WorldWideScience

Sample records for abundance n-glycosylated protein

  1. Rapid and individual-specific glycoprofiling of the low abundance N-glycosylated protein tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    A gel-based method for a mass spectrometric site-specific glycoanalysis was developed using a recombinant glycoprotein expressed in two different cell lines. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography at nanoscale level was used to enrich for glycopeptides prior to MS. The glycoprofiling...... glycoprofiling of a low abundance glycoprotein performed in an individual-specific manner allows for future studies of glycosylated biomarkers for person-specific detection of altered glycosylation and may thus allow early detection and monitoring of diseases....... was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS and MS/MS. The method proved to be fast and sensitive and furthermore yielded a comprehensive site-specific glycan analysis, allowing a differentiation of the glycoprofiles of the two sources of recombinant protein, both comprising N...

  2. PROTEIN N-GLYCOSYLATION OF GASTROPODS

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in several types of recognition processes associated with fertilisation and development, allergies, pathological events and cell death. Whereas the amino acid sequence of a protein is fixed by the DNA, the glycosylation abilities depend on enzymes and substrates currently present in the cell.

  3. Distribution of N-glycosylation sequons in proteins: how apart are they?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Shyama Prasad; Buus, Ole Thomsen; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    -terminus of the protein sequence and this effect was more pronounced for NXS sequons. The distribution of sequons, modeled based on balls-in-boxes classical occupancy, showed a near-maximum probability. Considerable proportion of sequons was found within a distance of ten amino acids, indicating that the steric hindrance...... was not a key factor in protein N-glycosylation. Interestingly, the distribution of all sequons present in N-glycoproteins showed a pattern very similar to that of glycosylated sequons. The results indicate that protein N-glycosylation chiefly follows a random design....

  4. Identification and characterization of N-glycosylated proteins using proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selby, David S; Larsen, Martin R; Calvano, Cosima Damiana;

    2008-01-01

    Glycoproteins constitute a large fraction of the proteome. The fundamental role of protein glycosylation in cellular development, growth, and differentiation, tissue development, and in host-pathogen interactions is by now widely accepted. Proteome-wide characterization of glycoproteins...

  5. Evolutionary Pattern of N-Glycosylation Sequon Numbers in Eukaryotic ABC Protein Superfamilies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Buus, Ole Thomsen; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline) which are the potential sites of asparagine (N) linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins and their underly......Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline) which are the potential sites of asparagine (N) linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins...... and their underlying causes have largely been unexplored. We computed the actual and probabilistic occurrence of NXS/T sequons in ABC protein superfamilies from eight diverse eukaryotic organisms. The ABC proteins contained significantly higher NXS/T sequon numbers compared to respective genome-wide average......-against the recent findings of only threonine specific Darwinian selection of sequons in proteins. The occurrence of sequons was positively correlated with the frequency of sequon specific amino acids and negatively correlated with proline and the NPS/T sequences. Further, the NPS/T sequences were significantly...

  6. Protein N-glycosylation in Archaea: defining Haloferax volcanii genes involved in S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2006-07-01

    In this study, characterization of the N-glycosylation process in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii was undertaken. Initially, putative Hfx. volcanii homologues of genes involved in eukaryal or bacterial N-glycosylation were identified by bioinformatics. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed that the proposed N-glycosylation genes are transcribed, indicative of true proteins being encoded. Where families of related gene sequences were detected, differential transcription of family members under a variety of physiological and environmental conditions was shown. Gene deletions point to certain genes, like alg11, as being essential yet revealed that others, such as the two versions of alg5, are not. Deletion of alg5-A did, however, lead to slower growth and interfered with surface (S)-layer glycoprotein glycosylation, as detected by modified migration on SDS-PAGE and glycostaining approaches. As deletion of stt3, the only component of the oligosaccharide transferase complex detected in Archaea, did not affect cell viability, it appears that N-glycosylation is not essential in Hfx. volcanii. Deletion of stt3 did, nonetheless, hinder both cell growth and S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation. Thus, with genes putatively involved in Hfx. volcanii protein glycosylation identified and the ability to address the roles played by the encoded polypeptides in modifying a reporter glycoprotein, the steps of the archaeal N-glycosylation pathway can be defined.

  7. Reliable Determination of Site-Specific In Vivo Protein N-Glycosylation Based on Collision-Induced MS/MS and Chromatographic Retention Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Benlian; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Chance, Mark R.

    2014-05-01

    Site-specific glycopeptide mapping for simultaneous glycan and peptide characterization by MS is difficult because of the heterogeneity and diversity of glycosylation in proteins and the lack of complete fragmentation information for either peptides or glycans with current fragmentation technologies. Indeed, multiple peptide and glycan combinations can readily match the same mass of glycopeptides even with mass errors less than 5 ppm providing considerably ambiguity and analysis of complex mixtures of glycopeptides becomes quite challenging in the case of large proteins. Here we report a novel strategy to reliably determine site-specific N-glycosylation mapping by combining collision-induced dissociation (CID)-only fragmentation with chromatographic retention times of glycopeptides. This approach leverages an experimental pipeline with parallel analysis of glyco- and deglycopeptides. As the test case we chose ABCA4, a large integral membrane protein with 16 predicted sites for N-glycosylation. Taking advantage of CID features such as high scan speed and high intensity of fragment ions together combined with the retention times of glycopeptides to conclusively identify the non-glycolytic peptide from which the glycopeptide was derived, we obtained virtually complete information about glycan compositions and peptide sequences, as well as the N-glycosylation site occupancy and relative abundances of each glycoform at specific sites for ABCA4. The challenges provided by this example provide guidance in analyzing complex relatively pure glycoproteins and potentially even more complex glycoprotein mixtures.

  8. In-Depth N-Glycosylation Reveals Species-Specific Modifications and Functions of the Royal Jelly Protein from Western (Apis mellifera) and Eastern Honeybees (Apis cerana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mao; Fang, Yu; Han, Bin; Xu, Xiang; Fan, Pei; Hao, Yue; Qi, Yuping; Hu, Han; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2015-12-04

    Royal jelly (RJ), secreted by honeybee workers, plays diverse roles as nutrients and defense agents for honeybee biology and human health. Despite being reported to be glycoproteins, the glycosylation characterization and functionality of RJ proteins in different honeybee species are largely unknown. An in-depth N-glycoproteome analysis and functional assay of RJ produced by Apis mellifera lingustica (Aml) and Apis cerana cerana (Acc) were conducted. RJ produced by Aml yielded 80 nonredundant N-glycoproteins carrying 190 glycosites, of which 23 novel proteins harboring 35 glycosites were identified. For Acc, all 43 proteins glycosylated at 138 glycosites were reported for the first time. Proteins with distinct N-glycoproteomic characteristics in terms of glycoprotein species, number of N-glycosylated sites, glycosylation motif, abundance level of glycoproteins, and N-glycosites were observed in this two RJ samples. The fact that the low inhibitory efficiency of N-glycosylated major royal jelly protein 2 (MRJP2) against Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) and the absence of antibacterial related glycosylated apidaecin, hymenoptaecin, and peritrophic matrix in the Aml RJ compared to Acc reveal the mechanism for why the Aml larvae are susceptible to P. larvae, the causative agent of a fatal brood disease (American foulbrood, AFB). The observed antihypertension activity of N-glycosylated MRJP1 in two RJ samples and a stronger activity found in Acc than in Aml reveal that specific RJ protein and modification are potentially useful for the treatment of hypertensive disease for humans. Our data gain novel understanding that the western and eastern bees have evolved species-specific strategies of glycosylation to fine-tune protein activity for optimizing molecular function as nutrients and immune agents for the good of honeybee and influence on the health promoting activity for human as well. This serves as a valuable resource for the targeted probing of the biological

  9. Proteomics and pathway analysis of N-glycosylated mammary gland proteins in response to Escherichia coli mastitis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxin; Shen, Weijun; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhao, Huiling; Huang, Dongwei; Cheng, Guanglong

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the N-linked glycosylated protein profile of mammary tissue from healthy cows and cows with mastitis due to Escherichia coli, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of the host response to mastitis. N-glycopeptides were enriched with a lectin mixture and identified through high-accuracy mass spectrometry. A total of 551 N-glycosylation sites, corresponding to 294 proteins, were identified in the mammary tissues of healthy cows; these glycoproteins were categorised into three functional groups and clustered into 11 specific pathways. A total of 511 N-glycosylation sites, corresponding to 283 glycosylated proteins, were detected in the mammary tissues of cows with E. coli mastitis. There were differences in N-glycosylation sites in 98 proteins in the mammary tissues of healthy cows and cows with mastitis due to E. coli. Most proteins with altered glycosylation were those involved in responses to stress, cell adhesion and the immune response, and were assigned to five specific pathways based on their gene ontology annotation. The results from this study show that the glycosylated protein profile in the mammary tissues of healthy and mastitic cows are different, and altered glycoproteins are associated with several pathways, including the lysosome and O-glycan biosynthesis pathways.

  10. Protein N-glycosylation and N-glycan trimming are required for postembryonic development of the pest beetle Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walski, Tomasz; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Christiaens, Olivier; De Pauw, Edwin; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-01-01

    In holometabolous insects the transition from larva to adult requires a complete body reorganization and relies on N-glycosylated proteins. N-glycosylation is an important posttranslational modification that influences protein activity but its impact on the metamorphosis has not been studied yet. Here we used the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, to perform a first comprehensive study on the involvement of the protein N-glycosylation pathway in metamorphosis. The transcript levels for genes encoding N-glycan processing enzymes increased during later developmental stages and, in turn, transition from larva to adult coincided with an enrichment of more extensively modified paucimannose glycans, including fucosylated ones. Blockage of N-glycan attachment resulted in larval mortality, while RNAi of α-glucosidases involved in early N-glycan trimming and quality control disrupted the larva to pupa transition. Additionally, simultaneous knockdown of multiple genes responsible for N-glycan processing towards paucimannose structures revealed their novel roles in pupal appendage formation and adult eclosion. Our findings revealed that, next to hormonal control, insect post-embryonic development and metamorphosis depend on protein N-glycan attachment and efficient N-glycan processing. Consequently, disruption of these processes could be an effective new approach for insect control. PMID:27731363

  11. Protein N-glycosylation in eukaryotic microalgae and its impact on the production of nuclear expressed biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu-Rivet, Elodie; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie-Christine; Vanier, Gaëtan; Ovide, Clément; Burel, Carole; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are currently used for the production of food compounds. Recently, few microalgae species have been investigated as potential biofactories for the production of biopharmaceuticals. Indeed in this context, microalgae are cheap, classified as Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) organisms and can be grown easily. However, problems remain to be solved before any industrial production of microalgae-made biopharmaceuticals. Among them, post-translational modifications of the proteins need to be considered. Especially, N-glycosylation acquired by the secreted recombinant proteins is of major concern since most of the biopharmaceuticals are N-glycosylated and it is well recognized that glycosylation represent one of their critical quality attribute. Therefore, the evaluation of microalgae as alternative cell factory for biopharmaceutical productions thus requires to investigate their N-glycosylation capability in order to determine to what extend it differs from their human counterpart and to determine appropriate strategies for remodeling the microalgae glycosylation into human-compatible oligosaccharides. Here, we review the secreted recombinant proteins which have been successfully produced in microalgae. We also report on recent bioinformatics and biochemical data concerning the structure of glycans N-linked to proteins from various microalgae phyla and comment the consequences on the glycan engineering strategies that may be necessary to render those microalgae-made biopharmaceuticals compatible with human therapy.

  12. Engineer medium and feed for modulating N-glycosylation of recombinant protein production in CHO cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    -glycosylation is crucial, as the structure of N-glycans can largely influence both biological and physicochemical properties of recombinant proteins. Protein N-glycosylation in CHO cell culture can be controlled and tuned by engineering medium, feed, culture process, as well as genetic elements of the cell......Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have become the primary expression system for the production of complex recombinant proteins due to their long-term success in industrial scale production and generating appropriate protein N-glycans similar to that of humans. Control and optimization of protein N...

  13. Comprehensive mapping of protein N-glycosylation in human liver by combining hydrophilic interaction chromatography and hydrazide chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Sun, Zhen; Cheng, Kai; Chen, Rui; Ye, Mingliang; Xu, Bo; Sun, Deguang; Wang, Liming; Liu, Jing; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-03-07

    Although glycoproteomics is greatly developed in recent years, our knowledge about N-glycoproteome of human tissues is still very limited. In this study, we comprehensively mapped the N-glycosylation sites of human liver by combining click maltose-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and the improved hydrazide chemistry. The specificity could be as high as 90% for hydrazide chemistry and 80% for HILIC. Altogether, we identified 14,480 N-glycopeptides matched with N-!P-[S|T|C] sequence motif from human liver, corresponding to 2210 N-glycoproteins and 4783 N-glycosylation sites. These N-glycoproteins are widely involved into different types of biological processes, such as hepatic stellate cell activation and acute phase response of human liver, which all highly associate with the progression of liver diseases. Moreover, the exact N-glycosylation sites of some key-regulating proteins within different human liver physiological processes were also obtained, such as E-cadherin, transforming growth factor beta receptor and 29 members of G protein coupled receptors family.

  14. Modulation of protein phosphorylation, N-glycosylation and Lys-acetylation in grape (Vitis vinifera) mesocarp and exocarp owing to Lobesia botrana infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Braga, Marcella N; Verano-Braga, Thiago; León, Ileana R; Antonacci, Donato; Nogueira, Fábio C S; Thelen, Jay J; Larsen, Martin R; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is an economically important fruit crop that is subject to many types of insect and pathogen attack. To better elucidate the plant response to Lobesia botrana pathogen infection, we initiated a global comparative proteomic study monitoring steady-state protein expression as well as changes in N-glycosylation, phosphorylation, and Lys-acetylation in control and infected mesocarp and exocarp from V. vinifera cv Italia. A multi-parallel, large-scale proteomic approach employing iTRAQ labeling prior to three peptide enrichment techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification of a total of 3059 proteins, 1135 phosphorylation sites, 323 N-linked glycosylation sites and 138 Lys-acetylation sites. Of these, we could identify changes in abundance of 899 proteins. The occupancy of 110 phosphorylation sites, 10 N-glycosylation sites and 20 Lys-acetylation sites differentially changed during L. botrana infection. Sequence consensus analysis for phosphorylation sites showed eight significant motifs, two of which containing up-regulated phosphopeptides (X-G-S-X and S-X-X-D) and two containing down-regulated phosphopeptides (R-X-X-S and S-D-X-E) in response to pathogen infection. Topographical distribution of phosphorylation sites within primary sequences reveal preferential phosphorylation at both the N- and C termini, and a clear preference for C-terminal phosphorylation in response to pathogen infection suggesting induction of region-specific kinase(s). Lys-acetylation analysis confirmed the consensus X-K-Y-X motif previously detected in mammals and revealed the importance of this modification in plant defense. The importance of N-linked protein glycosylation in plant response to biotic stimulus was evident by an up-regulated glycopeptide belonging to the disease resistance response protein 206. This study represents a substantial step toward the understanding of protein and PTMs-mediated plant-pathogen interaction shedding

  15. Modulation of Protein Phosphorylation, N-Glycosylation and Lys-Acetylation in Grape (Vitis vinifera) Mesocarp and Exocarp Owing to Lobesia botrana Infection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Braga, Marcella N.; Verano-Braga, Thiago; León, Ileana R.; Antonacci, Donato; Nogueira, Fábio C. S.; Thelen, Jay J.; Larsen, Martin R.; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is an economically important fruit crop that is subject to many types of insect and pathogen attack. To better elucidate the plant response to Lobesia botrana pathogen infection, we initiated a global comparative proteomic study monitoring steady-state protein expression as well as changes in N-glycosylation, phosphorylation, and Lys-acetylation in control and infected mesocarp and exocarp from V. vinifera cv Italia. A multi-parallel, large-scale proteomic approach employing iTRAQ labeling prior to three peptide enrichment techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification of a total of 3059 proteins, 1135 phosphorylation sites, 323 N-linked glycosylation sites and 138 Lys-acetylation sites. Of these, we could identify changes in abundance of 899 proteins. The occupancy of 110 phosphorylation sites, 10 N-glycosylation sites and 20 Lys-acetylation sites differentially changed during L. botrana infection. Sequence consensus analysis for phosphorylation sites showed eight significant motifs, two of which containing up-regulated phosphopeptides (X-G-S-X and S-X-X-D) and two containing down-regulated phosphopeptides (R-X-X-S and S-D-X-E) in response to pathogen infection. Topographical distribution of phosphorylation sites within primary sequences reveal preferential phosphorylation at both the N- and C termini, and a clear preference for C-terminal phosphorylation in response to pathogen infection suggesting induction of region-specific kinase(s). Lys-acetylation analysis confirmed the consensus X-K-Y-X motif previously detected in mammals and revealed the importance of this modification in plant defense. The importance of N-linked protein glycosylation in plant response to biotic stimulus was evident by an up-regulated glycopeptide belonging to the disease resistance response protein 206. This study represents a substantial step toward the understanding of protein and PTMs-mediated plant-pathogen interaction shedding

  16. Different glycosyltransferases are involved in lipid glycosylation and protein N-glycosylation in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naparstek, Shai; Vinagradov, Evguenii; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-07-01

    Both the lipid and the protein components of biological membranes can be modified by the covalent addition of polysaccharides. Whereas eukaryal and bacterial pathways of lipid and protein glycosylation are relatively well defined, considerably less is known of the parallel processes in Archaea. Recent efforts have identified glycosyltransferases involved in N-glycosylation of the surface-layer glycoprotein of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii. In the present study, the involvement of these same glycosyltransferases in the biosynthesis of Hfx. volcanii glycolipids was considered by performing nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the glycolipid fraction of Hfx. volcanii cells deleted of genes encoding those glycosyltransferases, as well as the oligosaccharyltransferase, AglB. The results reveal that different glycosyltransferases are involved in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycoproteins and glycolipids in Archaea.

  17. N-glycosylation at Asn residues 554 and 566 of E-cadherin affects cell cycle progression through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Zhao; Xiliang Zha; Lidong Sun; Liying Wang; Zhibin Xu; Feng Zhou; Jianmin Su; Jiawei Jin; Yong Yang; Yali Hu

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin, which has a widely acknowledged role in mediating calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion between epithelial cells, also functions as a tumor suppressor. The ectodomain of human E-cadherin contains four potential N-glycosylation sites at Asn residues 554, 566, 618, and 633.We investigated the role of E-cadherin N-glycosylation in cell cycle progression by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed previously that all four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin were N-glycosylated in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Removal of N-glycan at Asn633 dramatically affected E-cadherin stability. In this study we showed that E-cadherin mutant missing N-glycans at Asn554, Asn566 and Asn618 failed to induce cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and to suppress cell proliferation in comparison with wild-type E-cadherin. Moreover, N-glycans at Asn554 and Asn566, but not at Asn618, seemed to be indispensable for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.Removal of N-glycans at either Asn554 or Asn566 of E-cadherin was accompanied with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway. After treatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of the extraceilular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway, wild-type E-cadherin transfected MDA-MB-435 and E-cadherin N-glycosylation-deficient mutant transfected MDA-MB-435 cells had equivalent numbers of cells in G1 phase. These findings implied that N-glycosylation might be crucial for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.

  18. N-glycosylation in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Ivan G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The N-linked glycosylation of secretory and membrane proteins is the most complex posttranslational modification known to occur in eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to play critical roles in modulating protein function. Although this important biological process has been extensively studied in mammals, much less is known about this biosynthetic pathway in plants. The enzymes involved in plant N-glycan biosynthesis and processing are still not well defined and the mechanism of their genetic regulation is almost completely unknown. In this paper we describe our first attempt to understand the N-linked glycosylation mechanism in a plant species by using the data generated by the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST project. The SUCEST database was mined for sugarcane gene products potentially involved in the N-glycosylation pathway. This approach has led to the identification and functional assignment of 90 expressed sequence tag (EST clusters sharing significant sequence similarity with the enzymes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis and processing. The ESTs identified were also analyzed to establish their relative abundance.

  19. Adapting protein solubility by glycosylation. N-glycosylation mutants of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase in salt and organic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tams, J W; Vind, J; Welinder, K G

    1999-07-13

    Protein solubility is a fundamental parameter in biology and biotechnology. In the present study we have constructed and analyzed five mutants of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) with 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6 N-glycosylation sites. All mutants contain Man(x)(GlcNAc)(2) glycans. The peroxidase activity was the same for wild-type CIP and all the glycosylation mutants when measured with the large substrate 2,2'-azino-bis(-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). The solubility of the five CIP mutants showed a linear dependence on the number of carbohydrate residues attached to the protein in buffered solution of both ammonium sulfate (AMS) and acetone, increasing in AMS and decreasing in acetone. Moreover, the change in free energy of solvation appears to be a constant, though with opposite signs in these solvents, giving DeltaDeltaG degrees (sol)=-0.32+/-0.05 kJ/mol per carbohydrate residue in 2.0 M AMS, a value previously obtained comparing ordinary and deglycosylated horseradish peroxidase, and 0. 37+/-0.10 kJ/mol in 60 v/v% acetone.

  20. Post-translational Modification of Extremophilic Proteins: N-glycosylation in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-02

    Conference, Lucca, Italy 2013-Proteins: From birth to death. Jerusalem, Israel 2014-Meeting of the Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology ...it all, trends in microbiology , (11 2012): 512. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2012.08.007 J. Eichler, K. Jarrell, S. Albers. A proposal for the naming of N...Jerry Eichler. Extreme sweetness: protein glycosylation in archaea, Nature Reviews Microbiology , (01 2013): 151. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro2957 Lina

  1. Evaluation of protein N-glycosylation in 2-DE: Erythropoietin as a study case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Llop, E.; Gutiérrez Gallego, R.; Belalcazar, V.; Gerwig, G.J.; Kamerling, J.P.; Segura, J.; Pascual, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The structure, function, and physico-chemical properties of many proteins are determined by PTM, being glycosylation the most complex. This study describes how a combination of typical proteomics methods (2-DE) combines with glycomics strategies (HPLC, MALDI-TOF-MS, exoglycosidases sequencing) to yi

  2. Manual annotation, transcriptional analysis, and protein expression studies reveal novel genes in the agl cluster responsible for N glycosylation in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-05-01

    While Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea are all capable of protein N glycosylation, the archaeal version of this posttranslational modification is the least understood. To redress this imbalance, recent studies of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii have identified a gene cluster encoding the Agl proteins involved in the assembly and attachment of a pentasaccharide to select Asn residues of the surface layer glycoprotein in this species. However, because the automated tools used for rapid annotation of genome sequences, including that of H. volcanii, are not always accurate, a reannotation of the agl cluster was undertaken in order to discover genes not previously recognized. In the present report, reanalysis of the gene cluster that includes aglB, aglE, aglF, aglG, aglI, and aglJ, which are known components of the H. volcanii protein N-glycosylation machinery, was undertaken. Using computer-based tools or visual inspection, together with transcriptional analysis and protein expression approaches, genes encoding AglP, AglQ, and AglR are now described.

  3. CD133 protein N-glycosylation processing contributes to cell surface recognition of the primitive cell marker AC133 epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Anthony B; Blakely, Kim M; Williams, Rashida A; Penttilä, Pier-Andrée; Shukalyuk, Andrey I; Osman, Khan T; Kasimer, Dahlia; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason

    2011-11-25

    The AC133 epitope expressed on the CD133 glycoprotein has been widely used as a cell surface marker of numerous stem cell and cancer stem cell types. It has been recently proposed that posttranslational modification and regulation of CD133 may govern cell surface AC133 recognition. Therefore, we performed a large scale pooled RNA interference (RNAi) screen to identify genes involved in cell surface AC133 expression. Gene hits could be validated at a rate of 70.5% in a secondary assay using an orthogonal RNAi system, demonstrating that our primary RNAi screen served as a powerful genetic screening approach. Within the list of hits from the primary screen, genes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis were significantly enriched as determined by Ingenuity Canonical Pathway analyses. Indeed, inhibiting biosynthesis of the N-glycan precursor using the small molecule tunicamycin or inhibiting its transfer to CD133 by generating N-glycan-deficient CD133 mutants resulted in undetectable cell surface AC133. Among the screen hits involved in N-glycosylation were genes involved in complex N-glycan processing, including the poorly characterized MGAT4C, which we demonstrate to be a positive regulator of cell surface AC133 expression. Our study identifies a set of genes involved in CD133 N-glycosylation as a direct contributing factor to cell surface AC133 recognition and provides biochemical evidence for the function and structure of CD133 N-glycans.

  4. Evolution of protein N-glycosylation process in Golgi apparatus which shapes diversity of protein N-glycan structures in plants, animals and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Hong; Gai, Jiangtao; Tian, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Lv, Yongzhi; Jian, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation (PNG) is crucial for protein folding and enzymatic activities, and has remarkable diversity among eukaryotic species. Little is known of how unique PNG mechanisms arose and evolved in eukaryotes. Here we demonstrate a picture of onset and evolution of PNG components in Golgi apparatus that shaped diversity of eukaryotic protein N-glycan structures, with an emphasis on roles that domain emergence and combination played on PNG evolution. 23 domains were identified from 24 known PNG genes, most of which could be classified into a single clan, indicating a single evolutionary source for the majority of the genes. From 153 species, 4491 sequences containing the domains were retrieved, based on which we analyzed distribution of domains among eukaryotic species. Two domains in GnTV are restricted to specific eukaryotic domains, while 10 domains distribute not only in species where certain unique PNG reactions occur and thus genes harboring these domains are supoosed to be present, but in other ehkaryotic lineages. Notably, two domains harbored by β-1,3 galactosyltransferase, an essential enzyme in forming plant-specific Lea structure, were present in separated genes in fungi and animals, suggesting its emergence as a result of domain shuffling. PMID:28074929

  5. N-glycosylation in Haloferax volcanii: adjusting the sweetness

    OpenAIRE

    Eichler, Jerry; Arbiv, Adi; Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Kaminski, Lina; Kandiba, Lina; Konrad, Zvia

    2013-01-01

    Long believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now known that cells of all three domains of life perform N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of glycans to select target protein asparagine residues. Still, it is only in the last decade that pathways of N-glycosylation in Archaea have been delineated. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins is responsible for the addition of an N-linked pentasaccharide to modified proteins, including the ...

  6. N-glycosylation in Haloferax volcanii: Adjusting the sweetness

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry eEichler; Adi eArbiv; Chen eCohen-Rosenzweig; Lina eKaminski; Lina eKandiba; Zvia eKonrad

    2013-01-01

    Long believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now known that cells of all three domains of life perform N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of glycans to select target protein asparagine residues. Still, it is only in the last decade that pathways of N-glycosylation in Archaea have been delineated. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins is responsible for the addition of an N-linked pentasaccharide to modified proteins, including the ...

  7. N-Glycosylation of the archaellum filament is not important for archaella assembly and motility, although N-Glycosylation is essential for motility in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Birich, Anton; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2015-11-01

    N-Glycosylation is one of the predominant posttranslational modifications, which is found in all three domains of life. N-Glycosylation has been shown to influence many biological aspects of proteins, like protein folding, stability or activity. In this study we demonstrate that the archaellum filament subunit FlaB of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is N-glycosylated. Each of the six predicted N-Glycosylation sites within FlaB are modified with the attachment of an N-glycan. Although, it has been previously shown that N-Glycosylation is essential for motility in S. acidocaldarius, as defects in the N-Glycosylation process resulted in none or reduced motile cells, strains lacking one to all six N-Glycosylation sites within FlaB still remained motile. Deletion of the first five N-Glycosylation sites in FlaB did not significantly affect the motility, whereas removal of all six N-Glycosylation sites reduced motility by about 40%. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of non glycosylated and glycosylated archaellum filament revealed no structural change in length. Therefore N-Glycosylation does not appear to be important for the stability and assembly of the archaellum filament itself, but plays a role in other parts of the archaellum assembly.

  8. Protein glycosylation as an adaptive response in Archaea: growth at different salt concentrations leads to alterations in Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Calo, Doron; Eichler, Jerry

    2012-03-01

    To cope with life in hypersaline environments, halophilic archaeal proteins are enriched in acidic amino acids. This strategy does not, however, offer a response to transient changes in salinity, as would post-translational modifications. To test this hypothesis, N-glycosylation of the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein was compared in cells grown in high (3.4 M NaCl) and low (1.75 M NaCl) salt, as was the glycan bound to dolichol phosphate, the lipid upon which the N-linked glycan is assembled. In high salt, S-layer glycoprotein Asn-13 and Asn-83 are modified by a pentasaccharide, while dolichol phosphate is modified by a tetrasaccharide comprising the first four pentasaccharide residues. When the same targets were considered from cells grown in low salt, substantially less pentasaccharide was detected. At the same time, cells grown at low salinity contain dolichol phosphate modified by a distinct tetrasaccharide absent in cells grown at high salinity. The same tetrasaccharide modified S-layer glycoprotein Asn-498 in cells grown in low salt, whereas no glycan decorated this residue in cells grown in the high-salt medium. Thus, in response to changes in environmental salinity, Hfx. volcanii not only modulates the N-linked glycans decorating the S-layer glycoprotein but also the sites of such post-translational modification.

  9. Structural Context for Protein N-glycosylation in Bacteria: The Structure of PEB3, an Adhesin from Campylobacter Jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangarajan,E.; Bhatia, S.; Watson, D.; Munger, C.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Young, N.

    2007-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is unusual among bacteria in possessing a eukaryotic-like system for N-linked protein glycosylation at Asn residues in sequons of the type Asp/Glu-Xaa-Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr. However, little is known about the structural context of the glycosylated sequons, limiting the design of novel recombinant glycoproteins. To obtain more information on sequon structure, we have determined the crystal structure of the PEB3 (Cj0289c) dimer. PEB3 has the class II periplasmic-binding protein fold, with each monomer having two domains with a ligand-binding site containing citrate located between them, and overall resembles molybdate- and sulfate-binding proteins. The sequon around Asn90 is located within a surface-exposed loop joining two structural elements. The three key residues are well exposed on the surface; hence, they may be accessible to the PglB oligosaccharyltransferase in the folded state.

  10. Role of C6ORF120, an N-glycosylated protein, is implicated in apoptosis of CD4+T lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; QIAO Yong; CHANG Lu-si; XIAO Fan; LU Lian-he; HAO Xiao-hua; ZHANG Ren-wen; WU Hao; WEI Hong-shan

    2011-01-01

    Background Although CD4+ T cell apoptosis and CD8+ T cell responses have been extensively studied during HIV infection,how apoptosis signals being initiated in CD4+ T cells still need to be elucidated.The present study was designed to characterize the function-unknown gene,C6orf120,and elucidates its primary role in tunicamycin-induced CD4+ T apoptosis.Methods The C6orf120 coding sequence was amplified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) total RNA of AIDS patients.The DNA fragment was inserted into the pET-32a expression system,transformed into Escherichia coli,and preparation of C6ORF120 recombinant protein.The magnetic cell separation technology was used to prepare primary CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells.The primary T cells were cultu red at 1 x 106 cells/ml,treated with 0,0.1,1,10,100,and 200 ng/ml of C6orf120 recombinant protein for 48 hours,then harvested for cell cycle and apoptosis analysis.Tunicamycin (0.5 μmol/L) was used to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress in Jurkat cells.The biomarker 78 KDa glucose-regulated protein (GRp78) and growth arrest and DNA damage (GADD) were used to evaluate endoplasmic reticulum stress of Jurkat cells.Results We prepared C6ORF120 recombinant protein and its polyclonal antibody.Immunohistochemical analysis showed that C6orf120 mainly expressed in hepatocytes and cells in germinal center of lymph node.At concentration of 0.1,1,10,100,and 200 ng/ml,C6orf120 recombinant protein could induce apoptosis of Jurkat cells and primary CD4+T cells,and promoting G2 phase of its cell cycle.Western blotting analysis showed that C6ORF120 recombinant protein increased the expression of GRp78 and GADD in Jurkat cells in vitro.Conclusion Our results suggested that C6ORF120 could induce apoptosis of CD4+ T cells,at least in part,mediated with endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  11. AglH, a thermophilic UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase initiating protein N-glycosylation pathway in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, is capable of complementing the eukaryal Alg7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2017-01-01

    AglH, a predicted UDP-GlcNAc-1-phosphate:dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, is initiating the protein N-glycosylation pathway in the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. AglH successfully replaced the endogenous GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity of Alg7 in a conditional lethal Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, in which the first step of the eukaryal protein N-glycosylation process was repressed. This study is one of the few examples of cross-domain complementation demonstrating a conserved polyprenyl phosphate transferase reaction within the eukaryal and archaeal domain like it was demonstrated for Methanococcus voltae (Shams-Eldin et al. 2008). The topology prediction and the alignment of the AglH membrane protein with GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferases from the three domains of life show significant conservation of amino acids within the different proposed cytoplasmic loops. Alanine mutations of selected conserved amino acids in the putative cytoplasmic loops II (D100), IV (F220) and V (F264) demonstrated the importance of these amino acids for cross-domain AlgH activity in in vitro complementation assays in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment interfering directly with the activity of dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferases confirmed the essentiality of N-glycosylation for cell survival.

  12. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Pentameric and Hexameric Human IgM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moh, Edward S. X.; Lin, Chi-Hung; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylation is known to play an important role in IgG antibody structure and function. Polymeric IgM, the largest known antibody in humans, displays five potential N-glycosylation sites on each heavy chain monomer. IgM can exist as a pentamer with a connecting singly N-glycosylated J-chain (with a total of 51 glycosylation sites) or as a hexamer (60 glycosylation sites). In this study, the N-glycosylation of recombinant pentameric and hexameric IgM produced by the same human cell type and culture conditions was site-specifically profiled by RP-LC-CID/ETD-MS/MS using HILIC-enriched tryptic and GluC glycopeptides. The occupancy of all putative N-glycosylation sites on the pentameric and hexameric IgM were able to be determined. Distinct glycosylation differences were observed between each of the five N-linked sites on the IgM heavy chains. While Asn171, Asn332, and Asn395 all had predominantly complex type glycans, differences in glycan branching and sialylation were observed between the sites. Asn563, a high mannose-rich glycosylation site that locates in the center of the IgM polymer, was only approximately 60% occupied in both the pentameric and hexameric IgM forms, with a difference in relative abundance of the glycan structures between the pentamer and hexamer. This study highlights the information obtained by characterization of the site-heterogeneity of a highly glycosylated protein of high molecular mass with quaternary structure, revealing differences that would not be seen by global glycan or deglycosylated peptide profiling.

  13. Surface-exposed glycoproteins of hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 show a common N-glycosylation profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Gianna; Balestrieri, Marco; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Rossi, Mosè; Fiume, Immacolata; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella

    2013-06-07

    Cell surface proteins of hyperthermophilic Archaea actively participate in intercellular communication, cellular uptake, and energy conversion to sustain survival strategies in extreme habitats. Surface (S)-layer glycoproteins, the major component of the S-layers in many archaeal species and the best-characterized prokaryotic glycoproteins, were shown to have a large structural diversity in their glycan compositions. In spite of this, knowledge on glycosylation of proteins other than S-layer proteins in Archaea is quite limited. Here, the N-glycosylation pattern of cell-surface-exposed proteins of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 were analyzed by lectin affinity purification, HPAEC-PAD, and multiple mass spectrometry-based techniques. Detailed analysis of SSO1273, one of the most abundant ABC transporters present in the cell surface fraction of S. solfataricus, revealed a novel glycan structure composed of a branched sulfated heptasaccharide, Hex4(GlcNAc)2 plus sulfoquinovose where Hex is d-mannose and d-glucose. Having one monosaccharide unit more than the glycan of the S-layer glycoprotein of S. acidocaldarius, this is the most complex archaeal glycan structure known today. SSO1273 protein is heavily glycosylated and all 20 theoretical N-X-S/T (where X is any amino acid except proline) consensus sequence sites were confirmed. Remarkably, we show that several other proteins in the surface fraction of S. solfataricus are N-glycosylated by the same sulfated oligosaccharide and we identified 56 N-glycosylation sites in this subproteome.

  14. Identification of AglE, a Second Glycosyltransferase Involved in N Glycosylation of the Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Glycoprotein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Giordano, Assunta; Battaglia, Francesca; Trauner, Andrej; Hitchen, Paul G.; Morris, Howard R.; Dell, Anne; Eichler, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Archaea, like Eukarya and Bacteria, are able to N glycosylate select protein targets. However, in contrast to relatively advanced understanding of the eukaryal N glycosylation process and the information being amassed on the bacterial process, little is known of this posttranslational modification in Archaea. Toward remedying this situation, the present report continues ongoing efforts to identify components involved in the N glycosylation of the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein. By co...

  15. N-glycosylation in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius involves a short dolichol pyrophosphate carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ziqiang; Delago, Antonia; Nußbaum, Phillip; Meyer, Benjamin; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Eichler, Jerry

    2016-09-01

    N-glycosylation is a post-translational modification that occurs across evolution. In the thermoacidophilic archaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, glycoproteins are modified by an N-linked tribranched hexasaccharide reminiscent of the N-glycans assembled in Eukarya. Previously, hexose-bearing dolichol phosphate was detected in a S. acidocaldarius Bligh-Dyer lipid extract. Here, we used a specialized protocol for extracting lipid-linked oligosaccharides to detect a dolichol pyrophosphate bearing the intact hexasaccharide, as well as its biosynthetic intermediates. Furthermore, evidence for N-glycosylation of two S. acidocaldarius proteins by the same hexasaccharide and its derivatives was collected. These findings thus provide novel insight into archaeal N-glycosylation.

  16. N-glycosylation in Haloferax volcanii: Adjusting the sweetness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry eEichler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Long believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now known that cells of all three domains of life perform N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of glycans to select target protein asparagine residues. Still, it is only in the last decade that pathways of N-glycosylation in Archaea have been delineated. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation proteins is responsible for the addition of an N-linked pentasaccharide to modified proteins, including the surface (S-layer glycoprotein, the sole component of the surface layer surrounding the cell. The S-layer glycoprotein N-linked glycosylation profile changes, however, as a function of surrounding salinity. Upon growth at different salt concentrations, the S-layer glycoprotein is either decorated by the N-linked pentasaccharide introduced above or by both this pentasaccharide as well as a tetrasaccharide of distinct composition. Recent efforts have identified Agl5-Agl15 as components of a second Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway responsible for generating the tetrasaccharide attached to S-layer glycoprotein when growth occurs in 1.75 M but not 3.4 M NaCl-containing medium.

  17. N-glycosylation in Haloferax volcanii: adjusting the sweetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry; Arbiv, Adi; Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Kaminski, Lina; Kandiba, Lina; Konrad, Zvia

    2013-12-24

    Long believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now known that cells of all three domains of life perform N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of glycans to select target protein asparagine residues. Still, it is only in the last decade that pathways of N-glycosylation in Archaea have been delineated. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins is responsible for the addition of an N-linked pentasaccharide to modified proteins, including the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein, the sole component of the surface layer surrounding the cell. The S-layer glycoprotein N-linked glycosylation profile changes, however, as a function of surrounding salinity. Upon growth at different salt concentrations, the S-layer glycoprotein is either decorated by the N-linked pentasaccharide introduced above or by both this pentasaccharide as well as a tetrasaccharide of distinct composition. Recent efforts have identified Agl5-Agl15 as components of a second Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway responsible for generating the tetrasaccharide attached to S-layer glycoprotein when growth occurs in 1.75 M but not 3.4 M NaCl-containing medium.

  18. Deciphering a pathway of Halobacterium salinarum N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2015-02-01

    Genomic analysis points to N-glycosylation as being a common posttranslational modification in Archaea. To date, however, pathways of archaeal N-glycosylation have only been described for few species. With this in mind, the similarities of N-linked glycans decorating glycoproteins in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii and Halobacterium salinarum directed a series of bioinformatics, genetic, and biochemical experiments designed to describe that Hbt. salinarum pathway responsible for biogenesis of one of the two N-linked oligosaccharides described in this species. As in Hfx. volcanii, where agl (archaeal glycosylation) genes that encode proteins responsible for the assembly and attachment of a pentasaccharide to target protein Asn residues are clustered in the genome, Hbt. salinarum also contains a group of clustered homologous genes (VNG1048G-VNG1068G). Introduction of these Hbt. salinarum genes into Hfx. volcanii mutant strains deleted of the homologous sequence restored the lost activity. Moreover, transcription of the Hbt. salinarum genes in the native host, as well as in vitro biochemical confirmation of the predicted functions of several of the products of these genes provided further support for assignments made following bioinformatics and genetic experiments. Based on the results obtained in this study, the first description of an N-glycosylation pathway in Hbt. salinarum is offered.

  19. Defining the Topology of the N-Glycosylation Pathway in the Halophilic Archaeon Haloferax volcanii▿

    OpenAIRE

    Plavner, Noa; Eichler, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    In Eukarya, N glycosylation involves the actions of enzymes working on both faces of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The steps of bacterial N glycosylation, in contrast, transpire essentially on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, with only transfer of the assembled glycan to the target protein occurring on the external surface of the cell. For Archaea, virtually nothing is known about the topology of enzymes involved in assembling those glycans that are subsequently N linked to ...

  20. Understanding of decreased sialylation of Fc-fusion protein in hyperosmotic recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell culture: N-glycosylation gene expression and N-linked glycan antennary profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Jeong, Yeong Ran; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2017-03-07

    To understand the effects of hyperosmolality on protein glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing the Fc-fusion protein were cultivated in hyperosmolar medium resulting from adding NaCl (415 mOsm/kg). The hyperosmotic culture showed increased specific Fc-fusion protein productivity (qFc ) but a decreased proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of the Fc-fusion protein. The intracellular and extracellular sialidase activities in the hyperosmotic cultures were similar to those in the control culture (314 mOsm/kg), indicating that reduced sialylation of Fc-fusion protein at hyperosmolality was not due to elevated sialidase activity. Expression of 52 N-glycosylation-related genes was assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which provides a direct digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. After three days of hyperosmotic culture, nine genes (ugp, slc35a3, slc35d2, gcs1, manea, mgat2, mgat5b, b4galt3, and b4galt4) were differentially expressed over 1.5-fold of the control, and all these genes were down-regulated. N-linked glycan analysis by anion exchange and hydrophilic interaction HPLC showed that the proportion of highly sialylated (di-, tri-, tetra-) and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans was significantly decreased upon hyperosmotic culture. Addition of betaine, an osmoprotectant, to the hyperosmotic culture significantly increased the proportion of highly sialylated and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans (P ≤ 0.05), while it increased the expression of the N-glycan branching/antennary genes (mgat2 and mgat4b). Thus, decreased expression of the genes with roles in the N-glycan biosynthesis pathway correlated with reduced sialic acid content of Fc-fusion protein caused by hyperosmolar conditions. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effects of hyperosmolality on N-glycosylation, especially sialylation, in rCHO cells. This article is protected

  1. Role of N-glycosylation in renal betaine transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Burckhardt, Birgitta C; Joos, Friedericke; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Forrest, Lucy R; Kempson, Stephen A; Ziegler, Christine

    2015-09-01

    The osmolyte and folding chaperone betaine is transported by the renal Na(+)-coupled GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) symporter BGT-1 (betaine/GABA transporter 1), a member of the SLC6 (solute carrier 6) family. Under hypertonic conditions, the transcription, translation and plasma membrane (PM) insertion of BGT-1 in kidney cells are significantly increased, resulting in elevated betaine and GABA transport. Re-establishing isotonicity involves PM depletion of BGT-1. The molecular mechanism of the regulated PM insertion of BGT-1 during changes in osmotic stress is unknown. In the present study, we reveal a link between regulated PM insertion and N-glycosylation. Based on homology modelling, we identified two sites (Asn(171) and Asn(183)) in the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of BGT-1, which were investigated with respect to trafficking, insertion and transport by immunogold-labelling, electron microscopy (EM), mutagenesis and two-electrode voltage clamp measurements in Xenopus laevis oocytes and uptake of radiolabelled substrate into MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney) and HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) cells. Trafficking and PM insertion of BGT-1 was clearly promoted by N-glycosylation in both oocytes and MDCK cells. Moreover, association with N-glycans at Asn(171) and Asn(183) contributed equally to protein activity and substrate affinity. Substitution of Asn(171) and Asn(183) by aspartate individually caused no loss of BGT-1 activity, whereas the double mutant was inactive, suggesting that N-glycosylation of at least one of the sites is required for function. Substitution by alanine or valine at either site caused a dramatic loss in transport activity. Furthermore, in MDCK cells PM insertion of N183D was no longer regulated by osmotic stress, highlighting the impact of N-glycosylation in regulation of this SLC6 transporter.

  2. Mgat1-dependent N-glycosylation of membrane components primes Drosophila melanogaster blood cells for the cellular encapsulation response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Mortimer

    Full Text Available In nature, larvae of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster are commonly infected by parasitoid wasps, and so have evolved a robust immune response to counter wasp infection. In this response, fly immune cells form a multilayered capsule surrounding the wasp egg, leading to death of the parasite. Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying this encapsulation response are conserved with human immune responses. Our findings suggest that protein N-glycosylation, a common protein post-translational modification of human immune proteins, may be one such conserved mechanism. We found that membrane proteins on Drosophila immune cells are N-glycosylated in a temporally specific manner following wasp infection. Furthermore we have identified mutations in eight genes encoding enzymes of the N-glycosylation pathway that decrease fly resistance to wasp infection. More specifically, loss of protein N-glycosylation in immune cells following wasp infection led to the formation of defective capsules, which disintegrated over time and were thereby unsuccessful at preventing wasp development. Interestingly, we also found that one species of Drosophila parasitoid wasp, Leptopilina victoriae, targets protein N-glycosylation as part of its virulence mechanism, and that overexpression of an N-glycosylation enzyme could confer resistance against this wasp species to otherwise susceptible flies. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that protein N-glycosylation is a key player in Drosophila cellular encapsulation and suggest that this response may provide a novel model to study conserved roles of protein glycosylation in immunity.

  3. N-Glycosylation Is Important for Proper Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Stability and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Adi; Eichler, Jerry

    2017-03-15

    N-Glycosylation, the covalent linkage of glycans to select Asn residues of target proteins, is an almost universal posttranslational modification in archaea. However, whereas roles for N-glycosylation have been defined in eukarya and bacteria, the function of archaeal N-glycosylation remains unclear. Here, the impact of perturbed N-glycosylation on the structure and physiology of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii was considered. Cryo-electron microscopy was used to examine right-side-out membrane vesicles prepared from cells of a parent strain and from strains lacking genes encoding glycosyltransferases involved in assembling the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the surface layer (S-layer) glycoprotein, the sole component of the S-layer surrounding H. volcanii cells. Whereas a regularly repeating S-layer covered the entire surface of vesicles prepared from parent strain cells, vesicles from the mutant cells were only partially covered. To determine whether such N-glycosylation-related effects on S-layer assembly also affected cell function, the secretion of a reporter protein was addressed in the parent and N-glycosylation mutant strains. Compromised S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation resulted in impaired transfer of the reporter past the S-layer and into the growth medium. Finally, an assessment of S-layer glycoprotein susceptibility to added proteases in the mutants revealed that in cells lacking AglD, which is involved in adding the final pentasaccharide sugar, a distinct S-layer glycoprotein conformation was assumed in which the N-terminal region was readily degraded. Perturbed N-glycosylation thus affects S-layer glycoprotein folding. These findings suggest that H. volcanii could adapt to changes in its surroundings by modulating N-glycosylation so as to affect S-layer architecture and function.IMPORTANCE Long held to be a process unique to eukaryotes, it is now accepted that bacteria and archaea also perform N-glycosylation, namely, the covalent

  4. Modulation of protein phosphorylation, N-glycosylation and Lys-acetylation in grape (Vitis vinifera) mesocarp and exocarp owing to Lobesia botrana infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo-Braga, Marcella N; Verano-Braga, Thiago; León, Ileana R

    2012-01-01

    to pathogen infection. Topographical distribution of phosphorylation sites within primary sequences reveal preferential phosphorylation at both the N- and C termini, and a clear preference for C-terminal phosphorylation in response to pathogen infection suggesting induction of region-specific kinase(s). Lys...... resistance response protein 206. This study represents a substantial step toward the understanding of protein and PTMs-mediated plant-pathogen interaction shedding light on the mechanisms underlying the grape infection....

  5. Role of N-glycosylation sites and CXC motifs in trafficking of Medicago trunculata Nod Factor Perception protein to the plasma membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, B.; Klaus-Heisen, D.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Hervé, M.; Camut, S.; Auriac, M.C.; Gasciolli, V.; Nurisso, A.; Gadella, T.W.; Cullimore, J.

    2012-01-01

    The lysin motif receptor like kinase, NFP, is a key protein in the legume Medicago truncatula for the perception of lipochitooligosaccharidic Nod Factors, which are secreted bacterial signals essential for establishing the nitrogen-fixing legume-rhizobia symbiosis. Predicted structural and genetic a

  6. Phylogenetic- and genome-derived insight into the evolution of N-glycosylation in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Lina; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor N; Allers, Thorsten; Gophna, Uri; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-08-01

    N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of oligosaccharides to target protein Asn residues, is a post-translational modification that occurs in all three domains of life. In Archaea, the N-linked glycans that decorate experimentally characterized glycoproteins reveal a diversity in composition and content unequaled by their bacterial or eukaryal counterparts. At the same time, relatively little is known of archaeal N-glycosylation pathways outside of a handful of model strains. To gain insight into the distribution and evolutionary history of the archaeal version of this universal protein-processing event, 168 archaeal genome sequences were scanned for the presence of aglB, encoding the known archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase, an enzyme key to N-glycosylation. Such analysis predicts the presence of AglB in 166 species, with some species seemingly containing multiple versions of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the events leading to aglB duplication occurred at various points during archaeal evolution. In many cases, aglB is found as part of a cluster of putative N-glycosylation genes. The presence, arrangement and nucleotide composition of genes in aglB-based clusters in five species of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax points to lateral gene transfer as contributing to the evolution of archaeal N-glycosylation.

  7. The Patterns of Coevolution in Clade B HIV Envelope's N-Glycosylation Sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Garimalla

    Full Text Available The co-evolution of the potential N-glycosylation sites of HIV Clade B gp120 was mapped onto the coevolution network of the protein structure using mean field direct coupling analysis (mfDCA. This was possible for 327 positions with suitable entropy and gap content. Indications of pressure to preserve the evolving glycan shield are seen as well as strong dependencies between the majority of the potential N-glycosylation sites and the rest of the structure. These findings indicate that although mainly an adaptation against antibody neutralization, the evolving glycan shield is structurally related to the core polypeptide, which, thus, is also under pressure to reflect the changes in the N-glycosylation. The map we propose fills the gap in previous attempts to tease out sequon evolution by providing a more general molecular context. Thus, it will help design strategies guiding HIV gp120 evolution in a rational way.

  8. The Patterns of Coevolution in Clade B HIV Envelope's N-Glycosylation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimalla, Swetha; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Pashov, Anastas D.

    2015-01-01

    The co-evolution of the potential N-glycosylation sites of HIV Clade B gp120 was mapped onto the coevolution network of the protein structure using mean field direct coupling analysis (mfDCA). This was possible for 327 positions with suitable entropy and gap content. Indications of pressure to preserve the evolving glycan shield are seen as well as strong dependencies between the majority of the potential N-glycosylation sites and the rest of the structure. These findings indicate that although mainly an adaptation against antibody neutralization, the evolving glycan shield is structurally related to the core polypeptide, which, thus, is also under pressure to reflect the changes in the N-glycosylation. The map we propose fills the gap in previous attempts to tease out sequon evolution by providing a more general molecular context. Thus, it will help design strategies guiding HIV gp120 evolution in a rational way. PMID:26110648

  9. Quantification of the N-glycosylated secretome by super-SILAC during breast cancer progression and in human blood Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boersema, P.J.; Geiger, T.; Wiśniewski, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    that are representative of different stages of breast cancer development by specifically capturing N-glycosylated peptides using the N-glyco FASP technology. For accurate quantification we developed a super-SILAC mix from several labeled breast cancer cell lines and used it as an internal standard for all samples....... In total, 1398 unique N-glycosylation sites were identified and quantified. Enriching for N-glycosylated peptides focused the analysis on classically secreted and membrane proteins. N-glycosylated secretome profiles correctly clustered the different cell lines to their respective cancer stage, suggesting...... that biologically relevant differences were detected. Five different profiles of glycoprotein dynamics during cancer development were detected, and they contained several proteins with known roles in breast cancer. We then used the super-SILAC mix in plasma, which led to the quantification of a large number...

  10. Glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases in Archaea: putative components of the N-glycosylation pathway in the third domain of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidovich, Hilla; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-11-01

    The ability of Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea to perform N-glycosylation underlies the importance and possible antiquity of this post-translational protein modification. However, in contrast to the relatively well-studied eukaryal and bacterial pathways, the archaeal N-glycosylation process is less understood. To remedy this disparity, the following study has examined 56 available archaeal genomes with the aim of identifying glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases, including those putatively catalyzing this post-translational processing event. This analysis reveals that while oligosaccharyltransferases, central components of the N-glycosylation pathway, are found across the range of archaeal phenotypes, the N-glycosylation machinery of hyperthermophilic Archaea may well rely on fewer components than do the parallel systems of nonhyperthermophilic Archaea. Moreover, genes encoding predicted glycosyltransferases of hyperthermophilic Archaea tend to be far more scattered within the genome than is the case with nonhyperthermophilic species, where putative glycosyltransferase genes are often clustered around identified oligosaccharyltransferase-encoding sequences.

  11. Analysis of SCAP N-glycosylation and Trafficking in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chunming; Guo, Jeffrey Yunhua; Geng, Feng; Wu, Xiaoning; Cheng, Xiang; Li, Qiyue; Guo, Deliang

    2016-11-08

    Elevated lipogenesis is a common characteristic of cancer and metabolic diseases. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), a family of membrane-bound transcription factors controlling the expression of genes important for the synthesis of cholesterol, fatty acids and phospholipids, are frequently upregulated in these diseases. In the process of SREBP nuclear translocation, SREBP-cleavage activating protein (SCAP) plays a central role in the trafficking of SREBP from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi and in subsequent proteolysis activation. Recently, we uncovered that glucose-mediated N-glycosylation of SCAP is a prerequisite condition for the exit of SCAP/SREBP from the ER and movement to the Golgi. N-glycosylation stabilizes SCAP and directs SCAP/SREBP trafficking. Here, we describe a protocol for the isolation of membrane fractions in human cells and for the preparation of the samples for the detection of SCAP N-glycosylation and total protein by using western blot. We further provide a method to monitor SCAP trafficking by using confocal microscopy. This protocol is appropriate for the investigation of SCAP N-glycosylation and trafficking in mammalian cells.

  12. Attenuation of N-glycosylation causes polarity and adhesion defects in the C. elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Julia; Spang, Anne

    2017-04-01

    The Caenorhabditiselegans early embryo is highly polarized, requiring sequestration of cytoplasmic polarity factors at the plasma membrane. This compartmentalization aids asymmetric distribution of lipids and proteins, which is partially responsible for the fates of the daughter cells. Since most plasma membrane proteins are glycosylated, we determined the effect of attenuation of N-glycosylation on cell polarity. While polarity establishment was not perturbed, the size difference between the two cells formed in first cell division (AB and P1) was more variable in embryos with reduced N-glycosylation than in the mock-treated embryos. In addition, among other deficiencies, we observed spindle orientation defects in two-cell embryos. Moreover, cell-cell adhesion was specifically lost at the two-cell stage when N-glycosylation was reduced. This loss-of-adhesion phenotype was rescued by interfering with polarity establishment, indicating that polarity establishment enforces plasma membrane compartmentalization. Consistent with this idea, the decreased plasma membrane levels of the adhesion proteins E-cadherin and MAGI-1 in ribo-1(RNAi) embryos were restored in the absence of functional PAR-2. Our data suggest a general role for N-glycosylation in plasma membrane compartmentalization and cell polarity.

  13. The role of N-glycosylation in kiwi allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Arandia, María; Murua-García, Amaya; Palacin, Aranzazu; Tordesillas, Leticia; Gómez-Casado, Cristina; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Ramos, Tania; Canto, Gabriela; Blanco, Carlos; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa; Pacios, Luis F; Díaz Perales, Araceli

    2014-05-01

    The physical, biochemical, and immunological characteristics of plant allergens have been widely studied, but no definite conclusion has been reached about what actually makes a protein an allergen. In this sense, N-glycosylation is an exclusive characteristic of plant allergens not present in mammals and it could be implied in allergenic sensitization. With this aim, we evaluated and compared the allergenic activity of the protein fraction and the N-glycan fraction of the thaumatin-like protein and the main kiwi allergen, Act d 2. The natural allergen, Act d 2, was deglycosylated by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatment; the N-glycan fraction was obtained by extended treatment with proteinase K. N-glycan- and protein- fractions were recognized by specific IgE of kiwi-allergic patients. By contrast, the sugar moiety showed a reduced capacity to activate basophils and T cells, but not dendritic cells derived from patients' monocytes. Related to this, the production of cytokines such as IL6 and IL10 was increased by the incubation of dendritic cells with sugar moiety. Thus, the sugar moiety plays a significant role in sensitization, inducing the activation of antigen-presenting cells, but it is the protein fraction that is responsible for the allergic reactions.

