WorldWideScience

Sample records for absorption wavelength emitted

  1. Linearly Polarized Dual-Wavelength Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fan, Li; Fallahi, Mahmoud; Hader, Joerg; Zakharian, Aramais R; Moloney, Jerome V; Stolz, Wolfgang; Koch, Stephan W; Bedford, Robert; Murray, James T

    2007-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the multiwatt linearly polarized dual-wavelength operation in an optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser by means of an intracavity tilted Fabry-Perot...

  2. Passive cavity surface-emitting lasers: option of temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength for uncooled dense wavelength division multiplexing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukin, V. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Slight, T.; Meredith, W.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Nadtochy, A. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Maximov, M. V.; Blokhin, S. A.; Blokhin, A. A.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Maleev, N. A.; Ustinov, V. M.; Choquette, K. D.

    2016-03-01

    A concept of passive cavity surface-emitting laser is proposed aimed to control the temperature shift of the lasing wavelength. The device contains an all-semiconductor bottom distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), in which the active medium is placed, a dielectric resonant cavity and a dielectric top DBR, wherein at least one of the dielectric materials has a negative temperature coefficient of the refractive index, dn/dT < 0. This is shown to be the case for commonly used dielectric systems SiO2/TiO2 and SiO2/Ta2O5. Two SiO2/TiO2 resonant structures having a cavity either of SiO2 or TiO2 were deposited on a substrate, their optical power reflectance spectra were measured at various temperatures, and refractive index temperature coefficients were extracted, dn/dT = 0.0021 K-1 for SiO2 and dn/dT = -0.0092 K-1 for TiO2. Using such dielectric materials allows designing passive cavity surface-emitting lasers having on purpose either positive, or zero, or negative temperature shift of the lasing wavelength dλ/dT. A design for temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength (dλ/dT = 0) is proposed. Employing devices with temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength in wavelength division multiplexing systems may allow significant reducing of the spectral separation between transmission channels and an increase in number of channels for a defined spectral interval enabling low cost energy efficient uncooled devices.

  3. Analysis of complex samples using a portable multi-wavelength light emitting diode (LED) fluorescence spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spectroscopic analysis of chemically complex samples often requires an increase n the dimensionality of the measured response surface. This often involves the measurement of emitted light intensities as functions of both wavelengths of excitation and emission resulting in the generation of an excita...

  4. Scattering and absorption of particles emitted by a point source in a cluster of point scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljequist, D.

    2012-01-01

    A theory for the scattering and absorption of particles isotropically emitted by a point source in a cluster of point scatterers is described and related to the theory for the scattering of an incident particle beam. The quantum mechanical probability of escape from the cluster in different directions is calculated, as well as the spatial distribution of absorption events within the cluster. A source strength renormalization procedure is required. The average quantum scattering in clusters with randomly shifting scatterer positions is compared to trajectory simulation with the aim of studying the validity of the trajectory method. Differences between the results of the quantum and trajectory methods are found primarily for wavelengths larger than the average distance between nearest neighbour scatterers. The average quantum results include, for example, a local minimum in the number of absorption events at the location of the point source and interference patterns in the angle-dependent escape probability as well as in the distribution of absorption events. The relative error of the trajectory method is in general, though not generally, of similar magnitude as that obtained for beam scattering.

  5. Multi-wavelength studies of TeV γ-ray emitting BL Lac objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Sarah Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of TeV γ-ray emission of BL Lac objects gave new insights in the particle acceleration and the emission processes of the highly relativistic jets. To shed light on the conditions in the high energetic jets of the TeV γ-ray emitting BL Lac objects, I have studied in great detail the spectral energy distribution (SED) of sources with different characteristics. BL Lac objects with exceptional very high energy spectra (soft and hard spectra) and with large differences in the emission peak frequencies, to cover the different classes of BL Lac objects, have been chosen. The basic aim of this thesis was, to study with new, simultaneous multi- avelength (MWL) observations, if the emission processes of these extreme cases of TeV BL Lac objects can be explained by the synchrotron Self-Compton (SSC) model which is well established for the class of BL Lac objects at lower energies. We proposed MWL observations in the optical, UV and X-ray regime, to be conducted simultaneous to very high energy observations with the H.E.S.S. experiment, to study the emission processes. Simultaneous observations are crucial, since BL Lac objects are variable at all wavebands. I have analysed the MWL observations and conducted detailed variability and spectral studies in each wavelength range. The different kind of absorption at each wavelength as well as the influence of the host galaxy of the AGN has been considered to obtain the intrinsic jet spectrum. I have then applied the commonly used theoretical jet model, the SSC model, to the SED. I conducted a MWL campaign on a BL Lac object with the softest TeV spectrum, PKS 2005-489, during which it was observed in a very bright X-ray state. The good spectral coverage of the emission peaks allowed a detailed study of the SSC model. The extreme BL Lac object 1ES 0229+200 exhibits a hard intrinsic TeV spectrum. With my MWL campaign I found a clear cut-off in the optical range and therefore a high minimum Lorentz factor is needed to

  6. Effect of multi-wavelength irradiation on color characterization with light-emitting diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong Ju; Song, Woosub; Lee, Byeong-Il; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-06-01

    In the current study, a multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED)-integrated CMOS imaging device was developed to investigate the effect of various wavelengths on multiple color characterization. Various color pigments (black, red, green, and blue) were applied on both white paper and skin phantom surfaces for quantitative analysis. The artificial skin phantoms were made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed with coffee and TiO2 powder to emulate the optical properties of the human dermis. The customized LED-integrated imaging device acquired images of the applied pigments by sequentially irradiating with the LED lights in the order of white, red, green, and blue. Each color pigment induced a lower contrast during illumination by the light with the equivalent color. However, the illumination by light with the complementary (opposite) color increased the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 11-fold due to the formation of a strong contrast ( i.e., red LED = 1.6 ± 0.3 vs. green LED = 19.0 ± 0.6 for red pigment). Detection of color pigments in conjunction with multi-wavelength LEDs can be a simple and reliable technique to estimate variations in the color pigments quantitatively.

  7. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-02

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength.

  8. Double wavelength differential absorption as a technique for early diagnosis of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger, Vladimir V.; Zybin, Alexander V.; Niemax, Kay; Kuritsyn, Yuri A.; Bolshov, Mikhail A.

    2005-08-01

    The double-wavelength differential molecular absorption technique with diode lasers is proposed for sensitive detection of functional status of breast tissues. The method is based on the measurement of the transmitted intensity differences of the two beams of diode lasers tuned to selected wavelengths within a broad absorption band of a human breast tissue within 700 - 800 nm spectral range. The strategy for the optimum selection of the diode laser wavelengths and initial adjustment of the detection scheme is developed. The method is demonstrated by the detection of the relative concentrations of two dyes, the optical properties of which are similar to those of a mixture of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. The results of the first clinical tests of the proposed technique are briefly described.

  9. Dual-wavelength electroluminescence from an n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Bor-Sheng; Chiu, Hung-Jen; Chen, Tai-Hong; Lai, Li-Wen; Ho, Chai-Cheng; Liu, Day-Shan, E-mail: dsliu@nfu.edu.tw

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • The LEDs fabricated by 450 °C- and 700 °C-annealed n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction structures were investigated. • The structure annealed at 700 °C emitted yellowish light composed of the dual-wavelength radiations centered at 420 and 610 nm. • The long-wavelength radiation was attributed to emerge from the deep-level emission and the Ga–O interlayer emission. - Abstract: We investigated the electro-optical properties of light emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated by using the n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction structures annealed at 450 °C and 700 °C, in vacuum ambient. A dominant near-UV emission at approximately 420 nm was observed from the LED fabricated by the 450 °C-annealed n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction structure, whereas that of the structure annealed at 700 °C emitted a yellowish light composed of the dual-wavelength emissions centered at 420 and 610 nm. The mechanism responsible for the broad long-wavelength radiation was ascribed to the transitions associated with both the deep-level emissions due to the activation of the native defects on the n-ZnO side surface and the formation of the Ga–O interlayer resulting from the in-diffusion of oxygen atoms to the p-GaN side surface of the n-ZnO/p-GaN interface.

  10. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-01

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 μm wavelength CO2-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  11. 4.5 μm wavelength vertical external cavity surface emitting laser operating above room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, M.; Khiar, A.; Felder, F.; Fill, M.; Zogg, H.

    2009-05-01

    A midinfrared vertical external cavity surface emitting laser with 4.5 μm emission wavelength and operating above room temperature has been realized. The active part consists of a single 850 nm thick epitaxial PbSe gain layer. It is followed by a 2 1/2 pair Pb1-yEuyTe/BaF2 Bragg mirror. No microstructural processing is needed. Excitation is done optically with a 1.5 μm wavelength laser. The device operates up to 45 °C with 100 ns pulses and delivers 6 mW output power at 27 °C heat-sink temperature.

  12. Measurement of atmospheric NO2 profile using three-wavelength dual-differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuwu; Chen, Yafeng; Wang, Jie; Huang, Jian; Hu, Shunxing

    2017-11-01

    Lidar instruments are efficient detectors of air pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2). However, the measurement errors are not negligible due to the influence of the aerosol in the atmosphere. We present a novel lidar for measuring tropospheric NO2 vertical profiles. For improving the received powers, the emitter unit consists of two pulsed pump laser - dye laser combination, and use three wavelengths of 448.10nm, 447.20nm and 446.60 nm corresponding to the strong, medium and weak absorption of NO2 respectively. The effects of aerosol on tropospheric NO2 measurements by three - wavelength (448.10 -447.20 -446.60 nm) dual differential absorption lidar (dual-DIAL) and conventional two - wave length (448.10- 446.60nm) differential absorption lidar (DIAL) are theoretical analyzed, and their system err are computer simulated. Experimental results show that the three - wavelength dual - DIAL method is more effective to reduce the effects of aerosol than the two - wavelength DIAL method, and its system error is no more than 4% without correcting the aerosol effect.

  13. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  14. Long Wavelength Plasmonic Absorption Enhancement in Silicon Using Optical Lithography Compatible Core-Shell-Type Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Shahriar Sabuktagin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of rectangular core-shell type nanowires embedded in thin film silicon solar cell structure were characterized using FDTD simulations. Plasmon resonance of these nanowires showed tunability from  nm. However this absorption was significantly smaller than the Ohmic loss in the silver shell due to very low near-bandgap absorption properties of silicon. Prospect of improving enhanced absorption in silicon to Ohmic loss ratio by utilizing dual capability of these nanowires in boosting impurity photovoltaic effect and efficient extraction of the photogenerated carriers was discussed. Our results indicate that high volume fabrication capacity of optical lithography techniques can be utilized for plasmonic absorption enhancement in thin film silicon solar cells over the entire long wavelength range of solar radiation.

  15. Hessian Fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) Attraction to Different Wavelengths and Intensities of Light-Emitting Diodes in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ryan B; Snyder, Darren; Cohnstaedt, Lee W; McCornack, Brian P

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), populations is important for targeted management methods. Also, effectiveness of monitoring efforts is critical to surveillance efforts in regions of the world without this pest. Current Hessian fly monitoring traps rely purely on a single attractant, the female sex pheromone, which is ineffective for monitoring females in the population. Our objective was to examine another attractant targeting vision of both males and females. To do this, we evaluated emitted light of various wavelengths and intensities produced by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Hessian flies were released in the center of a four-leaf clover-shaped arena, which contained an LED within each collection cup at the apex of each of the four cloverleaves. Initially, we examined a range of colors, including red, amber, green, and blue, with wavelengths of 624, 590, 527, and 472 nm, respectively. Both sexes of Hessian fly preferred green LEDs; therefore, we examined specific wavelengths within the green spectrum (502, 525, and 565 nm), and varied light intensities (4, 8, 12, and 16 W/m2). Specifically, females preferred wavelengths in the lower region of the green spectrum (502 and 525 nm), and both sexes preferred high intensity light (16 W/m2). This is the first report of Hessian fly attraction to select emitted wavelengths and intensities from LEDs under controlled conditions. Leveraging these results into new trap designs will add a second sensory modality to the existing trap; however, future studies are needed to assess attraction to LED traps under field conditions. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Edge-emitting InGaAs/GaAs laser with high temperature stability of wavelength and threshold current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, N Yu; Novikov, I I; Chunareva, A V; Il'inskaya, N D; Shernyakov, Yu M; Maximov, M V; Kalyuzhnyy, N A; Mintairov, S A; Lantratov, V M; Payusov, A S; Shchukin, V A; Ledentsov, N N

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated an edge-emitting tilted wave laser (TWL) with the active region based on GaInAs/GaAs quantum wells. In the TWL the wavelength stabilization is based on the coupling of the laser active waveguide cavity to a specially introduced thick epitaxial layer and the emission wavelength is defined by the combined cavity mode preferably by a single dominating mode. The TWL wafer has been grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Laser parameters have been investigated both in pulsed and CW mode in the temperature range of 15–60 °C. In the temperature window of 20–50 °C under CW excitation the lasers have shown high wavelength temperature stability with the temperature shift of 0.05 nm K −1 and threshold current stability with the characteristic temperature of 500 K. The data obtained prove the concept of thermal stability in tilted wave lasers

  17. Intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network based on dense wavelength division multiplexing filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Ying; Duan, Liangcheng; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan

    2014-10-06

    We report the system design and experimental verification of an intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network with hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) sensors and dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) filters. Compared with fiber Bragg grating (FBG), it is easier for the DWDM to accomplish a stable output. We realize the concentration detection of three gas cells filled with acetylene. The sensitivity is up to 100 ppmV at 1536.71 nm. Voltage gradient is firstly used to optimize the intracavity sensor network enhancing the detection efficiency up to 6.5 times. To the best of our knowledge, DWDM is firstly used as a wavelength division multiplexing device to realize intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network. It make it possible to realize high capacity intracavity sensor network via multiplexed technique.

  18. All-Optical Wavelength Conversion by Picosecond Burst Absorption in Colloidal PbS Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiregat, Pieter; Houtepen, Arjan J; Van Thourhout, Dries; Hens, Zeger

    2016-01-26

    All-optical approaches to change the wavelength of a data signal are considered more energy- and cost-effective than current wavelength conversion schemes that rely on back and forth switching between the electrical and optical domains. However, the lack of cost-effective materials with sufficiently adequate optoelectronic properties hampers the development of this so-called all-optical wavelength conversion. Here, we show that the interplay between intraband and band gap absorption in colloidal quantum dots leads to a very strong and ultrafast modulation of the light absorption after photoexcitation in which slow components linked to exciton recombination are eliminated. This approach enables all-optical wavelength conversion at rates matching state-of-the-art convertors in speed, yet with cost-effective solution-processable materials. Moreover, the stronger light-matter interaction allows for implementation in small-footprint devices with low switching energies. Being a generic property, the demonstrated effect opens a pathway toward low-power integrated photonics based on colloidal quantum dots as the enabling material.

  19. Wavelength Locking to CO2 Absorption Line-Center for 2-Micron Pulsed IPDA Lidar Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-micron CW (Continuous Wave) laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nanometers, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  20. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Klein

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS. In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS. The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 µm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K. A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer.

  1. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  2. In vitro bactericidal effects of 625, 525, and 425 nm wavelength (red, green, and blue) light-emitting diode irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SangWoo; Kim, Jisun; Lim, WonBong; Jeon, SangMi; Kim, OkSu; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Kim, Chang-Su; Choi, HongRan; Kim, OkJoon

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of 625, 525, and 425 nm wavelengths, providing average power output and effects on three common pathogenic bacteria. Ultraviolet (UV) light kills bacteria, but the bactericidal effects of UV may not be unique, as 425 nm produces a similar effect. The bactericidal effects of light-emitting diode (LED) wavelengths such as 625 and 525 nm have not been described. Before conducting clinical trials, the appropriate wavelength with reasonable dose and exposure time should be established. The bactericidal effects of 625, 525, and 425 nm wavelength LED irradiation were investigated in vitro for the anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis and two aerobes (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli DH5α). Average power output was 6 mW/cm(2) for 1 h. The bacteria were exposed to LED irradiation for 1, 2, 4, and 8 h (21.6, 43.2, 86.4, and 172.8 J/cm(2), respectively). LED irradiation was performed during growth on agar and in broth. Control bacteria were incubated without LED irradiation. Bacterial growth was expressed in colony-forming units (CFU) and at an optical density at 600 nm in agar and broth. The bactericidal effect of LED phototherapy depended upon wavelength, power density, bacterial viable number, and bacteria species. The bactericidal effect of 425 and 525 nm irradiation varied depending upon the bacterial inoculation, compared with unirradiated samples and samples irradiated with red light. Especially, P. gingivalis and E. coli DH5α were killed by 425 nm, and S. aureus growth was inhibited by 525 nm. However, the wavelength of 625 nm was not bactericidal for P. gingivalis, E. coli DH5α, or S. aureus. Irradiation at 625 nm light was not bactericidal to S. aureus, E. coli, and P. gingivalis, whereas wavelengths of 425 and 525 nm had bactericidal effects. S. aureus was also killed at 525 nm.

  3. A Light-Emitting Diode- (LED-) Based Absorption Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, William; Vasu, Subith S

    2016-06-01

    A sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3-5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of the LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Water vapor spectroscopy in the 815-nm wavelength region for Differential Absorption Lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique was first applied to the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles from airborne platforms in 1981. The successful interpretation of the lidar profiles relies strongly on an accurate knowledge of specific water vapor absorption line parameters: line strength, pressure broadening coefficient, pressure-induced shift coefficient and the respective temperature-dependence factors. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and is currently testing an autonomous airborne water vapor lidar system: LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment). This DIAL system uses a Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser seeded by a diode laser as a lidar transmitter. The tunable diode has been selected to operate in the 813-818 nm wavelength region. This 5-nm spectral interval offers a large distribution of strengths for temperature-insensitive water vapor absorption lines. In support of the LASE project, a series of spectroscopic measurements were conducted for the 16 absorption lines that have been identified for use in the LASE measurements. Prior to this work, the experimental data for this water vapor absorption band were limited - to our knowledge - to the line strengths and to the line positions.

  5. Stellar Multi-Photon Absorption Materials: Beyond the Telecommunication Wavelength Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwich, Torsten; Barlow, Adam; Cifuentes, Marie P; Szeremeta, Janusz; Samoc, Marek; Humphrey, Mark G

    2017-06-22

    Very large molecular two- and three-photon absorption cross-sections are achieved by appending ligated bis(diphosphine)ruthenium units to oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) (OPE)-based "stars" with arms up to 7 phenyleneethynylene (PE) units in length. Extremely large three- and four-photon absorption cross-sections, through the telecommunications wavelengths range and beyond, are obtained for these complexes upon optimizing OPE length and the ruthenium-coordinated peripheral ligand. Multi-photon absorption (MPA) cross-sections are optimized with stars possessing arms 2 PE units in length. Peripheral ligand variation modifies MPA merit and, in particular, 4-nitrophenylethynyl ligand incorporation enhances maximal MPA values and "switches on" four-photon absorption (4PA) in these low molecular-weight complexes. The 4-nitrophenylethynyl-ligated 2PE-armed star possesses a maximal four-photon absorption cross-section of 1.8×10 -108  cm 8  s 3 at 1750 nm, and significant MPA activity extending beyond 2000 nm. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comparison of different Aethalometer correction schemes and a reference multi-wavelength absorption technique for ambient aerosol data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Jorge; Pöhlker, Christopher; Massabò, Dario; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Cheng, Yafang; Chi, Xuguang; Ditas, Florian; Hrabě de Angelis, Isabella; Morán-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Walter, David; Wang, Qiaoqiao; Artaxo, Paulo; Prati, Paolo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-08-01

    Deriving absorption coefficients from Aethalometer attenuation data requires different corrections to compensate for artifacts related to filter-loading effects, scattering by filter fibers, and scattering by aerosol particles. In this study, two different correction schemes were applied to seven-wavelength Aethalometer data, using multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) data as a reference absorption measurement at 637 nm. The compensation algorithms were compared to five-wavelength offline absorption measurements obtained with a multi-wavelength absorbance analyzer (MWAA), which serves as a multiple-wavelength reference measurement. The online measurements took place in the Amazon rainforest, from the wet-to-dry transition season to the dry season (June-September 2014). The mean absorption coefficient (at 637 nm) during this period was 1.8 ± 2.1 Mm-1, with a maximum of 15.9 Mm-1. Under these conditions, the filter-loading compensation was negligible. One of the correction schemes was found to artificially increase the short-wavelength absorption coefficients. It was found that accounting for the aerosol optical properties in the scattering compensation significantly affects the absorption Ångström exponent (åABS) retrievals. Proper Aethalometer data compensation schemes are crucial to retrieve the correct åABS, which is commonly implemented in brown carbon contribution calculations. Additionally, we found that the wavelength dependence of uncompensated Aethalometer attenuation data significantly correlates with the åABS retrieved from offline MWAA measurements.

  7. Group III nitride semiconductors for short wavelength light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, J. W.; Foxon, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    The group III nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN) represent an important trio of semiconductors because of their direct band gaps which span the range 1.95-6.2 eV, including the whole of the visible region and extending well out into the ultraviolet (UV) range. They form a complete series of ternary alloys which, in principle, makes available any band gap within this range and the fact that they also generate efficient luminescence has been the main driving force for their recent technological development. High brightness visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are now commercially available, a development which has transformed the market for LED-based full colour displays and which has opened the way to many other applications, such as in traffic lights and efficient low voltage, flat panel white light sources. Continuously operating UV laser diodes have also been demonstrated in the laboratory, exciting tremendous interest for high-density optical storage systems, UV lithography and projection displays. In a remarkably short space of time, the nitrides have therefore caught up with and, in some ways, surpassed the wide band gap II-VI compounds (ZnCdSSe) as materials for short wavelength optoelectronic devices. The purpose of this paper is to review these developments and to provide essential background material in the form of the structural, electronic and optical properties of the nitrides, relevant to these applications. We have been guided by the fact that the devices so far available are based on the binary compound GaN (which is relatively well developed at the present time), together with the ternary alloys AlGaN and InGaN, containing modest amounts of Al or In. We therefore concentrate, to a considerable extent, on the properties of GaN, then introduce those of the alloys as appropriate, emphasizing their use in the formation of the heterostructures employed in devices. The nitrides crystallize preferentially in the hexagonal wurtzite structure and devices have so

  8. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy--digital detection of gas absorption harmonics based on Fourier analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-03-20

    This work presents a detailed study of the theoretical aspects of the Fourier analysis method, which has been utilized for gas absorption harmonic detection in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lock-in detection of the harmonic signal is accomplished by studying the phase term of the inverse Fourier transform of the Fourier spectrum that corresponds to the harmonic signal. The mathematics and the corresponding simulation results are given for each procedure when applying the Fourier analysis method. The present work provides a detailed view of the WMS technique when applying the Fourier analysis method.

  9. The photochemical determinants of color vision: revealing how opsins tune their chromophore's absorption wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Geiger, James H; Borhan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a variety of important chromophore-dependent biological processes, including microbial light sensing and mammalian color vision, relies on protein modifications that alter the spectral characteristics of a bound chromophore. Three different color opsins share the same chromophore, but have three distinct absorptions that together cover the entire visible spectrum, giving rise to trichromatic vision. The influence of opsins on the absorbance of the chromophore has been studied through methods such as model compounds, opsin mutagenesis, and computational modeling. The recent development of rhodopsin mimic that uses small soluble proteins to recapitulate the binding and wavelength tuning of the native opsins provides a new platform for studying protein-regulated spectral tuning. The ability to achieve far-red shifted absorption in the rhodopsin mimic system was attributed to a combination of the lack of a counteranion proximal to the iminium, and a uniformly neutral electrostatic environment surrounding the chromophore. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.hurtado@strath.ac.uk [Institute of Photonics, SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, TIC Centre, 99 George Street, Glasgow G1 1RD (United Kingdom); Javaloyes, Julien [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, c/Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Mallorca (Spain)

    2015-12-14

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding.

  11. Investigation of black and brown carbon multiple-wavelength-dependent light absorption from biomass and fossil fuel combustion source emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael R. Olson; Mercedes Victoria Garcia; Michael A. Robinson; Paul Van Rooy; Mark A. Dietenberger; Michael Bergin; James Jay Schauer

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of the black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) components of source emissions is critical to understanding the impact combustion aerosols have on atmospheric light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption was measured from fuels including wood, agricultural biomass, coals, plant matter, and petroleum distillates in controlled combustion settings....

  12. Quantum-Confined and Enhanced Optical Absorption of Colloidal PbS Quantum Dots at Wavelengths with Expected Bulk Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debellis, Doriana; Gigli, Giuseppe; Ten Brinck, Stephanie; Infante, Ivan; Giansante, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays it is well-accepted to attribute bulk-like optical absorption properties to colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) at wavelengths above 400 nm. This assumption permits to describe PbS QD light absorption by using bulk optical constants and to determine QD concentration in colloidal solutions from

  13. Receiver Performance Analysis of a Multi-wavelength Sampling Integrated Path Differential Absorption CO2 Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Kawa, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A multi-wavelength sampling integrated path differential (IPDA) CO2 lidar is analyzed and modeled. The instrument transmits laser pulses at a series of wavelengths across the 1572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. The receiver measures the received laser pulse energy and time of flight at each wavelength. The measurements are then fit to a CO2 absorption line shape to determine the total column CO2 mixing ratio. The receiver model includes effects of solar background, photon detection shot noise, detector dark current, preamplifier noise and laser speckle noise. The least-square curve fit is a linear fit in the optical depth domain and the logarithm of the raw measurements. The column CO2 mixing ratio is proportional to the scaling factor resulted from the curve fit. There are several advantages to performing the curve fit in the optical depth domain: (a) the result is directly proportional to the CO2molecule number density of the column; (b) it is a standard linear least square error fit where the theory is well established; (c) there is no need to separately estimate the off-line optical transmission. The receiver model further gives insight about the effects of various instrument parameters and the difference between the atmosphere model used in the curve fit and the actual atmosphere. For example, we can use the model to estimate the biases in the retrieved CO2 mixing ratio from small errors in the meteorological data used to generate the line shape used in the curve fit. We have shown that the estimated instrument performance using this receiver model agrees with the results from our recent airborne measurements. The receiver model is also used in the simulation of the impact of the lidar measurements of the global greenhouse gas distribution and their projected impact on quantification of surface sources and sinks.

  14. Gamma-ray detection with an UV-enhanced photodiode and scintillation crystals emitting at short wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-noise ion implanted photodiode with high spectral response in the deep blue/UV region has been tested as read-out device for scintillation crystals with matching emission spectra (YAP(Ce), GSO(Ce), BGO and CsI(Tl)). This gamma-ray detector concept is attractive in many industrial applications where compactness, reliability and ambient temperature operation are important. The results show that the amount of detected scintillation light energy falls rapidly off as the wavelength of the scintillation light decreases. It is concluded that the dynamic spectral response of the photodiode, due to increasing carrier collection times, is considerably less than the DC response at short wavelengths. The diode is not useful in pulse mode operation with scintillation crystals emitting at wavelengths below about 400 nm. For read-out of CsI(Tl) with 661.6 keV gamma-radiation, however, the photodiode concept shows better energy resolution (7.1%) than other detectors. (orig.)

  15. Purifying Synthetic High-Strength Wastewater by Microalgae Chlorella Vulgaris Under Various Light Emitting Diode Wavelengths and Intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Ge

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The high-strength wastewater is now well known as a threat to the natural water since it is highly possible to arouse water eutrophication or algal blooms. The effects of various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities on the microalgae biological wastewater treatment system was studied in this research. The various nutrient removals and economic efficiencies represented similar variation trends, and these variations under both high C and N loading treatments were similar too. The order for microalgae C. vulgaris reproduction in terms of dry weight and nutrient removal efficiency both were red > white > yellow > blue, under high carbon and nitrogen loading treatments, indicating that the red light was the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, considering the optimal light intensity in terms of nutrient removal efficiency was 2500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s, while in terms of economic efficiency was 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s. Therefore, the optimum light intensity was found to be 2000 μmol/m2•s. In addition, the optimal experimental illumination time was determined as 120 h. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system utilized in this research was able to purify the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater effectively under optimum light wavelength and intensity.

  16. Development of long-wavelength-emitting scintillators with improved decay time characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, L.A.; Lutz, S.; Lyons, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported from efforts to develop radiation-to-light converters suitable for use with optical fibers as they are applied to the diagnostics of transient nuclear phenomena. Liquid and plastic fluors have been prepared which emit in the 550- to 600-nm region. Ternary liquid systems with decay times as short as 1.3 ns at 560 nm and plastic fluors with decay times less than 3 ns at 560 nm are reported. Other liquid and plastic fluors are reported with improved emission characteristics in the region of 600 nm. Conversion efficiences, on a pulse amplitude basis, are generally lower than that of a commercially available 570 nm-16 ns plastic fluor

  17. Impact of absorptivity and wavelength on the optical properties of aggregates with sintering necks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yujia; Huang, Yong; He, Beichen

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we constructed sintered aggregates based on the particle superposition model and apply the ball-necking factor η to characterize the sintering degree. The impact of the absorptivity characterized by the complex refractive index m and the wavelength of the incident light λ on the optical properties of aggregates with different η were compared and investigated. The results indicate that for different m and λ, the light scattering characteristics exhibit regular changes in the values, the peak locations and the size trends. Further, the deviation of 1 - S22/S11 caused by various η is noteworthy and considerable so that it can be used as a probe sensor parameter in the detection of the sintered aggregates configuration.

  18. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yano Akira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD. The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%, which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength, the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1 was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a

  19. Leaf absorption of atmospheric ammonia emitted from pig slurry applied beneath the canopy of winter wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjedde Sommer, S.; Jensen, E.S.; Kofoed Schjoerring, J.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption of volatilized ammonia after application of slurry onto the soil surface (sand) between rows of a wheat crop was studied in two experiments. The slurry was labelled with 15 N-NH 4 . During seven days the accumulated gaseous N loss from the slurry varied from 6.9 to 11.1 g N m -2 . In April ammonia losses from slurry applied beneath a 5 cm high wheat crop were equal to losses from slurry applied to a fallow, but 2.2% of the lost atmospheric ammonia was taken up by the leaves. In May ammonia loss from slurry applied between the rows of a 43 cm high crop was reduced by 6% compared to the loss from fallow, because of a reduced transfer of ammonia from the slurry to the air. Of the emitted ammonia 3.3% was absorbed by the canopy. (au)

  20. CENTRAL WAVELENGTH ADJUSTMENT OF LIGHT EMITTING SOURCE IN INTERFEROMETRIC SENSORS BASED ON FIBER-OPTIC BRAGG GRATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Aleynik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the investigation of fiber-optic interferometric sensor based on the array of fiber Bragg gratings. Reflection spectra displacement mechanism of the fiber Bragg gratings under the external temperature effects and the static pressure is described. The experiment has shown that reflection spectra displacement of Bragg gratings reduces the visibility of the interference pattern. A method of center wavelength adjustment is proposed for the optical radiation source in accord ance with the current Bragg gratings reflection spectra based on the impulse relative modulation of control signal for the Peltier element controller. The semiconductor vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser controlled by a pump driver is used as a light source. The method is implemented by the Peltier element controller regulating and stabilizing the light source temperature, and a programmable logic-integrated circuit monitoring the Peltier element controller. The experiment has proved that the proposed method rendered possible to regulate the light source temperature at a pitch of 0.05 K and adjust the optical radiation source center wavelength at a pitch of 0.05 nm. Experimental results have revealed that the central wavelength of the radiation adjustment at a pitch of 0.005 nm gives the possibility for the capacity of the array consisting of four opticalfiber sensors based on the fiber Bragg gratings. They are formed in one optical fiber under the Bragg grating temperature change from 0° C to 300° C and by the optical fiber mechanical stretching by the force up to 2 N.

