}{sup +} molecular ions; Untersuchungen zur Mehrstufen-Laserspektroskopie an gespeicherten H{sub 3}{sup +}-Molekuelionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, Dennis

    2010-07-21

    The triatomic H{sub 3}{sup +} molecular ion plays an important role in molecular quantum dynamics through its equilateral triangular structure. Many studies of molecular reactions involving H{sub 3}{sup +} have been done thus far, among them dissociative recombination in storage ring experiments with a cold electron-beam. For these strongly energy dependent reactions, the population in individual rovibrational levels is of large importance. To determine such populations for H{sub 3}{sup +} ions inside a storage ring, an extremely sensitive state-selective method must be used, such as the Resonant- Enhanced Multi-Photon Dissociation (REMPD). In REMPD, molecules are highly excited from a low lying initial level in a first resonant step and photodissociated from these high lying states in a second step. To fully employ this method, detailed investigations are necessary. Here, an experiment is presented which determines the energy range of the highly excited vibrational states of H{sub 3}{sup +} suitable for photodissociation. Additional photodissociation experiments, using hot H{sub 3}{sup +} ions in the storage ring TSR at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, yield an effective lifetime of these dissociated H{sub 3}{sup +} states. Finally selective vibrational excitation of cold H{sub 3}{sup +} (the rst step of REMPD) is discussed with the aim of reaching the highly excited vibrational states suitable for photodissociation. (orig.)

  15. F center-molecular ion couples in alkali halides: Magneto-optics study (part two). Spin lattice relaxation time and electron spin memory; Studi di magnetoottica sulla coppia centro F-ione molecolare negli alogenuri alcalini: Parte 2. Misura del tempo di rilassamento spin-reticolo e della memoria di spin dell`elettrone nel ciclo ottico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, G.; Botti, S.; Grassano, U.M.; Luty, F.

    1991-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time in the ground state, T/sub 1/, and the spin-mixing parameter during the optical cycle, epsilon, were measured in FH(OH) and FH(CN) centers in various alkali halides (KCl, KBr, KI, CsCl, and CsBr). For a close comparison, all experiments were performed before and after the optical association of the F center and molecular ion. T/sub 1/ becomes shorter before and still more after aggregation with respect to the values measured in the pure crystal, especially at very low magnetic fields. Epsilon decreases a little in crystals doped with OH-, while it increases a lot in crystals doped with CN-. Part of these results can be interpreted within the actual knowledge of the F-center physics. Part have been used to shed some light on the various unknown aspects of the energy transfer between the excited F-center and the molecular ion.

  16. Fragmentation, auto-modification and post ionisation proton bound dimer ion formation: the differential mobility spectrometry of low molecular weight alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiewicz, D M; Thomas, C L P; Eiceman, G A

    2016-08-07

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is currently being used for environmental monitoring of space craft atmospheres and has been proposed for the rapid assessment of patients at accident and emergency receptions. Three studies investigated hitherto undescribed complexity in the DMS spectra of methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol product ions formed from a (63)Ni ionisation source. 54 000 DMS spectra obtained over a concentration range of 0.01 mg m(-3)(g) to 1.80 g m(-3)(g) revealed the phenomenon of auto-modification of the product ions. This occurred when the neutral vapour concentration exceeded the level required to induce a neutral-ion collision during the low field portion of the dispersion field waveform. Further, post-ionisation cluster-ion formation or protonated monomer/proton bound dimer inter-conversion within the ion-filter was indicated by apparent shifts in the values of the protonated monomer compensation field maximum; indicative of post-ionisation conversion of the protonated monomer to a proton-bound dimer. APCI-DMS-quadrupole mass spectrometry studies enabled the ion dissociation products from dispersion-field heating to be monitored and product ion fragmentation relationships to be proposed. Methanol was not observed to dissociate, while propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol underwent dissociation reactions consistent with dehydration processes that led ultimately to the generation of what is tentatively assigned as a cyclo-C3H3(+) ion (m/z 39) and hydrated protons. Studies of the interaction of ion filter temperature with dispersion-field heating of product ions isolated dissociation/fragmentation product ions that have not been previously described in DMS. The implications of these combined findings with regard to data sharing and data interpretation were highlighted.

  17. Accurate calculations of the ground state and low-lying excited states of the (RbBa)+ molecular ion: a proposed system for ultracold reactive collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2010-01-01

    Collisions of ultracold Ba+ ions on a Rb Bose–Einstein condensate have been suggested as a possible benchmark system for ultracold ion-neutral collision experiments. However, a priori knowledge of the possible processes is desirable. For this purpose, we here present high-level four-component cou...

  18. Long-term smoking alters abundance of over half of the proteome in bronchoalveolar lavage cell in smokers with normal spirometry, with effects on molecular pathways associated with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxing; Kohler, Maxie; Heyder, Tina; Forsslund, Helena; Garberg, Hilde K; Karimi, Reza; Grunewald, Johan; Berven, Frode S; Magnus Sköld, C; Wheelock, Åsa M

    2018-03-08

    Smoking represents a significant risk factor for many chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To identify dysregulation of specific proteins and pathways in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells associated with smoking, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based shotgun proteomics analyses were performed on BAL cells from healthy never-smokers and smokers with normal lung function from the Karolinska COSMIC cohort. Multivariate statistical modeling, multivariate correlations with clinical data, and pathway enrichment analysis were performed. Smoking exerted a significant impact on the BAL cell proteome, with more than 500 proteins representing 15 molecular pathways altered due to smoking. The majority of these alterations occurred in a gender-independent manner. The phagosomal- and leukocyte trans endothelial migration (LTM) pathways significantly correlated with FEV 1 /FVC as well as the percentage of CD8 + T-cells and CD8 + CD69 + T-cells in smokers. The correlations to clinical parameters in healthy never-smokers were minor. The significant correlations of proteins in the phagosome- and LTM pathways with activated cytotoxic T-cells (CD69+) and the level of airway obstruction (FEV 1 /FVC) in smokers, both hallmarks of COPD, suggests that these two pathways may play a role in the molecular events preceding the development of COPD in susceptible smokers. Both pathways were found to be further dysregulated in COPD patients from the same cohort, thereby providing further support to this hypothesis. Given that not all smokers develop COPD in spite of decades of smoking, it is also plausible that some of the molecular pathways associated with response to smoking exert protective mechanisms to smoking-related pathologies in resilient individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02627872 ; Retrospectively registered on December 9, 2015.