  14. N-Glycosylation of cholera toxin B subunit: serendipity for novel plant-made vaccines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eMatoba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The non-toxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB has attracted considerable interests from vaccinologists due to strong mucosal immunomodulatory effects and potential utility as a vaccine scaffold for heterologous antigens. Along with other conventional protein expression systems, various plant species have been used as recombinant production hosts for CTB and its fusion proteins. However, it has recently become clear that the protein is N-glycosylated within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells – a eukaryotic post-translational modification that is not present in native CTB. While functionally active aglycosylated variants have been successfully engineered to circumvent potential safety and regulatory issues related to glycosylation, this modification may actually provide advantageous characteristics to the protein as a vaccine platform. Based on data from our recent studies, I discuss the unique features of N-glycosylated CTB produced in plants for the development of novel vaccines.

  15. N-Glycosylation of Cholera Toxin B Subunit: Serendipity for Novel Plant-Made Vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The non-toxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) has attracted considerable interests from vaccinologists due to strong mucosal immunomodulatory effects and potential utility as a vaccine scaffold for heterologous antigens. Along with other conventional protein expression systems, various plant species have been used as production hosts for CTB and its fusion proteins. However, it has recently become clear that the protein is N-glycosylated within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells-a eukaryotic post-translational modification that is not present in native CTB. While functionally active aglycosylated variants have been successfully engineered to circumvent potential safety and regulatory issues related to glycosylation, this modification may actually provide advantageous characteristics to the protein as a vaccine platform. Based on data from our recent studies, I discuss the unique features of N-glycosylated CTB produced in plants for the development of novel vaccines.

  16. N-Glycosylation of Cholera Toxin B Subunit: Serendipity for Novel Plant-Made Vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The non-toxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) has attracted considerable interests from vaccinologists due to strong mucosal immunomodulatory effects and potential utility as a vaccine scaffold for heterologous antigens. Along with other conventional protein expression systems, various plant species have been used as production hosts for CTB and its fusion proteins. However, it has recently become clear that the protein is N-glycosylated within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells—a eukaryotic post-translational modification that is not present in native CTB. While functionally active aglycosylated variants have been successfully engineered to circumvent potential safety and regulatory issues related to glycosylation, this modification may actually provide advantageous characteristics to the protein as a vaccine platform. Based on data from our recent studies, I discuss the unique features of N-glycosylated CTB produced in plants for the development of novel vaccines. PMID:26732492

  17. Genes Involved in the Endoplasmic Reticulum N-Glycosylation Pathway of the Red Microalga Porphyridium sp.: A Bioinformatic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshrat Levy-Ontman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available N-glycosylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications that influence protein polymorphism, including protein structures and their functions. Although this important biological process has been extensively studied in mammals, only limited knowledge exists regarding glycosylation in algae. The current research is focused on the red microalga Porphyridium sp., which is a potentially valuable source for various applications, such as skin therapy, food, and pharmaceuticals. The enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and processing of N-glycans remain undefined in this species, and the mechanism(s of their genetic regulation is completely unknown. In this study, we describe our pioneering attempt to understand the endoplasmic reticulum N-Glycosylation pathway in Porphyridium sp., using a bioinformatic approach. Homology searches, based on sequence similarities with genes encoding proteins involved in the ER N-glycosylation pathway (including their conserved parts were conducted using the TBLASTN function on the algae DNA scaffold contigs database. This approach led to the identification of 24 encoded-genes implicated with the ER N-glycosylation pathway in Porphyridium sp. Homologs were found for almost all known N-glycosylation protein sequences in the ER pathway of Porphyridium sp.; thus, suggesting that the ER-pathway is conserved; as it is in other organisms (animals, plants, yeasts, etc..

  18. Deciphering a pathway of Halobacterium salinarum N-glycosylation

    OpenAIRE

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analysis points to N-glycosylation as being a common posttranslational modification in Archaea. To date, however, pathways of archaeal N-glycosylation have only been described for few species. With this in mind, the similarities of N-linked glycans decorating glycoproteins in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii and Halobacterium salinarum directed a series of bioinformatics, genetic, and biochemical experiments designed to describe that Hbt. salinarum pathway responsible for biogenesis...

  19. Different routes to the same ending: comparing the N-glycosylation processes of Haloferax volcanii and Haloarcula marismortui, two halophilic archaea from the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Eichler, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent insight into the N-glycosylation pathway of the haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii, is helping to bridge the gap between our limited understanding of the archaeal version of this universal post-translational modification and the better-described eukaryal and bacterial processes. To delineate as yet undefined steps of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway, a comparative approach was taken with the initial characterization of N-glycosylation in Haloarcula marismortui, a second haloarchaeon also originating from the Dead Sea. While both species decorate the reporter glycoprotein, the S-layer glycoprotein, with the same N-linked pentasaccharide and employ dolichol phosphate as lipid glycan carrier, species-specific differences in the two N-glycosylation pathways exist. Specifically, Har. marismortui first assembles the complete pentasaccharide on dolichol phosphate and only then transfers the glycan to the target protein, as in the bacterial N-glycosylation pathway. In contrast, Hfx. volcanii initially transfers the first four pentasaccharide subunits from a common dolichol phosphate carrier to the target protein and only then delivers the final pentasaccharide subunit from a distinct dolichol phosphate to the N-linked tetrasaccharide, reminiscent of what occurs in eukaryal N-glycosylation. This study further indicates the extraordinary diversity of N-glycosylation pathways in Archaea, as compared with the relatively conserved parallel processes in Eukarya and Bacteria. PMID:21815949

  20. Different routes to the same ending: comparing the N-glycosylation processes of Haloferax volcanii and Haloarcula marismortui, two halophilic archaea from the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Eichler, Jerry

    2011-09-01

    Recent insight into the N-glycosylation pathway of the haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii, is helping to bridge the gap between our limited understanding of the archaeal version of this universal post-translational modification and the better-described eukaryal and bacterial processes. To delineate as yet undefined steps of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway, a comparative approach was taken with the initial characterization of N-glycosylation in Haloarcula marismortui, a second haloarchaeon also originating from the Dead Sea. While both species decorate the reporter glycoprotein, the S-layer glycoprotein, with the same N-linked pentasaccharide and employ dolichol phosphate as lipid glycan carrier, species-specific differences in the two N-glycosylation pathways exist. Specifically, Har. marismortui first assembles the complete pentasaccharide on dolichol phosphate and only then transfers the glycan to the target protein, as in the bacterial N-glycosylation pathway. In contrast, Hfx. volcanii initially transfers the first four pentasaccharide subunits from a common dolichol phosphate carrier to the target protein and only then delivers the final pentasaccharide subunit from a distinct dolichol phosphate to the N-linked tetrasaccharide, reminiscent of what occurs in eukaryal N-glycosylation. This study further indicates the extraordinary diversity of N-glycosylation pathways in Archaea, as compared with the relatively conserved parallel processes in Eukarya and Bacteria.

  1. Differential dependence on N-glycosylation of anthrax toxin receptors CMG2 and TEM8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Friebe

    Full Text Available ANTXR 1 and 2, also known as TEM8 and CMG2, are two type I membrane proteins, which have been extensively studied for their role as anthrax toxin receptors, but with a still elusive physiological function. Here we have analyzed the importance of N-glycosylation on folding, trafficking and ligand binding of these closely related proteins. We find that TEM8 has a stringent dependence on N-glycosylation. The presence of at least one glycan on each of its two extracellular domains, the vWA and Ig-like domains, is indeed necessary for efficient trafficking to the cell surface. In the absence of any N-linked glycans, TEM8 fails to fold correctly and is recognized by the ER quality control machinery. Expression of N-glycosylation mutants reveals that CMG2 is less vulnerable to sugar loss. The absence of N-linked glycans in one of the extracellular domains indeed has little impact on folding, trafficking or receptor function of the wild type protein expressed in tissue culture cells. N-glycans do, however, seem required in primary fibroblasts from human patients. Here, the presence of N-linked sugars increases the tolerance to mutations in cmg2 causing the rare genetic disease Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome. It thus appears that CMG2 glycosylation provides a buffer towards genetic variation by promoting folding of the protein in the ER lumen.

  2. Defining the topology of the N-glycosylation pathway in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavner, Noa; Eichler, Jerry

    2008-12-01

    In Eukarya, N glycosylation involves the actions of enzymes working on both faces of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The steps of bacterial N glycosylation, in contrast, transpire essentially on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, with only transfer of the assembled glycan to the target protein occurring on the external surface of the cell. For Archaea, virtually nothing is known about the topology of enzymes involved in assembling those glycans that are subsequently N linked to target proteins on the external surface of the cell. To remedy this situation, subcellular localization and topology predictive algorithms, protease accessibility, and immunoblotting, together with cysteine modification following site-directed mutagenesis, were enlisted to define the topology of Haloferax volcanii proteins experimentally proven to participate in the N-glycosylation process. AglJ and AglD, involved in the earliest and latest stages, respectively, of assembly of the pentasaccharide decorating the H. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein, were shown to present their soluble N-terminal domain, likely containing the putative catalytic site of each enzyme, to the cytosol. The same holds true for Alg5-B, Dpm1-A, and Mpg1-D, proteins putatively involved in this posttranslational event. The results thus point to the assembly of the pentasaccharide linked to certain Asn residues of the H. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein as occurring within the cell.

  3. Evaluation of Different N-Glycopeptide Enrichment Methods for N-Glycosylation Sites Mapping in Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengqian; Ye, Zilu; Xue, Peng; Shu, Qingbo; Zhou, Yue; Ji, Yanlong; Fu, Ying; Wang, Jifeng; Yang, Fuquan

    2016-09-01

    N-Glycosylation of proteins plays a critical role in many biological pathways. Because highly heterogeneous N-glycopeptides are present in biological sources, the enrichment procedure is a crucial step for mass spectrometry analysis. Five enrichment methods, including IP-ZIC-HILIC, hydrazide chemistry, lectin affinity, ZIC-HILIC-FA, and TiO2 affinity were evaluated and compared in the study of mapping N-glycosylation sites in mouse brain. On the basis of our results, the identified N-glycosylation sites were 1891, 1241, 891, 869, and 710 and the FDR values were 3.29, 5.62, 9.54, 9.54, and 20.02%, respectively. Therefore, IP-ZIC-HILIC enrichment method displayed the highest sensitivity and specificity. In this work, we identified a total of 3446 unique glycosylation sites conforming to the N-glycosylation consensus motif (N-X-T/S/C; X ≠ P) with (18)O labeling in 1597 N-glycoproteins. N-glycosylation site information was used to confirm or correct the transmembrane topology of the 57 novel transmembrane N-glycoproteins.

  4. Modification of N-glycosylation sites allows secretion of bacterial chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Elizabeth M; Fyfe, Ian; Gardiner, Sonya; Li, Li; Warren, Philippa; Fawcett, James W; Keynes, Roger J; Rogers, John H

    2010-01-15

    Although many eukaryotic proteins have been secreted by transfected bacterial cells, little is known about how a bacterial protein is treated as it passes through the secretory pathway when expressed in a eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotic N-glycosylation system could interfere with folding and secretion of prokaryotic proteins whose sequence has not been adapted for glycosylation in structurally appropriate locations. Here we show that such interference does indeed occur for chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris, and can be overcome by eliminating potential N-glycosylation sites. Chondroitinase ABC was heavily glycosylated when expressed in mammalian cells or in a mammalian translation system, and this process prevented secretion of functional enzyme. Directed mutagenesis of selected N-glycosylation sites allowed efficient secretion of active chondroitinase. As these proteoglycans are known to inhibit regeneration of axons in the mammalian central nervous system, the modified chondroitinase gene is a potential tool for gene therapy to promote neural regeneration, ultimately in human spinal cord injury.

  5. Interaction of FAM5C with UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGGT1): Implication of N-glycosylation in FAM5C secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yuya; Fujita, Hidenobu; Horibe, Sayo; Sato, Junya; Minami, Satomi; Kobayashi, Miwako; Matsuoka, Ichiro; Sasaki, Naoto; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2017-03-27

    N-glycosylation of proteins is important for protein folding and function. We have recently reported that FAM5C/BRINP3 contributes to the tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). However, regulatory mechanism of the FAM5C biosynthesis is poorly understood. Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed the interaction of FAM5C with UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGGT1), a glycoprotein folding-sensor enzyme. FAM5C ectopically expressed in HEK293 cells was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and co-localized with endogenously expressed UGGT1. Molecular size of FAM5C was reduced by treatment with N-glycosidase F and in FAM5C-expressing cells cultured in the presence of the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin. FAM5C was secreted by the cells and the secretion of FAM5C was blocked by tunicamycin. Among six potential N-glycosylation sites, the potential site at Asn(168) was not N-glycosylated, and Asn(337), Asn(456), Asn(562), Asn(609), and Asn(641) mutants were poorly secreted by the cells. These results demonstrated that FAM5C is an N-glycosylated protein and N-glycosylation is necessary for the secretion of FAM5C.

  6. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  7. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins in legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eBattaglia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirms the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions.

  8. Characterization of N-glycosylation consensus sequences in the Kv3.1 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Natasha L; Corey, Melissa J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2006-07-01

    N-Glycosylation is a cotranslational and post-translational process of proteins that may influence protein folding, maturation, stability, trafficking, and consequently cell surface expression of functional channels. Here we have characterized two consensus N-glycosylation sequences of a voltage-gated K+ channel (Kv3.1). Glycosylation of Kv3.1 protein from rat brain and infected Sf9 cells was demonstrated by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Digestion of total brain membranes with peptide N glycosidase F (PNGase F) produced a much faster-migrating Kv3.1 immunoband than that of undigested brain membranes. To demonstrate N-glycosylation of wild-type Kv3.1 in Sf9 cells, cells were treated with tunicamycin. Also, partially purified proteins were digested with either PNGase F or endoglycosidase H. Attachment of simple-type oligosaccharides at positions 220 and 229 was directly shown by single (N229Q and N220Q) and double (N220Q/N229Q) Kv3.1 mutants. Functional measurements and membrane fractionation of infected Sf9 cells showed that unglycosylated Kv3.1s were transported to the plasma membrane. Unitary conductance of N220Q/N229Q was similar to that of the wild-type Kv3.1. However, whole cell currents of N220Q/N229Q channels had slower activation rates, and a slight positive shift in voltage dependence compared to wild-type Kv3.1. The voltage dependence of channel activation for N229Q and N220Q was much like that for N220Q/N229Q. These results demonstrate that the S1-S2 linker is topologically extracellular, and that N-glycosylation influences the opening of the voltage-dependent gate of Kv3.1. We suggest that occupancy of the sites is critical for folding and maturation of the functional Kv3.1 at the cell surface.

  9. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.

    2008-01-01

    PAI approach which takes into account the number of sequenced peptides per protein. The values of abundance are within a broad range and accurately reflect independently measured copy numbers per cell. As expected, the most abundant proteins were those involved in protein synthesis, most notably ribosomal...... sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed em...... protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion: Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work represent the most complete study of protein abundance in a bacterial cell so far. We show significant associations between the abundance of a protein and its...

  10. N-Glycosylation of Human R-Spondin 1 Is Required for Efficient Secretion and Stability but Not for Its Heparin Binding Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Fang Chang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available R-spondin 1 (Rspo1 plays an essential role in stem cell biology by potentiating Wnt signaling activity. Despite the fact that Rspo1 holds therapeutic potential for a number of diseases, its biogenesis is not fully elucidated. All Rspo proteins feature two amino-terminal furin-like repeats, which are responsible for Wnt signal potentiation, and a thrombospondin type 1 (TSR1 domain that can provide affinity towards heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Using chemical inhibitors, deglycosylase and site-directed mutagenesis, we found that human Rspo1 and Rspo3 are both N-glycosylated at N137, a site near the C-terminus of the furin repeat 2 domain, and Rspo2 is N-glycosylated at N160, a position near the N-terminus of TSR1 domain. Elimination of N-glycosylation at these sites affects their accumulation in media but have no effect on the ability towards heparin. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site to Rspo2 mutant at the position homologous to N137 in Rspo1 restored full glycosylation and rescued the accumulation defect of nonglycosylated Rspo2 mutant in media. Similar effect can be observed in the N137 Rspo1 or Rspo3 mutant engineered with Rspo2 N-glycosylation site. The results highlight the importance of N-glycosylation at these two positions in efficient folding and secretion of Rspo family. Finally, we further showed that human Rspo1 is subjected to endoplasmic reticulum (ER quality control in N-glycan-dependent manner. While N-glycan of Rspo1 plays a role in its intracellular stability, it had little effect on secreted Rspo1. Our findings provide evidence for the critical role of N-glycosylation in the biogenesis of Rspo1.

  11. Ferritin acts as the most abundant binding protein for snowdrop lectin in the midgut of rice brown planthoppers (Nilaparvata lugens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Foissac, X; Carss, A; Gatehouse, A M; Gatehouse, J A

    2000-04-01

    The mannose-specific snowdrop lectin [Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)] displays toxicity to the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. A 26kDa GNA-binding polypeptide from N. lugens midgut was identified by lectin blotting and affinity chromatography, and characterized by N-terminal sequencing. This polypeptide is the most abundant binding protein for GNA in the N. lugens midgut. A cDNA (fersub2) encoding this protein was isolated from an N. lugens cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to ferritin subunits from Manduca sexta and other arthropods, plants and vertebrates, and contains a putative N-glycosylation site. Native ferritin was purified from whole insects as a protein of more than 400kDa in size and characterized biochemically. Three subunits of 20, 26 and 27kDa were released from the native complex. The 26kDa subunit binds GNA, and its N-terminal sequence was identical to that of fersub2. A second cDNA (fersub1), exhibiting strong homology with dipteran ferritin, was identified as an abundant cDNA in an N. lugens midgut-specific cDNA library, and could encode the larger ferritin subunit. The fersub1 cDNA carries a stem-loop structure (iron-responsive element) upstream from the start codon, similar to structures that have been shown to play a role in the control of ferritin synthesis in other insects.

  12. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Endothelial Cell Receptor Tyrosine Kinase VEGFR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kevin Brown; Leon, Deborah R; Meyer, Rosana D; Rahimi, Nader; Costello, Catherine E

    2017-02-03

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an important receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that plays critical roles in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. The extracellular domain of VEGFR-2 is composed of seven immunoglobulin-like domains, each with multiple potential N-glycosylation sites (sequons). N-glycosylation plays a central role in RTK ligand binding, trafficking, and stability. However, despite its importance, the functional role of N-glycosylation of VEGFR-2 remains poorly understood. The objectives of the present study were to characterize N-glycosylation sites in VEGFR-2 via enzymatic release of the glycans and concomitant incorporation of (18)O into formerly N-glycosylated sites followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis to determine N-glycosylation site occupancy and the site-specific N-glycan heterogeneity of VEGFR-2 glycopeptides. The data demonstrated that all seven VEGFR-2 immunoglobulin-like domains have at least one occupied N-glycosylation site. MS/MS analyses of glycopeptides and deamidated, deglycosylated (PNGase F-treated) peptides from ectopically expressed VEGFR-2 in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells identified N-glycans at the majority of the 17 potential N-glycosylation sites on VEGFR-2 in a site-specific manner. The data presented here provide direct evidence for site-specific, heterogeneous N-glycosylation and N-glycosylation site occupancy on VEGFR-2. The study has important implications for the therapeutic targeting of VEGFR-2, ligand binding, trafficking, and signaling.

  13. Protein Biophysics Explains Why Highly Abundant Proteins Evolve Slowly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian W.R. Serohijos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The consistent observation across all kingdoms of life that highly abundant proteins evolve slowly demonstrates that cellular abundance is a key determinant of protein evolutionary rate. However, other empirical findings, such as the broad distribution of evolutionary rates, suggest that additional variables determine the rate of protein evolution. Here, we report that under the global selection against the cytotoxic effects of misfolded proteins, folding stability (ΔG, simultaneous with abundance, is a causal variable of evolutionary rate. Using both theoretical analysis and multiscale simulations, we demonstrate that the anticorrelation between the premutation ΔG and the arising mutational effect (ΔΔG, purely biophysical in origin, is a necessary requirement for abundance–evolutionary rate covariation. Additionally, we predict and demonstrate in bacteria that the strength of abundance–evolutionary rate correlation depends on the divergence time separating reference genomes. Altogether, these results highlight the intrinsic role of protein biophysics in the emerging universal patterns of molecular evolution.

  14. Swift residue-screening identifies key N-glycosylated asparagines sufficient for surface expression of neuroglycoprotein Lingo-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaotian; Pocas, Jennifer; Liu, Yan; Wu, Paul W; Mosyak, Lidia; Somers, Will; Kriz, Ron

    2009-03-18

    Advances in genomics and proteomics have generated the needs for the efficient identification of key residues for structure and function of target proteins. Here we report the utilization of a new residue-screening approach, which combines a mammalian high-throughput transient expression system with a PCR-based expression cassette, for the study of the post-translational modification. Applying this approach results in a quick identification of essential N-glycosylation sites of a heavily glycosylated neuroglycoprotein Lingo-1, which are sufficient for the support of its surface expression. These key N-glycosylated sites uniquely locate on the concave surface of the elongated arc-shape structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain. The swift residue-screening approach may provide a new strategy for structural and functional analysis.

  15. Structure and synthesis of polyisoprenoids used in N-glycosylation across the three domains of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredith B; Rosenberg, Julian N; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Krag, Sharon S

    2009-06-01

    N-linked protein glycosylation was originally thought to be specific to eukaryotes, but evidence of this post-translational modification has now been discovered across all domains of life: Eucarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. In all cases, the glycans are first assembled in a step-wise manner on a polyisoprenoid carrier lipid. At some stage of lipid-linked oligosaccharide synthesis, the glycan is flipped across a membrane. Subsequently, the completed glycan is transferred to specific asparagine residues on the protein of interest. Interestingly, though the N-glycosylation pathway seems to be conserved, the biosynthetic pathways of the polyisoprenoid carriers, the specific structures of the carriers, and the glycan residues added to the carriers vary widely. In this review we will elucidate how organisms in each basic domain of life synthesize the polyisoprenoids that they utilize for N-linked glycosylation and briefly discuss the subsequent modifications of the lipid to generate a lipid-linked oligosaccharide.

  16. Selective control of oligosaccharide transfer efficiency for the N-glycosylation sequon by a point mutation in oligosaccharyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igura, Mayumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2011-04-15

    Asn-linked glycosylation is the most ubiquitous posttranslational protein modification in eukaryotes and archaea, and in some eubacteria. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. Inefficient oligosaccharide transfer results in glycoprotein heterogeneity, which is particularly bothersome in pharmaceutical glycoprotein production. Amino acid variation at the X position of the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon is known to modulate the glycosylation efficiency. The best amino acid at X is valine, for an archaeal Pyrococcus furiosus OST. We performed a systematic alanine mutagenesis study of the archaeal OST to identify the essential and dispensable amino acid residues in the three catalytic motifs. We then investigated the effects of the dispensable mutations on the amino acid preference in the N-glycosylation sequon. One residue position was found to selectively affect the amino acid preference at the X position. This residue is located within the recently identified DXXKXXX(M/I) motif, suggesting the involvement of this motif in N-glycosylation sequon recognition. In applications, mutations at this position may facilitate the design of OST variants adapted to particular N-glycosylation sites to reduce the heterogeneity of glycan occupancy. In fact, a mutation at this position led to 9-fold higher activity relative to the wild-type enzyme, toward a peptide containing arginine at X in place of valine. This mutational approach is potentially applicable to eukaryotic and eubacterial OSTs for the production of homogenous glycoproteins in engineered mammalian and Escherichia coli cells.

  17. Defectively N-glycosylated and non-O-glycosylated aminopeptidase N (CD13) is normally expressed at the cell surface and has full enzymatic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norén, K; Hansen, Gert Helge; Clausen, H;

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the effects of the absence of O-glycosylation and modifications of N-glycosylation on a class II membrane protein, pig and human aminopeptidase N (CD13) were stably expressed in the ldl(D) cell line. This cell line carries a UDP-Gal/UDP-GalNAc-epimerase deficiency which blocks...

  18. Lipid sugar carriers at the extremes: The phosphodolichols Archaea use in N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry; Guan, Ziqiang

    2017-03-19

    N-glycosylation, a post-translational modification whereby glycans are covalently linked to select Asn residues of target proteins, occurs in all three domains of life. Across evolution, the N-linked glycans are initially assembled on phosphorylated cytoplasmically-oriented polyisoprenoids, with polyprenol (mainly C55 undecaprenol) fulfilling this role in Bacteria and dolichol assuming this function in Eukarya and Archaea. The eukaryal and archaeal versions of dolichol can, however, be distinguished on the basis of their length, degree of saturation and by other traits. As is true for many facets of their biology, Archaea, best known in their capacity as extremophiles, present unique approaches for synthesizing phosphodolichols. At the same time, general insight into the assembly and processing of glycan-bearing phosphodolichols has come from studies of the archaeal enzymes responsible. In this review, these and other aspects of archaeal phosphodolichol biology are addressed.

  19. N-Glycosylation optimization of recombinant antibodies in CHO cell through process and metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou

    Thanks to the recent advances in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) “omic” revolution, the development of recombinant therapeutic protein bioprocessing using CHO cell factory started to merge with the new biological mindset called systems biology. In order to produce a CHO-derived recombinant therapeutic...... monoclonal antibody (mAb) towards desired patterns, and at the same time try to understand the underlying mechanisms of that from a systems biology perspective. Two different strategies were used and achieved great success in glyco-optimization: 1) optimize media and culture process; 2) Genetically optimize...... part of the thesis, both literature reviews and experimental applications were provided to demonstrate how to use omics data and implement systems biology to understand biological activities, especially N-glycosylation in CHO cells. In the last part of the thesis, the second strategy that apply genetic...

  20. N-glycosylation-negative catalase: a useful tool for exploring the role of hydrogen peroxide in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortz, S; Lenzen, S; Mehmeti, I

    2015-03-01

    Disulfide bond formation during protein folding of nascent proteins is associated with the generation of H2O2 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Approaches to quantifying H2O2 directly within the ER failed because of the oxidative environment in the ER lumen, and ER-specific catalase expression to detoxify high H2O2 concentrations resulted in an inactive protein owing to N-glycosylation. Therefore, the N-glycosylation motifs at asparagine-244 and -439 of the human catalase protein were deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. The ER-targeted expression of these variants revealed that the deletion of the N-glycosylation motif only at asparagine-244 (N244) was associated with the maintenance of full enzymatic activity in the ER. Expression of catalase N244 in the ER (ER-Catalase N244) was ER-specific and protected the cells significantly against exogenously added H2O2. With the expression of ER-Catalase N244, a highly effective H2O2 inactivation within the ER was achieved for the first time. Catalase has a high H2O2-inactivation capacity without the need of reducing cofactors, which might interfere with the ER redox homeostasis, and is not involved in protein folding. With these characteristics ER-Catalase N244 is an ideal tool to explore the impact of ER-generated H2O2 on the generation of disulfide bonds or to study the induction of ER-stress pathways through protein folding overload and accumulation of H2O2.

  1. Glycosylation of the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites in the human α1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Bross, Peter Gerd; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2000-01-01

    Human alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI) each contain four potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105, Asn167 and Asn198 and hFucTVI: Asn46, Asn91, Asn153 and Asn184). Glycosylation of the two N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105 and h......FucTVI: Asn46 and Asn91) have never been studied in detail. In the present study, we have analysed the glycosylation of these potential N-glycosylation sites. Initially, we compared the molecular mass of hFucTV and -VI expressed in COS-7 cells treated with tunicamycin with the mass of the proteins...... in untreated cells. The difference in molecular mass between the proteins in treated and untreated cells corresponded to the presence of at least three N-linked glycans. We then made a series of mutants, in which the asparagine residues in the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites were replaced...

  2. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Matthias

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the abundance of molecular components is an important prerequisite for building quantitative predictive models of cellular behavior. Proteins are central components of these models, since they carry out most of the fundamental processes in the cell. Thus far, protein concentrations have been difficult to measure on a large scale, but proteomic technologies have now advanced to a stage where this information becomes readily accessible. Results Here, we describe an experimental scheme to maximize the coverage of proteins identified by mass spectrometry of a complex biological sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed emPAI approach which takes into account the number of sequenced peptides per protein. The values of abundance are within a broad range and accurately reflect independently measured copy numbers per cell. As expected, the most abundant proteins were those involved in protein synthesis, most notably ribosomal proteins. Proteins involved in energy metabolism as well as those with binding function were also found in high copy number while proteins annotated with the terms metabolism, transcription, transport, and cellular organization were rare. The barrel-sandwich fold was found to be the structural fold with the highest abundance. Highly abundant proteins are predicted to be less prone to aggregation based on their length, pI values, and occurrence patterns of hydrophobic stretches. We also find that abundant proteins tend to be predominantly essential. Additionally we observe a significant correlation between protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work

  3. N-glycosylation of cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana: impacts on host stress response, production yield and vaccine potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Kouokam, J Calvin; Jurkiewicz, Jessica M; Nelson, Bailey; Moore, Lauren J; Husk, Adam S; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-23

    Plant-based transient overexpression systems enable rapid and scalable production of subunit vaccines. Previously, we have shown that cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), an oral cholera vaccine antigen, is N-glycosylated upon expression in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana. Here, we found that overexpression of aglycosylated CTB by agroinfiltration of a tobamoviral vector causes massive tissue necrosis and poor accumulation unless retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the re-introduction of N-glycosylation to its original or an alternative site significantly relieved the necrosis and provided a high CTB yield without ER retention. Quantitative gene expression analysis of PDI, BiP, bZIP60, SKP1, 26Sα proteasome and PR1a, and the detection of ubiquitinated CTB polypeptides revealed that N-glycosylation significantly relieved ER stress and hypersensitive response, and facilitated the folding/assembly of CTB. The glycosylated CTB (gCTB) was characterized for potential vaccine use. Glycan profiling revealed that gCTB contained approximately 38% plant-specific glycans. gCTB retained nanomolar affinity to GM1-ganglioside with only marginal reduction of physicochemical stability and induced an anti-cholera holotoxin antibody response comparable to native CTB in a mouse oral immunization study. These findings demonstrated gCTB's potential as an oral immunogen and point to a potential role of N-glycosylation in increasing recombinant protein yields in plants.

  4. Fundamental constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence

    2015-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media w...

  5. On ribosome load, codon bias and protein abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Klumpp

    Full Text Available Different codons encoding the same amino acid are not used equally in protein-coding sequences. In bacteria, there is a bias towards codons with high translation rates. This bias is most pronounced in highly expressed proteins, but a recent study of synthetic GFP-coding sequences did not find a correlation between codon usage and GFP expression, suggesting that such correlation in natural sequences is not a simple property of translational mechanisms. Here, we investigate the effect of evolutionary forces on codon usage. The relation between codon bias and protein abundance is quantitatively analyzed based on the hypothesis that codon bias evolved to ensure the efficient usage of ribosomes, a precious commodity for fast growing cells. An explicit fitness landscape is formulated based on bacterial growth laws to relate protein abundance and ribosomal load. The model leads to a quantitative relation between codon bias and protein abundance, which accounts for a substantial part of the observed bias for E. coli. Moreover, by providing an evolutionary link, the ribosome load model resolves the apparent conflict between the observed relation of protein abundance and codon bias in natural sequences and the lack of such dependence in a synthetic gfp library. Finally, we show that the relation between codon usage and protein abundance can be used to predict protein abundance from genomic sequence data alone without adjustable parameters.

  6. Fluorogenic probes reveal a role of GLUT4 N-glycosylation in intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Shinya; Hori, Yuichiro; Benedek, Zsolt; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2016-10-01

    Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is an N-glycosylated protein that maintains glucose homeostasis by regulating the protein translocation. To date, it has been unclear whether the N-glycan of GLUT4 contributes to its intracellular trafficking. Here, to clarify the role of the N-glycan, we developed fluorogenic probes that label cytoplasmic and plasma-membrane proteins for multicolor imaging of GLUT4 translocation. One of the probes, which is cell impermeant, selectively detected exocytosed GLUT4. Using this probe, we verified the 'log' of the trafficking, in which N-glycan-deficient GLUT4 was transiently translocated to the cell membrane upon insulin stimulation and was rapidly internalized without retention on the cell membrane. The results strongly suggest that the N-glycan functions in the retention of GLUT4 on the cell membrane. This study showed the utility of the fluorogenic probes and indicated that this imaging tool will be applicable for research on various membrane proteins that show dynamic changes in localization.

  7. Loss of Mgat5a-mediated N-glycosylation stimulates regeneration in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Wuhong; Huang, Sunny C.; Xu, Lisha; Pettie, Kade; Ceci, María Laura; Sánchez, Mario; Allende, Miguel L; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background We are using genetics to identify genes specifically involved in hearing regeneration. In a large-scale genetic screening, we identified mgat5a, a gene in the N-glycosylation biosynthesis pathway whose activity negatively impacts hair cell regeneration. Methods We used a combination of mutant analysis in zebrafish and a hair cell regeneration assay to phenotype the loss of Mgat5a activity in zebrafish. We used pharmacological inhibition of N-glycosylation by swansonine. We also use...

  8. Polyclonal Immunoglobulin G N-Glycosylation in the Pathogenesis of Plasma Cell Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermayr, Stefan; Lê, Giao N; Clarke, Colin; Millán Martín, Silvia; Larkin, Anne-Marie; O'Gorman, Peter; Bones, Jonathan

    2017-02-03

    The pathological progression from benign monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to smoldering myeloma (SMM) and finally to active myeloma (MM) is poorly understood. Abnormal immunoglobulin G (IgG) glycosylation in myeloma has been reported. Using a glycomic platform composed of hydrophilic interaction UPLC, exoglycosidase digestions, weak anion-exchange chromatography, and mass spectrometry, polyclonal IgG N-glycosylation profiles from 35 patients [MGUS (n = 8), SMM (n = 5), MM (n = 8), complete-response (CR) post-treatment (n = 5), relapse (n = 4), healthy age-matched control (n = 5)] were characterized to map glycan structures in distinct disease phases of multiple myeloma. N-Glycan profiles from MGUS resembled normal control. The abundance of neutral glycans containing terminal galactose was highest in SMM, while agalactosylated glycans and fucosylated glycans were lowest in MM. Three afucosyl-biantennary-digalactosylated-sialylated species (A2G2S1, A2BG2S1, and A2BG2S2) decreased 2.38-, 2.4-, and 4.25-fold, respectively, from benign to active myeloma. Increased light chain sialylation was observed in a longitudinal case of transformation from MGUS to MM. Bisecting N-acetylglucosamine was lowest in the CR group, while highest in relapsed disease. Gene expression levels of FUT 8, ST6GAL1, B4GALT1, RECK, and BACH2 identified from publicly available GEP data supported the glycomic changes seen in MM compared to control. The observed differential glycosylation underlined the heterogeneity of the myeloma spectrum. This study demonstrates the feasibility of mapping glycan modifications on the IgG molecule and provides proof of principle that differential IgG glycosylation patterns can be successfully identified in plasma cell disorders.

  9. Increased glucose transport in ras-transformed fibroblasts: a possible role for N-glycosylation of GLUT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onetti, R; Baulida, J; Bassols, A

    1997-05-05

    2-Deoxyglucose uptake was enhanced in ts371 KiMuSV-NRK cells when growing at the permissive temperature to allow the expression of a transforming p21 ras protein. This change is due to a decrease in the K(m) by approximately 2.5-fold without affecting the V(max) of the transporter. The amount of the GLUT1 glucose transporter dit not increase as deduced from immunoblot experiments on total membranes. Nevertheless, ras-transformed GLUT1 displays a higher molecular mass due to an increased N-glycosylation of the protein. Experiments made in tunicamycin-treated cells indicates that a higher glycosylation is responsible for the increase in 2-deoxyglucose uptake in ras-transformed cells.

  10. Combined N-glycome and N-glycoproteome analysis of the Lotus japonicus seed globulin fraction shows conservation of protein structure and glycosylation in legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend Secher; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Stenkjær, Eva

    2013-01-01

    β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose. Two abundant Lotus seed N-glycoproteins were site-specifically profiled; a predicted lectin containing two fully occupied N-glycosylation sites carried predominantly pauci-mannosidic structures in different distributions. In contrast, Lotus convicilin storage protein 2...

  11. Total protein or high-abundance protein: Which offers the best loading control for Western blotting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Jonathan S; Yeung, Derrick H; Staines, W Richard; Mielke, John G

    2016-03-01

    Western blotting routinely involves a control for variability in the amount of protein across immunoblot lanes. Normalizing a target signal to one found for an abundantly expressed protein is widely regarded as a reliable loading control; however, this approach is being increasingly questioned. As a result, we compared blotting for two high-abundance proteins (actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH]) and two total protein membrane staining methods (Ponceau and Coomassie Brilliant Blue) to determine the best control for loading variability. We found that Ponceau staining optimally balanced accuracy and precision, and we suggest that this approach be considered as an alternative to normalizing with a high-abundance protein.

  12. The C-terminal N-glycosylation sites of the human alpha1,3/4-fucosyltransferase III, -V, and -VI (hFucTIII, -V, adn -VI) are necessary for the expression of full enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, L L; Jensen, U B; Bross, P; Orntoft, T F

    2000-09-01

    The alpha1,3/4-fucosyltransferases are involved in the synthesis of fucosylated cell surface glycoconjugates. Human alpha1,3/4-fucosyltransferase III, -V, and -VI (hFucTIII, -V, and -VI) contain two conserved C-terminal N-glycosylation sites (hFucTIII: Asn154 and Asn185; hFucTV: Asn167 and Asn198; and hFucTVI: Asn153 and Asn184). In the present study, we have analyzed the functional role of these potential N-glycosylation sites, laying the main emphasis on the sites in hFucTIII. Tunicamycin treatment completely abolished hFucTIII enzyme activity while castanospermine treatment diminished hFucTIII enzyme activity to approximately 40% of the activity of the native enzyme. To further analyze the role of the conserved N-glycosylation sites in hFucTIII, -V, and -VI, we made a series of mutant genomic DNAs in which the asparagine residues in the potential C-terminal N-glycosylation sites were replaced by glutamine. Subsequently, the hFucTIII, -V, and -VI wild type and the mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells. All the mutants exhibited lower enzyme activity than the wild type and elimination of individual sites had different effects on the activity. The mutations did not affect the protein level of the mutants in the cells, but reduced the molecular mass as predicted. Kinetic analysis of hFucTIII revealed that lack of glycosylation at Asn185 did not change the Km values for the oligosaccharide acceptor and the nucleotide sugar donor. The present study demonstrates that hFucTIII, -V, and -VI require N-glycosylation at the two conserved C-terminal N-glycosylation sites for expression of full enzyme activity.

  13. Trends and approaches in N-Glycosylation engineering in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    will summarize a group of recent strategies andapproaches and come up with case studies for N-glycosylation engineering in CHO cells and show several examples of relevantstudy cases from our research: 1) media and feed design, 2) culture process optimization, 3) substrate addition, 4) geneticengineering, 5...

  14. N-glycosylation increases the circulatory half-life of human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flintegaard, Thomas V; Thygesen, Peter; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic use of recombinant GH typically involves daily sc injections. We examined the possibilities for prolonging the in vivo circulation of GH by introducing N-glycans. Human GH variants with a single potential N-glycosylation site (N-X-S/T) introduced by site-directed mutagenesis were expr...

  15. N-glycosylation is required for matriptase-2 autoactivation and ectodomain shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Yang, Jianfeng; Feng, Ping; Zuo, Bin; Dong, Ningzheng; Wu, Qingyu; He, Yang

    2014-07-11

    Matriptase-2 is a hepatic membrane serine protease that regulates iron homeostasis. Defects in matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency anemia. In cells, matriptase-2 is synthesized as a zymogen. To date, how matriptase-2 expression and activation are regulated remains poorly understood. Here we expressed human matriptase-2 in HEK293 and hepatic BEL-7402, SMMC-7721, and QGY-7703 cells. By labeling cell surface proteins and Western analysis, we examined matriptase-2 cell surface expression, zymogen activation, and ectodomain shedding. Our results show that matriptase-2 was activated on the cell surface but not intracellularly. Activated matriptase-2 underwent ectodomain shedding, producing soluble fragments in the conditioned medium. By testing inactive mutants, R576A and S762A, we found that matriptase-2 activation and shedding were mediated by its own catalytic activity and that the one-chain form of matriptase-2 had little activity in ectodomain shedding. We made additional matriptase-2 mutants, N136Q, N184Q, N216Q, N338Q, N433Q, N453Q, and N518Q, in which each of the predicted N-glycosylation sites was mutated. All of these mutants were expressed on the cell surface. However, mutants N216Q, N453Q, and N518Q, but not the other mutants, had impaired zymogen activation and ectodomain shedding. Our results indicate that N-glycans at specific sites are critical for matriptase-2 activation. Together, these data provide new insights into the cell surface expression, zymogen activation, and ectodomain shedding of matriptase-2.

  16. Understanding of altered N-glycosylation-related gene expression in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells subjected to elevated ammonium concentration by digital mRNA counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2015-08-01

    To understand the effects of ammonium on N-glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells that produce the Fc-fusion protein were cultivated in serum-free suspension cultures with 10 mM ammonium addition. The addition of ammonium to the cultures reduced the relative proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of an Fc-fusion protein. Fifty two N-glycosylation-related gene expressions were assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which provides a digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. Among these queried genes, thirteen genes (gale, nans, gpi, man2a1, b4galt5, b4galt7, st3gal2, st3gal5, glb1, hexa, hexb, neu1, and neu3) were up-regulated over 1.5 times in the culture with ammonium addition after 5 days of culture; however, none of the 54 genes were significantly different after 3 days of culture. In particular, the expression level of neu1 (sialidase-1) and neu3 (sialidase-3), which play a role in reduction of sialylation, increased over 2 times. Likewise, the protein expression levels of sialidase-1 and sialidase-3 determined by Western blot analysis were also increased significantly in the culture with ammonium addition. Transient transfection of neu-1 or neu3-targeted siRNAs significantly improved the sialic acid content of the Fc-fusion protein in the culture with ammonium addition, indicating that the decreased sialic acid content was in part due to the increased expression level of sialidase. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effect of ammonium on N-glycosylation, especially sialylation, in rCHO cells.

  17. Sulfoquinovose synthase - an important enzyme in the N-glycosylation pathway of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Zolghadr, Behnam; Peyfoon, Elham; Pabst, Martin; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Haslam, Stuart M; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina; Dell, Anne; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2011-12-01

    Recently, the Surface (S)-layer glycoprotein of the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeote Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was found to be N-glycosylated with a heterogeneous family of glycans, with the largest having a composition Glc(1)Man(2)GlcNAc(2) plus 6-sulfoquinovose. However, genetic analyses of genes involved in the N-glycosylation process in Crenarchaeota were missing so far. In this study we identify a gene cluster involved in the biosynthesis of sulfoquinovose and important for the assembly of the S-layer N-glycans. A successful markerless in-frame deletion of agl3 resulted in a decreased molecular mass of the S-layer glycoprotein SlaA and the flagellin FlaB, indicating a change in the N-glycan composition. Analyses with nanoLC ES-MS/MS confirmed the presence of only a reduced trisaccharide structure composed of Man(1) GlcNAc(2) , missing the sulfoquinovose, a mannose and glucose. Biochemical studies of the recombinant Agl3 confirmed the proposed function as a UDP-sulfoquinovose synthase. Furthermore, S. acidocaldarius cells lacking agl3 had a significantly lower growth rate at elevated salt concentrations compared with the background strain, underlining the importance of the N-glycosylation to maintain an intact and stable cell envelope, to enable the survival of S. acidocaldarius in its extreme environment.

  18. Depletion of abundant plasma proteins by poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylic acid) hydrogel particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Ventura-Espejo, Estela; Jensen, Ole N

    2014-01-01

    at higher efficiency than low abundance proteins, which are enriched in the supernatants, whereas (2) hydrogel particles incubated with high concentrations of plasma capture and irreversibly trap abundant proteins. During the elution step, irreversibly trapped proteins remain captured while low abundance...... (SRM) liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS. This novel use of hydrogel particles opens new perspectives for biomarker analysis based on mass spectrometry....

  19. Two Distinct N-Glycosylation Pathways Process the Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Glycoprotein upon Changes in Environmental Salinity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Lina; Guan, Ziqiang; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT N-glycosylation in Archaea presents aspects of this posttranslational modification not seen in either Eukarya or Bacteria. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein can be simultaneously modified by two different N-glycans. Asn-13 and Asn-83 are modified by a pentasaccharide, whereas Asn-498 is modified by a tetrasaccharide of distinct composition, with N-glycosylation at this position being related to environmental conditions. Specifically, N-glycosy...

  20. Integrated proteomic and N-glycoproteomic analyses of doxorubicin sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer cells reveal glycoprotein alteration in protein abundance and glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yanlong; Wei, Shasha; Hou, Junjie; Zhang, Chengqian; Xue, Peng; Wang, Jifeng; Chen, Xiulan; Guo, Xiaojing; Yang, Fuquan

    2017-01-06

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common cancer among women in the world, and chemotherapy remains the principal treatment for patients. However, drug resistance is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancers and the underlying mechanism is not clear. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of drug resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics and diagnostic. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of the doxorubicin sensitive OVCAR8 cells and its doxorubicin-resistant variant NCI/ADR-RES cells using integrated global proteomics and N-glycoproteomics. A total of 1525 unique N-glycosite-containing peptides from 740 N-glycoproteins were identified and quantified, of which 253 N-glycosite-containing peptides showed significant change in the NCI/ADR-RES cells. Meanwhile, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based comparative proteomic analysis of the two ovarian cancer cells led to the quantification of 5509 proteins. As about 50% of the identified N-glycoproteins are low-abundance membrane proteins, only 44% of quantified unique N-glycosite-containing peptides had corresponding protein expression ratios. The comparison and calibration of the N-glycoproteome versus the proteome classified 14 change patterns of N-glycosite-containing peptides, including 8 up-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the increased glycosylation sites occupancy, 35 up-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the unchanged glycosylation sites occupancy, 2 down-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the decreased glycosylation sites occupancy, 46 down-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the unchanged glycosylation sites occupancy. Integrated proteomic and N-glycoproteomic analyses provide new insights, which can help to unravel the relationship of N-glycosylation and multidrug resistance (MDR), understand the mechanism of MDR, and discover the new diagnostic and

  1. AglP is a S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferase that participates in the N-glycosylation pathway of Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidovich, Hilla; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Konrad, Zvia; Ventura, Valeria V; Dell, Anne; Hitchen, Paul G; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-04-01

    While pathways for N-glycosylation in Eukarya and Bacteria have been solved, considerably less is known of this post-translational modification in Archaea. In the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii, proteins encoded by the agl genes are involved in the assembly and attachment of a pentasaccharide to select asparagine residues of the S-layer glycoprotein. AglP, originally identified based on the proximity of its encoding gene to other agl genes whose products were shown to participate in N-glycosylation, was proposed, based on sequence homology, to serve as a methyltransferase. In the present report, gene deletion and mass spectrometry were employed to reveal that AglP is responsible for adding a 14 Da moiety to a hexuronic acid found at position four of the pentasaccharide decorating the Hfx. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein. Subsequent purification of a tagged version of AglP and development of an in vitro assay to test the function of the protein confirmed that AglP is a S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferase.

  2. AglB, catalyzing the oligosaccharyl transferase step of the archaeal N-glycosylation process, is essential in the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2014-08-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a thermo-acidophilic crenarchaeon which grows optimally at 76 °C and pH 3, exhibits an astonishing high number of N-glycans linked to the surface (S-) layer proteins. The S-layer proteins as well as other surface-exposed proteins are modified via N-glycosylation, in which the oligosaccharyl transferase AglB catalyzes the final step of the transfer of the glycan tree to the nascent protein. In this study, we demonstrated that AglB is essential for the viability of S. acidocaldarius. Different deletion approaches, that is, markerless in-frame deletion as well as a marker insertion were unsuccessful to create an aglB deletion mutant. Only the integration of a second aglB gene copy allowed the successful deletion of the original aglB.

  3. Design, Synthesis and Structure-activity of N-Glycosyl-1-pyridyl-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide as Inhibitors of Calcium Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yun-yun; LI Yu-xin; LI Yi-ming; YANG Xiao-ping; MAO Ming-zhen; LI Zheng-ming

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates,with broad-spectrum structures and biological functions,are key organic compounds in nature,along with nucleic acids and proteins.As part of our ongoing efforts to develop a new class of pesticides with novel mechanism of action,a series of novel N-glycosyl-l-pyridyl-lH-pyrazole-5-carboxamide was designed and synthesized via the reactions of glycosyl methanamides and pyridyl-pyrazole acid.The compounds were characterized by 1H NMR and 13C NMR.The bioassay results indicate that some of these compounds exhibit moderate insecticidal activities and assessed as potential inhibitors of calcium channels.The modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels by compounds 4a and 5a in the central neurons isolated from the third instar larvae of Spodoptera exigua was studied by whole-cell patch-clamp technique.In addition,compound 5a inhibits the recorded calcium currents reversible on washout.Experimental results also indicate that compound 5a did not release stored calcium from the Endoplasmic Reticulum.The present work demonstrates that N-glycosyl-l-pyridyl-lH-pyrazole-5-carboxamides cannot be used as possible inhibitors of calcium channels for developing novel pesticides.

  4. N-glycosylation in Archaea: on the coordinated actions of Haloferax volcanii AglF and AglM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Magidovich, Hilla; Ventura, Valeria V; Hitchen, Paul G; Dell, Anne; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    Like Eukarya and Bacteria, Archaea are also capable of performing N-glycosylation. In the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii, N-glycosylation is mediated by the products of the agl gene cluster. In the present report, this gene cluster was expanded to include an additional sequence, aglM, shown to participate in the biosynthesis of hexuronic acids contained within a pentasaccharide decorating the S-layer glycoprotein, a reporter H. volcanii glycoprotein. In response to different growth conditions, changes in the transcription profile of aglM mirrored changes in the transcription profiles of aglF, aglG and aglI, genes encoding confirmed participants in the H. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway, thus offering support to the hypothesis that in H. volcanii, N-glycosylation serves an adaptive role. Following purification, biochemical analysis revealed AglM to function as a UDP-glucose dehydrogenase. In a scoupled reaction with AglF, a previously identified glucose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, UDP-glucuronic acid was generated from glucose-1-phosphate and UTP in a NAD(+)-dependent manner. These experiments thus represent the first step towards in vitro reconstitution of the archaeal N-glycosylation process.

  5. Different routes to the same ending: comparing the N-glycosylation processes of Haloferax volcanii and Haloarcula marismortui, two halophilic archaea from the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Eichler, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Recent insight into the N-glycosylation pathway of the haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii, is helping to bridge the gap between our limited understanding of the archaeal version of this universal post-translational modification and the better-described eukaryal and bacterial processes. To delineate as yet undefined steps of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway, a comparative approach was taken with the initial characterization of N-glycosylation in Haloarcula marismortui, a second haloarch...

  6. Regular patterns for proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhong

    Full Text Available A proteome of the bio-entity, including cell, tissue, organ, and organism, consists of proteins of diverse abundance. The principle that determines the abundance of different proteins in a proteome is of fundamental significance for an understanding of the building blocks of the bio-entity. Here, we report three regular patterns in the proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species such as human, mouse, fly, worm, yeast, and bacteria: in most cases, protein abundance is positively correlated with the protein's origination time or sequence conservation during evolution; it is negatively correlated with the protein's domain number and positively correlated with domain coverage in protein structure, and the correlations became stronger during the course of evolution; protein abundance can be further stratified by the function of the protein, whereby proteins that act on material conversion and transportation (mass category are more abundant than those that act on information modulation (information category. Thus, protein abundance is intrinsically related to the protein's inherent characters of evolution, structure, and function.

  7. The C-terminal N-glycosylation sites of the human α1,3/4-fucosyltransferase III, -V and -VI (hFucTIII, -V and -VI) are necessary for the expression of full enzyme activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Bross, Peter Gerd;

    2000-01-01

    ; and hFucTVI: Asn153 and Asn184). In the present study, we have analyzed the functional role of these potential N-glycosylation sites, laying the main emphasis on the sites in hFucTIII. Tunicamycin treatment completely abolished hFucTIII enzyme activity while castanospermine treatment diminished h......FucTIII enzyme activity to approximately 40% of the activity of the native enzyme. To further analyze the role of the conserved N-glycosylation sites in hFucTIII, -V, and -VI, we made a series of mutant genomic DNAs in which the asparagine residues in the potential C-terminal N-glycosylation sites were replaced...... by glutamine. Subsequently, the hFucTIII, -V, and -VI wild type and the mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells. All the mutants exhibited lower enzyme activity than the wild type and elimination of individual sites had different effects on the activity. The mutations did not affect the protein level...

  8. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  9. Purification, cloning, characterization, and N-glycosylation analysis of a novel β-fructosidase from Aspergillus oryzae FS4 synthesizing levan- and neolevan-type fructooligosaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available β-Fructosidases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of terminal fructosyl units from various substrates. These enzymes also exhibit transglycosylation activity when they function with high concentrations of sucrose, which is used to synthesize fructooligosaccharides (FOS in the food industry. A β-fructosidase (BfrA with high transglycosylation activity was purified from Aspergillus oryzae FS4 as a monomeric glycoprotein. Compared with the most extensively studied Aspergillus spp. fructosidases that synthesize inulin-type β-(2-1-linked FOS, BfrA has unique transfructosylating property of synthesizing levan- and neolevan-type β-(2-6-linked FOS. The coding sequence (bfrAFS4, 1.86 kb of BfrA was amplified and expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. Both native and recombinant proteins showed transfructosylation and hydrolyzation activities with broad substrate specificity. These proteins could hydrolyze the following linkages: Glc α-1, 2-β Fru; Glc α-1, 3-α Fru; and Glc α-1, 5-β Fru. Compared with the unglycosylated E. coli-expressed BfrA (E.BfrA, the N-glycosylated native (N.BfrA and the P. pastoris-expressed BfrA (P.BfrA were highly stable at a wide pH range (pH 4 to 11, and significantly more thermostable at temperatures up to 50°C with a maximum activity at 55°C. Using sucrose as substrate, the Km and kcat values for total activity were 37.19±5.28 mM and 1.0016±0.039×104 s-1 for N.BfrA. Moreover, 10 of 13 putative N-glycosylation sites were glycosylated on N.BfrA, and N-glycosylation was essential for enzyme thermal stability and optima activity. Thus, BfrA has demonstrated as a well-characterized A. oryzae fructosidase with unique transfructosylating capability of synthesizing levan- and neolevan-type FOS.

  10. INTRODUCTION OF AN N-GLYCOSYLATION SITE INTO UDP-GLUCURONOSYLTRANSFERASE 2B3 ALTERS ITS SENSITIVITY TO CYTOCHROME P450 3A1-DEPENDENT MODULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Nakamura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated functional protein-protein interactions between cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT. However, the role of carbohydrate chains of UGTs in the interaction with CYP is not well understood. To address this issue, we examined whether CYP3A1 modulates the function of UGT2B3 which lacks potential glycosylation sites. We also examined whether the introduction of N-glycosylation to UGT2B3 affects CYP3A-dependent modulation of UGT function. To introduce a potential glycosylation site into UGT2B3, Ser 316 of UGT2B3 was substituted with Asn by site-directed mutagenesis. A baculovirus-Sf-9 cell system for expressing CYP3A1 and UGT2B3/UGT2B3(S316N was established using a Bac-to-Bac system. Glycosylation of UGT2B3(S316N was demonstrated in this expression system. The microsomal activity of recombinant UGT was determined using 4-methylumbelliferone as a substrate. The effect of CYP3A1 co-expression on UGT function was examined by comparing the kinetic profiles between single (UGT alone and double expression (UGT plus CYP systems. The kinetics of the two expression systems fitted a Michaelis-Menten equation. When the 4-MU concentration was varied, co-expression of CYP3A1 lowered the Vmax of UGT2B3-mediated conjugation. Conversely, for UGT2B3(S316N, the Vmax in the dual expression system was higher than that in the single expression system. The data obtained demonstrate that the introduction of N-glycosylation to UGT2B3 alters its sensitivity to CYP3A1-dependent modulation while CYP3A1 enhanced UGT2B3(S316N activity, and wild-type UGT2B3 was suppressed by CYP3A1. These data suggest that N-glycosylation of UGT is one of the determinants regulating the interaction between CYP3A and UGT.

  11. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; van Riper, Susan K.; Tawfik, Pierre N; Matthew D Stone; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Carlis, John V.; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC’s potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing quest...

  12. Structure-function analysis of the human sialyltransferase ST3Gal I - Role of N-glycosylation and a novel conserved sialylmotif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeanneau, C.; Chazalet, V.; Auge, C.

    2004-01-01

    of these residues and of the conserved residues of motif VS (HX4E) was assessed using as a template the human ST3Gal I. Mutational analysis showed that residues His(299) and Tyr(300) of the new motif, and His(316) of the VS motif, are essential for activity since their substitution by alanine yielded inactive...... showed that none of the mutants tested had any significant effect in nucleotide donor binding. Instead the mutant proteins were affected in their binding to the acceptor and/or demonstrated lower catalytic efficiency. Although the human ST3Gal I has four N-glycan attachment sites in its catalytic domain...... that are potentially glycosylated, none of them was shown to be necessary for enzyme activity. However, N-glycosylation appears to contribute to the proper folding and trafficking of the enzyme....