  1. In Vitro Bactericidal Effects of 625, 525, and 425 nm Wavelength (Red, Green, and Blue) Light-Emitting Diode Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, SangWoo; Kim, JiSun; Lim, WonBong; Jeon, SangMi; Kim, OkSu; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Kim, Chang-Su; Choi, HongRan; Kim, OkJoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of 625, 525, and 425 nm wavelengths, providing average power output and effects on three common pathogenic bacteria. Background data: Ultraviolet (UV) light kills bacteria, but the bactericidal effects of UV may not be unique, as 425 nm produces a similar effect. The bactericidal effects of light-emitting diode (LED) wavelengths such as 625 and 525 nm have not been described. Before conducting clinical trials, the approp...

  2. Determination of scattering coefficient considering wavelength and absorption dependence of anisotropy factor measured by polarized beam for biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutomi, D.; Ishii, K.; Awazu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, is the most important parameter to accurately determine scattering coefficient μs in the inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulation. It has been reported that g has wavelength and absorption dependence, however, there are few attempts in order to calculate μs of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of g. In this study, the scattering angular distributions of biological tissue phantoms were measured in order to determine g by using goniometric measurements with three polarization conditions at strongly and weakly absorbing wavelengths of hemoglobin. Then, optical properties, especially, μs were measured by integrating sphere measurements and iMC simulation in order to confirm the influence of measured g on optical properties in comparison of with general value of g (0.9) for soft biological tissue. Consequently, it was found that μs was overestimated at strongly absorbing wavelength, however, μs was underestimated at weakly absorbing wavelength if the g was not considered its wavelength and absorption dependence.

  3. Study on Scattering and Absorption Properties of Quantum-Dot-Converted Elements for Light-Emitting Diodes Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiasheng; Tang, Yong; Li, Zongtao; Ding, Xinrui; Yuan, Dong; Yu, Binhai

    2017-11-03

    CdSe/ZnS quantum-dot-converted elements (QDCEs) are good candidates for substituting rare-earth phosphor-converted elements (PCEs) in white light-emitting diodes (LEDs); however, studies on their scattering and absorption properties are scarce, suppressing further increment in the optical and thermal performance of quantum-dot-converted LEDs. Therefore, we introduce the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to achieve the critical optical parameters of QDCEs when used in white LEDs; their scattering cross-section (coefficient), absorption cross-section (coefficient), and scattering phase distributions are presented and compared with those of traditional YAG phosphor-converted elements (PCEs) at varying particle size and concentration. At a commonly used concentration ( < 50 mg / cm 3 ), QDCEs exhibit stronger absorption (tens of millimeters, even for green-to-red-wavelength light) and weaker scattering ( < 1 mm - 1 ) compared to PCEs; the reabsorption, total internal reflection, angular uniformity, and thermal quenching would be more significant concerns for QDCEs. Therefore, the unique scattering and absorption properties of QDCEs should be considered when used in white LEDs. Furthermore, knowledge of these important optical parameters is helpful for beginning a theoretical study on quantum-dot-converted LEDs according to the ray tracing method.

  4. Prediction of the maximum absorption wavelength of azobenzene dyes by QSPR tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuan; Luan, Feng; Liu, Huitao; Cheng, Jianbo; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2011-12-01

    The maximum absorption wavelength ( λmax) of a large data set of 191 azobenzene dyes was predicted by quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) tools. The λmax was correlated with the 4 molecular descriptors calculated from the structure of the dyes alone. The multiple linear regression method (MLR) and the non-linear radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) method were applied to develop the models. The statistical parameters provided by the MLR model were R2 = 0.893, Radj2=0.893, qLOO2=0.884, F = 1214.871, RMS = 11.6430 for the training set; and R2 = 0.849, Radj2=0.845, qext2=0.846, F = 207.812, RMS = 14.0919 for the external test set. The RBFNN model gave even improved statistical results: R2 = 0.920, Radj2=0.919, qLOO2=0.898, F = 1664.074, RMS = 9.9215 for the training set, and R2 = 0.895, Radj2=0.892, qext2=0.895, F = 314.256, RMS = 11.6427 for the external test set. This theoretical method provides a simple, precise and an alternative method to obtain λmax of azobenzene dyes.

  5. Comparison of electrothermal atomization diode laser Zeeman- and wavelength-modulated atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blecker, Carlo R.; Hermann, Gerd M.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry by using a near-infrared diode laser with and without Zeeman and wavelength modulation were carried out with graphite furnace electrothermal atomization. Analytical curves and limits of detection were compared. The magnetic field was modulated with 50 Hz, and the wavelength of the diode laser with 10 kHz. Coherent forward scattering was measured with crossed and slightly uncrossed polarizers. The results show that the detection limits of atomic absorption spectrometry are roughly the same as those of coherent forward scattering spectrometry with crossed polarizers. According to the theory with bright flicker noise limited laser sources the detection limits and linear ranges obtained with coherent forward scattering spectrometry with slightly uncrossed polarizers are significantly better than those obtained with crossed polarizers and with atomic absorption spectrometry. This is due to the fact that employing approaches of polarization spectroscopy reduce laser intensity fluctuations to their signal carried fractions

  6. An Optical Biosensing Strategy Based on Selective Light Absorption and Wavelength Filtering from Chromogenic Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jin Chun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the time and space constraints in disease diagnosis via the biosensing approach, we developed a new signal-transducing strategy that can be applied to colorimetric optical biosensors. Our study is focused on implementation of a signal transduction technology that can directly translate the color intensity signals—that require complicated optical equipment for the analysis—into signals that can be easily counted with the naked eye. Based on the selective light absorption and wavelength-filtering principles, our new optical signaling transducer was built from a common computer monitor and a smartphone. In this signal transducer, the liquid crystal display (LCD panel of the computer monitor served as a light source and a signal guide generator. In addition, the smartphone was used as an optical receiver and signal display. As a biorecognition layer, a transparent and soft material-based biosensing channel was employed generating blue output via a target-specific bienzymatic chromogenic reaction. Using graphics editor software, we displayed the optical signal guide patterns containing multiple polygons (a triangle, circle, pentagon, heptagon, and 3/4 circle, each associated with a specified color ratio on the LCD monitor panel. During observation of signal guide patterns displayed on the LCD monitor panel using a smartphone camera via the target analyte-loaded biosensing channel as a color-filtering layer, the number of observed polygons changed according to the concentration of the target analyte via the spectral correlation between absorbance changes in a solution of the biosensing channel and color emission properties of each type of polygon. By simple counting of the changes in the number of polygons registered by the smartphone camera, we could efficiently measure the concentration of a target analyte in a sample without complicated and expensive optical instruments. In a demonstration test on glucose as a model analyte, we

  7. Determination of the scattering coefficient of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of the anisotropy factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutomi, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    The anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, has a strong influence on the calculation of the scattering coefficient μ s in inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulations. It has been reported that g has the wavelength and absorption dependence; however, few attempts have been made to calculate μ s using g values by taking the wavelength and absorption dependence into account. In this study, the angular distributions of scattered light for biological tissue phantoms containing hemoglobin as a light absorber were measured by a goniometric optical setup at strongly (405 nm) and weakly (664 nm) absorbing wavelengths to obtain g. Subsequently, the optical properties were calculated with the measured values of g by integrating sphere measurements and an iMC simulation, and compared with the results obtained with a conventional g value of 0.9. The μ s values with measured g were overestimated at the strongly absorbing wavelength, but underestimated at the weakly absorbing wavelength if 0.9 was used in the iMC simulation.

  8. Multiphoton Absorption Order of CsPbBr3 As Determined by Wavelength-Dependent Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saouma, Felix O; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Kim, Yong Soo; Jang, Joon I

    2017-10-05

    CsPbBr 3 is a direct-gap semiconductor where optical absorption takes place across the fundamental bandgap, but this all-inorganic halide perovskite typically exhibits above-bandgap emission when excited over an energy level, lying above the conduction-band minimum. We probe this bandgap anomaly using wavelength-dependent multiphoton absorption spectroscopy and find that the fundamental gap is strictly two-photon forbidden, rendering it three-photon absorption (3PA) active. Instead, two-photon absorption (2PA) commences when the two-photon energy is resonant with the optical gap, associated with the level causing the anomaly. We determine absolute nonlinear optical dispersion over this 3PA-2PA region, which can be explained by two-band models in terms of the optical gap. The polarization dependence of 3PA and 2PA is also measured and explained by the relevant selection rules. CsPbBr 3 is highly luminescent under multiphoton absorption at room temperature with marked polarization and wavelength dependence at the 3PA-2PA crossover and therefore has potential for nonlinear optical applications.

  9. Analysis of the impact of wavelength separation on reflectivity error for differential absorption lidar using the ASTER spectral library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, William D.; Bartholomew, Jarett; Emery, William J.; Yerasi, Ashwin

    2017-07-01

    An investigation of the sensitivity of a gas-detecting, airborne differential absorption lidar to the wavelength-based reflectivity variations of the ground was made using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) reflectance library. The JPL library contains 2287 data sets of reflective materials covering a wide range from manmade to lunar regolith. The study covered an online wavelength range of 400 to 4000 nm. Two assumptions were made to provide a path to analysis. The first was that an instrument developer could tolerate no more than 5% error on the overall answer due to reflectivity differences from wavelength separation. The second was that, regardless of atmospheric conditions, molecular cross section, starting power levels, or myriad other effects, the offline received signal is 10% higher than the online received signal. From this foundation, wavelength separation limits were determined when 99%, 95%, and 90% of the materials in the database met the error criteria. It was found that most applications need wavelength separations within about 0.5 nm for low error while some applications could use wavelengths separated by 10 nm or more. Example case studies are provided to demonstrate the applicability and use of the computed plots intended for informing early-stage instrument design.

  10. Absorption spectroscopy of complex rare earth ion doped hybrid materials over a broad wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Stouwdam, J.W.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Driessen, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the present work we applied a measurement setup to determine several relevant properties of rare-earth doped nanoparticles dispersed in polymer slab waveguides in a single absorption measurement: background absorption of the polymer host material, water absorption, polymer composition

  11. Absorption spectroscopy of complex rare earth ion doped hybrid materials over a broad wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Stouwdam, J.W.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Driessen, A.

    In the present work we applied a measurement setup to determine several relevant properties of rare-earth doped nanoparticles dispersed in polymer slab waveguides in a single absorption measurement: background absorption of the polymer host material, water absorption, polymer composition

  12. On-chip cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using a white light-emitting diode and polymer mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, Cathy M; Jones, Gareth; Fischlechner, Martin; Walton, Emma; Morgan, Hywel

    2015-02-07

    We have developed a disposable microfluidic chip with integrated cavity mirrors comprised of two pieces of 3M Vikuiti™ enhanced specular reflector II (ESRII) film, for performing cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a white light-emitting diode (LED). Compared to measurements made with a chip without cavity mirrors, the absorption path length is enhanced by a maximum factor of 28 at 544 nm, and the sensitivity is enhanced by approximately 5 times, enabling micromolar range detection limits to be achieved in an optical path length of only 50 μm.

  13. All-optical wavelength conversion by picosecond burst absorption in colloidal PbS quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiregat, P.A.; Houtepen, A.J.; Van Thourhout, Dries; Hens, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to change the wavelength of a data signal are considered more energy-and cost-effective than current wavelength conversion schemes that rely on back and forth switching between the electrical and optical domains. However, the lack of cost-effective materials with

  14. Heat Dissipation of Resonant Absorption in Metal Nanoparticle-Polymer Films Described at Particle Separation Near Resonant Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Dunklin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer films containing plasmonic nanostructures are of increasing interest for development of responsive energy, sensing, and therapeutic systems. The present work evaluates heat dissipated from power absorbed by resonant gold (Au nanoparticles (NP with negligible Rayleigh scattering cross sections randomly dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS films. Finite element analysis (FEA of heat transport was coordinated with characterization of resonant absorption by Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation (CDA. At AuNP particle separation greater than resonant wavelength, correspondence was observed between measured and CDA-predicted optical absorption and FEA-derived power dissipation. At AuNP particle separation less than resonant wavelength, measured extinction increased relative to predicted values, while FEA-derived power dissipation remained comparable to CDA-predicted power absorption before lagging observed extinguished power at higher AuNP content and resulting particle separation. Effects of isolated particles, for example, scattering, and particle-particle interactions, for example, multiple scattering, aggregation on observed optothermal activity were evaluated. These complementary approaches to distinguish contributions to resonant heat dissipation from isolated particle absorption and interparticle interactions support design and adaptive control of thermoplasmonic materials for a variety of implementations.

  15. Utilising light-emitting diodes of specific narrow wavelengths for the optimization and co-production of multiple high-value compounds in Porphyridium purpureum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Thea; Fuentes-Grünewald, Claudio; Silkina, Alla; Oatley-Radcliffe, Darren L; Llewellyn, Gareth; Lovitt, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    The effect of specific narrow light-emitting diode (LED) wavelengths (red, green, blue) and a combination of LED wavelengths (red, green and blue - RGB) on biomass composition produced by Porphyridium purpureum is studied. Phycobiliprotein, fatty acids, exopolysaccharides, pigment content, and the main macromolecules composition were analysed to determine the effect of wavelength on multiple compounds of commercial interest. The results demonstrate that green light plays a significant role in the growth of rhodophyta, due to phycobiliproteins being able to harvest green wavelengths where chlorophyll pigments absorb poorly. However, under multi-chromatic LED wavelengths, P. purpureum biomass accumulated the highest yield of valuable products such as eicosapentaenoic acid (∼2.9% DW), zeaxanthin (∼586μgg -1 DW), β-carotene (397μgg -1 DW), exopolysaccharides (2.05g/L -1 ), and phycobiliproteins (∼4.8% DW). This increased accumulation is likely to be the combination of both photo-adaption and photo-protection, under the combined specific wavelengths employed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of brown and clear carbon on light absorption enhancement, single scatter albedo and absorption wavelength dependence of black carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lack

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of clear coatings on atmospheric black carbon (BC particles is known to enhance the magnitude of light absorption by the BC cores. Based on calculations using core/shell Mie theory, we demonstrate that the enhancement of light absorption (EAbs by atmospheric black carbon (BC when it is coated in mildly absorbing material (CBrown is reduced relative to the enhancement induced by non-absorbing coatings (CClear. This reduction, sensitive to both the CBrown coating thickness and imaginary refractive index (RI, can be up to 50% for 400 nm radiation and 25% averaged across the visible radiation spectrum for reasonable core/shell diameters. The enhanced direct radiative forcing possible due to the enhancement effect of CClear is therefore reduced if the coating is absorbing. Additionally, the need to explicitly treat BC as an internal, as opposed to external, mixture with CBrown is shown to be important to the calculated single scatter albedo only when models treat BC as large spherical cores (>50 nm. For smaller BC cores (or fractal agglomerates consideration of the BC and CBrown as an external mixture leads to relatively small errors in the particle single scatter albedo of <0.03. It has often been assumed that observation of an absorption Angström exponent (AAE>1 indicates absorption by a non-BC aerosol. Here, it is shown that BC cores coated in CClear can reasonably have an AAE of up to 1.6, a result that complicates the attribution of observed light absorption to CBrown within ambient particles. However, an AAE<1.6 does not exclude the possibility of CBrown; rather CBrown cannot be confidently assigned unless AAE>1.6. Comparison of these model

  17. Simultaneous multi-wavelength ultraviolet excited single-phase white light emitting phosphor Ba1-x(Zr,Ti)Si3O9:xEu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Liu, Guanghui; Ni, Jia; Liu, Wanlu; Liu, Qian

    2018-05-01

    A kind of novel compound Ba1-x(Zr,Ti)Si3O9:xEu simultaneously activated by different-valence Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions has been successfully synthesized. The existence of Ti4+-O2- charge transfer (CT) transitions in Ba1-xZrSi3O9:xEu is proved by the photoluminescence spectra and first principle calculations, and the Ti4+ ions come from the impurities in commercial ZrO2 raw materials. Under the excitation of multi-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (λEX = 392, 260, 180 nm), Ba1-xZrSi3O9:xEu (x = 0.15) can directly emit nearly white light. The coexistence of multiple luminescent centers and the energy transfer among Zr4+-O2- CT state, Ti4+-O2- CT state, Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions play important roles in the white light emission. Ba1-xZrSi3O9:xEu (x = 0.15) has good thermal stability, in particular, the intensity of emission spectrum (λEX = 392 nm) at 150 °C is ∼96% of that at room temperature. In general, the multi-wavelength ultraviolet-excited single-phase white light emitting phosphor Ba1-x(Zr,Ti)Si3O9:xEu possesses a promise for applications in white light emitting diodes (WLEDs), agriculture, medicine and other photonic fields.

  18. Enhanced vacuum laser-impulse coupling by volume absorption at infrared wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, C. R., Jr.; Harrison, R. F.; Shimada, T.; York, G. W.; Turner, R. F.

    1990-03-01

    This paper reports measurements of vacuum laser impulse coupling coefficients as large as 90 dyne/W, obtained with single microsec-duration CO2 laser pulses incident on a volume-absorbing, cellulose-nitrate-based plastic. This result is the largest coupling coefficient yet reported at any wavelength for a simple, planar target in vacuum, and partly results from expenditure of internal chemical energy in this material. Enhanced coupling was also observed in several other target materials that are chemically passive, but absorb light in depth at 10- and 3-micron wavelengths. The physical distinctions are discussed between this important case and that of simple, planar surface absorbers (such as metals) which were studied in the same experimental series, in light of the predictions of a simple theoretical model.

  19. Fine wavelength id for tunable laser local oscillators. [sensing the absorption emission spectra of atmospheric gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. G.; Augeri, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A wavelength ID device which consists of an electronic show that the etalon has a finesse F 30 which is maintainable for several days. These tests also demonstrate that the etalon system is capable of resonance frequency stability during similar time periods. With currently available coatings, this level of performance is achievable over an optical bandwidth delta lambda = 3 micrometers centered at lambda = 10 micrometers.

  20. Antireflective sub-wavelength structures for improvement of the extraction efficiency and color rendering index of monolithic white light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Corell, Dennis Dan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    (CRI) and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of the monolithic white LED have been demonstrated. The CRI of the monolithic white LED could be improved from 92.68 to around 94 by applying a cylinder structure, and the CCT could be modified in a very large range with appropriate design......We have theoretically investigated the influence of antireflective sub-wavelength structures on a monolithic white light-emitting diode (LED). The simulation is based on the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) algorithm, and both cylinder and moth-eye structures have been studied in the work. Our...... simulation results show that a moth-eye structure enhances the light extraction efficiency over the entire visible light range with an extraction efficiency enhancement of up to 26 %. Also for the first time to our best knowledge, the influence of sub-wavelength structures on both the color rendering index...

  1. Line-shape asymmetry of water vapor absorption lines in the 720-nm wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    Spectral line-shape analyses were performed for water vapor lines broadened by argon, oxygen, and xenon in the 720-nm wavelength region. A line-shape asymmetry was observed, which is attributed to statistical dependence or correlation between velocity- and state-changing collisions. The generalized (asymmetric) Galatry profile, which results from the soft-collision profile and includes correlation between velocity- and state-changing collisions, was fitted to the observed line shapes and was found to compare favorably with the observed data. The most prominent asymmetries were observed with xenon as the buffer gas.

  2. Calorimetric study of optical absorption of Suprasil W-1 fused quartz at visible, near-ir and near-uv wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swimm, R.T.; Bass, M.; Xiao, Y.

    1984-09-01

    The surface and bulk optical absorption of Suprasil W-1 fused quartz has been measured by means of laser calorimetry at visible, near-IR and near UV-wavelengths. Measurements carried out on samples with length of the order of 1 cm have yielded absorption data in agreement with published data measured using a long fiber waveguide. Precautions necessary to avoid systematic errors in measuring absorptions as low as one part in 10/sup 5/ are discussed. 8 references, 2 figures.

  3. Ultraviolet-B wavelengths regulate changes in UV absorption of cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus mucus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill P Zamzow

    Full Text Available High-energy wavelengths in the ultraviolet-B (UVB, 280-315 nm and the UVA (315-400-nm portion of the spectrum are harmful to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Interestingly, UVA is also involved in the repair of UV induced damage. Organisms living in shallow coral reef environments possess UV absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids, to protect them from UV radiation. While it has been demonstrated that exposure to UV (280-400 nm affects the UV absorbance of fish mucus, whether the effects of UV exposure vary between UVB and UVA wavelengths is not known. Therefore, we investigated whether the UVB, UVA, or photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm portions of the spectrum affected the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus and Fulton's body condition index of the cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. We also compared field-measured UV absorbance with laboratory based high-performance liquid chromatography measurements of mycosporine-like amino acid concentrations. After 1 week, we found that the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus was higher in the UVB+UVA+PAR treatment compared with the UVA+PAR and PAR only treatments; after 2 and 3 weeks, however, differences between treatments were not detected. After 3 weeks, Fulton's body condition index was lower for fish in the UVB+UVA+PAR compared with PAR and UVA+PAR treatments; furthermore, all experimentally treated fish had a lower Fulton's body condition index than did freshly caught fish. Finally, we found a decrease with depth in the UV absorbance of mucus of wild-caught fish. This study suggests that the increase in UV absorbance of fish mucus in response to increased overall UV levels is a function of the UVB portion of the spectrum. This has important implications for the ability of cleaner fish and other fishes to adjust their mucus UV protection in response to variations in environmental UV exposure.

  4. Ultraviolet-B Wavelengths Regulate Changes in UV Absorption of Cleaner Fish Labroides dimidiatus Mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamzow, Jill P.; Siebeck, Ulrike E.; Eckes, Maxi J.; Grutter, Alexandra S.

    2013-01-01

    High-energy wavelengths in the ultraviolet-B (UVB, 280-315 nm) and the UVA (315-400-nm) portion of the spectrum are harmful to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Interestingly, UVA is also involved in the repair of UV induced damage. Organisms living in shallow coral reef environments possess UV absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids, to protect them from UV radiation. While it has been demonstrated that exposure to UV (280-400 nm) affects the UV absorbance of fish mucus, whether the effects of UV exposure vary between UVB and UVA wavelengths is not known. Therefore, we investigated whether the UVB, UVA, or photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) portions of the spectrum affected the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus and Fulton’s body condition index of the cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. We also compared field-measured UV absorbance with laboratory based high-performance liquid chromatography measurements of mycosporine-like amino acid concentrations. After 1 week, we found that the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus was higher in the UVB+UVA+PAR treatment compared with the UVA+PAR and PAR only treatments; after 2 and 3 weeks, however, differences between treatments were not detected. After 3 weeks, Fulton’s body condition index was lower for fish in the UVB+UVA+PAR compared with PAR and UVA+PAR treatments; furthermore, all experimentally treated fish had a lower Fulton’s body condition index than did freshly caught fish. Finally, we found a decrease with depth in the UV absorbance of mucus of wild-caught fish. This study suggests that the increase in UV absorbance of fish mucus in response to increased overall UV levels is a function of the UVB portion of the spectrum. This has important implications for the ability of cleaner fish and other fishes to adjust their mucus UV protection in response to variations in environmental UV exposure. PMID:24143264

  5. Effects of light-emitting diode (LED) with a mixture of wavelengths on the growth and lipid content of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Chae Hun; Sirisuk, Phunlap; Jung, Jang-Hyun; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2018-04-01

    Integrations of two-phase culture for cell growth and lipid accumulation using mixed LED and green LED wavelengths were evaluated with the microalgae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Isochrysis galbana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Nannochloropsis oceanica. Among the single and mixed LED wavelengths, mixed LED produced higher biomass of the four microalgae, reaching 1.03 g DCW/L I. galbana, followed by 0.95 g DCW/L P. tricornutum, 0.85 g DCW/L N. salina, and 0.62 g DCW/L N. oceanica than single LED or fluorescent lights at day 10. Binary combination of blue and red LEDs could produce the high biomass and photosynthetic pigments in the four microalgae. The highest lipid accumulation during second phase with the exposure to green LED wavelengths was 56.0% for P. tricornutum, 55.2% for I. galbana, 53.0% for N. salina, and 51.0% for N. oceanica. The major fatty acid in the four microalgae was palmitic acid (C16:0) accounting for 38.3-47.3% (w/w) of the total fatty acid content.

  6. Molecular absorption measurements with an optical fibre coupled array of ultra-violet light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Duy Anh; Kraiczek, Karsten G; Hauser, Peter C

    2017-09-15

    A photometric detector based on eight different light-emitting diodes covering the ultraviolet range from 255 nm to 350 nm is described. These are coupled with fused silica optical fibres to a conventional cuvette with 1 cm optical path length or to a low volume flow through cell for detection in high-performance liquid chromatography. Photodiodes are employed for the measurement of the transmitted intensity as well as of a reference signal and the photocurrents are processed with a log-ratio amplifier to obtain a voltage proportional to absorbance values. The wavelength desired for the measurement at hand is selected by electronically switching on the requisite light-emitting diode. The detector was found to have a low noise level of 80 μAU. In batch-wise measurements as well as in detection for high-performance liquid chromatography dynamic ranges of 2-3 orders of magnitude were possible. Reproducibilities in peak areas for the latter application were better than 1%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-Wavelength InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Light Emitting Sources Monolithically Grown on Si Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct integration of III–V light emitting sources on Si substrates has attracted significant interest for addressing the growing limitations for Si-based electronics and allowing the realization of complex optoelectronics circuits. However, the high density of threading dislocations introduced by large lattice mismatch and incompatible thermal expansion coefficient between III–V materials and Si substrates have fundamentally limited monolithic epitaxy of III–V devices on Si substrates. Here, by using the InAlAs/GaAs strained layer superlattices (SLSs as dislocation filter layers (DFLs to reduce the density of threading dislocations. We firstly demonstrate a Si-based 1.3 µm InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD laser that lases up to 111 °C, with a low threshold current density of 200 A/cm2 and high output power over 100 mW at room temperature. We then demonstrate the operation of InAs/GaAs QD superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs monolithically grown on Si substrates. The fabricated two-section SLD exhibits a 3 dB linewidth of 114 nm, centered at ~1255 nm with a corresponding output power of 2.6 mW at room temperature. Our work complements hybrid integration using wafer bonding and represents a significant milestone for direct monolithic integration of III–V light emitters on Si substrates.

  8. Highly Selective Hg (II Ion Detection Based on Linear Blue-Shift of the Maximum Absorption Wavelength of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ping Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of detecting Hg (II ion with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs is developed in this contribution. When Hg (II ions were added into AgNPs solution, the solution displayed rapid color change and blue shift of the maximum absorption wavelength (Δλ, which was in proportion to the Hg (II ion concentration over the range of 2.0 × 10−7–6.0 × 10−6 mol/L, with detection limit (3σ of 6.6 × 10−9 mol/L. Under the same experimental conditions, other metal ions did not interfere. Thus, we propose a rapid, simple and highly selective method for detecting Hg (II ion.

  9. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure

  10. Fractional energy absorption from beta-emitting particles in the rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    Forty-four male, Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose-only to an aerosol of 144 Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles to obtain a relatively insoluble lung burden of this material. Twenty-eight rats, ages 12 to 25 weeks with body weights of 183 to 337 grams were analyzed seven to nine days after exposure; lung burdens were 13 to 82 nCi. An additional group of 16 rats was exposed when 12 weeks old and maintained for six months prior to analysis; body weights and lung burdens at six months after exposure ranged from 276 to 368 grams and 16 to 46 nCi, respectively. Lungs were analyzed, inflated and deflated in a 4π beta spectrometer to determine fractional energy absorption for 144 Ce. Over the relatively narrow range of sizes, 0.88 to 1.66 grams, for lungs in this study the average fractional energy absorption and its standard deviation was 0.23 +- 0.078 for the inflated lung and 0.40 +- 0.087 for the deflated lung

  11. Droplet epitaxial growth of highly symmetric quantum dots emitting at telecommunication wavelengths on InP(111)A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Neul; Kuroda, Takashi; Liu, Xiangming; Mano, Takaaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Noda, Takeshi; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Castellano, Andrea; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the formation of InAs quantum dots (QDs) on InAlAs/InP(111)A by means of droplet epitaxy. The C 3v symmetry of the (111)A substrate enabled us to realize highly symmetric QDs that are free from lateral elongations. The QDs exhibit a disk-like truncated shape with an atomically flat top surface. Photoluminescence signals show broad-band spectra at telecommunication wavelengths of 1.3 and 1.5 μm. Strong luminescence signals are retained up to room temperature. Thus, our QDs are potentially useful for realizing an entangled photon-pair source that is compatible with current telecommunication fiber networks

  12. Size- and Wavelength-Dependent Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section of CsPbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Junsheng; Zidek, Karel; Chabera, Pavel; Liu, Dongzhou; Cheng, Pengfei; Nuuttila, Lauri; Al-Marri, Mohammed J.; Lehtivuori, Heli; Messing, Maria E.; Han, Keli; Zheng, Kaibo; Pullerits, Tonu

    2017-01-01

    All-inorganic colloidal perovskite quantum dots (QDs) based on cesium, lead, and halide have recently emerged as promising light emitting materials. CsPbBr3 QDs have also been demonstrated as stable two-photon-pumped lasing medium. However, the reported two photon absorption (TPA) cross sections for

  13. Initial investigation of the wavelength dependence of optical properties measured with a new multi-pass Aerosol Extinction Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (AE-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Chartier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols directly affect climate by scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of the impact is dependent upon the wavelength of light, but is often estimated near 550 nm. When light scattering and absorption by aerosols is approximated, the wavelength dependence of the refractive index for specific components is lost. As a result, climate models would have inherent uncertainties for aerosol contributions to radiative forcing when considering the entire solar spectrum. An aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer has been developed to directly measure aerosol extinction at mid-ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths. The instrument consists of a spectrometer coupled to a closed White-type multi-pass gas cell with an adjustable path length of up to approximately 20 m. Laboratory measurements of various gases are compared with known absorption cross sections. Additionally, the extinction of monodisperse samples of polystyrene latex spheres are measured and compared to Mie theory generated with refractive index values from the literature to validate the new instrument. The polystyrene experiments also emphasize the ability of the new instrument to retrieve the wavelength dependent refractive index, especially in the ultraviolet wavelength regions where variability is expected. The spectrometer will be a significant advancement for determining wavelength dependent complex refractive indices in future laboratory studies as well as provide the ability to monitor ambient aerosol light extinction.

  14. Multi-wavelength study of the first γ-ray emitting LMXB XSS J12270-4859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Kei; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Ishida, Manabu; Mukai, Koji; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Shogo; Gandhi, Poshak

    2012-03-01

    Fermi is discovering many new γ-ray sources, and 1FGL J1227.9-4852 is one of them. Recent studies suggest that this source is associated with the X-ray source XSS J12270-4859 (hereafter J12270), of which nature is poorly understood. In this paper, we show results of our Suzaku and RXTE X-ray observations which are partly simultaneous with near-infrared (NIR) observations using Infra Red Survey Facility (IRSF). We found that J12270 shows (1) no emission lines in the X-ray spectra, (2) unique rapid temporal variations in X-rays, and (3) almost simultaneous X-ray and NIR flares. To investigate its nature, we constructed a spectral energy distribution (SED) from radio to γ-rays. Because of the similarity of its SED with those of other microquasars, we propose that J12270 is a microquasar with a synchrotron jet, and also the first γ-ray emitting low-mass X-ray binary.