  19. Analytical applications of ion exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Inczédy, J

    1966-01-01

    Analytical Applications of Ion Exchangers presents the laboratory use of ion-exchange resins. This book discusses the development in the analytical application of ion exchangers. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the history and significance of ion exchangers for technical purposes. This text then describes the properties of ion exchangers, which are large molecular water-insoluble polyelectrolytes having a cross-linked structure that contains ionic groups. Other chapters consider the theories concerning the operation of ion-exchange resins and investigate th

  20. Abundances in the Galactic bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbuy, B; Alves-Brito, A [Universidade de Sao Paulo, IAG, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Ortolani, S; Zoccali, M [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Hill, V; Gomez, A [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Melendez, J [Centro de AstrofIsica da Universidade de Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Asplund, M [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, 85741 Garching (Germany); Bica, E [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil); Renzini, A [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Minniti, D [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)], E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br

    2008-12-15

    The metallicity distribution and abundance ratios of the Galactic bulge are reviewed. Issues raised by recent work of different groups, in particular the high metallicity end, the overabundance of {alpha}-elements in the bulge relative to the thick disc and the measurement of giants versus dwarfs, are discussed. Abundances in the old moderately metal-poor bulge globular clusters are described.

  1. Energy abundance and economic progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurr, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the benefits of energy abundance and on the links between energy supply, economic growth and human welfare in the United States. It is argued that the restoration of energy abundance with dependable sources of supply should be a major national objective. (U.K.)

  2. Production of highly ionized recoil ions in heavy ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.; Tonuma, T.; Be, S.H.; Shibata, H.; Kase, M.; Kambara, T.; Kumagai, H.; Kohno, I.

    1985-01-01

    The production mechanisms of highly ionized recoil ions in energetic, highly charged heavy ion impact are compared with those in photon and electron impact. In addition to the innershell ionization processes which are important in photon and electron impact, the electron transfer processes are found to play a key role in heavy ion impact. In molecular targets are also observed highly ionized monoatomic ions which are believed to be produced through production of highly ionized molecular ions followed by prompt dissociation. The observed N 6+ ions produced in 1.05MeV/amu Ar 12+ ions on N 2 molecules are produced through, for example, N 2 12+ *→N 6+ +N 6+ process. (author)

  3. Ion implantation in ices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G.A.; Palumbo, M.E.; Satorre, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied, by in situ infrared spectroscopy, some effects due to ion implantation in frozen ices. In particular mixtures containing C, N and O atoms (e.g., N 2 :H 2 O:CH 4 ) have been irradiated with unreactive (noble gases) ions: the resulting alteration of the frozen sample induces the formation of other molecules (e.g., CO 2 , R- - -OCN, CO and HCN) and of a refractory organic residue. Similar products are formed when mixtures containing only C and O atoms (e.g., H 2 O:CH 4 ) are irradiated with N ions, i.e. molecular species that include the projectile are formed. These results are important, in particular for their applications to planetary physics. In planetary environments ice thickness is usually much larger than the penetration depth of the relevant ion populations (solar wind ions, magnetospheric particles, etc.) and ion implantation phenomena are expected. Our results indicate that some molecular species observed on icy planetary surfaces could not be native of that object but formed by ion irradiation and/or by implantation of reactive ions

  4. Ejecting intact large molecular structures by C{sub 60} ion impact upon bio-organic solids; Ejection de tres grandes structures moleculaires intactes par impact de C{sub 60} sur des solides bioorganiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunelle, A.; Della Negra, S.; Deprun, C.; Depauw, J.; Jacquet, D.; Le Beyec, Y.; Pautrat, N. [Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Haakansson, P. [Division of Ion Physics, Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala Univ. Uppsala (Sweden)

    1999-11-01

    C{sub 60} molecules accelerated to MeV energies (20 MeV) have been used to induce the desorption-ionization of large bio-molecules from solid samples. In the case of the trypsin molecules, the secondary molecular ion emission yield is about two orders of magnitude larger than with MeV atomic ions. This is a consequence of the very high energy density deposited in solids by 20 MeV C{sub 60} projectiles that gives rise to a large amount of matter ejected after each impact. Although time-of-flight mass spectra can be recorded within a few seconds, it is more the mechanistic aspects in comparison with other particle induced desorption methods, which are the objective of these first results with energetic fullerenes. (authors) 1 fig.

  5. Relative ion yields in mammalian cell components using C60 SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Selda; Piwowar, Alan; Hue, Jonathan; Shen, Kan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been used to better understand the influence of molecular environment on the relative ion yields of membrane lipid molecules found in high abundance in a model mammalian cell line, RAW264.7. Control lipid mixtures were prepared to simulate lipid–lipid interactions in the inner and outer leaflet of cell membranes. Compared with its pure film, the molecular ion yields of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine are suppressed when mixed with 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. In the mixture, proton competition between 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine led to lower ionization efficiency. The possible mechanism for ion suppression was also investigated with 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The formation of a hydroxyl bond in lipid mixtures confirms the mechanism involving proton exchange with the surrounding environment. Similar effects were observed for lipid mixtures mimicking the composition of the inner leaflet of cell membranes. The secondary molecular ion yield of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine was observed to be enhanced in the presence of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine. PMID:25140069

  6. Liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry of methyl glycosides of oligosaccharides using matrices containing carboxamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovácik, V; Hirsch, J; Zorić, S; Grützmacher, H F

    1996-01-01

    Intense cluster ions corresponding to proton-bound hetero-dimers of an amide molecule and an oligosaccharide molecule are observed in the liquid secondary ion mass spectra of methyl glycosides of oligoxylans if a solution of an aliphatic carboxamide in glycerol is used as the liquid matrix. These cluster ions are particularly abundant and persist for a long period if urea (U) or thiourea (TU) is used as the matrix additive. In these cases, cluster ions containing more than one molecule of U or TU and two oligosaccharide molecules are also observed. The intense signal due to the proton-bound hetero-dimer between U or TU and the oligosaccharide can be used with advantage for a molecular weight determination. The bonding interactions between a protonated saccharide molecule and a molecule U or TU in the proton-bound hetero-dimers are so strong that the urea molecules remain attached to the fragment ions during the decay of metastable cluster ions and even during collision-induced dissociation. Thus, the mass-analysed ion kinetic energy spectra of these proton-bound hetero-dimers are dominated by abundant cluster ions [Bn+U] and [Ym+U] arising from cleavage of the glycosidic bonds within the oligosaccharides. The collisionally-activated mass spectra of the proton-bound hetero-dimers additionally contain peaks of the free ions Bn and Ym. Therefore, these spectra clearly reflect the arrangement of the monosaccharide residues in the oligosaccharide and can be used conveniently for structural analysis.