  13. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R Dumpala

    Full Text Available Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05 difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri.

  14. Analysis of Agaricus meleagris pyranose dehydrogenase N-glycosylation sites and performance of partially non-glycosylated enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonaus, Christoph; Maresch, Daniel; Schropp, Katharina; Ó Conghaile, Peter; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2017-04-01

    Pyranose Dehydrogenase 1 from the basidiomycete Agaricus meleagris (AmPDH1) is an oxidoreductase capable of oxidizing a broad variety of sugars. Due to this and its ability of dioxidation of substrates and no side production of hydrogen peroxide, it is studied for use in enzymatic bio-fuel cells. In-vitro deglycosylated AmPDH1 as well as knock-out mutants of the N-glycosylation sites N(75) and N(175), near the active site entrance, were previously shown to improve achievable current densities of graphite electrodes modified with AmPDH1 and an osmium redox polymer acting as a redox mediator, up to 10-fold. For a better understanding of the role of N-glycosylation of AmPDH1, a systematic set of N-glycosylation site mutants was investigated in this work, regarding expression efficiency, enzyme activity and stability. Furthermore, the site specific extend of N-glycosylation was compared between native and recombinant wild type AmPDH1. Knocking out the site N(252) prevented the attachment of significantly extended N-glycan structures as detected on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but did not significantly alter enzyme performance on modified electrodes. This suggests that not the molecule size but other factors like accessibility of the active site improved performance of deglycosylated AmPDH1/osmium redox polymer modified electrodes. A fourth N-glycosylation site of AmPDH1 could be confirmed by mass spectrometry at N(319), which appeared to be conserved in related fungal pyranose dehydrogenases but not in other members of the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase structural family. This site was shown to be the only one that is essential for functional recombinant expression of the enzyme.

  15. Protein abundance changes of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in different sugar concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Niu, Chen; Liu, Bin; Wei, JianPing; Wang, HuXuan; Yuan, YaHong; Yue, TianLi

    2016-09-16

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a yeast which can cause spoilage in the concentrated juice industries. It exhibits resistance to high sugar concentrations but genome- and proteome-wide studies on Z. rouxii in response to high sugar concentrations have been poorly investigated. Herein, by using a 2-D electrophoresis based workflow, the proteome of a wild strain of Z. rouxii under different sugar concentrations has been analyzed. Proteins were extracted, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the pH range 4-7. Differences in growth (lag phase), protein content (13.97-19.23mg/g cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (196-296) were found between sugar concentrations. ANOVA test showed that 168 spots were different, and 47 spots, corresponding to 40 unique gene products have been identified. These protein species are involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, response to stimulus, protein transport and vesicle organization, cell morphogenesis regulation, transcription and translation, nucleotide metabolism, amino-sugar nucleotide-sugar pathways, oxidoreductases balancing, and ribosome biogenesis. The present study provides important information about how Z. rouxii acts to cope with high sugar concentration at molecular levels, which might enhance our global understanding of Z. rouxii's high sugar-tolerance trait.

  16. N-Glycosylation on different tumor necrosis factor receptor-Fc fusion protein: a preliminary analysis%不同肿瘤坏死因子受体-Fc融合蛋白N-糖基化修饰糖链的初步分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何椿鹏; 华玲; 杨小盼; 万德有; 李萌萌; 王清清; 陈方; 董立厚; 高新

    2013-01-01

    目的 建立基于LC-MS的N-糖基化修饰糖链的分析方法,并比较不同肿瘤坏死因子受体(TNFR)-Fc融合蛋白N-糖基化修饰差异.方法 用肽-N-糖苷酶F释放糖蛋白中的修饰糖链,有机溶剂沉淀蛋白后,利用还原胺化反应将2-氨基苯甲酰胺标记至糖链上,并通过亲水作用萃取柱除去过量标记试剂,所得糖链采用ZIC-HILIC亲水作用色谱柱结合离子阱质谱进行分析.以市售TNFR-Fc融合蛋白为标准品,优化影响标记效率的各种因素后,对A和B两种TNFR-Fc融合蛋白制品的N-糖基化修饰糖链进行了分析和比较.结果 TNFR-Fc融合蛋白A和B中的修饰糖链主要含有岩藻糖、末端唾液酸、末端半乳糖、末端N-乙酰葡糖胺等糖型,且末端唾液酸含量相近,但融合蛋白A的岩藻糖和末端N-乙酰基葡萄糖的含量显著高于融合蛋白B,而融合蛋白B末端半乳糖含量高于融合蛋白A.结论 成功建立了基于LC-MS的N-糖基化修饰糖链的分析方法,该方法可有效分析糖蛋白中的修饰糖链类型和含量比例,对于详细表征糖蛋白药物结构及性质具有参考价值,并为进一步研究糖基化对糖蛋白药物药理活性以及药代动力学研究奠定了良好基础.%Objective To develop a method for N-glycans analysis based on LC-MS,and compare the N-glycans of different tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-Fc fusion proteins.Methods Glycans were released from TNFR-Fc fusion glycoproteins by PNGase F.Proteins were removed by precipitation with organic solvent and the oligosaccharides were evaporated to dryness and then labeled with 2-aminobenzamide.After excess 2-aminobenzamide was removed from the labeling samples by hydrophilic solid phase extraction column,the glycans were separated on ZIC-HILIC columns and then analyzed with linear ion trap mass spectrometer.The N-glycans analysis method was developed with the commercially available TNFR-Fc fusion glycoprotein,the factors affecting

  17. Overexpression Analysis of emv2 gene coding for Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Vigna radiata (Wilczek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are speculated to protect against water stress deficit in plants. An over expression system for mungbean late embryogenesis abundant protein, emv2 was constructed in a pET29a vector, designated pET-emv2 which is responsible for higher expression under the transcriptional/translational control of T7/lac promoter incorporated in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3.Induction protocol was optimized for pET recombinants harboring the target gene. Overexpressed EMV2 protein was purified to homogeneity and the protein profile monitored by SDS-PAGE.

  18. Two Novel Heat-Soluble Protein Families Abundantly Expressed in an Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  19. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  20. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  1. Inhibition of phosphomannose isomerase by fructose 1-phosphate: an explanation for defective N-glycosylation in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeken, J; Pirard, M; Adamowicz, M; Pronicka, E; van Schaftingen, E

    1996-11-01

    Isoelectrofocusing of serum sialotransferrins from patients with untreated hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) shows a cathodal shift similar to that in carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein (CDG) syndrome type I and in untreated galactosemia. This report is on serum lysosomal enzyme abnormalities in untreated HFI that are identical to those found in CDG syndrome type I but different from those in untreated galactosemia. CDG syndrome type I is due to phosphomannomutase deficiency, a defect in the early glycosylation pathway. It was found that fructose 1-phosphate is a potent competitive inhibitor (Ki congruent to 40 microM) of phosphomannose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.8), the first enzyme of the N-glycosylation pathway thus explaining the N-glycosylation disturbances in HFI.

  2. Loci associated with N-glycosylation of human immunoglobulin G show pleiotropy with autoimmune diseases and haematological cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordan Lauc

    Full Text Available Glycosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG influences IgG effector function by modulating binding to Fc receptors. To identify genetic loci associated with IgG glycosylation, we quantitated N-linked IgG glycans using two approaches. After isolating IgG from human plasma, we performed 77 quantitative measurements of N-glycosylation using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC in 2,247 individuals from four European discovery populations. In parallel, we measured IgG N-glycans using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS in a replication cohort of 1,848 Europeans. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS results identified 9 genome-wide significant loci (P<2.27 × 10(-9 in the discovery analysis and two of the same loci (B4GALT1 and MGAT3 in the replication cohort. Four loci contained genes encoding glycosyltransferases (ST6GAL1, B4GALT1, FUT8, and MGAT3, while the remaining 5 contained genes that have not been previously implicated in protein glycosylation (IKZF1, IL6ST-ANKRD55, ABCF2-SMARCD3, SUV420H1, and SMARCB1-DERL3. However, most of them have been strongly associated with autoimmune and inflammatory conditions (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, diabetes type 1, multiple sclerosis, Graves' disease, celiac disease, nodular sclerosis and/or haematological cancers (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Follow-up functional experiments in haplodeficient Ikzf1 knock-out mice showed the same general pattern of changes in IgG glycosylation as identified in the meta-analysis. As IKZF1 was associated with multiple IgG N-glycan traits, we explored biomarker potential of affected N-glycans in 101 cases with SLE and 183 matched controls and demonstrated substantial discriminative power in a ROC-curve analysis (area under the curve = 0.842. Our study shows that it is possible to identify new loci that control glycosylation of a single plasma protein

  3. Hydrolytic Fitness of N-glycosyl Bonds: Comparing the Deglycosylation Kinetics of Modified, Alternative and Native Nucleosides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Andro C; Yu, Hiu T; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Nature’s selection of the contemporary nucleobases in RNA and DNA continues to intrigue the origin of life community. While the prebiotic synthesis of the N-glycosyl bond has historically been a central area of investigation, variations in hydrolytic stabilities among the N-glycosyl bonds may have presented an additional selection pressure that contributed to nucleobase and nucleoside evolution. To experimentally probe this hypothesis, a systematic kinetic analysis of the hydrolytic deglycosylation reactions of modified, alternative and native nucleosides was undertaken. Rate constants were measured as a function of temperature (at pH 1) to produce Arrhenius and Eyring plots for extrapolation to 37°C and determination of thermodynamic activation parameters. Rate enhancements based on the differences in reaction rates of deoxyribo- and ribo-glycosidic bonds were found to vary under the same conditions. Rate constants of deoxynucleosides were also measured across the pH range of 1 – 3 (at 50°C), which highlighted how simple changes to the heterocycle alone can lead to significant variation in deglycosylation rates. The contemporary nucleosides exhibited the slowest deglycosylation rates in comparison to the non-native/alternative nucleosides, which we suggest as experimental support for nature’s selection of the fittest N-glycosyl bonds. PMID:25750482

  4. System wide analyses have underestimated protein abundances and the importance of transcription in mammals

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    Jingyi Jessica Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Large scale surveys in mammalian tissue culture cells suggest that the protein expressed at the median abundance is present at 8,000–16,000 molecules per cell and that differences in mRNA expression between genes explain only 10–40% of the differences in protein levels. We find, however, that these surveys have significantly underestimated protein abundances and the relative importance of transcription. Using individual measurements for 61 housekeeping proteins to rescale whole proteome data from Schwanhausser et al. (2011, we find that the median protein detected is expressed at 170,000 molecules per cell and that our corrected protein abundance estimates show a higher correlation with mRNA abundances than do the uncorrected protein data. In addition, we estimated the impact of further errors in mRNA and protein abundances using direct experimental measurements of these errors. The resulting analysis suggests that mRNA levels explain at least 56% of the differences in protein abundance for the 4,212 genes detected by Schwanhausser et al. (2011, though because one major source of error could not be estimated the true percent contribution should be higher. We also employed a second, independent strategy to determine the contribution of mRNA levels to protein expression. We show that the variance in translation rates directly measured by ribosome profiling is only 9% of that inferred by Schwanhausser et al. (2011, and that the measured and inferred translation rates correlate poorly (R2 = 0.14. Based on this, our second strategy suggests that mRNA levels explain ∼84% of the variance in protein levels. We also determined the percent contributions of transcription, RNA degradation, translation and protein degradation to the variance in protein abundances using both of our strategies. While the magnitudes of the two estimates vary, they both suggest that transcription plays a more important role than the earlier studies implied and translation

  5. System wide analyses have underestimated protein abundances and the importance of transcription in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi Jessica; Bickel, Peter J; Biggin, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Large scale surveys in mammalian tissue culture cells suggest that the protein expressed at the median abundance is present at 8,000-16,000 molecules per cell and that differences in mRNA expression between genes explain only 10-40% of the differences in protein levels. We find, however, that these surveys have significantly underestimated protein abundances and the relative importance of transcription. Using individual measurements for 61 housekeeping proteins to rescale whole proteome data from Schwanhausser et al. (2011), we find that the median protein detected is expressed at 170,000 molecules per cell and that our corrected protein abundance estimates show a higher correlation with mRNA abundances than do the uncorrected protein data. In addition, we estimated the impact of further errors in mRNA and protein abundances using direct experimental measurements of these errors. The resulting analysis suggests that mRNA levels explain at least 56% of the differences in protein abundance for the 4,212 genes detected by Schwanhausser et al. (2011), though because one major source of error could not be estimated the true percent contribution should be higher. We also employed a second, independent strategy to determine the contribution of mRNA levels to protein expression. We show that the variance in translation rates directly measured by ribosome profiling is only 12% of that inferred by Schwanhausser et al. (2011), and that the measured and inferred translation rates correlate poorly (R(2) = 0.13). Based on this, our second strategy suggests that mRNA levels explain ∼81% of the variance in protein levels. We also determined the percent contributions of transcription, RNA degradation, translation and protein degradation to the variance in protein abundances using both of our strategies. While the magnitudes of the two estimates vary, they both suggest that transcription plays a more important role than the earlier studies implied and translation a much smaller

  6. Evaluation of three high abundance protein depletion kits for umbilical cord serum proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Jing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High abundance protein depletion is a major challenge in the study of serum/plasma proteomics. Prior to this study, most commercially available kits for depletion of highly abundant proteins had only been tested and evaluated in adult serum/plasma, while the depletion efficiency on umbilical cord serum/plasma had not been clarified. Structural differences between some adult and fetal proteins (such as albumin make it likely that depletion approaches for adult and umbilical cord serum/plasma will be variable. Therefore, the primary purposes of the present study are to investigate the efficiencies of several commonly-used commercial kits during high abundance protein depletion from umbilical cord serum and to determine which kit yields the most effective and reproducible results for further proteomics research on umbilical cord serum. Results The immunoaffinity based kits (PROTIA-Sigma and 5185-Agilent displayed higher depletion efficiency than the immobilized dye based kit (PROTBA-Sigma in umbilical cord serum samples. Both the PROTIA-Sigma and 5185-Agilent kit maintained high depletion efficiency when used three consecutive times. Depletion by the PROTIA-Sigma Kit improved 2DE gel quality by reducing smeared bands produced by the presence of high abundance proteins and increasing the intensity of other protein spots. During image analysis using the identical detection parameters, 411 ± 18 spots were detected in crude serum gels, while 757 ± 43 spots were detected in depleted serum gels. Eight spots unique to depleted serum gels were identified by MALDI- TOF/TOF MS, seven of which were low abundance proteins. Conclusions The immunoaffinity based kits exceeded the immobilized dye based kit in high abundance protein depletion of umbilical cord serum samples and dramatically improved 2DE gel quality for detection of trace biomarkers.

  7. Two Novel Heat-Soluble Protein Families Abundantly Expressed in an Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade

    OpenAIRE

    Ayami Yamaguchi; Sae Tanaka; Shiho Yamaguchi; Hirokazu Kuwahara; Chizuko Takamura; Shinobu Imajoh-Ohmi; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Atsushi Toyoda; Toshiaki Katayama; Kazuharu Arakawa; Asao Fujiyama; Takeo Kubo; Takekazu Kunieda

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade a...

  8. Nitrogen 15 abundance in protein fractions of beans fertilized with (15NH42SO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaud Saula Goulart

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the protein nutritive value of beans labelled with 15N, ussing nitrogen balance and the quantitation of faecal and urinary endogenous nitrogen, determined by isotopic dilution, have been extensively used. The objective of this research was to verify if the isotopic labelling of raw, freeze dried beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar Piratã 1 with 1.394 atoms%15N, resulted in the same abundance of the whole flour and of the protein fractions extracted from the beans with 0.5 mol L-1 NaCl. The isotopic abundance found in the whole bean flour, in the protein extract, in the globulin and albumin fractions were respectively: 1.394 ± 0.011; 1.403 ± 0.012; 1.399 ± 0.007 and 1.399 ± 0.028 atoms % of 15N, presenting no difference (P > 0.05. However, a difference was found (P < 0.05 between the above mentioned abundances and the isotopic abundance found in the nitrogen of the proteins in the extraction residue, which was 0.969 ± 0.084. Since the abundances did not differ, the protein nutritive indexes, such as digestibility and biological value, determined from the nitrogen balance and corrected for isotopic dilution, would not be affected by extracting the proteins from the beans with 0.5 mol L¹ NaCl. If working with the nitrogen balance of the residual proteins after extraction and even with the whole flours, these indexes could present incorrect values, since the isotopic labelling of the residual proteins was less than that of the protein fractions.

  9. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas;

    2016-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins...... produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address...... native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better...

  10. Visualization and Dissemination of Multidimensional Proteomics Data Comparing Protein Abundance During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N.; Noble, William S.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/.

  11. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-07-12

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling.

  12. [Functions of late embryogenesis abundant proteins in desiccation-tolerance of organisms: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Guobao; Li, Ranhui; Zou, Yongdong; Zheng, Yizhi

    2010-05-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are well associated with the desiccation tolerance in organisms. LEA proteins are categorized into at least seven groups by virtue of similarities in their deduced amino acid sequences. Most of the LEA proteins have the characteristics of high hydrophilicity and thermo-stability. The LEA proteins are in unstructured conformation in aqueous solution. However, they adopted amphiphilic alpha-helix structure during desiccation condition. LEA proteins are localized to the different organelles in the cells, i.e. cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. The multi-functional capacity of LEA proteins are suggested, as protein stabilization, protection of enzyme activity, membrane association and stabilization, antioxidant function, metal-ion binding or DNA protection, etc. Here, we review the structural and functional characteristics of LEA proteins to provide a reference platform to understand their protective mechanisms during the adaptive response to desiccation in organisms.

  13. O-mannosylation and N-glycosylation: two coordinated mechanisms regulating the tumour suppressor functions of E-cadherin in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sandra; Oliveira, Tiago; Bartels, Markus F; Miyoshi, Eiji; Pierce, Michael; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Carneiro, Fátima; Seruca, Raquel; Reis, Celso A; Strahl, Sabine; Pinho, Salomé S

    2016-10-04

    Dysregulation of tumor suppressor protein E-cadherin is an early molecular event in cancer. O-mannosylation profile of E-cadherin is a newly-described post-translational modification crucial for its adhesive functions in homeostasis. However, the role of O-mannosyl glycans in E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion in cancer and their interplay with N-glycans remains largely unknown. We herein demonstrated that human gastric carcinomas exhibiting a non-functional E-cadherin display a reduced expression of O-mannosyl glycans concomitantly with increased modification with branched complex N-glycans. Accordingly, overexpression of MGAT5-mediated branched N-glycans both in gastric cancer cells and transgenic mice models led to a significant decrease of O-mannosyl glycans attached to E-cadherin that was associated with impairment of its tumour suppressive functions. Importantly, overexpression of protein O-mannosyltransferase 2 (POMT2) induced a reduced expression of branched N-glycans which led to a protective effect of E-cadherin biological functions. Overall, our results reveal a newly identified mechanism of (dys)regulation of E-cadherin that occur through the interplay between O-mannosylation and N-glycosylation pathway.

  14. N-Glycosylation of integrin α5 acts as a switch for EGFR-mediated complex formation of integrin α5β1 to α6β4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Qinglei; Isaji, Tomoya; Hou, Sicong; Zhou, Ying; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Gu, Jianguo

    2016-09-19

    N-Glycosylation of integrin α5β1 is involved in multiple cell behaviors. We previously reported that the N-glycosylations of the calf domain on integrin α5 (S3-5,10-14) are essential for its inhibitory effect on EGFR signaling in regulating cell proliferation. However, the importance of the individual N-glycosylation and the underlying mechanisms of inhibition remain unclear. Here, we characterize the S3-5,10-14 mutants in detail and found that the N-glycosylation of site-11 (Asn712) is key for cell growth. The restoration of site-11, unlike the other individual sites, significantly suppressed cell growth and EGFR signaling in a manner that was similar to that of wild-type (WT). Mechanistically, this N-glycosylation inhibited the response abilities upon EGF stimulation and EGFR dimerization. Interestingly, we found this N-glycosylation controlled the EGFR complex formation with integrin α5β1 or α6β4; i.e., the loss of site-11 switched EGFR-α5β1 to EGFR-α6β4, which is well known to promote cellular signaling for cell growth. Moreover, the site-11 N-glycan exhibited a more branching structure compared with other sites, which may be required for EGFR-α5β1 formation. Taken together, these data clearly demonstrate that the site-11 N-glycosylation on α5 is most important for its inhibitory effect on EGFR signaling, which may provide a novel regulatory mechanism for crosstalks between integrins and EGFR.

  15. Immunodepletion of high-abundant proteins from acute and chronic wound fluids to elucidate low-abundant regulators in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojnacki Caroline

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of wound healing consists of several well distinguishable and finely tuned phases. For most of these phases specific proteins have been characterized, although the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not yet fully understood. It is an open question as to whether deficits in wound healing can be traced back to chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus. Previous research efforts in this field focus largely on a restricted set of marker proteins due to the limitations detection by antibodies imposes. For mechanistic purposes the elucidation of differences in acute and chronic wounds can be addressed by a less restricted proteome study. Mass spectrometric (MS methods, e.g. multi dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT, are well suitable for this complex theme of interest. The human wound fluid proteome is extremely complex, as is human plasma. Therefore, high-abundant proteins often mask the mass spectrometric detection of lower-abundant ones, which makes a depletion step of such predominant proteins inevitable. Findings In this study a commercially available immunodepletion kit was evaluated for the detection of low-abundant proteins from wound fluids. The dynamic range of the entire workflow was significantly increased to 5-6 orders of magnitude, which makes low-abundant regulatory proteins involved in wound healing accessible for MS detection. Conclusion The depletion of abundant proteins is absolutely necessary in order to analyze highly complex protein mixtures such as wound fluids using mass spectrometry. For this the used immunodepletion kit is a first but important step in order to represent the entire dynamic range of highly complex protein mixtures in the future.

  16. N-Glycosylation of the Na+-Taurocholate Cotransporting Polypeptide (NTCP) Determines Its Trafficking and Stability and Is Required for Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelman, Monique D.; Chakraborty, Anindita; Protzer, Ulrike; McKeating, Jane A.

    2017-01-01

    The sodium/bile acid cotransporter NTCP was recently identified as a receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV). NTCP is glycosylated and the role of glycans in protein trafficking or viral receptor activity is not known. NTCP contains two N-linked glycosylation sites and asparagine amino acid residues N5 and N11 were mutated to a glutamine to generate NTCP with a single glycan (NTCP-N5Q or NTCP- N11Q) or no glycans (NTCP- N5,11Q). HepG2 cells expressing NTCP with a single glycan supported HBV infection at a comparable level to NTCP-WT. The physiological function of NTCP, the uptake of bile acids, was also not affected in cells expressing these single glycosylation variants, consistent with their trafficking to the plasma membrane. However, glycosylation-deficient NTCP (NTCP-N5,11Q) failed to support HBV infection, showed minimal cellular expression and was degraded in the lysosome. This affected the physiological bile acid transporter function of NTCP-N5,11Q in a similar fashion. In conclusion, N-glycosylation is required for efficient NTCP localization at the plasma membrane and subsequent HBV infection and these characteristics are preserved in NTCP carrying a single carbohydrate moiety. PMID:28125599

  17. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, T.; Niepel, M.; McDermott, J. E.; Gao, Y.; Nicora, C. D.; Chrisler, W. B.; Markillie, L. M.; Petyuk, V. A.; Smith, R. D.; Rodland, K. D.; Sorger, P. K.; Qian, W. -J.; Wiley, H. S.

    2016-07-12

    It is not known whether cancer cells generally show quantitative differences in the expression of signaling pathway proteins that could dysregulate signal transduction. To explore this issue, we first defined the primary components of the EGF-MAPK pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells, identifying 16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators. We then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. We found that core pathway proteins were expressed at very similar levels across all cell types. In contrast, the EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were expressed at highly variable levels. The absolute abundance of most core pathway proteins was between 50,000- 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower levels (2,000-5,000 per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3,000-10,000 occupied EGFR, consistent with the idea that low adaptor levels limit signaling. Our results suggest that the core MAPK pathway is essentially invariant across different cell types, with cell- specific differences in signaling likely due to variable levels of feedback regulators. The low abundance of adaptors relative to the EGFR could be responsible for previous observation of saturable signaling, endocytosis, and high affinity EGFR.

  18. Pregnancy-Associated Changes of IgG and Serum N-Glycosylation in Camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Barbara; Albrecht, Simone; Stöckmann, Henning; Ghoneim, Ibrahim M; Al-Eknah, Marzook; Al-Busadah, Khalid A S; Karlsson, Niclas G; Carrington, Stephen D; Rudd, Pauline M

    2016-09-01

    The dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) is an agriculturally important species of high economic value but of low reproductive efficiency. Serum and IgG N-glycosylation are affected by physiological and pathogenic changes and might therefore be a useful diagnostic tool in camel livestock management. This study presents the first comprehensive annotation of the N-glycome from dromedary camel serum as well as their single-domain and conventional antibodies and its subsequent application for camel pregnancy diagnostics. N-glycans were released by PNGaseF, labeled with 2-aminobenzamide (2-AB), and analyzed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with fluorescent detection (HILIC-UPLC-FLD), enzymatic sequencing and mass spectrometry (MS). The use of a high-throughput robotic platform for sample preparation allowed the rapid generation of glycomics data from pregnant (n = 8) and nonpregnant (n = 8) camels of the Majaheem and Wadha breed. IgG N-glycans dominate the glycan profile of camel serum and present a mixture of core-fucosylated and noncore-fucosylated N-glycans which can contain N-glycolylneuraminic and N-acetylneuraminic acid. Significant pregnancy-associated but breed-independent increases in galactosylation, core-fucosylation, sialylation, and decreases in serum O-acetylation were observed. The monitoring of IgG and serum N-glycosylation presents an attractive complementary test for camel pregnancy diagnostics and presents an interesting tool for biomarker discovery in camel health and breeding.

  19. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression.

  20. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  1. Loci associated with N-glycosylation of human IgG are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a Mendelian randomisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarwood, Annie; Okada, Yukinori; Plenge, Robert; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Barton, Anne; Symmons, Deborah; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A recent study identified 16 genetic variants associated with N-glycosylation of human IgG. Several of the genomic regions where these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reside have also been associated with autoimmune disease (AID) susceptibility, suggesting there may be pleiotropy (genetic sharing) between loci controlling both N-glycosylation and AIDs. We investigated this by testing variants associated with levels of IgG N-glycosylation for association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility using a Mendelian randomisation study, and testing a subset of these variants in a less well-powered study of treatment response and severity. Methods SNPs showing association with IgG N-glycosylation were analysed for association with RA susceptibility in 14 361 RA cases and 43 923 controls. Five SNPs were tested for association with response to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in 1081 RA patient samples and for association with radiological disease severity in 342 patients. Results Only one SNP (rs9296009) associated with N-glycosylation showed an association (p=6.92×10–266) with RA susceptibility, although this was due to linkage disequilibrium with causal human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants. Four regions of the genome harboured SNPs associated with both traits (shared loci); although statistical analysis indicated that the associations observed for the two traits are independent. No SNPs showed association with response to anti-TNF therapy. One SNP rs12342831 was modestly associated with Larsen score (p=0.05). Conclusions In a large, well-powered cohort of RA patients, we show SNPs driving levels of N-glycosylation have no association with RA susceptibility, indicating colocalisation of associated SNPs are not necessarily indicative of a shared genetic background or a role for glycosylation in disease susceptibility. PMID:26386125

  2. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhu

    Full Text Available Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish or non-meat proteins (casein or soy for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  3. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  4. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis.

  5. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis. PMID:25971257

  6. An abundant evolutionarily conserved CSB-PiggyBac fusion protein expressed in Cockayne syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Newman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a devastating progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF family chromatin remodeling protein. Although all CSB mutations that cause CS are recessive, the complete absence of CSB protein does not cause CS. In addition, most CSB mutations are located beyond exon 5 and are thought to generate only C-terminally truncated protein fragments. We now show that a domesticated PiggyBac-like transposon PGBD3, residing within intron 5 of the CSB gene, functions as an alternative 3' terminal exon. The alternatively spliced mRNA encodes a novel chimeric protein in which CSB exons 1-5 are joined in frame to the PiggyBac transposase. The resulting CSB-transposase fusion protein is as abundant as CSB protein itself in a variety of human cell lines, and continues to be expressed by primary CS cells in which functional CSB is lost due to mutations beyond exon 5. The CSB-transposase fusion protein has been highly conserved for at least 43 Myr since the divergence of humans and marmoset, and appears to be subject to selective pressure. The human genome contains over 600 nonautonomous PGBD3-related MER85 elements that were dispersed when the PGBD3 transposase was last active at least 37 Mya. Many of these MER85 elements are associated with genes which are involved in neuronal development, and are known to be regulated by CSB. We speculate that the CSB-transposase fusion protein has been conserved for host antitransposon defense, or to modulate gene regulation by MER85 elements, but may cause CS in the absence of functional CSB protein.

  7. Assessment of Label-Free Quantification in Discovery Proteomics and Impact of Technological Factors and Natural Variability of Protein Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shweiki, Mhd Rami; Mönchgesang, Susann; Majovsky, Petra; Thieme, Domenika; Trutschel, Diana; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2017-04-07

    We evaluated the state of label-free discovery proteomics focusing especially on technological contributions and contributions of naturally occurring differences in protein abundance to the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates in this highly peptide-centric technology. First, the performance of popular quantitative proteomics software, Proteome Discoverer, Scaffold, MaxQuant, and Progenesis QIP, was benchmarked using their default parameters and some modified settings. Beyond this, the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates was decomposed into variability introduced by the entire technology itself and variable protein amounts inherent to individual plants of the Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 accession. The technical component was considerably higher than the biological intersample variability, suggesting an effect on the degree and validity of reported biological changes in protein abundance. Surprisingly, the biological variability, protein abundance estimates, and protein fold changes were recorded differently by the software used to quantify the proteins, warranting caution in the comparison of discovery proteomics results. As expected, ∼99% of the proteome was invariant in the isogenic plants in the absence of environmental factors; however, few proteins showed substantial quantitative variability. This naturally occurring variation between individual organisms can have an impact on the causality of reported protein fold changes.

  8. Nanomagnetic competition assay for low-abundance protein biomarker quantification in unprocessed human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanpeng; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Jing, Ying; Yao, Xiaofeng; Hugger, Marie A; Wang, Jian-Ping; Xing, Chengguo

    2010-03-31

    A novel giant magnetoresistive sensor and uniform high-magnetic-moment FeCo nanoparticles (12.8 nm)-based detecting platform with minimized detecting distance was developed for rapid biomolecule quantification from body fluids. Such a system demonstrates specific, accurate, and quick detection and quantification of interleukin-6, a low-abundance protein and a potential cancer biomarker, directly in 4 muL of unprocessed human sera. This platform is expected to facilitate the identification and validation of disease biomarkers. It may eventually lead to a low-cost personal medical device for chronic disease early detection, diagnosis, and prognosis.

  9. Risk association of hepatocellular carcinoma with S-gene additional N-glycosylation mutation of hepatitis B virus in HBsAg and anti-HBs coexistent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan QIAO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the association of additional N-glycosylation mutation in major hydrophilic region (MHR of hepatitis B virus (HBV S gene with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in HBsAg and anti-HBs coexistent patients. Methods  A total of 284 patients with coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs were enrolled in this study, who were admitted in 302 Hospital of PLA from July 2009 to June 2016. HBV DNA was extracted from serum samples and subjected to nested PCR for full-length S-gene sequencing. The association of MHR additional N-glycosylation mutation and clinical parameters with HCC occurrence risk was analyzed. Specifically, the additional N-glycosylation mutation was dynamically analyzed pre-and post-HCC occurrence for 18 patients. Results  Multivariate analysis showed that age >40 years, HBsAg >median, HBeAg negativity, and additional N-glycosylation mutation in MHR were associated with HCC occurrence for the HBsAg and anti-HBs coexistent patients (OR=4.281, 95%CI 1.843-9.941, P=0.001; OR=3.146, 95%CI 1.633-6.060, P=0.001; OR=2.097, 95%CI 1.010-4.357, P=0.047; and OR=4.381, 95%CI 1.842-10.417, P=0.001. In contrast, ALT, anti-HBs, anti-HBe, and HBV DNA levels had no significant association with HCC occurrence. Dynamical analysis showed that the additional N-glycosylation mutation had already developed 1-4 years prior to HCC occurrence in the 8 of 18 observed patients. Conclusion  Additional N-glycosylation mutation in MHR of HBV S gene had close association with HCC occurrence in HBsAg and anti-HBs coexistent patients, suggesting that HBsAg and anti-HBs coexistence and additional N-glycosylation mutation together could serve as a predictive indicator for HCC occurrence in chronic HBV-infected patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.11.08

  10. Protamine sulfate precipitation method depletes abundant plant seed-storage proteins: A case study on legume plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Ji; Wang, Yiming; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, So Wun; Min, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Chul; Park, Ki Hun; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Choung, Myoung-Gun; Kang, Kyu Young; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    Depletion of abundant proteins is one of the effective ways to improve detection and identification of low-abundance proteins. Our previous study showed that protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method can deplete abundant ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from leaf proteins and is suitable for their in-depth proteome investigation. In this study, we provide evidence that the PSP method can also be effectively used for depletion of abundant seed-storage proteins (SSPs) from the total seed proteins of diverse legume plants including soybean, broad bean, pea, wild soybean, and peanut. The 0.05% protamine sulfate (PS) was sufficient to deplete major SSPs from all legumes tested except for peanut where 0.1% PS was required. SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean and peanut seed proteins showed enriched spots in PS-supernatant than total proteins. Coefficient of variation percentage (%CV) and principal component analysis of 2DE spots support the reproducibility, suitability, and efficacy of the PSP method for quantitative and comparative seed proteome analysis. MALDI-TOF-TOF successfully identified some protein spots from soybean and peanut. Hence, this simple, reproducible, economical PSP method has a broader application in depleting plant abundant proteins including SSPs in addition to RuBisCO, allowing discussion for comprehensive proteome establishment and parallel comparative studies in plants.

  11. Abundantly and rarely expressed Lhc protein genes exhibit distinct regulation patterns in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimmek, Frank; Sjödin, Andreas; Noutsos, Christos; Leister, Dario; Jansson, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    We have analyzed gene regulation of the Lhc supergene family in poplar (Populus spp.) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using digital expression profiling. Multivariate analysis of the tissue-specific, environmental, and developmental Lhc expression patterns in Arabidopsis and poplar was employed to characterize four rarely expressed Lhc genes, Lhca5, Lhca6, Lhcb7, and Lhcb4.3. Those genes have high expression levels under different conditions and in different tissues than the abundantly expressed Lhca1 to 4 and Lhcb1 to 6 genes that code for the 10 major types of higher plant light-harvesting proteins. However, in some of the datasets analyzed, the Lhcb4 and Lhcb6 genes as well as an Arabidopsis gene not present in poplar (Lhcb2.3) exhibited minor differences to the main cooperative Lhc gene expression pattern. The pattern of the rarely expressed Lhc genes was always found to be more similar to that of PsbS and the various light-harvesting-like genes, which might indicate distinct physiological functions for the rarely and abundantly expressed Lhc proteins. The previously undetected Lhcb7 gene encodes a novel plant Lhcb-type protein that possibly contains an additional, fourth, transmembrane N-terminal helix with a highly conserved motif. As the Lhcb4.3 gene seems to be present only in Eurosid species and as its regulation pattern varies significantly from that of Lhcb4.1 and Lhcb4.2, we conclude it to encode a distinct Lhc protein type, Lhcb8.

  12. N-Glycosylation Modification of Plant-Derived Virus-Like Particles: An Application in Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun-Soon Kim; Jae-Heung Jeon; Kyung Jin Lee; Kisung Ko

    2014-01-01

    Plants have been developed as an alternative system to mammalian cells for production of recombinant prophylactic or therapeutic proteins for human and animal use. Effective plant expression systems for recombinant proteins have been established with the optimal combination of gene expression regulatory elements and control of posttranslational processing of recombinant glycoproteins. In plant, virus-like particles (VLPs), viral “empty shells” which maintain the same structural characteristic...

  13. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins protect human hepatoma cells during acute desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shumin; Chakraborty, Nilay; Borcar, Apurva; Menze, Michael A; Toner, Mehmet; Hand, Steven C

    2012-12-18

    Expression of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins is highly correlated with desiccation tolerance in anhydrobiotic animals, selected land plants, and bacteria. Genes encoding two LEA proteins, one localized to the cytoplasm/nucleus (AfrLEA2) and one targeted to mitochondria (AfrLEA3m), were stably transfected into human HepG2 cells. A trehalose transporter was used for intracellular loading of this disaccharide. Cells were rapidly and uniformly desiccated to low water content (spin-drying technique. Immediately on rehydration, control cells without LEA proteins or trehalose exhibited 0% membrane integrity, compared with 98% in cells loaded with trehalose and expressing AfrLEA2 or AfrLEA3m; surprisingly, AfrLEA3m without trehalose conferred 94% protection. Cell proliferation across 7 d showed an 18-fold increase for cells dried with AfrLEA3m and trehalose, compared with 27-fold for nondried controls. LEA proteins dramatically enhance desiccation tolerance in mammalian cells and offer the opportunity for engineering biostability in the dried state.

  14. Trends and approaches in N-Glycosylation engineering in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    , in particular, of those as drug substances, is extremely concerned in drug development andapproval, as it will largely affect their stability, efficacy, clearance rate and immunogenicity. Therefore to engineering N-glycosylationof CHO cell-derived recombinant proteins are extremely important. Here, we...

  15. Production of a Recombinant Vaccine Candidate against Burkholderia pseudomallei Exploiting the Bacterial N-Glycosylation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima eGarcia-Quintanilla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developing immune responses towards surface carbohydrates conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing infection and death by bacterial pathogens. Traditional production of these vaccines utilizes complex synthetic chemistry to acquire and conjugate the glycan to a protein. However, glycoproteins produced by bacterial protein glycosylation systems are significantly easier to produce, and could possible be used as vaccine candidates. In this work we functionally expressed the B. pseudomallei O polysaccharide (OPS II, the C. jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase, and a suitable glycoprotein (AcrA in a designer E. coli strain with a higher efficiency for production of glycoconjugates. We were able to produce and purify the OPS II-AcrA glycoconjugate, and MS analysis confirmed correct glycan was produced and attached. We observed the attachment of the O-acetylated deoxyhexose directly to the acceptor protein, which expands the range of substrates utilized by the OTase PglB. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG immune response against B. pseudomallei, and this response was partially protective against an intranasal challenge. Our experiments show that bacterial engineered glycoconjugates can be utilized as vaccine candidates against B. pseudomallei. Additionally, our new E. coli strain SDB1 is more efficient in glycoprotein production, and could have additional applications in the future.

  16. Subcellular localization and N-glycosylation of human ABCC6, expressed in MDCKII cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinko, E; Ilias, A; Ujhelly, O; Homolya, L; Scheffer, G.L.; Bergen, AA; Sarkadi, B; Varadi, A

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the gene coding for a human ABC transporter protein, ABCC6 (MRP6), are responsible for the development of pseudoxanthoma elasticum. Here, we demonstrate that human ABCC6, when expressed by retroviral transduction in polarized mammalian (MDCKII) cells, is exclusively localized to the bas

  17. Importance of N-Glycosylation on CD147 for Its Biological Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation of glycoproteins is one of many molecular changes that accompany malignant transformation. Post-translational modifications of proteins are closely associated with the adhesion, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. CD147, a tumor-associated antigen that is highly expressed on the cell surface of various tumors, is a potential target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. A significant biochemical property of CD147 is its high level of glycosylation. Studies on the structure and function of CD147 glycosylation provide valuable clues to the development of targeted therapies for cancer. Here, we review current understanding of the glycosylation characteristics of CD147 and the glycosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of CD147 N-glycans. Finally, we discuss proteins regulating CD147 glycosylation and the biological functions of CD147 glycosylation.

  18. Importance of N-glycosylation on CD147 for its biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Huang, Wan; Ma, Li-Tian; Jiang, Jian-Li; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2014-04-15

    Glycosylation of glycoproteins is one of many molecular changes that accompany malignant transformation. Post-translational modifications of proteins are closely associated with the adhesion, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. CD147, a tumor-associated antigen that is highly expressed on the cell surface of various tumors, is a potential target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. A significant biochemical property of CD147 is its high level of glycosylation. Studies on the structure and function of CD147 glycosylation provide valuable clues to the development of targeted therapies for cancer. Here, we review current understanding of the glycosylation characteristics of CD147 and the glycosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of CD147 N-glycans. Finally, we discuss proteins regulating CD147 glycosylation and the biological functions of CD147 glycosylation.

  19. An in vivo detection system for transient and low-abundant protein interactions and their kinetics in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezovich, Andrea; Schuschnig, Martina; Ammerer, Gustav; Kraft, Claudine

    2015-03-01

    Methylation tracking (M-Track) is a protein-proximity assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, allowing the detection of transient protein-protein interactions in living cells. The bait protein is fused to a histone lysine methyl transferase and the prey protein to a methylation acceptor peptide derived from histone 3. Upon interaction, the histone 3 fragment is stably methylated on lysine 9 and can be detected by methylation-specific antibodies. Since methylation marking is irreversible in budding yeast and only takes place in living cells, the occurrence of artifacts during cell lysate preparation is greatly reduced, leading to a more accurate representation of native interactions. So far, this method has been limited to highly abundant or overexpressed proteins. However, many proteins of interest are low-abundant, and overexpression of proteins may interfere with their function, leading to an artificial situation. Here we report the generation of a toolbox including a novel cleavage-enrichment system for the analysis of very low-abundant proteins at their native expression levels. In addition, we developed a system for the parallel analysis of two prey proteins in a single cell, as well as an inducible methylation system. The inducible system allows precise control over the time during which the interaction is detected and can be used to determine interaction kinetics. Furthermore, we generated a set of constructs facilitating the cloning-free genomic tagging of proteins at their endogenous locus by homologous recombination, and their expression from centromeric plasmids.

  20. Haloferax volcanii N-glycosylation: delineating the pathway of dTDP-rhamnose biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Kaminski

    Full Text Available In the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii, the surface (S-layer glycoprotein can be modified by two distinct N-linked glycans. The tetrasaccharide attached to S-layer glycoprotein Asn-498 comprises a sulfated hexose, two hexoses and a rhamnose. While Agl11-14 have been implicated in the appearance of the terminal rhamnose subunit, the precise roles of these proteins have yet to be defined. Accordingly, a series of in vitro assays conducted with purified Agl11-Agl14 showed these proteins to catalyze the stepwise conversion of glucose-1-phosphate to dTDP-rhamnose, the final sugar of the tetrasaccharide glycan. Specifically, Agl11 is a glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase, Agl12 is a dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase and Agl13 is a dTDP-4-dehydro-6-deoxy-glucose-3,5-epimerase, while Agl14 is a dTDP-4-dehydrorhamnose reductase. Archaea thus synthesize nucleotide-activated rhamnose by a pathway similar to that employed by Bacteria and distinct from that used by Eukarya and viruses. Moreover, a bioinformatics screen identified homologues of agl11-14 clustered in other archaeal genomes, often as part of an extended gene cluster also containing aglB, encoding the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase. This points to rhamnose as being a component of N-linked glycans in Archaea other than Hfx. volcanii.

  1. Haloferax volcanii N-glycosylation: delineating the pathway of dTDP-rhamnose biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    In the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii, the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein can be modified by two distinct N-linked glycans. The tetrasaccharide attached to S-layer glycoprotein Asn-498 comprises a sulfated hexose, two hexoses and a rhamnose. While Agl11-14 have been implicated in the appearance of the terminal rhamnose subunit, the precise roles of these proteins have yet to be defined. Accordingly, a series of in vitro assays conducted with purified Agl11-Agl14 showed these proteins to catalyze the stepwise conversion of glucose-1-phosphate to dTDP-rhamnose, the final sugar of the tetrasaccharide glycan. Specifically, Agl11 is a glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase, Agl12 is a dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase and Agl13 is a dTDP-4-dehydro-6-deoxy-glucose-3,5-epimerase, while Agl14 is a dTDP-4-dehydrorhamnose reductase. Archaea thus synthesize nucleotide-activated rhamnose by a pathway similar to that employed by Bacteria and distinct from that used by Eukarya and viruses. Moreover, a bioinformatics screen identified homologues of agl11-14 clustered in other archaeal genomes, often as part of an extended gene cluster also containing aglB, encoding the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase. This points to rhamnose as being a component of N-linked glycans in Archaea other than Hfx. volcanii.

  2. Tissue transglutaminase inhibits the TRPV5-dependent calcium transport in an N-glycosylation-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Sandor; Xi, Qi; Dimke, Henrik Anthony;

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a multifunctional Ca(2+)-dependent enzyme, catalyzing protein crosslinking. The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family of cation channels was recently shown to contribute to the regulation of TG activities in keratinocytes and hence skin barrier...... of polarized cultures of rabbit connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct (CNT/CCD) cells. Extracellular application of tTG significantly reduced TRPV5 activity in human embryonic kidney cells transiently expressing the channel. Similarly, a strong inhibition of transepithelial Ca(2+) transport...... was observed after apical application of purified tTG to polarized rabbit CNT/CCD cells. Furthermore, tTG promoted the aggregation of the plasma membrane-associated fraction of TRPV5. Using patch clamp analysis, we observed a reduction in the pore diameter after tTG treatment, suggesting distinct structural...

  3. Cloning and expression of N-glycosylation-related glucosidase from Glaciozyma antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajit, Noor Liana Mat; Kamaruddin, Shazilah; Hashim, Noor Haza Fazlin; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Murad, Abd. Munir Abd.; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Mackeen, Mukram Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The need for functional oligosaccharides in various field is ever growing. The enzymatic approach for synthesis of oligosaccharides is advantageous over traditional chemical synthesis because of the regio- and stereo- selectivity that can be achieved without the need for protection chemistry. In this study, the α-glucosidase I protein sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (UniProt database) was compared using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) with Glaciozyma antarctica genome database. Results showed 33% identity and an E-value of 1 × 10-125 for α-glucosidase I. The gene was amplified, cloned into the pPICZα C vector and used to transform Pichia pastoris X-33 cells. Soluble expression of α-Glucosidase I (˜91 kDa) was achieved at 28 °C with 1.0 % of methanol.

  4. Substitute sweeteners: diverse bacterial oligosaccharyltransferases with unique N-glycosylation site preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollis, Anne A; Chai, Yi; Natarajan, Aravind; Perregaux, Emily; Jaroentomeechai, Thapakorn; Guarino, Cassandra; Smith, Jessica; Zhang, Sheng; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2015-10-20

    The central enzyme in the Campylobacter jejuni asparagine-linked glycosylation pathway is the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), PglB, which transfers preassembled glycans to specific asparagine residues in target proteins. While C. jejuni PglB (CjPglB) can transfer many diverse glycan structures, the acceptor sites that it recognizes are restricted predominantly to those having a negatively charged residue in the -2 position relative to the asparagine. Here, we investigated the acceptor-site preferences for 23 homologs with natural sequence variation compared to CjPglB. Using an ectopic trans-complementation assay for CjPglB function in glycosylation-competent Escherichia coli, we demonstrated in vivo activity for 16 of the candidate OSTs. Interestingly, the OSTs from Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter upsaliensis, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio gigas, and Desulfovibrio vulgaris, exhibited significantly relaxed specificity towards the -2 position compared to CjPglB. These enzymes glycosylated minimal N-X-T motifs in multiple targets and each followed unique, as yet unknown, rules governing acceptor-site preferences. One notable example is D. gigas PglB, which was the only bacterial OST to glycosylate the Fc domain of human immunoglobulin G at its native 'QYNST' sequon. Overall, we find that a subset of bacterial OSTs follow their own rules for acceptor-site specificity, thereby expanding the glycoengineering toolbox with previously unavailable biocatalytic diversity.

  5. CHO cell line specific prediction and control of recombinant monoclonal antibody N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Rhian K; James, David C

    2013-11-01

    Here we demonstrate that it is possible to predict and control N-glycan processing of a secreted recombinant monoclonal antibody during manufacturing process development using a combination of statistical modelling and comparative measurement of cell surface glycans using fluorescent lectins. Using design of experiments--response surface modelling (DoE-RSM) methodology to adjust the relative media concentrations of known metabolic effectors of galactosylation (manganese, galactose, and uridine) we have shown that β1,4-galactosylation of the same recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibody produced by different CHO cell lines can be precisely controlled in a cell line specific manner. For two cell lines, monoclonal antibody galactosylation could be increased by over 100% compared to control, non-supplemented cultures without a reduction in product titre and with minimal effect on cell growth. Analysis of galactosylation effector interactions by DoE-RSM indicated that Mn²⁺ alone was necessary but not sufficient to improve galactosylation, and that synergistic combinations of Gal and Urd were necessary to maximize galactosylation, whilst minimizing the deleterious effect of Urd on cell growth. To facilitate rapid cell culture process development we also tested the hypothesis that substrate-level control of cellular galactosylation would similarly affect both cell surface and secreted monoclonal antibody glycans, enabling facile indirect prediction of product glycan processing. To support this hypothesis, comparative quantitation of CHO cell surface β1,4-galactosylation by flow cytometry using fluorescent derivatives of RCA and ConA lectins revealed that substrate-controlled variation in monoclonal antibody galactosylation and cell surface galactosylation were significantly correlated. Taken together, these data show that precision control of a complex, dynamic cellular process essential for the definition of protein product molecular heterogeneity and bioactivity is

  6. Characterization of a group 1 late embryogenesis abundant protein in encysted embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Michelle A; Kozarova, Anna; Clegg, James S; Vacratsis, Panayiotis O; Warner, Alden H

    2009-04-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are hydrophilic molecules that are believed to function in desiccation and low-temperature tolerance in some plants and plant propagules, certain prokaryotes, and several animal species. The brine shrimp Artemia franciscana can produce encysted embryos (cysts) that enter diapause and are resistant to severe desiccation. This ability is based on biochemical adaptations, one of which appears to be the accumulation of the LEA protein that is the focus of this study. The studies described herein characterize a 21 kDa protein in encysted Artemia embryos as a group 1 LEA protein. The amino acid sequence of this protein and its gene have been determined and entered into the NCBI database (no. EF656614). The LEA protein consists of 182 amino acids and it is extremely hydrophilic, with glycine (23%), glutamine (17%), and glutamic acid (12.6%) being the most abundant amino acids. This protein also consists of 8 tandem repeats of a 20 amino acid sequence, which is characteristic of group 1 LEA proteins from non-animal species. The LEA protein and its gene are expressed only in encysted embryos and not in larvae or adults. Evidence is presented to show that the LEA protein functions in the prevention of drying-induced protein aggregation, which supports its functional role in desiccation tolerance. This report describes, for the first time, the purification and characterization of a group 1 LEA protein from an animal species.

  7. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  8. Topological analysis of protein co-abundance networks identifies novel host targets important for HCV infection and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Jason E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput methods for obtaining global measurements of transcript and protein levels in biological samples has provided a large amount of data for identification of 'target' genes and proteins of interest. These targets may be mediators of functional processes involved in disease and therefore represent key points of control for viruses and bacterial pathogens. Genes and proteins that are the most highly differentially regulated are generally considered to be the most important. We present topological analysis of co-abundance networks as an alternative to differential regulation for confident identification of target proteins from two related global proteomics studies of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Results We analyzed global proteomics data sets from a cell culture study of HCV infection and from a clinical study of liver biopsies from HCV-positive patients. Using lists of proteins known to be interaction partners with pathogen proteins we show that the most differentially regulated proteins in both data sets are indeed enriched in pathogen interactors. We then use these data sets to generate co-abundance networks that link proteins based on similar abundance patterns in time or across patients. Analysis of these co-abundance networks using a variety of network topology measures revealed that both degree and betweenness could be used to identify pathogen interactors with better accuracy than differential regulation alone, though betweenness provides the best discrimination. We found that though overall differential regulation was not correlated between the cell culture and liver biopsy data, network topology was conserved to an extent. Finally, we identified a set of proteins that has high betweenness topology in both networks including a protein that we have recently shown to be essential for HCV replication in cell culture. Conclusions The results presented show that the network topology of protein co-abundance

  9. Dynamin-related proteins Vps1p and Dnm1p control peroxisome abundance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuravi, Kasinath; Nagotu, Shirisha; Krikken, Arjen M; Sjollema, Klaas; Deckers, Markus; Erdmann, Ralf; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three dynamin-related-proteins, Vps1p, Dnm1p and Mgm1p. Previous data from glucose-grown VPS1 and DNM1 null mutants suggested that Vps1p, but not Dnm1p, plays a role in regulating peroxisome abundance. Here we show that deletion of DNM1 also results in reduction of

  10. Characterization and recombinant protein expression of ferritin light chain homologue in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun Mee; Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2014-04-01

    The silkworm genome encodes three iron storage proteins or ferritins, Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH, and Fer3HCH. Probing our EST library constructed from 1-day-old silkworm eggs revealed only Fer2LCH mRNA, which encoded for a protein with a predicted putative N-glycosylation site. Developmental and tissue expression analyses during embryogenesis revealed that Fer2LCH mRNA was abundant from 6 h to 6 days after oviposition. Transcriptional expression of Fer2LCH during the postembryonic stage is also high in the larval fat body and mid-gut, and then is upregulated in all pupal tissues tested. We found that Fer2LCH mRNA contains an iron-responsive element, suggesting this ferritin subunit is subject to translational control. Although ferritin expression has been shown to increase following immune challenge in other insects, the levels of Fer2LCH mRNA were not significantly induced following viral or bacterial infection of Bombyx mori. Using a baculovirus expression system we expressed recombinant BmFer2LCH protein, which was detectable in the cytoplasmic fraction, likely in a compartment of the secretory pathway, and was shown to undergo posttranslational modifications including N-glycosylation. In particular, rBmFer2LCH carbohydrate chains were composed of mannose and GlcNAc. We suggest that Fer2LCH is important for iron homeostasis and maintaining normal organ function in silkworms.

  11. Stable isotope labelled mass spectrometry for quantification of the relative abundances for expressed proteins induced by PeaT1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The protein elicitor from the mycelium of Alternaria tenuissima has been isolated.The elicitor triggered resistance to the tobacco mosaic virus in tobacco by inducing relative oxygen species,but without causing hypersensitive necrosis.The elicitor is reported to impart resistance against Verticillium dahliae and to increase yield in cotton,but its mechanism is not yet clear.In this study,the stable isotope labelled mass spectrometry method was used to quantify the relative abundances of protein expression induced by PeaT1 in Arabidopsis.A significant difference in the relative abundances for the expression of different proteins related to metabolism,modification,regulatory,defense,stress and antioxidation was found in Arabidopsis.

  12. Sweet to the extreme: protein glycosylation in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Chaban, Bonnie; VanDyke, David J; Jarrell, Ken F; Eichler, Jerry

    2008-06-01

    Post-translational modifications account for much of the biological diversity generated at the proteome level. Of these, glycosylation is the most prevalent. Long thought to be unique to Eukarya, it is now clear that both Bacteria and Archaea are also capable of N-glycosylation, namely the covalent linkage of oligosaccharides to select target asparagine residues. However, while the eukaryal and bacterial N-glycosylation pathways are relatively well defined, little is known of the parallel process in Archaea. Of late, however, major advances have been made in describing the process of archaeal N-glycosylation. Such efforts have shown, as is often the case in archaeal biology, that protein N-glycosylation in Archaea combines particular aspects of the eukaryal and bacterial pathways along with traits unique to this life form. For instance, while the oligosaccharides of archaeal glycoproteins include nucleotide-activated sugars formed by bacterial pathways, the lipid carrier on which such oligosaccharides are assembled is the same as used in eukaryal N-glycosylation. By contrast, transfer of assembled oligosaccharides to their protein targets shows Archaea-specific properties. Finally, addressing N-glycosylation from an archaeal perspective is providing new general insight into this event, as exemplified by the solution of the first crystal structure of an oligosaccharide transferase from an archaeal source.