  15. Dynamics of 1.55 μm Wavelength Single-Mode Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser Output under External Optical Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong Hon Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the temporal dynamics of the laser output spectrum and polarization state of 1.55 μm wavelength single-mode (SM vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs induced by external optical beam injection. Injection of an external continuous-wave laser beam to a gain-switched SM VCSEL near the resonance wavelength corresponding to its main polarization-mode output was critical for improvement of its laser pulse generation characteristics, such as pulse timing-jitter reduction, linewidth narrowing, pulse amplitude enhancement, and pulse width shortening. Pulse injection of pulse width shorter than the cavity photon lifetime into the SM VCSEL in the orthogonal polarization direction with respect to its main polarization mode caused temporal delay of the polarization recovery after polarization switching (PS, and its delay was found to be the minimum at an optimized bias current. Polarization-mode bistability was observed even in the laser output of an SM VCSEL of a standard circularly cylindrical shape and used for all-optical flip-flop operations with set and reset injection pulses of very low pulse energy of order of the 3.5~4.5 fJ.

  16. Modulating dual-wavelength multiple quantum wells in white light emitting diodes to suppress efficiency droop and improve color rendering index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yukun; Wang, Shuai; Zheng, Min; Ding, Wen; Yun, Feng; Su, Xilin; Yang, Xiangrong; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Maofeng; Zhang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, gallium nitride (GaN) based white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with modulated quantities of blue (In 0.15 Ga 0.85 N) quantum wells (QWs) and cyan QWs (In 0.18 Ga 0.82 N) in multiple QW (MQW) structures have been investigated numerically and experimentally. It is demonstrated that the optical performance of LEDs is sensitive to the quantities of cyan QWs in dual-wavelength MQW structures. Compared to the LEDs with respective 0, 4, and 8 cyan QWs (12 QWs in total), the optical performance of the sample with 6 cyan QWs is the best. The deterioration of the optical performance in the sample with less (4 pairs) cyan QWs or more (8 pairs) cyan QWs than 6 cyan QWs may be ascribed to weakened reservoir effect or more defects induced. Compared to conventional blue LEDs (12 blue QWs), the sample with 6 cyan QWs could effectively suppress the efficiency droop (the experimental droop ratio decreases from 50.3% to 39.5% at 80 A/cm 2 ) and significantly improve the color rendering index (CRI, increases from 66.4 to 77.0) simultaneously. We attribute the droop suppression to the strengthened reservoir effect and carrier confinement of deeper QWs (higher indium composition) incorporated in the dual-wavelength MQW structures, which lead to the better hole spreading and enhanced radiative recombination. Meanwhile, the remarkable experimental CRI improvement may result from the wider full-width at half-maximum of electroluminescence spectra and higher cyan intensity in WLED chips with dual-wavelength MQW structures

  17. Modulating dual-wavelength multiple quantum wells in white light emitting diodes to suppress efficiency droop and improve color rendering index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yukun; Wang, Shuai; Zheng, Min; Ding, Wen [Key Laboratory of Physical Electronics and Devices of Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonics & Information Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Solid-State Lighting Engineering Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yun, Feng, E-mail: fyun2010@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Physical Electronics and Devices of Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonics & Information Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Solid-State Lighting Engineering Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Shaanxi Supernova Lighting Technology Co. Ltd, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710075 (China); Su, Xilin; Yang, Xiangrong; Liu, Shuo [Shaanxi Supernova Lighting Technology Co. Ltd, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710075 (China); Guo, Maofeng [Solid-State Lighting Engineering Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Shaanxi Supernova Lighting Technology Co. Ltd, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710075 (China); Zhang, Ye [Solid-State Lighting Engineering Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, gallium nitride (GaN) based white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with modulated quantities of blue (In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N) quantum wells (QWs) and cyan QWs (In{sub 0.18}Ga{sub 0.82}N) in multiple QW (MQW) structures have been investigated numerically and experimentally. It is demonstrated that the optical performance of LEDs is sensitive to the quantities of cyan QWs in dual-wavelength MQW structures. Compared to the LEDs with respective 0, 4, and 8 cyan QWs (12 QWs in total), the optical performance of the sample with 6 cyan QWs is the best. The deterioration of the optical performance in the sample with less (4 pairs) cyan QWs or more (8 pairs) cyan QWs than 6 cyan QWs may be ascribed to weakened reservoir effect or more defects induced. Compared to conventional blue LEDs (12 blue QWs), the sample with 6 cyan QWs could effectively suppress the efficiency droop (the experimental droop ratio decreases from 50.3% to 39.5% at 80 A/cm{sup 2}) and significantly improve the color rendering index (CRI, increases from 66.4 to 77.0) simultaneously. We attribute the droop suppression to the strengthened reservoir effect and carrier confinement of deeper QWs (higher indium composition) incorporated in the dual-wavelength MQW structures, which lead to the better hole spreading and enhanced radiative recombination. Meanwhile, the remarkable experimental CRI improvement may result from the wider full-width at half-maximum of electroluminescence spectra and higher cyan intensity in WLED chips with dual-wavelength MQW structures.

  18. Demonstration of 4×100 Gbps discrete multitone transmission using electric absorption modulated laser at 1550-nm for dense wavelength division multiplexing intradata center connect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuming; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate 4 lanes up to 400 Gbps discrete multitone transmission using an electric absorption modulated laser (EML) at 1550-nm for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) intradata center connects. This is the first demonstration of 4×100 Gb/s transmission using EML at 1550-nm, and it is compatible with the DWDM system at C-band.

  19. Strong spectral variation of biomass smoke light absorption and single scattering albedo observed with a novel dual-wavelength photoacoustic instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristin Lewis; William P. Arnott; Hans Moosmuller; Cyle E. Wold

    2008-01-01

    A dual-wavelength photoacoustic instrument operating at 405 and 870 nm was used during the 2006 Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment to measure light scattering and absorption by smoke from the combustion of a variety of biomass fuels. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering by reciprocal nephelometry within the instrument's acoustic resonator accompany...

  20. A low-power, high-speed, 9-channel germanium-silicon electro-absorption modulator array integrated with digital CMOS driver and wavelength multiplexer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, A V; Zheng, X; Feng, D; Lexau, J; Buckwalter, J F; Thacker, H D; Liu, F; Luo, Y; Chang, E; Amberg, P; Shubin, I; Djordjevic, S S; Lee, J H; Lin, S; Liang, H; Abed, A; Shafiiha, R; Raj, K; Ho, R; Asghari, M; Cunningham, J E

    2014-05-19

    We demonstrate the first germanium-silicon C-band electro-absorption based waveguide modulator array and echelle-grating-based silicon wavelength multiplexer integrated with a digital CMOS driver circuit. A 9-channel, 10Gbps SiGe electro-absorption wavelength-multiplexed modulator array consumed a power of 5.8mW per channel while being modulated at 10.25Gbps by 40nm CMOS drivers delivering peak-to-peak voltage swings of 2V, achieving a modulation energy-efficiency of ~570fJ/bit including drivers. Performance up to 25Gbps on a single-channel SiGe modulator and CMOS driver is also reported.

  1. Multi-wavelength thermal-lens spectrometry for high-accuracy measurements of absorptivities and quantum yields of photodegradation of a hemoprotein–lipid complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseniya Tishchenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of absorptivities and quantum yields of biochemical species under various conditions are an important task of applied photonics and analytical chemistry. In this work, we provide a comparison of the capabilities of thermal-lens spectrometry to measure these parameters of various samples. Measurements of relevant model substances, biologically active substituted 2-thiohydantoins and their complexes of copper(I,II and heme proteins (forms of hemoglobin and cytochrome c, showed negligible differences in apparent molar absorptivities for thermal-lens spectrometry and optical-absorption (spectrophotometric data. The values for tabletop and microscale thermal-lens measurements under batch conditions differ insignificantly. The precision of measurements of molar absorptivities by thermal-lens spectrometry is no less than in the case of spectrophotometry or the precision is even higher in the cases of low absorptivities. For cardiolipin–cytochrome c-NO complex, the difference between absorptivity values calculated from thermal-lens data and acquired by spectrophotometry is significant due to complex photodegradation. The quantum yield of its photolysis reaction calculated from optical absorption and thermal-lens data altogether at two wavelengths for 0.4–360 s of the reaction, 0.46 ± 0.04, was estimated.

  2. ATOMIC DATA FOR ABSORPTION-LINES FROM THE GROUND-LEVEL AT WAVELENGTHS GREATER-THAN-228-ANGSTROM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERNER, DA; BARTHEL, PD; TYTLER, D

    1994-01-01

    We list wavelengths, statistical weigths and oscillator strengths for 2249 spectral lines arising from the ground states of atoms and ions. The compilation covers all wavelengths longward of the HeII Lyman limit at 227.838 Angstrom and all the ion states of all elements from hydrogen to bismuth (Z =

  3. High-performance ternary blend all-polymer solar cells with complementary absorption bands from visible to near-infrared wavelengths

    OpenAIRE

    Benten, Hiroaki; Nishida, Takaya; Mori, Daisuke; Xu, Huajun; Ohkita, Hideo; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2016-01-01

    We developed high-performance ternary blend all-polymer solar cells with complementary absorption bands from visible to near-infrared wavelengths. A power conversion efficiency of 6.7% was obtained with an external quantum efficiency over 60% both in the visible and near-infrared regions. Our results demonstrate that the ternary blend all-polymer systems open a new avenue for accelerating improvement in the efficiency of non-fullerene thin-film polymer solar cells.

  4. The Indigo Molecule Revisited Again: Assessment of the Minnesota Family of Density Functionals for the Prediction of Its Maximum Absorption Wavelengths in Various Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cervantes-Navarro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Minnesota family of density functionals (M05, M05-2X, M06, M06L, M06-2X, and M06-HF were evaluated for the calculation of the UV-Vis spectra of the indigo molecule in solvents of different polarities using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT and the polarized continuum model (PCM. The maximum absorption wavelengths predicted for each functional were compared with the known experimental results.

  5. EXTENSION OF THE INVERSE ADDING-DOUBLING METHOD TO THE MEASUREMENT OF WAVELENGTH-DEPENDENT ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING COEFFICIENTS OF BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegood, M.S.; Baba, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Light interaction with biological tissue can be described using three parameters: the scattering and absorption coeffi cients (μs and μa), as well as the anisotropy (g) which describes the directional dependence of the scattered photons. Accurately determining these optical properties for different tissue types at specifi c wavelengths simultaneously would be benefi cial for a variety of different biomedical applications. The goal of this project was to take a user defi ned g-value and determine the remaining two parameters for a specifi ed wavelength range. A fully automated computer program and process was developed to collect data for all wavelengths in a timely and accurate manner. LabVIEW® was used to write programs to automate raw intensity data collection from a spectrometer equipped integrating sphere, conversion of the data into a format for analysis via Scott Prahl’s Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) C code execution, and fi nally computation of the optical properties based on the output from the IAD code. To allow data to be passed effi ciently between LabVIEW® and C code program modules, the two were combined into a single program (OPT 3.1). OPT 3.1 was tested using tissue mimicking phantoms. Determination of the absorption and scattering coeffi cients showed excellent agreement with theory for wavelengths where the user inputted single g-value was suffi ciently precise. Future improvements entail providing for multi-wavelength g-value entry to extend the accuracy of results to encompass the complete multispectral range. Ultimately, the data collection process and algorithms developed through this effort will be used to examine actual biological tissues for the purpose of building and refi ning models for light-tissue interactions.

  6. Reduction of patterning effects in SOA-based wavelength converters by combining cross-gain and cross-absorption modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Enbo; Öhman, Filip; Cheng, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    . The bit error ration (BER) of the output signals in both the co-propagating and the counter-propagating configurations is quantitatively evaluated. The simulation results indicate that the patterning effect in wavelength conversion due to the slow recovery of the carrier density in the SOA can be well...

  7. Correlation between Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis of hardened concrete for chlorides vs. Atomic Absorption (AA) analysis in accordance with AASHTO T- 260; sampling and testing for chloride ion in concrete and concrete raw mater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A correlation between Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence(WDXRF) analysis of Hardened : Concrete for Chlorides and Atomic Absorption (AA) analysis (current method AASHTO T-260, procedure B) has been : found and a new method of analysis has been ...

  8. Robust and economical multi-sample, multi-wavelength UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detector for biological and chemical contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Lu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a portable multi-channel, multi-sample UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detection device, which has no moving parts, can operate wirelessly and on batteries, interfaces with smart mobile phones or tablets, and has the sensitivity of commercial instruments costing an order of magnitude more. We use UV absorption to measure the concentration of ethylene glycol in water solutions at all levels above those deemed unsafe by the United States Food and Drug Administration; in addition we use fluorescence to measure the concentration of d-glucose. Both wavelengths can be used concurrently to increase measurement robustness and increase detection sensitivity. Our small robust economical device can be deployed in the absence of laboratory infrastructure, and therefore may find applications immediately following natural disasters, and in more general deployment for much broader-based testing of food, agricultural and household products to prevent outbreaks of poisoning and disease.

  9. Size- and Wavelength-Dependent Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section of CsPbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junsheng; Žídek, Karel; Chábera, Pavel; Liu, Dongzhou; Cheng, Pengfei; Nuuttila, Lauri; Al-Marri, Mohammed J; Lehtivuori, Heli; Messing, Maria E; Han, Keli; Zheng, Kaibo; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2017-05-18

    All-inorganic colloidal perovskite quantum dots (QDs) based on cesium, lead, and halide have recently emerged as promising light emitting materials. CsPbBr 3 QDs have also been demonstrated as stable two-photon-pumped lasing medium. However, the reported two photon absorption (TPA) cross sections for these QDs differ by an order of magnitude. Here we present an in-depth study of the TPA properties of CsPbBr 3 QDs with mean size ranging from 4.6 to 11.4 nm. By using femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy we found that TPA cross section is proportional to the linear one photon absorption. The TPA cross section follows a power law dependence on QDs size with exponent 3.3 ± 0.2. The empirically obtained power-law dependence suggests that the TPA process through a virtual state populates exciton band states. The revealed power-law dependence and the understanding of TPA process are important for developing high performance nonlinear optical devices based on CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals.

  10. High-resolution absorption coefficient and refractive index spectra of common pollutant gases at millimeter and THz wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoayed, Nawaf N.; Piyade, Baris C.; Afsar, Mohammed N.

    2007-09-01

    Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DFTS) provides us with a very precise method of measuring the absorption and refractive index spectra of common pollutant gases. This paper presents the rotational transition lines of Sulfur Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide gas as a function of varying pressure using DFTS for the very first time as a combined study. The relationship between the variation of the pressure and the change in the absorption spectrum is examined and discussed in detail. Sulfur Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide gases are highly toxic, pollutant gases that are major contributors to global pollution and can potentially be used as a chemical threat. The relationship between pressure and rotational transmission lines is discussed in detail in the frequency range of 0.3 THz - 0.9 THz. These findings are crucial in characterizing these gases as well as identifying them in a blind test.

  11. Application of Internal Standard Method for Several 3d-Transition Metallic Elements in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using a Multi-wavelength High-resolution Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Yusuke; Itagaki, Toshiko; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a simultaneous internal standard method in flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), in order to better the analytical precision of 3d-transition metals contained in steel materials. For this purpose, a new spectrometer system for FAAS, comprising a bright xenon lamp as the primary radiation source and a high-resolution Echelle monochromator, was employed to measure several absorption lines at a wavelength width of ca. 0.3 nm at the same time, which enables the absorbances of an analytical line and also an internal standard line to be estimated. In considering several criteria for selecting an internal standard element and the absorption line, it could be suggested that platinum-group elements: ruthenium, rhodium, or palladium, were suitable for an internal standard element to determine the 3d-transition metal elements, such as titanium, iron, and nickel, by measuring an appropriate pair of these absorption lines simultaneously. Several variances of the absorption signal, such as a variation in aspirated amounts of sample solution and a short-period drift of the primary light source, would be corrected and thus reduced, when the absorbance ratio of the analytical line to the internal standard line was measured. In Ti-Pd, Ni-Rh, and Fe-Ru systems chosen as typical test samples, the repeatability of the signal respnses was investigated with/without the internal standard method, resulting in better precision when the internal standard method was applied in the FAAS with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame rather than an air-acetylene flame.

  12. A Compact Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer to Monitor CO2 at 2.7 µm Wavelength in Hypersonic Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphäel Vallon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship’s Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow.

  13. Fine-tune optical absorption and light emitting behavior of the CdS/PVA hybridized film nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiba, Z. K.; Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr; Imam, N. G.

    2017-05-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) nucleated at different temperatures were composited with PVA to control and fine-tune optical absorption and emission of the nano-hybrid composite by varying the sizes of the CdS NPs which in turn depends on the nucleation temperature. The implanting of CdS NPs into PVA matrix was confirmed by XRD hand in hand with absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. UV/VIS absorption spectra confirm the formation of hybridized film CdS/PVA nanocomposite with refractive index in the range of 2-4. UV/VIS measurements were also used in calculating different optical and dielectric parameters such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, dielectric constants, and optical conductivity. The optical parameters varied with the incorporation of CdS NPs within PVA matrix; accordingly, the optical constants of the nanocomposite films could be controlled by size of CdS content. Tauc's relation was used to determine the optical band gap and to determine the type of electronic transition. It is found that the direct allowed transition is more probable in CdS/PVA nanocomposite film of direct band gap around 3.8 eV. Blue and green light emissions from CdS/PVA nanocomposite film have been observed. Further, the PL studies indicated the emission peak observed at UV band represents band to band transition, while the blue and green emissions could be assigned to the optical transition of the first excitonic state of the CdS NPs and emission from interstitial sulfur respectively. The blue shift in the PL spectra was parallel to the shift observed in UV/VIS spectra. Because of its excellent fluorescence and highly transparent performance, the composite film of CdS nucleated at 200 °C was found to be suitable for bio-related applications such as bio-labeling, bio-imaging, drug delivery, and LEDs as well as a window layer in solar cell.

  14. InAs/InP quantum dots emitting in the 1.55 μm wavelength region by inserting submonolayer GaP interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Q.; Noetzel, R.; Veldhoven, P.J. van; Eijkemans, T.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) in GaInAsP on InP (100) substrates by chemical-beam epitaxy, with emission wavelength in the 1.55 μm region. Submonolayer coverage of GaP on the GaInAsP buffer before deposition of the InAs QDs results in most efficient suppression of As/P exchange during InAs growth and subsequent growth interruption under arsenic flux. Continuous wavelength tuning from above 1.6 to below 1.5 μm is thus achieved by varying the coverage of the GaP interlayer within the submonolayer range. Temperature dependent photoluminescence reveals distinct zero-dimensional carrier confinement and indicates that the InAs QDs are free of defects and dislocations

  15. Interplay of morphology, composition, and optical properties of InP-based quantum dots emitting at the 1.55 μ m telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmesin, C.; Schowalter, M.; Lorke, M.; Mourad, D.; Grieb, T.; Müller-Caspary, K.; Yacob, M.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Benyoucef, M.; Rosenauer, A.; Jahnke, F.

    2017-12-01

    Results for the development and detailed analysis of self-organized InAs/InAlGaAs/InP quantum dots suitable for single-photon emission at the 1.55 μ m telecom wavelength are reported. The structural and compositional properties of the system are obtained from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy of individual quantum dots. The system is composed of almost pure InAs quantum dots embedded in quaternary InAlGaAs barrier material, which is lattice matched to the InP substrate. When using the measured results for a representative quantum-dot geometry as well as experimentally reconstructed alloy concentrations, a combination of strain-field and electronic-state calculations is able to reproduce the quantum-dot emission wavelength in agreement with the experimentally determined photoluminescence spectrum. The inhomogeneous broadening of the latter can be related to calculated variations of the emission wavelength for the experimentally deduced In-concentration fluctuations and size variations.

  16. Biocompatible photoresistant far-red emitting, fluorescent polymer probes, with near-infrared two-photon absorption, for living cell and zebrafish embryo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjili, Salim; Favier, Arnaud; Fargier, Guillaume; Thomas, Audrey; Massin, Julien; Monier, Karine; Favard, Cyril; Vanbelle, Christophe; Bruneau, Sylvia; Peyriéras, Nadine; Andraud, Chantal; Muriaux, Delphine; Charreyre, Marie-Thérèse

    2015-04-01

    Exogenous probes with far-red or near-infrared (NIR) two-photon absorption and fluorescence emission are highly desirable for deep tissue imaging while limiting autofluorescence. However, molecular probes exhibiting such properties are often hydrophobic. As an attractive alternative, we synthesized water-soluble polymer probes carrying multiple far-red fluorophores and demonstrated here their potential for live cell and zebrafish embryo imaging. First, at concentrations up to 10 μm, these polymer probes were not cytotoxic. They could efficiently label living HeLa cells, T lymphocytes and neurons at an optimal concentration of 0.5 μm. Moreover, they exhibited a high resistance to photobleaching in usual microscopy conditions. In addition, these polymer probes could be successfully used for in toto labeling and in vivo two-photon microscopy imaging of developing zebrafish embryos, with remarkable properties in terms of biocompatibility, internalization, diffusion, stability and wavelength emission range. The near-infrared two-photon absorption peak at 910 nm is particularly interesting since it does not excite the zebrafish endogenous fluorescence and is likely to enable long-term time-lapse imaging with limited photodamage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Photodynamic therapy using systemic administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid and a 410-nm wavelength light-emitting diode for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected ulcers in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kuniyuki; Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Awazu, Kunio; Ito, Nobuhisa; Honda, Norihiro; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Tsuruta, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a worldwide problem. One potential alternative for bacterial control is photodynamic therapy. 5-aminolevulinic acid is a natural precursor of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX. Relatively little is known about the antibacterial efficacy of photodynamic therapy using the systemic administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid; a few reports have shown that 5-aminolevulinic acid exerts photodynamic effects on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid and a 410-nm wavelength light-emitting diode in vitro and in vivo for the treatment of MRSA. We found that 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy with the light-emitting diode had an in-vitro bactericidal effect on MRSA. In vivo, protoporphyrin IX successfully accumulated in MRSA on ulcer surfaces after intraperitoneal administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid to mice. Furthermore, 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy accelerated wound healing and decreased bacterial counts on ulcer surfaces; in contrast, vancomycin treatment did not accelerate wound healing. Our findings indicate that 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy may be a new treatment option for MRSA-infected wounds.

  18. Characterization of thin poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based tissue-simulating phantoms with tunable reduced scattering and absorption coefficients at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Gage J; Istfan, Raeef; Higgins, Laura M; Balachandran, Kartik; Roblyer, Darren; Pierce, Mark C; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Optical phantoms are used in the development of various imaging systems. For certain applications, the development of thin phantoms that simulate the physical size and optical properties of tissue is important. Here, we demonstrate a method for producing thin phantom layers with tunable optical properties using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a substrate material. The thickness of each layer (between 115 and 880 μm) was controlled using a spin coater. The reduced scattering and absorption coefficients were controlled using titanium dioxide and alcohol-soluble nigrosin, respectively. These optical coefficients were quantified at six discrete wavelengths (591, 631, 659, 691, 731, and 851 nm) at varying concentrations of titanium dioxide and nigrosin using spatial frequency domain imaging. From the presented data, we provide lookup tables to determine the appropriate concentrations of scattering and absorbing agents to be used in the design of PDMS-based phantoms with specific optical coefficients. In addition, heterogeneous phantoms mimicking the layered features of certain tissue types may be fabricated from multiple stacked layers, each with custom optical properties. These thin, tunable PDMS optical phantoms can simulate many tissue types and have broad imaging calibration applications in endoscopy, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging, and optical coherence tomography, etc.

  19. Compact electro-absorption modulator integrated with vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Ahmed, Moustafa; Bakry, Ahmed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact electro-absorption slow-light modulator laterally-integrated with an 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), which enables highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation. We found a strong leaky travelling wave in the lateral direction between the two cavities via widening the waveguide width with a taper shape. The small signal response of the fabricated device shows a large enhancement of over 55 dB in the modulation amplitude at frequencies beyond 35 GHz; thanks to the photon-photon resonance. A large group index of over 150 in a Bragg reflector waveguide enables the resonance at millimeter wave frequencies for 25 μm long compact modulator. Based on the modeling, we expect a resonant modulation at a higher frequency of 70 GHz. The resonant modulation in a compact slow-light modulator plays a significant key role for high efficient narrow-band modulation in the millimeter wave range far beyond the intrinsic modulation bandwidth of VCSELs.

  20. Development of Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Silicon-Germanium Alloys for Improving Long-Wavelength Absorption in Si-Based Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Tang Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon-germanium (μc-Si1-xGex:H alloys were developed for application in Si-based thin-film solar cells. The effects of the germane concentration (RGeH4 and the hydrogen ratio (RH2 on the μc-Si1-xGex:H alloys and the corresponding single-junction thin-film solar cells were studied. The behaviors of Ge incorporation in a-Si1-xGex:H and μc-Si1-xGex:H were also compared. Similar to a-Si1-xGex:H, the preferential Ge incorporation was observed in μc-Si1-xGex:H. Moreover, a higher RH2 significantly promoted Ge incorporation for a-Si1-xGex:H, while the Ge content was not affected by RH2 in μc-Si1-xGex:H growth. Furthermore, to eliminate the crystallization effect, the 0.9 μm thick absorbers with a similar crystalline volume fraction were applied. With the increasing RGeH4, the accompanied increase in Ge content of μc-Si1-xGex:H narrowed the bandgap and markedly enhanced the long-wavelength absorption. However, the bias-dependent EQE measurement revealed that too much Ge incorporation in absorber deteriorated carrier collection and cell performance. With the optimization of RH2 and RGeH4, the single-junction μc-Si1-xGex:H cell achieved an efficiency of 5.48%, corresponding to the crystalline volume fraction of 50.5% and Ge content of 13.2 at.%. Compared to μc-Si:H cell, the external quantum efficiency at 800 nm had a relative increase by 33.1%.

  1. Magneto absorption measurements of nano-size ɛ-AlxFe2-xO3 powder materials at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed N.; Li, Zijing; Korolev, Konstantin A.; Namai, Asuka; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2011-04-01

    Ferromagnetic absorption spectra of ɛ-AlxFe2-xO3 powders with various x parameters and densities were obtained using free space quasi-optical spectrometer. Two absorption peaks located at around 95 and 105 GHz have been found. The 95 GHz absorption corresponds to x parameter value of 0.66; while the 105 GHz absorption corresponds to x-parameter value of 0.49. The absorption peak shifts to the lower frequency with increasing value of x parameter. The change in densities resulted in change in absorption intensity. The absorption characteristics are repeatable for these specimens prepared even at eight months interval. These absorbers are composed of ɛ-AlxFe2-xO3 nanomagnets and prepared by sol-gel techniques. Free space quasi-optical spectrometer equipped with a set of tunable backward-wave oscillators as power sources is used in this work to study the transmittance and absorption property of this series of materials at millimeter wave frequencies. The transmittance and absorbance spectra of ɛ-AlxFe2-xO3 powders with different x values (x = 0.66 and 0.49) and densities are recorded using the free space spectrometer. Strong magnetic absorption centering at 95 GHz (corresponding to x = 0.66) and at 105 GHz (x = 0.49) are found for all densities.

  2. In vitro and in vivo Efficacy of New Blue Light Emitting Diode Phototherapy Compared to Conventional Halogen Quartz Phototherapy for Neonatal Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yun Sil; Hwang, Jong Hee; Kwon, Hyuk Nam; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Sun Young; Park, Won Soon; Shin, Son Moon; Lee, Munhyang

    2005-01-01

    High intensity light emitting diodes (LEDs) are being studied as possible light sources for the phototherapy of neonatal jaundice, as they can emit high intensity light of narrow wavelength band in the blue region of the visible light spectrum corresponding to the spectrum of maximal bilirubin absorption. We developed a prototype blue gallium nitride LED phototherapy unit with high intensity, and compared its efficacy to commercially used halogen quartz phototherapy device by measuring both i...

  3. Absorption and Scattering by Molecules and Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoble, Jacqueline; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Herman, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere absorbs, scatters, and emits electromagnetic radiation. Although air molecules are the primary actors in these processes, aerosol particles are also present ubiquitously and modify the radiation field. In fact, this modification constitutes the very physical basis of aerosol remote sensing. Whenever clouds are present, they have a much larger influence on radiation which largely overshadows the aerosol impact. Therefore, in aerosol remote sensing, one often has to limit observations to cloudless conditions and screen cloudy pixels. In the solar part of the spectrum, molecular absorption is mostly limited to ultraviolet (UV; ozone) and near-infrared (near-IR; carbon dioxide, water vapor) wavelengths and is characterized by strong and narrow oxygen bands. A brief description of atmospheric molecular absorption is presented in Section 2.2. Shortwave aerosol remote sensing is usually performed outside the absorption bands, but some instruments also have channels capturing absorption bands with the objective of quantifying gaseous components.

  4. Non-Destructive and Discriminating Identification of Illegal Drugs by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy in the Visible and Near-IR Wavelength Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Chie; Furube, Akihiro; Katoh, Ryuzi; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-01

    We have tested the possibility of identifying illegal drugs by means of nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with a 10-ns UV-laser pulse for the excitation light and visible-to-near-IR light for the probe light. We measured the transient absorption spectra of acetonitrile solutions of d-methamphetamine, dl-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine hydrochloride (MDMA), and dl-N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine hydrochloride (MBDB), which are illegal drugs widely consumed in Japan. Transient absorption signals of these drugs were observed between 400 and 950 nm, a range in which they are transparent in the ground state. By analyzing the spectra in terms of exponential and Gaussian functions, we could identify the drugs and discriminate them from chemical substances having similar structures. We propose that transient absorption spectroscopy will be a useful, non-destructive method of inspecting for illegal drugs, especially when they are dissolved in liquids. Such a method may even be used for drugs packed in opaque materials if it is further extended to utilize intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  5. STUDY OF DYNAMIC ABSORPTIVITY AT 10.6 µm (CO2) AND 1.06 µm (Nd-YAG) WAVELENGTHS AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE

    OpenAIRE

    Sainte-Catherine, C.; Jeandin, Michel; Kechemair, D.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Sabatier, L.

    1991-01-01

    One of the main advantages of Nd-YAG lasers compared to CO2 lasers consists of easy beam handling using optical silica fibers. However, up to now Nd-YAG applications for material processing were limited due to a rather low available mean output power (less than about 500 W). A Eureka project (termed "EU-226") which consequently aimed at developing the so called "High Power Solid State Laser (HPSSL)" capable of 1 to 3 kW, involved absorptivity studies results of which are given in this contrib...

  6. Validation of H2O continuum absorption models in the wave number range 180-600 cm(-1) with atmospheric emitted spectral radiance measured at the Antarctica Dome-C site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-07-14

    This work presents the results concerning the analysis of a set of atmospheric emitted (down welling) spectral radiance observations in the spectral range 180 to 1100 cm(-1) acquired at the Dome-C site in Antarctica during an extensive field campaign in 2011-2012. The work has been mainly focused on retrieving and validating the coefficients of the foreign contribution to the water vapour continuum absorption, within a spectral range overlapping the water vapour rotational band. Retrievals have been performed by using a simultaneous physical retrieval procedure for atmospheric and spectroscopic parameters. Both day (summer) and night (winter) spectra have been used in our analysis. This new set of observations in the far infrared range has allowed us to extend validation and verification of state-of-art water vapour continuum absorption models down to 180 cm(-1). Results show that discrepancies between measurements and models are less than 10% in the interval 350-590 cm(-1), while they are slightly larger at wave numbers below 350 cm(-1). On overall, our study shows a good consistency between observations and state-of-art models and provides evidence toward needing to adjust absorptive line strengths. Finally, it has been found that there is a good agreement between the coefficients retrieved using either summer or winter spectra, which are acquired in far different meteorological conditions.