  7. Molecular size distribution of Np(V)-humate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Nagao, Seiya; Tanaka, Tadao

    1996-10-01

    Molecular size distributions of humic acid and Np(V)-humate were studied as a function of pH and an ionic strength by an ultrafiltration method. Small particle (10,000-30,000 daltons) of humic acid increased slightly with increases in solution pH. The ion strength dependence of the molecular size distribution was clearly observed for humic acid. The abundance ratio of humic acid in the range from 10,000 to 30,000 daltons increased with the ionic strength from 0.015 M to 0.105 M, in place of the decreasing of that in range from 30,000 to 100,000 daltons. Most of neptunium(V) in the 200 mg/l of the humic acid solution was fractionated into 10,000-30,000 daltons. The abundance ratio of neptunium(V) in the 10,000-30,000 daltons was not clearly dependent on pH and the ionic strength of the solution, in spite of the changing in the molecular size distribution of humic acid by the ionic strength. These results imply that the molecular size distribution of Np(V)-humate does not simply obey by that of the humic acid. Stability constant of Np(V)-humate was measured as a function of the molecular size of the humic acid. The stability constant of Np(V)-humate in the range from 10,000 to 30,000 daltons was highest value comparing with the constants in the molecular size ranges of 100,000 daltons-0.45μm, 30,000-100,000, 5,000-10,000 daltons and under 5,000 daltons. These results may indicate that the Np(V) complexation with humic acid is dominated by the interaction of neptunyl ion with the humic acid in the specific molecular size range. (author)

  8. On the observability of rotational and vibrational spectra of isotopically asymmetrized homonuclear diatomic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, R.B.; Certain, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to the pseudo-homonuclear diatomic ions HD + , 3 He 4 He + , 12 C 13 C + , 14 N 15 N + and 16 O 18 O + , with special reference to their dipole moments. The values of these moments are stated to be within an order of magnitude of those of typical heteronuclear diatomic molecules, implying that the infrared and microwave spectra of the ions should be observable, both in absorption in the laboratory and emiission from interstellar cloud sources. Laboratory measurements of such spectra would be valuable, both because of the significance of the molecular structure data thereby obtained and because a knowledge of the transition frequencies would facilitate the search for such ions in the interstellar medium. Recent measurements of the microwave spectra of neutral molecules, such as CO, HCN, H 2 CO, etc., in certain interstellar clouds have revealed anomalous enrichments of the rarer isotopic species with respect to their terrestrial abundances, for examples 13 C, 15 N, 18 O, etc. This suggests the possibility of observing rotational spectra of a hitherto inaccessible class of molecular ions, referred to as isotopically substituted asymmetrized homonuclear diatomic ions, that possess significant dipole moments. With the increasing availability of space platforms and observatories it should soon be possible to carry out a search for the spectra of such ions. Laboratory experimental approached are also briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  9. Molecular spectroscopy of interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshalovich, D.A.; Khersonskij, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in the investigation into molecules of interstellar medium by molecular-spectroscopic methods are discussed generally. Ion-molecule reactions play a significant part in the formation of multiatom molecules in the interstellar medium as well as reactions proceeding on the surface of interstellar dust. More than 50 types of molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium at present. In a wide range of wave lengths over 500 spectral lines belonging to various molecules and molecular fragments have been recorded. Interstellar molecules permit to investigate interstellar gas from all the sides. They are a suitable indicator of the isotope composition of interstellar gas. Radio observations of interstellar molecules make it possible to effectively investigate kinematics and space structure both separate gas-dust complexes and total gas distribution in Galaxy. It is noted that achievements of molecular spectroscopy of the interstellar medium radically change representations of the chemical composition of interstellar gas, of isotope abundance and organic substance in the Universe

  10. Nuclear abundances and evolution of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannier, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of molecular and elemental abundances in the interstellar medium (ISM) are reviewed, with special attention given to isotope ratios. The derivation of molecular isotope abundances for the ISM is discussed, along with H and C fractionation. Millimeter- and centimeter-wave spectra of giant clouds are examined with respect to isotope abundances of C, O, N, Si, S, and D. Evidence for the current enrichment of the ISM by mass loss from evolved stars is considered, together with chemical abundance gradients in H II regions and planetary nebulae. Cosmic-ray observations pertaining to abundances in the ISM are summarized, with emphasis on available results for Ne, Mg, Si, Fe, and Ni. The observations reviewed are shown to support arguments in favor of: (1) the cosmological production of D and He-3 (2) the production of the CNO elements by hydrostatic hydrogen burning (3) the nucleosynthesis of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Fe, and Ni as a result of He burning (4) solar abundances of interstellar S, Fe, and Ni and (5) a direct association between observed inhomogeneities in the ISM and mass loss from evolved stellar objects

  11. Na Cl ion pair association in water-DMSO mixtures: Effect of ion pair ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ion pair in water–dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixtures for three DMSO mole fractions have been computed using constrained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and confirmed by dynamical trajectories and residence times of the ion pair at various inter-ionic separations. The three ion-ion direct potentials used are 12-6-1 ...

  12. Molecular cloning of ion channels in Felis catus that are related to periodic paralyses in man: a contribution to the understanding of the genetic susceptibility to feline neck ventroflexion and paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Marlyn; Kunii, Ilda S; Paninka, Rolf M; Simões, Denise M N; Castillo, Víctor A; Reche, Archivaldo; Maciel, Rui M B; Dias da Silva, Magnus R

    2014-07-25

    Neck ventroflexion in cats has different causes; however, the most common is the hypokalemia associated with flaccid paralysis secondary to chronic renal failure. In humans, the most common causes of acute flaccid paralysis are hypokalemia precipitated by thyrotoxicosis and familial forms linked to mutations in sodium, potassium, and calcium channel genes. Here, we describe the sequencing and analysis of skeletal muscle ion channels in Felis catus that could be related to periodic paralyses in humans, contributing to the understanding of the genetic susceptibility to feline neck ventroflexion and paralysis. We studied genomic DNA from eleven cats, including five animals that were hyperthyroid with hypokalemia, although only one presented with muscle weakness, and six healthy control domestic cats. We identified the ion channel ortholog genes KCNJ2, KCNJ12, KCNJ14, CACNA1S and SCN4A in the Felis catus genome, together with several polymorphic variants. Upon comparative alignment with other genomes, we found that Felis catus provides evidence for a high genomic conservation of ion channel sequences. Although we hypothesized that neck ventroflexion in cats could be associated with a thyrotoxic or familial periodic paralysis channel mutation, we did not identify any previously detected human channel mutation in the hyperthyroid cat presenting hypokalemia. However, based on the small number of affected cats in this study, we cannot yet rule out this molecular mechanism. Notwithstanding, hyperthyroidism should still be considered as a differential diagnosis in hypokalemic feline paralysis. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Molecular cloning of ion channels in Felis catus that are related to periodic paralyses in man: a contribution to the understanding of the genetic susceptibility to feline neck ventroflexion and paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlyn Zapata

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neck ventroflexion in cats has different causes; however, the most common is the hypokalemia associated with flaccid paralysis secondary to chronic renal failure. In humans, the most common causes of acute flaccid paralysis are hypokalemia precipitated by thyrotoxicosis and familial forms linked to mutations in sodium, potassium, and calcium channel genes. Here, we describe the sequencing and analysis of skeletal muscle ion channels in Felis catus that could be related to periodic paralyses in humans, contributing to the understanding of the genetic susceptibility to feline neck ventroflexion and paralysis. We studied genomic DNA from eleven cats, including five animals that were hyperthyroid with hypokalemia, although only one presented with muscle weakness, and six healthy control domestic cats. We identified the ion channel ortholog genes KCNJ2, KCNJ12, KCNJ14, CACNA1S and SCN4A in the Felis catus genome, together with several polymorphic variants. Upon comparative alignment with other genomes, we found that Felis catus provides evidence for a high genomic conservation of ion channel sequences. Although we hypothesized that neck ventroflexion in cats could be associated with a thyrotoxic or familial periodic paralysis channel mutation, we did not identify any previously detected human channel mutation in the hyperthyroid cat presenting hypokalemia. However, based on the small number of affected cats in this study, we cannot yet rule out this molecular mechanism. Notwithstanding, hyperthyroidism should still be considered as a differential diagnosis in hypokalemic feline paralysis.