  13. Analysis of the plasma proteome in COPD: Novel low abundance proteins reflect the severity of lung remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Salim; Barrero, Carlos A; Bowler, Russell P; Chen, Diane Er; Criner, Gerard; Braverman, Alan; Litwin, Samuel; Yeung, Anthony; Kelsen, Steven G

    2014-04-01

    The search for COPD biomarkers has largely employed a targeted approach that focuses on plasma proteins involved in the systemic inflammatory response and in lung injury and repair. This proof of concept study was designed to test the idea that an open, unbiased, in-depth proteomics approach could identify novel, low abundance plasma proteins i.e., ng/mL concentration, which could serve as potential biomarkers. Differentially expressed proteins were identified in a discovery group with severe COPD (FEV1 <45% predicted; n = 10). Subjects with normal lung function matched for age, sex, ethnicity and smoking history served as controls (n = 10). Pooled plasma from each group was exhaustively immunodepleted of abundant proteins, d separated by 1-D gel electrophoresis and extensively fractionated prior to LC-tandem mass spectroscopy (GeLC-MS). Thirty one differentially expressed proteins were identified in the discovery group including markers of lung defense against oxidant stress, alveolar macrophage activation, and lung tissue injury and repair. Four of the 31 proteins (i.e., GRP78, soluble CD163, IL1AP and MSPT9) were measured in a separate verification group of 80 subjects with varying COPD severity by immunoassay. All 4 were significantly altered in COPD and 2 (GRP78 and soluble CD163) correlated with both FEV1 and the extent of emphysema. In-depth, plasma proteomic analysis identified a group of novel, differentially expressed, low abundance proteins that reflect known pathogenic mechanisms and the severity of lung remodeling in COPD. These proteins may also prove useful as COPD biomarkers.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum α-Glycosidases of Candida albicans Are Required for N Glycosylation, Cell Wall Integrity, and Normal Host-Fungus Interaction▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The cell surface of Candida albicans is enriched in highly glycosylated mannoproteins that are involved in the interaction with the host tissues. N glycosylation is a posttranslational modification that is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 N-glycan is processed by α-glucosidases I and II and α1,2-mannosidase to generate Man8GlcNAc2. This N-oligosaccharide is then elaborated in the Golgi to form N-glycans with highly branched outer chains rich in mannose. I...

  15. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Petritis, Brianne O; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Wood, Stephen A; Melega, William P; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Desmond J; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in each analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall picture of

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase A as a highly abundant eye lens protein in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rheede, Teun; Amons, Reinout; Stewart, Niall; de Jong, Wilfried W

    2003-06-01

    Vertebrate eye lenses mostly contain two abundant types of proteins, the alpha-crystallins and the beta/gamma-crystallins. In addition, certain housekeeping enzymes are highly expressed as crystallins in various taxa. We now observed an unusual approximately 41-kd protein that makes up 16% to 18% of the total protein in the platypus eye lens. Its cDNA sequence was determined, which identified the protein as muscle-type lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A). It is the first observation of LDH-A as a crystallin, and we designate it upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin. Interestingly, the related heart-type LDH-B occurs as an abundant lens protein, known as epsilon-crystallin, in many birds and crocodiles. Thus, two members of the ldh gene family have independently been recruited as crystallins in different higher vertebrate lineages, suggesting that they are particularly suited for this purpose in terms of gene regulatory or protein structural properties. To establish whether platypus LDH-A/upsilon-crystallin has been under different selective constraints as compared with other vertebrate LDH-A sequences, we reconstructed the vertebrate ldh-a gene phylogeny. No conspicuous rate deviations or amino acid replacements were observed.

  17. Abundant class III acidic chitinase homologue in tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed serves as the major storage protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Devavratha H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-03-26

    The phyla Leguminosae contains protease inhibitors, lectins, chitinases, and glycohydrolases as major defense proteins in their seeds. Electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins of tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.), an agri-waste material, indicated the unusual presence of two major proteins comparable to overexpression of recombinant proteins. These proteins were identified by amino-terminal analysis to be (1) Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and (2) class III endochitinase (34000 Da). These two proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity by a single-step chitin bead affinity chromatography and characterized. The Kunitz inhibitor was specific toward inhibiting trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1. The 33000 +/- 1000 Da protein, accounting for >50% of the total seed protein, is an acidic glycoprotein exhibiting a very low endotype hydrolytic activity toward chitin derivatives. SDS-PAGE followed by densitometry of tamarind seed germination indicates the disappearance of the chitinase with the concomitant appearance of a cysteine endopeptidase. On the basis of its abundance, accumulation without any pathogenesis-related stimulus, temporal regulation, amino acid composition, and very low enzyme activity, this 34000 Da protein designated "tamarinin" physiologically serves as the major storage protein.

  18. Pharmacological zinc and phytase supplementation enhance metallothionein mRNA abundance and protein concentration in newly weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Michelle M; Hill, Gretchen M; Link, Jane E; Raney, Nancy E; Tempelman, Robert J; Ernst, Catherine W

    2004-03-01

    The swine industry feeds pharmacological zinc (Zn) to newly weaned pigs to improve health. Because most swine diets are plant-based with a high phytic acid content, we hypothesized that adding phytase to diets could reduce the amount of Zn required to obtain beneficial responses. The role of metallothionein (MT) in Zn homeostasis could be important in this positive response. Thus, the goal of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary Zn and phytase on relative MT mRNA abundance and protein concentration in newly weaned pigs. Diets containing adequate (150 mg Zn/kg) or pharmacological concentrations of Zn (1000 or 2000 mg Zn/kg), as zinc oxide, with or without phytase [0, 500 phytase units (FTU)/kg, Natuphos, BASF] were fed in a 3 x 2 factorial design. Plasma and tissue minerals were measured in pigs killed after 14 d of dietary intervention. Hepatic and renal relative MT mRNA abundance and protein were greater (P pigs fed 1000 mg Zn/kg with phytase, or 2000 mg Zn/kg with or without phytase vs. the remaining treatments. Intestinal mucosa MT mRNA abundance and protein were greater (P pigs fed 2000 mg Zn/kg with phytase than in pigs fed 2000 mg Zn/kg alone or 1000 mg Zn/kg with phytase. Pigs fed 1000 mg Zn/kg plus phytase or 2000 mg Zn/kg with or without phytase had higher plasma, hepatic, and renal Zn than those fed the adequate Zn diets or 1000 mg Zn/kg. We conclude that feeding 1000 mg Zn/kg with phytase enhances MT mRNA abundance and protein and Zn absorption to the same degree as 2000 mg Zn/kg with and without phytase.

  19. SPAK and OSR1 Sensitive Cell Membrane Protein Abundance and Activity of KCNQ1/E1 K+ Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Elvira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: KCNQ1/E1 channels are expressed in diverse tissues and serve a variety of functions including endolymph secretion in the inner ear, cardiac repolarization, epithelial transport and cell volume regulation. Kinases involved in regulation of epithelial transport and cell volume include SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1, which are under control of WNK (with-no-K[Lys] kinases. The present study explored whether KCNQ1/E1 channels are regulated by SPAK and/or OSR1. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNQ1/E1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SPAK, constitutively active T233ESPAK, WNK insensitive T233ASPAK, catalytically inactive D212ASPAK, wild-type OSR1, constitutively active T185EOSR1, WNK insensitive T185AOSR1 and catalytically inactive D164AOSR1. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp and KCNQ1/E1 channel protein abundance in the cell membrane utilizing chemiluminescence of KCNQ1/E1 containing an extracellular Flag tag epitope (KCNQ1-Flag/E1. Results: KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly enhanced by wild-type SPAK and T233ESPAK, but not by T233ASPAK and D212ASPAK. Similarly, KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly increased by wild-type OSR1 and T185EOSR1, but not by T185AOSR1 and D164AOSR1. Conclusions: SPAK and OSR1 participate in the regulation of KCNQ1/E1 protein abundance and activity.

  20. Glyco-engineering in Archaea: differential N-glycosylation of the S-layer glycoprotein in a transformed Haloferax volcanii strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2011-07-01

    Archaeal glycoproteins present a variety of N-linked glycans not seen elsewhere. The ability to harness the agents responsible for this unparalleled diversity offers the possibility of generating glycoproteins bearing tailored glycans, optimized for specific functions. With a well-defined N-glycosylation pathway and available genetic tools, the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii represents a suitable platform for such glyco-engineering efforts. In Hfx. volcanii, the S-layer glycoprotein is modified by an N-linked pentasaccharide. In the following, S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation was considered in cells in which AglD, the dolichol phosphate mannose synthase involved in addition of the final residue of the pentasaccharide, was replaced by a haloarchaeal homologue of AglJ, the enzyme involved in addition of the first residue of the N-linked pentasaccharide. In the engineering strain, the S-layer glycoprotein is modified by a novel N-linked glycan not found on this reporter from the parent strain. Moreover, deletion of AglD alone and introduction of the AglJ homologue from Halobacterium salinarum, OE2528R, into the deletion strain resulted in increased biosynthesis of the novel 894 Da glycan concomitant with reduced biogenesis of the pentasaccharide normally N-linked to the S-layer glycoprotein. These findings justify efforts designed to transform Hfx. volcanii into a glyco-engineering 'workshop'.

  1. Isolation of Low Abundance Proteins and Cells Using Buoyant Glass Microbubble Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional protein affinity chromatography relies on highly porous resins that have large surface areas. These properties are ideal for fast flow separation of proteins from biological samples with maximum yields, but these properties can also lead to increased nonspecific protein binding. In certain applications where the purity of an isolated protein is more important than the yield, using a glass solid phase could be advantageous as glass is nonporous and hydrophilic and has a low surface area and low nonspecific protein binding. As a proof of principle, we used protein A-conjugated hollow glass microbubbles to isolate fluorescently labeled neurofilament heavy chain spiked into serum and compared them to protein A Sepharose and protein A magnetic beads (Dynabeads using an anti-neurofilament protein antibody. As expected, a greater volume of glass bubbles was required to match the binding capacity of the magnetic beads and Sepharose resins. On the other hand, nonspecific protein binding to glass bubbles was greatly reduced compared to the other resins. Additionally, since the glass bubbles are buoyant and transparent, they are well suited for isolating cells from biological samples and staining them in situ.

  2. Analysis of the c-src gene product structure, abundance, and protein kinase activity in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, J; Deseau, V; Amini, S; Rosen, N; Bolen, J B

    1987-01-01

    We have compared in different human neuroblastoma cell lines and human glioblastoma cells the expression level, structure, and tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity of pp60c-src. Our results show that not all human neuroblastoma cell lines express pp60c-src molecules with amino-terminal structural alterations. In neuroblastoma cells which possess pp60c-src with altered gel migration, the diminished polyacrylamide gel mobility of pp60c-src was found not to be dependent upon amino-terminal phosphorylations since extensive treatment of these molecules with phosphatase did not significantly change their gel migration properties. Similar differences in gel migration were observed when RNA from the various neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells was translated in vitro using either rabbit reticulocyte or wheat germ lysates. White the level of c-src mRNA in the different cells analyzed was found to be similar, the abundance of pp60c-src in these same cells was found to vary by as much as 12-fold. This suggests that the abundance of pp60c-src in human neuroendocrine tumors is regulated through post-transcriptional and/or post-translational events which may be related to the stage of neuronal differentiation of the cells. Based upon determination of pp60c-src abundance by immunoblot analysis, we demonstrate that pp60c-src molecules derived from human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells have very similar in vitro protein kinase activities.

  3. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  4. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  5. Exploiting the multiplexing capabilities of tandem mass tags for high-throughput estimation of cellular protein abundances by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrné, Erik; Martinez-Segura, Amalia; Syed, Afzal Pasha; Vina-Vilaseca, Arnau; Gruber, Andreas J; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The generation of dynamic models of biological processes critically depends on the determination of precise cellular concentrations of biomolecules. Measurements of system-wide absolute protein levels are particularly valuable information in systems biology. Recently, mass spectrometry based proteomics approaches have been developed to estimate protein concentrations on a proteome-wide scale. However, for very complex proteomes, fractionation steps are required, increasing samples number and instrument analysis time. As a result, the number of full proteomes that can be routinely analyzed is limited. Here we combined absolute quantification strategies with the multiplexing capabilities of isobaric tandem mass tags to determine cellular protein abundances in a high throughput and proteome-wide scale even for highly complex biological systems, such as a whole human cell line. We generated two independent data sets to demonstrate the power of the approach regarding sample throughput, dynamic range, quantitative precision and accuracy as well as proteome coverage in comparison to existing mass spectrometry based strategies.

  6. Effects of EPA and DHA on lipid droplet accumulation and mRNA abundance of PAT proteins in caprine monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecchi, Cristina; Invernizzi, Guido; Agazzi, Alessandro; Modina, Silvia; Sartorelli, Paola; Savoini, Giovanni; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effects on caprine monocytes of two ω-3 PUFAs, namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on lipid droplet formation, an emerging process of fundamental importance in innate immunity regulation. The mRNA abundance of PAT protein family (PLIN1, PLIN2 and PLIN3), involved in the formation and trafficking of the droplets, was also assessed. The effects of EPA and DHA on monocyte apoptosis were studied as well. The number of lipid droplets per cell was found to be dependent on both type and concentration of fatty acid. ω-3 PUFAs upregulated PLIN3 and PLIN2 gene expression, as well as apoptosis rate. The present findings suggest that PUFA might modify innate immune functions of goat monocytes by interfering with the formation of lipid droplets and by upregulating proteins belonging to PAT protein family.

  7. Pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins of prevalent motile commensal bacteria are variably abundant in the intestinal microbiome of elderly humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Anne Neville

    Full Text Available Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute "cell motility" category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8 from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ(28. The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13-4.79 Gb total sequence in our study insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1% relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing

  8. Diversity, abundance, and sex-specific expression of chemosensory proteins in the reproductive organs of the locust Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian-Hong; Ban, Li-Ping; Iovinella, Immacolata; Zhao, Li-Jing; Gao, Qian; Felicioli, Antonio; Sagona, Simona; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Paolo; Zhang, Long; Dani, Francesca Romana

    2013-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are small soluble proteins often associated with chemosensory organs in insects but include members involved in other functions, such as pheromone delivery and development. Although the CSPs of the sensory organs have been extensively studied, little is known on their functions in other parts of the body. A first screening of the available databases has identified 70 sequences encoding CSPs in the oriental locust Locusta migratoria manilensis. Applying proteomic analysis, we have identified 17 of them abundantly expressed in the female reproductive organs, but only one (CSP91) in male organs. Bacterially expressed CSP91 binds fatty acids with a specificity for oleic and linoleic acid, as well as medium-length alcohols and esters. The same acids have been detected as the main gas chromatographic peaks in the dichloromethane extracts of reproductive organs of both sexes. The abundance and the number of CSPs in female reproductive organs indicates important roles for these proteins. We cannot exclude that different functions can be associated with each of the 17 CSPs, including delivery of semiochemicals, solubilization of hormones, direct control of development, or other unknown tasks.

  9. Conformation of a group 2 late embryogenesis abundant protein from soybean. Evidence of poly (L-proline)-type II structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulages, Jose L; Kim, Kangmin; Arrese, Estela L; Walters, Christina; Cushman, John C

    2003-03-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are members of a large group of hydrophilic, glycine-rich proteins found in plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria known collectively as hydrophilins that are preferentially expressed in response to dehydration or hyperosmotic stress. Group 2 LEA (dehydrins or responsive to abscisic acid) proteins are postulated to stabilize macromolecules against damage by freezing, dehydration, ionic, or osmotic stress. However, the structural and physicochemical properties of group 2 LEA proteins that account for such functions remain unknown. We have analyzed the structural properties of a recombinant form of a soybean (Glycine max) group 2 LEA (rGmDHN1). Differential scanning calorimetry of purified rGmDHN1 demonstrated that the protein does not display a cooperative unfolding transition upon heating. Ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein is in a largely hydrated and unstructured conformation in solution. However, ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism measurements collected at different temperatures showed that the protein exists in equilibrium between two extended conformational states: unordered and left-handed extended helical or poly (L-proline)-type II structures. It is estimated that 27% of the residues of rGmDHN1 adopt or poly (L-proline)-type II-like helical conformation at 12 degrees C. The content of extended helix gradually decreases to 15% as the temperature is increased to 80 degrees C. Studies of the conformation of the protein in solution in the presence of liposomes, trifluoroethanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that rGmDHN1 has a very low intrinsic ability to adopt alpha-helical structure and to interact with phospholipid bilayers through amphipathic alpha-helices. The ability of the protein to remain in a highly extended conformation at low temperatures could constitute the basis of the functional role of GmDHN1 in the prevention of freezing, desiccation

  10. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hari B; Chen, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-06-01

    Rice, the staple food of south and east Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16, 26, 33, and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Recently, it was documented that the 56 kDa rice allergen was responsible for rice-induced anaphylaxis. The 14-16 kDa allergens have been identified as α-amylase inhibitors; the 26 kDa protein has been identified as α-globulin; and the 33 kDa protein has been identified as glyoxalase I. However, the identity of the 56 kDa rice allergen has not yet been determined. In this study, we demonstrate that serum from patients allergic to maize shows IgE binding to a 56 kDa protein that was present in both maize and rice but not in the oil seeds soybean and peanut. The 56 kDa IgE-binding protein was abundant in the rice endosperm. We have purified this protein from rice endosperm and demonstrated its reactivity to IgE antibodies from the serum of maize-allergic patients. The purified protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, resulting in identification of this rice allergen as granule-bound starch synthase, a product of the Waxy gene. Immunoblot analysis using protein extracts from a waxy mutant of rice revealed the absence of the 56 kDa IgE-binding protein. Our results demonstrate that the 56 kDa rice allergen is granule-bound starch synthase and raise the possibility of using waxy mutants of rice as a potential source of the hypoallergenic diet for patients sensitized to the 56 kDa rice allergen.

  11. Effects of Tamarindus indica fruit pulp extract on abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins and their possible consequential impact on metabolism and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Ursula R W; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina; Hashim, Onn H; Mat-Junit, Sarni

    2013-01-01

    The fruit pulp extract of Tamarindus indica has been reported for its antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. In this study, the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp was investigated for its effects on the abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins. Cell lysate was extracted from HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp. Approximately 2500 spots were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the abundance of 20 cellular proteins was found to be significantly reduced. Among the proteins of reduced abundance, fourteen, including six proteins involved in metabolism (including ethanolamine phosphate cytidylyltransferase), four mitochondrial proteins (including prohibitin and respiratory chain proteins), and four proteins involved in translation and splicing, were positively identified by mass spectrometry and database search. The identified HepG2 altered abundance proteins, when taken together and analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software, are suggestive of the effects of T. indica fruit pulp extract on metabolism and inflammation, which are modulated by LXR/RXR. In conclusion, the methanol fruit pulp extract of T. indica was shown to cause reduced abundance of HepG2 mitochondrial, metabolic, and regulatory proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and cellular metabolism.

  12. Effects of Tamarindus indica Fruit Pulp Extract on Abundance of HepG2 Cell Lysate Proteins and Their Possible Consequential Impact on Metabolism and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula R. W. Chong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fruit pulp extract of Tamarindus indica has been reported for its antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. In this study, the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp was investigated for its effects on the abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins. Cell lysate was extracted from HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp. Approximately 2500 spots were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the abundance of 20 cellular proteins was found to be significantly reduced. Among the proteins of reduced abundance, fourteen, including six proteins involved in metabolism (including ethanolamine phosphate cytidylyltransferase, four mitochondrial proteins (including prohibitin and respiratory chain proteins, and four proteins involved in translation and splicing, were positively identified by mass spectrometry and database search. The identified HepG2 altered abundance proteins, when taken together and analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA software, are suggestive of the effects of T. indica fruit pulp extract on metabolism and inflammation, which are modulated by LXR/RXR. In conclusion, the methanol fruit pulp extract of T. indica was shown to cause reduced abundance of HepG2 mitochondrial, metabolic, and regulatory proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and cellular metabolism.

  13. The highly abundant protein Ag-Ibp55 from Ascaridia galli represents a novel type of lipid-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, R; Radoslavov, G; Fischer, P; Torda, A; Lottspeich, F; Boteva, R; Walter, RD; Bankov, [No Value; Liebau, E

    2005-01-01

    Lipid-binding proteins exhibit important functions in lipid transport, cellular signaling, gene transcription, and cytoprotection. Their functional analogues in nematodes are nematode polyprotein allergens/antigens and fatty acid and retinoid-binding proteins. This work describes a novel 55-kDa prot

  14. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  15. One-step non-chromatography purification of a low abundant fucosylated protein from complex plant crude extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Arnold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Effective methods for isolation and purification of glycoproteins and other glycoconjugates are important to biopharmaceutical industry and diagnostic industry. They are also critical to an emerging field of glycoproteomics. In this work, we applied the newly-developed affinity ligand, a fusion protein of elastic like polymer (ELP and a bacterial lectin, in an affinity precipitation process to purify soybean peroxidase (SBP based on the presence of fucoseon the protein surface. We addressed, in particular, the challenge of purifying a low abundant protein from a complex dilute crude plant extract. The novel affinity precipitation developed in this work was very promising. One step binding and precipitation resulted in >95% recovery yield directly from crude extract and a 22.7 fold purification, giving a specific activity of 420 U/mg. The SBP isolated using this affinity precipitation meets or exceeds the quality specifications of reagent grade products by Sigma. We showed that the recovery yield had a strong dependence on the molar ratio of ligand to target fucosylated protein, with a ratio of three giving nearly full recovery, which could be predicted based on the total fucose content per protein molecule and the number of binding site per ligand molecule. We additionally developed a method of ligand regeneration and investigated its reuse. A simple wash with pH buffer was shown to be effective to regenerate the binding capacity for the ligand, and the ligand could be used for 10 times, giving an averaged 80% isolation yield based on initial input of soybean peroxidase. Taken together, an effective method of affinity precipitation was developed, which could be used to enrich a low abundant target glycoprotein from a complex mixture with a high recovery yield. The high selectivity for fucosylated protein and its ease of operation make this method particularly useful for purification of low abundant glycoprotein from natural sources. This work

  16. Role of N-glycosylation in cell surface expression and protection against proteolysis of the intestinal anion exchanger SLC26A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Yukari

    2012-03-01

    SLC26A3 is a Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger that plays a major role in Cl(-) absorption from the intestine. Its mutation causes congenital chloride-losing diarrhea. It has been shown that SLC26A3 are glycosylated, with the attached carbohydrate being extracellular and perhaps modulating function. However, the role of glycosylation has yet to be clearly determined. We used the approaches of biochemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis to prevent glycosylation. Deglycosylation experiments with glycosidases indicated that the mature glycosylated form of SLC26A3 exists at the plasma membrane, and a putative large second extracellular loop contains all of the N-linked carbohydrates. Deglycosylation of SLC26A3 causes depression of transport activity compared with wild-type, although robust intracellular pH changes were still observed, suggesting that N-glycosylation is not absolutely necessary for transport activity. To localize glycosylation sites, we mutated the five consensus sites by replacing asparagine (N) with glutamine. Immnoblotting suggests that SLC26A3 is glycosylated at N153, N161, and N165. Deglycosylation of SLC26A3 causes a defect in cell surface processing with decreased cell surface expression. We also assessed whether SLC26A3 is protected from tryptic digestion. While the mature glycosylated SLC26A3 showed little breakdown after treatment with trypsin, deglycosylated SLC26A3 exhibited increased susceptibility to trypsin, suggesting that the oligosaccharides protect SLC26A3 from tryptic digestion. In conclusion, our data indicate that N-glycosylation of SLC26A3 is important for cell surface expression and for protection from proteolytic degradation that may contribute to the understanding of pathogenesis of congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  17. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namik Mammad Oglu Rashydov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986 and Fukushima (2011. The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  18. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, CIHR Group in Protein Structure and Function and Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada)

    2004-06-15

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C NOE were determined in this study. The C{alpha}H relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured {sup 15}N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the {chi}{sub 1} dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than {+-}25 deg.

  19. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  20. Abundance and diversity of dockerin-containing proteins in the fiber-degrading rumen bacterium, Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1.

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    Marco T Rincon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cellulosome is a multi-enzyme machine, which plays a key role in the breakdown of plant cell walls in many anaerobic cellulose-degrading microorganisms. Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1, a major fiber-degrading bacterium present in the gut of herbivores, has the most intricate cellulosomal organization thus far described. Cellulosome complexes are assembled through high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. More than two-hundred dockerin-containing proteins have been identified in the R. flavefaciens genome, yet the reason for the expansion of these crucial cellulosomal components is yet unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have explored the full spectrum of 222 dockerin-containing proteins potentially involved in the assembly of cellulosome-like complexes of R. flavefaciens. Bioinformatic analysis of the various dockerin modules showed distinctive conservation patterns within their two Ca(2+-binding repeats and their flanking regions. Thus, we established the conceptual framework for six major groups of dockerin types, according to their unique sequence features. Within this framework, the modular architecture of the parent proteins, some of which are multi-functional proteins, was evaluated together with their gene expression levels. Specific dockerin types were found to be associated with selected groups of functional components, such as carbohydrate-binding modules, numerous peptidases, and/or carbohydrate-active enzymes. In addition, members of other dockerin groups were linked to structural proteins, e.g., cohesin-containing proteins, belonging to the scaffoldins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report profiles the abundance and sequence diversity of the R. flavefaciens FD-1 dockerins, and provides the molecular basis for future understanding of the potential for a wide array of cohesin-dockerin specificities. Conserved differences between dockerins may be reflected in their stability, function or expression within

  1. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast*

    OpenAIRE

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; Da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion...

  2. BacS: an abundant bacteroid protein in Rhizobium etli whose expression ex planta requires nifA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Olivia J; Davila, Guillermo; Romero, David; Noel, K Dale

    2003-01-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 bacteroids from bean nodules possessed an abundant 16-kDa protein (BacS) that was found in the membrane pellet after cell disruption. This protein was not detected in bacteria cultured in tryptone-yeast extract. In minimal media, it was produced at low oxygen concentration but not in a mutant whose nifA was disrupted. N-terminal sequencing of the protein led to isolation of a bacS DNA fragment. DNA hybridization and nucleotide sequencing revealed three copies of the bacS gene, all residing on the main symbiotic plasmid of strain CFN42. A stretch of 304 nucleotides, exactly conserved upstream of all three bacS open reading frames, had very close matches with the NifA and sigma 54 consensus binding sequences. The only bacS homology in the genetic sequence databases was to three hypothetical proteins of unknown function, all from rhizobial species. Mutation and genetic complementation indicated that each of the bacS genes gives rise to a BacS polypeptide. Mutants disrupted or deleted in all three genes did not produce the BacS polypeptide but were Nod+ and Fix+ on Phaseolus vulgaris.

  3. Tunicamycin inhibits Toll-like receptor-activated inflammation in RAW264.7 cells by suppression of NF-κB and c-Jun activity via a mechanism that is independent of ER-stress and N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Song-Yi; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Han, Inn-Oc

    2013-12-05

    In this study, we investigated the effect of tunicamycin on the production of pro-inflammatory molecules in RAW264.7 macrophage cells in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Tunicamycin caused a reduction in LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In contrast, other ER stress-inducing chemicals, such as A23187 and thapsigargin (TG), increased LPS-induced COX-2 expression and had no effect on LPS-induced iNOS, TNF-α or IL-1β expression. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of tunicamycin on LPS-induced inflammation was not influenced by salubrinal, an ER stress inhibitor, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of tunicamycin is independent of ER stress. Tunicamycin also inhibited the expression of inflammatory molecule mRNAs induced by stimulation of TLR2 (with lipoteichoic acid) or TLR3 (with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid), which do not require myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD2) for their activation. Moreover, inhibition of LPS-induced iNOS expression was not inhibited by castanospermine, another N-glycosylation inhibitor, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of tunicamycin on LPS-induced iNOS induction is likely independent of MD2 N-glycosylation. Tunicamycin inhibited nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activity by suppressing LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p50 and subsequent DNA binding of p50 and p65 to the NF-κB site of the iNOS promoter. Tunicamycin also inhibited the transcriptional activity of a cAMP-response element (CRE) reporter, possibly by inhibiting c-Jun activation. Therefore, we conclude that tunicamycin represses TLR-induced inflammation through suppression of NF-κB and CRE activity via a mechanism that is independent of ER-stress and N-glycosylation.

  4. Molecular evolution of myelin basic protein, an abundant structural myelin component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Schanila; Schweitzer, Jörn; Jahn, Olaf; Werner, Hauke B

    2013-08-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in jawed vertebrates is facilitated by the myelination of axons, which evolved in ancient cartilaginous fish. We aim to understand the coevolution of myelin and the major myelin proteins. We found that myelin basic protein (MBP) derived from living cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) associated with the plasma membrane of glial cells similar to the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP₂)-binding marker PH-PLCδ1, and that ionomycin-induced PIP₂-hydrolysis led to its cellular redistribution. We identified two paralogous mbp genes in multiple teleost species, consistent with a genome duplication at the root of the teleost clade. Zebrafish mbpb is organized in a complex transcription unit together with the unrelated gene-of-the-oligodendrocyte-lineage (golli) while mbpa does not encode GOLLI. Moreover, the embryonic expression of mbpa and mbpb differed, indicating functional specialization after duplication. However, both mbpa and mbpb-mRNAs were detected in mature oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, MBPa and MBPb were mass spectrometrically identified in zebrafish myelin, both associated with the plasma membrane via PIP₂, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide-substitution rates (Ka/Ks) was low. Together, this indicates selective pressure to conserve many aspects of the cellular expression and function of MBP across vertebrate species. We propose that the PIP₂-binding function of MBP is evolutionarily old and that its emergence in ancient gnathostomata provided glial cells with the competence to myelinate.

  5. Assessment of current mass spectrometric workflows for the quantification of low abundant proteins and phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bauer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data described here provide a systematic performance evaluation of popular data-dependent (DDA and independent (DIA mass spectrometric (MS workflows currently used in quantitative proteomics. We assessed the limits of identification, quantification and detection for each method by analyzing a dilution series of 20 unmodified and 10 phosphorylated synthetic heavy labeled reference peptides, respectively, covering six orders of magnitude in peptide concentration with and without a complex human cell digest background. We found that all methods performed very similarly in the absence of background proteins, however, when analyzing whole cell lysates, targeted methods were at least 5–10 times more sensitive than directed or DDA methods. In particular, higher stage fragmentation (MS3 of the neutral loss peak using a linear ion trap increased dynamic quantification range of some phosphopeptides up to 100-fold. We illustrate the power of this targeted MS3 approach for phosphopeptide monitoring by successfully quantifying 9 phosphorylation sites of the kinetochore and spindle assembly checkpoint component Mad1 over different cell cycle states from non-enriched pull-down samples. The data are associated to the research article ‘Evaluation of data-dependent and data-independent mass spectrometric workflows for sensitive quantification of proteins and phosphorylation sites׳ (Bauer et al., 2014 [1]. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000964.

  6. Norvaline and Norleucine May Have Been More Abundant Protein Components during Early Stages of Cell Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The absence of the hydrophobic norvaline and norleucine in the inventory of protein amino acids is readdressed. The well-documented intracellular accumulation of these two amino acids results from the low-substrate specificity of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that act over a number of related α-ketoacids. The lack of absolute substrate specificity of leucyl-tRNA synthase leads to a mischarged norvalyl-tRNALeu that evades the translational proofreading activites and produces norvaline-containing proteins, (cf. Apostol et al. J Biol Chem 272:28980-28988, 1997). A similar situation explains the presence of minute but detectable amounts of norleucine in place of methionine. Since with few exceptions both leucine and methionine are rarely found in the catalytic sites of most enzymes, their substitution by norvaline and norleucine, respectively, would have not been strongly hindered in small structurally simple catalytic polypeptides during the early stages of biological evolution. The report that down-shifts of free oxygen lead to high levels of intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and the subsequent biosynthesis of norvaline (Soini et al. Microb Cell Factories 7:30, 2008) demonstrates the biochemical and metabolic consequences of the development of a highly oxidizing environment. The results discussed here also suggest that a broader definition of biomarkers in the search for extraterrestrial life may be required.

  7. Differential protein abundance and function of UT-B urea transporters in human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D; Winter, D C; Hogan, A M; Schirmer, L; Baird, A W; Stewart, G S

    2010-03-01

    Facilitative UT-B urea transporters enable the passage of urea across cell membranes. Gastrointestinal urea transporters are thought to play a significant role in the urea nitrogen salvaging process that occurs between mammalian hosts and their gut bacteria. This study investigated the expression of UT-B urea transporters in different segments of human colon. Immunoblot analysis showed that human colon expressed a 35-kDa glycosylated UT-B protein in the colonic mucosa. The 35-kDa UT-B transporter was predominantly located in plasma membrane-enriched samples (P UT-B transporters were located throughout colonocytes situated in the upper portion of the colonic crypts. Bidirectional trans-epithelial urea transport was significantly greater in the ascending colon than the descending colon (P UT-B protein in different sections of the human colon, strongly correlating to regions that contain the largest populations of intestinal bacteria. This study suggests an important role for UT-B urea transporters in maintaining the symbiotic relationship between humans and their gut bacteria.

  8. The effect of cryopreservation on DNA damage, gene expression and protein abundance in vertebrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujune Tsai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation techniques allow the long-term storage of a wide variety of biological material without significant deterioration in quality. Immediate post-thaw survival is most often used to assess the effect of the freeze-thaw process on cells. However, this parameter provides no information on possible subtle effects of cryopreservation, including DNA damage, alteration of mRNA levels and protein function that may not be evident immediately post thaw. These potential adverse effects don’t necessarily result in cell death. While there are many comprehensive reviews of gamete and embryo cryopreservation in vertebrate species, we review here the publications relating to cryopreservation impact on the genome of sperm, embryos and oocytes.

  9. Extreme sweetness: protein glycosylation in archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Although N-glycosylation was first reported in archaea almost 40 years ago, detailed insights into this process have become possible only recently, with the availability of complete genome sequences for almost 200 archaeal species and the development of appropriate molecular tools. As a result of these advances, recent efforts have not only succeeded in delineating the pathways involved in archaeal N-glycosylation, but also begun to reveal how such post-translational protein modification helps archaea to survive in some of the harshest environments on the planet.

  10. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA.

  11. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Phytosiderophore Production in Boron-Tolerant Barley1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, John; Ford, Kris; Cassin, Andrew; Natera, Siria; Bacic, Antony

    2007-01-01

    Boron (B) phytotoxicity affects cereal-growing regions worldwide. Although B-tolerant barley (Hordeum vulgare) germplasm is available, molecules responsible for this tolerance mechanism have not been defined. We describe and use a new comparative proteomic technique, iTRAQ peptide tagging (iTRAQ), to compare the abundances of proteins from B-tolerant and -intolerant barley plants from a ‘Clipper’ × ‘Sahara’ doubled-haploid population selected on the basis of a presence or absence of two B-tolerance quantitative trait loci. iTRAQ was used to identify three enzymes involved in siderophore production (Iron Deficiency Sensitive2 [IDS2], IDS3, and a methylthio-ribose kinase) as being elevated in abundance in the B-tolerant plants. Following from this result, we report a potential link between iron, B, and the siderophore hydroxymugineic acid. We believe that this study highlights the potency of the iTRAQ approach to better understand mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in cereals, particularly when applied in conjunction with bulked segregant analysis. PMID:17478636

  12. A human FSHB transgene encoding the double N-glycosylation mutant (Asn(7Δ) Asn(24Δ)) FSHβ subunit fails to rescue Fshb null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huizhen; Butnev, Vladimir; Bousfield, George R; Kumar, T Rajendra

    2016-05-05

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a gonadotrope-derived heterodimeric glycoprotein. Both the common α- and hormone-specific β subunits contain Asn-linked N-glycan chains. Recently, macroheterogeneous FSH glycoforms consisting of β-subunits that differ in N-glycan number were identified in pituitaries of several species and subsequently the recombinant human FSH glycoforms biochemically characterized. Although chemical modification and in vitro site-directed mutagenesis studies defined the roles of N-glycans on gonadotropin subunits, in vivo functional analyses in a whole-animal setting are lacking. Here, we have generated transgenic mice with gonadotrope-specific expression of either an HFSHB(WT) transgene that encodes human FSHβ WT subunit or an HFSHB(dgc) transgene that encodes a human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, and separately introduced these transgenes onto Fshb null background using a genetic rescue strategy. We demonstrate that the human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, unlike human FSHβ WT subunit, inefficiently combines with the mouse α-subunit in pituitaries of Fshb null mice. FSH dimer containing this mutant FSHβ subunit is inefficiently secreted with very low levels detectable in serum. Fshb null male mice expressing HFSHB(dgc) transgene are fertile and exhibit testis tubule size and sperm number similar to those of Fshb null mice. Fshb null female mice expressing the mutant, but not WT human FSHβ subunit-containing FSH dimer are infertile, demonstrate no evidence of estrus cycles, and many of the FSH-responsive genes remain suppressed in their ovaries. Thus, HFSHB(dgc) unlike HFSHB(WT) transgene does not rescue Fshb null mice. Our genetic approach provides direct in vivo evidence that N-linked glycans on FSHβ subunit are essential for its efficient assembly with the α-subunit to form FSH heterodimer in pituitary. Our studies also reveal that N-glycans on FSHβ subunit are

  13. Structure of the dimeric N-glycosylated form of fungal β-N-acetylhexosaminidase revealed by computer modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and biochemical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklenář Jan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungal β-N-acetylhexosaminidases catalyze the hydrolysis of chitobiose into its constituent monosaccharides. These enzymes are physiologically important during the life cycle of the fungus for the formation of septa, germ tubes and fruit-bodies. Crystal structures are known for two monomeric bacterial enzymes and the dimeric human lysosomal β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. The fungal β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are robust enzymes commonly used in chemoenzymatic syntheses of oligosaccharides. The enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae was purified and its sequence was determined. Results The complete primary structure of the fungal β-N-acetylhexosaminidase from Aspergillus oryzae CCF1066 was used to construct molecular models of the catalytic subunit of the enzyme, the enzyme dimer, and the N-glycosylated dimer. Experimental data were obtained from infrared and Raman spectroscopy, and biochemical studies of the native and deglycosylated enzyme, and are in good agreement with the models. Enzyme deglycosylated under native conditions displays identical kinetic parameters but is significantly less stable in acidic conditions, consistent with model predictions. The molecular model of the deglycosylated enzyme was solvated and a molecular dynamics simulation was run over 20 ns. The molecular model is able to bind the natural substrate – chitobiose with a stable value of binding energy during the molecular dynamics simulation. Conclusion Whereas the intracellular bacterial β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are monomeric, the extracellular secreted enzymes of fungi and humans occur as dimers. Dimerization of the fungal β-N-acetylhexosaminidase appears to be a reversible process that is strictly pH dependent. Oligosaccharide moieties may also participate in the dimerization process that might represent a unique feature of the exclusively extracellular enzymes. Deglycosylation had only limited effect on enzyme activity, but it significantly affected

  14. Identification of Residues Important for the Activity of Haloferax volcanii AglD, a Component of the Archaeal N-Glycosylation Pathway

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    Lina Kaminski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Haloferax volcanii, AglD adds the final hexose to the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the S-layer glycoprotein. Not knowing the natural substrate of the glycosyltransferase, together with the challenge of designing assays compatible with hypersalinity, has frustrated efforts at biochemical characterization of AglD activity. To circumvent these obstacles, an in vivo assay designed to identify amino acid residues important for AglD activity is described. In the assay, restoration of AglD function in an Hfx. volcanii aglD deletion strain transformed to express plasmid-encoded versions of AglD, generated through site-directed mutagenesis at positions encoding residues conserved in archaeal homologues of AglD, is reflected in the behavior of a readily detectable reporter of N-glycosylation. As such Asp110 and Asp112 were designated as elements of the DXD motif of AglD, a motif that interacts with metal cations associated with nucleotide-activated sugar donors, while Asp201 was predicted to be the catalytic base of the enzyme.

  15. Identification of residues important for the activity of Haloferax volcanii AglD, a component of the archaeal N-glycosylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-05-06

    In Haloferax volcanii, AglD adds the final hexose to the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the S-layer glycoprotein. Not knowing the natural substrate of the glycosyltransferase, together with the challenge of designing assays compatible with hypersalinity, has frustrated efforts at biochemical characterization of AglD activity. To circumvent these obstacles, an in vivo assay designed to identify amino acid residues important for AglD activity is described. In the assay, restoration of AglD function in an Hfx. volcanii aglD deletion strain transformed to express plasmid-encoded versions of AglD, generated through site-directed mutagenesis at positions encoding residues conserved in archaeal homologues of AglD, is reflected in the behavior of a readily detectable reporter of N-glycosylation. As such Asp110 and Asp112 were designated as elements of the DXD motif of AglD, a motif that interacts with metal cations associated with nucleotide-activated sugar donors, while Asp201 was predicted to be the catalytic base of the enzyme.

  16. A functional analysis of N-glycosylation-related genes on sialylation of recombinant erythropoietin in six commonly used mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peiqing; Tan, Diana Lifen; Heng, Desmond; Wang, Tianhua; Mariati; Yang, Yuansheng; Song, Zhiwei

    2010-11-01

    Significant efforts have been made to improve the sialylation of recombinant glycoproteins with the aim of extending their in vivo circulation time. Here, we report a systematic functional analysis of 31 N-glycosylation-related genes on sialylation of recombinant EPO in six cell lines. BHK and CHO cells were found to sialylate recombinant EPO most effectively. None of the 31 genes, individually or in combination, was able to improve EPO sialylation in these cells. HEK293, Cos-7 and 3T3 cells showed intermediate sialylation capabilities, whereas NS0 cells sialylated recombinant EPO poorly. Overexpression of ST6GalI, ST3GalIII or ST3GalIV, but not ST3GalVI, was able to improve EPO sialylation in these four cell lines. qRT-PCR experiments revealed that ST3GalIII and ST3GalIV are indeed under expressed in HEK293, 3T3 and NS0 cells. Co-expression of upstream glycogenes failed to synergize with these sialyltransferases to further enhance sialylation, suggesting that the upstream glycogenes are all expressed at sufficient levels.

  17. Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shih, M.D.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Hsing, Y.I.C.

    2008-01-01

    During the late maturation stage of seed development, water content decreases greatly. One of the most striking characteristics of mature orthodox seeds is their ability to withstand severe desiccation. Mechanisms of plant drought/desiccation tolerance have been studied by numerous groups, and a bro

  18. Expression Profiles of 12 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Genes from Tamarix hispida in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqiu Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve embryogenesis abundant protein (LEA genes (named ThLEA-1 to -12 were cloned from Tamarix hispida. The expression profiles of these genes in response to NaCl, PEG, and abscisic acid (ABA in roots, stems, and leaves of T. hispida were assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. These ThLEAs all showed tissue-specific expression patterns in roots, stems, and leaves under normal growth conditions. However, they shared a high similar expression patterns in the roots, stems, and leaves when exposed to NaCl and PEG stress. Furthermore, ThLEA-1, -2, -3, -4, and -11 were induced by NaCl and PEG, but ThLEA-5, -6, -8, -10, and -12 were downregulated by salt and drought stresses. Under ABA treatment, some ThLEA genes, such as ThLEA-1, -2, and -3, were only slightly differentially expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, indicating that they may be involved in the ABA-independent signaling pathway. These findings provide a basis for the elucidation of the function of LEA genes in future work.

  19. Modulation of N-glycosylation by mesalamine facilitates membranous E-cadherin expression in colon epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Vineeta; Lang, Michaela; Dammann, Kyle; Campregher, Christoph; Lyakhovich, Alex; Gasche, Christoph

    2014-01-15

    Genome wide association studies have implicated intestinal barrier function genes in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. One of such loci CDH1, encoding E-cadherin, a transmembrane glycoprotein with known tumor suppressor functions, is also linked to the susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Loss of membranous E-cadherin expression is common in both colitis and cancer. We have recently demonstrated that mesalamine (5-ASA); the anti-inflammatory drug used to treat ulcerative colitis, induces membranous expression of E-cadherin and increases intercellular adhesion. Using colorectal cancer epithelial cells with aberrant E-cadherin expression, we investigated the mechanism underlying such an effect of 5-ASA. Post-translational modification of E-cadherin glycosylation was analyzed by biotin/streptavidin detection of sialylated glycoproteins. GnT-III (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III) expression was assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. GnT-III activity was analyzed by reactivity with E-4/L-4-PHA. Expression, localization and interaction of E-cadherin and β-catenin were analyzed by Western blot, immunocytochemistry and RNA interference. 5-ASA activity modulated E-cadherin glycosylation and increased both mRNA and protein levels of GnT-III and its activity as detected by increased E4-lectin reactivity. Intestinal APC(Min) polyps in mice showed low expression of GnT-III and 5-ASA was effective in increasing its expression. The data demonstrated that remodeling of glycans by GnT-III mediated bisect glycosylation, contributes to the membranous retention of E-cadherin by 5-ASA; facilitating intercellular adhesion. Induction of membranous expression of E-cadherin by 5-ASA is a novel mechanism for mucosal healing in colitis that might impede tumor progression by modulation of GnT-III expression.

  20. Heterogeneous conditions in dissolved oxygen affect N-glycosylation but not productivity of a monoclonal antibody in hybridoma cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, J Antonio; Palomares, Laura A; Meneses-Acosta, Angélica; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2004-10-20

    It is known that heterogeneous conditions exist in large-scale animal cell cultures. However, little is known about how heterogeneities affect cells, productivities, and product quality. To study the effect of non-constant dissolved oxygen tension (DOT), hybridomas were subjected to sinusoidal DOT oscillations in a one-compartment scale-down simulator. Oscillations were forced by manipulating the inlet oxygen partial pressure through a feedback control algorithm in a 220-mL bioreactor maintained at a constant agitation. Such temporal DOT oscillations simulate spatial DOT gradients that can occur in large scales. Different oscillation periods, in the range of 800 to 12,800 s (axis of 7% (air saturation) and amplitude of 7%), were tested and compared to constant DOT (10%) control cultures. Oscillating DOT decreased maximum cell concentrations, cell growth rates, and viability indexes. Cultures at oscillating DOT had an increased glycolytic metabolism that was evidenced by a decrease in yield of cells on glucose and an increase in lactate yield. DOT gradients, even several orders of magnitude higher than those expected under practical large-scale conditions, did not significantly affect the maximum concentration of an IgG(1) monoclonal antibody (MAb). The glycosylation profile of the MAb produced at a constant DOT of 10% was similar to that reported in the literature. However, MAb produced under oscillating culture conditions had a higher amount of triantennary and sialylated glycans, which can interfere with effector functions of the antibody. It was shown that transient excursions of hybridomas to limiting DOT, as occurs in deficiently mixed large-scale bioreactors, is important to culture performance as the oscillation period, and thus the time cells spent at low DOT, affected cell growth, metabolism, and the glycosylation pattern of MAb. Such results underline the importance of monitoring protein characteristics for the development of large-scale processes.

  1. Processing, fusogenicity, virion incorporation and CXCR4-binding activity of a feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein lacking the two conserved N-glycosylation sites at the C-terminus of the V3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Silvia A; Affranchino, José L

    2016-07-01

    The process of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) entry into its target cells is initiated by the association of the surface (SU) subunit of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) with the cellular receptors CD134 and CXCR4. This event is followed by the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes, which is mediated by the transmembrane (TM) subunit of Env. We and others have previously demonstrated that the V3 domain of the SU subunit of Env is essential for CXCR4 binding. Of note, there are two contiguous and highly conserved potential N-glycosylation sites ((418)NST(420) and (422)NLT(424)) located at the C-terminal side of the V3 domain. We therefore decided to study the relevance for Env functions of these N-glycosylation motifs and found that disruption of both of them by introducing the N418Q/N422Q double amino acid substitution drastically impairs Env processing into the SU and TM subunits. Moreover, the simultaneous mutation of these N-glycosylation sites prevents Env incorporation into virions and Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Notably, a recombinant soluble version of the SU glycoprotein carrying the double amino acid replacement N418Q/N422Q at the V3 C-terminal side binds to CXCR4 with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type SU.

  2. Combining Phytate/Ca2+Fractionation with Trichloroacetic Acid/Acetone Precipitation Improved Separation of Low-Abundant Proteins of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Leaf for Proteomic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad A R F Sultan; LIU Hui; CHENG Yu-Feng; ZHANG Pei-pei; ZHAO Hui-xian

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic assessment of low-abundance leaf proteins is hindered by the large quantity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) present within plant leaf tissues. In the present study, total proteins were extracted from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves by a conventional trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone method and a protocol first developed in this work. Phytate/Ca2+fractionation and TCA/acetone precipitation were combined to design an improved TCA/acetone method. The extracted proteins were analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The resulting 2-DE images were compared to reveal major differences. The results showed that large quantities of Rubisco were deleted from wheat leaf proteins prepared by the improved method. As many as (758±4) protein spots were detected from 2-DE images of protein extracts obtained by the improved method, 130 more than those detected by the TCA/acetone method. Further analysis indicated that more protein spots could be detected at regions of pI 4.00-4.99 and 6.50-7.00 in the improved method-based 2-DE images. Our findings indicated that the improved method is an efficient protein preparation protocol for separating low-abundance proteins in wheat leaf tissues by 2-DE analysis. The proposed protocol is simple, fast, inexpensive and also applicable to protein preparations of other plants.

  3. Isolation, N-glycosylations and Function of a Hyaluronidase-Like Enzyme from the Venom of the Spider Cupiennius salei.

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    Olivier Biner

    Full Text Available Hyaluronidases are important venom components acting as spreading factor of toxic compounds. In several studies this spreading effect was tested on vertebrate tissue. However, data about the spreading activity on invertebrates, the main prey organisms of spiders, are lacking. Here, a hyaluronidase-like enzyme was isolated from the venom of the spider Cupiennius salei. The amino acid sequence of the enzyme was determined by cDNA analysis of the venom gland transcriptome and confirmed by protein analysis. Two complex N-linked glycans akin to honey bee hyaluronidase glycosylations, were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. A C-terminal EGF-like domain was identified in spider hyaluronidase using InterPro. The spider hyaluronidase-like enzyme showed maximal activity at acidic pH, between 40-60°C, and 0.2 M KCl. Divalent ions did not enhance HA degradation activity, indicating that they are not recruited for catalysis.Besides hyaluronan, the enzyme degrades chondroitin sulfate A, whereas heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate are not affected. The end products of hyaluronan degradation are tetramers, whereas chondroitin sulfate A is mainly degraded to hexamers. Identification of terminal N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine at the reducing end of the oligomers identified the enzyme as an endo-β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidase hydrolase. The spreading effect of the hyaluronidase-like enzyme on invertebrate tissue was studied by coinjection of the enzyme with the Cupiennius salei main neurotoxin CsTx-1 into Drosophila flies. The enzyme significantly enhances the neurotoxic activity of CsTx-1. Comparative substrate degradation tests with hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate A, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate with venoms from 39 spider species from 21 families identified some spider families (Atypidae, Eresidae, Araneidae and Nephilidae without activity of hyaluronidase-like enzymes. This is interpreted as a loss of this enzyme and fits quite well

  4. Interleukin (IL)-1 in rat parturition: IL-1 receptors 1 and 2 and accessory proteins abundance in pregnant rat uterus at term - regulation by progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Tomohito; Takeda, Jun; Fang, Xin; Bronson, Heather; Olson, David M

    2016-07-01

    The role of interleukin-1 (IL-1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in parturition is typically noted by changes in its concentrations. Studying the expression of its receptor family, IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) 1, IL-1R2, IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP), and its predominantly brain isoform, IL-1RAcPb, during late gestation in the uterus in the Long-Evans rat is another. We assessed changes in their mRNA and protein relative abundance in the uterus and compared IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance in uterus, cervix, ovaries, placenta, and whole blood of Long-Evans rats during late gestation or in RU486 and progesterone-treated dams using quantitative real-time PCR and western immunoblotting. IL-1R1, IL-1RAcP, and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance significantly increased in the uterus at delivery whereas IL-1R2 mRNA abundance significantly decreased. IL-1R1 protein increased at term and IL-1R2 protein decreased at term compared to nonpregnant uteri. IL1-RAcPb mRNA abundance was less than IL-1RAcP, but in the lower uterine segment it was the highest of all tissues examined. RU486 stimulated preterm delivery and an increase in IL-1R1 mRNA abundance whereas progesterone administration extended pregnancy and suppressed the increase in IL-1R1. These data suggest that changes in uterine sensitivity to IL-1 occur during late gestation and suggest another level of regulation for the control of delivery. The roles for IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb need to be determined, but may relate to different intracellular signaling pathways.

  5. Effects of dietary nitrogen concentration on messenger RNA expression and protein abundance of urea transporter-B and aquaporins in ruminal papillae from lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Theil, Peter Kappel;

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that dietary N concentrations affect gut epithelial urea transport by modifying the expression of urea transporter B (UT-B) and aquaporins (AQP), the mRNA expression and protein abundance of UT-B and AQP3, AQP7, AQP8, and AQP10 were investigated in ruminal papillae from 9 l....... In conclusion, AQP3, 7, and 8 were found to be expressed in bovine rumen papillae. None of the investigated transcripts or proteins correlated to the increased rumen epithelial urea permeability observed with low dietary N concentration.......To test the hypothesis that dietary N concentrations affect gut epithelial urea transport by modifying the expression of urea transporter B (UT-B) and aquaporins (AQP), the mRNA expression and protein abundance of UT-B and AQP3, AQP7, AQP8, and AQP10 were investigated in ruminal papillae from 9...... lactating dairy cows. Ruminal papillae were harvested from cows fed low N (12.9% crude protein) and high N (17.1% crude protein) diets in a crossover design with 21-d periods. The mRNA expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and protein abundance by immunoblotting. The m...

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum α-Glycosidases of Candida albicans Are Required for N Glycosylation, Cell Wall Integrity, and Normal Host-Fungus Interaction▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M.; Bates, Steven; Netea, Mihai G.; Díaz-Jiménez, Diana F.; López-Romero, Everardo; Zinker, Samuel; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Odds, Frank C.; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2007-01-01

    The cell surface of Candida albicans is enriched in highly glycosylated mannoproteins that are involved in the interaction with the host tissues. N glycosylation is a posttranslational modification that is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 N-glycan is processed by α-glucosidases I and II and α1,2-mannosidase to generate Man8GlcNAc2. This N-oligosaccharide is then elaborated in the Golgi to form N-glycans with highly branched outer chains rich in mannose. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CWH41, ROT2, and MNS1 encode for α-glucosidase I, α-glucosidase II catalytic subunit, and α1,2-mannosidase, respectively. We disrupted the C. albicans CWH41, ROT2, and MNS1 homologs to determine the importance of N-oligosaccharide processing on the N-glycan outer-chain elongation and the host-fungus interaction. Yeast cells of Cacwh41Δ, Carot2Δ, and Camns1Δ null mutants tended to aggregate, displayed reduced growth rates, had a lower content of cell wall phosphomannan and other changes in cell wall composition, underglycosylated β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and had a constitutively activated PKC-Mkc1 cell wall integrity pathway. They were also attenuated in virulence in a murine model of systemic infection and stimulated an altered pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile from human monocytes. Therefore, N-oligosaccharide processing by ER glycosidases is required for cell wall integrity and for host-fungus interactions. PMID:17933909

  7. Detection and quantitation of twenty-seven cytokines, chemokines and growth factors pre- and post-high abundance protein depletion in human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Beom Ahn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines, chemokines and growth factors (CCGFs in human plasma are analyzed for identification of biomarkers. However concentrations of CCGFs are very low; it is difficult to identify and quantify low abundance proteins in the presence of the high abundance proteins (HAPs unless HAPs are removed prior to analysis. However, there is a concern that the low abundance proteins such as CCGFs may also be removed during the HAP depletion process. In this study, we have examined whether or not depletion of the HAPs enhances detection of the CCGFs by immuno-assays. Top 14 HAPs were depleted from 10 healthy volunteers’ plasma using MARS-14 immuno-depletion column and a total of 27 CCGFs were analyzed by bead-based multiplexed immuno-assay. All 27 CCGFs were detected in neat plasma (NP, 25 were detected in flow through fraction (FT and 21 were detected in bound protein (BP fraction. Concentrations of 22 CCGFs were significantly higher in NP compared to FT and BP. Only one CCGF had higher concentration in FT compared to NP. The remaining 2 CCGFs were not different between NP and FT. It was counter-productive for the detection of 24 CCGFs after HAP removal, primarily due to post-depletion protein precipitation and/or re-suspension of pellets.

  8. SOLiD-SAGE of endophyte-infected red fescue reveals numerous effects on host transcriptome and an abundance of highly expressed fungal secreted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen V Ambrose

    Full Text Available One of the most important plant-fungal symbiotic relationships is that of cool season grasses with endophytic fungi of the genera Epichloë and Neotyphodium. These associations often confer benefits, such as resistance to herbivores and improved drought tolerance, to the hosts. One benefit that appears to be unique to fine fescue grasses is disease resistance. As a first step towards understanding the basis of the endophyte-mediated disease resistance in Festuca rubra we carried out a SOLiD-SAGE quantitative transcriptome comparison of endophyte-free and Epichloë festucae-infected F. rubra. Over 200 plant genes involved in a wide variety of physiological processes were statistically significantly differentially expressed between the two samples. Many of the endophyte expressed genes were surprisingly abundant, with the most abundant fungal tag representing over 10% of the fungal mapped tags. Many of the abundant fungal tags were for secreted proteins. The second most abundantly expressed fungal gene was for a secreted antifungal protein and is of particular interest regarding the endophyte-mediated disease resistance. Similar genes in Penicillium and Aspergillus spp. have been demonstrated to have antifungal activity. Of the 10 epichloae whole genome sequences available, only one isolate of E. festucae and Neotyphodium gansuense var inebrians have an antifungal protein gene. The uniqueness of this gene in E. festucae from F. rubra, its transcript abundance, and the secreted nature of the protein, all suggest it may be involved in the disease resistance conferred to the host, which is a unique feature of the fine fescue-endophyte symbiosis.