  7. Near-infrared light emitting device using semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supran, Geoffrey J.S.; Song, Katherine W.; Hwang, Gyuweon; Correa, Raoul Emile; Shirasaki, Yasuhiro; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Scherer, Jennifer

    2018-04-03

    A near-infrared light emitting device can include semiconductor nanocrystals that emit at wavelengths beyond 1 .mu.m. The semiconductor nanocrystals can include a core and an overcoating on a surface of the core.

  8. A compact tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer to monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm wavelength in hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship's Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow.

  9. Determination of cadmium in aluminium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, D.A.; Erlijman, L.H.

    1978-12-01

    A direct method for the determination of cadmium in elemental aluminium is described. Metal samples are dissolved in diluted hydrochloric acid and cadmium is determined by atomic absorption spectrometry in an air-acetylene flame. Interference by non-specific absorption observed at the analytical wavelength incorrected for by means of a non-absorbing line emitted by the hollow-cathode lamp. Relatively large amounts of arsenic do not interfere. The minimun determinable concentration of cadmium for this procedure is 2-3 ppm, expressed on aluminium basis. (author) [es

  10. Wavelength conversion techniques and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Søren Lykke; Mikkelsen, Benny; Hansen, Peter Bukhave

    1997-01-01

    interesting for use in WDM optical fibre networks. However, the perfect converter has probably not yet been fabricated and new techniques such as conversion relying on cross-absorption modulation in electro-absorption modulators might also be considered in pursue of effective conversion devices......Taking into account the requirements to the converters e.g., bit rate transparency (at least up to 10 Gbit/s), polarisation independence, wavelength independence, moderate input power levels, high signal-to-noise ratio and high extinction ratio interferometric wavelength convertors are very...

  11. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  12. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  13. Near Field and Far Field Effects in the Taguchi-Optimized Design of AN InP/GaAs-BASED Double Wafer-Fused Mqw Long-Wavelength Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, P. S.; Kandiah, K.; Mandeep, J. S.; Shaari, S.; Apte, P. R.

    Long-wavelength VCSELs (LW-VCSEL) operating in the 1.55 μm wavelength regime offer the advantages of low dispersion and optical loss in fiber optic transmission systems which are crucial in increasing data transmission speed and reducing implementation cost of fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) access networks. LW-VCSELs are attractive light sources because they offer unique features such as low power consumption, narrow beam divergence and ease of fabrication for two-dimensional arrays. This paper compares the near field and far field effects of the numerically investigated LW-VCSEL for various design parameters of the device. The optical intensity profile far from the device surface, in the Fraunhofer region, is important for the optical coupling of the laser with other optical components. The near field pattern is obtained from the structure output whereas the far-field pattern is essentially a two-dimensional fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the near-field pattern. Design parameters such as the number of wells in the multi-quantum-well (MQW) region, the thickness of the MQW and the effect of using Taguchi's orthogonal array method to optimize the device design parameters on the near/far field patterns are evaluated in this paper. We have successfully increased the peak lasing power from an initial 4.84 mW to 12.38 mW at a bias voltage of 2 V and optical wavelength of 1.55 μm using Taguchi's orthogonal array. As a result of the Taguchi optimization and fine tuning, the device threshold current is found to increase along with a slight decrease in the modulation speed due to increased device widths.

  14. An infrared metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption for low observability (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jagyeong; Han, Kiwook; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    Advancement in stealth technology is very crucial for the protection from enemy. Detection of IR electromagnetic wave is performed by detecting the IR radiation from aircraft fuselage or reflected laser by using laser guided missile. In this research, we designed the metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption to minimize observability from these detecting system. The model is designed as T-asymmetric structure for dual-band absorption or emission, and these two parts can be independently tuned. One part is designed as emitter which emit the radiation in the wavelength region where atmospheric absorption is strong. In order to select the target wavelength region, we used the MODTRAN database to calculate the molecular absorption in the atmosphere and strong absorptions occurs at 2μm, 4μm and 5-8μm wavelength regions. The other part is designed as an absorber which absorbs the IR signal from laser guided missile at 1.064μm. Selective emission or absorption at these wavelength region can be achieved by tuning the geometry of the structure. These mechanisms suppose the thermal equilibrium state so that the Kirchhoff law is satisfied. FDTD simulations of the designed structure was conducted to confirm the electromagnetic resonance. Also, we calculated the detected energy from the designed structure and compared with that from conventional aircraft surface. According to the calculation results, the measured signal from the suggested structure decreases to 1/10 of the signal from conventional surface.

  15. Multiple wavelength multitimescale optical absorption system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, R.; Allan, D.; Hodgson, B.W.; Swallow, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    A new workstation for pulse radiolysis studies has been developed for the Paterson Institute Linear Accelerator Laboratory. It is particularly suited to the study of materials available only in limited quantities. The analysing light beam is dispersed into a plane spectrum by a McPherson 270 monochromator and focused down to a line spectrum by a rod lens. The spectral intensity distribution is sampled by a linear array of optical fibres which conduct the light to photodiodes. A preamplifier unit amplifies and buffers the diode photocurrent signal which then passes to the main electronics unit incorporating further amplification stages, filters, backing-off of the background photocurrent, analog-to-digital conversion, data storage memory and a computer interface. All control of the electronic system is performed from a computer equipped with appropriate software. The system has 10 channels of spectral bandwidth 16 nm, a useful spectral response from 350 nm to 1 μm with a high signal-to-noise ratio, signal sampling rates from 20 MHz to 2 kHz and 8 kbyte of local memory for each channel. (author)

  16. Multiple wavelength multitimescale optical absorption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, R.; Allan, D.; Hodgson, B. W.; Swallow, A. J.

    A new workstation for pulse radiolysis studies has been developed for the Paterson Institute Linear Accelerator Laboratory. It is particularly suited to the study of materials available only in limited quantities. The analysing light beam is dispersed into a plane spectrum by a McPherson 270 monochromator and focused down to a line spectrum by a rod lens. The spectral intensity distribution is sampled by a linear array of optical fibres which conduct the light to photodiodes. A preamplifier unit amplifies and buffers the diode photocurrent signal which then passes to the main electronics unit incorporating further amplification stages, filters, backing-off of the background photocurrent, analog-to-digital conversion, data storage memory and a computer interface. All control of the electronic system is performed from a computer equipped with appropriate software. The system has 10 channels of spectral bandwidth 16 nm, a useful spectral response from 350 nm to 1 μm with a high signal-to-noise ratio, signal sampling rates from 20 MHz to 2 kHz and 8 kbyte of local memory for each channel.

  17. High reflectivity YDH/SiO2 distributed Bragg reflector for UV-C wavelength regime

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2018-02-15

    A distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) composed of Y2O3-doped HfO2 (YDH)/SiO2 layers with high reflectivity spectrum centered at a wavelength of ~240 nm is deposited using radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. Before the DBR deposition, optical properties for a single layer of YDH, SiO2, and HfO2 thin films were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry and spectrophotometry. To investigate the performance of YDH as a material for the high refractive index layer in the DBR, a comparison of its optical properties was made with HfO2 thin films. Due to larger optical bandgap, the YDH thin films demonstrated higher transparency, lower extinction coefficient, and lower absorption coefficient in the UV-C regime (especially for wavelengths below 250 nm) compared to the HfO2 thin films. The deposited YDH/SiO2 DBR consisting of 15 periods achieved a reflectivity higher than 99.9% at the wavelength of ~240 nm with a stopband of ~50 nm. The high reflectivity and broad stopband of YDH/SiO2 DBRs will enable further advancement of various photonic devices such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and resonant-cavity photodetectors operating in the UV-C wavelength regime.

  18. Wavelength standards in the infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, KN

    2012-01-01

    Wavelength Standards in the Infrared is a compilation of wavelength standards suitable for use with high-resolution infrared spectrographs, including both emission and absorption standards. The book presents atomic line emission standards of argon, krypton, neon, and xenon. These atomic line emission standards are from the deliberations of Commission 14 of the International Astronomical Union, which is the recognized authority for such standards. The text also explains the techniques employed in determining spectral positions in the infrared. One of the techniques used includes the grating con

  19. Efficiency enhancement of fluorescence blue organic light-emitting diodes by incorporating Ag nanoparticles layers due to a localized surface plasmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Minwoo; Chung, Nak-Kwan; Shim, Seob; Yun, Ju-Young; Kim, Jin-Tae; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2017-09-01

    Enhanced electroluminescence in blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is obtained by incorporating Ag nanoparticles (NPs) into hole injection layer of poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonic acid (PEDOT:PSS). The absorption peak of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) introduced by the 60 nm Ag NPs matches the emission wavelength of the blue OLEDs were matched at wavelength of 442 nm. In addition, to maximize their coupling and to prevent the quenching of the emission, the distance between surface plasmons (SPs) around NPs and organic fluorophores is optimized. Finally, the emission intensity and the current efficiency of diode with Ag NPs were increased by 19% and 18%, respectively.

  20. Characterization of ethanol concentrations at ultraviolet wavelength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the measurement of optical absorption spectrum for different concentrations of ethanol at ultraviolet wavelength. Ethanol absorption spectrum was measured using portable spectroscopy setup from Avantes. It consists of Balanced Deuterium Halogen light source and spectrometer. The light source can ...

  1. Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

    2014-08-26

    Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

  2. DFB lasers at wavelengths in excess of 2300 nm for remote gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeth, J.; Fischer, M.; Legge, M.; Seufert, J.; Werner, R.

    2017-11-01

    Remote gas sensing for atmospheric and environmental studies using single mode emitting semiconductor lasers, e.g. in LIDAR applications has gained wide interest in the last few years. This technique has been brought to sophisticated sensitivity levels and nowadays detection limits are in the range of a few ppb. However, up until recently only semiconductor laser diode sources with wavelengths below 2.3 μm have been available, which inherently limits the detection sensitivity due to the fact that the fundamental absorption band of many gases lies in the spectral range beyond 2.3 μm. With novel distributed feedback laser diodes at wavelengths up to 2.9 μm higher detection sensitivities as compared to currently available laser based sensors are possible.

  3. Wavelength converter technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloch, Allan; Hansen, Peter Bukhave; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov

    1999-01-01

    Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on all-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.......Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on all-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  4. Wavelength converter technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloch, Allan; Hansen, Peter Bukhave; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov

    1999-01-01

    Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on air-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.......Wavelength conversion is important since it ensures full flexibility of the WDM network layer. Progress in optical wavelength converter technology is reviewed with emphasis on air-optical wavelength converter types based on semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  5. Wavelength conversion devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Benny; Durhuus, Terji; Jørgensen, Carsten

    1996-01-01

    Summary form only given. Wavelength converters will be essential devices to exploit the full potential of the wavelength dimension in wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) networks. Based on experiments, we discuss different candidates for efficient wavelength converters with attention to expected...

  6. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A; Elson, Daniel S; Hares, Jonathan D

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM

  7. Highly Selective Volatile Organic Compounds Breath Analysis Using a Broadly-Tunable Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzson, Béla; Jágerská, Jana; Looser, Herbert; Graf, Manuel; Felder, Ferdinand; Fill, Matthias; Tappy, Luc; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2017-06-20

    A broadly tunable mid-infrared vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) is employed in a direct absorption laser spectroscopic setup to measure breath acetone. The large wavelength coverage of more than 30 cm -1 at 3.38 μm allows, in addition to acetone, the simultaneous measurement of isoprene, ethanol, methanol, methane, and water. Despite the severe spectral interferences from water and alcohols, an unambiguous determination of acetone is demonstrated with a precision of 13 ppbv that is achieved after 5 min averaging at typical breath mean acetone levels in synthetic gas samples mimicking human breath.

  8. Wavelength encoding technique for particle analyses in hematology analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongeat, Nelly; Brunel, Patrick; Gineys, Jean-Philippe; Cremien, Didier; Couderc, Vincent; Nérin, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to combine multiple excitation wavelengths in order to improve accuracy of fluorescence characterization of labeled cells. The experimental demonstration is realized with a hematology analyzer based on flow cytometry and a CW laser source emitting two visible wavelengths. A given optical encoding associated to each wavelength allows fluorescence identification coming from specific fluorochromes and avoiding the use of noisy compensation method.

  9. New Optoelectronic Technology Simplified for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED, using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry when producing new technological products. The OLED are the base Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, and Polyaniline, PANI, were deposited in Indium Tin Oxide, ITO, and characterized by UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis, Optical Parameters (OP and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In addition, the thin film obtained by the deposition of PANI, prepared in perchloric acid solution, was identified through PANI-X1. The result obtained by UV-Vis has demonstrated that the Quartz/ITO/PEDOT/PANI-X1 layer does not have displacement of absorption for wavelengths greaters after spin-coating and electrodeposition. Thus, the spectral irradiance of the OLED informed the irradiance of 100 W/m2, and this result, compared with the standard Light Emitting Diode (LED, has indicated that the OLED has higher irradiance. After 1000 hours of electrical OLED tests, the appearance of nanoparticles visible for images by SEM, to the migration process of organic semiconductor materials, was present, then. Still, similar to the phenomenon of electromigration observed in connections and interconnections of microelectronic devices, the results have revealed a new mechanism of migration, which raises the passage of electric current in OLED.

  10. Ex vivo comparison of the tissue effects of six laser wavelengths for potential use in laser supported partial nephrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoder, Wael Y.; Zilinberg, Katja; Waidelich, Raphaela; Stief, Christian G.; Becker, Armin J.; Pangratz, Thomas; Hennig, Georg; Sroka, Ronald

    2012-06-01

    Laparoscopic/robotic partial nephrectomy (LPN) is increasingly considered for small renal tumors (RT). This demands new compatible surgical tools for RT-resection, such as lasers, to optimize cutting and coagulation. This work aims to characterize ex vivo handling requirements for six medically approved laser devices emitting different light wavelengths (940, 1064, 1318, 1470, 1940, and 2010 nm) amenable for LPN. Incisions were made by laser fibers driven by a computer-controlled stepping motor allowing precise linear movement with a preset velocity at a fixed fiber-tip distance to tissue. Optical parameters were measured on 200 μm tissue slices. Cutting quality depended on power output, fiber velocity and fiber-tip distance to tissue. Contact manner is suitable for cutting while a noncontact manner (5 mm distance) induces coagulation. Ablation threshold differs for each wavelength. Ablation depth is proportional to power output (within limit) while axial and superficial coagulation remains mostly constant. Increased fiber velocity compromises the coagulation quality. Optical parameters of porcine kidney tissue demonstrate that renal absorption coefficient follows water absorption in the 2 μm region while for other spectral regions (900 to 1500 and 1 μm) the tissue effects are influenced by other chromophores and scattering. Tissue color changes demonstrate dependencies on irradiance, scan velocity, and wavelength. Current results clearly demonstrate that surgeons considering laser-assisted RT excisions should be aware of the mentioned technical parameters (power output, fiber velocity and fiber-tip tissue-distance) rather than wavelength only.

  11. Ghost Spectroscopy with Classical Thermal Light Emitted by a Superluminescent Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janassek, Patrick; Blumenstein, Sébastien; Elsäßer, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    We propose and realize the first classical ghost-imaging (GI) experiment in the frequency or wavelength domain, thus performing ghost spectroscopy using thermal light exhibiting photon bunching. The required wavelength correlations are provided by light emitted by spectrally broadband near-infrared amplified spontaneous emission of a semiconductor-based superluminescent diode. They are characterized by wavelength-resolved intensity cross-correlation measurements utilizing two-photon-absorption interferometry. Finally, a real-world spectroscopic application of this ghost spectroscopy with a classical light scheme is demonstrated in which an absorption band of trichloromethane (chloroform) at 1214 nm is reconstructed with a spectral resolution of 10 nm as a proof-of-principle experiment. This ghost-spectroscopy work fills the gap of a hitherto missing analogy between the spatial and the spectral domain in classical GI modalities, with the expectation of contributing towards a broader dissemination of correlated photon ghost modalities, hence paving the way towards more applications which exploit the favorable advantages.

  12. Pulsed hybrid dual wavelength Y-branch-DFB laser-tapered amplifier system suitable for water vapor detection at 965 nm with 16 W peak power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thi N.; Klehr, Andreas; Sumpf, Bernd; Hoffmann, Thomas; Liero, Armin; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-03-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier system emitting alternatingly at two neighbored wavelengths around 965 nm is presented. As master oscillator (MO) a Y-branch DFB-laser is used. The two branches, which can be individually controlled, deliver the two wavelengths needed for a differential absorption measurement of water vapor. Adjusting the current through the DFB sections, the wavelength can be adjusted with respect to the targeted either "on" or "off" resonance, respectively wavelength λon or wavelength λoff. The emission of this laser is amplified in a tapered amplifier (TA). The ridge waveguide section of the TA acts as optical gate to generate short pulses with duration of 8 ns at a repetition rate of 25 kHz, the flared section is used for further amplification to reach peak powers up to 16 W suitable for micro-LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). The necessary pulse current supply user a GaN-transistor based driver electronics placed close to the power amplifier (PA). The spectral properties of the emission of the MO are preserved by the PA. A spectral line width smaller than 10 pm and a side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 37 dB are measured. These values meet the demands for water vapor absorption measurements under atmospheric conditions.

  13. Lighting emitting microstructures in porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squire, E.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical techniques are used to examine microstructuring effects on the optical properties of single layer, multilayer, single and multiple microcavity structures fabricated from porous silicon. Two important issues regarding the effects of the periodic structuring of this material are discussed. Firstly, the precise role played by this microstructuring, given that the luminescence is distributed throughout the entire structure and the low porosity layers are highly absorbing at short wavelengths. The second issue examined concerns the observed effects on the optical spectra of the samples owing to the emission bandwidth of the material being greater than the optical stopband of the structure. Measurements of the reflectivity and photoluminescence spectra of different porous silicon microstructures are presented and discussed. The results are modelled using a transfer matrix technique. The matrix method has been modified to calculate the optical spectra of porous silicon specifically by accounting for the effects of dispersion, absorption and emission within the material. Layer thickness and porosity gradients have also been included in the model. The dielectric function of the two component layers (i.e. silicon and air) is calculated using the Looyenga formula. This approach can be adapted to suit other porous semiconductors if required. Examination of the experimental results have shown that the emitted light is strongly controlled by the optical modes of the structures. Furthermore, the data display an interplay of a wide variety of effects dependent upon the structural composition. Comparisons made between the experimental and calculated reflectivity and photoluminescence spectra of many different porous silicon microstructures show very good agreement. (author)

  14. Coagulation and ablation of biological soft tissue by quantum cascade laser with peak wavelength of 5.7 μm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Hashimura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecules such as water, proteins and lipids that are contained in biological tissue absorb mid-infrared (MIR light, which allows such light to be used in laser surgical treatment. Esters, amides and water exhibit strong absorption bands in the 5–7 μm wavelength range, but at present there are no lasers in clinical use that can emit in this range. Therefore, the present study focused on the quantum cascade laser (QCL, which is a new type of semiconductor laser that can emit at MIR wavelengths and has recently achieved high output power. A high-power QCL with a peak wavelength of 5.7 μm was evaluated for use as a laser scalpel for ablating biological soft tissue. The interaction of the laser beam with chicken breast tissue was compared to a conventional CO2 laser, based on surface and cross-sectional images. The QCL was found to have sufficient power to ablate soft tissue, and its coagulation, carbonization and ablation effects were similar to those for the CO2 laser. The QCL also induced comparable photothermal effects because it acted as a pseudo-continuous wave laser due to its low peak power. A QCL can therefore be used as an effective laser scalpel, and also offers the possibility of less invasive treatment by targeting specific absorption bands in the MIR region.

  15. Aerosol light absorption and its measurement: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosmueller, H.; Chakrabarty, R.K.; Arnott, W.P.

    2009-01-01

    Light absorption by aerosols contributes to solar radiative forcing through absorption of solar radiation and heating of the absorbing aerosol layer. Besides the direct radiative effect, the heating can evaporate clouds and change the atmospheric dynamics. Aerosol light absorption in the atmosphere is dominated by black carbon (BC) with additional, significant contributions from the still poorly understood brown carbon and from mineral dust. Sources of these absorbing aerosols include biomass burning and other combustion processes and dust entrainment. For particles much smaller than the wavelength of incident light, absorption is proportional to the particle volume and mass. Absorption can be calculated with Mie theory for spherical particles and with more complicated numerical methods for other particle shapes. The quantitative measurement of aerosol light absorption is still a challenge. Simple, commonly used filter measurements are prone to measurement artifacts due to particle concentration and modification of particle and filter morphology upon particle deposition, optical interaction of deposited particles and filter medium, and poor angular integration of light scattered by deposited particles. In situ methods measure particle absorption with the particles in their natural suspended state and therefore are not prone to effects related to particle deposition and concentration on filters. Photoacoustic and refractive index-based measurements rely on the heating of particles during light absorption, which, for power-modulated light sources, causes an acoustic signal and modulation of the refractive index in the air surrounding the particles that can be quantified with a microphone and an interferometer, respectively. These methods may suffer from some interference due to light-induced particle evaporation. Laser-induced incandescence also monitors particle heating upon absorption, but heats absorbing particles to much higher temperatures to quantify BC mass

  16. Doubly Resonant Photonic Antenna for Single Infrared Quantum Dot Imaging at Telecommunication Wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua; Lefier, Yannick; Suarez, Miguel Angel; Mivelle, Mathieu; Salut, Roland; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-04-12

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have drawn strong interest in the past for their high prospects in scientific, medical, and industrial applications. However, the full characterization of these quantum emitters is currently restricted to the visible wavelengths, and it remains a key challenge to optically probe single CQDs operating in the infrared spectral domain, which is targeted by a growing number of applications. Here, we report the first experimental detection and imaging at room temperature of single infrared CQDs operating at telecommunication wavelengths. Imaging was done with a doubly resonant bowtie nanoaperture antenna (BNA) written at the end of a fiber nanoprobe, whose resonances spectrally fit the CQD absorption and emission wavelengths. Direct near-field characterization of PbS CQDs reveal individual nanocrystals with a spatial resolution of 75 nm (λ/20) together with their intrinsic 2D dipolar free-space emission properties and exciton dynamics (blinking phenomenon). Because the doubly resonant BNA is strongly transmissive at both the CQD absorption and the emission wavelengths, we are able to perform all-fiber nanoimaging with a standard 20% efficiency InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD). The detection efficiency is predicted to be 3000 fold larger than with a conventional circular aperture tip of the same transmission area. Double resonance BNA fiber probes thus offer the possibility of exploring extreme light-matter interaction in low band gap CQDs with current plug-and-play detection techniques, opening up new avenues in the fields of infrared light-emitting devices, photodetectors, telecommunications, bioimaging, and quantum information technology.

  17. Sub-wavelength antenna enhanced bilayer graphene tunable photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Howell, Stephen W.; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul; Ohta, Taisuke

    2016-03-22

    The integration of bilayer graphene with an absorption enhancing sub-wavelength antenna provides an infrared photodetector capable of real-time spectral tuning without filters at nanosecond timescales.

  18. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  19. Note: Three wavelengths near-infrared spectroscopy system for compensating the light absorbance by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, M. Raheel; Hong, Keum-Shik; Kim, Beop-Min; Hong, Melissa Jiyoun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Se-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Given that approximately 80% of blood is water, we develop a wireless functional near-infrared spectroscopy system that detects not only the concentration changes of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) during mental activity but also that of water (H2O). Additionally, it implements a water-absorption correction algorithm that improves the HbO and HbR signal strengths during an arithmetic task. The system comprises a microcontroller, an optical probe, tri-wavelength light emitting diodes, photodiodes, a WiFi communication module, and a battery. System functionality was tested by means of arithmetic-task experiments performed by healthy male subjects.

  20. Color and wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Samantha

    2018-01-01

    "Using the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the My World of Science series provides the earliest readers with background on key STEM concepts. Color and Wavelengths explores the different frequencies in light wavelengths in a simple, engaging way that will help readers develop word recognition and reading skills. Includes a glossary and index"-- Provided by publisher.

  1. Electronic absorption spectra of antiviral aminophenol derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkov, M. V.; Ksendzova, G. A.; Raichyonok, T. F.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Sorokin, V. L.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Shadyro, O. I.

    2011-03-01

    Electronic absorption spectra of aminophenol derivatives in solutions have been studied. A general property of the absorption spectra of these compounds, the dependence of the maximum of a long-wavelength absorption band on the solvent polarity, is revealed. As a rule, the absorption band maximum of compounds possessing pharmacological properties shows a greater shift to short wavelength with an increase in the medium polarity than that of inactive compounds. Absorption measurements of solutions of aminophenol derivatives can be used for a tentative estimation of their antiviral activity.

  2. Spectral matching research for light-emitting diode-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ruting; Guo, Zhenning; Lin, Jieben

    2015-09-01

    To decrease the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy and minimize the need for exchange transfusions, we report a novel design for light source of light-emitting diode (LED)-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device (NJTD). The bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo was regarded as target. Based on spectral constructing theory, we used commercially available LEDs with different peak wavelengths and full width at half maximum as matching light sources. Simple genetic algorithm was first proposed as the spectral matching method. The required LEDs number at each peak wavelength was calculated, and then, the commercial light source sample model of the device was fabricated to confirm the spectral matching technology. In addition, the corresponding spectrum was measured and the effect was analyzed finally. The results showed that fitted spectrum was very similar to the target spectrum with 98.86 % matching degree, and the actual device model has a spectrum close to the target with 96.02 % matching degree. With higher fitting degree and efficiency, this matching algorithm is very suitable for light source matching technology of LED-based spectral distribution, and bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo will be auspicious candidate for the target spectrum of new LED-based NJTD light source.

  3. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  4. Short wavelength FELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs

  5. Short wavelength FELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Null bactericidal effect of ultraviolet radiation emitted by LEDs.

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Alcántara Muñoz; Rafael Moreno-Rojas; Alicia Moreno Ortega; José Emilio Muñoz Cañete; Rafael Gómez Díaz

    2016-01-01

    This research has aimed to assess the bactericidal effect of ultraviolet light emitted by LEDS on the growth on Petri dishes of microorganisms whose legal limits in foods have been established. An electrically fed apparatus has been designed with precise timing and a camera to prevent light spillage, in which two ultraviolet radiation emission devices were connected by LED technology at different wavelengths: through an array of LEDS emitting at around 350nm, and a single specific...

  7. Single cavity Fabry-Perot modulator enhancements and integrated vertically coupled cavity light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxin

    Fabry-Perot modulators with Multi-Quantum Wells (MQWs) cavities have been studied with great interest during recent years. Usually operating as intensity modulators, these devices have very high modulation contrast ratios, can be operated at very high speed, can be easily made into two dimensional arrays and can be integrated with silicon ICs. They are thus very promising for optical interconnects, optical switching and image processing applications. But before these modulators are to be used in real applications, there are several issues that need to be solved, including the parasitic phase modulation, the bandwidth of such modulators and the alignment of modulator operation wavelength with the wavelength of lasers or light emitting diodes. In this work, the phase properties of Fabry-Perot reflection modulators will be discussed first and an experimental method using a modified Michelson interferometer to characterize the exact phase change will be demonstrated. It is demonstrated that the phase of the reflection light beam from a Fabry-Perot modulator is determined not only by the refractive index change inside the cavity but also by the absorption change inside the cavity. With the purpose of expanding the limited bandwidth of such modulator, devices with short passive cavities are designed and fabricated, the results are described and trade-offs between modulation depth and bandwidth will be discussed. In order to solve the problem of alignment and expand the functionality of Fabry-Perot modulators further, vertically coupled cavity devices with each cavity being electrically controlled independently have been developed. Both a coupled cavity modulator and an integrated light emitting diode with a transmission Fabry-Perot modulator are demonstrated; the first device enhances the modulation bandwidth while the second device has the potential of combining the advantage of high speed operation of MQWs modulators with the long lifetime and low cost of light

  8. Spectra Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Laboratory and Urban Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.

    a shell-core model, we verified, for the first time, that AEA can be as high as 1.6 even for non-absorbing coating on BC, suggesting that the organic coating need not be intrinsically brown to observe effects commonly attributed to BrC absorption. Additionally, for laboratory generated incense burning aerosols, AEA varied as lambda -4.5for wavelengths ranging from 355 to 1047 nm. In contrast, the wood smoke aerosols during winter had a much weaker wavelength dependence (lambda-1.1), comparable to that of traffic emission aerosols. During these observations, the multispectral SSA decreased with the wavelength for traffic-related emissions, yet it increased for biomass and incense burning aerosol. The strong spectral dependence was due to the enhanced light absorption by BrC at UV and blue wavelengths. In all cases, results of this analysis suggested that inefficient smoldering combustion processes can emit predominantly BrC, in comparison to high-temperature and flaming burning processes. During the CARES field campaign, aerosols were dominated by biogenic emissions. Aerosol light absorption was modestly enhanced (lambda -1.6) at shorter wavelengths (355, 375, 405, and 532 nm) compared to 870 and 1047 nm, likely due to the spectral dependence of coating on BC. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentration steadily increased in the latter half of the campaign, with strong 355 nm aerosol light scattering. Overall, results of this field campaign showed that the biogenic SOA was not BrC, i.e. it didn't have intrinsic characteristics near UV absorption. These results should be further tested and analyzed to assess the full implications of BrC aerosol light absorption.

  9. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  10. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Semiconductor Nanomembrane-Based Light-Emitting and Photodetecting Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous integration between silicon (Si, III-V group material and Germanium (Ge is highly desirable to achieve monolithic photonic circuits. Transfer-printing and stacking between different semiconductor nanomembranes (NMs enables more versatile combinations to realize high-performance light-emitting and photodetecting devices. In this paper, lasers, including vertical and edge-emitting structures, flexible light-emitting diode, photodetectors at visible and infrared wavelengths, as well as flexible photodetectors, are reviewed to demonstrate that the transfer-printed semiconductor nanomembrane stacked layers have a large variety of applications in integrated optoelectronic systems.

  12. Enhanced quantum efficiency in blue-emitting polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposite light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Lim, Yong Taik; Park, O Ok; Yu, Jae-Woong; Kim, Jai Kyeong; Kim, Young Chul

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting devices based on environmentally stable, blue-emitting polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposites were fabricated by blending poly(di-octylfluorene) (PDOF) with organo-clay. By reducing the excimer formation that leads to long wavelength tails, the photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) color purity of the device was enhanced. When a conjugated polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposite is applied to an EL device, we expect an electronic structure similar to the well-known quantum well in small nanodomains. The ratio of PDOF/organo-clay was regulated from 2:1 to 0.5:1 (w/w). The light-emitting device of 0.5:1 (w/w) blend demonstrated the highest quantum efficiency (QE), 0.72% (ph/el), which is ∼500 times higher value compared with that of the pure PDOF layer device. However, the driving voltage of the nanocomposite devices tended to increase with increasing organo-clay content

  13. A Low-Cost Quantitative Absorption Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Daniel R.; Todt, Michael A.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to make absorption spectrophotometry available to high school chemistry and physics classes, we have designed an inexpensive visible light absorption spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer was constructed using LEGO blocks, a light emitting diode, optical elements (including a lens), a slide-mounted diffraction grating, and a…

  14. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  15. Ultrasonic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews studies of ultrasonic absorption in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to measure the absorption coefficients are briefly described. Experimental results reported for the liquid metals: sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium, at medium temperatures, are presented, as well as data for liquid alloys. Absorption losses due to the presence of an external magnetic field, and the effects of viscosity on the absorption in metals, are both discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Robust Visible and Infrared Light Emitting Devices Using Rare-Earth-Doped GaN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steckl, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) dopants (such as Er, Eu, Tm) in the wide bandgap semiconductor (WBGS) GaN are investigated for the fabrication of robust visible and infrared light emitting devices at a variety of wavelengths...