  14. Origin of the correlation between the standard Gibbs energies of ion transfer from water to a hydrophobic ionic liquid and to a molecular solvent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Záliš, Stanislav; Samec, Zdeněk; Bovtun, Viktor; Kempa, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, JAN 2013 (2013), s. 591-598 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/0707 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : ionic liquids * cyclic voltammetry * standard Gibbs energy of ion transfer Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.086, year: 2013

  15. Analysis of molecular species of triacylglycerols from vegetable oils containing fatty acids with non-methylene-interrupted double bonds, by HPLC in the silver-ion mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Y.; Kim, S. [Dong A Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-20

    The possibilities for application of silver ion HPLC to analysis of the triacylglycerols containing conjugate trienoic acids and {Delta}{sup 5}-polymethylene-interrupted acids and proportions of triacylglycerol fractions obtained by silver-ion HPLC from the seed oil of Momordica charantia double bonds were examined, respectively. The triacylglycerols of seed oils containing conjugate trienoic acids such as {alpha}-eleostearic acid (C{sub 18:3 9c,11t,13t}) and punicic acid (C{sub 18:3} {sub 9c,11t,13c}) were resolved by silver-ion HPLC. Fractions were fractionated on the basis of the number and configuration of double bonds in the species, and the elution profile is quite different from that of the species comprising exclusively saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with methylene-interrupted double bonds ; for instance, the species (DT(c2)) composed of one dienoic acid and two conjugate trienoic acids eluted much earlier than the species (D{sub 2}T{sub c}) composed of two dienoic acids and one conjugate trienoic acid, in spite of having larger number of double bonds. This means that the interaction of conjugate double bonds with silver ions is weaker than that of methylene-interrupted double bonds, presumably because of the delocalization of {pi}-electrons in conjugate double bonds. In this instance, the strength of interaction of a conjugate trienoic double bond system with silver ions seemed to be between that of methylene-interrupted dienoic and monoenoic double bond systems. Triacylglycerols of the seeds of Ginkgo biloba have been resolved by HPLC in the silver-ion mode according to the number and position of double bonds. In this instance, the strength of interaction between the {pi}-electrons of double bonds in the fatty acyl residues and silver ions is in the order; C{sub 18:3{omega}3}>C(20:3){Delta}{sup 5,11,14}C{sub 18:3}{Delta}{sup 5,9,12}>= C{sub 18:2{omega}6}>C{sub 18:2}{Delta}{sup 5,9}>C{sub 18:1{omega}9}>C{sub 18:1ome= ga7}. 49 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Abundances of Neutral and Ionized PAH Along The Lines-of-Sight of Diffuse and Translucent Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Galazutdinov, Gazinur; Krewloski, Jacek; Biennier, Ludovic; Beletsky, Yuri; Song, In-Ok

    2013-01-01

    The spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs isolated in the gas phase at low temperature have been measured in the laboratory under conditions that mimic interstellar conditions and are compared with a set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data provide upper limits for the abundances of neutral PAH molecules and ions along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from infrared observations. We present the characteristics of the laboratory facility (COSmIC) that was developed for this study and discuss the findings resulting from the comparison of the laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. COSmIC combines a supersonic jet expansion with discharge plasma and cavity ringdown spectroscopy and provides experimental conditions that closely mimic the interstellar conditions. The column densities of the individual PAH molecules and ions probed in these surveys are derived from the comparison of the laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data lead to clear conclusions regarding the expected abundances for PAHs in the interstellar environments probed in the surveys. Band profile comparisons between laboratory and astronomical spectra lead to information regarding the molecular structures and characteristics associated with the DIB carriers in the corresponding lines-of-sight. These quantitative surveys of neutral and ionized PAHs in the optical range open the way for quantitative searches of PAHs and complex organics in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments.

  17. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P; Barkley, Robert M; Jones, David N M; Hankin, Joseph A; Murphy, Robert C

    2018-04-23

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H] - ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H] - and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H 2 O-CO 2 ] - and [M-H-H 2 O] - displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H 2 O] - ion from LTB 4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H 2 O] - product ions from LTB 4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL ABUNDANCES ON NITROGEN IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    The dominant form of nitrogen provided to most solar system bodies is currently unknown, though available measurements show that the detected nitrogen in solar system rocks and ices is depleted with respect to solar abundances and the interstellar medium. We use a detailed chemical/physical model of the chemical evolution of a protoplanetary disk to explore the evolution and abundance of nitrogen-bearing molecules. Based on this model, we analyze how initial chemical abundances provided as either gas or ice during the early stages of disk formation influence which species become the dominant nitrogen bearers at later stages. We find that a disk with the majority of its initial nitrogen in either atomic or molecular nitrogen is later dominated by atomic and molecular nitrogen as well as NH 3 and HCN ices, where the dominant species varies with disk radius. When nitrogen is initially in gaseous ammonia, it later becomes trapped in ammonia ice except in the outer disk where atomic nitrogen dominates. For a disk with the initial nitrogen in the form of ammonia ice, the nitrogen remains trapped in the ice as NH 3 at later stages. The model in which most of the initial nitrogen is placed in atomic N best matches the ammonia abundances observed in comets. Furthermore, the initial state of nitrogen influences the abundance of N 2 H + , which has been detected in protoplanetary disks. Strong N 2 H + emission is found to be indicative of an N 2 abundance greater than n N 2 /n H 2 >10 −6 in addition to tracing the CO snow line. Our models also indicate that NO is potentially detectable, with lower N gas abundances leading to higher NO abundances

  19. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Allende Prieto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  20. CHLORINE ABUNDANCES IN COOL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Indiana University Bloomington, Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Hinkle, K., E-mail: zmaas@indiana.edu, E-mail: cpilacho@indiana.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H{sup 35}Cl at 3.69851 μ m. The high-resolution L -band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with −0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] = (−0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [{sup 35}Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ∼0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl could be measured, a {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  1. Anthropogenic noise changes arthropod abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkley, Jessie P; McClure, Christopher J W; Kawahara, Akito Y; Francis, Clinton D; Barber, Jesse R