  9. SOLiD-SAGE of endophyte-infected red fescue reveals numerous effects on host transcriptome and an abundance of highly expressed fungal secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Karen V; Belanger, Faith C

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important plant-fungal symbiotic relationships is that of cool season grasses with endophytic fungi of the genera Epichloë and Neotyphodium. These associations often confer benefits, such as resistance to herbivores and improved drought tolerance, to the hosts. One benefit that appears to be unique to fine fescue grasses is disease resistance. As a first step towards understanding the basis of the endophyte-mediated disease resistance in Festuca rubra we carried out a SOLiD-SAGE quantitative transcriptome comparison of endophyte-free and Epichloë festucae-infected F. rubra. Over 200 plant genes involved in a wide variety of physiological processes were statistically significantly differentially expressed between the two samples. Many of the endophyte expressed genes were surprisingly abundant, with the most abundant fungal tag representing over 10% of the fungal mapped tags. Many of the abundant fungal tags were for secreted proteins. The second most abundantly expressed fungal gene was for a secreted antifungal protein and is of particular interest regarding the endophyte-mediated disease resistance. Similar genes in Penicillium and Aspergillus spp. have been demonstrated to have antifungal activity. Of the 10 epichloae whole genome sequences available, only one isolate of E. festucae and Neotyphodium gansuense var inebrians have an antifungal protein gene. The uniqueness of this gene in E. festucae from F. rubra, its transcript abundance, and the secreted nature of the protein, all suggest it may be involved in the disease resistance conferred to the host, which is a unique feature of the fine fescue-endophyte symbiosis.

  10. Methods for protein characterization by mass spectrometry, thermal shift (ThermoFluor) assay, and multiangle or static light scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nettleship, Joanne E; Brown, James; Groves, Matthew R; Geerlof, Arie

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is widely used within structural and functional proteomics for a variety of tasks including protein quality assessment, identification, and characterization. MS is used routinely for the determination of the total mass of proteins, including N-glycosylated proteins, analysis o

  11. Sequential extraction results in improved proteome profiling of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata tubers, which contain large amounts of high-abundance proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Wu

    Full Text Available Pinellia ternata tuber is one of the well-known Chinese traditional medicines. In order to understand the pharmacological properties of tuber proteins, it is necessary to perform proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. However, a few high-abundance proteins (HAPs, mainly mannose-binding lectin (agglutinin, exist in aggregates of various sizes in the tubers and seriously interfere with proteome profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Therefore, selective depletion of these HAPs is a prerequisite for enhanced proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. Based on differential protein solubility, we developed a novel protocol involving two sequential extractions for depletion of some HAPs and prefractionation of tuber proteins prior to 2-DE. The first extraction using 10% acetic acid selectively extracted acid-soluble HAPs and the second extraction using the SDS-containing buffer extracted remaining acid-insoluble proteins. After application of the protocol, 2-DE profiles of P. ternata tuber proteins were greatly improved and more protein spots were detected, especially low-abundance proteins. Moreover, the subunit composition of P. ternata lectin was analyzed by electrophoresis. Native lectin consists of two hydrogen-bonded subunits (11 kDa and 25 kDa and the 11 kDa subunit was a glycoprotein. Subsequently, major HAPs in the tubers were analyzed by mass spectrometry, with nine protein spots being identified as lectin isoforms. The methodology was easy to perform and required no specialized apparatus. It would be useful for proteome analysis of other tuber plants of Araceae.

  12. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin eWu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5, deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation.

  13. A gestational high protein diet affects the abundance of muscle transcripts related to cell cycle regulation throughout development in porcine progeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In various animal models pregnancy diets have been shown to affect offspring phenotype. Indeed, the underlying programming of development is associated with modulations in birth weight, body composition, and continual diet-dependent modifications of offspring metabolism until adulthood, producing the hypothesis that the offspring's transcriptome is permanently altered depending on maternal diet. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess alterations of the offspring's transcriptome due to gestational protein supply, German Landrace sows were fed isoenergetic diets containing protein levels of either 30% (high protein--HP or 12% (adequate protein--AP throughout their pregnancy. Offspring muscle tissue (M. longissimus dorsi was collected at 94 days post conception (dpc, and 1, 28, and 188 days post natum (dpn for use with Affymetrix GeneChip Porcine Genome Arrays and subsequent statistical and Ingenuity pathway analyses. Numerous transcripts were found to have altered abundance at 94 dpc and 1 dpn; at 28 dpn no transcripts were altered, and at 188 dpn only a few transcripts showed a different abundance between diet groups. However, when assessing transcriptional changes across developmental time points, marked differences were obvious among the dietary groups. Depending on the gestational dietary exposure, short- and long-term effects were observed for mRNA expression of genes related to cell cycle regulation, energy metabolism, growth factor signaling pathways, and nucleic acid metabolism. In particular, the abundance of transcripts related to cell cycle remained divergent among the groups during development. CONCLUSION: Expression analysis indicates that maternal protein supply induced programming of the offspring's genome; early postnatal compensation of the slight growth retardation obvious at birth in HP piglets resulted, as did a permanently different developmental alteration and responsiveness to the common environment of the

  14. Heterologous Expression of MeLEA3: A 10 kDa Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein of Cassava, Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress in Escherichia coli with Recombinant Protein Showing In Vitro Chaperone Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nicolle L F; da Silva, Diehgo T; Marques, Deyvid N; de Brito, Fabiano M; dos Reis, Savio P; de Souza, Claudia R B

    2015-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are small molecular weight proteins involved in acquisition of tolerance to drought, salinity, high temperature, cold, and freezing stress in many plants. Previous studies revealed a cDNA sequence coding for a 10 kDa atypical LEA protein, named MeLEA3, predicted to be located into mitochondria with potential role in salt stress response of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). Here we aimed to produce the recombinant MeLEA3 protein by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and evaluate the tolerance of bacteria expressing this protein under abiotic stress. Our result revealed that the recombinant MeLEA3 protein conferred a protective function against heat and salt stress in bacterial cells. Also, the recombinant MeLEA3 protein showed in vitro chaperone activity by protection of NdeI restriction enzyme activity under heat stress.

  15. Dietary Yeast Cell Wall Extract Alters the Proteome of the Skin Mucous Barrier in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar): Increased Abundance and Expression of a Calreticulin-Like Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Giulia; Cash, Phillip; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Rajan, Binoy; Tinsley, John W; Bickerdike, Ralph; Martin, Samuel A M; Bowman, Alan S

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve fish health and reduce use of chemotherapeutants in aquaculture production, the immunomodulatory effect of various nutritional ingredients has been explored. In salmon, there is evidence that functional feeds can reduce the abundance of sea lice. This study aimed to determine if there were consistent changes in the skin mucus proteome that could serve as a biomarker for dietary yeast cell wall extract. The effect of dietary yeast cell wall extract on the skin mucus proteome of Atlantic salmon was examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Forty-nine spots showed a statistically significant change in their normalised volumes between the control and yeast cell wall diets. Thirteen spots were successfully identified by peptide fragment fingerprinting and LC-MS/MS and these belonged to a variety of functions and pathways. To assess the validity of the results from the proteome approach, the gene expression of a selection of these proteins was studied in skin mRNA from two different independent feeding trials using yeast cell wall extracts. A calreticulin-like protein increased in abundance at both the protein and transcript level in response to dietary yeast cell wall extract. The calreticulin-like protein was identified as a possible biomarker for yeast-derived functional feeds since it showed the most consistent change in expression in both the mucus proteome and skin transcriptome. The discovery of such a biomarker is expected to quicken the pace of research in the application of yeast cell wall extracts.

  16. Dietary Yeast Cell Wall Extract Alters the Proteome of the Skin Mucous Barrier in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar): Increased Abundance and Expression of a Calreticulin-Like Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Giulia; Cash, Phillip; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.; Rajan, Binoy; Tinsley, John W.; Bickerdike, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve fish health and reduce use of chemotherapeutants in aquaculture production, the immunomodulatory effect of various nutritional ingredients has been explored. In salmon, there is evidence that functional feeds can reduce the abundance of sea lice. This study aimed to determine if there were consistent changes in the skin mucus proteome that could serve as a biomarker for dietary yeast cell wall extract. The effect of dietary yeast cell wall extract on the skin mucus proteome of Atlantic salmon was examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Forty-nine spots showed a statistically significant change in their normalised volumes between the control and yeast cell wall diets. Thirteen spots were successfully identified by peptide fragment fingerprinting and LC-MS/MS and these belonged to a variety of functions and pathways. To assess the validity of the results from the proteome approach, the gene expression of a selection of these proteins was studied in skin mRNA from two different independent feeding trials using yeast cell wall extracts. A calreticulin-like protein increased in abundance at both the protein and transcript level in response to dietary yeast cell wall extract. The calreticulin-like protein was identified as a possible biomarker for yeast-derived functional feeds since it showed the most consistent change in expression in both the mucus proteome and skin transcriptome. The discovery of such a biomarker is expected to quicken the pace of research in the application of yeast cell wall extracts. PMID:28046109

  17. Quantitation of human milk proteins and their glycoforms using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jincui; Kailemia, Muchena J; Goonatilleke, Elisha; Parker, Evan A; Hong, Qiuting; Sabia, Rocchina; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2017-01-01

    Human milk plays a substantial role in the child growth, development and determines their nutritional and health status. Despite the importance of the proteins and glycoproteins in human milk, very little quantitative information especially on their site-specific glycosylation is known. As more functions of milk proteins and other components continue to emerge, their fine-detailed quantitative information is becoming a key factor in milk research efforts. The present work utilizes a sensitive label-free MRM method to quantify seven milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, secretory immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, α1-antitrypsin, and lysozyme) using their unique peptides while at the same time, quantifying their site-specific N-glycosylation relative to the protein abundance. The method is highly reproducible, has low limit of quantitation, and accounts for differences in glycosylation due to variations in protein amounts. The method described here expands our knowledge about human milk proteins and provides vital details that could be used in monitoring the health of the infant and even the mother. Graphical Abstract The glycopeptides EICs generated from QQQ.

  18. Purification and in vitro chaperone activity of a class I small heat-shock protein abundant in recalcitrant chestnut seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collada, C; Gomez, L; Casado, R; Aragoncillo, C

    1997-09-01

    A 20-kD protein has been purified from cotyledons of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, where it accumulates at levels comparable to those of major seed storage proteins. This protein, termed Cs smHSP 1, forms homododecameric complexes under nondenaturing conditions and appears to be homologous to cytosolic class I small heat-shock proteins (smHSPs) from plant sources. In vitro evidence has been obtained that the isolated protein can function as a molecular chaperone; it increases, at stoichiometric levels, the renaturation yields of chemically denatured citrate synthase and also prevents the irreversible thermal inactivation of this enzyme. Although a role in desiccation tolerance has been hypothesized for seed smHSPs, this does not seem to be the case for Cs smHSP 1. We have investigated the presence of immunologically related proteins in orthodox and recalcitrant seeds of 13 woody species. Our results indicate that the presence of Cs smHSP 1-like proteins, even at high levels, is not enough to confer desiccation tolerance, and that the amount of these proteins does not furnish a reliable criterion to identify desiccation-sensitive seeds. Additional proteins or mechanisms appear necessary to keep the viability of orthodox seeds upon shedding.

  19. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection.

  20. Aestivation Induces Changes in the mRNA Expression Levels and Protein Abundance of Two Isoforms of Urea Transporters in the Gills of the African Lungfish, Protopterus annectens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, You R.; Ong, Jasmine L. Y.; Ching, Biyun; Chen, Xiu L.; Hiong, Kum C.; Wong, Wai P.; Chew, Shit F.; Lam, Siew H.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2017-01-01

    The African lungfish, Protopterus annectens, is ammonotelic in water despite being ureogenic. When it aestivates in mucus cocoon on land, ammonia is detoxified to urea. During the maintenance phase of aestivation, urea accumulates in the body, which is subsequently excreted upon arousal. Urea excretion involves urea transporters (UT/Ut). This study aimed to clone and sequence the ut isoforms from the gills of P. annectens, and to test the hypothesis that the mRNA and/or protein expression levels of ut/Ut isoforms could vary in the gills of P. annectens during the induction, maintenance, and arousal phases of aestivation. Two isoforms of ut, ut-a2a and ut-a2b, were obtained from the gills of P. annectens. ut-a2a consisted of 1227 bp and coded for 408 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 44.7 kDa, while ut-a2b consisted of 1392 bp and coded for 464 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 51.2 kDa. Ut-a2a and Ut-a2b of P. annectens had a closer phylogenetic relationship with Ut/UT of tetrapods than Ut of fishes. While the mRNA expression pattern of ut-a2a and ut-a2b across various tissues of P. annectens differed, the transcript levels of ut-a2a and ut-a2b in the gills were comparable, indicating that they might be equally important for branchial urea excretion during the initial arousal phase of aestivation. During the maintenance phase of aestivation, the transcript level of ut-a2a increased significantly, but the protein abundance of Ut-a2a remained unchanged in the gills of P. annectens. This could be an adaptive feature to prepare for an increase in the production of Ut-a2a upon arousal. Indeed, arousal led to a significant increase in the branchial Ut-a2a protein abundance. Although the transcript level of ut-a2b remained unchanged, there were significant increases in the protein abundance of Ut-a2b in the gills of P. annectens throughout the three phases of aestivation. The increase in the protein abundance of Ut-a2b during the maintenance

  1. KvLEA, a New Isolated Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Kosteletzkya virginica Responding to Multiabiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongyan; Chu, Liye; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    The LEA proteins are a kind of hydrophilic proteins, playing main functions in desiccation tolerance. However, their importance as a kind of stress proteins in abiotic stress is being clarified little by little. In this study we isolated, cloned, and identified the first KvLEA gene in Kosteletzkya virginica. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the protein encoded by this gene had common properties of LEA proteins and the multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic analysis further showed that this protein had high homology with two Arabidopsis LEA proteins. Gene expression analysis revealed that this gene had a higher expression in root and it was induced obviously by salt stress. Moreover, the transcripts of KvLEA were also induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, high temperature, chilling, and ABA treatment. Among these abiotic stresses, ABA treatment brought about the biggest changes to this gene. Collectively, our research discovered a novel LEA gene and uncovered its involvement in multiabiotic stresses in K. virginica. This research not only enriched studies on LEA gene in plant but also would accelerate more studies on K. virginica in the future.

  2. Foetal life protein restriction in male mink (Neovison vison) kits lowers post-weaning protein oxidation and the relative abundance of hepatic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiesen, C F; Blache, D; Thomsen, P D; Tauson, A-H

    2012-01-01

    Foetal life malnutrition has been studied intensively in a number of animal models. Results show that especially foetal life protein malnutrition can lead to metabolic changes later in life. This might be of particular importance for strict carnivores, for example, cat and mink (Neovison vison) because of their higher protein requirement than in other domestic mammals. This study aimed to investigate the effects of low protein provision during foetal life to male mink kits on their protein metabolism during the early post-weaning period of rapid growth and to investigate whether foetal life protein deficiency affects the response to adequate or deficient protein provision post weaning. Further, we intended to study whether the changes in the gene expression of key enzymes in foetal hepatic tissue caused by maternal protein deficiency were manifested post-weaning. A total of 32 male mink kits born to mothers fed either a low-protein diet (LP), that is, 14% of metabolizable energy (ME) from protein (foetal low - FL), n = 16, or an adequate-protein (AP) diet, that is, 29% of ME from protein (foetal adequate - FA), n = 16) in the last 16.3 ± 1.8 days of pregnancy were used. The FL offspring had lower birth weight and lower relative abundance of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (Fru-1,6-P2ase) and pyruvate kinase mRNA in foetal hepatic tissue than FA kits. The mothers were fed a diet containing adequate protein until weaning. At weaning (7 weeks of age), half of the kits from each foetal treatment group were fed an AP diet (32% of ME from protein; n = 8 FA and 8 FL) and the other half were fed a LP diet (18% of ME from protein; n = 8 FA and 8 FL) until 9.5 weeks of age, yielding four treatment groups (i.e. FA-AP, FA-LP, FL-AP and FL-LP). Low protein provision in foetal life lowered the protein oxidation post-weaning compared with the controls (P = 0.006), indicating metabolic flexibility and a better ability to conserve protein. This could not, however, be supported by

  3. Proteomic Characterization of Differential Abundant Proteins Accumulated between Lower and Upper Epidermises of Fleshy Scales in Onion (Allium cepa L.) Bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    The onion (Allium cepa L.) is widely planted worldwide as a valuable vegetable crop. The scales of an onion bulb are a modified type of leaf. The one-layer-cell epidermis of onion scales is commonly used as a model experimental material in botany and molecular biology. The lower epidermis (LE) and upper epidermis (UE) of onion scales display obvious differences in microscopic structure, cell differentiation and pigment synthesis; however, associated proteomic differences are unclear. LE and UE can be easily sampled as single-layer-cell tissues for comparative proteomic analysis. In this study, a proteomic approach based on 2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to compare LE and UE of fleshy scales from yellow and red onions. We identified 47 differential abundant protein spots (representing 31 unique proteins) between LE and UE in red and yellow onions. These proteins are mainly involved in pigment synthesis, stress response, and cell division. Particularly, the differentially accumulated chalcone-flavanone isomerase and flavone O-methyltransferase 1-like in LE may result in the differences in the onion scale color between red and yellow onions. Moreover, stress-related proteins abundantly accumulated in both LE and UE. In addition, the differential accumulation of UDP-arabinopyranose mutase 1-like protein and β-1,3-glucanase in the LE may be related to the different cell sizes between LE and UE of the two types of onion. The data derived from this study provides new insight into the differences in differentiation and developmental processes between onion epidermises. This study may also make a contribution to onion breeding, such as improving resistances and changing colors. PMID:28036352

  4. Quantification of intermediate-abundance proteins in serum by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry in a single-quadrupole ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shanhua; Shaler, Thomas A; Becker, Christopher H

    2006-08-15

    A method is presented to quantify intermediate-abundance proteins in human serum using a single-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer-in contrast, for example, to a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. Stable-isotope-labeled (tryptic) peptides are spiked into digested protein samples as internal standards, aligned with the traditional isotope dilution approach. As a proof-of-concept experiment, four proteins of intermediate abundance were selected, coagulation factor V, adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and thyroxine binding globulin. Stable-isotope-labeled peptides were synthesized with one tryptic sequence from each of these proteins. The normal human serum concentration ranges of these proteins are from 1 to 30 microg/mL (or 20 to 650 pmol/mL). These labeled peptides and their endogenous counterparts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring, a multiplexed form of the selected reaction monitoring technique. For these experiments, only one chromatographic dimension (on-line reversed-phase capillary column) was used. Improved limits of detection will result with multidimensional chromatographic methods utilizing more material per sample. Standard curves of the spiked calibrants were generated with concentrations ranging from 3 to 700 pmol/mL using both neat solutions and peptides spiked into the complex matrix of digested serum protein solution where ion suppression effects and interferences are common. Endogenous protein concentrations were determined by comparing MS/MS peak areas of the endogenous peptides to the isotopically labeled internal calibrants. The derived concentrations from a normal human serum pool (neglecting loss of material during sample processing) were 9.2, 110, 120, and 246 pmol/mL for coagulation factor V, adiponectin, CRP, and thyroxine binding globulin, respectively. These concentrations generally agree with the reported normal ranges for these proteins. As a measure of analytical reproducibility of this

  5. The highly abundant chlorophyll-protein complex of iron-deficient Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (CP43') is encoded by the isiA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnap, R L; Troyan, T; Sherman, L A

    1993-11-01

    A chlorophyll (Chl)-protein complex designated CPVI-4 becomes the major pigment-protein complex in Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 cells grown under conditions of iron limitation. Work by Laudenbach et al. (J Bacteriol [1988] 170: 5018-5026) has identified an iron-repressible operon, designated isiAB, containing the flavodoxin gene and a gene predicted to encode a Chl-binding protein resembling CP43 of photosystem II. To test the hypothesis that the CP43-like protein is a component of the CPVI-4 complex, we have inactivated the isiAB operon in Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 using directed insertional mutagenesis. Mutant cells grown under conditions of iron limitation exhibit pronounced changes in their spectroscopic and photosynthetic properties relative to similarly grown wild-type cells. Notably, the strong 77 K fluorescence emission at 685 nm, which dominates the spectrum of iron-deficient wild-type cells, is dramatically reduced in the mutant. The loss of this emission appears to unmask the otherwise obscured photosystem II emissions at 685 and 695 nm. Most importantly, mildly denaturing gel electrophoresis shows that mutant cells no longer express the CPVI-4 complex, indicating that the isiA gene encodes a component of this abundant Chl-protein complex.

  6. Depth-specific fluctuations of gene expression and protein abundance modulate the photophysiology in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Gabriele; Ruocco, Miriam; Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Dattolo, Emanuela; Brunet, Christophe; D’Esposito, Daniela; Lauritano, Chiara; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia Anna; Bernardo, Letizia; Piro, Amalia; Beer, Sven; Björk, Mats; Gullström, Martin; Buapet, Pimchanok; Rasmusson, Lina M.; Felisberto, Paulo; Gobert, Sylvie; Runcie, John W.; Silva, João; Olivé, Irene; Costa, Monya M.; Barrote, Isabel; Santos, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Here we present the results of a multiple organizational level analysis conceived to identify acclimative/adaptive strategies exhibited by the seagrass Posidonia oceanica to the daily fluctuations in the light environment, at contrasting depths. We assessed changes in photophysiological parameters, leaf respiration, pigments, and protein and mRNA expression levels. The results show that the diel oscillations of P. oceanica photophysiological and respiratory responses were related to transcripts and proteins expression of the genes involved in those processes and that there was a response asynchrony between shallow and deep plants probably caused by the strong differences in the light environment. The photochemical pathway of energy use was more effective in shallow plants due to higher light availability, but these plants needed more investment in photoprotection and photorepair, requiring higher translation and protein synthesis than deep plants. The genetic differentiation between deep and shallow stands suggests the existence of locally adapted genotypes to contrasting light environments. The depth-specific diel rhythms of photosynthetic and respiratory processes, from molecular to physiological levels, must be considered in the management and conservation of these key coastal ecosystems.

  7. Depth-specific fluctuations of gene expression and protein abundance modulate the photophysiology in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Gabriele; Ruocco, Miriam; Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Dattolo, Emanuela; Brunet, Christophe; D’Esposito, Daniela; Lauritano, Chiara; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia Anna; Bernardo, Letizia; Piro, Amalia; Beer, Sven; Björk, Mats; Gullström, Martin; Buapet, Pimchanok; Rasmusson, Lina M.; Felisberto, Paulo; Gobert, Sylvie; Runcie, John W.; Silva, João; Olivé, Irene; Costa, Monya M.; Barrote, Isabel; Santos, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Here we present the results of a multiple organizational level analysis conceived to identify acclimative/adaptive strategies exhibited by the seagrass Posidonia oceanica to the daily fluctuations in the light environment, at contrasting depths. We assessed changes in photophysiological parameters, leaf respiration, pigments, and protein and mRNA expression levels. The results show that the diel oscillations of P. oceanica photophysiological and respiratory responses were related to transcripts and proteins expression of the genes involved in those processes and that there was a response asynchrony between shallow and deep plants probably caused by the strong differences in the light environment. The photochemical pathway of energy use was more effective in shallow plants due to higher light availability, but these plants needed more investment in photoprotection and photorepair, requiring higher translation and protein synthesis than deep plants. The genetic differentiation between deep and shallow stands suggests the existence of locally adapted genotypes to contrasting light environments. The depth-specific diel rhythms of photosynthetic and respiratory processes, from molecular to physiological levels, must be considered in the management and conservation of these key coastal ecosystems. PMID:28211527

  8. Increased reactive oxygen species production and lower abundance of complex I subunits and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B protein despite normal mitochondrial respiration in insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine...... palmitoyltransferase 1B). CONCLUSIONS: We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute...... to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance....

  9. Na+/K+-ATPase α1 identified as an abundant protein in the blood-labyrinth barrier that plays an essential role in the barrier integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yang

    Full Text Available The endothelial-blood/tissue barrier is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis. The ear harbors a unique endothelial-blood/tissue barrier which we term "blood-labyrinth-barrier". This barrier is critical for maintaining inner ear homeostasis. Disruption of the blood-labyrinth-barrier is closely associated with a number of hearing disorders. Many proteins of the blood-brain-barrier and blood-retinal-barrier have been identified, leading to significant advances in understanding their tissue specific functions. In contrast, capillaries in the ear are small in volume and anatomically complex. This presents a challenge for protein analysis studies, which has resulted in limited knowledge of the molecular and functional components of the blood-labyrinth-barrier. In this study, we developed a novel method for isolation of the stria vascularis capillary from CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea and provided the first database of protein components in the blood-labyrinth barrier as well as evidence that the interaction of Na(+/K(+-ATPase α1 (ATP1A1 with protein kinase C eta (PKCη and occludin is one of the mechanisms of loud sound-induced vascular permeability increase.Using a mass-spectrometry, shotgun-proteomics approach combined with a novel "sandwich-dissociation" method, more than 600 proteins from isolated stria vascularis capillaries were identified from adult CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea. The ion transporter ATP1A1 was the most abundant protein in the blood-labyrinth barrier. Pharmacological inhibition of ATP1A1 activity resulted in hyperphosphorylation of tight junction proteins such as occludin which increased the blood-labyrinth-barrier permeability. PKCη directly interacted with ATP1A1 and was an essential mediator of ATP1A1-initiated occludin phosphorylation. Moreover, this identified signaling pathway was involved in the breakdown of the blood-labyrinth-barrier resulting from loud sound trauma.The results presented here provide a novel method for

  10. Characterization of the carbohydrate components of Taenia solium oncosphere proteins and their role in the antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H; Gilman, Robert H

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that posttranslational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells.

  11. Protein glycosylation in Archaea: sweet and extreme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-09-01

    While each of the three domains of life on Earth possesses unique traits and relies on characteristic biological strategies, some processes are common to Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea. Once believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now clear that Bacteria and Archaea are also capable of performing N-glycosylation. However, in contrast to Bacteria, where this posttranslational modification is still considered a rare event, numerous species of Archaea, isolated from a wide range of environments, have been reported to contain proteins bearing Asn-linked glycan moieties. Analysis of the chemical composition of the Asn-linked polysaccharides decorating archaeal proteins has, moreover, revealed the use of a wider variety of sugar subunits than seen in either eukaryal or bacterial glycoproteins. Still, although first reported some 30 years ago, little had been known of the steps or components involved in the archaeal version of this universal posttranslational modification. Now, with the availability of sufficient numbers of genome sequences and the development of appropriate experimental tools, molecular analysis of archaeal N-glycosylation pathways has become possible. Accordingly using halophilic, methanogenic and thermophilic model species, insight into the biosynthesis and attachment of N-linked glycans decorating archaeal glycoproteins is starting to amass. In this review, current understanding of N-glycosylation in Archaea is described.

  12. CpLEA5, the Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Chimonanthus praecox, Possesses Low Temperature and Osmotic Resistances in Prokaryote and Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiling Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants synthesize and accumulate a series of stress-resistance proteins to protect normal physiological activities under adverse conditions. Chimonanthus praecox which blooms in freezing weather accumulates late embryogenesis abundant proteins (LEAs in flowers, but C. praecox LEAs are little reported. Here, we report a group of five LEA genes of C. praecox (CpLEA5, KT727031. Prokaryotic-expressed CpLEA5 was employed in Escherichia coli to investigate bioactivities and membrane permeability at low-temperature. In comparison with the vacant strains, CpLEA5-containing strains survived in a 20% higher rate; and the degree of cell membrane damage in CpLEA5-containing strains was 55% of that of the vacant strains according to a conductivity test, revealing the low-temperature resistance of CpLEA5 in bacteria. CpLEA5 was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Interestingly, besides low-temperature resistance, CpLEA5 conferred high resistance to salt and alkali in CpLEA5 overexpressing yeast. The CpLEA5 gene was transferred into Arabidopsis thaliana to also demonstrate CpLEA5 actions in plants. As expected, the transgenic lines were more resistant against low-temperature and drought while compared with the wild type. Taken together, CpLEA5-conferred resistances to several conditions in prokaryote and eukaryotes could have great value as a genetic technology to enhance osmotic stress and low-temperature tolerance.

  13. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus): cDNA cloning, sites of expression and transcript abundance in corticosteroidogenic tissue after an acute stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Makoto; Zuccarelli, Micah D; Nakamura, Ikumi; Young, Graham

    2009-06-01

    The white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, is a primitive bony fish that is recognized as an important emerging species for aquaculture. However, many aspects of its stress and reproductive physiology remain unclear. These processes are controlled by various steroid hormones. In order to investigate the regulation of steroidogenesis associated with acute stress in sturgeon, a cDNA-encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) was isolated from white sturgeon. The putative amino acid sequence of sturgeon StAR shares high homology (over 60%) with other vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis grouped sturgeon StAR within Actinopterygii, but it was clearly segregated from teleost StARs. RT-PCR analysis revealed that transcripts were most abundant in yellow corpuscles found throughout the kidney and weaker signals were detected in gonad and kidney. Very weak signals were also detected in brain and spleen by quantitative real-time PCR. In situ hybridization revealed that StAR is expressed in the cells of yellow corpuscles. No significant changes in StAR gene expression were detected in response to an acute handling stress. These results suggest that StAR is highly conserved throughout vertebrates, but the expression of the functional protein during the stress response may be partially regulated post-transcriptionally.

  14. A late embryogenesis abundant protein HVA1 regulated by an inducible promoter enhances root growth and abiotic stress tolerance in rice without yield penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Shih; Lo, Shuen-Fang; Sun, Peng-Kai; Lu, Chung-An; Ho, Tuan-Hua D; Yu, Su-May

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of root architecture is essential for maintaining plant growth under adverse environment. A synthetic abscisic acid (ABA)/stress-inducible promoter was designed to control the expression of a late embryogenesis abundant protein (HVA1) in transgenic rice. The background of HVA1 is low but highly inducible by ABA, salt, dehydration and cold. HVA1 was highly accumulated in root apical meristem (RAM) and lateral root primordia (LRP) after ABA/stress treatments, leading to enhanced root system expansion. Water-use efficiency (WUE) and biomass also increased in transgenic rice, likely due to the maintenance of normal cell functions and metabolic activities conferred by HVA1 which is capable of stabilizing proteins, under osmotic stress. HVA1 promotes lateral root (LR) initiation, elongation and emergence and primary root (PR) elongation via an auxin-dependent process, particularly by intensifying asymmetrical accumulation of auxin in LRP founder cells and RAM, even under ABA/stress-suppressive conditions. We demonstrate a successful application of an inducible promoter in regulating the spatial and temporal expression of HVA1 for improving root architecture and multiple stress tolerance without yield penalty.

  15. The Campylobacter jejuni/coli cjaA (cj0982c) gene encodes an N-glycosylated lipoprotein localized in the inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszyńska, Agnieszka; Zycka, Joanna; Godlewska, Renata; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2008-09-01

    The Campylobacter coli 72Dz/92 cjaA gene (orthologue of cj0982c of C. jejuni NCTC 11168) product is a highly immunogenic, amino acid-binding protein. CjaA was palmitic acid-modified when processed in E. coli. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of the Cys residue of the LAAC motif of its signal sequence confirmed that CjaA is a lipoprotein when processed in Campylobacter. Localization of the protein appeared to be host dependent. In Campylobacter, CjaA was recovered mainly as an inner-membrane protein, whereas in E. coli most of the protein was present in the periplasmic space. Interestingly, antiserum raised against Campylobacter glycine-extracted material also recognized CjaA produced by Campylobacter and Escherichia coli, indicating that at least part of the protein may be surface exposed. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Asn residues of two putative N-linked glycosylation sites (NIS and NFT) showed that CjaA is glycosylated and that only the first N-X-S/T sequeon serves as a glycan acceptor.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of urinary prostate protein glycosylation profiling in prostatitis diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermassen, Tijl; Van Praet, Charles; Poelaert, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Decaestecker, Karel; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Belle, Simon; Rottey, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although prostatitis is a common male urinary tract infection, clinical diagnosis of prostatitis is difficult. The developmental mechanism of prostatitis is not yet unraveled which led to the elaboration of various biomarkers. As changes in asparagine-linked-(N-)-glycosylation were observed between healthy volunteers (HV), patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients, a difference could exist in biochemical parameters and urinary N-glycosylation between HV and prostatitis patients. We therefore investigated if prostatic protein glycosylation could improve the diagnosis of prostatitis. Materials and methods Differences in serum and urine biochemical markers and in total urine N-glycosylation profile of prostatic proteins were determined between HV (N = 66) and prostatitis patients (N = 36). Additionally, diagnostic accuracy of significant biochemical markers and changes in N-glycosylation was assessed. Results Urinary white blood cell (WBC) count enabled discrimination of HV from prostatitis patients (P < 0.001). Urinary bacteria count allowed for discriminating prostatitis patients from HV (P < 0.001). Total amount of biantennary structures (urinary 2A/MA marker) was significantly lower in prostatitis patients compared to HV (P < 0.001). Combining the urinary 2A/MA marker and urinary WBC count resulted in an AUC of 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.70–0.89) which was significantly better than urinary WBC count (AUC = 0.70, 95% CI = [0.59–0.82], P = 0.042) as isolated test. Conclusions We have demonstrated the diagnostic value of urinary N-glycosylation profiling, which shows great potential as biomarker for prostatitis. Further research is required to unravel the developmental course of prostatic inflammation. PMID:26526330

  17. Expression, Purification, and Biophysical Characterization of a Secreted Anthrax Decoy Fusion Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Duhra-Gill, Sifti; Kailemia, Muchena J.; Phu, My L.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; Nandi, Somen; McDonald, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptor-mediated drug development for blocking anthrax toxin action has received much attention in recent decades. In this study, we produced a secreted anthrax decoy fusion protein comprised of a portion of the human capillary morphogenesis gene-2 (CMG2) protein fused via a linker to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain of human immunoglobulin G1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a transient expression system. Using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and co-expression with the p19 gene silencing suppressor, we were able to achieve a high level of recombinant CMG2-Fc-Apo (rCMG2-Fc-Apo) protein accumulation. Production kinetics were observed up to eight days post-infiltration, and maximum production of 826 mg/kg fresh leaf weight was observed on day six. Protein A affinity chromatography purification of the rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid showed the homodimeric form under non-reducing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the molecular integrity of the secreted protein. The N-glycosylation pattern of purified rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein was analysed; the major portion of N-glycans consists of complex type structures in both protein samples. The most abundant (>50%) N-glycan structure was GlcNAc2(Xyl)Man3(Fuc)GlcNAc2 in rCMG2-Fc-Apo recovered from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid. High mannose N-glycan structures were not detected in the apoplast wash fluid preparation, which confirmed the protein secretion. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that high-level production of rCMG2-Fc-Apo can be achieved by transient production in Nicotiana benthamiana plants with apoplast targeting. PMID:28054967

  18. A transgenic Bm cell line of piggyBac transposon-derived targeting expression of humanized glycoproteins through N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jia-Biao; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Mei-Xian; Zhou, Fang; Niu, Yan-Shan; Miao, Yun-Gen

    2012-08-01

    Glycoproteins have been implicated in a wide variety of important biochemical and biological functions, including protein stability, immune function, enzymatic function, cellular adhesion and others. Unfortunately, there is no therapeutic protein produced in insect system to date, due to the expressed glycoproteins are paucimannosidic N-glycans, rather than the complex, terminally sialylated N-glycans in mammalian cells. In this paper, we cloned the necessary genes in glycosylation of mammalian cells, such as N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II (Gn-TII), galactosyltransferases (Gal-Ts), 2,6-Sial-T (ST6 GalII)and 2,3-Sial-T (ST3GalIII), and transformed them to silkworm genome of BmN cell line through transgenesis to establish a transgenic Bm cell line of piggyBac transposon-derived targeting expression of humanized glycoproteins. The study supplied a new insect cell line which is practically to produce "bisected" complex N-glycans like in mammalian cells.

  19. Addition of N-glycosylation sites on the globular head of the H5 hemagglutinin induces the escape of highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses from vaccine-induced immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Pierre-Louis; Lorin, Valérie; Jouvion, Grégory; Da Costa, Bruno; Escriou, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses remain endemic in poultry in several countries and still constitute a pandemic threat. Since the early 20th century, we experienced four influenza A pandemics. H3N2 and H1N1pdm09 viruses that respectively emerged during 1968 and 2009 pandemics are still responsible for seasonal epidemics. These viruses evolve regularly by substitutions in antigenic sites of the hemagglutinin (HA), which prevent neutralization by antibodies directed against previous strains (antigenic drift). For seasonal H3N2 viruses, an addition of N-glycosylation sites (glycosites) on H3 contributed to this drift. Here, we questioned whether additional glycosites on H5 could induce an escape of H5N1 virus from neutralization, as it was observed for seasonal H3N2 viruses. Seven H5N1 mutants were produced by adding glycosites on H5. The most glycosylated virus escaped from neutralizing antibodies, in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a single additional glycosite was responsible for this escape.

  20. The interaction between the first transmembrane domain and the thumb of ASIC1a is critical for its N-glycosylation and trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Jing

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a, the primary proton receptor in the brain, contributes to multiple diseases including stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. Thus, a better understanding of its biogenesis will provide important insights into the regulation of ASIC1a in diseases. Interestingly, ASIC1a contains a large, yet well organized ectodomain, which suggests the hypothesis that correct formation of domain-domain interactions at the extracellular side is a key regulatory step for ASIC1a maturation and trafficking. We tested this hypothesis here by focusing on the interaction between the first transmembrane domain (TM1 and the thumb of ASIC1a, an interaction known to be critical in channel gating. We mutated Tyr71 and Trp287, two key residues involved in the TM1-thumb interaction in mouse ASIC1a, and found that both Y71G and W287G decreased synaptic targeting and surface expression of ASIC1a. These defects were likely due to altered folding; both mutants showed increased resistance to tryptic cleavage, suggesting a change in conformation. Moreover, both mutants lacked the maturation of N-linked glycans through mid to late Golgi. These data suggest that disrupting the interaction between TM1 and thumb alters ASIC1a folding, impedes its glycosylation and reduces its trafficking. Moreover, reducing the culture temperature, an approach commonly used to facilitate protein folding, increased ASIC1a glycosylation, surface expression, current density and slowed the rate of desensitization. These results suggest that correct folding of extracellular ectodomain plays a critical role in ASIC1a biogenesis and function.

  1. Plant protein glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an essential co- and post-translational modification of secretory and membrane proteins in all eukaryotes. The initial steps of N-glycosylation and N-glycan processing are highly conserved between plants, mammals and yeast. In contrast, late N-glycan maturation steps in the Golgi differ significantly in plants giving rise to complex N-glycans with β1,2-linked xylose, core α1,3-linked fucose and Lewis A-type structures. While the essential role of N-glycan modifications on distinct mammalian glycoproteins is already well documented, we have only begun to decipher the biological function of this ubiquitous protein modification in different plant species. In this review, I focus on the biosynthesis and function of different protein N-linked glycans in plants. Special emphasis is given on glycan-mediated quality control processes in the ER and on the biological role of characteristic complex N-glycan structures. PMID:26911286

  2. N-糖基化对植酸酶phy(QF)酶学性质的影响%The Effects of N-glycosylation on Enzymological Properties of Phytase Phy(QF)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王茜; 宋玛丽; 杜军; 付月君; 胡风云; 梁爱华

    2015-01-01

    为探讨N-糖基化对植酸酶phy( QF )酶学性质的影响,将植酸酶基因phy( QF )在毕赤酵母中进行了表达,利用脱糖基化酶Endo Hf去除重组植酸酶phy(QF)的糖链,对去除糖链前后的植酸酶phy(QF)进行了纯化和酶学性质研究与比较。结果表明,糖基化的植酸酶phy(QF)分子量约为53 kDa,酶活为3201 U/mg,Km =392μmol/L,Vmax =3267 U/mg;糖基化的植酸酶phy( QF )最适pH值为4.5,最适反应温度为55℃,与去糖基化的植酸酶phy( QF )的最适pH值无明显区别,比去糖基化的植酸酶phy(QF)最适温度提高了5℃,Tm值提高约2℃。经70℃孵育10 min后,去糖基化的植酸酶phy(QF)完全失活,而糖基化的植酸酶phy(QF)仍残留13%的活性,说明N-糖基化作为一种重要的翻译后修饰,对植酸酶phy( QF )的稳定性有促进作用。%In order to study the effects of N-glycosylation on enzymological properties of phytase phy (QF),the recombinant phytase gene phy(QF) was expressed in pichia pastoris GS115.Phytase phy(QF) was deglycosylated by endoglycosylase Endo H f .Enzymology properties of glycosylated phy (QF)and deglycosylated phy (QF)were an-alyzed.The results showed that the glycosylated phy (QF) had a specific activity of 3 201 U/mg with an MW of ap-proximately 53 kDa and the Km and Vmax of glycosylated phy(QF) were 392 μmol/L and 3 267 U/mg,respectively. The optimal pH value of glycosylated phy(QF) was 4.5 and was consistented with that of deglycosylated phy (QF). However,the optimal temperature of glycosylated phy (QF) was 55 ℃,5 ℃ higher than that of deglycosylated phy (QF) and 2 ℃increased in the melting temperature (Tm).The glycosylated phy(QF) exhibited 13%residual ac-tivity after treatment at 70 ℃for 10 min and deglycosylated phy (QF)was completely deactivated under the condi-tion.As one of posttranslational modifications ,N-glycosylation may play an important

  3. Manipulating the glycosylation pathway in bacterial and lower eukaryotes for production of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2015-12-01

    The medical use of pharmaceutical proteins is rapidly increasing and cheap, fast and efficient production is therefore attractive. Microbial production hosts are promising candidates for development and production of pharmaceutical proteins. However, as most therapeutic proteins are secreted proteins, they are frequently N-glycosylated. This hampers production in microbes as these hosts glycosylate proteins differently. The resulting products may therefore be immunogenic, unstable and show reduced efficacy. Recently, successful glycoengineering of microbes has demonstrated that it is possible to produce proteins with humanlike glycan structures setting the stage for production of pharmaceutical proteins in bacteria, yeasts and algae.

  4. Piperidine-based glycodendrons as protein N-glycan prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Jason E; Belardi, Brian; Appel, Mason J; Solania, Angelo; Robinson, Peter V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2016-10-15

    The generation of homogeneously glycosylated proteins is essential for defining glycoform-specific activity and improving protein-based therapeutics. We present a novel glycodendron prosthetic which can be site-selectively appended to recombinant proteins to create 'N-glycosylated' glycoprotein mimics. Using computational modeling, we designed the dendrimer scaffold and protein attachment point to resemble the native N-glycan architecture. Three piperidine-melamine glycodendrimers were synthesized via a chemoenzymatic route and attached to human growth hormone and the Fc region of human IgG. These products represent a new class of engineered biosimilars bearing novel glycodendrimer structures.

  5. Quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins with peptide affinity-based enrichment and pseudo-multiple reaction monitoring by hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Hoe; Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jin Young; An, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-07-02

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is commonly used for the quantitative analysis of proteins during mass pectrometry (MS), and has excellent specificity and sensitivity for an analyte in a complex sample. In this study, a pseudo-MRM method for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins was developed using hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (hybrid Q-TOF) MS and peptide affinity-based enrichment. First, a pseudo-MRM-based analysis using hybrid Q-TOF MS was performed for synthetic peptides selected as targets and spiked into tryptic digests of human serum. By integrating multiple transition signals corresponding to fragment ions in the full scan MS/MS spectrum of a precursor ion of the target peptide, a pseudo-MRM MS analysis of the target peptide showed an increased signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and sensitivity, as well as an improved reproducibility. The pseudo-MRM method was then used for the quantitative analysis of the tryptic peptides of two low-abundance serological proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and tissue-type protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa (PTPκ), which were prepared with peptide affinity-based enrichment from human serum. Finally, this method was used to detect femtomolar amounts of target peptides derived from TIMP1 and PTPκ, with good coefficients of variation (CV 2.7% and 9.8%, respectively), using a few microliters of human serum from colorectal cancer patients. The results suggest that pseudo-MRM using hybrid Q-TOF MS, combined with peptide affinity-based enrichment, could become a promising alternative for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance target proteins of interest in complex serum samples that avoids protein depletion.

  6. Improved method for identification of low abundance proteins using 2D-gel electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF and TOF/TOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Differential protein expression studies have been routinely performed in our laboratory to determine the health effects of environmentally-important chemicals. In this abstract, improvements in the in-gel protein digestion, MALDI plate spotting and data acquisition...

  7. The MRC-5 human embryonal lung fibroblast two-dimensional gel cellular protein database: quantitative identification of polypeptides whose relative abundance differs between quiescent, proliferating and SV40 transformed cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Dejgaard, K; Madsen, Peder;

    1990-01-01

    (1323 with isoelectric focusing and 572 with nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) are recorded in this database, containing quantitative and qualitative data on the relative abundance of cellular proteins synthesized by quiescent, proliferating and SV40 transformed MRC-5 fibroblasts. Of the 592...... proteins quantitated so far, the levels of 138 were up- or down-regulated (51 and 87, respectively) by two times or more in the transformed cells as compared to their normal proliferating counterparts, while only 14 behaved similarly in quiescent cells. Seven MRC-5 SV40 proteins, including plastin and two...... cells (AMA) database (Celis et al., Electrophoresis 1990, 11, 989-1071) for those polypeptides of known and unknown identity that have been matched to AMA polypeptides. As more information is gathered in this and other laboratories, including data on oncogene proteins and transcription factors...

  8. Raccoon abundance inventory report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a raccoon abundance inventory on Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge in 2012. Determining raccoon abundance allows for...

  9. 甲醇沉淀法去除人血清高丰度蛋白质的实验研究%Establishment of methyl alcohol precipitation method for removing high abundant proteins in human serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹璐颖; 李克; 郑文杰

    2012-01-01

    Objective The common method of depleting the high abundant proteins in human serum is too complicated and ex -pensive to be applied to clinical practice . In this study, an effective and simple method of methyl alcohol precipitation was established for the removal of serum high abundant proteins. Methods The serum albumin of healthy controls was precipitated by different volume methyl alcohol. The removal effect was analyzed with one -dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate -polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ( SDS-PAGE) and quantitative method of albumin. Results Compared with the gel images of the original serum , the band of protein with molecular weight between 50000-80000 was removed. The results showed that the average concentration of albumin in the serum was de -creased from (47.65-.35) g/L to (1.16-.08) g/L. The removal ratio of protein was over 97% and the percentage of albumin in the total protein of serum was decreased from 65.4% to49.3%. The significantly statistical differences were observed (P<0.001). And the low abundance proteins could be seen and reserved . Conclusion The methyl alcohol depletion strategy may offer an effective and simple method to remove albumin from human serum , which provided a technical support for further study of serum proteomics .%目的 常用人血清高丰度蛋白质(high abundant proteins,HAP)去除方法操作较繁且成本高,文中探索建立简便有效的甲醇沉淀法去除人血清HAP.方法 用不同体积的甲醇处理血清样品,然后与原血清样品上样进行十二烷基磺酸钠聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis,SDS-PAGE)分析,并对去除HAP后的样品进行蛋白定量检测.结果 SDS-PAGE显示,经甲醇处理过的血清样品与原血清电泳结果 相比,相对分子质量在50000~80000 间的清蛋白等HAP被明显去除,血清清蛋白平均浓度显著降低,由(47.65±0.35)g /L下降至(1.16±0.08)g /L,去除率达97%以上,

  10. High abundance of Serine/Threonine-rich regions predicted to be hyper-O-glycosylated in the secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Mario

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background O-glycosylation of secretory proteins has been found to be an important factor in fungal biology and virulence. It consists in the addition of short glycosidic chains to Ser or Thr residues in the protein backbone via O-glycosidic bonds. Secretory proteins in fungi frequently display Ser/Thr rich regions that could be sites of extensive O-glycosylation. We have analyzed in silico the complete sets of putatively secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes (Botrytis cinerea, Magnaporthe grisea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ustilago maydis, Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma reesei, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in search of Ser/Thr-rich regions as well as regions predicted to be highly O-glycosylated by NetOGlyc (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk. Results By comparison with experimental data, NetOGlyc was found to overestimate the number of O-glycosylation sites in fungi by a factor of 1.5, but to be quite reliable in the prediction of highly O-glycosylated regions. About half of secretory proteins have at least one Ser/Thr-rich region, with a Ser/Thr content of at least 40% over an average length of 40 amino acids. Most secretory proteins in filamentous fungi were predicted to be O-glycosylated, sometimes in dozens or even hundreds of sites. Residues predicted to be O-glycosylated have a tendency to be grouped together forming hyper-O-glycosylated regions of varying length. Conclusions About one fourth of secretory fungal proteins were predicted to have at least one hyper-O-glycosylated region, which consists of 45 amino acids on average and displays at least one O-glycosylated Ser or Thr every four residues. These putative highly O-glycosylated regions can be found anywhere along the proteins but have a slight tendency to be at either one of the two ends.

  11. Cloning and Characterization of a Novel cDNA Encoding Late Embryogenesis-Abundant Protein 5 Like (LEA-5) Gene from Cara Cara Navel Orange Fruit(Citrus sinensis Osbeck)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Neng-guo; YE Jun-li; XU Juan; DENG Xiu-xin

    2006-01-01

    LEA5 gene was postulated related with both stress and hormone responses. In an attempt to find genes exclusively expressed during fruit ripening of Cara Cara navel orange, a novel cDNA clone encoding late embryogenesis-abundant protein 5 like gene (CitLEA5-1) was obtained. It was 582 bp in length, containing 97 deduced amino acids. Compared with the stress-induced LEA5 from leaves of Citrus sinensis, CitLEA5-1 had a shorter 3' untranslated region (UTR). Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that CitLEA5-1 was transcriptional regulated during fruit ripening of Cara Cara navel orange.

  12. The absence of protein Y4yS affects negatively the abundance of T3SS Mesorhizobium loti secretin, RhcC2, in bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercante, Virginia; Duarte, Cecilia M; Sánchez, Cintia M; Zalguizuri, Andrés; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Lepek, Viviana C

    2015-01-01

    Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 has a functional type III secretion system (T3SS) that is involved in the determination of nodulation competitiveness on Lotus. The M. loti T3SS cluster contains gene y4yS (mlr8765) that codes for a protein of unknown function (Y4yS). A mutation in the y4yS gene favors the M. loti symbiotic competitive ability on Lotus tenuis cv. Esmeralda and affects negatively the secretion of proteins through T3SS. Here we localize Y4yS in the bacterial membrane using a translational reporter peptide fusion. In silico analysis indicated that this protein presents a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain, a signal peptide and a canonical lipobox LGCC in the N-terminal sequence. These features that are shared with proteins required for the formation of the secretin complex in type IV secretion systems and in the Tad system, together with its localization, suggest that the y4yS-encoded protein is required for the formation of the M. loti T3SS secretin (RhcC2) complex. Remarkably, analysis of RhcC2 in the wild-type and M. loti y4yS mutant strains indicated that the absence of Y4yS affects negatively the accumulation of normal levels of RhcC2 in the membrane.

  13. The absence of protein Y4yS affects negatively the abundance of T3SS Mesorhizobium loti secretin, RhcC2, in bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia eMercante

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 has a functional type III secretion system (T3SS that is involved in the determination of nodulation competitiveness on Lotus. The M. loti T3SS cluster contains gene y4yS (mlr8765 that codes for a protein of unknown function (Y4yS. A mutation in the y4yS gene favors the M. loti symbiotic competitive ability on Lotus tenuis cv. Esmeralda and affects negatively the secretion of proteins through T3SS. Here we localize Y4yS in the bacterial membrane using a translational reporter peptide fusion. In silico analysis indicated that this protein presents a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain, a signal peptide and a canonical lipobox LGCC in the N-terminal sequence. These features that are shared with proteins required for the formation of the secretin complex in type IV secretion systems and in the Tad system, together with its localization, suggest that the y4yS-encoded protein is required for the formation of the M. loti T3SS secretin (RhcC2 complex. Remarkably, analysis of RhcC2 in the wild-type and M. loti y4yS mutant strains indicated that the absence of Y4yS affects negatively the accumulation of normal levels of RhcC2 in the membrane.

  14. Precision Chemical Abundance Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Meléndez, Jorge;

    2012-01-01

    This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate that the ob......This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate...... that the observed abundance dispersion exceeds the measurement uncertainties and that many pairs of elements show significant correlations when plotting [X1/H] vs. [X2/H]. Our tentative conclusions are that either NGC 6752 is not chemically homogeneous at the ~=0.03 dex level or the abundance variations...

  15. Abundant immunohistochemical expression of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor and p53 protein in meningiomas: follow-up, relation to gender, age, tumor grade, and recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, G.; Pereira-Lima, J.F.S.; Leães, C.G.S. [Programa de Graduação em Patologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Centro de Neuroendocrinologia, Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, N.P. [Centro de Neuroendocrinologia, Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Barbosa-Coutinho, L.M. [Programa de Graduação em Patologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Oliveira, M.C. [Programa de Graduação em Patologia, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Centro de Neuroendocrinologia, Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-03-03

    Meningiomas are common, usually benign tumors, with a high postoperative recurrence rate. However, the genesis and development of these tumors remain controversial. We aimed to investigate the presence and implications of a mutated p53 protein and dopamine D{sub 2} receptor in a representative series of meningiomas and to correlate these findings with age, gender, tumor grade, and recurrence. Tumor tissue samples of 157 patients diagnosed with meningioma (37 males and 120 females, mean age 53.6±14.3 years) who underwent surgical resection between 2003 and 2012 at our institution were immunohistochemically evaluated for the presence of p53 protein and dopamine D{sub 2} receptor and were followed-up to analyze tumor recurrence or regrowth. Tumors were classified as grades I (n=141, 89.8%), II (n=13, 8.3%), or grade III (n=3, 1.9%). Dopamine D{sub 2} receptor and p53 protein expression were positive in 93.6% and 49.7% of the cases, respectively. Neither of the markers showed significant expression differences among different tumor grades or recurrence or regrowth statuses. Our findings highlight the potential role of p53 protein in meningioma development and/or progression. The high positivity of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor observed in this study warrants further investigation of the therapeutic potential of dopamine agonists in the evolution of meningiomas.

  16. Small-Molecule Transport by CarO, an Abundant Eight-Stranded β-Barrel Outer Membrane Protein from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Michael; D'Agostino, Tommaso; Eren, Elif; Baslé, Arnaud; Ceccarelli, Matteo; van den Berg, Bert

    2015-07-17

    Outer membrane (OM) β-barrel proteins composed of 12-18 β-strands mediate cellular entry of small molecules in Gram-negative bacteria. Small OM proteins with barrels of 10 strands or less are not known to transport small molecules. CarO (carbapenem-associated outer membrane protein) from Acinetobacter baumannii is a small OM protein that has been implicated in the uptake of ornithine and carbapenem antibiotics. Here we report crystal structures of three isoforms of CarO. The structures are very similar and show a monomeric eight-stranded barrel lacking an open channel. CarO has a substantial extracellular domain resembling a glove that contains all the divergent residues between the different isoforms. Liposome swelling experiments demonstrate that full-length CarO and a "loop-less" truncation mutant mediate small-molecule uptake at low levels but that they are unlikely to mediate passage of carbapenem antibiotics. These results are confirmed by biased molecular dynamics simulations that allowed us to quantitatively model the transport of selected small molecules.

  17. Foetal life protein restriction in male mink (Neovison vison) kits lowers post-weaning protein oxidation and the relative abundance of hepatic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Connie Marianne Frank; Blache, D.; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl;

    2012-01-01

    protein deficiency affects the response to adequate or deficient protein provision post weaning. Further, we intended to study whether the changes in the gene expression of key enzymes in foetal hepatic tissue caused by maternal protein deficiency were manifested post-weaning. A total of 32 male mink kits...... (P restriction leads to changes in post-weaning protein metabolism through lower protein oxidation of male mink kits....

  18. Abundances of iron-binding photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixing proteins of Trichodesmium both in culture and in situ from the North Atlantic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Richier

    Full Text Available Marine cyanobacteria of the genus Trichodesmium occur throughout the oligotrophic tropical and subtropical oceans, where they can dominate the diazotrophic community in regions with high inputs of the trace metal iron (Fe. Iron is necessary for the functionality of enzymes involved in the processes of both photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. We combined laboratory and field-based quantifications of the absolute concentrations of key enzymes involved in both photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation to determine how Trichodesmium allocates resources to these processes. We determined that protein level responses of Trichodesmium to iron-starvation involve down-regulation of the nitrogen fixation apparatus. In contrast, the photosynthetic apparatus is largely maintained, although re-arrangements do occur, including accumulation of the iron-stress-induced chlorophyll-binding protein IsiA. Data from natural populations of Trichodesmium spp. collected in the North Atlantic demonstrated a protein profile similar to iron-starved Trichodesmium in culture, suggestive of acclimation towards a minimal iron requirement even within an oceanic region receiving a high iron-flux. Estimates of cellular metabolic iron requirements are consistent with the availability of this trace metal playing a major role in restricting the biomass and activity of Trichodesmium throughout much of the subtropical ocean.