  17. Recipient luminophoric mediums having narrow spectrum luminescent materials and related semiconductor light emitting devices and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeToquin, Ronan P; Tong, Tao; Glass, Robert C

    2014-12-30

    Light emitting devices include a light emitting diode ("LED") and a recipient luminophoric medium that is configured to down-convert at least some of the light emitted by the LED. In some embodiments, the recipient luminophoric medium includes a first broad-spectrum luminescent material and a narrow-spectrum luminescent material. The broad-spectrum luminescent material may down-convert radiation emitted by the LED to radiation having a peak wavelength in the red color range. The narrow-spectrum luminescent material may also down-convert radiation emitted by the LED into the cyan, green or red color range.

  18. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire’s theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer. - Highlights: • Range-energy relationship for the beta particles in yttrium-90 is calculated. • Formalism for the semi-analytical calculation of self-absorption coefficients. • Energy-dependent self-absorption coefficient calculated for yttrium-90. • Flux rate of beta particles from a self-attenuating radioactive sphere is shown. • The efficiency of beta particle emitting radioactive microspheres is calculated

  19. Wavelength conversion technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    Optical wavelength conversion is currently attracting much interest. This is because it enables full flexibility and eases management of WDM fibre networks. The tutorial will review existing and potential application areas. Examples of node architectures and network demonstrators that use wavelen...

  20. Broadband mid-infrared superlattice light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, R. J.; Provence, S. R.; Norton, D. T.; Boggess, T. F.; Prineas, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice light-emitting diodes were fabricated to form a device that provides emission over the entire 3-5 μm mid-infrared transmission window. Variable bandgap emission regions were coupled together using tunnel junctions to emit at peak wavelengths of 3.3 μm, 3.5 μm, 3.7 μm, 3.9 μm, 4.1 μm, 4.4 μm, 4.7 μm, and 5.0 μm. Cascading the structure recycles the electrons in each emission region to emit several wavelengths simultaneously. At high current densities, the light-emitting diode spectra broadened into a continuous, broadband spectrum that covered the entire mid-infrared band. When cooled to 77 K, radiances of over 1 W/cm2 sr were achieved, demonstrating apparent temperatures above 1000 K over the 3-5 μm band. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices are capable of emitting from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the device design can be expanded to include longer emission wavelengths.

  1. Optical modelling of photoluminescence emitted by thin doped films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeat, P.; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Briancon, J.L.; Rinnert, H.

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra emitted by doped films are deformed owing to film thickness-dependent wave interference. This hampers knowing well their PL generating mechanisms as well as designing photonic devices with suitable geometries that improve their PL efficiency. We develop in this paper an energy model for PL emitted by doped films considering the interaction between the wavelength-differing incident standing and emitted waves, their energy transfer in-between, and the interferences undergone by both. The film optical constants are estimated fitting the model to the measured PL. This simple model has thus allowed us to interpret the evolution of PL emitted by Er-doped AlN films prepared on Si substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. The shapes, the amplitudes, and the illusive sub-spectral features of the PL spectra depend essentially on the film thickness. The model further predicts high sensitivity for PL emitted by non-homogenously doped stacked-films to incident light wavelengths and film-thickness variations. This property has potential applications in tracking wavelength variations and in measuring physical quantities producing thickness variations. This model may be used to optimise PL efficiency of photonic devices through different film geometries and optical properties.

  2. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  3. Comparison of Nitric Oxide Concentrations in μs- and ns-Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas by UV Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, F.; Hirschberg, J.; Mertens, N.; Wieneke, S.; Viöl, W.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an absorption spectroscopy measurement method was applied on two atmospheric pressure plasma sources to determine their production of nitric oxide. The concentrations are essential for evaluating the plasma sources based on the principle of the Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) for applications in plasma medicine. The described method is based on a setup with an electrodeless discharge lamp filled with a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. One of the emitted wavelengths is an important resonance wavelength of nitric oxide (λ = 226.2 nm). By comparing the absorption behaviour at the minimum and maximum of the spectral absorption cross section of nitric oxide around that wavelength, and measuring the change in intensity by the absorbing plasma, the concentration of nitric oxide inside the plasma can be calculated. The produced nitric oxide concentrations depend on the pulse duration and are in the range of 180 ppm to 1400 ppm, so that a distance of about 10cm to the respiratory tract is enough to conform to the VDI Guideline 2310.

  4. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  5. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda Siok Lee

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  6. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael C L

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is co...

  7. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  8. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire's theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer.

  9. Study of Photosensitive Dry Films Absorption for Printed Circuit Boards by Photoacoustic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, R.; Zaragoza, J. A. Barrientos; Jiménez-Pérez, J. L.; Orea, A. Cruz; Correa-Pacheco, Z. N.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the study of photosensitive dry-type films by photoacoustic technique is proposed. The dry film photoresist is resistant to chemical etching for printed circuit boards such as ferric chloride, sodium persulfate or ammonium, hydrochloric acid. It is capable of faithfully reproducing circuit pattern exposed to ultraviolet light (UV) through a negative. Once recorded, the uncured portion is removed with alkaline solution. It is possible to obtain good results in surface mount circuits with tracks of 5 mm. Furthermore, the solid resin films are formed by three layers, two protective layers and a UV-sensitive optical absorption layer in the range of 325 nm to 405 nm. By means of optical absorption of UV-visible rays emitted by a low-power Xe lamp, the films transform this energy into thermal waves generated by the absorption of optical radiation and subsequently no-radiative de-excitation occurs. The photoacoustic spectroscopy is a useful technique to measure the transmittance and absorption directly. In this study, the optical absorption spectra of the three layers of photosensitive dry-type films were obtained as a function of the wavelength, in order to have a knowledge of the absorber layer and the protective layers. These analyses will give us the physical properties of the photosensitive film, which are very important in curing the dry film for applications in printed circuit boards.

  10. Compact environmental spectroscopy using advanced semiconductor light-emitting diodes and lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes research completed under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development program funded for part of FY94, FY95 and FY96. The main goals were (1) to develop novel, compound-semiconductor based optical sources to enable field-based detection of environmentally important chemical species using miniaturized, low-power, rugged, moderate cost spectroscopic equipment, and (2) to demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy to quantitatively measure contaminants. Potential applications would include monitoring process and effluent streams for volatile organic compound detection and sensing head-space gasses in storage vessels for waste management. Sensing is based on absorption in the 1.3-1.9 {mu}m band from overtones of the C-H, N-H and O-H stretch resonances. We describe work in developing novel broadband light-emitting diodes emitting over the entire 1.4-1.9 {mu}m wavelength range, first using InGaAs quantum wells, and second using a novel technique for growing digital-alloy materials in the InAlGaAs material system. Next we demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy for quantitatively determining contamination of soil by motor oil. Finally we discuss the separability of different classes of organic compounds using near-infrared spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Wavelength sweepable laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength sweepable laser source is disclosed, wherein the laser source is a semiconductor laser source adapted for generating laser light at a lasing wavelength. The laser source comprises a substrate, a first reflector, and a second reflector. The first and second reflector together defines...... and having a rest position, the second reflector and suspension together defining a microelectromechanical MEMS oscillator. The MEMS oscillator has a resonance frequency and is adapted for oscillating the second reflector on either side of the rest position.; The laser source further comprises electrical...... connections adapted for applying an electric field to the MEMS oscillator. Furthermore, a laser source system and a method of use of the laser source are disclosed....

  12. Using prepulsing: a useful way for increasing absorption efficiency of high intensity laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huimin; Zhang Guoping; Sheng Jiatian

    1990-01-01

    Using prepulse to irradiate target for increasing absorption efficiency of high intensity incident laser beam is considered and some theoretical simulations have been done. 1-D non-LTE radiative hydrodynamic code is used to simulate the interactions of laser beam with matter. A gaussian laser prepulse of wavelength 1.06 μm, FWHM 600 ps and peak intensity 1.5 x 10 12 W/cm 2 was used to irradiate 20 μm thick Au plate target, after 3ns a main gaussian pulse with wavelength 1.06 μm, FWHM 600 ps and peak intensity 3.0 x 10 14 W/cm 2 irradiated the expanding Au plasma. The responces of laser-produced plasma conditions are shown. By comparing with without prepulsing, under the condition of same main incident laser pulse, the absorption efficiency is increased from 0.36 to 0.60 and the laser-x-ray conversion efficiency is increased from 0.16 to 0.25. The electron temperature of hot plasma is also higher than without prepulsing, and the x-ray spectrum which is emitted from laser-produced hot plasma is harder and more intense than without prepulsing. The responces of laser-produced plasma for Fe target with prepulsing are shown as well. The conclusion is that using prepulsing is a useful way for getting high absorption laser beam

  13. Light-Emitting Pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  14. Spectral interferences in atomic absorption spectrometry, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro

    1979-01-01

    Spectral interferences were observed in trace element analysis of concentrated solutions by atomic absorption spectrometry. Molecular absorption and emission spectra for strontium chloride and nitrate, barium chloride and nitrate containing 12 mg/ml of metal ion in airacetylene flame were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The absorption and emission spectra of SrO were centered near 364.6 nm. The absorption spectra of SrOH around 606.0, 671.0 and 682.0 nm were very strong. And, emission spectrum of BaOH in the wavelength range from 480 to 550 nm was stronger. But, the absorption of this band spectrum was very weak. In the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm, some unknown bands of absorption were observed for strontium and barium. Absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were observed in the argon-hydrogen flame. Also, in the carbon tube atomizer, the absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were detected clearly in the wavelength range from 185 to 400 nm. (author)

  15. Optical fluence modelling for ultraviolet light emitting diode-based water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, R; Gabbai, U E; Moram, M A

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a validated optical fluence rate model optimised for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), which allow a very wide range of emission wavelengths and source geometries to be used in water treatment units. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach, in which an incremental ray-tracing algorithm is used to calculate the local volumetric rate of energy absorption and subsequently convert it to the local fluence rate distribution for an UV-LED water treatment chamber of arbitrary design. The model includes contributions from optical reflections and scattering by treatment chamber walls and from scattering due to particulates and/or microorganisms. The model successfully predicts optical fluence rates in point-of-use water treatment units, as verified using biodosimetry with MS-2 bacteriophage at a UV-LED emission wavelength of 254 nm. The effects of chamber geometry are also modelled effectively and are consistent with the inactivation data for E. coli at 254 nm. The data indicate that this model is suitable for application in the design and optimisation of UV-LED-based water treatment systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modular PbSrS/PbS mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting laser on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiar, A.; Rahim, M.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Zogg, H.; Cao, D.; Kobayashi, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Ishida, A.

    2011-07-01

    A mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) based on undoped PbS is described herein. A 200 nm-thick PbS active layer embedded between PbSrS cladding layers forms a double heterostructure. The layers are grown on a lattice and thermal expansion mismatched Si-substrate. The substrate is placed onto a flat bottom Bragg mirror again grown on a Si substrate, and the VECSEL is completed with a curved top mirror. Pumping is done optically with a 1.55 μm laser diode. This leads to an extremely simple modular fabrication process. Lasing wavelengths range from 3-3.8 μm at 100-260 K heat sink temperature. The lowest threshold power is ˜210 mWp and highest output power is ˜250 mWp. The influence of the different recombination mechanism as well as free carrier absorption on the threshold power is modeled.

  17. Human wavelength discrimination of monochromatic light explained by optimal wavelength decoding of light of unknown intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhaoping

    Full Text Available We show that human ability to discriminate the wavelength of monochromatic light can be understood as maximum likelihood decoding of the cone absorptions, with a signal processing efficiency that is independent of the wavelength. This work is built on the framework of ideal observer analysis of visual discrimination used in many previous works. A distinctive aspect of our work is that we highlight a perceptual confound that observers should confuse a change in input light wavelength with a change in input intensity. Hence a simple ideal observer model which assumes that an observer has a full knowledge of input intensity should over-estimate human ability in discriminating wavelengths of two inputs of unequal intensity. This confound also makes it difficult to consistently measure human ability in wavelength discrimination by asking observers to distinguish two input colors while matching their brightness. We argue that the best experimental method for reliable measurement of discrimination thresholds is the one of Pokorny and Smith, in which observers only need to distinguish two inputs, regardless of whether they differ in hue or brightness. We mathematically formulate wavelength discrimination under this wavelength-intensity confound and show a good agreement between our theoretical prediction and the behavioral data. Our analysis explains why the discrimination threshold varies with the input wavelength, and shows how sensitively the threshold depends on the relative densities of the three types of cones in the retina (and in particular predict discriminations in dichromats. Our mathematical formulation and solution can be applied to general problems of sensory discrimination when there is a perceptual confound from other sensory feature dimensions.

  18. Synthesis of near-infrared-emitting CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping

    2014-04-01

    Near-infrared-emitting quantum dots (QDs) were fabricated via organic synthesis strategies through constructing CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS multishell heterostructure. An effective shell-coating route was developed for multishell growth on CdTe cores. Core/shell growth was monitored by absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy observation. Yellow emitting CdTe cores were coated with a CdSe shell to generate type II structure. This yields core/shell QDs with red photoluminescence. The passivation by the ZnSe shell having a substantially wide bandgap confines the excitons within the CdTe/CdSe interface and isolates them from the solution environment and consequently improves the stability of the heterostructure. An additional ZnS shell was deposited around the outer layer of CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe QDs to form a heterostructure through the reaction between zinc oleate and trioctylphosphine sulfur in the crude CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe solution. By varying CdTe core size and each shell thickness, the PL wavelength of the obtained heterostructure can span from 580 to 770 nm. The PL efficiency is quenched in CdTe QDs in diluted solution but increases substantially up to 24% for CdTe/CdSe core/shell QDs. The PL efficiency of CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS QDs with average diameter of 5.4 nm and a PL peak wavelength of 770 nm is 20%.

  19. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Landfill Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Robinson, Rod; Gardiner, Tom; Finlayson, Andrew; Connor, Andy

    2017-04-01

    DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR (DIAL) MEASURMENTS OF LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS F. INNOCENTI *, R.A. ROBINSON *, T.D. GARDINER, A. FINLAYSON *, A. CONNOR* * National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW, United Kingdom Methane is one of the most important gaseous hydrocarbon species for both industrial and environmental reasons. Understanding and quantifying methane emissions to atmosphere is an important element of climate change research. Range-resolved infrared Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements provide the means to map and quantify a wide range of different methane sources. DIAL is a powerful technique that can be used to track and quantify plumes emitted from area emission sources such as landfill sites, waste water treatment plants and petrochemical plants. By using lidar (light detection and ranging), the DIAL technique is able to make remote range-resolved single-ended measurements of the actual distribution of target gases in the atmosphere, with no disruption to normal site operational activities. DIAL provides 3D mapping of emission concentrations and quantification of emission rates for a wide range of target gases such as methane. The NPL DIAL laser source is operated alternately at two similar wavelengths. One of these, termed the "on-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a wavelength which is absorbed by the target species. The other, the "off-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a nearby wavelength which is not absorbed significantly by the target species. The two wavelengths are chosen to be close, so that the atmospheric scattering properties are the same for both wavelengths. They are also chosen so that any differential absorption due to other atmospheric species are minimised. Any measured difference in the returned signals is therefore due to absorption by the target gas. In the typical DIAL measurement configuration the mobile DIAL facility is positioned downwind of the area being

  20. Absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption studies were once quite popular but hardly anyone does them these days. It is easier to estimate the blood level of the nutrient directly by radioimmunoassay (RIA). However, the information obtained by estimating the blood levels of the nutrients is not the same that can be obtained from the absorption studies. Absorption studies are primarily done to find out whether some of the essential nutrients are absorbed from the gut or not and if they are absorbed, to determine how much is being absorbed. In the advanced countries, these tests were mostly done to detect pernicious anaemia where vitamin B 12 is not absorbed because of the lack of the intrinsic factor in the stomach. In the tropical countries, ''malabsorption syndrome'' is quire common. In this condition, several nutrients like fat, folic acid and vitamin B 12 are not absorbed. It is possible to study absorption of these nutrients by radioisotopic absorption studies

  1. Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, J; Eriksson, A C; Nielsen, I Elbæk; Malmborg, V Berg; Ahlberg, E; Andersen, C; Lindgren, R; Nyström, R; Nordin, E Z; Brune, W H; Svenningsson, B; Swietlicki, E; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2015-12-15

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective.

  2. The Long Wavelength Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlström, Ylva

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open-skies, user-oriented aperture synthesis instrument dedicated to explore frequencies between 20 and 80 MHz. The LWA will provide high temporal (millisecond or better) and high spatial resolution (arcsecond) and mJy-level sensitivity. The LWA key science areas include acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM; the high-redshift Universe; planetary, solar and space science; and the transient universe at radio wavelengths. In addition, key goals of the LWA are as a training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers and to re-invigorate radio astronomy in the US at the university level. The LWA will be operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC), thereby providing opportunities for students within the fields of astronomy, computer science and electrical engineering. Currently, in its first year of construction funding, the LWA team is now bringing up the first station near the Very Large Array site in the southwest US.

  3. Hybrid fluorescent layer emitting polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadimasoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanorods have anisotropic absorption and emission properties. In this work a hybrid luminescent layer is produced based on a mixture of CdSe/CdS nanorods dispersed in a liquid crystal that is aligned by an electric field and polymerized by UV illumination. The film emits light with polarization ratio 0.6 (polarization contrast 4:1. Clusters of nanorods in liquid crystal can be avoided by applying an AC electric field with sufficient amplitude. This method can be made compatible with large-scale processing on flexible transparent substrates. Thin polarized light emitters can be used in LCD backlights or solar concentrators to increase the efficiency.

  4. Folate absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    Folate is the generic term given to numerous compounds of pteroic acid with glutamic acid. Knowledge of absorption is limited because of the complexities introduced by the variety of compounds and because of the inadequacy of investigational methods. Two assay methods are in use, namely microbiological and radioactive. Techniques used to study absorption include measurement of urinary excretion, serum concentration, faecal excretion, intestinal perfusion, and haematological response. It is probably necessary to test absorption of both pteroylmonoglutamic acid and one or more polyglutamates, and such tests would be facilitated by availability of synthesized compounds labelled with radioactive tracers at specifically selected sites. (author)

  5. Continuous-wave optical parametric oscillation tunable up to 8 μm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Ingo; Fürst, Josef Urban; Hanka, Kevin; Buse, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate the first cw OPO emitting mid-infrared light at wavelengths up to 8 μm. This device is based on a 3.5-mm-diameter whispering gallery resonator made of silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe2) pumped by a compact distributed feedback laser diode emitting light at 1.57 μm wavelength. Phase-matching is achieved for a c-cut resonator disk pumped with extraordinarily polarized light at this wavelength. The oscillation thresholds are in the mW region, while the output power ranges from 10 to 800 μW. Wavelength tuning is achieved via changing the radial mode number of the pump wave and by changing the resonator temperature. Simulations predict that whispering gallery OPOs based on AgGaSe2 with diameters around 2 mm can generate idler waves exceeding 10 μm wavelength.

  6. Narrative absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narrative Absorption brings together research from the social sciences and Humanities to solve a number of mysteries: Most of us will have had those moments, of being totally absorbed in a book, a movie, or computer game. Typically we do not have any idea about how we ended up in such a state. Nor...... do we fully realize how we might have changed as we return for the fictional worlds we have visited. The feeling of being absorbed is one of the most illusive and transient feelings, but also one that motivates audiences to spend considerable amounts of time in narrative worlds, and one...... that is central to our understanding of the effects of narratives on beliefs and behavior. Key specialists inform the reader of this book about the nature of the peculiar state of consciousness during episodes of absorption, the perception of absorption in history, the role of absorption in meaningful experiences...

  7. Laser Radar Study Using Resonance Absorption for Remote Detection Of Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Takashi

    1973-01-01

    A laser radar using resonance absorption has an advantage of increased detection range and sensitivity compared with that achieved by Raman or resonance back scattering. In this paper, new laser radar system using resonance absorption is proposed and results obtained from this laser radar system are discussed. NO2, SO2 gas has an absorption spectrum at 4500 A and 3000 A respectively as shown in Fig. 1. A laser light including at least a set of an absorption peak (lambda)1 and a valley (lambda)2 is emitted into a pollutant atmosphere. The light reflected with a topographical reflector or an atmospheric Mie scattering as distributed reflectors is received and divided into two wavelength components (lambda)1 and (lambda)2. The laser radar system used in the investigation is shown in Fig', 2 and consists of a dye laser transmitter, an optical receiver with a special monochrometer and a digital processer. Table 1 shows the molecular constants of NO2, and SO2 and the dye laser used in this experiment. In this system, the absolute concentration of the pollutant gas can be measured in comparison with a standard gas cell. The concentration of NO2, SO2 as low as 0.1 ppm have been measured at 100 m depth resolution. For a 1 mJ laser output, the observable range of this system achieved up to 300 m using the distributed Mie reflector. The capability and technical limitation of the system will be discussed in detail.

  8. Enhanced Plasmonic Wavelength Selective Infrared Emission Combined with Microheater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ishihara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The indirect wavelength selective thermal emitter that we have proposed is constructed using a new microheater, demonstrating the enhancement of the emission peak generated by the surface plasmon polariton. The thermal isolation is improved using a 2 μm-thick Si membrane having 3.6 and 5.4 mm outer diameter. The emission at around the wavelength of the absorption band of CO2 gas is enhanced. The absorption signal increases, confirming the suitability for gas sensing. Against input power, the intensity at the peak wavelength shows a steeper increasing ratio than the background intensity. The microheater with higher thermal isolation gives larger peak intensity and its increasing ratio against the input power.

  9. The influence of the wavelength of ultraviolet radiation on survival, mutation induction and DNA repair in irradiated Chinese hamster cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, B.; Reynolds, R.J.; Kottenhagen, M.J.; Schuite, A.; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were used to compare the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of far-UV radiation emitted by a low-pressure mercury, germicidal lamp (wavelength predominantly 254 nm) with that of near-UV radiation emitted by a fluorescent lamp with a continuous spectrum (Westinghouse 'Sun

  10. Powerful infrared emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogan L. M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Powerful infrared LEDs with emission wavelength 805 ± 10, 870 ± 20 and 940 ± 10 nm developed at SPC OED "OPTEL" are presented in the article. The radiant intensity of beam diode is under 4 W/sr in the continuous mode and under 100 W/sr in the pulse mode. The radiation power of wide-angle LEDs reaches 1 W in continuous mode. The external quantum efficiency of emission IR diodes runs up to 30%. There also has been created infrared diode modules with a block of flat Fresnel lenses with radiant intensity under 70 W/sr.

  11. Light-emitting diodes in dermatology: stimulation of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Fryc

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-level light therapy (LLLT, which is sometimes included in phototherapy, is an effective therapeutic strategy to improve wound healing and reduce pain, inflammation and swelling. Nowadays, new sources of light, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs with a broad range of wavelengths, are widely available. The biological effects promoted by LEDs are dependent on irradiation parameters, mainly wavelength and dose. This review article focuses on recent clinical trials using light-emitting diode low-level light therapy (LED-LLLT for enhancing wound healing. In this article, we also cover the mechanisms of action of LLLT on cells and tissues and highlight the importance of defining optimum LLLT parameters for stimulation of wound healing.

  12. Light-emitting carbazole derivatives: potential electroluminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K R; Lin, J T; Tao, Y T; Ko, C W

    2001-09-26

    Stable carbazole derivatives that contain peripheral diarylamines at the 3- and 6-positions and an ethyl or aryl substituent at the 9-position of the carbazole moiety have been synthesized via palladium-catalyzed C-N bond formation. These new carbazole compounds (carbs) are amorphous with high glass transition temperatures (T(g), 120-194 degrees C) and high thermal decomposition temperatures (T(d) > 450 degrees C). The compounds are weakly to moderately luminescent in nature. The emission wavelength ranges from green to blue and is dependent on the substituent at the peripheral nitrogen atoms. Two types of light-emitting diodes were constructed from carb: (I) ITO/carb/TPBI/Mg:Ag and (II) ITO/carb/Alq(3)/Mg:Ag, where TPBI and Alq(3) are 1,3,5-tris(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl)benzene and tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum, respectively. In type I devices, the carb functions as the hole-transporting as well as emitting material. In type II devices, either carb, or Alq(3) is the light-emitting material. Several green light-emitting devices exhibit exceptional maximum brightness, and the physical performance appears to be better than those of typical green light-emitting devices of the structure ITO/diamine/Alq(3)/Mg:Ag. The relation between the LUMO of the carb and the performance of the light-emitting diode is discussed.

  13. Light-emitting carbazole derivatives for electroluminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiann T.; Thomas, K. R. J.; Tao, Yu-Tai; Ko, Chung-Wen

    2002-02-01

    Amorphous carbazole derivatives containing peripheral diarylamines at the 3- and 6-positions and an ethyl or aryl substituent at the 9-position of the carbazole moiety have been synthesized. These new carbazole compounds (carbs) possess high glass transition temperatures (Tg: 120- 194 degree(s)C) and high thermal decomposition temperatures (Td>450 degree(s)C). The compounds are weakly to moderately luminescent with the emission wavelength ranging from green to blue. Two types of light-emitting diodes (LED) were constructed from carb:(I)ITO/carb/TPBI/Mg:Ag and (II)ITO/carb/Alq3/Mg:Ag, where TPBI and Alq3 are 1,3,5-tris(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl)benzene and tris(8- hydroxyquinoline) aluminum, respectively. In type I devices the carb functions as the hole-transporting as well as emitting material. In type II devices either carb and/or Alq3 is the light emitting material. Several green light-emitting devices exhibit exceptional maximum brightness and the physical performance is superior to those of typical green-light-emitting devices of the structure ITO/diamine/Alq3/Mg:Ag. Relation between the LUMO of the carb and the performance of the light-emitting diode is discussed.

  14. Benzoporphyrin derivative and light-emitting diode for use in photodynamic therapy: Applications of space light-emitting diode technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W.; Meyer, Glenn A.

    1998-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality that recently has been applied as adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. PDT consists of intravenously injecting a photosensitizer, which preferentially accumulates in tumor cells, into a patient and then activating the photosensitizer with a light source. This results in free radical generation followed by cell death. The development of more effective light sources for PDT of brain tumors has been facilitated by applications of space light-emitting diode array technology; thus permitting deeper tumor penetration of light and use of better photosensitizers. Currently, the most commonly used photosensitizer for brain tumor PDT is Photofrin®. Photofrin® is a heterogeneous mixture of compounds derived from hematoporphyrin. Photofrin® is activated with a 630 nm laser light and does destroy tumor cells in animal models and humans. However, treatment failure does occur using this method. Most investigators attribute this failure to the limited penetration of brain tissue by a 630 nm laser light and to the fact that Photofrin® has only a minor absorption peak at 630 nm, meaning that only a small fraction of the chemical is activated. Benzoporphyrin Derivative Monoacid Ring A (BPD) is a new, second generation photosensitizer that can potentially improve PDT for brain tumors. BPD has a major absorption peak at 690 nm, which gives it two distinct advantages over Photofrin®. First, longer wavelengths of light penetrate brain tissue more easily so that larger tumors could be treated, and second, the major absorption peak means that a larger fraction of the drug is activated upon exposure to light. In the first part of this project we have studied the tumoricidal effects of BPD in vitro using 2A9 canine glioma and U373 human glioblastoma cell cultures. Using light emitting diodes (LED) with a peak emission of 688 nm as a light source, cell kill of up to 86 percent was measured in these cell lines by tumor DNA synthesis

  15. Benzoporphyrin derivative and light-emitting diode for use in photodynamic therapy: Applications of space light-emitting diode technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W. II; Meyer, Glenn A.

    1998-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality that recently has been applied as adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. PDT consists of intravenously injecting a photosensitizer, which preferentially accumulates in tumor cells, into a patient and then activating the photosensitizer with a light source. This results in free radical generation followed by cell death. The development of more effective light sources for PDT of brain tumors has been facilitated by applications of space light-emitting diode array technology; thus permitting deeper tumor penetration of light and use of better photosensitizers. Currently, the most commonly used photosensitizer for brain tumor PDT is Photofrin registered . Photofrin registered is a heterogeneous mixture of compounds derived from hematoporphyrin. Photofrin registered is activated with a 630 nm laser light and does destroy tumor cells in animal models and humans. However, treatment failure does occur using this method. Most investigators attribute this failure to the limited penetration of brain tissue by a 630 nm laser light and to the fact that Photofrin registered has only a minor absorption peak at 630 nm, meaning that only a small fraction of the chemical is activated. Benzoporphyrin Derivative Monoacid Ring A (BPD) is a new, second generation photosensitizer that can potentially improve PDT for brain tumors. BPD has a major absorption peak at 690 nm, which gives it two distinct advantages over Photofrin registered . First, longer wavelengths of light penetrate brain tissue more easily so that larger tumors could be treated, and second, the major absorption peak means that a larger fraction of the drug is activated upon exposure to light. In the first part of this project we have studied the tumoricidal effects of BPD in vitro using 2A9 canine glioma and U373 human glioblastoma cell cultures. Using light emitting diodes (LED) with a peak emission of 688 nm as a light source, cell kill of up to 86 percent was

  16. Absorption enhancement in graphene photonic crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleque, Abdul; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2016-04-10

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, is attracting significant interest because of its potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although graphene exhibits almost uniform absorption within a large wavelength range, its interaction with light is weak. In this paper, the enhancement of the optical absorption in graphene photonic crystal structures is studied: the structure is modified by introducing scatterers and mirrors. It is shown that the absorption of the graphene photonic crystal structure can be enhanced about four times (nearly 40%) with respect to initial reference absorption of 9.8%. The study can be a useful tool for investigating graphene physics in different optical settings.

  17. Wavelength conversion devices and techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian; Jørgensen, Carsten; Danielsen, Søren Lykke

    1996-01-01

    Wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks are currently subject to an immense interest because of the extra capacity and flexibility they provide together with the possibilities for graceful system upgrades. For full network flexibility it is very attractive to be able to translate the chann...... wavelengths in an easy way and preferably without opto-electronic conversion. Here, we will first briefly look at advantages of employing optical wavelength converters in WDM networks and next review the optical wavelength conversion devices with emphasis on recent developments....

  18. Orbital synchronization capture of two binaries emitting gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Naoki

    2018-03-01

    We study the possibility of orbital synchronization capture for a hierarchical quadrupole stellar system composed by two binaries emitting gravitational waves. Based on a simple model including the mass transfer for white dwarf binaries, we find that the capture might be realized for inter-binary distances less than their gravitational wavelength. We also discuss related intriguing phenomena such as a parasitic relation between the coupled white dwarf binaries and significant reductions of gravitational and electromagnetic radiations.