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic noise is a widespread and growing form of sensory pollution associated with the expansion of human infrastructure. One specific source of constant and intense noise is that produced by compressors used for the extraction and transportation of natural gas. Terrestrial arthropods play a central role in many ecosystems, and given that numerous species rely upon airborne sounds and substrate-borne vibrations in their life histories, we predicted that increased background sound levels or the presence of compressor noise would influence their distributions. In the second largest natural gas field in the United States (San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA), we assessed differences in the abundances of terrestrial arthropod families and community structure as a function of compressor noise and background sound level. Using pitfall traps, we simultaneously sampled five sites adjacent to well pads that possessed operating compressors, and five alternate, quieter well pad sites that lacked compressors, but were otherwise similar. We found a negative association between sites with compressor noise or higher levels of background sound and the abundance of five arthropod families and one genus, a positive relationship between loud sites and the abundance of one family, and no relationship between noise level or compressor presence and abundance for six families and two genera. Despite these changes, we found no evidence of community turnover as a function of background sound level or site type (compressor and noncompressor). Our results indicate that anthropogenic noise differentially affects the abundances of some arthropod families. These preliminary findings point to a need to determine the direct and indirect mechanisms driving these observed responses. Given the diverse and important ecological functions provided by arthropods, changes in abundances could have ecological implications. Therefore, we recommend the consideration of arthropods in the environmental

  2. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  3. Projectile Energy Dependence in the Molecular Excitation of the H3+, D3+ Molecular Ions in their Polar Dissociation. F.B. Yousif, G. Hinojosa, I. Dominguez, J. de Urquijo, C. Cisneros and I. Alvarez, Laboratorio de Cuernavaca, IFUNAM, Cuernavaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, F. B.; Hinojosa, G.; Dominguez, I.; de Urquijo, J.; Cisneros, C.; Alvarez, I.

    1996-05-01

    The laboratory energy distributions of H+ and D+ in coincidence with H- and D- ions, resulting from the collision-induced-dissociation of H3+ and D3+ on He target for incoming beam energies ranging from 2.5 to 9.0 -keV has been measured. The energy-analyzed-spectra of ionic fragments were measured both independently and in coincidence with each other. >From these, the energy absorbed by the dissociating molecular ions in the excitation process induced by the collision with He prior to its breakup, was evaluated as a function of the projectile energy and it was found that it is not constant but its consistent with the identified H3+ excited states which have adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer energies of 21-50 eV above the H3+ ground state. Research partially supported by CONACYT, 3347-E and DGAPA IN100295.

  4. Ion dip spectroscopy of cold molecules and ions. Progress report and renewal proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessel, J.

    1987-08-13

    A research program is underway with the objective of developing techniques of high resolution multiphoton spectroscopy for selective, ultrasensitive molecular detection. Methods under study include various forms of ion dip spectroscopy and new methods of ion fragmentation spectroscopy. The studies are providing a new understanding of the fundamental spectroscopy and photophysics of large molecular ions. Dimer and cluster ions of polynuclear aromatics and related species are also being investigated, with potential detection applications.

  5. A cold target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy for the investigation on the dynamics of atomic and molecular reactions in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, X.; Lu, D.; Wei, B.; Zhang, B. H.; Tang, Y. J.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2014-10-01

    A cold target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy to study the fragmentation of molecules impact by electrons has been described, which mainly comprises a pulsed electron gun, a supersonic gas jet, a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer, a multi-hit position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system. According to the measured TOF data and corresponding positions information on the detector, the recoil-ions' trajectories can be reconstructed and their initial 3D momentum vectors can be calculated. The energy spread of the electron gun, about 8.5 eV, and the resolution of momentum component parallel and perpendicular to the TOF direction for recoil-ions, about 0.23 and 0.35 a.u., respectively, are obtained by using helium as the gas target. To test the performance of the setup, the fragmentation of nitrogen induced by 100 eV electrons impact is investigated and some reaction channels with different kinetic energy distributions, like dissociative ionization and Coulomb explosion, are analyzed. Good agreement is achieved with previous studies.

  6. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  7. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  8. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  9. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  10. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  11. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  12. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  13. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  14. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  15. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  16. Sensing with Ion Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Martinac, Boris

    2008-01-01

    All living cells are able to detect and translate environmental stimuli into biologically meaningful signals. Sensations of touch, hearing, sight, taste, smell or pain are essential to the survival of all living organisms. The importance of sensory input for the existence of life thus justifies the effort made to understand its molecular origins. Sensing with Ion Channels focuses on ion channels as key molecules enabling biological systems to sense and process the physical and chemical stimuli that act upon cells in their living environment. Its aim is to serve as a reference to ion channel specialists and as a source of new information to non specialists who want to learn about the structural and functional diversity of ion channels and their role in sensory physiology.

  17. Ion sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

    2004-05-18

    The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

  18. Mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures from layered molecular precursors for Li-ion battery application: the case of β-In2S3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Tian, Lei-Lei; Li, Shuankui; Lin, Ling-Piao; Pan, Feng

    2016-04-04

    A new method was demonstrated to construct mesoporous and carbon hybrid structures of β-In2S3 from the thermal decomposition of layered molecular precursors. When applied to LIBs, they all exhibit good cycling stability and excellent rate performance due to the great uniformity of mesopores and pyrolysis carbon distributed in the materials.

  19. Seasonal abundance and molecular identification of West Nile virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion of the Ace2 gene by PCR confirmed morphormetric identification of the mosquitoes. Results: A total of 751 mosquitoes were ... WestNile virus, (WNV), Yellow fever virus. (YFV), Dengue virus (DNV) and Rift valley fever virus ..... West Nile virus in mosquitoes and febrile patients in a semi-arid zone in Nigeria. J Am Sci.

  20. Chloroflexi bacteria are more diverse, abundant, and similar in high than in low microbial abundance sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Susanne; Deines, Peter; Behnam, Faris; Wagner, Michael; Taylor, Michael W

    2011-12-01

    Some marine sponges harbor dense and phylogenetically complex microbial communities [high microbial abundance (HMA) sponges] whereas others contain only few and less diverse microorganisms [low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges]. We focused on the phylum Chloroflexi that frequently occurs in sponges to investigate the different associations with three HMA and three LMA sponges from New Zealand. By applying a range of microscopical and molecular techniques a clear dichotomy between HMA and LMA sponges was observed: Chloroflexi bacteria were more abundant and diverse in HMA than in LMA sponges. Moreover, different HMA sponges contain similar Chloroflexi communities whereas LMA sponges harbor different and more variable communities which partly resemble Chloroflexi seawater communities. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of our own and publicly available sponge-derived Chloroflexi 16S rRNA gene sequences (> 780 sequences) revealed the enormous diversity of this phylum within sponges including 29 sponge-specific and sponge-coral clusters (SSC/SCC) as well as a 'supercluster' consisting of > 250 sponge-derived and a single nonsponge-derived 16S rRNA gene sequence. Interestingly, the majority of sequences obtained from HMA sponges, but only a few from LMA sponges, fell into SSC/SCC clusters. This indicates a much more specific association of Chloroflexi bacteria with HMA sponges and suggests an ecologically important role for these prominent bacteria. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Highly accurate bound state calculations of the two-center molecular ions by using the universal variational expansion for three-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Alexei M.