  19. Abiotic stress induces change in Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) protein abundance and lignin deposition in developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sameer; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Arafat, Yasir Ali; Gupta, Sushim K; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-04-01

    Aboitic stress such as drought and salinity are class of major threats, which plants undergo through their lifetime. Lignin deposition is one of the responses to such abiotic stresses. The gene encoding Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis, which has been shown to be over-expressed under stress conditions. In the present study, developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala (Vernacular name: Subabul, White popinac) were treated with 1 % mannitol and 200 mM NaCl to mimic drought and salinity stress conditions, respectively. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) based expression pattern of CCR protein was monitored coupled with Phlorogucinol/HCl activity staining of lignin in transverse sections of developing L. leucocephala seedlings under stress. Our result suggests a differential lignification pattern in developing root and stem under stress conditions. Increase in lignification was observed in mannitol treated stems and corresponding CCR protein accumulation was also higher than control and salt stress treated samples. On the contrary CCR protein was lower in NaCl treated stems and corresponding lignin deposition was also low. Developing root tissue showed a high level of CCR content and lignin deposition than stem samples under all conditions tested. Overall result suggested that lignin accumulation was not affected much in case of developing root however developing stems were significantly affected under drought and salinity stress condition.

  20. Dietary whey protein lowers serum C-peptide concentration and duodenal SREBP-1c mRNA abundance, and reduces occurrence of duodenal tumors and colon aberrant crypt foci in azoxymethane-treated male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rijin; Carter, Julie A; Linz, Amanda L; Ferguson, Matthew; Badger, Thomas M; Simmen, Frank A

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated partially hydrolyzed whey protein (WPH) for inhibitory effects on the development of colon aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and intestinal tumors in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rats. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats and their progeny were fed AIN-93G diets containing casein (CAS, control diet) or WPH as the sole protein source. Colons and small intestines from the male progeny were obtained at 6, 12, 20 and 23 weeks after AOM treatment. At 6 and 23 weeks, post-AOM, WPH-fed rats had fewer ACF than did CAS-fed rats. Intestinal tumors were most frequent at 23 weeks, post-AOM. At this time point, differences in colon tumor incidence with diet were not observed; however, WPH-fed rats had fewer tumors in the small intestine (7.6% vs. 26% incidence, P=.004). Partially hydrolized whey protein suppressed circulating C-peptide concentration (a stable indicator of steady-state insulin secretion) at all four time points relative to the corresponding CAS-fed animals. The relative mRNA abundance for the insulin-responsive, transcription factor gene, SREBP-1c, was reduced by WPH in the duodenum but not colon. Results indicate potential physiological linkages of dietary protein type with circulating C-peptide (and by inference insulin), local expression of SREBP-1c gene and propensity for small intestine tumorigenesis.

  1. Perturbations of amino acid metabolism associated with glyphosate-dependent inhibition of shikimic acid metabolism affect cellular redox homeostasis and alter the abundance of proteins involved in photosynthesis and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P; Bulman, Christopher A; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2011-09-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway.

  2. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V., E-mail: luck@fafnir.astr.cwru.edu, E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua [Department of Astronomy and Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, Shevchenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  3. A single N-linked glycosylation site in the Japanese encephalitis virus prM protein is critical for cell type-specific prM protein biogenesis, virus particle release, and pathogenicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Hahn, Youn-Soo; Lee, Chan-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Young-Min

    2008-08-01

    The prM protein of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) contains a single potential N-linked glycosylation site, N(15)-X(16)-T(17), which is highly conserved among JEV strains and closely related flaviviruses. To investigate the role of this site in JEV replication and pathogenesis, we manipulated the RNA genome by using infectious JEV cDNA to generate three prM mutants (N15A, T17A, and N15A/T17A) with alanine substituting for N(15) and/or T(17) and one mutant with silent point mutations introduced into the nucleotide sequences corresponding to all three residues in the glycosylation site. An analysis of these mutants in the presence or absence of endoglycosidases confirmed the addition of oligosaccharides to this potential glycosylation site. The loss of prM N glycosylation, without significantly altering the intracellular levels of viral RNA and proteins, led to an approximately 20-fold reduction in the production of extracellular virions, which had protein compositions and infectivities nearly identical to those of wild-type virions; this reduction occurred at the stage of virus release, rather than assembly. This release defect was correlated with small-plaque morphology and an N-glycosylation-dependent delay in viral growth. A more conservative mutation, N15Q, had the same effect as N15A. One of the four prM mutants, N15A/T17A, showed an additional defect in virus growth in mosquito C6/36 cells but not human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y or hamster BHK-21 cells. This cell type dependence was attributed to abnormal N-glycosylation-independent biogenesis of prM. In mice, the elimination of prM N glycosylation resulted in a drastic decrease in virulence after peripheral inoculation. Overall, our findings indicate that this highly conserved N-glycosylation motif in prM is crucial for multiple stages of JEV biology: prM biogenesis, virus release, and pathogenesis.

  4. Real-time RT-PCR quantification of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A mRNA abundance in bovine granulosa and theca cells: effects of hormones in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, Pauline Y; Voge, Justin L; Santiago, Consuelo A; Malayer, Jerry R; Spicer, Leon J

    2006-11-01

    Ovarian follicular growth and dominance are controlled by a series of hormonal and intraovarian events including a decrease in intrafollicular IGF-binding proteins -2, -4 and -5 levels. Proteolytic enzymes such as pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) degrade IGFBPs and increase bioavailability of IGF-I and -II during follicular development. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of IGF-I, IGF-II, insulin (INS), LH, FSH, estradiol (E2), leptin or cortisol on ovarian PAPP-A mRNA levels. Granulosa (GC) from small (SM) (1-5 mm) and large (LG) (8-22 mm) follicles as well as theca cells (TC) from LG follicles were collected from bovine ovaries and cultured for 48 h in medium containing 10% FCS and then treated with various hormones in serum-free medium for an additional 24 h. Cells were treated with various concentrations (3-500 ng/ml) and combinations of IGF-I, IGF-II, FSH, LH, E2, INS, leptin and (or) cortisol for 24 h (Experiments 1-10). PAPP-A mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In SM-GC and LG-GC, none of the treatments significantly affected (P>0.10) PAPP-A mRNA abundance. In LG-TC, IGF-I, LH or cortisol did not affect (P>0.10) PAPP-A mRNA levels, whereas INS with or without LH decreased (P<0.05) PAPP-A mRNA. E2 alone decreased PAPP-A mRNA levels in LG-TC, and E2 amplified the insulin-induced inhibition of PAPP-A mRNA abundance in LG-TC. We conclude that control of PAPP-A mRNA abundance in granulosa and theca cells differs, and that E2 may be part of an intraovarian negative feedback system which may reduce the bioavailable IGFs in the theca layer during growth and selection of follicles.

  5. N-linked protein glycosylation in a bacterial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothaft, Harald; Liu, Xin; McNally, David J; Szymanski, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    N-Linked protein glycosylation is conserved throughout the three domains of life and influences protein function, stability, and protein complex formation. N-Linked glycosylation is an essential process in Eukaryotes; however, although N-glycosylation affects multiple cellular processes in Archaea and Bacteria, it is not needed for cell survival. Methods for the analyses of N-glycosylation in eukaryotes are well established, but comparable techniques for the analyses of the pathways in Bacteria and Archaea are needed. In this chapter we describe new methods for the detection and analyses of N-linked, and the recently discovered free oligosaccharides (fOS), from whole cell lysates of Campylobacter jejuni using non-specific pronase E digestion and permethylation followed by mass spectrometry. We also describe the expression and immunodetection of the model N-glycoprotein, AcrA, fused to a hexa-histidine tag to follow protein glycosylation in C. jejuni. This chapter concludes with the recent demonstration that high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR of intact bacterial cells provides a rapid, non-invasive method for analyzing fOS in C. jejuni in vivo. This combination of techniques provides a powerful tool for the exploration, quantification, and structural analyses of N-linked and free oligosaccharides in the bacterial system.

  6. Combined N-glycome and N-glycoproteome analysis of the Lotus japonicus seed globulin fraction shows conservation of protein structure and glycosylation in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Svend; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Stenkjær, Eva; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H; Stougaard, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Legume food allergy, such as allergy toward peanuts and soybeans, is a health issue predicted to worsen as dietary advice recommends higher intake of legume-based foods. Lotus japonicus (Lotus) is an established legume plant model system for studies of symbiotic and pathogenic microbial interactions and, due to its well characterized genotype/phenotype and easily manipulated genome, may also be suitable for studies of legume food allergy. Here we present a comprehensive study of the Lotus N-glycoproteome. The global and site-specific N-glycan structures of Lotus seed globulins were analyzed using mass spectrometry-based glycomics and glycoproteomics techniques. In total, 19 N-glycan structures comprising high mannose (∼20%), pauci-mannosidic (∼40%), and complex forms (∼40%) were determined. The pauci-mannosidic and complex N-glycans contained high amounts of the typical plant determinants β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose. Two abundant Lotus seed N-glycoproteins were site-specifically profiled; a predicted lectin containing two fully occupied N-glycosylation sites carried predominantly pauci-mannosidic structures in different distributions. In contrast, Lotus convicilin storage protein 2 (LCP2) carried exclusively high mannose N-glycans similar to its homologue, Ara h 1, which is the major allergen in peanut. In silico investigation confirmed that peanut Ara h 1 and Lotus LCP2 are highly similar at the primary and higher protein structure levels. Hence, we suggest that Lotus has the potential to serve as a model system for studying the role of seed proteins and their glycosylation in food allergy.

  7. The impaired intestinal mucosal immune system by valine deficiency for young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with decreasing immune status and regulating tight junction proteins transcript abundance in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on the growth, intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance and gene expression of immune-related signaling molecules in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Six iso-nitrogenous diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3-19.1 g kg(-)(1) diet) were fed to the fish for 8 weeks. The results showed that percentage weight gain (PWG), feed intake and feed efficiency of fish were the lowest in fish fed the valine-deficient diet (P valine deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase activities and complement 3 content in the intestine (P valine deficiency significantly decreased transcript of Occludin, Claudin b, Claudin c, Claudin 3, and ZO-1 (P valine did not have a significant effect on expression of Claudin 12 in the intestine of grass carp (P > 0.05). In conclusion, valine deficiency decreased fish growth and intestinal immune status, as well as regulated gene expression of tight junction proteins, NF-κB P65, IκBα and TOR in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity or PWG, the dietary valine requirement of young grass carp (268-679 g) were established to be 14.47 g kg(-1) diet (4.82 g 100 g(-1) CP) or 14.00 g kg(-1) diet (4.77 g 100 g(-1) CP), respectively.

  8. Deuterium abundance and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal-Madjar, A; Lemoine, M

    1996-01-01

    We review the status of the measurements of the deuterium abundance from the local interstellar medium to the solar system and high redshifts absorbers toward quasars. We present preliminary results toward a white dwarf and a QSO. We conclude that the deuterium evolution from the Big-Bang to now is still not properly understood.

  9. Interaction of unsaturated fat or coconut oil with monensin in lactating dairy cows fed 12 times daily. I. Protozoal abundance, nutrient digestibility, and microbial protein flow to the omasum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveneau, C; Karnati, S K R; Oelker, E R; Firkins, J L

    2012-04-01

    Monensin (tradename: Rumensin) should reduce the extent of amino acid deamination in the rumen, and supplemental fat should decrease protozoal abundance and intraruminal N recycling. Because animal-vegetable (AV) fat can be biohydrogenated in the rumen and decrease its effectiveness as an anti-protozoal agent, we included diets supplemented with coconut oil (CNO) to inhibit protozoa. In a 6 × 6 Latin square design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments, 6 rumen-cannulated cows were fed diets without or with Rumensin (12 g/909 kg) and either no fat (control), 5% AV fat, or 5% CNO. The log10 concentrations (cells/mL) of total protozoa were not different between control (5.97) and AV fat (5.95) but were decreased by CNO (4.79; main effect of fat source). Entodinium and Dasytricha decreased as a proportion of total cells from feeding CNO, whereas Epidinium was unchanged in total abundance and thus increased proportionately. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was not affected by diet, but the acetate:propionate ratio decreased for CNO (1.85) versus control (2.95) or AV fat (2.58). Feeding CNO (23.8%) decreased ruminal neutral detergent fiber digestibility compared with control (31.1%) and AV fat (30.5%). The total-tract digestibility of NDF was lower for CNO (45.8%) versus control (57.0%) and AV fat (54.6%), with no difference in apparent organic matter digestibility (averaging 69.8%). The omasal flows of microbial N and non-ammonia N were lower for CNO versus control and AV fat, but efficiency of microbial protein synthesis was not affected. The dry matter intake was 4.5 kg/d lower with CNO, which decreased milk production by 3.1 kg/d. Main effect means of dry matter intake and milk yield tended to decrease by 0.7 and 1.2 kg/d, respectively, when Rumensin was added. Both percentage and production of milk fat decreased for CNO (main effect of fat source). An interaction was observed such that AV decreased milk fat yield more when combined with Rumensin

  10. Applying unconventional secretion of the endochitinase Cts1 to export heterologous proteins in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Janpeter; Sarkari, Parveen; Kreibich, Saskia; Brefort, Thomas; Feldbrügge, Michael; Schipper, Kerstin

    2012-10-15

    The demand on the biotechnological production of proteins for pharmaceutical, medical and industrial applications is steadily growing. For the production of challenging proteins, we aim to establish a novel expression platform in the well characterized eukaryotic microorganism Ustilago maydis. In filaments of this fungus, secretion of the endochitinase Cts1 depends on mRNA transport along microtubules, which is mediated by the key RNA-binding protein Rrm4. Here, we report two important findings: (i) Cts1 secretion occurs via a novel unconventional route and (ii) this secretory mechanism can be exploited for the export of active heterologous proteins. Initially, we used β-glucuronidase (Gus) as a reporter for unconventional secretion. This bacterial enzyme is inactivated by N-glycosylation during its passage through the conventional eukaryotic secretory pathway. By contrast, in our system Gus was exported in its active form by fusion to Cts1 confirming its secretion by an unconventional route. As a proof-of-principle for economically important biopharmaceuticals we expressed an active single-chain antibody. Importantly, the novel protein export pathway circumvents N-glycosylation which is advantageous in many applications, e.g., to avoid undesired immune reactions in humans. Thus, the unconventional Cts1 secretion machinery has a high potential for the production of biotechnologically relevant proteins.

  11. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  12. Trans-species Engineering of Glycosylated Therapeutic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang

    Recombinant expression of therapeutic proteins is one of the major tasks in modern biomedicine. One of the most important factors with respect to therapeutic use in human is posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of the recombinant proteins, of which protein glycosylation is by far the most...... important to address. Whenever glycosylation has been found to be an important PTM for function or bioactivity, human therapeutics have generally been produced in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. Oglycosylation is one of the most complex regulated PTMs of proteins but also one of the least...... understood. Currently, mammalian cells are required for human O-glycosylation. Increasing efforts have been devoted to engineering non-mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins with “human-like” glycosylation. Substantial success has been achieved with designed N-glycosylation in both lower...

  13. Short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition alters intestinal structure, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA and protein, and proglucagon mRNA abundance in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappenden, K A; Drozdowski, L A; Thomson, A B; McBurney, M I

    1998-07-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a complex physiologic process that is not completely understood. Intravenous short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) enhance intestinal adaptation after 80% enterectomy in rats. The purpose of this study was to examine rapid responses to SCFA-supplemented total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in the normal small intestine. After jugular catheterization, 31 Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 258 +/- 3 g) were randomly assigned to receive standard TPN or an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous TPN solution supplemented with SCFAs (TPN+SCFA). Intestinal samples were obtained after 24 or 72 h of nutrient infusion. TPN+SCFA for 24 h increased (P SCFA for 72 h increased (P SCFA infusion and returned to levels seen with control TPN by 72 h. Glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA was significantly higher (P SCFA groups at both time points when compared with control TPN groups. Ileal GLUT2 protein abundance in the 72-h TPN+SCFA group was significantly higher (P SCFA than after 24 h, whereas the 24- and 72-h TPN groups did not differ. In summary, SCFAs led to rapid changes in ileal proglucagon and glucose transporter expression in rats receiving TPN and provide insights into therapeutic management of individuals with short bowel syndrome or intestinal malabsorption syndromes.

  14. hebp3, a novel member of the heme-binding protein gene family, is expressed in the medaka meninges with higher abundance in females due to a direct stimulating action of ovarian estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Kiyoshi; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Okubo, Kataaki

    2013-02-01

    The brains of teleost fish exhibit remarkable sexual plasticity throughout their life span. To dissect the molecular basis for the development and reversal of sex differences in the teleost brain, we screened for genes differentially expressed between sexes in the brain of medaka (Oryzias latipes). One of the genes identified in the screen as being preferentially expressed in females was found to be a new member of the heme-binding protein gene family that includes hebp1 and hebp2 and was designated here as hebp3. The medaka hebp3 is expressed in the meninges with higher abundance in females, whereas there is no expression within the brain parenchyma. This female-biased expression of hebp3 is not attributable to the direct action of sex chromosome genes but results from the transient and reversible action of estrogens derived from the ovary. Moreover, estrogens directly activate the transcription of hebp3 via a palindromic estrogen-responsive element in the hebp3 promoter. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that hebp3 is a novel transcriptional target of estrogens, with female-biased expression in the meninges. The definite but reversible sexual dimorphism of the meningeal hebp3 expression may contribute to the development and reversal of sex differences in the teleost brain.

  15. Plant Cell Wall Proteomics: Mass Spectrometry Data, a Trove for Research on Protein Structure/Function Relationships

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cécile Albenne; Hervé Canut; Georges Boudart; Yu Zhang; Héléne San Clemente; Rafael Pont-Lezica; Elisabeth Jamet

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organ-elles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identi-fication, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of multigene families can be differentiated. Two lectins presenting 93% amino acid identity were identified using peptide mass fingerprinting. Although the identification of structural proteins such as extensins or hydroxyproline/proline-rich proteins (H/PRPs) is arduous, different types of MS spectra were exploited to identify and characterize an H/PRR Matu-ration events in a couple of cell wall proteins (CWPs) were analyzed using site mapping. N-glycosylation of CWPs as well as the hydroxylation or oxidation of amino acids were also explored, adding information to improve our understanding of CWP structure/function relationships. A bioinformatic tool was developed to locate by means of MS the N-terminus of mature secreted proteins and N-glycosylation.

  16. Plant cell wall proteomics: mass spectrometry data, a trove for research on protein structure/function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Zhang, Yu; San Clemente, Hélène; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2009-09-01

    Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organelles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identification, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of multigene families can be differentiated. Two lectins presenting 93% amino acid identity were identified using peptide mass fingerprinting. Although the identification of structural proteins such as extensins or hydroxyproline/proline-rich proteins (H/PRPs) is arduous, different types of MS spectra were exploited to identify and characterize an H/PRP. Maturation events in a couple of cell wall proteins (CWPs) were analyzed using site mapping. N-glycosylation of CWPs as well as the hydroxylation or oxidation of amino acids were also explored, adding information to improve our understanding of CWP structure/function relationships. A bioinformatic tool was developed to locate by means of MS the N-terminus of mature secreted proteins and N-glycosylation.

  17. Hot and sweet: protein glycosylation in Crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-02-01

    Every living cell is covered with a dense and complex array of covalently attached sugars or sugar chains. The majority of these glycans are linked to proteins via the so-called glycosylation process. Protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life: Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea. However, on the basis of the limit in analytic tools for glycobiology and genetics in Archaea, only in the last few years has research on archaeal glycosylation pathways started mainly in the Euryarchaeota Haloferax volcanii, Methanocaldococcus maripaludis and Methanococcus voltae. Recently, major steps of the crenarchaeal glycosylation process of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius have been described. The present review summarizes the proposed N-glycosylation pathway of S. acidocaldarius, describing the phenotypes of the mutants disrupted in N-glycan biosynthesis as well as giving insights into the archaeal O-linked and glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor glycosylation process.

  18. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of protein glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoldoš, Vlatka; Grgurević, Srđana; Lauc, Gordan

    2010-10-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is an ancient metabolic pathway that still exists in all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya). The covalent addition of one or more complex oligosaccharides (glycans) to protein backbones greatly diversifies their structures and makes the glycoproteome several orders of magnitude more complex than the proteome itself. Contrary to polypeptides, which are defined by a sequence of nucleotides in the corresponding genes, the glycan part of glycoproteins are encoded in a complex dynamic network of hundreds of proteins, whereby activity is defined by both genetic sequence and the regulation of gene expression. Owing to the complex nature of their biosynthesis, glycans are particularly versatile and apparently a large part of human variation derives from differences in protein glycosylation. Composition of the individual glycome appears to be rather stable, and thus differences in the pattern of glycan synthesis between individuals could originate either from genetic polymorphisms or from stable epigenetic regulation of gene expression in different individuals. Studies of epigenetic modification of genes involved in protein glycosylation are still scarce, but their results indicate that this process might be very important for the regulation of protein glycosylation.

  20. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Takahara, F; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  1. Trafficking of endoplasmic reticulum-retained recombinant proteins is unpredictable in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eDe Meyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of recombinant proteins has been produced in the dicot model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Many of these proteins are targeted for secretion by means of an N terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER signal peptide. In addition, they can also be designed for ER retention by adding a C terminal H/KDEL-tag. Despite extensive knowledge of the protein trafficking pathways, the final protein destination, especially of such H/KDEL-tagged recombinant proteins, is unpredictable. In this respect, glycoproteins are ideal study objects. Microscopy experiments reveal their deposition pattern and characterization of their N-glycans aids in elucidating the trafficking. Here, we combine microscopy and N glycosylation data generated in Arabidopsis leaves and seeds, and highlight the lack of a decent understanding of heterologous protein trafficking.

  2. Applications of diagonal chromatography for proteome-wide characterization of protein modifications and activity-based analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Kris; Impens, Francis; Van Damme, Petra; Ghesquière, Bart; Hanoulle, Xavier; Vandekerckhove, Joël

    2007-12-01

    Numerous gel-free proteomics techniques have been reported over the past few years, introducing a move from proteins to peptides as bits of information in qualitative and quantitative proteome studies. Many shotgun proteomics techniques randomly sample thousands of peptides in a qualitative and quantitative manner but overlook the vast majority of protein modifications that are often crucial for proper protein structure and function. Peptide-based proteomic approaches have thus been developed to profile a diverse set of modifications including, but not at all limited, to phosphorylation, glycosylation and ubiquitination. Typical here is that each modification needs a specific, tailor-made analytical procedure. In this minireview, we discuss how one technique - diagonal reverse-phase chromatography - is applied to study two different types of protein modification: protein processing and protein N-glycosylation. Additionally, we discuss an activity-based proteome study in which purine-binding proteins were profiled by diagonal chromatography.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum glucosidases and protein quality control factors cooperate to establish biotrophy in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Jiménez-Martín, Alberto; Marín-Menguiano, Miriam; Ibeas, José I

    2013-11-01

    Secreted fungal effectors mediate plant-fungus pathogenic interactions. These proteins are typically N-glycosylated, a common posttranslational modification affecting their location and function. N-glycosylation consists of the addition, and subsequent maturation, of an oligosaccharide core in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus. In this article, we show that two enzymes catalyzing specific stages of this pathway in maize smut (Ustilago maydis), glucosidase I (Gls1) and glucosidase II β-subunit (Gas2), are essential for its pathogenic interaction with maize (Zea mays). Gls1 is required for the initial stages of infection following appressorium penetration, and Gas2 is required for efficient fungal spreading inside infected tissues. While U. maydis Δgls1 cells induce strong plant defense responses, Δgas2 hyphae are able to repress them, showing that slight differences in the N-glycoprotein processing can determine the extent of plant-fungus interactions. Interestingly, the calnexin protein, a central element of the ER quality control system for N-glycoproteins in eukaryotic cells, is essential for avoiding plant defense responses in cells with defective N-glycoproteins processing. Thus, N-glycoprotein maturation and this conserved checkpoint appear to play an important role in the establishment of an initial biotrophic state with the plant, which allows subsequent colonization.

  4. Identification of a protein glycosylation operon from Campylobacter jejuni JCM 2013 and its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Ohashi, Takao; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a human enteropathogenic bacterium possessing an N-glycosylation system. In this work, a protein glycosylation (pgl) operon conferring prokaryotic N-glycosylation in C. jejuni JCM 2013 was cloned and identified. Fourteen open reading frames (ORFs) were found in the pgl operon. The operon organization was similar to that of C. jejuni NCTC 11168, with 98% and 99% identities in overall nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence, respectively. The pgl operon was heterologously co-expressed with model protein CmeA in the Escherichia coli BL21 ΔwaaL mutant. The immuno- and lectin-blotting analysis indicated the protein glycosylation on the recombinant CmeA. In addition, to analyze the glycan composition, the recombinant CmeA was purified and subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion followed by mass spectrometry analysis. The mass spectrometry analysis showed the presence of the N-acetylhexosamine residue at the reducing end but not the predicted di-N-acetylbacillosamine (diNAcBac) residue. Further glycan structural study using the conventional fluorophore-labeling method revealed the GalNAcα-GalNAcα-(Hex-)HexNAc-HexNAc-HexNAc-HexNAc structure. Transcriptional analysis showed that UDP-diNAcBac synthases and diNAcBac transferase are transcribed but might not function in the constructed system. In conclusion, a pgl operon from C. jejuni JCM 2013 successfully functioned in E. coli, resulting in the observed prokaryotic glycosylation.

  5. Gaseous abundances in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P; Origlia, L; Maiolino, R; Makishima, K; Ranalli, Piero; Comastri, Andrea; Origlia, Livia; Maiolino, Roberto; Makishima, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    We present the preliminary analysis of a deep (100ks) XMM-Newton observation of M82. The spatial distribution of the abundances of chemical elements (Fe, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S) is investigated through narrow-band imaging analisys and spatially-resolved spectroscopy. We find that the abundances of alpha-elements follow a bipolar distribution, these elements being more abundant in the gaseous outflow than in the galaxy centre. This behaviour is found to be more marked for lighter elements (O, Ne) than for heavier elements.

  6. Not just for Eukarya anymore: protein glycosylation in Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry; Sharon, Nathan

    2008-10-01

    Of the many post-translational modifications proteins can undergo, glycosylation is the most prevalent and the most diverse. Today, it is clear that both N-glycosylation and O-glycosylation, once believed to be restricted to eukaryotes, also transpire in Bacteria and Archaea. Indeed, prokaryotic glycoproteins rely on a wider variety of monosaccharide constituents than do those of eukaryotes. In recent years, substantial progress in describing the enzymes involved in bacterial and archaeal glycosylation pathways has been made. It is becoming clear that enhanced knowledge of bacterial glycosylation enzymes may be of therapeutic value, while the demonstrated ability to introduce bacterial glycosylation genes into Escherichia coli represents a major step forward in glyco-engineering. A better understanding of archaeal protein glycosylation provides insight into this post-translational modification across evolution as well as protein processing under extreme conditions. Here, we discuss new structural and biosynthetic findings related to prokaryotic protein glycosylation, until recently a neglected topic.

  7. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/.

  8. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  9. Gibberellic Acid-Induced Aleurone Layers Responding to Heat Shock or Tunicamycin Provide Insight into the N-Glycoproteome, Protein Secretion, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barba Espin, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per;

    2014-01-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro...... respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping...... shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions...

  10. Construction of a two-dimensional liquid chromatography separation system for high abundance proteins depletion in human plasma%去除血浆中高丰度蛋白质的二维液相色谱体系的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱绍春; 张学洋; 高明霞; 晏国全; 张祥民

    2011-01-01

    High abundance proteins existing in human plasma severely impede the detection of low abundance proteins. This is one of the most difficult problems encountered in plasma pro-teomics research. We developed a two-dimensional liquid chromatography system with strong anion exchange chromatography-reversed-phase liquid chromatography ( SAX-RPLC) for the extensive separation of plasma proteins and selective depletion of high abundance proteins. TSKgel SuperQ-5PW was selected as the first dimensional separation column for crude human plasma fractionation and Jupiter C4 column was selected as the second dimensional separation column. Separation gradients of the two-dimensional liquid chromatography system were optimized to ensure an extensive separation of plasma proteins. Ten peaks with high signal intensities ( >20 mAU) at 215 nm during the second dimensional separation were collected and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). As a result, 32 proteins, all of which were reported to be high abundance proteins in plasma, including human serum albumin (HAS), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and so on were successfully identified. This system provides an effective method for future depletion of more high abundance proteins and in-depth research in human plasma proteomics.%血浆中高丰度蛋白质的存在严重干扰低丰度蛋白质的检测,是困扰血浆蛋白质组学研究的技术瓶颈之一.针对这一热点问题,建立了一种二维液相色谱(强阴离子交换色谱-反相高效液相色谱)分离系统,对血浆中的高丰度蛋白质进行了色谱定位并进行去除.选择TSKgel SuperQ-5PW为第一维色谱分离柱,第二维色谱分离采用Jupiter C4柱,对第一维的馏分进行进一步的分离.通过梯度优化,血浆样品经过二维系统得到充分分离.第二维分离过程中从紫外信号强度高(215 nm,大于20 mAU)的峰中选择10个峰,利用液相色谱-串联质谱鉴定出32种高丰度蛋白质,

  11. Association between ferritin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and relative abundance of Hepcidin mRNA with the risk of type 2 diabetes in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews Guzmán, Mónica; Arredondo Olguín, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus share a strong pro-inflammatory profile. It has been observed that iron is a risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between iron nutritional status and inflammation with the risk of type 2 diabetes development in obese subjects. We studied 30 obese men with type 2 diabetes (OBDM); 30 obese subjects without diabetes (OB) and 30 healthy subjects (Cn). We isolated peripheral mononuclear cells (PMCs) and challenged them with high Fe concentrations. Total mRNA was isolated and relative abundance of TNF-, IL-6 and hepcidin were determined by qPCR. Iron status, biochemical, inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters were also characterized. OBDM and OB patients showed increased hsCRP levels compared to the Cn group. OBDM subjects showed higher levels of ferritin than the Cn group. TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA relative abundances were increased in OBDM PMCs treated with high/Fe. Hepcidin mRNA was increased with basal and high iron concentration. We found that the highest quartile of ferritin was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes when it was adjusted to BMI and HOMA-IR; this association was independent of the inflammatory status. The highest level of hepcidin gene expression also showed a trend of increased risk of diabetes, however it was not significant. Levels of hsCRP over 2 mg/L showed a significant trend of increasing the risk of diabetes. In conclusion, iron may stimulate the expression of pro-inflammatory genes (TNF-α and IL- 6), and both hepcidin and ferritin gene expression levels could be a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Subjects that have an increased cardiovascular risk also have a major risk to develop type 2 diabetes, which is independent of the BMI and insulin resistance state.

  12. Association between ferritin, high sensitivity c-reactive protein (hsCRP and relative abundance of Hepcidin mRNA with the risk of type 2 diabetes in obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Andrews Guzmán

    Full Text Available Obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus share a strong pro-inflammatory profile. It has been observed that iron is a risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between iron nutritional status and inflammation with the risk of type 2 diabetes development in obese subjects. We studied 30 obese men with type 2 diabetes (OBDM; 30 obese subjects without diabetes (OB and 30 healthy subjects (Cn. We isolated peripheral mononuclear cells (PMCs and challenged them with high Fe concentrations. Total mRNA was isolated and relative abundance of TNF-αIL-6 and hepcidin were determined by qPCR. Iron status, biochemical, inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters were also characterized. OBDM and OB patients showed increased hsCRP levels compared to the Cn group. OBDM subjects showed higher levels of ferritin than the Cn group. TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA relative abundances were increased in OBDM PMCs treated with high/Fe. Hepcidin mRNA was increased with basal and high iron concentration. We found that the highest quartile of ferritin was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes when it was adjusted to BMI and HOMA-IR; this association was independent of the inflammatory status. The highest level of hepcidin gene expression also showed a trend of increased risk of diabetes, however it was not significant. Levels of hsCRP over 2 mg/L showed a significant trend of increasing the risk of diabetes. In conclusion, iron may stimulate the expression of pro-inflammatory genes (TNF-α and IL-6, and both hepcidin and ferritin gene expression levels could be a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Subjects that have an increased cardiovascular risk also have a major risk to develop type 2 diabetes, which is independent of the BMI and insulin resistance state.

  13. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Labby, Z E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf...

  14. Gd Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Den Hartog, E A; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 49 even-parity and 14 odd-parity levels of Gd II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 611 lines of Gd II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Gd II transition probabilities and the first using a high performance Fourier transform spectrometer. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Gd abundance, log epsilon = 1.11 +/- 0.03. Revised Gd abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars CS 22892-052, BD+17 3248, and HD 115444. The resulting Gd/Eu abundance ratios are in very good agreement with the solar-system r-process ratio. We have employed the increasingly accurate stellar abundance determinations, resulting in large part from the more precise laboratory atomic data, to predict directly the Solar System r-process elemental...

  15. Changes in protein abundance between tender and tough meat from bovine Longissimus thoracis muscle assessed by isobaric Tag for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnadóttir, S G; Hollung, K; Høy, M

    2012-01-01

    -DE analysis (P flux through the tricarboxylate cycle [2......The aim of this study was to find potential biomarkers for meat tenderness in bovine Longissimus thoracis muscle and to compare results from isobaric Tag for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis. The experiment included 4 tender and 4......-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex component E2 (OGDC-E2)], apoptosis (galectin-1) and regulatory role in the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores (annexin A6). Even though the overlap in significantly changing proteins was relatively low between iTRAQ and 2-DE analysis, certain proteins predicted to have...

  16. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  17. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  18. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  19. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  20. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  1. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  2. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  3. Human baby hair amino acid natural abundance 15N-isotope values are not related to the 15N-isotope values of amino acids in mother's breast milk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Julien, Maxime; Frasquet-Darrieux, Marine; Tea, Illa; Antheaume, Ingrid; Hankard, Régis; Robins, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Since exclusively breast-suckled infants obtain their nutrient only from their mother's milk, it might be anticipated that a correlation will exist between the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of amino acids of protein of young infants and those supplied by their mother. The work presented here aimed to determine whether amino nitrogen transfer from human milk to infant hair protein synthesized within the first month of life conserves the maternal isotopic signature or whether post-ingestion fractionation dominates the nitrogen isotope spectrum. The study was conducted at 1 month post-birth on 100 mother-infant pairs. Isotope ratios (15)N/(14)N and (13)C/(12)C were measured using isotope ratio measurement by Mass Spectrometry (irm-MS) for whole maternal milk, and infant hair and (15)N/(14)N ratios were also measured by GC-irm-MS for the N-pivaloyl-O-isopropyl esters of amino acids obtained from the hydrolysis of milk and hair proteins. The δ(15)N and δ(13)C (‰) were found to be significantly higher in infant hair than in breast milk (δ(15)N, P amino acids in infant hair was also significantly higher than that in maternal milk (P < 0.001). By calculation, the observed shift in isotope ratio was shown not to be accounted for by the amino acid composition of hair and milk proteins, indicating that it is not simply due to differences in the composition in the proteins present. Rather, it would appear that each pool-mother and infant-turns over independently, and that fractionation in infant N-metabolism even in the first month of life dominates over the nutrient N-content.

  4. Sm Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, J E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2005-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 212 odd-parity levels of Sm II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for more than 900 lines of Sm II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Sm II transition probabilities using modern methods. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Sm abundance, log epsilon = 1.00 +/- 0.03, from 26 lines. The spectra of three very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich stars also have been analyzed, employing between 55 and 72 Sm II lines per star. The abundance ratios of Sm relative to other rare earth elements in these stars are in agreement, and are consistent with ratios expected from rapid neutron-capture nucleosynthesis (the r-process).

  5. Element abundances at high redshift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, D.M.; Welty, D.E.; York, D.G. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA); Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe( ), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value. 25 refs.

  6. Element abundances at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  7. Abundance analysis of Barium stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Qing Liu; Yan-Chun Liang; Li-Cai Deng

    2009-01-01

    We obtain the chemical abundances of six barium stars and two CH subgiant stars based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra. The neu- tron capture process elements Y, Zr, Ba, La and Eu show obvious overabundances relative to the Sun, for example, their [Ba/Fe] values are from 0.45 to 1.27. Other elements, in- cluding Na, Mg, A1, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Ni, show comparable abundances to the Solar ones, and their [Fe/H] covers a range from -0.40 to 0.21, which means they belong to the Galactic disk. The predictions of the theoretical model of wind accretion for bi- nary systems can explain the observed abundance patterns of the neutron capture process elements in these stars, which means that their overabundant heavy-elements could be caused by accreting the ejecta of AGB stars, the progenitors of present-day white dwarf companions in binary systems.

  8. Diversity in protein glycosylation among insect species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Vandenborre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A very common protein modification in multicellular organisms is protein glycosylation or the addition of carbohydrate structures to the peptide backbone. Although the Class of the Insecta is the largest animal taxon on Earth, almost all information concerning glycosylation in insects is derived from studies with only one species, namely the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, the differences in glycoproteomes between insects belonging to several economically important insect orders were studied. Using GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin affinity chromatography, different sets of glycoproteins with mannosyl-containing glycan structures were purified from the flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum, the silkworm (Bombyx mori, the honeybee (Apis mellifera, the fruit fly (D. melanogaster and the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum. To identify and characterize the purified glycoproteins, LC-MS/MS analysis was performed. For all insect species, it was demonstrated that glycoproteins were related to a broad range of biological processes and molecular functions. Moreover, the majority of glycoproteins retained on the GNA column were unique to one particular insect species and only a few glycoproteins were present in the five different glycoprotein sets. Furthermore, these data support the hypothesis that insect glycoproteins can be decorated with mannosylated O-glycans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results presented here demonstrate that oligomannose N-glycosylation events are highly specific depending on the insect species. In addition, we also demonstrated that protein O-mannosylation in insect species may occur more frequently than currently believed.

  9. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plez, B.; Hill, V.; Cayrel, R.;

    2004-01-01

    stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data......stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data...

  10. Surface abundances of ON stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, F; Palacios, A; Howarth, I; Georgy, C; Walborn, N R; Bouret, J -C; Barba, R

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient, or when mass transfer in binary systems happens, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle or not is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. We perform a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determine the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measure the projected rotational velocities. We compare the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. We show that ON stars are usually helium-rich. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cann...

  11. Abundance analysis of DAZ white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Kawka, Adela; Dinnbier, Frantisek; Cibulkova, Helena; Nemeth, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present an abundance analysis of a sample of 33 hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarfs. We have used archival high-resolution spectra to measure abundances of calcium, magnesium and iron in a set of 30 objects. In addition, we present preliminary calcium abundances in three new white dwarfs based on low-dispersion spectra. We investigate some abundance ratios (Mg/Ca, Fe/Ca) that may help uncover the composition of the accretion source.

  12. Metaproteomics reveals abundant transposase expression in mutualistic endosymbionts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiner, Manuel [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Young, Jacque C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Dubilier, Nicole [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology

    2013-01-01

    Transposases, enzymes that catalyze the movement of mobile genetic elements, are the most abundant genes in nature. While many bacteria encode an abundance of transposases in their genomes, the current paradigm is that transposase gene expression is tightly regulated and generally low due to its severe mutagenic effects. In the current study, we detected the highest number of transposase proteins ever reported in bacteria, in symbionts of the gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis using metaproteomics. At least 26 different transposases from 12 different families were detected and genomic and proteomic analyses suggest many of these are active. This high expression of transposases indicates that the mechanisms for their tight regulation have been disabled or destroyed. Based on recent studies on other symbionts and pathogens that showed high transposase transcription, we speculate that abundant transposase expression might be common in symbionts and pathogens.

  13. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of planetary nebulae abundances from ISO measurements. It is shown that these nebulae show abundance gradients (with galactocentric distance), which in the case of neon, argon, sulfur and oxygen (with four exceptions) are the same as HII regions and early type star abundance gradi

  14. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2010-01-01

    Context. In recent years mid-and far infrared spectra of planetary nebulae have been analysed and lead to more accurate abundances. It may be expected that these better abundances lead to a better understanding of the evolution of these objects. Aims. The observed abundances in planetary nebulae are

  15. Origin of Cosmic Chemical Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e$^-$, H, H$^+$, H$^-$, He, He$^+$, He$^{++}$, D, D$^+$, H$_2$, H$_2^+$, HD, HeH$^+$), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers at redshift $z\\gtrsim 2$. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below $\\sim 10^4\\,\\rm K$, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/...

  16. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  17. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide va...

  18. Protein: MPA6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in 30 kDa adipocyte complement-related protein, Adipocyte complement-related 30 kDa protein, Adipocyte, C1q ...and collagen domain-containing protein, Adipose most abundant gene transcript 1 protein, Gelatin-binding protein 9606 Homo sapiens Q15848 9370 9370 Q15848 18054335, 19646806 ...

  19. Abundant Semigroups with a Multiplicative Adequate Transversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao Jiang

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate abundant semigroups with a multiplicative adequate transversal. Some properties and characterizations for such semigroups are obtained. In particular,we establish the structure of this class of abundant semigroups in terms of left normal bands, right normal bands and adequate semigroups with some simple compatibility conditions. Finally, we apply this structure to some special cases.

  20. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa.

  1. Resource Abundance and Resource Dependence in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, K.; Magnus, J.R.; Wang, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the ‘curse of resources’ hypothesis for the case of China, and distinguishes between resource abundance, resource rents, and resource dependence. Resource abundance and resource rents are shown to be approximately equivalent, and their association with resource dependence vari

  2. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter depositi

  3. Sorting signals, N-terminal modifications and abundance of the chloroplast proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zybailov

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chloroplast proteome is needed to understand the essential contribution of the chloroplast to plant growth and development. Here we present a large scale analysis by nanoLC-Q-TOF and nanoLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS of ten independent chloroplast preparations from Arabidopsis thaliana which unambiguously identified 1325 proteins. Novel proteins include various kinases and putative nucleotide binding proteins. Based on repeated and independent MS based protein identifications requiring multiple matched peptide sequences, as well as literature, 916 nuclear-encoded proteins were assigned with high confidence to the plastid, of which 86% had a predicted chloroplast transit peptide (cTP. The protein abundance of soluble stromal proteins was calculated from normalized spectral counts from LTQ-Obitrap analysis and was found to cover four orders of magnitude. Comparison to gel-based quantification demonstrates that 'spectral counting' can provide large scale protein quantification for Arabidopsis. This quantitative information was used to determine possible biases for protein targeting prediction by TargetP and also to understand the significance of protein contaminants. The abundance data for 550 stromal proteins was used to understand abundance of metabolic pathways and chloroplast processes. We highlight the abundance of 48 stromal proteins involved in post-translational proteome homeostasis (including aminopeptidases, proteases, deformylases, chaperones, protein sorting components and discuss the biological implications. N-terminal modifications were identified for a subset of nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded proteins and a novel N-terminal acetylation motif was discovered. Analysis of cTPs and their cleavage sites of Arabidopsis chloroplast proteins, as well as their predicted rice homologues, identified new species-dependent features, which will facilitate improved subcellular localization prediction. No evidence

  4. Bacterioplankton abundance and production and nanozooplankton abundance in Kenyan coastal waters (Western Indian Ocean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, N.K.; Van Rijswijk, P.; De Bie, M.J.M.; Peene, J.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial abundance, [H-3]thymidine incorporation rate and heterotrophic nanoflagellate abundance were measured in the water column along transects perpendicular to the Kenyan coast (western Indian Ocean) during June-July (SE monsoon) and November-December (intermonsoon) 1992. Bacterial abundance wa

  5. Detecting Abundance Variations in Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, H.; Santos, P. M.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2014-04-01

    Empirical methods of investigating chemical abundances are still widely used as a primary tool to study planetary nebulae (PNe) as well as HII regions. In this work we investigate the capacity of the empirical abundance determination methods to recover pre-defined parameters and abundance variations in a realistically modeled planetary nebula. To perform the test we use a threedimensional density structure obtained from a hydrodynamical simulation which is fed through a threedimensional photoionization code. The density structure is an asymetrical and inhomogeneous elongated closed shell. The input parameters used, such as, ionizing source, density, and chemical abundances are typical values of type I PNe. The model emissivities are then projected in the line of sight and emission line maps are generated, which are used to obtain the temperature and density diagnostics. The diagnostics and line emission maps are then used to obtain spatially resolved maps of the abundances. In this work we use the method described above to investigate abundances for two distinct orientations of the density structure. Our results show that for typical signal to noise ratios obtained from long-slit spectroscopy, only large abundance variations can be determined with good precision.

  6. Lithium Abundance of Metal-poor Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Wei Zhang; Gang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra have been obtained for 32 metal-poor stars. The equivalent widths of Li λ6708A were measured and the lithium abundances were derived. The average lithium abundance of 21 stars on the lithium plateau is 2.33±0.02 dex. The Lithium plateau exhibits a marginal trend along metallicity, dA(Li)/d[Fe/H] = 0.12±0.06, and no clear trend with the effective temperature. The trend indicates that the abundance of lithium plateau may not be primordial and that a part of the lithium was produced in Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE).

  7. Study of the primordial lithium abundance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Lithium isotopes have attracted an intense interest because the abundance of both 6Li and 6Li from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the puzzles in nuclear astrophysics. Many investigations of both astrophysical observation and nucleosynthesis calculation have been carried out to solve the puzzle, but it is not solved yet. Several nuclear reactions involving lithium have been indirectly measured at China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing. The Standard BBN (SBBN) network calculations are then performed to investigate the primordial Lithium abundance. The result shows that these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the SBBN abundances of 6Li and 7Li.

  8. Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 4 (PEBP4) is a secreted protein and has multiple functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Liu, Dan; Lin, Hui; Jiang, Shanshan; Ying, Ying; Chun, Shao; Deng, Haiteng; Zaia, Joseph; Wen, Rong; Luo, Zhijun

    2016-07-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine binding proteins (PEBP) represent a superfamily of proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. In mammals, four members have been identified, PEBP1-4. To determine the functional differences among PEBP1-4 and the underlying mechanism for their actions, we performed a sequence alignment and found that PEBP4 contains a signal peptide and potential glycosylation sites, whereas PEBP1-3 are intracellular proteins. To test if PEBP4 is secreted, we made constructs with Myc epitope at the amino (N) terminus or carboxyl (C) terminus to mask the signal sequence or keep it free, respectively. Our data revealed that both mouse and human PEBP4 were secreted when the epitope was tagged at their C-terminus. To our surprise, secretion was dependent upon the C-terminal conserved domain in addition to the N-terminal signal sequence. When the epitope was placed to the N-terminus, the recombinant protein failed to secrete and instead, was retained in the cytoplasm. Mass spectrometry detected asparagine (N)-glycosylation on the secreted PEBP4. Although overexpression of N-terminal tagged PEBP4 resulted in an inhibition of ERK activation by EGF, that with a C-terminal epitope tag did not have such an effect. Likewise, transfection of PEBP4 shRNA did not appear to affect ERK activation, suggesting that PEBP4 does not participate in the regulation of this pathway. In contrast, PEBP4 siRNA suppressed phosphorylation of Act at S473. Therefore, our results suggest that PEBP4 is a multifunctional protein and can be secreted. It will be important to investigate the mechanism by which PEBP4 is secreted and regulates cellular events.

  9. Influence of sorbitol on protein production and glycosylation and cell wall formation in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górka-Nieć, Wioletta; Perlińska-Lenart, Urszula; Zembek, Patrycja; Palamarczyk, Grażyna; Kruszewska, Joanna S

    2010-10-01

    Sorbitol is often used at 1 mol/liter as an osmotic stabilizer for cultivation of fungi with a fragile cell wall phenotype. On the other hand, at this concentration sorbitol causes an osmotic stress in fungal cells resulting in intensive production of intracellular glycerol. The highly increased consumption of glucose for glycerol synthesis may lead to changes in processes requiring carbohydrate residues. This study provides new information on the consequences of osmotic stress to the cell wall composition, protein production and glycosylation, and cell morphology of Trichoderma reesei. We observed that high osmolarity conditions enhanced biomass production and strongly limited synthesis of cell wall glucans and chitin. Moreover, in these conditions the amount of secreted protein decreased nearly ten-fold and expression of cbh1 and cbh2 genes coding for cellobiohydrolase I and cellobiohydrolase II, the main secretory proteins in T. reesei, was inhibited resulting in a lack of the proteins in the cell and cultivation medium. The activity of DPM synthase, enzyme engaged in both N- and O-glycosylation pathways, was reduced two-fold, suggesting an overall inhibition of protein glycosylation. However, the two modes of glycosylation were affected divergently: O-glycosylation of secreted proteins decreased in the early stages of growth while N-glycosylation significantly increased in the stationary phase.

  10. Advanced technologies for improved expression of recombinant proteins in bacteria: perspectives and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-12-01

    Prokaryotic expression systems are superior in producing valuable recombinant proteins, enzymes and therapeutic products. Conventional microbial technology is evolving gradually and amalgamated with advanced technologies in order to give rise to improved processes for the production of metabolites, recombinant biopharmaceuticals and industrial enzymes. Recently, several novel approaches have been employed in a bacterial expression platform to improve recombinant protein expression. These approaches involve metabolic engineering, use of strong promoters, novel vector elements such as inducers and enhancers, protein tags, secretion signals, high-throughput devices for cloning and process screening as well as fermentation technologies. Advancement of the novel technologies in E. coli systems led to the production of "difficult to express" complex products including small peptides, antibody fragments, few proteins and full-length aglycosylated monoclonal antibodies in considerable large quantity. Wacker's secretion technologies, Pfenex system, inducers, cell-free systems, strain engineering for post-translational modification, such as disulfide bridging and bacterial N-glycosylation, are still under evaluation for the production of complex proteins and peptides in E. coli in an efficient manner. This appraisal provides an impression of expression technologies developed in recent times for enhanced production of heterologous proteins in E. coli which are of foremost importance for diverse applications in microbiology and biopharmaceutical production.

  11. Screening of differentially expressed Iow-abundance proteins among serum samples from patients with different HBV-related hepatic diseases by SELDI-TOF-MS%小分子差异蛋白在HBV相关性肝病患者血清中的SELDI-TOF-MS筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁秋悦; 吴继周; 李国坚; 臧宁; 胡蝶飞; 吴健林; 陈茂伟; 万裴琦

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To screen differentially expressed lowabundance proteins among serum samples from patients with different HBV-related hepatic diseases and to evaluate their possible value in the diagnosis of these diseases.METHODS: The surface-enhanced laser desorption or ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (SELDI-TOF-MS) was used to screen differentially expressed proteins among serum samples, in which high-abundance proteins had been removed with acetonitrile, collected from patients with asymptomatic chronic hepatitis B (ASC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver cirrhosis (LC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and normal controls.Diagnostic models for each disease were then established with differentially expressed proteins.Protein databases were searched to predict the possible structure and function of differentially expressed proteins.RESULTS: Compared with the normal control group, 63 differentially expressed protein peaks were detected in the ASC group, of which 29 were up-regulated and 34 down-regulated (P < 0.05); 57 in the CHB group, of which 29 upregulated and 34 down-regulated; 68 in the LC group, of which 33 up-regulated and 35 downregulated; and 74 in the HCC group, of which 28 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated.A peak with a m/z of 15 889.8 corresponded to a protein whose expression was up-regulated gradually in an order of healthy controls, ASC, CHB and LC patients, and its expression level in the HCC group was lower than those in the CHB group and LC group.The expression of a protein with a m/z of 11 742.2 was higher in the LC group and HCC group than in other groups, and its expression was gradually increased in an order of healthy controls, CHB, and LC patients, or in another order of healthy controls, CHB, and HCC patients.The sensitivity and specificity using the protein peak at 11 742.2 for diagnosis of LC were 90% and 86.67% and for HCC were 93.33% and 83.33%, respectively.%目的:探讨乙型肝炎病毒(HBV)相关性肝病患者血清

  12. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  13. Estimating Squirrel Abundance From Live trapping Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A reprint of an article from the Journal of Wildlife Management entitled "Estimating Squirrel Abundance from Live Trapping Data" by Nixon, Edwards and Eberhardt. The...

  14. SWFSC/MMTD: Vaquita Abundance Survey 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1997, the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) conducted a survey designed to estimate the abundance of vaquita, the Gulf of California harbor porpoise...

  15. Iron abundance in the atmosphere of Arcturus

    CERN Document Server

    Sheminova, V A

    2015-01-01

    Abundance of iron in the atmosphere of Arcturus has been determined from the profiles or regions of the profiles of the weak lines sensitive to iron abundance. The selected lines of Fe I and Fe II were synthesized with the MARCS theoretical models of the atmosphere. From the observed profiles of lines available with a high spectral resolution in the atlas by Hinkle and Wallace (2005), the values of the iron abundance $A = 6.95 \\pm 0.03$ and the radial-tangential macroturbulent velocity $5.6 \\pm 0.2$ km/s were obtained for Arcturus. The same physical quantities were found for the Sun as a star; they are $7.42 \\pm 0.02$ and $3.4 \\pm 0.3$ km/s, respectively. For Arcturus, the iron abundance relative to the solar one was determined with the differential method as [Fe/H] $=-0.48 \\pm 0.02$.

  16. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, G C; Spite, M; Chen, Y Q; Zhao, G; Zhang, B; Liu, G Q; Liu, Y J; Liu, N; Deng, L C; Spite, F; Hill, V; Zhang, C X

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures, surface gravities, metallicity and microturbulent velocity) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their light elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-ca...

  17. How Egg Case Proteins Can Protect Cuttlefish Offspring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Cornet

    Full Text Available Sepia officinalis egg protection is ensured by a complex capsule produced by the female accessory genital glands and the ink bag. Our study is focused on the proteins constituting the main egg case. De novo transcriptomes from female genital glands provided essential databases for protein identification. A proteomic approach in SDS-PAGE coupled with MS unveiled a new egg case protein family: SepECPs, for Sepia officinalis Egg Case Proteins. N-glycosylation was demonstrated by PAS staining SDS-PAGE gels. These glycoproteins are mainly produced in the main nidamental glands. SepECPs share high sequence homology, especially in the signal peptide and the three cysteine-rich domains. SepECPs have a high number of cysteines, with conserved motifs involved in 3D-structure. SDS-PAGE showed that SepECPs could form dimers; this result was confirmed by TEM observations, which also revealed a protein network. This network is similar to the capsule network, and it associates these structural proteins with polysaccharides, melanin and bacteria to form a tight mesh. Its hardness and elasticity provide physical protection to the embryo. In addition, SepECPs also have bacteriostatic antimicrobial activity on GRAM- bacteria. By observing the SepECP / Vibrio aestuarianus complex in SEM, we demonstrated the ability of these proteins to agglomerate bacteria and thus inhibit their growth. These original proteins identified from the outer egg case ensure the survival of the species by providing physical and chemical protection to the embryos released in the environment without any maternal protection.

  18. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  19. Does land abundance explain African institutions?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The land abundance view of African history uses sparse population to explain pre-colonial land tenure and slavery. I document the geographic forcing variables that predict land rights, slavery, and population density in a cross section of global societies. I discuss whether these correlations support theories of land rights and slavery, including the land abundance view. I show that pre-colonial institutions predict institutional outcomes in Africa in the present, including land transactions,...

  20. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Pottasch, S R

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of planetary nebulae abundances from ISO measurements. It is shown that these nebulae show abundance gradients (with galactocentric distance), which in the case of neon, argon, sulfur and oxygen (with four exceptions) are the same as HII regions and early type star abundance gradients. The abundance of these elements predicted from these gradients at the distance of the Sun from the center are exactly the solar abundance. Sulfur is the exception to this; the reason for this is discussed. The higher solar neon abundance is confirmed; this is discussed in terms of the results of helioseismology. Evidence is presented for oxygen destruction via ON cycling having occurred in the progenitors of four planetary nebulae with bilobal structure. These progenitor stars had a high mass, probably greater than 5 solar masses. This is deduced from the high values of He/H and N/H found in these nebulae. Formation of nitrogen, helium and carbon are discussed. The high mass progenitors which showed oxygen de...

  1. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  2. Modelling Void Abundance in Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F

    2016-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f(R) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surv...

  3. Emergence of canine distemper virus strains with two amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin protein, detected from vaccinated carnivores in North-Eastern China in 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianjun; Zhang, Hailing; Bai, Xue; Martella, Vito; Hu, Bo; Sun, Yangang; Zhu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hao; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Xiqun; Wu, Wei; Yan, Xijun

    2014-04-01

    A total of 16 strains of canine distemper virus (CDV) were detected from vaccinated minks, foxes, and raccoon dogs in four provinces in North-Eastern China between the end of 2011 and 2013. Upon sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin gene and comparison with wild-type CDV from different species in the same geographical areas, two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in 10 CDV strains, which led to amino acid changes at positions 542 (isoleucine to asparagine) and 549 (tyrosine to histidine) of the haemagglutinin protein coding sequence. The change at residue 542 generated a potentially novel N-glycosylation site. Masking of antigenic epitopes by sugar moieties might represent a mechanism for evasion of virus neutralising antibodies and reduced protection by vaccination.