  19. All-optical demultiplexing and wavelength conversion in an electroabsorption modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Hilliger, E.; Tersigni, Andrea

    2001-01-01

    Cross-absorption modulation in an all electroabsorption modulator is utilised to perform 80/10 Gb/s all-optical demultiplexing. An improvement in receiver sensitivity at 10 Gb/s is demonstrated when wavelength converting.......Cross-absorption modulation in an all electroabsorption modulator is utilised to perform 80/10 Gb/s all-optical demultiplexing. An improvement in receiver sensitivity at 10 Gb/s is demonstrated when wavelength converting....

  20. High energy optical parametric source for multi-wavelength CO2 dial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos-Barria, Jessica; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Raybaut, Myriam; Godard, Antoine; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Lefebvre, Michel

    2017-11-01

    In the scope of the preparation of spaceborne lidar missions to measure the concentration of greenhouse gases with differential absorption LIDAR techniques, we report on the development of a high energy 2.05 μm optical parametric source based on a versatile architecture enabling multiple wavelengths generation in the vicinity of the R30 absorption line of CO2. The multi-wavelength configuration is under study for a few greenhouse gas active detection missions, such as Ascend.

  1. Reliable Operation for 14500 h of a Wavelength-Stabilized Diode Laser System on a Microoptical Bench at 671 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumpf, Bernd; Maiwald, Martin; Müller, André

    2012-01-01

    Reliability tests for wavelength-stabilized compact diode laser systems emitting at 671 nm are presented. The devices were mounted on microoptical benches with the dimensions of 13 mm $\\times\\,$4 mm. Reflecting Bragg gratings were used for wavelength stabilization and emission width narrowing...

  2. Microfluidic Integration on Detector Array for Absorption and Fluorescence Micro-Spectrometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adam, Mark L; Enzelberger, Markus; Quake, Stephen; Scherer, Axel

    2005-01-01

    .... Elastomers are excellent transparent materials, which provide hermetic seals to silicon dioxide and allow sensitive absorption and fluorescent spectroscopy in the visible and near-UV wavelength range...

  3. Filter-based measurements of UV-vis mass absorption cross sections of organic carbon aerosol from residential biomass combustion: Preliminary findings and sources of uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Pervez, Shamsh; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.

    2016-10-01

    Combustion of solid biomass fuels is a major source of household energy in developing nations. Black (BC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosols are the major PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 μm) pollutants co-emitted during burning of these fuels. While the optical nature of BC is well characterized, very little is known about the properties of light-absorbing OC (LAOC). Here, we report our preliminary findings on the mass-based optical properties of LAOC emitted from the combustion of four commonly used solid biomass fuels - fuel-wood, agricultural residue, dung-cake, and mixed - in traditional Indian cookstoves. As part of a pilot field study conducted in central India, PM2.5 samples were collected on Teflon filters and analyzed for their absorbance spectra in the 300-900 nm wavelengths at 1 nm resolution using a UV-Visible spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere. The mean mass absorption cross-sections (MAC) of the emitted PM2.5 and OC, at 550 nm, were 0.8 and 0.2 m2 g-1, respectively, each with a factor of ~2.3 uncertainty. The mean absorption Ångström exponent (AǺE) values for PM2.5 were 3±1 between 350 and 550 nm, and 1.2±0.1 between 550 and 880 nm. In the 350-550 nm range, OC had an AǺE of 6.3±1.8. The emitted OC mass, which was on average 25 times of the BC mass, contributed over 50% of the aerosol absorbance at wavelengths smaller than 450 nm. The overall OC contribution to visible solar light (300-900 nm) absorption by the emitted particles was 26-45%. Our results highlight the need to comprehensively and accurately address: (i) the climatic impacts of light absorption by OC from cookstove emissions, and (ii) the uncertainties and biases associated with variability in biomass fuel types and combustion conditions, and filter-based measurement artifacts during determination of MAC values.

  4. Light-emitting diodes for analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macka, Mirek; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are playing increasingly important roles in analytical chemistry, from the final analysis stage to photoreactors for analyte conversion to actual fabrication of and incorporation in microdevices for analytical use. The extremely fast turn-on/off rates of LEDs have made possible simple approaches to fluorescence lifetime measurement. Although they are increasingly being used as detectors, their wavelength selectivity as detectors has rarely been exploited. From their first proposed use for absorbance measurement in 1970, LEDs have been used in analytical chemistry in too many ways to make a comprehensive review possible. Hence, we critically review here the more recent literature on their use in optical detection and measurement systems. Cloudy as our crystal ball may be, we express our views on the future applications of LEDs in analytical chemistry: The horizon will certainly become wider as LEDs in the deep UV with sufficient intensity become available.

  5. Surface emitting ring quantum cascade lasers for chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szedlak, Rolf; Hayden, Jakob; Martín-Mateos, Pedro; Holzbauer, Martin; Harrer, Andreas; Schwarz, Benedikt; Hinkov, Borislav; MacFarland, Donald; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Acedo, Pablo; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2018-01-01

    We review recent advances in chemical sensing applications based on surface emitting ring quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). Such lasers can be implemented in monolithically integrated on-chip laser/detector devices forming compact gas sensors, which are based on direct absorption spectroscopy according to the Beer-Lambert law. Furthermore, we present experimental results on radio frequency modulation up to 150 MHz of surface emitting ring QCLs. This technique provides detailed insight into the modulation characteristics of such lasers. The gained knowledge facilitates the utilization of ring QCLs in combination with spectroscopic techniques, such as heterodyne phase-sensitive dispersion spectroscopy for gas detection and analysis.

  6. All-optical wavelength conversion and signal regeneration using an electroabsorption modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Sune; Bischoff, Svend; Mørk, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    All-optical wavelength conversion and signal regeneration based on cross-absorption modulation in an InGaAsP quantum well electroabsorption modulator (EAM) is studied at different bit rates. We present theoretical results showing wavelength conversion efficiency in agreement with existing...

  7. Effects of particle size and laser wavelength on heating of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Calculations for acquiring temperatures under irradiations of pulsed KrF laser and pulsed Nd:YAG laser were performed. We showed that for low wavelengths of the laser, smaller nanoparticles have larger absorption efficiency compared to larger nanoparticles and in high wavelengths, temperature of all particles increased ...

  8. UVC emitting phosphors obtained by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiut, J.M.A., E-mail: jmacaiut@iq.unesp.b [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CEMES/CNRS-BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Institute of Chemistry, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, CP 355, Araraquara-SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Lechevallier, S.; Dexpert-Ghys, J. [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CEMES/CNRS-BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Caillier, B.; Guillot, Ph. [Diagnostic des Plasmas Hors Equilibre, Universite Jean Francois Champollion, place de Verdun, 81012 Albi Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-04-15

    The broadband inter-configurational (4f{sup 1}5d{sup 1{yields}}4f{sup 2}) emission of Pr{sup 3+} doped in lanthanum orthophosphate (LaPO{sub 4}) and in calcium pyrophosphate (Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}) has been investigated under plasma excitation. The synthesis by spray pyrolysis at moderate temperature followed by a controlled annealing proves to be a very efficient way to produce good quality UVC emitting phosphor Ca{sub 1.92}Pr{sub 0.04}Na{sub 0.04}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} ({alpha} phase). The emission of this phosphor in the wavelength range 200-350 nm has been measured with a prototype device, which can be employed for anti-microbial testing. - Research Highlights: {yields} The Pr{sup 3+} doped orthophosphate and pyrophosphate were synthesized by spray pyrolysis. {yields} The dense particles present good quality UVC emitting (200-350 nm). {yields} The prototype device can be employed for anti-microbial testing.

  9. Selection of Quantum Dot Wavelengths for Biomedical Assays and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Taik Lim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots [QDs] are hypothesized to be excellent contrast agents for biomedical assays and imaging. A unique property of QDs is that their absorbance increases with increasing separation between excitation and emission wavelengths. Much of the enthusiasm for using QDs in vivo stems from this property, since photon yield should be proportional to the integral of the broadband absorption. In this study, we demonstrate that tissue scatter and absorbance can sometimes offset increasing QD absorption at bluer wavelengths, and counteract this potential advantage. By using a previously validated mathematical model, we explored the effects of tissue absorbance, tissue scatter, wavelength dependence of the scatter, water-to- hemoglobin ratio, and tissue thickness on QD performance. We conclude that when embedded in biological fluids and tissues, QD excitation wavelengths will often be quite constrained, and that excitation and emission wavelengths should be selected carefully based on the particular application. Based on our results, we produced near-infrared QDs optimized for imaging surface vasculature with white light excitation and a silicon CCD camera, and used them to image the coronary vasculature in vivo. Taken together, our data should prove useful in designing fluorescent QD contrast agents optimized for specific biomedical applications.

  10. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  11. Polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier-Thianche, Emmmanuelle

    1998-01-01

    We study sandwich type semiconducting polymer light emitting diodes; anode/polymer/cathode. ITO is selected as anode, this polymer is a blend of a commercially available polymer with a high hole transport ability: polyvinyl-carbazole and a laser dye: coumarin-515. Magnesium covered with silver is chosen for the anode. We study the influence of polymer thickness and coumarin doping ratio on electroluminescence spectrum, electric characteristics and quantum efficiency. An important drawback is that diodes lifetime remains low. In the second part of our study we determine degradations causes with X-Ray reflectivity experiments. It may be due to ITO very high roughness. We realize a new type of planar electroluminescent device: a channel type electroluminescent device in which polymer layer is inserted into an aluminium channel. Such a device is by far more stable than using classical sandwich structures with the same polymer composition: indeed, charges are generated by internal-field ionization and there is no injection from the electrode to the polymer. This avoids electrochemical reactions at electrodes, thus reducing degradations routes. (author) [fr

  12. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Efficient SO2 Absorption by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANIRBAN MONDAL

    Ionic liquids are appropriate candidates for the absorption of acid gases such as SO2. Six anion- functionalized ionic liquids with ... Sulfur dioxide (SO2), a significant air pollutant, is mainly emitted from combustion of fossil-fuel and ...... anism of CO2 absorption in phosphonium amino acid ionic liquid RSC Adv. 6 55438. 63.

  13. Topology optimised wavelength dependent splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, K. K.; Burgos Leon, J.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    A photonic crystal wavelength dependent splitter has been constructed by utilising topology optimisation1. The splitter has been fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material (Fig. 1). The topology optimised wavelength dependent splitter demonstrates promising 3D FDTD simulation results....... This complex photonic crystal structure is very sensitive against small fabrication variations from the expected topology optimised design. A wavelength dependent splitter is an important basic building block for high-performance nanophotonic circuits. 1J. S. Jensen and O. Sigmund, App. Phys. Lett. 84, 2022...

  14. AJ/LPI at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, G. B.; Bleck, D. T.; Boatman, R. K.

    The AJ/LPI advantages of millimeter wavelength communication at or near the 60-GHz oxygen line have been apparent to researchers for many years. Realizing the full extent of these advantages in a system appropriate for field operation requires more than simply designing a conventional communications link for operation at 60 GHz. Very low sidelobe, narrow beamwidth antennas of rugged construction and the use of frequency agility and spread spectrum modulation are also necessary. Construction of short range, clear weather tactical communication systems exploiting tropospheric oxygen absorption in the 50- to 70-GHz region appears feasible with current state-of-the-art solid-state components. The critical design parameters for achieving all weather jamming resistance and covertness are frequency selection, power management, waveform design, and antenna side- and back-lobe performance.

  15. Experimental investigations into the physics of light emitting conjugated polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Whitelegg, S A

    2001-01-01

    chloroprecursor MEH-PPV in-situ of ITO results in a reaction of the polymer with ITO, which significantly shift the emission to high energies. Electroabsorption spectroscopy is used to probe the internal electric fields within operating polymer light emitting devices. When a PPV based LED in an oxygen/water atmosphere, degradation of the device occurs whereby an electric field develops, which opposes the applied electric field. This opposing electric field subsequently decays when the device is turned to its off state. Operating lifetimes and emission efficiencies of polymer light emitting devices are now approaching values suitable for the manufacture and sale of polymer light emitting based products. However, degradation and device performance still continues to be of chief concern and in order for these to be improved the underlying physical processes have to be identified. This thesis aims to identify some of these processes. An investigation in to the optical absorption and emission properties of insolub...

  16. Selective excavation of decalcified dentin using a mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser: wavelength dependency in the 6 μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-07-01

    Selective caries treatment has been anticipated as an essential application of dentistry. In clinic, some lasers have already realized the optical drilling of dental hard tissue. However, conventional lasers lack the selectivity, and still depend on the dentist's ability. Based on the absorption property of carious dentin, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for excavation. The objective of this study is to develop a selective excavation of carious dentin by using the laser ablation with 6 μm wavelength range. A mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The wavelength was tuned around the absorption bands called amide 1 and amide 2. In the wavelength range from 5.75 to 6.60 μm, the difference of ablation depth between demineralized and normal dentin was observed. The wavelength at 6.02 μm and the average power density of 15 W/cm2, demineralized dentin was removed selectively with less-invasive effect on normal dentin. The wavelength at 6.42 μm required the increase of average power density, but also showed the possibility of selective ablation. This study provided a valuable insight into a wavelength choice for a novel dental laser device under development for minimal intervention dentistry.

  17. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with III-nitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 mu m aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of similar to 550 mu W with a threshold current density of similar to 3.5 kA/cm(2), while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of similar to 80 mu W and threshold current densities of similar to 7 kA/cm

  18. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Shen, C.; Margalith, T.; Ng, T. K.; DenBaars, S. P.; Ooi, B. S.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with IIInitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 μm aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of ~550 μW with a threshold current density of ~3.5 kA/cm2, while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of ~80 μW and threshold current densities of ~7 kA/cm2.

  19. Abrupt change of luminescence spectrum in single-layer phosphorescent polymer light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.; Lee, D.-H.; Chae, H. [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, S.M., E-mail: sungmcho@skku.edu [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Materials and Process Research Center for IT, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    PVK-based single-layer phosphorescent polymer OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes) with different rubrene concentrations were fabricated and examined for the Foerster energy transfer from phosphorescent FIrpic dye to rubrene. We found out that at a certain rubrene concentration the energy transfer occurs abruptly and the transfer shows an abnormal evolution of electroluminescence (EL) spectrum due to the coincidence of peak wavelengths of bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C{sup 2'}](picolinate) iridium(III) (FIrpic) emission and 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) absorption. With the calculation of Foerster radius and average distance between FIrpic molecules, we have related the calculated ratio between the number of FIrpic molecules within to that out of Foerster radius with the degree of Foerster energy transfer from EL spectra measured in the experiment. Experimental results were found to fit well with the predicted results especially at low rubrene concentrations. - Highlights: > Foerster energy transfer between FIrpic and rubrene. > Energy transfer shows an abnormal evolution of emission spectrum. > Calculated Foerster radius and degree of energy transfer by a simple model.

  20. Dye mixtures for ultrafast wavelength shifters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangopadhyay, S.; Liu, L.; Palsule, C.; Borst, W.; Wigmans, R.

    1994-01-01

    Particle detectors based on scintillation processes have been used since the discovery of radium about 100 years ago. The fast signals that can be obtained with these detectors, although often considered a nice asset, were rarely essential for the success of experiments. However, the new generation of high energy particle accelerators require particle detectors with fast response time. The authors have produced fast wavelength shifters using mixtures of various Coumarin dyes with DCM in epoxy-polymers (DGEBA+HHPA) and measured the properties of these wavelength shifters. The particular mixtures were chosen because there is a substantial overlap between the emission spectrum of Coumarin and the absorption spectrum of DCM. The continuous wave and time-resolved fluorescence spectra have been studied as a function of component concentration to optimize the decay times, emission peaks and quantum yields. The mean decay times of these mixtures are in the range of 2.5--4.5 ns. The mean decay time increases with an increase in Coumarin concentration at a fixed DCM concentration or with a decrease in DCM concentration at a fixed Coumarin concentration. This indicates that the energy transfer is radiative at lower relative DCM concentrations and becomes non-radiative at higher DCM concentrations

  1. SU-F-J-46: Feasibility of Cerenkov Emission for Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraiqat, I; Rehemtulla, A; Lam, K; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Clarke, R [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission (CE) is a promising tool for online tumor microenvironment interrogation and targeting during radiotherapy. In this work, we utilize CE generated during radiotherapy as a broadband excitation source for real-time absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of CE spectroscopy using a controlled experiment of materials with known emission/absorption properties. Methods: A water tank is irradiated with 20 MeV electron beam to induce Cerenkov emission. Food coloring dyes (Yellow #5, Red #40, and Blue #1), which have known emission/absorption properties were added to the water tank with increasing concentration (1 drop (0.05 mL), 2 drops, and 4 drops from a dispenser bottle). The signal is collected using a condensing lens which is coupled into a 20m optical fiber that is fed into a spectrometer that measures the emitted spectra. The resulting spectra from water/food coloring dye solutions were normalized by the reference spectrum, which is the Cerenkov spectrum of pure water, correcting for both the nonlinearity of the broadband Cerenkov emission spectrum as well as the non-uniform spectral response of the spectrometer. The emitted spectra were then converted into absorbance and their characteristics were analyzed. Results: The food coloring dye had a drastic change on the Cerenkov emission, shifting its wavelength according to its visible color. The collected spectra showed various absorbance peaks which agrees with tabulated peak positions of the dyes added within 0.3% for yellow, 1.7% for red, and 0.16% for blue. The CE peak heights proportionally increased as the dye concentration is increased. Conclusion: This work shows the potential for real-time functional spectroscopy using Cerenkov emission during radiotherapy. It was demonstrated that molecule identification as well as relative concentration can be extracted from the Cerenkov emission color shift.

  2. Light absorption properties of laboratory generated tar ball particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2015-06-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type which is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g. organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter is emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up generating pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84-0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have substantial

  3. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC), which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 - 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have

  4. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hoffer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tar balls (TBs are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC, which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and total carbon (TC analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8–3.0 m2 g−1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9 in the wavelength range 467–652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 − 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS. Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning

  5. Multiple-wavelength free-space laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvinskis, Robert; Giggenbach, Dirk; Henniger, Hennes; Perlot, Nicolas; David, Florian

    2003-07-01

    Free-space optical communications systems in the atmosphere, based on intensity modulation and direct detection, are heavily affected by fading caused by turbulence cells of varying scale and motion. Several data sets of fading measurements under different scenarios have been recorded demonstrating this effect. In this paper we introduce a form of free-space laser communications involving a source operating on several wavelengths. The goal is to overcome atmospheric interference on a communications link. We have performed simulations using the DLR PILab Matlab toolbox. These indicate the extent to which the turbulence and beam properties interact. Experimental investigations are planned. Further properties are also taken into account, including the choice of appropriate laser bandwidth and wavelengths, the effect of atmospheric absorption from aerosols and molecular absorption lines, as well as effects of atmospheric structure on beam propagation. Possible scenarios for application of this scheme will be presented as well.

  6. Multi-wavelength mid-IR light source for gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioja, Pentti; Alajoki, Teemu; Cherchi, Matteo; Ollila, Jyrki; Harjanne, Mikko; Heinilehto, Noora; Suomalainen, Soile; Viheriälä, Jukka; Zia, Nouman; Guina, Mircea; Buczyński, Ryszard; Kasztelanic, Rafał; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Salo, Tomi; Virtanen, Sami; Kluczyński, Paweł; Sagberg, Hâkon; Ratajczyk, Marcin; Kalinowski, Przemyslaw

    2017-02-01

    Cost effective multi-wavelength light sources are key enablers for wide-scale penetration of gas sensors at Mid-IR wavelength range. Utilizing novel Mid-IR Si-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) filter and wide-band Mid-IR Super Luminescent Light Emitting Diodes (SLEDs), we show the concept of a light source that covers 2.5…3.5 μm wavelength range with a resolution of market impact is expected to be disruptive, since the devices currently in the market are either complicated, expensive and heavy instruments, or the applied measurement principles are inadequate in terms of stability and selectivity.

  7. Nanoscale resonant-cavity-enhanced germanium photodetectors with lithographically defined spectral response for improved performance at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Audet, Ross M; Miller, David A B

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the use of a subwavelength planar metal-dielectric resonant cavity to enhance the absorption of germanium photodetectors at wavelengths beyond the material's direct absorption edge, enabling high responsivity across the entire telecommunications C and L bands. The resonant wavelength of the detectors can be tuned linearly by varying the width of the Ge fin, allowing multiple detectors, each resonant at a different wavelength, to be fabricated in a single-step process. This approach is promising for the development of CMOS-compatible devices suitable for integrated, high-speed, and energy-efficient photodetection at telecommunications wavelengths.

  8. Saturable absorption in detonation nanodiamond dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanyukov, Viatcheslav; Mikheev, Gennady; Mogileva, Tatyana; Puzyr, Alexey; Bondar, Vladimir; Lyashenko, Dmitry; Chuvilin, Andrey

    2017-07-01

    We report on a saturable absorption in aqueous dispersions of nanodiamonds with femtosecond laser pulse excitation at a wavelength of 795 nm. The open aperture Z-scan experiments reveal that in a wide range of nanodiamond particle sizes and concentrations, a light-induced increase of transmittance occurs. The transmittance increase originates from the saturation of light absorption and is associated with a light absorption at 1.5 eV by graphite and dimer chains (Pandey dimer chains). The obtained key nonlinear parameters of nanodiamond dispersions are compared with those of graphene and carbon nanotubes, which are widely used for the mode-locking.

  9. A method optimization study for atomic absorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sadia Ata

    2014-04-24

    Apr 24, 2014 ... The atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Hitachi model. A-1800) was used during this study. For simultaneous analysis, it consists of eight turret lamps with a wavelength range of. 190–900 nm. For analysis precision, it has D2 and self reversal background correction with a grating of 1800 gooves/mm.

  10. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline.

  11. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  12. Suppression of long wavelength reflection from extreme-UV multilayer optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Qiushi; van den Boogaard, Toine; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav; Louis, Eric; Bijkerk, Frederik; Khounsary, A.; Goto, S.; Morawe, C.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma based radiation sources optimized to emit 13.5 nm Extreme UV radiation also produce a significant amount of light at longer wavelengths. This so called out-of-band (OoB) radiation is detrimental for the imaging capabilities of an EUV lithographic imaging system, particularly the deep

  13. Continuous-wave Optically Pumped Lasing of Hybrid Perovskite VCSEL at Green Wavelength

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-05-08

    We demonstrate the lasing of a perovskite vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at green wavelengths, which operates under continuous-wave optical pumping at room-temperature by embedding hybrid perovskite between dielectric mirrors deposited at low-temperature.

  14. CO ICE PHOTODESORPTION: A WAVELENGTH-DEPENDENT STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, Edith C.; Linnartz, Harold; Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Michaut, Xavier; Fillion, Jean-Hugues; Oeberg, Karin I.

    2011-01-01

    UV-induced photodesorption of ice is a non-thermal evaporation process that can explain the presence of cold molecular gas in a range of interstellar regions. Information on the average UV photodesorption yield of astrophysically important ices exists for broadband UV lamp experiments. UV fields around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars, around shocks and in many other astrophysical environments are however often dominated by discrete atomic and molecular emission lines. It is therefore crucial to consider the wavelength dependence of photodesorption yields and mechanisms. In this work, for the first time, the wavelength-dependent photodesorption of pure CO ice is explored between 90 and 170 nm. The experiments are performed under ultra high vacuum conditions using tunable synchrotron radiation. Ice photodesorption is simultaneously probed by infrared absorption spectroscopy in reflection mode of the ice and by quadrupole mass spectrometry of the gas phase. The experimental results for CO reveal a strong wavelength dependence directly linked to the vibronic transition strengths of CO ice, implying that photodesorption is induced by electronic transition (DIET). The observed dependence on the ice absorption spectra implies relatively low photodesorption yields at 121.6 nm (Lyα), where CO barely absorbs, compared to the high yields found at wavelengths coinciding with transitions into the first electronic state of CO (A 1 Π at 150 nm); the CO photodesorption rates depend strongly on the UV profiles encountered in different star formation environments.

  15. Wavelength-independent fringe spacing in rainbows from falling neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, M.V.

    1982-01-01

    For particles with speed upsilon and mass m emitted isotropically from a point source and falling under gravity g, the quantal probability density is dominated by a paraboloidal caustic decorated with paraboloidal interference fringes. Near the caustic, the fringes have a spacing independent of upsilon and hence of wavelength, given by ΔR=3.53897x(h 2 /m 2 g)sup(1/3) for the first two (brightest) fringes at the level of the source. For neutrons in the Earth's field, ΔR=0.02617mm. The effect might be difficult to detect. (author)

  16. Wavelength-Shifter Testing for CLAS LTCC PMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Brandon; Johnston, Kyle; Joosten, Sylvester; Meziani, Zein-Eddine

    2014-03-01

    The CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) in Jefferson Lab Hall B detects neutral and charged particles around the full solid angle. This provides insight into both nuclear and hadronic reactions. The Low Threshold Cherenkov Counter (LTCC) of the CLAS detector acts as an electron detector, and therefore provides a means of separating electrons and pions. Because the 216 photomultiplier tubes in the LTCC have a low quantum-efficiency for wavelengths below 300 nm, we are coating them with a wavelength shifter, para-terphenyl, which absorbs photons with frequencies in the deep UV and re-emits them in the 360-500 nm range. I wrote VME data acquisition software to provide a means of testing these PMTs. I will present the gain in quantum efficiency and discuss our test setup and data acquisition system.

  17. Tunable dual-wavelength actively Q-switched Er/Yb double-clad fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durán-Sánchez, M; Álvarez-Tamayo, R I; Kuzin, E A; Ibarra-Escamilla, B; González-García, A; Maya-Ordoñez, F; Pottiez, O; Flores-Rosas, A

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a dual-wavelength tunable actively Q-switched fiber laser using 3 m of Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped fiber as the gain medium. For wavelength tuning we used a tunable Hi-Bi FBG having two reflection wavelengths separated by 0.4 nm. The laser emits a dual-wavelength signal that is tunable in a range of 11.8 nm. Laser operation can be switched between single and double wavelength emission. The laser operates at repetition rates from 30 to 110 kHz with pulse durations of 280 ns and pulse energies near 0.5 μJ. (letter)

  18. Near infrared imaging of teeth at wavelengths between 1200 and 1600 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soojeong; Fried, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2011-03-01

    Near-IR (NIR) imaging is a new technology that is currently being investigated for the detection and assessment of dental caries without the use of ionizing radiation. Several papers have been published on the use of transillumination and reflectance NIR imaging to detect early caries in enamel. The purpose of this study was to investigate alternative near infrared wavelengths besides 1300-nm in the range from 1200- 1600-nm to determine the wavelengths that yield the highest contrast in both transmission and reflectance imaging modes. Artificial lesions were created on thirty tooth sections of varying thickness for transillumination imaging. NIR images at wavelengths from the visible to 1600-nm were also acquired for fifty-four whole teeth with occlusal lesions using a tungsten halogen lamp with several spectral filters and a Ge-enhanced CMOS image sensor. Cavity preparations were also cut into whole teeth and Z250 composite was used as a restorative material to determine the contrast between composite and enamel at NIR wavelengths. Slightly longer NIR wavelengths are likely to have better performance for the transillumination of occlusal caries lesions while 1300-nm appears best for the transillumination of proximal surfaces. Significantly higher performance was attained at wavelengths that have higher water absorption, namely 1460-nm and wavelengths greater than 1500-nm and these wavelength regions are likely to be more effective for reflectance imaging. Wavelengths with higher water absorption also provided higher contrast of composite restorations.

  19. Engineering light: advances in wavelength conversion materials for energy and environmental technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Ezra L; Chinnapongse, Stephanie L; Kim, Jae-Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2012-11-20

    Upconversion photoluminescence (UC) occurs in optical materials that are capable of absorbing low energy photons and emitting photons of higher energy and shorter wavelength, while downconversion (DC) materials may absorb one high energy photon and emit two of lower energy for quantum yields exceeding unity. These wavelength conversion processes allow us to transform electromagnetic radiation so it may be more effectively utilized by light-capturing devices and materials. Progress in designing more efficient organic and inorganic photochemical conversion systems has initiated a recent surge in attempts to apply these processes for practical uses, including enhancement of many energy and environmental technologies. In this review, we introduce important concepts in UC and DC materials and discuss the current status and challenges toward the application of wavelength conversion to solar cells, photocatalysis, and antimicrobial surfaces.