    2018-03-01

    The universal variational expansion for the non-relativistic three-body systems is explicitly constructed. This universal expansion can be used to perform highly accurate numerical computations of the bound state spectra in various three-body systems, including Coulomb three-body systems with arbitrary particle masses and electric charges. Our main interest is related to the adiabatic three-body systems which contain one bound electron and two heavy nuclei of hydrogen isotopes: the protium p, deuterium d and tritium t. We also consider the analogous (model) hydrogen ion ∞H2+ with the two infinitely heavy nuclei.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc, and copper. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, R.H.

    1978-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of potentially toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, with primary attention given to cadmium, zinc, and arsenic. In addition, the toxic effects of cadmium on the metabolism of vitamin D and calcium have been investigated in some detail. Several approaches have been taken, including studies on the localization of heavy metals in the intestinal mucosa, the effects of cadmium on various parameters of calcium metabolism, the modes of intestinal absorption of cadmium, arsenate, and zinc, and the interactions of heavy metals with each other and with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Details of these experiments are attached in the Comprehensive Progress Report

  3. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc, and copper. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, R. H.

    1978-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of potentially toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, with primary attention given to cadmium, zinc, and arsenic. In addition, the toxic effects of cadmium on the metabolism of vitamin D and calcium have been investigated in some detail. Several approaches have been taken, including studies on the localization of heavy metals in the intestinal mucosa, the effects of cadmium on various parameters of calcium metabolism, the modes of intestinal absorption of cadmium, arsenate, and zinc, and the interactions of heavy metals with each other and with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Details of these experiments are attached in the Comprehensive Progress Report.

  4. Abundances in stars with exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Israelian, Garik

    2003-01-01

    Extensive spectroscopic studies of stars with and without planets have concluded that stars hosting planets are significantly more metal-rich than those without planets. More subtle trends of different chemical elements begin to appear as the number of detected extrasolar planetary systems continues to grow. I review our current knowledge concerning the observed abundance trends of various chemical elements in stars with exoplanets and their possible implications.

  5. Abundances, Ionization States, Temperatures, and FIP in Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2018-04-01

    The relative abundances of chemical elements and isotopes have been our most effective tool in identifying and understanding the physical processes that control populations of energetic particles. The early surprise in solar energetic particles (SEPs) was 1000-fold enhancements in {}3He/{}4He from resonant wave-particle interactions in the small "impulsive" SEP events that emit electron beams that produce type III radio bursts. Further studies found enhancements in Fe/O, then extreme enhancements in element abundances that increase with mass-to-charge ratio A/Q, rising by a factor of 1000 from He to Au or Pb arising in magnetic reconnection regions on open field lines in solar jets. In contrast, in the largest SEP events, the "gradual" events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by fast, wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Averaging many events provides a measure of solar coronal abundances, but A/Q-dependent scattering during transport causes variations with time; thus if Fe scatters less than O, Fe/O is enhanced early and depleted later. To complicate matters, shock waves often reaccelerate impulsive suprathermal ions left over or trapped above active regions that have spawned many impulsive events. Direct measurements of ionization states Q show coronal temperatures of 1-2 MK for most gradual events, but impulsive events often show stripping by matter traversal after acceleration. Direct measurements of Q are difficult and often unavailable. Since both impulsive and gradual SEP events have abundance enhancements that vary as powers of A/Q, we can use abundances to deduce the probable Q-values and the source plasma temperatures during acceleration, ≈3 MK for impulsive SEPs. This new technique also allows multiple spacecraft to measure temperature variations across the face of a shock wave, measurements otherwise unavailable and provides a new understanding of abundance variations in the element He. Comparing coronal abundances from SEPs

  6. Molecular detection of targeted major histocompatibility complex I-bound peptides using a probabilistic measure and nanospray MS3 on a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Bruce; Keskin, Derin B; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2010-11-01

    A nanospray MS(3) method deployed on a quadrupole linear ion trap hybrid can detect targeted peptides with high dynamic range and high sensitivity from complex mixtures without separations. The method uses a recognition algorithm that is a modification of the relative (Kullback-Leibler, KL) entropy characterization of probabilistic distance to detect if reference MS(3) fragmentation patterns are components of acquired MS(3) spectra. The recognition reflects the probabilistic structure of physical MS measurements unlike the Euclidean or inner product metrics widely used for comparing spectra. It capably handles spectra with a significant chemical ion background in contrast to the Euclidean metric or the direct relative entropy. The full nanospray MS(3) method allows both the detection and quantitation of targets without the need to obtain isotopically labeled standards. By avoiding chromatographic separations and its associated surface losses, the detection can be applied to complex samples on a very limited material scale. The methodology is illustrated by applications to the medically important problem of detecting targeted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I associated peptides extracted from limited cell numbers.

  7. Comparison on the molecular response profiles between nano zinc oxide (ZnO) particles and free zinc ion using a genome-wide toxicogenomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guanyong; Zhang, Xiaowei; Giesy, John P; Musarrat, Javed; Saquib, Quaiser; Alkhedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Yu, Hongxia

    2015-11-01

    Increasing production and applications of nano zinc oxide particles (nano-ZnO) enhances the probability of its exposure in occupational and environmental settings, but toxicity studies are still limited. Taking the free Zn ion (Zn(2+)) as a control, cytotoxicity of a commercially available nano-ZnO was assessed with a 6-h exposure in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The fitted dose-cytotoxicity curve for ZnCl2 was significantly sharper than that from nano-ZnO. Then, a genome-wide gene expression profile following exposure to nano-ZnO was conducted by use of a live cell reporter assay system with library of 1820 modified green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing promoter reporter vectors constructed from E. coli K12 strains, which resulted in 387 significantly altered genes in bacterial (p statistical hypergeometric testing, strongly suggesting that exposure to nano-ZnO would result a great disturbance on the functional gene product synthesis processing, such as translation, gene expression, RNA modification, and structural constituent of ribosome. The pattern of expression of 37 genes altered by nano-ZnO (fold change>2) was different from the profile following exposure to 6 mg/L of free zinc ion. The result indicates that these two Zn forms might cause toxicity to bacterial in different modes of action. Our results underscore the importance of understanding the adverse effects elicited by nano-ZnO after entering aquatic environment.

  8. A cold target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy for the investigation on the dynamics of atomic and molecular reactions in Shanghai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, X.; Lu, D. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: brwei@fudan.edu.cn [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, B.H.; Tang, Y.J. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, PO Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Hutton, R.; Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-10-15

    A cold target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy to study the fragmentation of molecules impact by electrons has been described, which mainly comprises a pulsed electron gun, a supersonic gas jet, a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer, a multi-hit position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system. According to the measured TOF data and corresponding positions information on the detector, the recoil-ions’ trajectories can be reconstructed and their initial 3D momentum vectors can be calculated. The energy spread of the electron gun, about 8.5 eV, and the resolution of momentum component parallel and perpendicular to the TOF direction for recoil-ions, about 0.23 and 0.35 a.u., respectively, are obtained by using helium as the gas target. To test the performance of the setup, the fragmentation of nitrogen induced by 100 eV electrons impact is investigated and some reaction channels with different kinetic energy distributions, like dissociative ionization and Coulomb explosion, are analyzed. Good agreement is achieved with previous studies.