  4. The M Protein of SARS-CoV: Basic Structural and Immunological Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongwu Hu; Jianping Shi; Xiangjun Tian; Feng Jiang; Xiaoqian Zhao; Jun Wang; Siqi Liu; Changqing Zeng; Jian Wang; Huanming Yang; Jie Wen; Lin Tang; Haijun Zhang; Xiaowei Zhang; Yan Li; Jing Wang; Yujun Han; Guoqing Li

    2003-01-01

    We studied structural and immunological properties of the SARS-CoV M (mem-brane) protein, based on comparative analyses of sequence features, phylogeneticinvestigation, and experimental results. The M protein is predicted to contain atriple-spanning transmembrane (TM) region, a single N-glycosylation site near itsN-terminus that is in the exterior of the virion, and a long C-terminal region inthe interior. The M protein harbors a higher substitution rate (0.6% correlated toits size) among viral open reading frames (ORFs) from published data. The foursubstitutions detected in the M protein, which cause non-synonymous changes,can be classified into three types. One of them results in changes of pI (isoelectricpoint) and charge, affecting antigenicity. The second changes hydrophobicity of theTM region, and the third one relates to hydrophilicity of the interior structure.Phylogenetic tree building based on the variations of the M protein appears tosupport the non-human origin of SARS-CoV. To investigate its immunogenicity,we synthesized eight oligopeptides covering 69.2% of the entire ORF and screenedthem by using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) with sera from SARSpatients. The results confirmed our predictions on antigenic sites.

  5. A vesicle carrier that mediates peroxisome protein traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sheung Kwan; Yoda, Naofumi; Schekman, Randy

    2010-12-14

    Pex19p, a soluble cytoplasmic transport protein, is required for the traffic of the peroxisomal membrane proteins Pex3p and Pex15p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome. We documented Pex15p traffic from the ER using a chimeric protein containing a C-terminal glycosylation acceptor peptide. Pex15Gp expressed in wild-type yeast cells is N-glycosylated and functions properly in the peroxisome. In contrast, pex19Δ-mutant cells accumulate the glycoprotein Pex15Gp in the ER. We developed a cell-free preperoxisomal vesicle-budding reaction in which Pex15Gp and Pex3p are packaged into small vesicles in the presence of cytosol, Pex19p, and ATP. Secretory vesicle budding (COPII) detected by the packaging of a SNARE protein (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive attachment protein receptor) occurs in the same incubation but does not depend on Pex19p. Conversely a dominant GTPase mutant Sar1p which inhibits COPII has no effect on Pex3p packaging. Pex15Gp and Pex3p budded vesicles sediment as low-buoyant-density membranes on a Nycodenz gradient and copurify by affinity isolation using native but not Triton X-100-treated budded vesicles. ER-peroxisome transport vesicles appear to rely on a novel budding mechanism requiring Pex19p and additional unknown factors.

  6. Analysis of conventional and unconventional trafficking of CFTR and other membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Heon Yung; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Min Goo

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a polytopic transmembrane protein that functions as a cAMP-activated anion channel at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Mutations in CFTR cause cystic fibrosis and are also associated with monosymptomatic diseases in the lung, pancreas, intestines, and vas deferens. Many disease-causing CFTR mutations, including the deletion of a single phenylalanine residue at position 508 (ΔF508-CFTR), result in protein misfolding and trafficking defects. Therefore, intracellular trafficking of wild-type and mutant CFTR has been studied extensively, and results from these studies significantly contribute to our general understanding of mechanisms involved in the cell-surface trafficking of membrane proteins. CFTR is a glycoprotein that undergoes complex N-glycosylation as it passes through Golgi-mediated conventional exocytosis. Interestingly, results from recent studies revealed that CFTR and other membrane proteins can reach the plasma membrane via an unconventional alternative route that bypasses Golgi in specific cellular conditions. Here, we describe methods that have been used to investigate the conventional and unconventional surface trafficking of CFTR. With appropriate modifications, the protocols described in this chapter can also be applied to studies investigating the intracellular trafficking of other plasma membrane proteins.

  7. Abundance, distribution and patch formation of zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffenhöfer, Gustav-Adolf; Sherman, Byron K.; Lee, Thomas N.

    The goal of studies described here was to determine the responses of zooplankton taxa to phytoplankton patches which develop in and near intrusions of cold, nutrient-rich Gulf Stream water. To achieve this goal we determined the horizontal and vertical distributions of abundant mesozooplankton taxa on the south-eastern continental shelf of the USA between 29°30‧ and 31°N. The study period was from June 23 to August 16, 1981. Highest concentrations of zooplankton usually occurred in and near patches of phytoplankton. Increased phytoplankton appeared to trigger the formation of patches of the calanoid copepod Temora turbinata and the cyclopoid copepods Oithona spp. and Oncaea spp. The patches of zooplankton had greater alongshore than cross-shelf dimensions. T. turbinata responded rapidly to increased concentrations of phytoplankton by reproducing and aggregating in and above intruded waters. Oithonidae which were often, but not always, abundant in phytoplankton patches eventually attained high concentrations over most of the middle and part of the inner shelf. Their concentration and that of Oncaeidae increased steadily. Oncaeidae were not abundant in recently upwelled waters, as was T. turbinata but reached high concentrations in older intrusions when the abundance of T. turbinata remained level or decreased slowly. Both cyclopoid taxa are thought to reproduce slowly (egg sacs) compared to T. turbinata. Another taxon, the doliolids, became abundant far more rapidly in intruded waters (by asexual reproduction) than did the other three taxa. Doliolids were the most opportunistic intrusion zooplankton form. They do not regularly occur in low abundance on the shelf, as do the three copepod taxa, but develop in pulses in regions where T. turbinata and Oncaea are not abundant. Of the four taxa studied the abundance of doliolids increased and decreased most rapidly, whereas Oithona and Oncaea increased slowly and did not decrease during the study period. T. turbinata

  8. Predicting folivorous primate abundance: validation of a nutritional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Colin A; Chapman, Lauren J; Naughton-Treves, Lisa; Lawes, Michael J; McDowell, Lee R

    2004-02-01

    Understanding the determinants of animal abundance has become more vital as ecologists are increasingly asked to apply their knowledge to the construction of informed management plans. However, there are few general models are available to explain variation in abundance. Some notable exceptions are studies of folivorous primates, in which the protein-to-fiber ratio of foods has been shown to predict biomass. Here we examine the generality of Milton's [American Naturalist 114:363-378, 1979] protein/fiber model by providing a detailed analysis of diet selection in black-and-white colobus monkeys (Colobus guereza), and applying the model to populations shown to be stable; an assumption not previously examined. Based on observations of two groups of black-and-white colobus in Kibale National Park, Uganda, and one group in a forest fragment, we documented that the animals selected young leaves that had more protein, were more digestible, and had a higher protein-to-fiber ratio than mature leaves. The mature leaves did not differ from young leaves with respect to secondary compounds or mineral content (with the exceptions of copper and zinc). All of the colobus groups selected foods with a high protein-to-fiber ratios. However, one group also selected more digestible foods, and in another group, foraging efforts were positively related to zinc and negatively related to potassium. Previous studies that examined Milton's protein/fiber model did not demonstrate that the study populations were stable. If some populations were not at carrying capacity, then the correlations drawn between food availability and/or quality and folivore biomass may have been spurious. To address this issue, we censused a series of forest fragments in 1995 and again in 2000. We found that the populations in these fragments had declined from 165 in 1995 to 119 animals in 2000. However, based on evidence of population stability and lack of forest disturbance, we concluded that five of the original

  9. The solar photospheric abundance of zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Steffen, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr), together with strontium and yttrium, is an important element in the understanding of the Galactic nucleosynthesis. In fact, the triad Sr-Y-Zr constitutes the first peak of s-process elements. Despite its general relevance not many studies of the solar abundance of Zr were conducted. We derive the zirconium abundance in the solar photosphere with the same CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model of the solar atmosphere that we previously used to investigate the abundances of C-N-O. We review the zirconium lines available in the observed solar spectra and select a sample of lines to determine the zirconium abundance, considering lines of neutral and singly ionised zirconium. We apply different line profile fitting strategies for a reliable analysis of Zr lines that are blended by lines of other elements. The abundance obtained from lines of neutral zirconium is very uncertain because these lines are commonly blended and weak in the solar spectrum. However, we believe that some lines of ionised zirconium are...

  10. The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge

    CERN Document Server

    Dufton, P L; Thompson, H M A; Street, R A

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution HST ultra-violet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-LTE effects or from errors in the atomic data as similar low Fe abundances having previously been reported from the analysis of the ultra-violet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 dex and -0.8 dex respectively and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our...

  11. Abundance differences among G and K giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challener, Sharon Lynn Montgomery

    Effective temperatures and surface gravities were derived for 52 G and K giants using model atmosphere. Of these, 33 were called very strong-lined (or VSL) stars primarily because of their CN line strength. We find that when compared to normal stars, the VSL stars show a mean iron overabundance of 0.15 dex. Contrary to earlier suggestions, none of the heavier elements (Z greater than 10) appear selectively enhanced. Red giants are believed to undergo mixing, thereby driving the surface abundances towards those of the stellar interior. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances are most sensitive to mixing as they are produced through nucleosynthesis at various depths beneath the star's surface. The CNO abundances (normalized to the iron abundances) of the VSLs appear on average to be normal for G and K giants. This result suggests that the strong CN absorption seen in VSLs is not the result of unusual mixing. Their general overabundance of metal appears instead to be innate, presumably reflecting the metallicity of the gaseous clouds from which they formed. This should be settled once the appropriate number of VSL dwarfs is found. The deviations from the normal population of giants are rather small, however, and certainly not of the magnitude envisioned by Spinrad and Taylor (1969). It is likely that VSLs are merely the stars lying in the tail of the normal abundance distribution.

  12. Oxygen abundance maps of CALIFA galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zinchenko, I A; Grebel, E K; Sanchez, S F; Vilchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    We construct maps of the oxygen abundance distribution across the disks of 88 galaxies using CALIFA data release 2 (DR2) spectra. The position of the center of a galaxy (coordinates on the plate) were also taken from the CALIFA DR2. The galaxy inclination, the position angle of the major axis, and the optical radius were determined from the analysis of the surface brightnesses in the SDSS $g$ and $r$ bands of the photometric maps of SDSS data release 9. We explore the global azimuthal abundance asymmetry in the disks of the CALIFA galaxies and the presence of a break in the radial oxygen abundance distribution. We found that there is no significant global azimuthal asymmetry for our sample of galaxies, i.e., the asymmetry is small, usually lower than 0.05 dex. The scatter in oxygen abundances around the abundance gradient has a comparable value, $\\lesssim 0.05$ dex. A significant (possibly dominant) fraction of the asymmetry can be attributed to the uncertainties in the geometrical parameters of these galaxie...

  13. Estimating the relationship between abundance and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Lewy, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies investigate the relationship between abundance and distribution using indices reflecting one of the three aspects of distribution: proportion of area occupied, aggregation, and geographical range. Using simulations and analytical derivations, we examine whether these indices...... based on Euclidean distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution. Only the proportion of structurally empty areas, Lloyds index, and indices of the distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution are unbiased at all levels of abundance. The remaining indices generate...... relationships between abundance and distribution even in cases where no underlying relationships exists, although the problem decreases for measures derived from Lorenz curves when samples contain more than four individuals on average. To illustrate the problem, the indices are applied to juvenile North Sea cod...

  14. Chemical Fractionation and Abundances in Coronal Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, J J

    2003-01-01

    Much of modern astrophysics is grounded on the observed chemical compositions of stars and the diffuse plasma that pervades the space between stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies. X-ray and EUV spectra of the hot plasma in the outer atmospheres of stars have demonstrated that these environments are subject to chemical fractionation in which the abundances of elements can be enhanced and depleted by an order of magnitude or more. These coronal abundance anomalies are discussed and some of the physical mechanisms that might be responsible for producing them are examined. It is argued that coronal abundances can provide important new diagnostics on physical processes at work in solar and stellar coronae. It seems likely that other hot astrophysical plasmas will be subject to similar effects.

  15. Glycan masking of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein for probing protein binding function and vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Sampath

    Full Text Available Glycan masking is an emerging vaccine design strategy to focus antibody responses to specific epitopes, but it has mostly been evaluated on the already heavily glycosylated HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Here this approach was used to investigate the binding interaction of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and to evaluate if glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens would focus the antibody response on key interaction surfaces. Four variants of PVDBPII were generated and probed for function and immunogenicity. Whereas two PvDBPII glycosylation variants with increased glycan surface coverage distant from predicted interaction sites had equivalent binding activity to wild-type protein, one of them elicited slightly better DARC-binding-inhibitory activity than wild-type immunogen. Conversely, the addition of an N-glycosylation site adjacent to a predicted PvDBP interaction site both abolished its interaction with DARC and resulted in weaker inhibitory antibody responses. PvDBP is composed of three subdomains and is thought to function as a dimer; a meta-analysis of published PvDBP mutants and the new DBPII glycosylation variants indicates that critical DARC binding residues are concentrated at the dimer interface and along a relatively flat surface spanning portions of two subdomains. Our findings suggest that DARC-binding-inhibitory antibody epitope(s lie close to the predicted DARC interaction site, and that addition of N-glycan sites distant from this site may augment inhibitory antibodies. Thus, glycan resurfacing is an attractive and feasible tool to investigate protein structure-function, and glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens might contribute to P. vivax vaccine development.

  16. Securing abundance : The politics of energy security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Energy Security is a concept that is known in the literature for its ‘slippery’ nature and subsequent wide range of definitions. Instead of another attempt at grasping the essence of this concept, Securing Abundance reformulates the problem and moves away from a definitional problem to a theoretical

  17. In Abundance: Networked Participatory Practices as Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bonnie E.

    2015-01-01

    In an era of knowledge abundance, scholars have the capacity to distribute and share ideas and artifacts via digital networks, yet networked scholarship often remains unrecognized within institutional spheres of influence. Using ethnographic methods including participant observation, interviews, and document analysis, this study investigates…

  18. Analysis of 26 Barium Stars I. Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, D M; Allen, Dinah M.; Barbuy, Beatriz

    2006-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of 26 barium stars, including dwarf barium stars, providing their atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H], vt) and elemental abundances. We aim at deriving gravities and luminosity classes of the sample stars, in particular to confirm the existence of dwarf barium stars. Accurate abundances of chemical elements were derived. Abundance ratios between nucleosynthetic processes, by using Eu and Ba as representatives of the r- and s-processes are presented. High-resolution spectra with the FEROS spectrograph at the ESO-1.5m Telescope, and photometric data with Fotrap at the Zeiss telescope at the LNA were obtained. The atmospheric parameters were derived in an iterative way, with temperatures obtained from colour-temperature calibrations. The abundances were derived using spectrum synthesis for Li, Na, Al, alpha-, iron peak, s- and r-elements atomic lines, and C and N molecular lines. Atmospheric parameters in the range 4300 < Teff < 6500, -1.2 < [Fe/H] < 0.0 and 1.4...

  19. Toward reliable estimates of abundance: comparing index methods to assess the abundance of a Mammalian predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Güthlin

    Full Text Available Due to time and financial constraints indices are often used to obtain landscape-scale estimates of relative species abundance. Using two different field methods and comparing the results can help to detect possible bias or a non monotonic relationship between the index and the true abundance, providing more reliable results. We used data obtained from camera traps and feces counts to independently estimate relative abundance of red foxes in the Black Forest, a forested landscape in southern Germany. Applying negative binomial regression models, we identified landscape parameters that influence red fox abundance, which we then used to predict relative red fox abundance. We compared the estimated regression coefficients of the landscape parameters and the predicted abundance of the two methods. Further, we compared the costs and the precision of the two field methods. The predicted relative abundances were similar between the two methods, suggesting that the two indices were closely related to the true abundance of red foxes. For both methods, landscape diversity and edge density best described differences in the indices and had positive estimated effects on the relative fox abundance. In our study the costs of each method were of similar magnitude, but the sample size obtained from the feces counts (262 transects was larger than the camera trap sample size (88 camera locations. The precision of the camera traps was lower than the precision of the feces counts. The approach we applied can be used as a framework to compare and combine the results of two or more different field methods to estimate abundance and by this enhance the reliability of the result.

  20. An approach to remove albumin for the proteomic analysis of low abundance biomarkers in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nuzhat; Barker, Gillian; Oliva, Karen; Garfin, David; Talmadge, Kenneth; Georgiou, Harry; Quinn, Michael; Rice, Greg

    2003-10-01

    Proteomic technologies are being used to discover and identify disease-associated biomarkers. The application of these technologies in the search for potential diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in the serum of patients has been limited by the presence of highly abundant albumin and immunoglobulins that constitute approximately 60-97% of the total serum proteins. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether treatment of human serum with Affi-Gel Blue alone or in combination with Protein A (Aurum serum protein mini kit, Bio-Rad) before two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis removed high abundance proteins to allow the visualization of low abundant proteins. Serum samples were treated with either Affi-Gel Blue or Aurum kit and then subjected to 2-DE using 11 cm, pH 4-7 isoelectric focussing strips for the first dimension and 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for second dimension. Protein spots were visualized using a fluorescent protein dye (SYPRO Ruby, Bio-Rad). Comparison between treatment methods showed significant removal of albumin by both Affi-Gel Blue and Aurum kit and considerable differences in the protein profile of the gels after each treatment. Direct comparison between treatments revealed twenty-eight protein spots unique to Affi-Gel Blue while only two spots were unique after Aurum kit treatment. Unique spots in Affi-Gel Blue and Aurum kit treated serum were not visualized in untreated serum. Sixteen hours of Affi-Gel Blue treatment resulted in enhanced visualization of fifty-three protein spots by two-fold, thirty-one by five-fold, twelve by ten-fold and six by twenty-fold. In parallel after Aurum kit treatment two-, five-, ten- and twenty-fold enhancements of thirty, thirteen, eight and five protein spots, respectively, were observed. The pattern of increased visualization of protein spots with both treatment methods was similar. In conclusion, treatment of serum samples with Affi-Gel Blue or Aurum kit before

  1. Non-Salmonid Abundance - Line Features [ds186

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. The "Other Fish" category contains data collected...

  2. Role of Dietary Soy Protein in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel T. Velasquez, Sam J. Bhathena

    2007-01-01

    Soy protein is an important component of soybeans and provides an abundant source of dietary protein. Among the dietary proteins, soy protein is considered a complete protein in that it contains ample amounts of all the essential amino acids plus several other macronutrients with a nutritional value roughly equivalent to that of animal protein of high biological value. Soy protein is unique among the plant-based proteins because it is associated with isoflavones, a group of compounds with a v...

  3. Chemical Cartography in the Milky Way with SDSS/APOGEE: Multi-element abundances and abundance ratio variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Hasselquist, Sten; Johnson, Jennifer; Bird, Jonathan C.; Majewski, Steven R.; SDSS/APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The SDSS/APOGEE project is measuring abundances of multiple elements for several hundred thousand stars across the Milky Way. These allow the mapping of abundances and abundance ratio variations. Results will be presented for multiple abundance ratios across of the Galactic disk. The interpretation of mean abundance maps is complicated by variations in star formation history across the disk and by changing abundance ratios that result from an overall metallicity gradient. Variations in chemical abundance sequences, however, show the potential for using abundance ratios to track the movement of stars through the disk, and provide key information for constraining Galaxy formation and chemical evolution models.

  4. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  5. Regulation of NHE3, NKCC2, and NCC abundance in kidney during aldosterone escape phenomenon: role of NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turban, Sharon; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Knepper, Mark A

    2003-11-01

    Escape from aldosterone-induced renal NaCl retention is an important homeostatic mechanism in pathophysiological states in which plasma aldosterone levels are inappropriately elevated, e.g., in primary aldosteronism. Our previous studies demonstrated that the escape process occurs largely as a result of a marked suppression of the abundance of the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) of the distal convoluted tubule but have also demonstrated a paradoxical increase in the protein abundance of the apical Na/H exchanger of the proximal tubule (NHE3). In the present study, we confirmed the increase in NHE3 and also showed that a similar increase in NHE3 protein abundance occurs in escape from ANG II-mediated NaCl retention. To investigate the potential role of nitric oxide (NO) in the observed upregulation of NHE3, we repeated the aldosterone escape experiment with a superimposed infusion of a NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). l-NAME infusion abolished the increase in NHE3 protein abundance. Furthermore, in a different experiment, NO synthase inhibition uncovered an associated decrease in the abundance of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) of the thick ascending limb, not seen with simple aldosterone escape. However, NO synthase inhibition did not block the decrease in NCC abundance normally seen with aldosterone escape. Furthermore, l-NAME infusion in aldosterone-treated rats markedly decreased both NHE3 and NKCC2 protein abundance, without changes in the corresponding mRNA levels. We conclude that NHE3 and NKCC2 protein abundances in kidney are positively regulated by NO and that the increase in NHE3 abundance seen in the aldosterone escape phenomenon is NO dependent.

  6. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias ($f$). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is $...

  7. The primordial deuterium abundance problems and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Kegel, W H; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Takahara, Fumio; Kegel, Wilhelm H.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of extragalactic deuterium abundance is discussed using two examples of `low' and `high' D/H measurements. We show that the discordance of these two types of D abundances may be a consequence of the spatial correlations in the stochastic velocity field. Within the framework of the generalized procedure (accounting for such effects) one finds good agreement between different observations and the theoretical predictions for standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN). In particular, we show that the deuterium absorption seen at z = 2.504 toward Q1009+2956 and the H+D Ly-alpha profile observed at z = 0.701 toward Q1718+4807 are compatible with D/H $\\sim 4.1 - 4.6\\times10^{-5}$. This result supports SBBN and, thus, no inhomogeneity is needed. The problem of precise D/H measurements is discussed.

  8. In Abundance: Networked Participatory Practices as Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie E Stewart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an era of knowledge abundance, scholars have the capacity to distribute and share ideas and artifacts via digital networks, yet networked scholarship often remains unrecognized within institutional spheres of influence. Using ethnographic methods including participant observation, interviews, and document analysis, this study investigates networks as sites of scholarship. Its purpose is to situate networked practices within Boyer’s (1990 four components of scholarship – discovery, integration, application, and teaching – and to explore them as a techno-cultural system of scholarship suited to an era of knowledge abundance. Not only does the paper find that networked engagement both aligns with and exceeds Boyer’s model for scholarship, it suggests that networked scholarship may enact Boyer’s initial aim of broadening scholarship itself through fostering extensive cross-disciplinary, public ties and rewarding connection, collaboration, and curation between individuals rather than roles or institutions.

  9. Earth Abundant Element Type I Clathrate Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Earth abundant element clathrate phases are of interest for a number of applications ranging from photovoltaics to thermoelectrics. Silicon-containing type I clathrate is a framework structure with the stoichiometry A8-xSi46 (A = guest atom such as alkali metal that can be tuned by alloying and doping with other elements. The type I clathrate framework can be described as being composed of two types of polyhedral cages made up of tetrahedrally coordinated Si: pentagonal dodecahedra with 20 atoms and tetrakaidecahedra with 24 atoms in the ratio of 2:6. The cation sites, A, are found in the center of each polyhedral cage. This review focuses on the newest discoveries in the group 13-silicon type I clathrate family: A8E8Si38 (A = alkali metal; E = Al, Ga and their properties. Possible approaches to new phases based on earth abundant elements and their potential applications will be discussed.

  10. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    CERN Document Server

    Aver, Erik; Porter, R L; Skillman, Evan D

    2013-01-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, & Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y_p. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increase...

  11. Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Berkovits, D; Bordeanu, C; Ghelberg, S; Hashimoto, Y; Hershcovitch, A I; Jiang, S; Nakanishi, T; Sakamoto, K

    2001-01-01

    Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

  12. Detailed Chemical Abundances of Extragalactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, R A

    2005-01-01

    We outline a method to measure the detailed chemical composition of extragalactic (unresolved) globular clusters (GCs) from echelle spectra of their integrated light. Our goal is to use this method to measure abundance patterns of GCs in distant spiral and elliptical galaxies to constrain their formation histories. To develop this technique we have obtained a ``training set'' of integrated-light spectra of resolved GCs in the Milky Way and LMC by scanning across the clusters during exposures. Our training set also include spectra of individual stars in those GCs from which abundances can be obtained in the normal way to provide a check on our integrated-light results. We present here the preliminary integrated-light analysis of one GC in our training set, NGC 104 (47 Tuc), and outline some of the techniques utilized and problems encountered in that analysis.

  13. Revised Thorium Abundances for Lunar Red Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, J. J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Hawke, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar red spots are features on the nearside of the Moon that are characterized by high albedo and by a strong absorption in the ultraviolet. These red spots include the Gruithuisen domes, the Mairan domes, Hansteen Alpha, the southern portion of Montes Riphaeus, Darney Chi and Tau, Helmet, and an area near the Lassell crater. It has been suggested that many of the red spots are extrusive, nonmare, volcanic features that could be composed of an evolved lithlogy enriched in thorium. In fact, Hawke et al. used morphological characteristics to show that Hansteen Alpha is a nonmare volcanic construct. However, because the apparent Th abundances (6 - 7 ppm) were lower than that expected for evolved rock types, Hawke et al. concluded that Hansteen Alpha was composed of an unknown rock type. Subsequent studies by Lawrence et al. used improved knowledge of the Th spatial distribution for small area features on the lunar surface to revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at the Hansteen Alpha red spot. As part of their study, Lawrence et al. used a forward modeling technique to show that the Th abundance at Hansteen Alpha is not 6 ppm, but is more likely closer to 25 ppm, a value consistent with evolved lithologies. This positive correlation between the morphology and composition of Hansteen Alpha provides support for the presence of evolved lithologies on the lunar surface. It is possible, however, that Hansteen Alpha represents an isolated occurrence of non-mare volcanism. That is why we have chosen to use the forward modeling technique of Lawrence et al. to investigate the Th abundances at other lunar red spots, starting with the Gruithuisen domes. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a hemolymph clottable protein from tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, M S; Huang, C J; Leu, J H; Lee, Y C; Tsai, I H

    1999-12-01

    To investigate the coagulation system in crustacean decapoda, a homodimeric glycoprotein of 380 kDa was purified from the hemolymph of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) by sequential DEAE anion exchange chromatography. The purified protein was coagulated by the shrimp hemocyte transglutaminase in the presence of Ca2+. The clottable protein contains 44% alpha helices and 26% beta sheets as determined by circular dichroism spectra. Its conformation is stable in buffer of pH 4-9. To solve its primary structure, partial sequences of the purified polypeptides from cyanogen bromide cleavage and endopeptidase digestion were also determined. A shrimp cDNA expression library was constructed. By combination with antibody screening, reverse transcriptase PCR using degenerate primers from determined amino acid sequences and cDNA library screening with digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes, the entire cDNA of 6124 bp was obtained. This cDNA encodes a protein of 1670 amino acids, including a 14-amino acid signal peptide. With four potential N-glycosylation sites, the clottable protein was found to contain 3.8% high-mannose glycan; and Man8GlcNAc and Man9GlcNAc were released upon endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase hydrolysis. Upon conducting a protein sequence database survey, the shrimp clottable protein shows 36% identities to the crayfish clotting protein and lower similarities to members of insect vitellogenins, apolipoprotein B and mammalian von Willebrand factor. Notably, a region rich in Gln residues, a polyGln motif and five Ser-Lys-Thr-Ser repeats are present in the shrimp protein, suggesting this protein might be a transglutaminase substrate. Northern blot analysis revealed that the clottable protein is expressed in most of the shrimp tissues but not in the mature hemocytes.

  15. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    CERN Document Server

    de Castro, D B; Roig, F; Jilinski, E; Drake, N A; Chavero, C; Silva, J V Sales

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, $alpha$-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code {\\sc moog}. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of $alpha$-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heav...

  16. Water Abundance in Molecular Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Snell, R L; Ashby, M L N; Bergin, E A; Chin, G; Erickson, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Harwit, M; Kleiner, S C; Koch, D G; Neufeld, D A; Patten, B M; Plume, R; Schieder, R; Stauffer, J R; Tolls, V; Wang, Z; Winnewisser, G; Zhang, Y F; Melnick, G J

    2000-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) observations of the 1_{10}-1_{01} transition of ortho-water at 557 GHz toward 12 molecular cloud cores. The water emission was detected in NGC 7538, Rho Oph A, NGC 2024, CRL 2591, W3, W3(OH), Mon R2, and W33, and was not detected in TMC-1, L134N, and B335. We also present a small map of the water emission in S140. Observations of the H_2^{18}O line were obtained toward S140 and NGC 7538, but no emission was detected. The abundance of ortho-water relative to H_2 in the giant molecular cloud cores was found to vary between 6x10^{-10} and 1x10^{-8}. Five of the cloud cores in our sample have previous water detections; however, in all cases the emission is thought to arise from hot cores with small angular extents. The water abundance estimated for the hot core gas is at least 100 times larger than in the gas probed by SWAS. The most stringent upper limit on the ortho-water abundance in dark clouds is provided in TMC-1, where the 3-sigma upper limit on the ...

  17. Abundances In Very Metal Poor Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, J G; McWilliam, A; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Wasserburg, G J; Ivans, I I; Dehn, M; Karlsson, T; Melendez, J; Cohen, Judith G.; Christlieb, Norbert; William, Andrew Mc; Shectman, Steve; Thompson, Ian; Ivans, Inese; Dehn, Matthias; Karlsson, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the detailed composition of 28 extremely metal-poor dwarfs, 22 of which are from the Hamburg/ESO Survey, based on Keck Echelle spectra. Our sample has a median [Fe/H] of -2.7 dex, extends to -3.5 dex, and is somewhat less metal-poor than was expected from [Fe/H](HK,HES) determined from low resolution spectra. Our analysis supports the existence of a sharp decline in the distribution of halo stars with metallicity below [Fe/H] = -3.0 dex. So far no additional turnoff stars with [Fe/H]}<-3.5 have been identified in our follow up efforts. For the best observed elements between Mg and Ni, we find that the abundance ratios appear to have reached a plateau, i.e. [X/Fe] is approximately constant as a function of [Fe/H], except for Cr, Mn and Co, which show trends of abundance ratios varying with [Fe/H]. These abundance ratios at low metallicity correspond approximately to the yield expected from Type II SN with a narrow range in mass and explosion parameters; high mass Type II SN progenitors are requir...

  18. A global database of ant species abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Heloise; Dunn, Rob R.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Grossman, Blair F.; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Agosti, Donat; Andersen, Alan N.; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Ingre; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B.; Bishop, Tom R.; Boulay, Raphael; Bruhl, Carsten; Castracani, Cristina; Cerda, Xim; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Enriquez, Martha L.; Fayle, Tom M.; Feener Jr., Donald H.; Fisher, Brian L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Fitpatrick, Matthew C.; Gomez, Cristanto; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Gove, Aaron; Grasso, Donato A.; Groc, Sarah; Guenard, Benoit; Gunawardene, Nihara; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin; Janda, Milan; Jenkins, Clinton; Kaspari, Michael; Klimes, Petr; Lach, Lori; Laeger, Thomas; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Luke, Sarah H.; Majer, Jonathan; McGlynn, Terrence P.; Menke, Sean; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Moses, Jimmy; Munyai, Thinandavha Caswell; Pacheco, Renata; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M.; Resasco, Julian; Retana, Javier; Silva, Rogerio R.; Sorger, Magdalena D.; Souza, Jorge; Suarez, Andrew V.; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Vonshak, Merav; Weiser, Michael D.; Yates, Michelle; Parr, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    What forces structure ecological assemblages? A key limitation to general insights about assemblage structure is the availability of data that are collected at a small spatial grain (local assemblages) and a large spatial extent (global coverage). Here, we present published and unpublished data from 51,388 ant abundance and occurrence records of more than 2693 species and 7953 morphospecies from local assemblages collected at 4212 locations around the world. Ants were selected because they are diverse and abundant globally, comprise a large fraction of animal biomass in most terrestrial communities, and are key contributors to a range of ecosystem functions. Data were collected between 1949 and 2014, and include, for each geo-referenced sampling site, both the identity of the ants collected and details of sampling design, habitat type and degree of disturbance. The aim of compiling this dataset was to provide comprehensive species abundance data in order to test relationships between assemblage structure and environmental and biogeographic factors. Data were collected using a variety of standardised methods, such as pitfall and Winkler traps, and will be valuable for studies investigating large-scale forces structuring local assemblages. Understanding such relationships is particularly critical under current rates of global change. We encourage authors holding additional data on systematically collected ant assemblages, especially those in dry and cold, and remote areas, to contact us and contribute their data to this growing dataset.

  19. Abundance analyses of cool extreme helium stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, G; Lambert, D L; Jeffery, C S; Asplund, M; Pandey, Gajendra; Lambert, David L.; Asplund, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Extreme helium stars (EHe) with effective temperatures from 8000K to 13000K are among the coolest EHe stars and overlap the hotter R CrB stars in effective temperature. The cool EHes may represent an evolutionary link between the hot EHes and the R CrBs. Abundance analyses of four cool EHes are presented. To test for an evolutionary connection, the chemical compositions of cool EHes are compared with those of hot EHes and R CrBs. Relative to Fe, the N abundance of these stars is intermediate between those of hot EHes and R CrBs. For the R CrBs, the metallicity M derived from the mean of Si and S appears to be more consistent with the kinematics than that derived from Fe. When metallicity M derived from Si and S replaces Fe, the observed N abundances of EHes and R CrBs fall at or below the upper limit corresponding to thorough conversion of initial C and O to N. There is an apparent difference between the composition of R CrBs and EHes; the former having systematically higher [N/M] ratios. The material present...

  20. The shape of terrestrial abundance distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroy, John

    2015-09-01

    Ecologists widely accept that the distribution of abundances in most communities is fairly flat but heavily dominated by a few species. The reason for this is that species abundances are thought to follow certain theoretical distributions that predict such a pattern. However, previous studies have focused on either a few theoretical distributions or a few empirical distributions. I illustrate abundance patterns in 1055 samples of trees, bats, small terrestrial mammals, birds, lizards, frogs, ants, dung beetles, butterflies, and odonates. Five existing theoretical distributions make inaccurate predictions about the frequencies of the most common species and of the average species, and most of them fit the overall patterns poorly, according to the maximum likelihood-related Kullback-Leibler divergence statistic. Instead, the data support a low-dominance distribution here called the "double geometric." Depending on the value of its two governing parameters, it may resemble either the geometric series distribution or the lognormal series distribution. However, unlike any other model, it assumes both that richness is finite and that species compete unequally for resources in a two-dimensional niche landscape, which implies that niche breadths are variable and that trait distributions are neither arrayed along a single dimension nor randomly associated. The hypothesis that niche space is multidimensional helps to explain how numerous species can coexist despite interacting strongly.

  1. Angel lichen moth abundance and morphology data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Anya; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Muehlbauer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Two unique datasets on the abundance and morphology of the angel lichen moth ( Cisthene angelus) in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA were compiled to describe the phenology and life history of this common, but poorly known, species. The abundance data were collected from 2012 to 2013 through a collaboration with river runners in Grand Canyon National Park. These citizen scientists deployed light traps from their campsites for one hour each night of their expedition. Insects were preserved in ethanol on site, and returned to the Southwest Biological Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona for analysis in the laboratory. A total of 2,437 light trap samples were sorted through, 903 of which contained C. angelus. In total, 73,841 C. angelus were identified and enumerated to create the abundance data set. The morphology dataset is based on a subset of 28 light trap samples from sampling year 2012 (14 from spring and 14 from fall.) It includes gender and forewing lengths for 2,674 individual moths and dry weights for 1,102 of those individuals.

  2. Abundances in Stars with Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchey, Adam M; Stone, Myra; Wallerstein, George

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a detailed chemical abundance analysis for a sample of solar-type stars known to exhibit excess infrared emission associated with dusty debris disks. Our sample of 28 stars was selected based on results from the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Spitzer Legacy Program, for the purpose of investigating whether the stellar atmospheres have been polluted with planetary material, which could indicate that the metallicity enhancement in stars with planets is due to metal-rich infall in the later stages of star and planet formation. The preliminary results presented here consist of precise abundances for 15 elements (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, and Ni) for half of the stars in our sample. We find that none of the stars investigated so far exhibit the expected trend of increasing elemental abundance with increasing condensation temperature, which would result from the stars having accreted planetary debris. Rather, the slopes of linear least...

  3. Elemental Abundances of Solar Sibling Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, I.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Roederer, I. U.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  4. Stellar Mixing and the Primordial Lithium Abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsonneault, M H; Walker, T P; Narayanan, V K

    2002-01-01

    We compare the properties of recent samples of the lithium abundances in halo stars to one another and to the predictions of theoretical models including rotational mixing, and we examine the data for trends with metal abundance. We find from a KS test that in the absence of any correction for chemical evolution, the Ryan, Norris, & Beers (1999} sample is fully consistent with mild rotational mixing induced depletion and, therefore, with an initial lithium abundance higher than the observed value. Tests for outliers depend sensitively on the threshold for defining their presence, but we find a 10$--$45% probability that the RNB sample is drawn from the rotationally mixed models with a 0.2 dex median depletion (with lower probabilities corresponding to higher depletion factors). When chemical evolution trends (Li/H versus Fe/H) are treated in the linear plane we find that the dispersion in the RNB sample is not explained by chemical evolution; the inferred bounds on lithium depletion from rotational mixing...

  5. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    CERN Document Server

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  6. Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-1205 (United States); Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V. [Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of RAS, 65/1, Pulkovskoye Chaussee, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Roederer, I. U. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wittenmyer, R. A. [School of Physics, UNSW Australia, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  7. Glycoprotein folding and quality-control mechanisms in protein-folding diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Ferris

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of proteins – from translation to folding to export – encompasses a complex set of events that are exquisitely regulated and scrutinized to ensure the functional quality of the end products. Cells have evolved to capitalize on multiple post-translational modifications in addition to primary structure to indicate the folding status of nascent polypeptides to the chaperones and other proteins that assist in their folding and export. These modifications can also, in the case of irreversibly misfolded candidates, signal the need for dislocation and degradation. The current Review focuses on the glycoprotein quality-control (GQC system that utilizes protein N-glycosylation and N-glycan trimming to direct nascent glycopolypeptides through the folding, export and dislocation pathways in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. A diverse set of pathological conditions rooted in defective as well as over-vigilant ER quality-control systems have been identified, underlining its importance in human health and disease. We describe the GQC pathways and highlight disease and animal models that have been instrumental in clarifying our current understanding of these processes.

  8. The potential of Pseudozyma yeastlike epiphytes for the production of heterologous recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, T J; Cheng, Y L; Zhao, Y Y; Bolduc, S; Neveu, B; Anguenot, R; Labbé, C; Belzile, F; Bélanger, R R

    2005-12-01

    Although Basidiomycetes represent the most evolved class of fungi, they have been neglected with regard to recombinant gene expression. In this work, basidiomycetous yeasts belonging to Pseudozyma spp. were studied with respect to their amenability to heterologous protein production. Single plasmid or cotransformation experiments routinely afforded 100 to 200 independent transformants for the two tested species of Pseudozyma. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in the correctly folded conformation, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was expressed in its active form, as revealed by its lytic activity on Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells. Protease analysis established that Pseudozyma spp. contained equivalent or less extracellular protease activity than yeasts and far less protease activity than ascomycetous filamentous fungi in similar culture conditions. This proteolytic activity was inhibited by over 97% with a combination of PMSF and Pepstatin A. N-glycosylation patterns of native Pseudozyma flocculosa secreted proteins were comprised of one or a few short glycan chains that possess a classic eukaryotic structure typical of higher fungi and animal cells. This is the first report of a Basidiomycete that possesses multiple intrinsic characteristics necessary for use as a heterologous gene expression system.

  9. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  10. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Heat-Soluble Proteins Identified in the Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade Improve Osmotic Tolerance of Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sae Tanaka; Junko Tanaka; Yoshihiro Miwa; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Toshiaki Katayama; Kazuharu Arakawa; Atsushi Toyoda; Takeo Kubo; Takekazu Kunieda

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are se...

  11. Can occupancy-abundance models be used to monitor wolf abundance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cecilia Latham

    Full Text Available Estimating the abundance of wild carnivores is of foremost importance for conservation and management. However, given their elusive habits, direct observations of these animals are difficult to obtain, so abundance is more commonly estimated from sign surveys or radio-marked individuals. These methods can be costly and difficult, particularly in large areas with heavy forest cover. As an alternative, recent research has suggested that wolf abundance can be estimated from occupancy-abundance curves derived from "virtual" surveys of simulated wolf track networks. Although potentially more cost-effective, the utility of this approach hinges on its robustness to violations of its assumptions. We assessed the sensitivity of the occupancy-abundance approach to four assumptions: variation in wolf movement rates, changes in pack cohesion, presence of lone wolves, and size of survey units. Our simulations showed that occupancy rates and wolf pack abundances were biased high if track surveys were conducted when wolves made long compared to short movements, wolf packs were moving as multiple hunting units as opposed to a cohesive pack, and lone wolves were moving throughout the surveyed landscape. We also found that larger survey units (400 and 576 km2 were more robust to changes in these factors than smaller survey units (36 and 144 km2. However, occupancy rates derived from large survey units rapidly reached an asymptote at 100% occupancy, suggesting that these large units are inappropriate for areas with moderate to high wolf densities (>15 wolves/1,000 km2. Virtually-derived occupancy-abundance relationships can be a useful method for monitoring wolves and other elusive wildlife if applied within certain constraints, in particular biological knowledge of the surveyed species needs to be incorporated into the design of the occupancy surveys. Further, we suggest that the applicability of this method could be extended by directly incorporating some of its

  12. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aver, Erik [Department of Physics, Gonzaga University, 502 E Boone Ave, Spokane, WA, 99258 (United States); Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455 (United States); Porter, R.L., E-mail: aver@gonzaga.edu, E-mail: olive@umn.edu, E-mail: ryanlporter@gmail.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  13. Cosmic ray source abundance of calcium

    CERN Document Server

    Perron, C

    1978-01-01

    Re-examines the results of experiments in which ultra-high purity iron targets were irradiated by protons from the two CERN accelerators (600 MeV and 21 GeV); the spallation products were then chemically separated, and their isotopic composition determined by mass spectrometry. Ratios of cross-sections for calcium production by spallation of iron show that /sup 42/Ca, /sup 43/Ca and /sup 44/Ca have about the same abundance, about 10-15% that of iron, confirming earlier studies. (11 refs).

  14. Effect of correlated tRNA abundances on translation errors and evolution of codon usage bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premal Shah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that tRNA abundances are thought to play a major role in determining translation error rates, their distribution across the genetic code and the resulting implications have received little attention. In general, studies of codon usage bias (CUB assume that codons with higher tRNA abundance have lower missense error rates. Using a model of protein translation based on tRNA competition and intra-ribosomal kinetics, we show that this assumption can be violated when tRNA abundances are positively correlated across the genetic code. Examining the distribution of tRNA abundances across 73 bacterial genomes from 20 different genera, we find a consistent positive correlation between tRNA abundances across the genetic code. This work challenges one of the fundamental assumptions made in over 30 years of research on CUB that codons with higher tRNA abundances have lower missense error rates and that missense errors are the primary selective force responsible for CUB.

  15. Effect of correlated tRNA abundances on translation errors and evolution of codon usage bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Premal; Gilchrist, Michael A

    2010-09-16

    Despite the fact that tRNA abundances are thought to play a major role in determining translation error rates, their distribution across the genetic code and the resulting implications have received little attention. In general, studies of codon usage bias (CUB) assume that codons with higher tRNA abundance have lower missense error rates. Using a model of protein translation based on tRNA competition and intra-ribosomal kinetics, we show that this assumption can be violated when tRNA abundances are positively correlated across the genetic code. Examining the distribution of tRNA abundances across 73 bacterial genomes from 20 different genera, we find a consistent positive correlation between tRNA abundances across the genetic code. This work challenges one of the fundamental assumptions made in over 30 years of research on CUB that codons with higher tRNA abundances have lower missense error rates and that missense errors are the primary selective force responsible for CUB.

  16. High throughput quantitative glycomics and glycoform-focused proteomics of murine dermis and epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Rie; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Shinohara, Yasuro; Deguchi, Kisaburo; Monde, Kenji; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2005-12-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the significance of the protein glycosylation, the throughput of protein glycosylation analysis is still too low to be applied to the exhaustive glycoproteomic analysis. Aiming to elucidate the N-glycosylation of murine epidermis and dermis glycoproteins, here we used a novel approach for focused proteomics. A gross N-glycan profiling (glycomics) of epidermis and dermis was first elucidated both qualitatively and quantitatively upon N-glycan derivatization with novel, stable isotope-coded derivatization reagents followed by MALDI-TOF(/TOF) analysis. This analysis revealed distinct features of the N-glycosylation profile of epidermis and dermis for the first time. A high abundance of high mannose type oligosaccharides was found to be characteristic of murine epidermis glycoproteins. Based on this observation, we performed high mannose type glycoform-focused proteomics by direct tryptic digestion of protein mixtures and affinity enrichment. We identified 15 glycoproteins with 19 N-glycosylation sites that carry high mannose type glycans by off-line LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Moreover the relative quantity of microheterogeneity of different glycoforms present at each N-glycan binding site was determined. Glycoproteins identified were often contained in lysosomes (e.g. cathepsin L and gamma-glutamyl hydrolase), lamellar granules (e.g. glucosylceramidase and cathepsin D), and desmosomes (e.g. desmocollin 1, desmocollin 3, and desmoglein). Lamellar granules are organelles found in the terminally differentiating cells of keratinizing epithelia, and desmosomes are intercellular junctions in vertebrate epithelial cells, thus indicating that N-glycosylation of tissue-specific glycoproteins may contribute to increase the relative proportion of high mannose glycans. The striking roles of lysosomal enzymes in epidermis during lipid remodeling and desquamation may also reflect the observed high abundance of high mannose

  17. Metal Abundances of KISS Galaxies. V. Nebular Abundances of Fifteen Intermediate Luminosity Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschauer, Alec S; Bresolin, Fabio; Saviane, Ivo; Yegorova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    We present high S/N spectroscopy of 15 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) cataloged in the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS), selected for their possession of high equivalent width [O III] lines. The primary goal of this study was to attempt to derive direct-method ($T_e$) abundances for use in constraining the upper-metallicity branch of the $R_{23}$ relation. The spectra cover the full optical region from [O II]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}3726,3729 to [S III]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}9069,9531 and include the measurement of [O III]{\\lambda}4363 in 13 objects. From these spectra, we determine abundance ratios of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon. We find these galaxies to predominantly possess oxygen abundances in the range of 8.0 $\\lesssim$ 12+log(O/H) $\\lesssim$ 8.3. We present a comparison of direct-method abundances with empirical SEL techniques, revealing several discrepancies. We also present a comparison of direct-method oxygen abundance calculations using electron temperatures determined from e...

  18. VLT\\/UVES Abundances in Four Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies I. Nucleosynthesis and Abundance Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Shetrone, M; Tolstoy, E; Primas, F; Hill, V; Kaufer, A

    2003-01-01

    We have used UVES on VLT-UT2 to take spectra of 15 red giants in the Sculptor, Fornax, Carina and Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We measure the abundances of alpha, iron peak, s and r-process elements. No dSph giants in our sample show the deep mixing abundance pattern seen in nearly all globular clusters. At a given metallicity, the dSph giants exhibit lower [el/Fe] abundance ratios for the alpha elements than stars in the Galactic halo. This can be caused by a slow star formation rate and contribution from Type Ia SN, and/or a small star formation event (low total mass) and mass dependent Type II SN yields. Differences in the even-Z [el/Fe] ratios between these galaxies, as well as differences in the evolution of the s&r-process elements are interpreted in terms of their star formation histories. Comparison of the dSph abundances with those of the Galactic halo reveals some consistencies. In particular, we find stars that mimic the abundance pattern found by Nissen & Shuster (1997) for metal-rich,...

  19. Non-additive effects of genotypic diversity increase floral abundance and abundance of floral visitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Genung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1 plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2 plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  20. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  1. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  2. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  3. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  4. Occupancy as a surrogate for abundance estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKenzie, D. I.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In many monitoring programmes it may be prohibitively expensive to estimate the actual abundance of a bird species in a defined area, particularly at large spatial scales, or where birds occur at very low densities. Often it may be appropriate to consider the proportion of area occupied by the species as an alternative state variable. However, as with abundance estimation, issues of detectability must be taken into account in order to make accurate inferences: the non-detection of the species does not imply the species is genuinely absent. Here we review some recent modelling developments that permit unbiased estimation of the proportion of area occupied, colonization and local extinction probabilities. These methods allow for unequal sampling effort and enable covariate information on sampling locations to be incorporated. We also describe how these models could be extended to incorporate information from marked individuals, which would enable finer questions of population dynamics (such as turnover rate of nest sites by specific breeding pairs to be addressed. We believe these models may be applicable to a wide range of bird species and may be useful for investigating various questions of ecological interest. For example, with respect to habitat quality, we might predict that a species is more likely to have higher local extinction probabilities, or higher turnover rates of specific breeding pairs, in poor quality habitats.

  5. Automatic abundance analysis of high resolution spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, P; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Caffau, Elisabetta

    2003-01-01

    We describe an automatic procedure for determining abundances from high resolution spectra. Such procedures are becoming increasingly important as large amounts of data are delivered from 8m telescopes and their high-multiplexing fiber facilities, such as FLAMES on ESO-VLT. The present procedure is specifically targeted for the analysis of spectra of giants in the Sgr dSph; however, the procedure may be, in principle, tailored to analyse stars of any type. Emphasis is placed on the algorithms and on the stability of the method; the external accuracy rests, ultimately, on the reliability of the theoretical models (model-atmospheres, synthetic spectra) used to interpret the data. Comparison of the results of the procedure with the results of a traditional analysis for 12 Sgr giants shows that abundances accurate at the level of 0.2 dex, comparable with that of traditional analysis of the same spectra, may be derived in a fast and efficient way. Such automatic procedures are not meant to replace the traditional ...

  6. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, N C; Israelian, G; Mayor, M; Rebolo, R; García-Gíl, A; Pérez de Taoro, M R; Randich, S

    2002-01-01

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be deple...

  7. Elemental Abundances of Solar Sibling Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, I; Bobylev, V V; Roederer, I U; Lambert, D L; Endl, M; Cochran, W D; MacQueen, P J; Wittenmyer, R A

    2014-01-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying a...

  8. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle -- stars more massive than the Sun quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low mass stars evolve slowly and high mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to 1-2Msun stars disr...

  9. Comparative Proteomics and Glycoproteomics Reveal Increased N-Linked Glycosylation and Relaxed Sequon Specificity in Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Nichollas E.; Marzook, N. Bishara; Cain, Joel A.;

    2014-01-01

    present at statistically significant altered levels of abundance between variants. Proteins associated with the O variant included adhesins (CadF and FlpA), proteases, capsule biosynthesis, and cell shape determinants as well as six proteins encoded by the Pgl system, including the PglK flippase and Pgl......Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni encodes a protein glycosylation (Pgl) locus responsible for the N-glycosylation of membrane-associated proteins. We examined two variants of the genome sequenced strain NCTC11168: O, a representative of the original...

  10. N-glycosylation of asparagine 8 regulates surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) alleles dependent on threonine 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maiken Mellergaard; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    -glycosylation and the retention was rescued by T24A substitution. Our study reveals N-glycosylation as an allele-specific regulatory mechanism important for regulation of surface expression of MICA018 and we pinpoint the residues essential for this N-glycosylation dependency. In addition we show that this regulatory mechanism...... for cell-surface expression and sought to identify the essential residues. We found that a single N-glycosylation site (N8) was important for MICA018 surface expression. The frequently expressed MICA allele 008, with an altered transmembrane and intracellular domain, was not affected by mutation of this N...

  11. New Elemental Abundances for V1974 Cygni

    CERN Document Server

    Vanlandingham, K M; Shore, S N; Starrfield, S; Wagner, R M

    2005-01-01

    We present a new analysis of existing optical and ultraviolet spectra of the ONeMg nova V1974 Cygni 1992. Using these data and the photoionization code Cloudy, we have determined the physical parameters and elemental abundances for this nova. Many of the previous studies of this nova have made use of incorrect analyses and hence a new study was required. Our results show that the ejecta are enhanced, relative to solar, in helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium and iron. Carbon was found to be subsolar. We find an ejected mass of ~2x10e-4 solar masses. Our model results fit well with observations taken at IR, radio, sub-millimeter and X-ray wavelengths.

  12. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    Detritivorous macrofauna species co-ingest large quantities of microorganisms some of which survive the gut passage. Denitrifying bacteria, in particular, become metabolically induced by anoxic conditions, nitrate, and labile organic compounds in the gut of invertebrates. A striking consequence...... of the short-term metabolic induction of gut denitrification is the preferential production of nitrous oxide rather than dinitrogen. On a large scale, gut denitrification in, for instance, Chironomus plumosus larvae can increase the overall nitrous oxide emission of lake sediment by a factor of eight. We...... that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  13. An Update of the Primordial Helium Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peimbert, Antonio; Peimbert, Manuel; Luridiana, Valentina

    2015-08-01

    Three of the best determinations of the primordial helium abundance (Yp) are those obtained from low metallicity HII regions by Aver, Olive, Porter, & Skillman (2013); Izotov, Thuan, & Guseva (2014); and Peimbert, Peimbert, & Luridiana (2007). In this poster we update the Yp determination by Peimbert et al. taking into account, among other aspects, recent advances in the determination of the He atomic physical parameters, the temperature structure, the collisional effects of high temperatures on the Balmer lines, as well as the effect of H and He bound-bound absorption.We compare our results with those of Aver et al. and Izotov et al. and point out possible explanations for the differences among the three determinations. We also compare our results with those obtained with the Plank satellite considering recent measurements of the neutron mean life; this comparison has implications on the determination of the number of light neutrino families.

  14. Forms and genesis of species abundance distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans O. Ochiaga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Species abundance distribution (SAD is one of the most important metrics in community ecology. SAD curves take a hollow or hyperbolic shape in a histogram plot with many rare species and only a few common species. In general, the shape of SAD is largely log-normally distributed, although the mechanism behind this particular SAD shape still remains elusive. Here, we aim to review four major parametric forms of SAD and three contending mechanisms that could potentially explain this highly skewed form of SAD. The parametric forms reviewed here include log series, negative binomial, lognormal and geometric distributions. The mechanisms reviewed here include the maximum entropy theory of ecology, neutral theory and the theory of proportionate effect.

  15. Gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers responding to heat shock or tunicamycin provide insight into the N-glycoproteome, protein secretion, and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2014-02-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping effects on both the intracellular and secreted proteomes. Proteins in a total of 22 and 178 two-dimensional gel spots changing in intensity in extracellular and intracellular fractions, respectively, were identified by mass spectrometry. Among these are proteins with key roles in protein processing and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions. This represents major progress in characterization of the barley N-glycoproteome, since only four of these sites were previously described. Overall, these findings considerably advance knowledge of the plant protein secretion system in general and emphasize the versatility of the aleurone layer as a model system for studying plant protein secretion.

  16. High-level expression of nonglycosylated human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Deprez-Beauclair, Paule; Berton, Amelie; Crenon, Isabelle

    2006-10-01

    The human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (HPLRP2) was produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The HPLRP2 cDNA corresponding to the protein coding sequence including the native signal sequence, was cloned into the pPIC9K vector and integrated into the genome of P. pastoris. P. pastoris transformants secreting high-level rHPLRP2 were obtained and the expression level into the liquid culture medium reached about 40mg/L after 4 days of culture. rHPLRP2 was purified by a single anion-exchange step after an overnight dialysis. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the purified rHPLRP2 mature protein possessed a correct N-terminal amino acid sequence indicating that its signal peptide was properly processed. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that the recombinant HPLRP2 molecular weight was 52,532Da which was 2451Da greater than the mass calculated from the sequence of the protein (50,081Da) and 1536Da greater than the mass of the native human protein (50,996Da). In vitro deglycosylation experiments by peptide:N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) indicated that rHPLRP2 secreted from P. pastoris was N-glycosylated. Specific conditions were setup in order to obtain a recombinant protein free of glycan chain. We observed that blocking glycosylation in vivo by addition of tunicamycin in the culture medium during the production resulted in a correct processing of the rHPLRP2 mature protein. The lipase activity of glycosylated or nonglycosylated rHPLRP2, which was about 800U/mg on tributyrin, was inhibited by the presence of bile salts and not restored by adding colipase. In conclusion, the experimental procedure which we have developed will allow us to get a high-level production in P. pastoris of glycosylated and nonglycosylated rHPLRP2, suitable for subsequent biophysical and structural studies.

  17. Expression, purification and mass spectrometric analysis of LIM mineralization protein-1 in human lung epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sreedhara Sangadala; Louisa Titus; Scott D. Boden

    2008-01-01

    LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) is a novel osteoin ductive protein that has been cloned and shown to induce bone formation both in vitro and in vivo. Detection and evaluation of the possible presence of carbohydrate structures in LMP-1 is an important regulatory consideration for the therapeutic use of recombinantly expressed protein. The sequence of LMP-1 contains a highly conserved N-terminal PDZ domain and three C-terminal LIM domains. The sequence analysis of LMP-I predicts two potential N-glycosylation sites and several O-glycosylation sites. Here, we report the cloning and overexpression of LMP.1 in human lung carcinoma(A549) cells. Even though our group already reported the sequence of LMP-1 cDNA, we undertook this work to clarify whether or not the overexpressed protein undergoes any glycosylation in vivo. The expressed full-length recombinant protein was purified and subjected to chemical analysis and internal sequencing. The absence of any hexosamines (Nacetyl glucosamine or N-acetyl galactosamine) in chemical composition analysis of LMP.I protein revealed that there is little or no post-translational glycosylation of the LMP-1 polypeptide in lung carcinoma cells (A549). We performed in-gel trypsin digestion on purified LMP-I, and the resulting peptide digests were analyzed further using matrix.assisted laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry for peptide mass finger printing, which produced several exact matches with the corresponding LMP-1 peptides. Separation by high performance liquid chromatography and purification of the desired peptides followed by N-terminal sequencing resulted in many exact LMP-1 matches for several purified peptides, thus establishing the identity of the purified protein as LMP-1.