  20. Short-wavelength visible light emission from silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Xiaodong; Liptak, Rick; Campbell, Stephen; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2007-03-01

    Si is the material of choice for modern microelectronics but, as an indirect-bandgap semiconductor, it is not an efficient light emitter. An electrically pumped Si laser would present a breakthrough for optoelectronic integration that may enable optical interconnect to make computers faster. Si light emitting diodes may revolutionize solid-state lighting and displays because of the low cost and environmental friendliness of Si. One of the most challenging problems of Si-based lighting and displays is the lack of a reliable and efficient full visible spectrum emission. Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) have so far been the most promising form of Si to emit light. Most of the synthesis approaches of Si-NCs, however, only lead to red light emission. Our recent work on Si-NCs synthesized by non-thermal plasmas has focused on extending their light emission into the short-wavelength range. Firstly, the process of oxidation-etching-oxidation of Si-NCs is investigated. This process causes the size of Si-NCs to decrease, leading to shorter wavelength light emission from Si-NCs. Yellow or green photoluminescence (PL) has been observed from initially oxidized red light emitting Si-NCs after HF vapour etching and atmospheric oxidation. The intensity of PL from Si-NCs, however, decreases by a factor up to 100. It is found that HF etching restructures the surface of Si-NCs. This leads to a decrease in the incorporation of O during subsequent oxidation, which finally results in silicon suboxide SiO1.9. Such an understoichiometry indicates a high density of defects such as Si dangling bonds at the Si-NC/oxide interface. Therefore, the PL efficiency is extremely low for short-wavelength light emitting Si-NCs obtained by the process of oxidation-etching-oxidation. Secondly, an integrated two-stage plasma system is employed to achieve the light emission from Si-NCs in the full visible spectrum range. Red-light-emitting Si-NCs are produced in the first stage by the plasma decomposition of SiH4

  1. New rare-earth quinolinate complexes for organic light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, H. [Physics Department, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Paolini, T.B. [Chemistry Institute, Department of Fundamental Chemistry, University of São Paulo, USP, 05599-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Niyama, E. [Physics Department, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Brito, H.F. [Chemistry Institute, Department of Fundamental Chemistry, University of São Paulo, USP, 05599-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Cremona, M., E-mail: cremona@fis.puc-rio.br [Physics Department, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-01-01

    Because of its thermal and morphological stability and optical and electrical properties, tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) is one of the most widely used electron transporting materials in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). The search for substitutes for this compound constitutes an important field of research in organic electronics. We report on a study of a new rare-earth tetrakis 8-hydroxyquinoline complex. Synthesis of tris complexes with rare-earth metals and 8-hydroxyquinoline resulted in unstable compounds. However, the inclusion of an additional quinoline group stabilized these compounds. Li[RE(q){sub 4}] (where RE = La{sup 3+}, Lu{sup 3+} and Y{sup 3+} and q = 8-hydroxyquinoline) were synthesized and then used as the electron-transporting and emitting layer in OLEDs. Thin films were deposited in a high-vacuum environment by thermal evaporation on quartz and silicon substrates. Optical characterization of the RE complexes revealed emission in the 510–525 nm range, the same as that observed for Alq{sub 3}, while absorption was observed at wavelengths of 382 nm for the Y/La complexes and 388 nm for the Lu complex. The OLEDs were fabricated with an indium tin oxide layer (ITO) as the anode, (N,N′-bis (1-naphtyl)-N,N′-diphenyl-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-diamine) NPB as the hole-transporting layer (25 nm), Li[RE(q){sub 4}] as the electron-transporting and emitting layer (40 nm) and aluminum as the cathode (120 nm). The electroluminescence (EL) spectra showed a broad band from 520 to 540 nm and green-colored emission associated with the 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand. There was an interesting dependence of the maximum energy peak position and half-width of the emission band in the EL spectra on the atomic radius of the RE ion used. The best luminance for the OLEDs produced in this study was achieved with the Li[RE(q){sub 4}] compound. The optical and electrical properties of this OLED were comparable to those of similar devices based on Alq{sub 3

  2. How to distinguish scattered and absorbed light from re-emitted light for white LEDs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meretska, Maryna; Lagendijk, Aart; Thyrrestrup Nielsen, Henri; Mosk, Allard; IJzerman, Wilbert; Vos, Willem L.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the light transport through phosphor diffuser plates that are used in commercial solid-state lighting modules (Fortimo). These polymer plates contain YAG:Ce+3 phosphor particles that scatter, absorb and re-emit incident light in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm). To

  3. Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology--Space Station and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, H.T.; Houle, J.M.; Donohoe, D.L.; Bajic, D.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Reichert, K.W.; Weyenberg, G.T.; Larson, D.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Caviness, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  4. Efficient yellow and green emitting InGaN/GaN nanostructured QW materials and LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitake; Lin, Yenting; Dapkus, Paul Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Efficient green emitting LEDs and monolithic white light emitting LEDs require the extension of the range of efficient light emission in the GaN/InGaN materials system. We demonstrate high efficiency green and yellow light emitting multiple quantum well (MQW) structures grown on GaN nanostripe templates. The structures show promise for realizing high efficiency phosphor - free white LEDs. The nanostripe dimensions range from 100 to 300 nm and have separations that range from 300 nm to 1 μm. The MOCVD growth conditions strongly affect surfaces expressed in the GaN nanostripes whose sidewalls can be controlled to be nearly vertical or inclined and intersecting. Single quantum well (QW) structures are grown on these different stripes. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows that QW grown on stripes with the {10-11} surfaces and triangular shape emit the longest peak wavelength and highly efficient PL emission peak wavelengths as long as 570 nm are realized. PL and electroluminescence (EL) spectra show narrow linewidth that is comparable to the planar case and CL studies further demonstrate the uniform emission wavelength along the sidewalls of the structures. Finally, we have grown and fabricated green emitting LEDs on {10-11} faceted nanostripes with promising device characteristics. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes enhanced by spontaneously formed buckles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Won Hoe; Jeong, Soon Moon; Araoka, Fumito; Ishikawa, Ken; Nishimura, Suzushi; Toyooka, Takehiro; Takezoe, Hideo

    2010-04-01

    Most of the light in conventional organic light-emitting diodes is confined to high-refractive-index layers (such as an organic medium, indium tin oxide and glass substrate) resulting in a low light extraction efficiency of ~20% (refs 1,2). Many studies have used wavelength-scale periodic gratings to increase the external efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes. However, the efficiency is only enhanced at particular wavelengths satisfying the Bragg condition. Here, we demonstrate that a quasi-periodic buckling structure with broad distribution and directional randomness can enhance the light extraction efficiency without introducing spectral changes and directionality. Organic light-emitting diodes corrugated by buckles showed improved current and power efficiencies and an electroluminescence spectrum enhanced by at least a factor of two across the entire visible wavelength regime. These buckling patterns are formed spontaneously on elastic materials with a thin metallic film. The buckled organic light-emitting diode devices are practical and attractive for use in fabricating full colour and white organic light-emitting diodes.

  6. Water vapor absorption of carbon dioxide laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.; Margolis, J. S.; Rosengren, L.-G.

    1976-01-01

    An optoacoustic detector or spectrophone has been used to perform detailed measurements of the absorptivity of mixtures of water vapor in air. A (C-12) (O-16)2 laser was used as the source, and measurements were made at forty-nine different wavelengths from 9.2 to 10.7 microns. The details of the optoacoustic detector and its calibration are presented, along with a discussion of its performance characteristics. The results of the measurements of water vapor absorption show that the continuum absorption in the wavelength range covered is 5-10% lower than previous measurements.

  7. Effect of idler absorption in pulsed optical parametric oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, Gunnar; Arisholm, Gunnar; Farsund, Øystein

    2011-01-31

    Absorption at the idler wavelength in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is often considered detrimental. We show through simulations that pulsed OPOs with significant idler absorption can perform better than OPOs with low idler absorption both in terms of conversion efficiency and beam quality. The main reason for this is reduced back conversion. We also show how the beam quality depends on the beam width and pump pulse length, and present scaling relations to use the example simulations for other pulsed nanosecond OPOs.

  8. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  9. Optical Salisbury screen with design-tunable resonant absorption bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Janardan; Smith, Evan; Maukonen, Douglas; Peale, Robert E.

    2014-05-01

    A thin-film selective absorber at visible and near infra-red wavelengths is demonstrated. The structure consists of an optically thick layer of gold, a SiO2 dielectric spacer and a partially transparent gold film on top. The optical cavity so formed traps and absorbs light at a resonance wavelength determined by the film thicknesses. Observed fundamental-resonance absorption strengths are in the range 93%-97%. The absorption red-shifts and broadens as the thickness of the top gold layer is decreased with little change in absorption strength. Thus, strong absorption with design-tunable wavelength and width is achieved easily by unstructured blanket depositions. Observed angle-dependent spectra agree well with the recent three-layer analytical model of Shu et al. [Opt. Express 21, 25307 (2013)], if effective medium approximation is used to calculate the permittivity of the top gold film when it becomes discontinuous at the lowest thicknesses.

  10. Optical absorption of carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolong; Quan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhuomin; Cheng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In order to enhance the solar thermal energy conversion efficiency, we propose to use carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles dispersed in liquid water. This work demonstrates theoretically that an absorbing carbon (C) core enclosed in a plasmonic gold (Au) nanoshell can enhance the absorption peak while broadening the absorption band; giving rise to a much higher solar absorption than most previously studied core-shell combinations. The exact Mie solution is used to evaluate the absorption efficiency factor of spherical nanoparticles in the wavelength region from 300 nm to 1100 nm as well as the electric field and power dissipation profiles inside the nanoparticles at specified wavelengths (mostly at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength). The field enhancement by the localized plasmons at the gold surfaces boosts the absorption of the carbon particle, resulting in a redshift of the absorption peak with increased peak height and bandwidth. In addition to spherical nanoparticles, we use the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate the absorption of cubic core-shell nanoparticles. Even stronger enhancement can be achieved with cubic C-Au core-shell structures due to the localized plasmonic resonances at the sharp edges of the Au shell. The solar absorption efficiency factor can exceed 1.5 in the spherical case and reach 2.3 in the cubic case with a shell thickness of 10 nm. Such broadband absorption enhancement is in great demand for solar thermal applications including steam generation.

  11. Absolute noninvasive measurement of CO2 mole fraction emitted by E. coli and S. aureus using calibration-free 2f WMS applied to a 2004  nm VCSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarin, A S; Chakraborty, Arup Lal; Upadhyay, Abhishek

    2017-06-01

    We report the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of accurate real-time noninvasive measurement of the absolute cumulative mole fraction of metabolic carbon dioxide emitted by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus over a period of several hours of their life cycles using a recently developed calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy technique. A 1 mW vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is used to interrogate a single rotational vibrational absorption line of carbon dioxide at 2003.5 nm. The measurements are immune to laser intensity fluctuations and variable optical coupling that is inevitable in such free-space coupled experiments that run over 10-18 h. The cumulative carbon dioxide mole fraction follows the characteristic modified Gompertz model that is typical of bacterial growth in batch cultures. The characteristic growth parameters are extracted from this curve. The technique can be readily extended to study multiple volatile organic compounds that bacteria are known to emit.

  12. Novel Biomedical Device Utilizing Light-Emitting Nanostructures Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Goldman, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Sketches and chemical diagrams of state-of-the-art device and novel proposed device are presented. Current device uses a diode laser that emits into a fluorescent fluid only one wavelength and a photodetector diode that detects only one wavelength. Only one type of bacteria can be detected. The proposed device uses a quantum dot array that emits into a fluorescent fluid multiple wavelengths and an NIR 512 spectrometer that scans 0.8- to 1.7-mm wavelengths. Hundreds of different bacteria and viruses can be detected. A novel biomedical device is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with the University of Michigan. This device uses nano-structured quantum dots that emit light in the near-infrared (IR) region. The nanostructured quantum dots are used as a source and excite fluorochrome polymers coupled with antibodies that seek out and attach to specific bacteria and viruses. The fluorochrome polymers/antibodies fluoresce at specific wavelengths in the near-IR spectrum, but these wavelengths are offset from the excitation wavelength and can be detected with a tunable spectrometer. The device will be used to detect the presence of viruses and bacteria in simple fluids and eventually in more complex fluids, such as blood. Current state-of-the-art devices are limited to single bacteria or virus detection and a considerable amount of time and effort is required to prepare samples for analysis. Most importantly, the devices are quite large and cumbersome, which prohibits them from being used on the International Space Station and the space shuttles. This novel device uses nanostructured quantum dots which, through molecular beam epitaxy and highly selective annealing processes, can be developed into an illumination source that could potentially generate hundreds of specific wavelengths. As a result, this device will be able to excite hundreds of antibody/fluorochrome polymer combinations, which in turn could be used to detect hundreds of bacteria

  13. In vitro and in vivo Efficacy of New Blue Light Emitting Diode Phototherapy Compared to Conventional Halogen Quartz Phototherapy for Neonatal Jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yun Sil; Hwang, Jong Hee; Kwon, Hyuk Nam; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Sun Young; Park, Won Soon; Shin, Son Moon

    2005-01-01

    High intensity light emitting diodes (LEDs) are being studied as possible light sources for the phototherapy of neonatal jaundice, as they can emit high intensity light of narrow wavelength band in the blue region of the visible light spectrum corresponding to the spectrum of maximal bilirubin absorption. We developed a prototype blue gallium nitride LED phototherapy unit with high intensity, and compared its efficacy to commercially used halogen quartz phototherapy device by measuring both in vitro and in vivo bilirubin photodegradation. The prototype device with two focused arrays, each with 500 blue LEDs, generated greater irradiance than the conventional device tested. The LED device showed a significantly higher efficacy of bilirubin photodegradation than the conventional phototherapy in both in vitro experiment using microhematocrit tubes (44±7% vs. 35±2%) and in vivo experiment using Gunn rats (30±9% vs. 16±8%). We conclude that high intensity blue LED device was much more effective than conventional phototherapy of both in vitro and in vivo bilirubin photodegradation. Further studies will be necessary to prove its clinical efficacy. PMID:15716604

  14. Microcavity light emitting diodes in the visible red and near infrared wavelength range

    OpenAIRE

    Joray, Reto

    2005-01-01

    It was about 125 years ago that the light bulb was commercialized by Thomas Edison. No doubt a brilliant invention at the time, today its low power conversion efficiency is one of the reasons why lighting in the western world has such high energy consumption. Thus, the potential for saving energy is enormous in this area. The introduction of halogen, discharge and fluorescent lamps has lead to certain efficiency improvements, however more than half of the energy is still lost as heat. Light-e...

  15. Optical properties of wavelength-tunable green-emitting color conversion glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hu, Li-Li; Yang, Bo-Bo; Shi, Ming-Ming; Zou, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51302171), the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 14500503300), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 12ZR1430900).

  16. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  17. Review of short wavelength lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references

  18. Review of short wavelength lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-03-18

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references.

  19. Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography selectively extracting wavelength information from wavelength-multiplexed holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Mori, Ryota; Kikunaga, Shuhei; Arai, Yasuhiko; Takaki, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-15

    Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography that selectively extracts wavelength information from five wavelength-multiplexed holograms is presented. Specific phase shifts for respective wavelengths are introduced to remove the crosstalk components and extract only the object wave at the desired wavelength from the holograms. Object waves in multiple wavelengths are selectively extracted by utilizing 2π ambiguity and the subtraction procedures based on phase-shifting interferometry. Numerical results show the validity of the proposed technique. The proposed technique is also experimentally demonstrated.

  20. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Wen Yeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV LEDs and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED, have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450-480 nm and nUV (380-400 nm LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  1. Wavelength-Dependent Damage to Adenoviral Proteins Across the Germicidal UV Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sara E; Hull, Natalie M; Poepping, Christopher; Linden, Karl G

    2018-01-02

    Adenovirus, a waterborne pathogen responsible for causing bronchitis, pneumonia, and gastrointestinal infections, is highly resistant to UV disinfection and therefore drives the virus disinfection regulations set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Polychromatic UV irradiation has been shown to be more effective at inactivating adenovirus and other viruses than traditional monochromatic irradiation emitted at 254 nm; the enhanced efficacy has been attributed to UV-induced damage to viral proteins. This research shows UV-induced damage to adenoviral proteins across the germicidal UV spectrum at wavelength intervals between 200 and 300 nm. A deuterium lamp with bandpass filters and UV light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) isolated wavelengths in approximate 10 nm intervals. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and image densitometry were used to detect signatures for the hexon, penton, fiber, minor capsid, and core proteins. The greatest loss of protein signature, indicating damage to viral proteins, occurred below 240 nm. Hexon and penton proteins exposed to a dose of 28 mJ/cm 2 emitted at 214 nm were approximately 4 times as sensitive and fiber proteins approximately 3 times as sensitive as those exposed to a dose of 50 mJ/cm 2 emitted at 254 nm. At 220 nm, a dose of 38 mJ/cm 2 reduced the hexon and penton protein quantities to approximately 33% and 31% of the original amounts, respectively. In contrast, a much higher dose of 400 mJ/cm 2 emitted at 261 and 278 nm reduced the original protein quantity to between 66-89% and 80-93%, respectively. No significant damage was seen with a dose of 400 mJ/cm 2 at 254 nm. This research directly correlates enhanced inactivation at low wavelengths with adenoviral protein damage at those wavelengths, adding fundamental insight into the mechanisms of inactivation of polychromatic germicidal UV irradiation for improving UV water disinfection.

  2. On pair-absorption in intrinsic vapours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotop, R.; Niemax, K.; Schlueter, D.

    1982-01-01

    The bound-state pair-absorption bands Cs(6 2 S 1 sub(/) 2 ) + Cs(6 2 S 1 sub(/) 2 ) + hν → Cs(5 2 D 5 sub(/) 2 sub(,) 3 sub(/) 2 ) + Cs(6 2 P 1 sub(/) 2 ) and the K-K continuum-state pair-absorptions in the wavelength region 2.350 <= lambda <= 2.850 Angstroem have been investigated experimentally. In the case of the bound-state pair-absorption bands a theoretical approach for the absorption cross section at the band centre is given which is in good agreement with the experimental observation. Differences between our and the theoretical formulas given by the Stanford group are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Calculation of effective absorption coefficient for aerosols of internal mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Bo; Huang Yinbo; Fan Chengyu; Qiao Chunhong

    2012-01-01

    The effective absorption coefficient with time of strong absorbing aerosol made of carbon dusts and water of internal mixture is analyzed, and the influence of different wavelengths and radius ratios on it is discussed. The shorter the wavelength is, the larger the effective absorption coefficient is , and more quickly it increases during 1-100 μs, and the largest increase if 132.65% during 1-100 μs. Different ratios between inner and outer radius have large influence on the effective absorption coefficient. The larger the ratio is, the larger the effective absorption coefficient is, and more quickly it increases during 1-100 μs. The increase of the effective absorption coefficient during 1-100 μs is larger than that during 100-1000 μs, and the largest increase is 138.66% during 1-100 μs. (authors)

  4. Spectral absorption studies of visible materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, M.; Swimm, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    Results of studies of optical absorption in twelve thin-film optical coatings at 482 nm wavelength, surface and bulk absorption in sapphire throughout the visible and near IR, and initial measurements in KDP are described. Laser calorimetry was carried out at room temperature, using an unfocused laser beam at normal incidence. All thin-film absorption data yielded values of P/sub abs//P/sub inc/ in the range 3 x 10 U to 3 x 10 T at a wavelength of 482 nm. Sapphire absorption showed Urbach-tail behavior at 350 nm to 1300 nm. The range of absorption, being far lower than usual, extends the range of application of Urbach's rule. Finally, KDP measurements were attempted, but surface degradation due to the hydroscopic nature of the samples resulted in excessive light scatter.

  5. Light Absorption By Coated Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    , in contrast to this, light absorption by sulfuric acid coated soot displays unexpectedly complex behavior where the degree of amplification appears to be dependent upon the underlying soot core diameter. These preliminary results will be presented. Arnott, W. P., Hamsha, K., Moosmüller, H., Sheridan, P. J., and Ogren, J. A. (2005). Towards aerosol light absorption measurements with a 7-wavelength Aethalometer: Evaluation with a Photoacoustic instrument and a 3 wavelength nephelometer, Aerosol Sci. Tech. 39, 17-39 Bond, T. C., G. Habib, and R. W. Bergstrom (2006), Limitations in the enhancement of visible light absorption due to mixing state, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D20,211, doi:10.1029/2006/JD007,315 Lack, D. A., Lovejoy, E. R., Baynard, T., Pettersson, A., and Ravishankara,A.R. (2006). AerosolAbsorptionMeasurementusingPhotoacousticSpectroscopy: Sensitivity, Calibration, and Uncertainty Developments, Aerosol Sci. Technol. 40:697-708 Ramanathan, V., and Carmichael, G. (2008), Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, Nature Geoscience, 1, 221-227. Sedlacek, A. J., and Lee, L. (2007), Photothermal interferometric aerosol absorption spectrometry, J. Aerosol Sci., 41, 1089-1101

  6. Sub-half-wavelength localization of an atom via trichromatic phase control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jun; Hu Xiangming

    2007-01-01

    We show that the trichromatic manipulation of the absorption spectrum leads to sub-half-wavelength atom localization. In particular, a three-level atom in the Λ configuration is considered, in which one transition is coupled by a trichromatic field with one sideband component being a standing-wave field while the other transition is probed by a weak monochromatic field. By varying the sum of relative phases of the sideband components of the trichromatic field to the central component, the atom is localized in either of the two half-wavelength regions with 50% detecting probability when the absorption spectrum is measured

  7. Measuring the Photocatalytic Breakdown of Crystal Violet Dye using a Light Emitting Diode Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Underwood, Lauren W.; O'Neal, Duane; Pagnutti, Mary; Davis, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    A simple method to estimate the photocatalytic reactivity performance of spray-on titanium dioxide coatings for transmissive glass surfaces was developed. This novel technique provides a standardized method to evaluate the efficiency of photocatalytic material systems over a variety of illumination levels. To date, photocatalysis assessments have generally been conducted using mercury black light lamps. Illumination levels for these types of lamps are difficult to vary, consequently limiting their use for assessing material performance under a diverse range of simulated environmental conditions. This new technique uses an ultraviolet (UV) gallium nitride (GaN) light emitting diode (LED) array instead of a traditional black light to initiate and sustain photocatalytic breakdown. This method was tested with a UV-resistant dye (crystal violet) applied to a titanium dioxide coated glass slide. Experimental control is accomplished by applying crystal violet to both titanium dioxide coated slides and uncoated control slides. A slide is illuminated by the UV LED array, at various light levels representative of outdoor and indoor conditions, from the dye side of the slide. To monitor degradation of the dye over time, a temperature-stabilized white light LED, whose emission spectrum overlaps with the dye absorption spectrum, is used to illuminate the opposite side of the slide. Using a spectrometer, the amount of light from the white light LED transmitted through the slide as the dye degrades is monitored as a function of wavelength and time and is subsequently analyzed. In this way, the rate of degradation for photocatalytically coated versus uncoated slide surfaces can be compared. Results demonstrate that the dye absorption decreased much more rapidly on the photocatalytically coated slides than on the control uncoated slides, and that dye degradation is dependent on illumination level. For photocatalytic activity assessment purposes, this experimental configuration and

  8. Ultra-high-speed wavelength conversion in a silicon photonic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hao; Ji, Hua; Galili, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated all-optical wavelength conversion of a 640-Gbit/s line-rate return-to-zero differential phase-shift keying (RZ-DPSK) signal based on low-power four wave mixing (FWM) in a silicon photonic chip with a switching energy of only ~110 fJ/bit. The waveguide dispersion...... of the silicon nanowire is nano-engineered to optimize phase matching for FWM and the switching power used for the signal processing is low enough to reduce nonlinear absorption from twophoton- absorption (TPA). These results demonstrate that high-speed wavelength conversion is achievable in silicon chips...... with high data integrity and indicate that high-speed operation can be obtained at moderate power levels where nonlinear absorption due to TPA and free-carrier absorption (FCA) is not detrimental. This demonstration can potentially enable highspeed optical networks on a silicon photonic chip....

  9. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-01-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Null bactericidal effect of ultraviolet radiation emitted by LEDs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alcántara Muñoz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research has aimed to assess the bactericidal effect of ultraviolet light emitted by LEDS on the growth on Petri dishes of microorganisms whose legal limits in foods have been established. An electrically fed apparatus has been designed with precise timing and a camera to prevent light spillage, in which two ultraviolet radiation emission devices were connected by LED technology at different wavelengths: through an array of LEDS emitting at around 350nm, and a single specific emission LED at 280nm. 1000 cfu of E. Coli and S. aureus sown on PCA were used as prototypes of gram negative and positive bacteria, respectively, onto which ultraviolet light was radiated at different time intervals, by means of both devices, with the whole experiment being carried out in triplicate . In none of the three series of treatments at the two wavelengths were reductions in microbial growth observed. The series of sowings on PCA were done on unseeded plates in order to be able to discard the likelihood of subsequent recontamination.

  11. Demonstration of an optical enhancement cavity with 10 micron wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, K.; Washio, M.; Endo, A.

    2015-05-01

    We have been developing a pulsed-laser optical enhancement cavity for laser-Compton scattering (LCS). LCS can produce high brightness X-ray through the collision between relativistic electrons generated from the accelerator and high power laser photons with a compact facility. In order to increase the number of collisions/sec, high repetition rate accelerator and laser are required. For the laser system, an optical enhancement cavity is the most powerful tool for LCS, thus we have been developing the cavity for storing 1 micron laser pulse. On the other hand, the resulting X-ray energy can be changed by the collision laser wavelength. If we have another optical cavity with different wavelength, the multicolor, quasi-monochromatic, high brightness and compact X-ray source can be realized. Therefore, we started to develop an optical cavity at 10 micron wavelength with CO2 laser. At this wavelength region, the absorption loss is dominant compared with scattering loss. Thus we carefully chose the optical mirrors for enhancement cavity. We demonstrated a more than 200 enhancement factor with 795 finesse optical cavity at 10 micron CO2 laser. Moreover, 2.3 kW storage in the optical cavity was successfully demonstrated. The design of optical cavity, first experimental results and future prospects will be presented at the conference.

  12. Monitoring of MOCVD reactants by UV absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baucom, K.C.; Killeen, K.P.; Moffat, H.K.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper, we describe how UV absorption measurements can be used to measure the flow rates of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactants. This method utilizes the calculation of UV extinction coefficients by measuring the total pressure and absorbance in the neat reactant system. The development of this quantitative reactant flow rate monitor allows for the direct measurement of the efficiency of a reactant bubbler. We demonstrate bubbler efficiency results for TMGa, and then explain some discrepancies found in the TMAl system due to the monomer to dimer equilibrium. Also, the UV absorption spectra of metal organic and hydride MOCVD reactants over the wavelength range 185 to 400 nm are reported.

  13. Examples of Radiation-Emitting Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Examples of Radiation-Emitting Electronic Products Radiation Use Medical: Diagnostic Medical: Therapeutic Medical: Surgical Medical: Other Scientific, ... FDA Enforcement Authorities for Radiation-Emitting Products (with examples of products) RCHSA Television Receivers, Microwave Ovens, Cabinet ...

  14. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    There has been a strong, application driven development of Si-based cameras and spectrometers for imaging and spectral analysis of light in the visible and near infrared spectral range. This has resulted in very efficient devices, with high quantum efficiency, good signal to noise ratio and high...... resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...... visible or near infrared cameras and spectrometers to include other spectral regions of interest....

  15. Optimizing wavelength choice for quantitative optoacoustic imaging using the Cramer-Rao lower bound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modgil, Dimple; La Riviere, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Several papers have recently addressed the issue of estimating chromophore concentration in optoacoustic imaging (OAI) using multiple wavelengths. The choice of wavelengths obviously affects the accuracy and precision of the estimates. One might assume that the wavelengths that maximize the extinction coefficients of the chromophores would be the most suitable. However, this may not always be the case since the distribution of light intensity in the medium is also wavelength dependent. In this paper, we explore a method for optimizing the choice of wavelengths based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on the variance of the chromophore concentration. This lower bound on variance can be evaluated numerically for different wavelengths using the variation of the extinction coefficients and scattering coefficients with wavelength. The wavelengths that give the smallest variance will be considered optimal for multi-wavelength OAI to estimate the chromophore concentrations. The expression for the CRLB has been derived analytically for estimating the concentration of multiple chromophores for several simple phantom models for the case when the optoacoustic signal is proportional to the product of the optical absorption and the illumination function. This approach could be easily extended to other geometries.

  16. Optimizing wavelength choice for quantitative optoacoustic imaging using the Cramer-Rao lower bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modgil, Dimple; La Riviére, Patrick J

    2010-12-07

    Several papers have recently addressed the issue of estimating chromophore concentration in optoacoustic imaging (OAI) using multiple wavelengths. The choice of wavelengths obviously affects the accuracy and precision of the estimates. One might assume that the wavelengths that maximize the extinction coefficients of the chromophores would be the most suitable. However, this may not always be the case since the distribution of light intensity in the medium is also wavelength dependent. In this paper, we explore a method for optimizing the choice of wavelengths based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on the variance of the chromophore concentration. This lower bound on variance can be evaluated numerically for different wavelengths using the variation of the extinction coefficients and scattering coefficients with wavelength. The wavelengths that give the smallest variance will be considered optimal for multi-wavelength OAI to estimate the chromophore concentrations. The expression for the CRLB has been derived analytically for estimating the concentration of multiple chromophores for several simple phantom models for the case when the optoacoustic signal is proportional to the product of the optical absorption and the illumination function. This approach could be easily extended to other geometries.

  17. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Tomohiro, E-mail: tkita@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  18. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range

  19. Highly stable red-emitting polymer dots for cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelora, Jipsa; Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Rui; Thachoth Chandran, Hrisheekesh; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2017-07-01

    Polymer dots (Pdots) have emerged as a new type of fluorescent probe material for biomedical applications and have attracted great interest due to their excellent optical properties and biocompatability. In this work, we report on a red-emitting P3HT Pdot fluorescent probe for intracellular bioimaging. The as-prepared Pdot fluorescent probe exhibits good stability and has a large Stokes shift (121 nm) compared to molecules in tetrahydrofuran (THF). Furthermore, the probe shows low cytotoxicity, broad absorption spectrum, resistance against photodegradation, and good water dispersibility. These advantageous characteristics make P3HT Pdots a promising fluorescent probe material for bioimaging.

  20. Electromagnetic radiation emitted by a plasma produced in air by laser pulses with lambda = 10.6 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilychev, V.A.; Zvorykin, V.D.; Kholin, I.V.; Chugunov, A.Y.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum, brightness, and energy have been measured for the electromagnetic radiation emitted by a plasma produced in air near a solid surface by pulses from a high-power CO 2 laser. The air pressure was varied over the range p 0 = 0.1--760 torr, and the laser power density was varied over the range q = 5 x 10 6 --10 8 W/cm 2 . At p 0 > or approx. =2--5 torr the radiation properties of the plasma are determined by a laser-beam absorption wave which arises in the gas. The maximum brightness temperature, T/sub b/approx. =50 000 K (lambda = 400 +- 20 nm), is reached at p 0 = 25 torr. The emission spectrum is quite different from an equilibrium spectrum, consisting primarily of NII, OII, and NIII lines. The total energy radiation by the plasma in the wavelength interval 360--2600 nm into a solid angle of 4π sr reaches 2.3% of the laser pulse energy

  1. Red Emitting Phenyl-Polysiloxane Based Scintillators for Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Palma, Matteo; Quaranta, Alberto; Marchi, Tommaso; Gramegna, Fabiana; Cinausero, Marco; Carturan, Sara; Collazuol, Gianmaria

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the performances of new red emitting phenyl- substituted polysiloxane based scintillators are described. Three dyes were dispersed in a phenyl-polysiloxane matrix in order to shift the scintillation wavelength towards the red part of the visible spectrum. PPO, Lumogen Violet (BASF) and Lumogen Red (BASF) were mixed to the starting resins with different wt. % and the analysis of the different samples was performed by means of fluorescence measurements. The scintillation yield to alpha particles at the different dye ratios was monitored by detecting either the full spectrum or the red part of the emitted light. Finally, thin red scintillators with selected compositions were coupled to Avalanche Photodiode sensors, which are usually characterized by higher efficiency in the red part of the spectrum. An increased light output of about 17% has been obtained comparing the red scintillators to standard blue emitting systems. Preliminary results on the detection of fast neutrons with the APD-red scintillator system are also presented. (authors)

  2. The antifungal effect of light emitting diode on Malassezia yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Hyun Seung; Na, Eui Young; Yun, Sook Jung; Lee, Jee-Bum

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia (M.) species are members of the normal part of the skin flora, but they might induce or be involved with various cutaneous diseases. Although the role of Malassezia in the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases is not fully understood, recent studies have shown that decreased density of Malassezia led to improvement of these diseases. To identify the antifungal effect of light emitting diode (LED) against Malassezia, its antifungal mechanisms and the impact on the keratinocytes. LED with various wavelengths (370-630nm) on Malassezia furfur, Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia globosa was irradiated according to dose and then the antifungal effects were thereafter assessed. After irradiating LED with 392.5±1nm of wavelength according to dose on Malassezia species, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid hydroperoxide production assay were measured. In addition, cell viability and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β, TLR-2 and COX-2) expressions in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) by LED irradiation were evaluated. The growth of Malassezia species was dose-dependently suppressed by both LED with 380±2 and 392.5±1nm wavelengths. The increases of intracellular and extracellular ROS by LED irradiation with 392.5±1nm wavelengths were significantly observed compared to control group. The cell viability and cytokines in NHEKs were not significantly affected by LED irradiation under 5J/cm(2)in vitro. LED irradiation with 380±2 and 392.5±1nm wavelengths proved to have antifungal effect against Malassezia species and no impact on NHEKs under 5J/cm(2). The findings suggest that LED might be an adjunctive therapeutic light tool against Malassezia yeasts related cutaneous diseases. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. First demonstration of InGaP/InAlGaP based orange laser emitting at 608 nm

    KAUST Repository

    Majid, Mohammed Abdul

    2015-06-26

    The fabrication of orange-emitting semiconductor laser on interdiffused InGaP/InAlGaP structure is reported. The lasers lased at 22°C at a wavelength as short as 608 nm with threshold current density of 3.4 KAcm −2 and a maximum output power of ∼46 mW. This is the shortest wavelength electrically pumped semiconductor laser emission from the InGaP/InAlGaP structure.

  4. Spectral properties of a new flourescent dye emitting in the red: A benzoxazinone derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, Marie-Thérèse; Mugnier, Jacques; Bourson, Jean; Valeur, Bernard

    1984-04-01

    7-dimethylamino-3( p-formylstyryl)-1,4-benzoxazine-2-one (DFSBO) is a new dye emitting in the red which may be useful for several applications owing to its interesting spectral properties: a board first absorption band, large Stokes shift, and good quantum yield with a very small temperature and excitation-wavelenghth dependence.