  9. Determination of low-molecular-weight amines and ammonium in saline waters by ion chromatography after their extraction by steam distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Fernanda Nunes; Afonso, Julio Carlos; Pontes, Fernanda Veronesi Marinho; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; Neto, Arnaldo Alcover; Tristão, Maria Luiza Bragança; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto

    2016-04-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of ammonium ion, monomethylamine and monoethylamine in saline waters by ion chromatography. Steam distillation was used to eliminate matrix interferences. Variables such as distillation time, concentration of sodium hydroxide solution and analyte mass were optimized by using a full two-level factorial (2(3) ) design. The influence of steam distillation on the analytical curves prepared in different matrices was also investigated. Limits of detection of 0.03, 0.05 and 0.05 mg/L were obtained for ammoniumion, monomethylamine and monoethylamine, respectively. Saline water samples from the Brazilian oil industry, containing sodium and potassium concentrations between 2.0-5.2% w/v and 96-928 mg/L, respectively, were analyzed. Satisfactory recoveries (90-105%) of the analytes were obtained for all spiked samples, and the precision was ≤ 7% (n = 3). The proposed method is adequate for analyzing saline waters containing sodium to ammoniumion, monomethylamine and monoethylamine concentration ratios up to 28 000:1 and potassium to ammonium, monomethylamine and monoethylamine concentration ratios up to 12 000:1. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-31

    of Birmingam, P 0 Box 363, 2310/A2 Birmingham B15 2TT, England. 2303/GlAC II. Controlling Office Name and Address 12. Report Date Air Force Geophysics...source. Thus unwanted molecular excitation and dissociation can be avoided and greater control can be exercised in the creation of suitable plasma...The Fall fractigRal ionization density in these afterglow plagas (%-10 -𔃺) ensures that electron- neutral collisions are the most effective. This

  11. A Large Seasonal Variation of Energetic C+ and CO+ Abundances in Saturn's Magnetosphere Probably Resulting from Changing Ring Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. C.; Christon, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In mid-2014 the Cassini/CHEMS instrument observed a rather dramatic increase in the relative abundances of both C+ and CO+ (factors of 2 to 4). The enhancements then decreased during 2015 and 2016, with CO+ decreasing much more quickly. C+ and CO+ (these mass 28 molecular ions could also include N2+) are trace components of the energetic (96-220 keV) ion population in Saturn's magnetosphere, which is dominated by water group ions W+ (O+, OH+, and H2O+ and H30+), H+, and H2+. We suggest that the C+ and CO+ enhancements are associated with CO2, possibly from Enceladus, building up on the cold rings near equinox, but then released from the north side of the A, and possibly B, rings as they were warmed above 80K in late 2013 or early 2014 by increasing solar illumination after the 2009 equinox (Morishima et al, 2016). Hodyss et al (2008) found preferential sublimation of CO2 from a CO2:H2O ice mixture when it was warmed above 80K. Meteoroid bombardment could be another source of carbon in the ring ice. After release from the ice, transport, dissociation, ionization, and then acceleration in the magnetosphere would produce the observed energetic C+ and CO+, with the enhancements subsiding as the CO2 and other carbon species gradually become depleted. We will report the relevant abundance ratios from SOI in 2004 through the Sept. 15, 2017 end of mission to test this hypothesis. Hodyss, R. et al, Icarus, 194, 836-842, 2008. Morishima, R. et al, Icarus, 279, 2-19, 2016.

  12. Superbasic alkyl-substituted bisphosphazene proton sponges: a new class of deprotonating matrices for negative ion matrix-assisted ionization/laser desorption mass spectrometry of low molecular weight hardly ionizable analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, C D; Cataldi, T R I; Kögel, J F; Monopoli, A; Palmisano, F; Sundermeyer, J

    2016-07-30

    Here hardly ionizable and low molecular weight compounds are detected in negative ion mode by using novel superbasic proton sponges based on 1,8-bisphosphazenylnaphthalene (PN) as MALDI matrices. Among the selected proton sponges, 1,8-bis(trispyrrolidinophosphazenyl)naphthalene (TPPN) has shown the best behaviour as matrix since it allows the direct detection of intact cholesterol without derivatization also in real challenging samples. Very weakly acidic compounds such as sterols, steroids, fatty alcohols and saccharides were detected in reflectron negative ion mode by a MALDI TOF/TOF system equipped with a neodymium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Nd:YLF) laser (345 nm) with typical mass accuracy of 10 ppm. MS/MS experiments were performed by using ambient air as the collision gas. Contrary to traditional MALDI matrices, superbasic proton sponges allowed the easy deprotonation of an alcohol functional group without a previous chemical derivatization step. Experimental evidence indicates that analyte deprotonation is achieved in the condensed phase, i.e. PN superbasic proton sponges operate according to a recently proposed model named matrix assisted ionization/laser desorption (MAILD). A detection limit of 3 pmol/spot of cholesterol (model compound) with a signal-to-noise ratio ≥ 10 was typically obtained. For the first time, the usefulness of novel superbasic proton sponges is demonstrated for MALDI detection of hardly ionizable compounds such as sterols, steroids, fatty alcohols and saccharides. The leading candidate TPPN has been successfully applied for negative ion MAILD-MS analysis of cholesterol, fatty acids and phospholipids in egg yolk and brain tissue extracts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  14. A data-driven approach for retrieving temperatures and abundances in brown dwarf atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Line, MR; Fortney, JJ; Marley, MS; Sorahana, S

    2014-01-01

    © 2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Brown dwarf spectra contain a wealth of information about their molecular abundances, temperature structure, and gravity. We present a new data driven retrieval approach, previously used in planetary atmosphere studies, to extract the molecular abundances and temperature structure from brown dwarf spectra. The approach makes few a priori physical assumptions about the state of the atmosphere. The feasibility of the approach is fi...

  15. Experimental Evaluation of a Negative Ion Source for a Heavy Ion Fusion Negative Ion Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, L. R.; Hahto, S. K.; Hahto, S. T.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.