  18. VLT/UVES abundances in four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies. I. Nucleosynthesis and abundance ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetrone, M; Venn, KA; Tolstoy, E; Primas, F; Hill, [No Value; Kaufer, A

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Ultraviolet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on Kueyen (UT2) of the Very Large Telescope to take spectra of 15 individual red giants in the Sculptor, Fornax, Carina, and Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph's). We measure the abundances of alpha-, iron peak, first s-process, second s-pr

  19. Abundances of Galactic Anticenter Planetary Nebulae and the Oxygen Abundance Gradient in the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, R B C; Jaskot, Anne E; Balick, Bruce; Morrison, Michael A; Milingo, Jacquelynne B

    2010-01-01

    We have obtained spectrophotometric observations of 41 anticenter planetary nebulae (PNe) located in the disk of the Milky Way. Electron temperatures and densities, as well as chemical abundances for He, N, O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar were determined. Incorporating these results into our existing database of PN abundances yielded a sample of 124 well-observed objects with homogeneously-determined abundances extending from 0.9-21 kpc in galactocentric distance. We performed a detailed regression analysis which accounted for uncertainties in both oxygen abundances and radial distances in order to establish the metallicity gradient across the disk to be: 12+log(O/H)=(9.09+/-.05) - (0.058+/-.006) x Rg, with Rg in kpc. While we see some evidence that the gradient steepens at large galactocentric distances, more objects toward the anticenter need to be observed in order to confidently establish the true form of the metallicity gradient. We find no compelling evidence that the gradient differs between Peimbert Types I and ...

  20. Characterization of an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Spodoptera frugiperda cell line as an alternative host for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghodia, Ajay B; Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-06-01

    Cell lines derived from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf), are widely used as hosts for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system (BICS). However, it was recently discovered that these cell lines are contaminated with a virus, now known as Sf-rhabdovirus [1]. The detection of this adventitious agent raised a potential safety issue that could adversely impact the BICS as a commercial recombinant protein production platform. Thus, we examined the properties of Sf-RVN, an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Sf cell line, as a potential alternative host. Nested RT-PCR assays showed Sf-RVN cells had no detectable Sf-rhabdovirus over the course of 60 passages in continuous culture. The general properties of Sf-RVN cells, including their average growth rates, diameters, morphologies, and viabilities after baculovirus infection, were virtually identical to those of Sf9 cells. Baculovirus-infected Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells produced equivalent levels of three recombinant proteins, including an intracellular prokaryotic protein and two secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins, and provided similar N-glycosylation patterns. In fact, except for the absence of Sf-rhabdovirus, the only difference between Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells was SF-RVN produced higher levels of infectious baculovirus progeny. These results show Sf-RVN cells can be used as improved, alternative hosts to circumvent the potential safety hazard associated with the use of Sf-rhabdovirus-contaminated Sf cells for recombinant protein manufacturing with the BICS.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of evolutionarily conserved but functionally uncharacterized membrane proteins in archaea: Prediction of novel components of secretion, membrane remodeling and glycosylation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Galperin, Michael Y; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-11-01

    A systematic comparative genomic analysis of all archaeal membrane proteins that have been projected to the last archaeal common ancestor gene set led to the identification of several novel components of predicted secretion, membrane remodeling, and protein glycosylation systems. Among other findings, most crenarchaea have been shown to encode highly diverged orthologs of the membrane insertase YidC, which is nearly universal in bacteria, eukaryotes, and euryarchaea. We also identified a vast family of archaeal proteins, including the C-terminal domain of N-glycosylation protein AglD, as membrane flippases homologous to the flippase domain of bacterial multipeptide resistance factor MprF, a bifunctional lysylphosphatidylglycerol synthase and flippase. Additionally, several proteins were predicted to function as membrane transporters. The results of this work, combined with our previous analyses, reveal an unexpected diversity of putative archaeal membrane-associated functional systems that remain to be functionally characterized. A more general conclusion from this work is that the currently available collection of archaeal (and bacterial) genomes could be sufficient to identify (almost) all widespread functional modules and develop experimentally testable predictions of their functions.

  2. Solar-system abundances of the elements - A new table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevesse, Nicolas; Anders, Edward

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an abridged version of a new abundance compilation (Anders and Grevesse, 1988), representing an update of Anders and Ebihara (1982) and Grevesse (1984). It includes revised meteoritic abundances as well as photospheric and coronal abundances, based on literature through mid-1988.

  3. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  4. RT-PCR and sequence analysis of the full-length fusion protein of Canine Distemper Virus from domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanutti, Carina; Gallo Calderón, Marina; Keller, Leticia; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, José

    2016-02-01

    During 2007-2014, 84 out of 236 (35.6%) samples from domestic dogs submitted to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes were positive for Canine Distemper Virus (CDV), as analyzed by RT-PCR amplification of a fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. Fifty-nine of them (70.2%) were from dogs that had been vaccinated against CDV. The full-length gene encoding the Fusion (F) protein of fifteen isolates was sequenced and compared with that of those of other CDVs, including wild-type and vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis using the F gene full-length sequences grouped all the Argentinean CDV strains in the SA2 clade. Sequence identity with the Onderstepoort vaccine strain was 89.0-90.6%, and the highest divergence was found in the 135 amino acids corresponding to the F protein signal-peptide, Fsp (64.4-66.7% identity). In contrast, this region was highly conserved among the local strains (94.1-100% identity). One extra putative N-glycosylation site was identified in the F gene of CDV Argentinean strains with respect to the vaccine strain. The present report is the first to analyze full-length F protein sequences of CDV strains circulating in Argentina, and contributes to the knowledge of molecular epidemiology of CDV, which may help in understanding future disease outbreaks.

  5. A dual approach for improving homogeneity of a human-type N-glycan structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Mari A; Boer, Harry; de Ruijter, Jorg C; Frey, Alexander D

    2016-04-01

    N-glycosylation is an important feature of therapeutic and other industrially relevant proteins, and engineering of the N-glycosylation pathway provides opportunities for developing alternative, non-mammalian glycoprotein expression systems. Among yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most established host organism used in therapeutic protein production and therefore an interesting host for glycoengineering. In this work, we present further improvements in the humanization of the N-glycans in a recently developed S. cerevisiae strain. In this strain, a tailored trimannosyl lipid-linked oligosaccharide is formed and transferred to the protein, followed by complex-type glycan formation by Golgi apparatus-targeted human N-acetylglucosamine transferases. We improved the glycan pattern of the glycoengineered strain both in terms of glycoform homogeneity and the efficiency of complex-type glycosylation. Most of the interfering structures present in the glycoengineered strain were eliminated by deletion of the MNN1 gene. The relative abundance of the complex-type target glycan was increased by the expression of a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine transporter from Kluyveromyces lactis, indicating that the import of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine into the Golgi apparatus is a limiting factor for efficient complex-type N-glycosylation in S. cerevisiae. By a combination of the MNN1 deletion and the expression of a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine transporter, a strain forming complex-type glycans with a significantly improved homogeneity was obtained. Our results represent a further step towards obtaining humanized glycoproteins with a high homogeneity in S. cerevisiae.

  6. AglJ Adds the First Sugar of the N-Linked Pentasaccharide Decorating the Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Glycoprotein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Lina; Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Ventura, Valeria V.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Hitchen, Paul G.; Dell, Anne; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Like the Eukarya and Bacteria, the Archaea also perform N glycosylation. Using the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system, a series of Agl proteins involved in the archaeal version of this posttranslational modification has been identified. In the present study, the participation of HVO_1517 in N glycosylation was considered, given its homology to a known component of the eukaryal N-glycosylation pathway and because of the genomic proximity of HVO_1517 to agl genes encoding known e...

  7. Abundance of sardine fish species in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Bikram Jit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted during January, 2012 to December 2012 in the sardine fisheries which is occurred both in artisanal and industrial fishing sector in the marine water of the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. During this study period the total landing amounts by weight of sardines were 7352.99 MT, among these 23.76% (1747.22 MT was exploited by the artisanal mechanized boats and 76.24% (5605.77 MT captured through different industrial fishing trawlers and contributed 17.51% of the total marine fish production by commercial fish trawlers during the study period. 4 sardine species have been recorded from our marine territory. Among them, 2 sardine species are highly abundant, Sardinella fimbriata total production volumes was 5495.79 MT (74.74% contributed 1747.22MT (31.79% from the artisanal and 3748.57MT (68.21% from the industrial sector and Dussumieria acuta production amounts was 1857.20MT (25.26% contributed only from the industrial fishing sector.Species wise contribution shows that S. fimbriata contributed 100% in the artisanal sector and in the industrial fishing S. fimbriata contributed 66.87% and D. acuta contributed the rest 33.13%. The distribution of the S. fimbriata is within 10-20 meters depth and abundance was observed in the southern part of the South patches and South of south patches (N: 210.09// -22, E: 920.04/-07 to N: 200.45/-25, E: 920.18/-56 and 10-50m depth in onshore and off shore areas in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point -N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57. The distribution of the D. acuta is within 40-60 m. depth and abundance was observed in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground areas (Kohinoor point - N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57 and south-west to south-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point- N: 200-17/.29, E: 900.15/.21 to N: 200.29/.56, E: 910.24/.22 in the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. The peak capture season of

  8. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Dual host-defence functions of SPLUNC2/PSP and synthetic peptides derived from the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorr, Sven-Ulrik; Abdolhosseini, Mahsa; Shelar, Anuradha; Sotsky, Julie

    2011-08-01

    PSP (parotid secretory protein)/SPLUNC2 (short palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone 2) is expressed in human salivary glands and saliva. The protein exists as an N-glycosylated and non-glycosylated form and both appear to induce agglutination of bacteria, a major antibacterial function for salivary proteins. Both forms of PSP/SPLUNC2 bind LPS (lipopolysaccharide), suggesting that the protein may also play an anti-inflammatory role. Based on the predicted structure of PSP/SPLUNC2 and the location of known antibacterial and anti-inflammatory peptides in BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein) and LBP (LPS-binding protein), we designed GL13NH2 and GL13K, synthetic peptides that capture these proposed functions of PSP/SPLUNC2. GL13NH3 agglutinates bacteria, leading to increased clearance by macrophages and reduced spread of infection in a plant model. GL13K kills bacteria with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 5-10 μg/ml, kills bacteria in biofilm and retains activity in 150 mM NaCl and 50% saliva. Both peptides block endotoxin action, but only GL13K appears to bind endotoxin. The peptides do not cause haemolysis, haemagglutination in serum, inhibit mammalian cell proliferation or induce an inflammatory response in macrophages. These results suggest that the GL13NH2 and the modified peptide GL13K capture the biological activity of PSP/SPLUNC2 and can serve as lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides.

  10. The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: I. Constraints from Stellar Interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, F; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2005-01-01

    The latest solar atmosphere models include non-LTE corrections and 3D hydrodynamic convection simulations. These models predict a significant reduction in the solar metal abundance, which leads to a serious conflict between helioseismic data and the predictions of solar interiors models. We demonstrate that the helioseismic constraints on the surface convection zone depth and helium abundance combined with stellar interiors models can be used to define the goodness of fit for a given chemical composition. After a detailed examination of the errors in the theoretical models we conclude that models constructed with the older solar abundances are consistent (<2 \\sigma) with the seismic data. Models constructed with the proposed new low abundance scale are strongly disfavored, disagreeing at the 15 \\sigma level. We then use the sensitivity of the seismic properties to abundance changes to invert the problem and infer a seismic solar heavy element abundance mix with two components: meteoritic abundances, and th...

  11. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, J J; Sneden, C; Den Hartog, E A; Collier, J L; Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; Collier, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingl...

  12. Rapid Upregulation of Orai1 Abundance in the Plasma Membrane of Platelets Following Activation with Thrombin and Collagen Related Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilai Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood platelets accomplish primary hemostasis following vascular injury and contribute to the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Platelets are activated by an increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, which is accomplished by Ca2+-release from intracellular stores and subsequent store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE through Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel moiety Orai1. Powerful activators of platelets include thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP, which are in part effective by activation of small G- protein Rac1. The present study explored the influence of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i in platelets drawn from wild type mice. Methods: Orai1 protein surface abundance was quantified utilizing CF™488A conjugated antibodies, and [Ca2+]i was determined with Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: In resting platelets, Orai1 protein abundance and [Ca2+]i were low. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml and CRP (5ug/ml within 2 min increased [Ca2+]i and Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface. [Ca2+]i was further increased by Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM and by store depletion with the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 µM. However, Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface was not significantly affected by ionomycin and only slightly increased by thapsigargin. The effect of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 abundance and [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted by Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (50 µM. Conclusion: The increase of [Ca2+]i following stimulation of platelets with thrombin and collagen related peptide is potentiated by ultrarapid Rac1 sensitive translocation of Orai1 into the cell membrane.

  13. Comparing halo bias from abundance and clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Kai; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    We model the abundance of haloes in the $\\sim(3 \\ \\text{Gpc}/h)^3$ volume of the MICE Grand Challenge simulation by fitting the universal mass function with an improved Jack-Knife error covariance estimator that matches theory predictions. We present unifying relations between different fitting models and new predictions for linear ($b_1$) and non-linear ($c_2$ and $c_3$) halo clustering bias. Different mass function fits show strong variations in their overall poor performance when including the low mass range ($M_h \\lesssim 3 \\ 10^{12} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$) in the analysis, which indicates noisy friends-of-friends halo detection given the MICE resolution ($m_p \\simeq 3 \\ 10^{10} \\ M_{\\odot}$/h). Together with fits from the literature we find an overall variance in the amplitudes of around $10%$ in the low mass and up to $50%$ in the high mass (galaxy cluster) range ($M_h > 10^{14} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$). These variations propagate into a $10%$ change in $b_1$ predictions and a $50%$ change in $c_2$ or $c_3$. Despite the...

  14. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Shields, J C; Constantin, A; Heidt, J; Jäger, K; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2003-01-01

    We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within the framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note that this also appears to be the era of re-ionization of the universe. Finally, there is some evidence for a positive lum...

  15. Nitrogen Abundances in High-z DLAs

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, P; D'Odorico, V; Péroux, C

    2003-01-01

    Determination of chemical abundances for elements produced mainly by Type I SNae and intermediate mass stars in high redshift DLAs probes the early chemical build-up on time-scales comparable with their production. Nitrogen shows a peculiar behaviour never detected before in any other class of objects. For [N/H] < -3 there is a plateau with [N/Si]= -1.45(\\pm 0.05). We interpret this as empirical evidence for primary N production by massive stars in young systems where AGB stars have not yet had time to make their contribution. The plateau provides the observational integrated yields for N production by massive stars which are theoretically rather uncertain. High N/Si and solar [alpha/iron-peak] ratios are observed at high redshift and place at an earlier epoch the onset of star formation. On the other hand, low N/Si, i.e. young objects, are observed also at relatively low redshifts. These evidences suggest that DLAs started to be formed at a very early epoch but their formation has been extended up to late...

  16. Bacterial bile metabolising gene abundance in Crohn's, ulcerative colitis and type 2 diabetes metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Labbé

    Full Text Available We performed an analysis to determine the importance of bile acid modification genes in the gut microbiome of inflammatory bowel disease and type 2 diabetic patients. We used publicly available metagenomic datasets from the Human Microbiome Project and the MetaHIT consortium, and determined the abundance of bile salt hydrolase gene (bsh, 7 alpha-dehydroxylase gene (adh and 7-alpha hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene (hsdh in fecal bacteria in diseased populations of Crohn's disease (CD, Ulcerative Colitis (UC and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Phylum level abundance analysis showed a significant reduction in Firmicute-derived bsh in UC and T2DM patients but not in CD patients, relative to healthy controls. Reduction of adh and hsdh genes was also seen in UC and T2DM patients, while an increase was observed in the CD population as compared to healthy controls. A further analysis of the bsh genes showed significant differences in the correlations of certain Firmicutes families with disease or healthy populations. From this observation we proceeded to analyse BSH protein sequences and identified BSH proteins clusters representing the most abundant strains in our analysis of Firmicute bsh genes. The abundance of the bsh genes corresponding to one of these protein clusters was significantly reduced in all disease states relative to healthy controls. This cluster includes bsh genes derived from Lachospiraceae, Clostridiaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae and Ruminococcaceae families. This metagenomic analysis provides evidence of the importance of bile acid modifying enzymes in health and disease. It further highlights the importance of identifying gene and protein clusters, as the same gene may be associated with health or disease, depending on the strains expressing the enzyme, and differences in the enzymes themselves.

  17. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-08-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio [A/Q] of the ions. Since the Q-values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element-abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller magnetic reconnections, "nanojets", produce suprathermal seed ions, thus averaging over varying abundances, while an impulsive SEP event only samples one local region of abundance variations. Evidence for a reference He/O-abundance ratio of 91, rather than 57, is also found for the hotter plasma. However, while this is similar to the solar-wind abundance of He/O, the solar-wind abundances otherwise provide an unacceptably poor reference for the SEP-abundance enhancements, generating extremely large errors.

  18. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  19. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%.

  20. Housing system influences abundance of Pax3 and Pax7 in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H D; Li, D Y; Zhang, L; Yang, M Y; Zhao, X L; Wang, Y; Liu, Y P; Zhu, Q

    2014-06-01

    Paired box (Pax) proteins 3 and 7 are associated with activation of muscle satellite cells and play a major role in hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of housing system on abundance of Pax3 and Pax7 in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles. At 42 d, 1,200 chickens with similar BW were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range group. The mRNA abundance was measured in pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d 56, 70, and 84, and the protein expression was quantified at d 84. Increases in mRNA abundance of PAX3 and PAX7 with age were less pronounced in caged system chickens than in pen and free-range chickens from d 56 to 84, and free-range chickens showed a more pronounced increase in gene expression with age compared with penned chickens. At d 84, quantities of PAX3 and PAX7 mRNA and protein were highest in both pectoralis major and thigh muscle of chickens raised in the free-range group, lowest in penned chickens, and intermediate in caged chickens (P chicken skeletal muscles.

  1. Fiber type effects on contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 abundance in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorena, Carlos M; Arias, Edward B; Sharma, Naveen; Bogan, Jonathan S; Cartee, Gregory D

    2015-02-01

    To fully understand skeletal muscle at the cellular level, it is essential to evaluate single muscle fibers. Accordingly, the major goals of this study were to determine if there are fiber type-related differences in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle for: 1) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and/or 2) the abundance of GLUT4 and other metabolically relevant proteins. Paired epitrochlearis muscles isolated from Wistar rats were either electrically stimulated to contract (E-Stim) or remained resting (No E-Stim). Single fibers isolated from muscles incubated with 2-deoxy-d-[(3)H]glucose (2-DG) were used to determine fiber type [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform protein expression], 2-DG uptake, and abundance of metabolically relevant proteins, including the GLUT4 glucose transporter. E-Stim, relative to No E-Stim, fibers had greater (P GLUT4, tethering protein containing a UBX domain for GLUT4 (TUG), cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV), and filamin C protein levels were significantly greater (P GLUT4 levels for MHC-IIax fibers exceeded MHC-IIxb fibers. GLUT4, COX IV, filamin C, and TUG abundance in single fibers was significantly (P GLUT4 abundance among the fiber types were not accompanied by significant differences in contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  2. Bisecting GlcNAc modification stabilizes BACE1 protein under oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Miyako; Kitazume, Shinobu; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is a protease essential for amyloid-β (Aβ) production in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 protein is known to be up-regulated by oxidative stress-inducing stimuli but the mechanism for this up-regulation still needs to be clarified. We have recently found that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-III (GnT-III, encoded by the Mgat3 gene) and that GnT-III deficiency reduces Aβ-plaque formation in the brain by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. Therefore, we hypothesized that bisecting GlcNAc would stabilize BACE1 protein on oxidative stress. In the present study, we first show that Aβ deposition in the mouse brain induces oxidative stress, together with an increase in levels of BACE1 and bisecting GlcNAc. Furthermore, prooxidant treatment induces expression of BACE1 protein in wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), whereas it reduces BACE1 protein in GnT-III (Mgat3) knock-out MEFs by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. We purified BACE1 from Neuro2A cells and performed LC/ESI/MS analysis for BACE1-derived glycopeptides and mapped bisecting GlcNAc-modified sites on BACE1. Point mutations at two N-glycosylation sites (Asn(153) and Asn(223)) abolish the bisecting GlcNAc modification on BACE1. These mutations almost cancelled the enhanced BACE1 degradation seen in Mgat3(-/-) MEFs, indicating that bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1 indeed regulates its degradation. Finally, we show that traumatic brain injury-induced BACE1 up-regulation is significantly suppressed in the Mgat3(-/-) brain. These results highlight the role of bisecting GlcNAc in oxidative stress-induced BACE1 expression and offer a novel glycan-targeted strategy for suppressing Aβ generation.

  3. Electrostatics and N-glycan-mediated membrane tethering of SCUBE1 is critical for promoting bone morphogenetic protein signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ju; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-03-01

    SCUBE1 (S1), a secreted and membrane-bound glycoprotein, has a modular protein structure composed of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence followed by nine epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, a spacer region and three cysteine-rich (CR) motifs with multiple potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and one CUB domain at the C-terminus. Soluble S1 is a biomarker of platelet activation but an active participant of thrombosis via its adhesive EGF-like repeats, whereas its membrane-associated form acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptor in promoting BMP signal activity. However, the mechanism responsible for the membrane tethering and the biological importance of N-glycosylation of S1 remain largely unknown. In the present study, molecular mapping analysis identified a polycationic segment (amino acids 501-550) in the spacer region required for its membrane tethering via electrostatic interactions possibly with the anionic heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Furthermore, deglycosylation by peptide N-glycosidase F treatment revealed that N-glycans within the CR motif are essential for membrane recruitment through lectin-mediated surface retention. Injection of mRNA encoding zebrafish wild-type but not N-glycan-deficient scube1 restores the expression of haematopoietic and erythroid markers (scl and gata1) in scube1-knockdown embryos. We describe novel mechanisms in targeting S1 to the plasma membrane and demonstrate that N-glycans are required for S1 functions during primitive haematopoiesis in zebrafish.

  4. Radial molecular abundances and gas cooling in starless cores

    CERN Document Server

    Sipilä, O

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to simulate radial profiles of molecular abundances and the gas temperature in cold and heavily shielded starless cores by combining chemical and radiative transfer models. Methods: A determination of the dust temperature in a modified Bonnor-Ebert sphere is used to calculate initial radial molecular abundance profiles. The abundances of selected cooling molecules corresponding to two different core ages are then extracted to determine the gas temperature at two time steps. The calculation is repeated in an iterative process yielding molecular abundances consistent with the gas temperature. Line emission profiles for selected substances are calculated using simulated abundance profiles. Results: The gas temperature is a function of time; the gas heats up as the core gets older because the cooling molecules are depleted onto grain surfaces. The contributions of the various cooling molecules to the total cooling power change with time. Radial chemical abundance profiles are non-trivial: different s...

  5. Evolution of dispersion in the cosmic deuterium abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorkin, Irina; Silk, Joseph; Petitjean, Patrick; Olive, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Deuterium is created during Bing Bang Nucleosynthesis, and, in contrast to the other light stable nuclei, can only be destroyed thereafter by fusion in stellar interiors. In this paper we study the cosmic evolution of the deuterium abundance in the interstellar medium and its dispersion using realistic galaxy evolution models. We find that models that reproduce the observed metal abundance are compatible with observations of the deuterium abundance in the local ISM and z ~ 3 absorption line systems. In particular, we reproduce the low astration factor which we attribute to a low global star formation efficiency. We calculate the dispersion in deuterium abundance arising from different structure formation histories in different parts of the Universe. Our model also predicts an extremely tight correlation between deuterium and metal abundances which could be used to measure the primordial deuterium abundance.

  6. TEA: A Code for Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, M Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. (1958) and Eriksson (1971). It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp (1999), the free thermochemical equilibrium code CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications), and the example given by White et al. (1958). Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is ...

  7. Shallow extra mixing in solar twins inferred from Be abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, M Tucci; Castro, M; Asplund, M; Ramírez, I; Monroe, T R; Nascimento, J D do; Yong, D

    2015-01-01

    Lithium and beryllium are destroyed at different temperatures in stellar interiors. As such, their relative abundances offer excellent probes of the nature and extent of mixing processes within and below the convection zone. We determine Be abundances for a sample of eight solar twins for which Li abundances have previously been determined. The analyzed solar twins span a very wide range of age, 0.5-8.2 Gyr, which enables us to study secular evolution of Li and Be depletion. We gathered high-quality UVES/VLT spectra and obtained Be abundances by spectral synthesis of the Be II 313 nm doublet. The derived beryllium abundances exhibit no significant variation with age. The more fragile Li, however, exhibits a monotonically decreasing abundance with increasing age. Therefore, relatively shallow extra mixing below the convection zone is necessary to simultaneously account for the observed Li and Be behavior in the Sun and solar twins.

  8. Abundances of metals in five nearby open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hui-Bon-Hoa, A

    1998-01-01

    Abundances of Mg, Ca, Sc, Cr, Fe, and Ni are derived for A stars of five nearby open clusters of various ages using high resolution spectroscopy. We point out a correlation between the abundance of Ca and that of Sc, suggesting that the abundance anomalies of these elements arise from the same physical process. Pronounced Am patterns are rather found in the oldest cluster stars whereas younger targets show weaker Am anomalies and atypical patterns for some of them.

  9. The Stellar Oxygen Abundance Gradient in M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteverde, M. I.; Herrero, A.; Lennon, D. J.; Kudritzki, R.-P.

    1997-01-01

    We report here first results concerning stellar oxygen abundances in M33. Non-LTE model atmosphere and non-LTE line formation calculations were used to determine the oxygen abundance of B-type supergiants. By choosing stars located at different projected radial distances to the center of M33, we are able to determine the oxygen abundance gradient, for which we obtain a value of -0.16 +/- 0.06 dex kpc-1. This is the first time that the oxygen stellar abundance gradient has been determined in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way.

  10. Safety evaluation of the phosphinothricin acetyltransferase proteins encoded by the pat and bar sequences that confer tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium herbicide in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hérouet, Corinne; Esdaile, David J; Mallyon, Bryan A; Debruyne, Eric; Schulz, Arno; Currier, Thomas; Hendrickx, Koen; van der Klis, Robert-Jan; Rouan, Dominique

    2005-03-01

    Transgenic plant varieties, which are tolerant to glufosinate-ammonium, were developed. The herbicide tolerance is based upon the presence of either the bar or the pat gene, which encode for two homologous phosphinothricin acetyltransferases (PAT), in the plant genome. Based on both a review of published literature and experimental studies, the safety assessment reviews the first step of a two-step-approach for the evaluation of the safety of the proteins expressed in plants. It can be used to support the safety of food or feed products derived from any crop that contains and expresses these PAT proteins. The safety evaluation supports the conclusion that the genes and the donor microorganisms (Streptomyces) are innocuous. The PAT enzymes are highly specific and do not possess the characteristics associated with food toxins or allergens, i.e., they have no sequence homology with any known allergens or toxins, they have no N-glycosylation sites, they are rapidly degraded in gastric and intestinal fluids, and they are devoid of adverse effects in mice after intravenous administration at a high dose level. In conclusion, there is a reasonable certainty of no harm resulting from the inclusion of the PAT proteins in human food or in animal feed.

  11. Herbivore regulation of plant abundance in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin A; O'Hare, Matthew T; McDonald, Claire; Searle, Kate R; Daunt, Francis; Stillman, Richard A

    2017-05-01

    Herbivory is a fundamental process that controls primary producer abundance and regulates energy and nutrient flows to higher trophic levels. Despite the recent proliferation of small-scale studies on herbivore effects on aquatic plants, there remains limited understanding of the factors that control consumer regulation of vascular plants in aquatic ecosystems. Our current knowledge of the regulation of primary producers has hindered efforts to understand the structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems, and to manage such ecosystems effectively. We conducted a global meta-analysis of the outcomes of plant-herbivore interactions using a data set comprised of 326 values from 163 studies, in order to test two mechanistic hypotheses: first, that greater negative changes in plant abundance would be associated with higher herbivore biomass densities; second, that the magnitude of changes in plant abundance would vary with herbivore taxonomic identity. We found evidence that plant abundance declined with increased herbivore density, with plants eliminated at high densities. Significant between-taxa differences in impact were detected, with insects associated with smaller reductions in plant abundance than all other taxa. Similarly, birds caused smaller reductions in plant abundance than echinoderms, fish, or molluscs. Furthermore, larger reductions in plant abundance were detected for fish relative to crustaceans. We found a positive relationship between herbivore species richness and change in plant abundance, with the strongest reductions in plant abundance reported for low herbivore species richness, suggesting that greater herbivore diversity may protect against large reductions in plant abundance. Finally, we found that herbivore-plant nativeness was a key factor affecting the magnitude of herbivore impacts on plant abundance across a wide range of species assemblages. Assemblages comprised of invasive herbivores and native plant assemblages were associated with

  12. Engineering the vaccinia virus L1 protein for increased neutralizing antibody response after DNA immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Bernard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The licensed smallpox vaccine, comprised of infectious vaccinia virus, has associated adverse effects, particularly for immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, safer DNA and protein vaccines are being investigated. The L1 protein, a component of the mature virion membrane that is conserved in all sequenced poxviruses, is required for vaccinia virus entry into host cells and is a target for neutralizing antibody. When expressed by vaccinia virus, the unglycosylated, myristoylated L1 protein attaches to the viral membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor without traversing the secretory pathway. The purpose of the present study was to investigate modifications of the gene expressing the L1 protein that would increase immunogenicity in mice when delivered by a gene gun. Results The L1 gene was codon modified for optimal expression in mammalian cells and potential N-glycosylation sites removed. Addition of a signal sequence to the N-terminus of L1 increased cell surface expression as shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry of transfected cells. Removal of the transmembrane domain led to secretion of L1 into the medium. Induction of binding and neutralizing antibodies in mice was enhanced by gene gun delivery of L1 containing the signal sequence with or without the transmembrane domain. Each L1 construct partially protected mice against weight loss caused by intranasal administration of vaccinia virus. Conclusion Modifications of the vaccinia virus L1 gene including codon optimization and addition of a signal sequence with or without deletion of the transmembrane domain can enhance the neutralizing antibody response of a DNA vaccine.

  13. A case for protein-level and site-level specificity in glycoproteomic studies of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Katherine N; Dodds, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal glycosylation of proteins is known to be either resultant or causative of a variety of diseases. This makes glycoproteins appealing targets as potential biomarkers and focal points of molecular studies on the development and progression of human ailment. To date, a majority of efforts in disease glycoproteomics have tended to center on either determining the concentration of a given glycoprotein, or on profiling the total population of glycans released from a mixture of glycoproteins. While these approaches have demonstrated some diagnostic potential, they are inherently insensitive to the fine molecular detail which distinguishes unique and possibly disease relevant glycoforms of specific proteins. As a consequence, such analyses can be of limited sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy because they do not comprehensively consider the glycosylation status of any particular glycoprotein, or of any particular glycosylation site. Therefore, significant opportunities exist to improve glycoproteomic inquiry into disease by engaging in these studies at the level of individual glycoproteins and their exact loci of glycosylation. In this concise review, the rationale for glycoprotein and glycosylation site specificity is developed in the context of human disease glycoproteomics with an emphasis on N-glycosylation. Recent examples highlighting disease-related perturbations in glycosylation will be presented, including those involving alterations in the overall glycosylation of a specific protein, alterations in the occupancy of a given glycosylation site, and alterations in the compositional heterogeneity of glycans occurring at a given glycosylation site. Each will be discussed with particular emphasis on how protein-specific and site-specific approaches can contribute to improved discrimination between glycoproteomes and glycoproteins associated with healthy and unhealthy states.

  14. Microbial Nitrogen-Cycle Gene Abundance in Soil of Cropland Abandoned for Different Periods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huhe

    Full Text Available In Inner Mongolia, steppe grasslands face desertification or degradation because of human overuse and abandonment after inappropriate agricultural management. The soils in these abandoned croplands exist in heterogeneous environments characterized by widely fluctuating microbial growth. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of microbial genes encoding proteins involved in the nitrogen cycle was used to study Azotobacter species, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the soils from steppe grasslands and croplands abandoned for 2, 6, and 26 years. Except for nitrifying archaea and nitrous oxide-reducing bacteria, the relative genotypic abundance of microbial communities involved in nitrogen metabolism differed by approximately 2- to 10-fold between abandoned cropland and steppe grassland soils. Although nitrogen-cycle gene abundances varied with abandonment time, the abundance patterns of nitrogen-cycle genes separated distinctly into abandoned cropland versus light-grazing steppe grassland, despite the lack of any cultivation for over a quarter-century. Plant biomass and plant diversity exerted a significant effect on the abundance of microbial communities that mediate the nitrogen cycle (P < 0.002 and P < 0.03, respectively. The present study elucidates the ecology of bacteria that mediate the nitrogen cycle in recently abandoned croplands.

  15. Latitudinal patterns in the abundance of major marine bacterioplankton groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wietz, Matthias; Gram, Lone; Jørgensen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    ) and Gammaproteobacteria (polar stations) varied between major oceanic regions (biomes), as did absolute abundances of Roseobacter (peaking at temperate and polar stations). For almost all groups absolute abundances were positively correlated with nutrient concentrations in warmer oceans, and negatively with oxygen...

  16. Detecting novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Sanggyu; Bao, Jingyue; Zhou, Guolin;

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-abundant transcripts may play fundamental roles in biological processes. In an attempt to estimate the prevalence of low-abundant transcripts in eukaryotic genomes, we performed a transcriptome analysis in Drosophila using the SAGE technique. We collected 244...

  17. Variation in rank abundance replicate samples and impact of clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuteboom, J.H.; Struik, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Calculating a single-sample rank abundance curve by using the negative-binomial distribution provides a way to investigate the variability within rank abundance replicate samples and yields a measure of the degree of heterogeneity of the sampled community. The calculation of the single-sample rank a

  18. A protocol for sampling vascular epiphyte richness and abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, J.H.D.; Gradstein, S.R.; Nadkarni, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    The sampling of epiphytes is fraught with methodological difficulties. We present a protocol to sample and analyse vascular epiphyte richness and abundance in forests of different structure (SVERA). Epiphyte abundance is estimated as biomass by recording the number of plant components in a range of

  19. Abundance sensitive points of line profiles in the stellar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Sheminova, V A

    2014-01-01

    Many abundance studies are based on spectrum synthesis and $\\chi$-squared differences between the synthesized and an observed spectrum. Much of the spectra so compared depend only weakly on the elemental abundances. Logarithmic plots of line depths rather than relative flux make this more apparent. We present simulations that illustrate a simple method for finding regions of the spectrum most sensitive to abundance, and also some caveats for using such information. As expected, we find that weak features are the most sensitive. Equivalent widths of weak lines are ideal features, because of their sensitivity to abundances, and insensitivity to factors that broaden the line profiles. The wings of strong lines can also be useful, but it is essential that the broadening mechanisms be accurately known. The very weakest features, though sensitive to abundance, should be avoided or used with great caution because of uncertainty of continuum placement as well as numerical uncertainties associated with the subtraction...

  20. Abundance Survey of M and K Dwarf Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, Vincent M. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98133 (United States); Wallerstein, George [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98133 (United States)

    2005-07-25

    We report the measurement of chemical abundances in 35 low-mass main sequence (M and K dwarf) stars. We have measured the abundance of 12 elements in Kapteyn's Star, a nearby halo M subdwarf. The abundances indicate an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.98, which is about 0.5 dex smaller than that measured in the only previous published measurement using atomic absorption lines. We have measured Fe and Ti abundances in 35 M and K dwarfs with -2.39 [Fe/H] +0.21 using atomic absorption lines, mostly in the 8000A <{lambda} < 8850A range. These will be used to calibrate photometric and low-resolution spectrum metallicity indices for low mass dwarfs, which will make metallicity estimates for these stars more certain. We also describe some difficulties encountered which are not normally necessary to consider when studying warmer stars.

  1. Ionized Gaseous Nebulae Abundance Determination from the Direct Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Montero, Enrique

    2017-04-01

    This tutorial explains the procedure used to analyze an optical emission-line spectrum produced by a nebula ionized by massive star formation. Particularly, the methodology used to derive physical properties, such as electron density and temperature, and the ionic abundances of the most representative elements whose emission lines are present in the optical spectrum is described. The main focus is on the direct method, which is based on the measurement of the electron temperature to derive the abundances, given that the ionization and thermal equilibrium of the ionized gas is dominated by the metallicity. The ionization correction factors used to obtain total abundances from the abundances of some of their ions are also given. Finally, some strong-line methods to derive abundances are described. Such methods are used when no estimation of the temperature can be derived, but which can be consistent with the direct method if they are empirically calibrated.

  2. The Detailed Chemical Abundance Patterns of M31 Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, J E; Cohen, J

    2012-01-01

    We present detailed chemical abundances for $>$20 elements in $\\sim$30 globular clusters in M31. These results have been obtained using high resolution ($\\lambda/\\Delta\\lambda\\sim$24,000) spectra of their integrated light and analyzed using our original method. The globular clusters have galactocentric radii between 2.5 kpc and 117 kpc, and therefore provide abundance patterns for different phases of galaxy formation recorded in the inner and outer halo of M31. We find that the clusters in our survey have a range in metallicity of $-2.2$20 kpc have a small range in abundance of [Fe/H]$=-1.6 \\pm 0.10$. We also measure abundances of alpha, r- and s-process elements. These results constitute the first abundance pattern constraints for old populations in M31 that are comparable to those known for the Milky Way halo.

  3. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies; 1, Oxygen abundances and abundance gradients in low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; Hulst, J. M. van der

    1998-01-01

    Submitted to: Astron. Astrophys. Abstract: We present measurements of the oxygen abundances in 64 HII regions in 12 LSB galaxies. We find that oxygen abundances are low. No regions with solar abundance have been found, and most have oxygen abundances $sim 0.5$ to 0.1 solar. The oxygen abundance appe

  4. Evidences of abundant hemocyanin variants in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianliang; Guo, Lingling; Lu, Xin; Lu, Hui; Wang, Fan; Zhong, Mingqi; Chen, Jiehui; Zhang, Yueling

    2016-09-01

    Hemocyanin (HMC) is a multifunctional immune molecule present in mollusks and arthropods and functions as an important antigen non-specific immune protein. Our previous evidences demonstrated that Litopenaeus vannamei HMC might display extensive molecular diversities. In this study, bioinformatics analysis showed dozens of variant sequences of the HMC subunit with higher molecular weight from L. vannamei (LvHMC). Three variant fragments, named as LvHMCV1-3, which shared 85-99% nucleotide identity with that of the classical form of LvHMC (AJ250830.1), were cloned and characterized. Spatial expression profiles showed that LvHMCV1-3 had different tissue-specific distribution, which were affected by stimulation with six pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K12, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, with each variant fragment showing a specific stress pattern to different bacterial pathogens. Full length cDNA of LvHMCV3 was further cloned and characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence shared 92% identity with that of LvHMC, possessed a conserved structure characteristic of the HMC family and could be clustered into one branch along with other arthropod HMC in a phylogenetic tree. In addition, the recombinant protein of LvHMCV3 (rLvHMCV3) showed obvious agglutination activities against three aquaculture pathogenic bacteria including E. coli K12, V. parahaemolyticus and S.aureus at concentrations ranging from 31.25-62.5g/mL. It also showed obvious antibacterial activity against V. parahaemolyticus at concentrations 0.02-0.5mg/mL, and possessed the best inhibitive effects compared with those of rLvHMCV4 and rLvHMC. Co-injection of V. parahaemolyticus and rLvHMCV3 in L. vannamei showed significant decrease of the mortality rate at 24-72h after injection. Therefore, these studies suggested that L. vannamei had abundant HMC variants, which possessed obvious resistance to pathogenic

  5. Dam removal increases American eel abundance in distant headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Eyler, Sheila; Wofford, John E.B.

    2012-01-01

    American eel Anguilla rostrata abundances have undergone significant declines over the last 50 years, and migration barriers have been recognized as a contributing cause. We evaluated eel abundances in headwater streams of Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, to compare sites before and after the removal of a large downstream dam in 2004 (Embrey Dam, Rappahannock River). Eel abundances in headwater streams increased significantly after the removal of Embrey Dam. Observed eel abundances after dam removal exceeded predictions derived from autoregressive models parameterized with data prior to dam removal. Mann–Kendall analyses also revealed consistent increases in eel abundances from 2004 to 2010 but inconsistent temporal trends before dam removal. Increasing eel numbers could not be attributed to changes in local physical habitat (i.e., mean stream depth or substrate size) or regional population dynamics (i.e., abundances in Maryland streams or Virginia estuaries). Dam removal was associated with decreasing minimum eel lengths in headwater streams, suggesting that the dam previously impeded migration of many small-bodied individuals (dams may influence eel abundances in headwater streams up to 150 river kilometers distant, and that dam removal may provide benefits for eel management and conservation at the landscape scale.

  6. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-07

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  7. Beryllium Abundances in Stars of One-Solar-Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant

    2008-01-01

    We have determined Be abundances in 50 F and G dwarfs in the mass range of 0.9 $\\leq$ M$_\\odot$ $\\leq$ 1.1 as determined by Lambert & Reddy. The effective temperatures are 5600 to 6400 K and metallicities from $-$0.65 to +0.11. The spectra were taken primarily with Keck I + HIRES. The Be abundances were found via spectral synthesis of Be II lines near 3130 \\AA. The Be abundances were investigated as a function of age, temperature, metallicity and Li abundance in this narrow mass range. Even though our stars are similar in mass, they show a range in Be abundances of a factor of $>$40. We find that [Be/Fe] has no dependence on temperature, but does show a spread of a factor of 6 at a given temperature. The reality of the spread is shown by two identical stars which differ from each other by a factor of two only in their abundances of Li and Be. Our thin-disk-star sample fits the trend between Be abundance and [Fe/H] found for halo and thick disk stars, extending it to about 4 orders of magnitude in the two ...

  8. Stellar abundances in the solar neighborhood: The Hypatia Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Timmes, F.X.; Young, Patrick A.; Pagano, Michael D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Turnbull, Margaret C. [Global Science Institute, P.O. Box 252, Antigo, WI 54409 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We compile spectroscopic abundance data from 84 literature sources for 50 elements across 3058 stars in the solar neighborhood, within 150 pc of the Sun, to produce the Hypatia Catalog. We evaluate the variability of the spread in abundance measurements reported for the same star by different surveys. We also explore the likely association of the star within the Galactic disk, the corresponding observation and abundance determination methods for all catalogs in Hypatia, the influence of specific catalogs on the overall abundance trends, and the effect of normalizing all abundances to the same solar scale. The resulting stellar abundance determinations in the Hypatia Catalog are analyzed only for thin-disk stars with observations that are consistent between literature sources. As a result of our large data set, we find that the stars in the solar neighborhood may reveal an asymmetric abundance distribution, such that a [Fe/H]-rich group near the midplane is deficient in Mg, Si, S, Ca, Sc II, Cr II, and Ni as compared to stars farther from the plane. The Hypatia Catalog has a wide number of applications, including exoplanet hosts, thick- and thin-disk stars, and stars with different kinematic properties.

  9. Geographical range and local abundance of tree species in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibao Ren

    Full Text Available Most studies on the geographical distribution of species have utilized a few well-known taxa in Europe and North America, with little research in China and its wide range of climate and forest types. We assembled large datasets to quantify the geographic ranges of tree species in China and to test several biogeographic hypotheses: 1 whether locally abundant species tend to be geographically widespread; 2 whether species are more abundant towards their range-centers; and 3 how abundances are correlated between sites. Local abundances of 651 species were derived from four tree plots of 20-25 ha where all individuals ≥1 cm in stem diameter were mapped and identified taxonomically. Range sizes of these species across China were then estimated from over 460,000 geo-referenced records; a Bayesian approach was used, allowing careful measures of error of each range estimate. The log-transformed range sizes had a bell-shaped distribution with a median of 703,000 km(2, and >90% of 651 species had ranges >10(5 km(2. There was no relationship between local abundance and range size, and no evidence for species being more abundant towards their range-centers. Finally, species' abundances were positively correlated between sites. The widespread nature of most tree species in China suggests few are vulnerable to global extinction, and there is no indication of the double-peril that would result if rare species also had narrow ranges.

  10. (Un)true deuterium abundance in the Galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanović, Tijana; Steigman, Gary; Fields, Brian D.

    2010-04-01

    Deuterium has a special place in cosmology, nuclear astrophysics, and galactic chemical evolution, because of its unique property that it is only created in the big bang nucleosynthesis while all other processes result in its net destruction. For this reason, among other things, deuterium abundance measurements in the interstellar medium (ISM) allow us to determine the fraction of interstellar gas that has been cycled through stars, and set constraints and learn about different Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models. However, recent indications that deuterium might be preferentially depleted onto dust grains complicate our understanding about the meaning of measured ISM deuterium abundances. For this reason, recent estimates by Linsky et al. (2006) have yielded a lower bound to the “true”, undepleted, ISM deuterium abundance that is very close to the primordial abundance, indicating a small deuterium astration factor contrary to the demands of many GCE models. To avoid any prejudice about deuterium dust depletion along different lines of sight that are used to determine the “true” D abundance, we propose a model-independent, statistical Bayesian method to address this issue and determine in a model-independent manner the undepleted ISM D abundance. We find the best estimate for the gas-phase ISM deuterium abundance to be (D/H)ISM ≥ (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10-5. Presented are the results of Prodanović et al. (2009).

  11. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene SpLea5 from Sesuviumportulacastrum%海马齿胚胎发育晚期丰富蛋白基因SpLea5的克隆与表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付桂; 范伟; 畅文军; 张治礼

    2011-01-01

    根据筛选文库时获得的EST序列信息,利用RACE技术从海马齿根中分离获得了一个海马齿胚胎发育晚期丰富蛋白基因的全长cDNA,命名为SeLea5.序列分析结果表明,SpLea5基因cDNA全长685 bp,含有一个294 bD的完整开放阅读框,编码97个氨基酸残基;推测编码的氨基酸序列与柽柳、杨木樨、烟草、甜橙、温州蜜柑、麻风树和陆地棉中相廊基因的氨基酸序列一致性为54%、52%、48%、47%、47%、46%、44%、41%,在聚类分析时与高等植物聚为一类.SpLea5在海马齿植株中呈组成型表达,但根中表达最为丰富,茎和叶次之:海水、NaCl、PEG、ABA处理均能够诱导根部SpLea5基凶的表达.这些结果表明,SpLea5基因可能参与了海马齿对盐和十旱胁迫的分子响应.%Based on the EST sequences from a differentially expressed eDNA library of Sesuvium portulacastrum roots, the full-length eDNA of a late embryogenesis abundant pnotein gene designated as SpLea5 was cloned from S. portulacastrum roots. Sequence analysis showed that the SpLea5 eDNA contained 685 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 294 bp and encoded 97 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shared the identity of 54%, 52%, 48%, 47%, 47%,46%, 46%, 44% and 41% with that from Tamarix androssowii, Populus suaveolens, Nicotiana tabacum, Citrus sinensis,Citrus unshiu, Jatropha curcas, Gossypium hirsutum, Glycine max and Ricinus communis, respectively. In phylogenetic tree the SpLea5 and other plant-derived Leas were grouped into one large cluster. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the SPLea5 was constitutively expressed in all tested organs but at different levels. The SpLea5 was strongly expressed in roots, but weakly in leaves and stems. The expression of SpLea5 was strongly regulated by seawater, NaCI, PEG and ABA, suggesting that the SpLea5 in S.portulacastrum may be involved in responses to salt stress and drought.

  12. How ants drop out: ant abundance on tropical mountains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Longino

    Full Text Available In tropical wet forests, ants are a large proportion of the animal biomass, but the factors determining abundance are not well understood. We characterized ant abundance in the litter layer of 41 mature wet forest sites spread throughout Central America (Chiapas, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica and examined the impact of elevation (as a proxy for temperature and community species richness. Sites were intentionally chosen to minimize variation in precipitation and seasonality. From sea level to 1500 m ant abundance very gradually declined, community richness declined more rapidly than abundance, and the local frequency of the locally most common species increased. These results suggest that within this elevational zone, density compensation is acting, maintaining high ant abundance as richness declines. In contrast, in sites above 1500 m, ant abundance dropped abruptly to much lower levels. Among these high montane sites, community richness explained much more of the variation in abundance than elevation, and there was no evidence of density compensation. The relative stability of abundance below 1500 m may be caused by opposing effects of temperature on productivity and metabolism. Lower temperatures may decrease productivity and thus the amount of food available for consumers, but slower metabolisms of consumers may allow maintenance of higher biomass at lower resource supply rates. Ant communities at these lower elevations may be highly interactive, the result of continuous habitat presence over geological time. High montane sites may be ephemeral in geological time, resulting in non-interactive communities dominated by historical and stochastic processes. Abundance in these sites may be determined by the number of species that manage to colonize and/or avoid extinction on mountaintops.

  13. Understanding and reducing statistical uncertainties in nebular abundance determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, R.; Stock, D. J.; Scicluna, P.

    2012-06-01

    Whenever observations are compared to theories, an estimate of the uncertainties associated with the observations is vital if the comparison is to be meaningful. However, many or even most determinations of temperatures, densities and abundances in photoionized nebulae do not quote the associated uncertainty. Those that do typically propagate the uncertainties using analytical techniques which rely on assumptions that generally do not hold. Motivated by this issue, we have developed Nebular Empirical Analysis Tool (NEAT), a new code for calculating chemical abundances in photoionized nebulae. The code carries out a standard analysis of lists of emission lines using long-established techniques to estimate the amount of interstellar extinction, calculate representative temperatures and densities, compute ionic abundances from both collisionally excited lines and recombination lines, and finally to estimate total elemental abundances using an ionization correction scheme. NEATuses a Monte Carlo technique to robustly propagate uncertainties from line flux measurements through to the derived abundances. We show that, for typical observational data, this approach is superior to analytic estimates of uncertainties. NEAT also accounts for the effect of upward biasing on measurements of lines with low signal-to-noise ratio, allowing us to accurately quantify the effect of this bias on abundance determinations. We find not only that the effect can result in significant overestimates of heavy element abundances derived from weak lines, but also that taking it into account reduces the uncertainty of these abundance determinations. Finally, we investigate the effect of possible uncertainties in R, the ratio of selective-to-total extinction, on abundance determinations. We find that the uncertainty due to this parameter is negligible compared to the statistical uncertainties due to typical line flux measurement uncertainties.

  14. Core-shell hydrogel particles harvest, concentrate and preserve labile low abundance biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Longo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood proteome is thought to represent a rich source of biomarkers for early stage disease detection. Nevertheless, three major challenges have hindered biomarker discovery: a candidate biomarkers exist at extremely low concentrations in blood; b high abundance resident proteins such as albumin mask the rare biomarkers; c biomarkers are rapidly degraded by endogenous and exogenous proteinases. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hydrogel nanoparticles created with a N-isopropylacrylamide based core (365 nm-shell (167 nm and functionalized with a charged based bait (acrylic acid were studied as a technology for addressing all these biomarker discovery problems, in one step, in solution. These harvesting core-shell nanoparticles are designed to simultaneously conduct size exclusion and affinity chromatography in solution. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, a clinically relevant, highly labile, and very low abundance biomarker, was chosen as a model. PDGF, spiked in human serum, was completely sequestered from its carrier protein albumin, concentrated, and fully preserved, within minutes by the particles. Particle sequestered PDGF was fully protected from exogenously added tryptic degradation. When the nanoparticles were added to a 1 mL dilute solution of PDGF at non detectable levels (less than 20 picograms per mL the concentration of the PDGF released from the polymeric matrix of the particles increased within the detection range of ELISA and mass spectrometry. Beyond PDGF, the sequestration and protection from degradation for a series of additional very low abundance and very labile cytokines were verified. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We envision the application of harvesting core-shell nanoparticles to whole blood for concentration and immediate preservation of low abundance and labile analytes at the time of venipuncture.

  15. A metastable equilibrium model for the relative abundances of microbial phyla in a hot spring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Dick

    Full Text Available Many studies link the compositions of microbial communities to their environments, but the energetics of organism-specific biomass synthesis as a function of geochemical variables have rarely been assessed. We describe a thermodynamic model that integrates geochemical and metagenomic data for biofilms sampled at five sites along a thermal and chemical gradient in the outflow channel of the hot spring known as "Bison Pool" in Yellowstone National Park. The relative abundances of major phyla in individual communities sampled along the outflow channel are modeled by computing metastable equilibrium among model proteins with amino acid compositions derived from metagenomic sequences. Geochemical conditions are represented by temperature and activities of basis species, including pH and oxidation-reduction potential quantified as the activity of dissolved hydrogen. By adjusting the activity of hydrogen, the model can be tuned to closely approximate the relative abundances of the phyla observed in the community profiles generated from BLAST assignments. The findings reveal an inverse relationship between the energy demand to form the proteins at equal thermodynamic activities and the abundance of phyla in the community. The distance from metastable equilibrium of the communities, assessed using an equation derived from energetic considerations that is also consistent with the information-theoretic entropy change, decreases along the outflow channel. Specific divergences from metastable equilibrium, such as an underprediction of the relative abundances of phototrophic organisms at lower temperatures, can be explained by considering additional sources of energy and/or differences in growth efficiency. Although the metabolisms used by many members of these communities are driven by chemical disequilibria, the results support the possibility that higher-level patterns of chemotrophic microbial ecosystems are shaped by metastable equilibrium states that

  16. Proteoglycans in Leiomyoma and Normal Myometrium: Abundance, Steroid Hormone Control, and Implications for Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Nichole M; Carrino, David A; Caplan, Arnold I; Hurd, William W; Liu, James H; Tan, Huiqing; Mesiano, Sam

    2016-03-01

    Uterine leiomyoma are a common benign pelvic tumors composed of modified smooth muscle cells and a large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM). The proteoglycan composition of the leiomyoma ECM is thought to affect pathophysiology of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we examined the abundance (by immunoblotting) and expression (by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction) of the proteoglycans biglycan, decorin, and versican in leiomyoma and normal myometrium and determined whether expression is affected by steroid hormones and menstrual phase. Leiomyoma and normal myometrium were collected from women (n = 17) undergoing hysterectomy or myomectomy. In vitro studies were performed on immortalized leiomyoma (UtLM) and normal myometrial (hTERT-HM) cells with and without exposure to estradiol and progesterone. In leiomyoma tissue, abundance of decorin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were 2.6-fold and 1.4-fold lower, respectively, compared with normal myometrium. Abundance of versican mRNA was not different between matched samples, whereas versican protein was increased 1.8-fold in leiomyoma compared with myometrium. Decorin mRNA was 2.4-fold lower in secretory phase leiomyoma compared with proliferative phase tissue. In UtLM cells, progesterone decreased the abundance of decorin mRNA by 1.3-fold. Lower decorin expression in leiomyoma compared with myometrium may contribute to disease growth and progression. As decorin inhibits the activity of specific growth factors, its reduced level in the leiomyoma cell microenvironment may promote cell proliferation and ECM deposition. Our data suggest that decorin expression in leiomyoma is inhibited by progesterone, which may be a mechanism by which the ovarian steroids affect leiomyoma growth and disease progression.

  17. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications.

  18. The determination of electron abundances in interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootten, A.; Snell, R.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    An independent method is proposed for the determination of electron abundances in dense clouds based upon the abundance ratio of HCO(+) and CO. The method is derived from a simple application of gas phase ion molecule interstellar chemistry. It is noted that unlike the fractionation of deuterated molecules, it applies to warm as well as to cool clouds. The method is illustrated with the results of the recent abundance survey of Wooten et al. (1978). Finally, it is shown that in cases where deuterium enhancement is measured, an upper limit can be obtained for the cosmic ray ionization rate.

  19. Trace-element abundances in several new ureilites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, William V.; Hill, Dolores H.

    1993-01-01

    Four new ureilites are analyzed for trace-element abundances. Frontier Mountain (FRO) 90054 is an augite-rich ureilite and has high rare earth element (REE) abundances with a pattern expected of augite. FRO 90036 and Acfer 277 have REE patterns similar to the V-shape pattern of other ureilites. Nuevo Mercurio (b) has very high REE abundances, but they look like they are due to terrestrial alteration. The siderophile-element pattern of these ureilites are similar to those of known ureilites.

  20. Oxygen and nitrogen abundances in Virgo and field spirals

    OpenAIRE

    Pilyugin, L. S.; Molla, Mercedes; Ferrini, Federico; Vilchez, Jose M.

    2001-01-01

    The oxygen and nitrogen abundances in the HII regions of the nine Virgo spirals of the sample from Skillman et al (1996) and in nine field spiral galaxies are re-determined with the recently suggested P - method. We confirm that there is an abundance segregation in the sample of Virgo spirals in the sense that the HI deficient Virgo spirals near the core of the cluster have higher oxygen abundances in comparison to the spirals at the periphery of the Virgo cluster. At the same time both the V...