    2004-06-16

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that i s used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 45 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  16. Rovibrationally selected ion-molecule collision study using the molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion method: charge transfer reaction of N2(+)(X 2Σg+; v+ = 0-2; N+ = 0-9) + Ar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yih Chung; Xu, Yuntao; Lu, Zhou; Xu, Hong; Ng, C Y

    2012-09-14

    We have developed an ion-molecule reaction apparatus for state-selected absolute total cross section measurements by implementing a high-resolution molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) ion source to a double-quadrupole double-octopole ion-guide mass spectrometer. Using the total cross section measurement of the state-selected N(2)(+)(v(+), N(+)) + Ar charge transfer (CT) reaction as an example, we describe in detail the design of the VUV laser PFI-PI ion source used, which has made possible the preparation of reactant N(2)(+)(X (2)Σ(g)(+), v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) PFI-PIs with high quantum state purity, high intensity, and high kinetic energy resolution. The PFI-PIs and prompt ions produced in the ion source are shown to have different kinetic energies, allowing the clean rejection of prompt ions from the PFI-PI beam by applying a retarding potential barrier upstream of the PFI-PI source. By optimizing the width and amplitude of the pulsed electric fields employed to the VUV-PFI-PI source, we show that the reactant N(2)(+) PFI-PI beam can be formed with a laboratory kinetic energy resolution of ΔE(lab) = ± 50 meV. As a result, the total cross section measurement can be conducted at center-of-mass kinetic energies (E(cm)'s) down to thermal energies. Absolute total rovibrationally selected cross sections σ(v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) for the N(2)(+)(X (2)Σ(g)(+); v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) + Ar CT reaction have been measured in the E(cm) range of 0.04-10.0 eV, revealing strong vibrational enhancements and E(cm)-dependencies of σ(v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9). The thermochemical threshold at E(cm) = 0.179 eV for the formation of Ar(+) from N(2)(+)(X; v(+) = 0, N(+)) + Ar was observed by the measured σ(v(+) = 0), confirming the narrow ΔE(cm) spread achieved in the present study. The σ(v(+) = 0-2; N(+)) values obtained here are compared with previous experimental and theoretical results. The theoretical predictions

  17. Gas-Phase Analysis of the Complex of Fibroblast GrowthFactor 1 with Heparan Sulfate: A Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TWIMS) and Molecular Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Xu, Yongmei; Zong, Chengli; Zhang, Fuming; Boons, Geert-Jan; Liu, Jian; Linhardt, Robert J.; Woods, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate several cellular developmental processes by interacting with cell surface heparan proteoglycans and transmembrane cell surface receptors (FGFR). The interaction of FGF with heparan sulfate (HS) is known to induce protein oligomerization, increase the affinity of FGF towards its receptor FGFR, promoting the formation of the HS-FGF-FGFR signaling complex. Although the role of HS in the signaling pathways is well recognized, the details of FGF oligomerization and formation of the ternary signaling complex are still not clear, with several conflicting models proposed in literature. Here, we examine the effect of size and sulfation pattern of HS upon FGF1 oligomerization, binding stoichiometry and conformational stability, through a combination of ion mobility (IM) and theoretical modeling approaches. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) of FGF1 in the presence of several HS fragments ranging from tetrasaccharide (dp4) to dodecasaccharide (dp12) in length was performed. A comparison of the binding stoichiometry of variably sulfated dp4 HS to FGF1 confirmed the significance of the previously known high-affinity binding motif in FGF1 dimerization, and demonstrated that certain tetrasaccharide-length fragments are also capable of inducing dimerization of FGF1. The degree of oligomerization was found to increase in the presence of dp12 HS, and a general lack of specificity for longer HS was observed. Additionally, collision cross-sections (CCSs) of several FGF1-HS complexes were calculated, and were found to be in close agreement with experimental results. Based on the (CCSs) a number of plausible binding modes of 2:1 and 3:1 FGF1-HS are proposed.

  18. An ultrasensitive and highly selective fluorescent and colorimetric chemosensor for citrate ions based on rhodamine B and its application as the first molecular security keypad lock based on phosphomolybdic acid and citrate inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Baezzat, Mohammad-Reza; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Parhami, Abolfath; Hasanli, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Rhodamine B (Rh B ) has been developed as novel and efficient colorimetric and fluorometric chemosensor for citrate ions (Cit 3− ) in an absolutely aqueous media. The UV–vis absorption and fluorescent emission titrations experiments have been employed to study the sensing process. Rh B could act as an efficient “ON–OFF” fluorescent chemosensor for phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) based on an electron transfer (ET) process. Also (Rh B + ) 3 .PMA 3− could operate as an “OFF–ON” fluorescent chemosensor for citrate ions based on a ligand substitution process. The chemosensor Rh B shows excellent fluorescence sensitivity and selectivity toward citrate in aqueous media, and displays ON–OFF–ON type fluorescence change with alternately adding PMA and citrate to the media along with reversible association–dissociation of the complex. The (Rh B + ) 3 .PMA 3− can be applied to the quantification of citrate with a linear ranges covering from 0.053 to 0.83 and 0.08 to 1.6 µM by detection limits of 6.0 and 9.1 nM for fluorescence and colorimetric methods respectively. The keypad lock operation is particularly important, as the output of the system depends not only on the proper combination but also on the order of input signals, creating the correct password that can be used to “open” this molecular keypad lock through strong fluorescence emission at 575 nm. As a whole, its various logic gate properties may improve its impact for the development of new-generation “intelligence” digital devices. The ionic PMA and Cit 3− inputs to (Rh B + ) 3 .PMA 3− have been mimicked as a superimposed electronic molecular keypad lock. Also indicates that Rh B is suitable for the detection of Cit 3− ions in the biological environment. - Highlights: • Our probe is commercially available with good photostability and high quantum yield. • Both color and fluorescence change with long emission wavelength in aqueous media. • Characteristics of an ON

  19. Tailoring Ion Charge State Distribution in Tetramethyltin Clusters under Influence of Moderate Intensity Picosecond Laser Pulse: Role of Laser Wavelength and Rate of Energy Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod; Das, Soumitra; Vatsa, Rajesh K.

    2017-07-01

    Systematic manipulation of ionic-outcome in laser-cluster interaction process has been realized for studies carried out on tetramethyltin (TMT) clusters under picosecond laser conditions, determined by choice of laser wavelength and intensity. As a function of laser intensity, TMT clusters exhibit gradual enhancement in overall ionization of its cluster constituents, up to a saturation level of ionization, which was distinct for different wavelengths (266, 355, and 532 nm). Simultaneously, systematic appearance of higher multiply charged atomic ions and shift in relative abundance of multiply charged atomic ions towards higher charge state was observed, using time-of-flight mass spectrometer. At saturation level, multiply charged atomic ions up to (C2+, Sn2+) at 266 nm, (C4+, Sn4+) at 355 nm, and (C4+, Sn6+) at 532 nm were detected. In addition, at 355 nm intra-cluster ion chemistry within the ionized cluster leads to generation of molecular hydrogen ion (H2 +) and triatomic molecular hydrogen ion (H3 +). Generation of multiply charged atomic ions is ascribed to efficient coupling of laser pulse with the cluster media, facilitated by inner-ionized electrons produced within the cluster, at the leading edge of laser pulse. Role of inner-ionized electrons is authenticated by measuring kinetic energy distribution of electrons liberated upon disintegration of excessively ionized cluster, under the influence of picosecond laser pulse.

  20. Propensity for the air/water interface and ion pairing in magnesium acetate vs magnesium nitrate solutions: Molecular dynamics simmulations and surface tension measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Minofar, Babak; Vácha, Robert; Wahab, A.; Mahiuddin, S.; Kunz, W.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 32 (2006), s. 15939-15944 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 644; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001 Grant - others:NSF(US) CHE0431312; NSF(US) CHE0209719 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : surfaces of salt solutions * surface tension * molecular dynamics simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.115, year: 2006