  5. Polymer-coated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode vapor sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain ...

  6. Study on wavelength of maximum absorbance for phenyl- thiourea derivatives: A topological and non-conventional physicochemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Suprajnya; Mishra, Ashutosh; Thakur, Mamta; Thakur, Abhilash

    2014-01-01

    In present study efforts have been made to analyze the role of different structural/ topological and non-conventional physicochemical features on the X-ray absorption property wavelength of maximum absorption λ m . Efforts are also made to compare the magnitude of various parameters for optimization of the features mainly responsible to characterize the wavelength of maximum absorbance λ m in X-ray absorption. For the purpose multiple linear regression method is used and on the basis of regression and correlation value suitable model have been developed.

  7. Influence of absorption on stability of terahertz difference frequency generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nan; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Wang, Zhaolu; Li, Shaopeng; Han, Jing

    2016-01-20

    This work presents numerical studies of the stability feature of terahertz difference frequency generation (THz-DFG) with a ZnGeP(2) crystal using two pump wavelengths. We found that the maximum output of a THz wave is located in the unstable output region because of the competitive equilibrium between the absorption and the gain. Furthermore, the output stability is dependent on the pump stability. Different from the results at the pump wavelength of 9.588 μm, there is neither an appropriate stable output region nor gain saturation region at the pump wavelength of 1.064 μm for a larger absorption coefficient. This work demonstrates that the stable output region of the THz wave is difficult to obtain when the pump absorption is excessively large in DFG.

  8. High-Sensitivity AGN Polarimetry at Sub-Millimeter Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Martí-Vidal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The innermost regions of radio loud Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN jets are heavily affected by synchrotron self-absorption, due to the strong magnetic fields and high particle densities in these extreme zones. The only way to overcome this absorption is to observe at sub-millimeter wavelengths, although polarimetric observations at such frequencies have so far been limited by sensitivity and calibration accuracy. However, new generation instruments such as the Atacama Large mm/sub-mm Array (ALMA overcome these limitations and are starting to deliver revolutionary results in the observational studies of AGN polarimetry. Here we present an overview of our state-of-the-art interferometric mm/sub-mm polarization observations of AGN jets with ALMA (in particular, the gravitationally-lensed sources PKS 1830−211 and B0218+359, which allow us to probe the magneto-ionic conditions at the regions closest to the central black holes.

  9. Disinfection of Spacecraft Potable Water Systems by Photocatalytic Oxidation Using UV-A Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.; O'Neal, Jeremy A.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has long been used in terrestrial water treatment systems for photodisinfection and the removal of organic compounds by several processes including photoadsorption, photolysis, and photocatalytic oxidation/reduction. Despite its effectiveness for water treatment, UV has not been explored for spacecraft applications because of concerns about the safety and reliability of mercury-containing UV lamps. However, recent advances in ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have enabled the utilization of nanomaterials that possess the appropriate optical properties for the manufacture of LEDs capable of producing monochromatic light at germicidal wavelengths. This report describes the testing of a commercial-off-the-shelf, high power Nichia UV-A LED (250mW A365nnJ for the excitation of titanium dioxide as a point-of-use (POD) disinfection device in a potable water system. The combination of an immobilized, high surface area photocatalyst with a UV-A LED is promising for potable water system disinfection since toxic chemicals and resupply requirements are reduced. No additional consumables like chemical biocides, absorption columns, or filters are required to disinfect and/or remove potentially toxic disinfectants from the potable water prior to use. Experiments were conducted in a static test stand consisting of a polypropylene microtiter plate containing 3mm glass balls coated with titanium dioxide. Wells filled with water were exposed to ultraviolet light from an actively-cooled UV-A LED positioned above each well and inoculated with six individual challenge microorganisms recovered from the International Space Station (ISS): Burkholderia cepacia, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Wautersia basilensis. Exposure to the Nichia UV-A LED with photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a complete (>7-log) reduction of each challenge bacteria population in <180 minutes of contact

  10. Optoelectronic Properties of Color-Tunable Mixed Ligand-Based Light-Emitting Zinc Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devender; Bhagwan, Shri; Saini, Raman Kumar; Tanwar, Vijeta; Nishal, Vandna

    2016-10-01

    A series of mixed ligand-based zinc complexes (Zn1-Zn5); [(8-hydroxyquinolinato)(2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazolato)zinc(II)] (Zn1), [(5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinato)(2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazolato)zinc(II)] (Zn2), [(5,7-dichloro-8-hydroxyquinolinato)(2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazolato)zinc(II)] (Zn3), [(2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinolinato)(2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazolato)zinc(II)] (Zn4) and [(5,7-dimethyl-8-hydroxyquinolinato)(2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazolato)zinc(II)] (Zn5) were synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of zinc complexes were examined by ultraviolet-visible absorption and photoluminescence emission spectroscopy. All prepared metal complexes produced intense luminescence on excitation with a UV light source. In this study, the color-tunable characteristics of metal complexes were investigated by introducing the electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups on the 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand. The emission spectra of metal complexes showed emission wavelength at 500 nm for [ZnHBI(q)], 509 nm for [ZnHBI(Clq)], 504 nm for [Zn(HBI)(Cl2q)], 496 nm for [ZnHBI (Meq)] and 573 nm for [ZnHBI(Me2Q)] materials. A temperature-dependent PL spectrum was used to study the emission profile of zinc complex and observed that variation in the temperature altered the position and the intensity of emission peak. The synthesized metal complex also exhibited good thermal stability (>300°C). Photophysical characteristics of color-tunable light-emitting zinc complexes suggested that these materials could be efficiently used for emissive display device applications.

  11. Phosphorescent Neutral Iridium (III) Complexes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Mohd Yusoff, Abd Rashid; Huckaba, Aron J; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2017-04-01

    The development of transition metal complexes for application in light-emitting devices is currently attracting significant research interest. Among phosphorescent emitters, those involving iridium (III) complexes have proven to be exceedingly useful due to their relatively short triplet lifetime and high phosphorescence quantum yields. The emission wavelength of iridium (III) complexes significantly depends on the ligands, and changing the electronic nature and the position of the ligand substituents can control the properties of the ligands. In this chapter, we discuss recent developments of phosphorescent transition metal complexes for organic light-emitting diode applications focusing solely on the development of iridium metal complexes.

  12. Deep Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diode (LED)-Based Sensing of Sulfur Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Anna P M; Kapit, Jason

    2017-05-01

    With the recent development of deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) comes the possibility of targeting absorption bands of several gases, including sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ). SO 2 has strong absorption bands in the 300 nm spectral region. The low cost and small size of DUV LEDs, coupled with their spectral coverage, makes them viable sources for new gas sensors. Here, we demonstrate the capability to use absorption spectroscopy with a balanced detection scheme using a 300 nm DUV LED source for SO 2 detection at concentrations ranging from less than 1 ppm to 50 ppm.

  13. End-fire silicon optical phased array with half-wavelength spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossey, Michael R.; Rizk, Charbel; Foster, Amy C.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical phased array with emitting elements spaced at half the operational wavelength. The device is a one-dimensional array fabricated on an integrated silicon platform for operation at a wavelength of 1.55 μm. Light is emitted end-fire from the chip edge where the waveguides are terminated. The innovative design and high confinement afforded by the silicon waveguides enables λ/2 spacing (775-nm pitch) at the output thereby eliminating grating lobes and maximizing the power in the main lobe. Steering is achieved by inducing a phase shift between the waveguide feeds via integrated thermo-optic heaters. The device forms a beam with a full-width half-maximum angular width of 17°, and we demonstrate beam steering over a 64° range limited only by the element factor.

  14. Accelerator physics and radiometric properties of superconducting wavelength shifters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Subject of this thesis is the operation of wave-length shifters at electron storage rings and their use in radiometry. The basic aspects of the radiometry, the technical requirements, the influence of wave-length shifters on the storage ring, and results of first measurements are presented for a device installed at BESSY. Most of the calculations are carried out by the program WAVE, which has been developed within this thesis. WAVE allows to calculate the synchrotron radiation spectra of wavelength shifters within an relative uncertainty of 1/100000. The properties of wave-length shifters in terms of accelerator physics as well as a generating function for symplectic tracking calculations can also be calculated by WAVE. The later was implemented in the tracking code BETA to investigate the influence of insertion devices on the dynamic aperture and emittance of the storage ring. These studies led to the concept of alternating low- and high-beta-sections at BESSY-II, which allow to operate superconducting insertion devices without a significant distortion of the magnetic optics. To investigate the experimental aspects of the radiometry at wave-length shifters, a program based on the Monte-Carlo-code GEANT4 has been developed. It allows to simulate the radiometrical measurements and the absorption properties of detectors. With the developed codes first radiometrical measurements by the PTB have been analysed. A comparison of measurements and calculations show a reasonable agreement with deviations of about five percent in the spectral range of 40-60 keV behind a 1-mm-Cu filter. A better agreement was found between 20 keV and 80 keV without Cu filter. In this case the measured data agreed within a systematic uncertainty of two percent with the results of the calculations. (orig.)

  15. Scattering and absorption differential cross sections for double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    absorption differential cross sections agree with theory within experimental estimated error. Keywords. ... have been given in a previous paper [2] to which we refer for literature on the theoretical studies on this process ... thick iron and 1 mm thick aluminium, with iron facing lead to absorb K x-rays emitted by lead shielding.

  16. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.E.

    1977-10-01

    The use of modulation spectroscopy to study the electronic properties of solids has been very productive. The construction of a wide range Wavelength Modulation Spectrometer to study the optical properties of solids is described in detail. Extensions of the working range of the spectrometer into the vacuum ultraviolet are discussed. Measurements of the reflectivity and derivative reflectivity spectra of the lead chalcogenides, the chalcopyrite ZnGeP/sub 2/, the layer compounds GaSe and GaS and their alloys, the ferroelectric SbSI, layer compounds SnS/sub 2/ and SnSe/sub 2/, and HfS/sub 2/ were made. The results of these measurements are presented along with their interpretation in terms of band structure calculations.

  17. High temperature operation of short wavelength InAs-based quantum cascade lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Laffaille

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available InAs/AlSb quantum cascade lasers emitting at 3.06 and 3.22 μm at room temperature has been studied. The lasers with high reflection coating on back facets operated in pulse mode up to 400 and 423 K, respectively. The obtained results showed no dramatic performance degradation of the InAs-based QCLs with decreasing emission wavelength down to 3 μm.

  18. Multi-wavelength Characterization of Brown and Black Carbon from Filter Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. M.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) scatters and absorbs solar radiation and thereby affects visibility, the Earth's radiation balance, and properties and lifetimes of clouds. Understanding the radiative forcing (RF) of PM is essential to reducing the uncertainty in total anthropogenic and natural RF. Many instruments that measure light absorption coefficients (βabs [λ], Mm-1) of PM have used light at near-infrared (NIR; e.g., 880 nm) or red (e.g., 633 nm) wavelengths. Measuring βabs over a wider wavelength range, especially including the ultraviolet (UV) and visible, allows for contributions from black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and mineral dust (MD) to be differentiated. This will help to determine PM RF and its emission sources. In this study, source and ambient samples collected on Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filters are used to characterize and develop a multi-wavelength (250 - 1000 nm) filter-based measurement method of PM light absorption. A commercially available UV-visible spectrometer coupled with an integrating sphere is used for quantifying diffuse reflectance and transmittance of filter samples, from which βabs and absorption Ǻngström exponents (AAE) of the PM deposits are determined. The filter-based light absorption measurements of laboratory generated soot and biomass burning aerosol are compared to 3-wavelength photoacoustic absorption measurements to evaluate filter media and loading effects. Calibration factors are developed to account for differences between filter types (Teflon-membrane vs. quartz-fiber), and between filters and in situ photoacoustic absorption values. Application of multi-spectral absorption measurements to existing archived filters, including specific source samples (e.g. diesel and gasoline engines, biomass burning, dust), will also be discussed.

  19. Quantitative diagnosis of small approximal caries lesions utilizing wavelength-dependent fiber-optic transillumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarkamp, J; TenBosch, JJ; Verdonschot, EH; Tranaeus, S

    The instruments clinically available for the diagnosis of approximal caries lesions are inadequate to detect lesions early and quantitatively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether wavelength-dependent light scattering and absorption of carious tissues may be utilized for the quantitative

  20. Wavelength-coded volume holographic imaging endoscope for multidepth imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Isela D; Han, Wanglei; Rice, Photini; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2017-10-01

    A wavelength-coded volume holographic imaging (WC-VHI) endoscope system capable of simultaneous multifocal imaging is presented. The system images light from two depths separated by 100  μm in a tissue sample by using axial chromatic dispersion of a gradient index probe in combination with two light-emitting diode sources and a multiplexed volume hologram to separate the images. This system is different from previous VHI systems in that it uses planar multiplexed gratings and does not require curved holographic gratings. This results in improved lateral imaging resolution from 228.1 to 322.5  lp/mm. This letter describes the design and fabrication of the WC-VHI endoscope and experimental images of hard and soft resolution targets and biological tissue samples to illustrate the performance properties. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  1. Single-photon generator for optical telecommunication wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usuki, T; Sakuma, Y; Hirose, S; Takemoto, K; Yokoyama, N; Miyazawa, T; Takatsu, M; Arakawa, Y

    2006-01-01

    We report on the generation of single-photon pulses from a single InAs/InP quantum dot in telecommunication bands (1.3-1.55 μm: higher transmittance through an optical fiber). First we prepared InAs quantum dots on InP (0 0 1) substrates in a low-pressure MOCVD by using a so-called InP 'double-cap' procedure. The quantum dots have well-controlled photo emission wavelength in the telecommunication bands. We also developed a single-photon emitter in which quantum dots were embedded. Numerical simulation designed the emitter to realize efficient injection of the emitted photons into a single-mode optical fiber. Using a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss technique has proved that the photons through the fiber were single photons

  2. Self-absorption corrections for well-type germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, P.G.; Richardson, N.; Nolan, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Corrections for self-absorption are of vital importance to accurate determination by gamma spectrometry of radionuclides such as 210 Pb, 241 Am and 234 Th which emit low energy gamma radiation. A simple theoretical model for determining the necessary corrections for well-type germanium detectors is presented. In this model, self-absorption factors are expressed in terms of the mass attenuation coefficient of the sample and a parameter characterising the well geometry. Experimental measurements of self-absorption are used to evaluate the model and to determine a semi-empirical algorithm for improved estimates of the geometrical parameter. (orig.)

  3. Wavelength optimization for rapid chromophore mapping using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Amaan; Dell, Steven; Cuccia, David J; Gioux, Sylvain; Durkin, Anthony J; Frangioni, John V; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2010-01-01

    Spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) utilizes multiple-frequency structured illumination and model-based computation to generate two-dimensional maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties. SFDI absorption data are measured at multiple wavelengths and used to fit for the tissue concentration of intrinsic chromophores in each pixel. This is done with a priori knowledge of the basis spectra of common tissue chromophores, such as oxyhemoglobin (ctO(2)Hb), deoxyhemoglobin (ctHHb), water (ctH(2)O), and bulk lipid. The quality of in vivo SFDI fits for the hemoglobin parameters ctO(2)Hb and ctHHb is dependent on wavelength selection, fitting parameters, and acquisition rate. The latter is critical because SFDI acquisition time is up to six times longer than planar two-wavelength multispectral imaging due to projection of multiple-frequency spatial patterns. Thus, motion artifact during in vivo measurements compromises the quality of the reconstruction. Optimal wavelength selection is examined through matrix decomposition of basis spectra, simulation of data, and dynamic in vivo measurements of a human forearm during cuff occlusion. Fitting parameters that minimize cross-talk from additional tissue chromophores, such as water and lipid, are determined. On the basis of this work, a wavelength pair of 670 nm∕850 nm is determined to be the optimal two-wavelength combination for in vivo hemodynamic tissue measurements provided that assumptions for water and lipid fractions are made in the fitting process. In our SFDI case study, wavelength optimization reduces acquisition time over 30-fold to 1.5s compared to 50s for a full 34-wavelength acquisition. The wavelength optimization enables dynamic imaging of arterial occlusions with improved spatial resolution due to reduction of motion artifacts.

  4. Uptake and transport of positron-emitting tracer in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Shimazu, Masamitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The transport of a positron-emitting isotope introduced into a plant was dynamically followed by a special observation apparatus called `Positron-Emitting Tracer Imaging System`. In the system, annihilation {gamma}-rays from the positron emitter are detected with two planer detectors (5 x 6 cm square). The water containing ca. 5 MBq/ml of {sup 18}F was fed to the cut stem of soybean for 2 min and then the images of tracer activity were recorded for 30 - 50 min. When the midrib of a leaf near the petiole was cut just before measurement, the activity in the injured leaf was decreased but detected even at the apex. This result suggests that the damaged leaf recovered the uptake of water through the lamina. Maximum tracer activities in leaves of unirradiated plant were observed within 10 min, whereas those of irradiated plant at 100 Gy were observed after over 25 min. The final activity of irradiated plant after 30 min was lower than that of unirradiated plant. In case of beans, there was a difference in the absorption behavior of the {sup 18}F-labeled water between unirradiated and irradiated samples. These results show that the system is effective to observe the uptake and transportation of water containing positron emitting tracer for the study of damage and recovery functions of plants. (author)

  5. Omnidirectional light absorption of disordered nano-hole structure inspired from Papilio ulysses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Bai, Mingwen; Zhang, Di

    2014-07-15

    Butterflies routinely produce nanostructured surfaces with useful properties. Here, we report a disordered nano-hole structure with ridges inspired by Papilio ulysses that produce omnidirectional light absorption compared with the common ordered structure. The result shows that the omnidirectional light absorption is affected by polarization, the incident angle, and the wavelength. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the stable omnidirectional light absorption is achieved in the structure inspired from the Papilio ulysses over a wide incident angle range and with various wavelengths. This explains some of the mysteries of the structure of the Papilio ulysses butterfly. These conclusions can guide the design of omnidirectional absorption materials.

  6. Derivation of water vapour absorption cross-sections in the red region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, M.; Chakrabarty, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption spectrum in 436 to 448 nm wavelength region gives NO2 and O3 column densities. This spectrum can also give H2O column density. The spectrum in the range of 655 to 667 nm contains absorption due to NO3 and H2O. Combining the absorption spectra in the wavelength ranges of 436 to 448 and 655 to 667 nm, water vapor absorption cross-sections in this range comes out to be of the order of 2.0 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp -2).

  7. High-power, high-efficiency, high-brightness long-wavelength laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Steve; Crump, Paul; Wang, Jun; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; Zhang, Shiguo; Elim, Sandrio; Das, Suhit; Bougher, Mike; Patterson, Jason; Kuang, Guokui; Bell, Jake; Farmer, Jason; DeVito, Mark

    2006-05-01

    Interest is rapidly growing in solid-state lasers emitting from 1500-nm to 2100-nm with applications in eye-safe range finding, LIDAR, infrared countermeasures, medicine, dentistry, and others. Traditionally, these solid-state lasers have been pumped by flash lamps or more recently, by semiconductor diode lasers. In the case of the latter, the diodes of choice have been those emitting below 1-μm. The sub-micron class of semiconductor diode lasers is highly mature and has enjoyed recent rapid advances in power and efficiency. Unfortunately, the quantum defect generated when converting to the desired wavelengths results in large amounts of excess heat generation leading to costly and heavy, expensive cooling systems and performance problems related to thermal lensing. System complexity adds further cost and weight when intermediaries, such as optical parametric oscillators, are required to reach the desired longer wavelengths. Recent advances in laser diodes emitting from 1400-nm to over 1900-nm now enable the near resonant pumping of such solid state media as Er:YAG, Ho:YAG and Cr:ZnSe. Record results in the peak output power and electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of diode lasers emitting around 1470-nm, 1700-nm and 1900-nm are presented here.

  8. Ultrafast Coherent Absorption in Diamond Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounis, Artemios; Nalla, Venkatram; MacDonald, Kevin F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2018-02-27

    Diamond is introduced as a material platform for visible/near-infrared photonic metamaterials, with a nanostructured polycrystalline diamond metasurface only 170 nm thick providing an experimental demonstration of coherent light-by-light modulation at few-optical-cycle (6 fs) pulse durations. "Coherent control" of absorption in planar (subwavelength-thickness) materials has emerged recently as a mechanism for high-contrast all-optical gating, with a speed of response that is limited only by the spectral width of the absorption line. It is shown here that a free-standing diamond membrane structured by focused ion beam milling can provide strong, spectrally near-flat absorption over a visible to near-infrared wavelength range that is wide enough (wider than is characteristically achievable in plasmonic metal metasurfaces) to facilitate coherent modulation of ultrashort optical pulses comprising only a few oscillations of electromagnetic field. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  10. Which colors would extraterrestrial civilizations use to transmit signals?: The ;magic wavelengths; for optical SETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusawa, Shin-ya; Aota, Tatusya; Kishimoto, Ryo

    2018-04-01

    In the case of radio SETI, there are predicted frequencies which extraterrestrial beings select to send messages to other civilizations. Those are called ;magic frequencies. Considering the optical region, terrestrial technologies can not transmit arbitrary wavelengths of high-power optical lasers, easily. In this article, we discuss communications among civilizations with the same level of technology as us to enhance the persuasive power. It might be possible to make a reasonable assumption about the laser wavelengths transmitted by extraterrestrial intelligences to benefit optical SETI (OSETI) methods. Therefore, we propose some ;magic wavelengths; for spectroscopic OSETI observations in this article. From the senders point of view, we argue that the most favorable wavelength used for interstellar communication would be the one of YAG lasers, at 1.064 μm or its Second Harmonic Generation (532.1 nm). On the contrary, there are basic absorption lines in the optical spectra, which are frequently observed by astrophysicists on Earth. It is possible that the extraterrestrials used lasers, which wavelengths are tuned to such absorption lines for sending messages. In that case, there is a possibility that SHG and/or Sum Frequency Generation of YAG and YLF lasers are used. We propose three lines at, 393.8 nm (near the Ca K line), 656.5 nm (near the Hα line) and 589.1 nm (Na D2 line) as the magic wavelengths.

  11. ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTY MEASUREMENT IN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    OpenAIRE

    NEHA S.MAHAJAN; NITIN K. MANDAVGADE; S.B. JAJU

    2012-01-01

    A spectrophotometer is a photometer that can measure intensity as a function of the light source wavelength. The important features of spectrophotometers are spectral bandwidth and linear range of absorption or reflectance measurement. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) is a very common technique for detecting chemical composition of elements in metal and its alloy. It is very reliable and simple to use. Quality of result (accuracy) depends on the uncertainty of measurement value of the tes...

  12. Nutrition and magnesium absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true magnesium absorption was neither affected by soybean protein in the diet nor by supplemental phytate. The inhibitory influence of soybean protein and phytate on apparent magnesium absorption was found ...

  13. Emission behavior of dual-side emissive transparent white organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wing Hong; Tam, Hoi Lam; Ma, Dongge; Zhu, Furong

    2015-06-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) resemble light more naturally, with emission spectrum that is comfortable to the human eye. The transparent WOLEDs can be almost invisible by day and can emit a pleasant diffused light at night, allowing the surface light source to shine in both directions, an exciting new lighting technology that could bring new device concepts. However, undesirable angular-dependent emission in transparent WOLEDs is often observed, due to the microcavity effect. In this work, the emission behavior of dual-side emissive transparent WOLEDs was studied experimentally and theoretically. It is found that avoidance of the overlap between the peak wavelengths of the emitters and the resonant wavelength of the organic microcavity moderates the angular-dependent electroluminescence emission behavior, thereby improving the color stability of the transparent white WOLEDs over a broad range of the viewing angle.

  14. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  15. Wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo observed by skyradiometer in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa; Eck, Thomas F.; Lee, Yun Gon; Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Mijin; Jung, Ukkyo; Yoon, Jongmin; Mok, Jungbin; Cho, Hi-Ku

    2016-11-01

    Absorption and scattering characteristics of various aerosol events are investigated using 2-years of measurements from a skyradiometer at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. Both transported dust and anthropogenic aerosols are observed at distinct geo-location of Seoul, a megacity located a few thousand kilometers away from dust source regions in China. We focus on the wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA), showing the characteristics of regional aerosols. The correlation between spectral SSAs and AEs calculated using different wavelength pairs generally indicates relatively weak absorption of fine-mode aerosols (urban pollution and/or biomass burning) and strong absorption of coarse-mode aerosols (desert dust) at this location. AE ratio (AER), a ratio of AEs calculated using wavelength pair between shorter (340-675 nm) and longer wavelength pair (675-1020 nm) correlates differently with SSA according to the dominant size of local aerosols. Correlations between SSA and AER show strong absorption of aerosols for AER 2.0. Based on the seasonal pattern of wavelength dependence of AER and SSA, this correlation difference looks to reveal the separated characteristics of transported dust and anthropogenic particles from urban pollution respectively. The seasonal characteristics of AER and SSAs also show that the skyradiometer measurement with multiple wavelengths may be able to detect the water soluble brown carbon, one of the important secondary organic aerosols in the summertime atmospheric composition.

  16. Method for calibration-free scanned-wavelength modulation spectroscopy for gas sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Sun, Kai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing

    2018-04-10

    A method of calibration-free scanned-wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) absorption sensing is provided by obtaining absorption lineshape measurements of a gas sample on a sensor using 1f-normalized WMS-2f where an injection current to an injection current-tunable diode laser (TDL) is modulated at a frequency f, where a wavelength modulation and an intensity modulation of the TDL are simultaneously generated, extracting using a numerical lock-in program and a low-pass filter appropriate band-width WMS-nf (n=1, 2, . . . ) signals, where the WMS-nf signals are harmonics of the f, determining a physical property of the gas sample according to ratios of the WMS-nf signals, determining the zero-absorption background using scanned-wavelength WMS, and determining non-absorption losses using at least two of the harmonics, where a need for a non-absorption baseline measurement is removed from measurements in environments where collision broadening has blended transition linewidths, where calibration free WMS measurements without knowledge of the transition linewidth is enabled.

  17. A Compact In Situ Sensor for Measurement of Absorption and Backscattering in Natural Waters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an active sensor for in situ measurement of the inherent optical properties (IOPs) absorption and backscattering at multiple wavelengths....

  18. Absorption and excretion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berberich, R.

    1988-01-01

    The absorption and excretion of radiopharmaceuticals is still of interest in diagnostic investigations of nuclear medicine. In this paper the most common methods of measuring absorption and excretion are described. The performance of the different tests and their standard values are discussed. More over the basic possibilities of measuring absorption and excretion including the needed measurement equipments are presented. (orig.) [de

  19. Wavelength-stabilization-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for methane detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zhen; Ren, Wei

    2017-06-01

    A compact and portable photoacoustic gas sensor was developed for sensitive methane (CH4) detection at 1.6 µm using a software-based wavelength stabilization scheme. A transmission-type photoacoustic cell was connected in series with a reference gas cell to measure the photoacoustic signal and the reference gas absorption for wavelength stabilization simultaneously. The central wavelength of the diode laser was locked to the target CH4 line with a fluctuation of less than 10.6 MHz using a digital proportional-integral-derivative controller. The CH4 sensor was designed to be insensitive to the incoherent external acoustic noise by the cumulative average of the demodulated photoacoustic signal by a digital lock-in amplifier. With an incident laser power of 6 mW, our CH4 sensor achieved a minimum detection limit of 11.5 ppm at 10 s response time and an excellent linearity (R 2  =  0.9999) in the concentration range of 400-6300 ppm.

  20. Detection of O4 absorption around 328 and 419 nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lampel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Retrieving the column of an absorbing trace gas from spectral data requires that all absorbers in the corresponding wavelength range are sufficiently well known. This is especially important for the retrieval of weak absorbers, whose absorptions are often in the 10−4 range. Previous publications on the absorptions of the oxygen dimer O2–O2 (or short: O4 list absorption peaks at 328 and 419 nm, for which no spectrally resolved literature cross sections are available. As these absorptions potentially influence the spectral retrieval of various trace gases, such as HCHO, BrO, OClO and IO, their shape and magnitude need to be quantified. We assume that the shape of the absorption peaks at 328 and 419 nm can be approximated by their respective neighbouring absorption peaks. Using this approach we obtain estimates for the wavelength of the absorption and its magnitude. Using long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS observations and multi-axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS observations, we estimate the peak absorption cross sections of O4 to be (1.96  ±  0.20 × 10−47 cm5 molec−2 and determine the wavelength of its maximum at 328.59  ±  0.15 nm. For the absorption at 419.13  ±  0.42 nm a peak O4 cross-section value is determined to be (5.0  ±  3.5 × 10−48 cm5 molec−2.

  1. Solar Observations at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, P.

    We review earlier to recent observational evidences and theoretical motivations leading to a renewed interest to observe flares in the submillimeter (submm) - infrared (IR) range of wavelengths. We describe the new solar dedicated submillimeter wave telescope which began operations at El Leoncito in the Argentina Andes: the SST project. It consists of focal plane arrays of two 405 GHz and four 212 GHz radiometers placed in a 1.5-m radome-enclosed Cassegrain antenna, operating simultaneously with one millisecond time resolution. The first solar events analyzed exhibited the onset of rapid submm-wave spikes (100-300 ms), well associated to other flare manifestations, especially at X-rays. The spikes positions were found scattered over the flaring source by tens of arcseconds. For one event an excellent association was found between the gamma-ray emission time profile and the rate of occurrence of submm-wave rapid spikes. The preliminary results favour the idea that bulk burst emissions are a response to numerous fast energetic injections, discrete in time, produced at different spatial positions over the flaring region. Coronal mass ejections were associated to the events studied. Their trajectories extrapolated to the solar surface appear to correspond to the onset time of the submm-wave spikes, which might represent an early signature of the CME's initial acceleration process.

  2. Single-particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Nizzero, Sara; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Cai, Yi-Yu; Su, Man-Nung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-05-13

    Removing effects of sample heterogeneity through single-molecule and single-particle techniques has advanced many fields. While background free luminescence and scattering spectroscopy is widely used, recording the absorption spectrum only is rather difficult. Here we present an approach capable of recording pure absorption spectra of individual nanostructures. We demonstrate the implementation of single-particle absorption spectroscopy on strongly scattering plasmonic nanoparticles by combining photothermal microscopy with a supercontinuum laser and an innovative calibration procedure that accounts for chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent excitation powers. Comparison of the absorption spectra to the scattering spectra of the same individual gold nanoparticles reveals the blueshift of the absorption spectra, as predicted by Mie theory but previously not detectable in extinction measurements that measure the sum of absorption and scattering. By covering a wavelength range of 300 nm, we are furthermore able to record absorption spectra of single gold nanorods with different aspect ratios. We find that the spectral shift between absorption and scattering for the longitudinal plasmon resonance decreases as a function of nanorod aspect ratio, which is in agreement with simulations.

  3. The low-ion QSO absorption-line systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzetta, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    Various techniques are used to investigate the class of QSO absorption-line systems that exhibit low-ion absorption lines. Four separate investigations are conducted as follows: Spectroscopy of 32 QSOs at red wavelengths is presented and used to investigate intermediate-redshift MgII absorption. A total of 22 Mg II doublets are detected, from which properties of the Mg II absorbers are derived. Marginal evidence for intrinsic evolution of the number density of the Mg II absorbers with redshift is found. The data are combined with previous observations of C IV and C II seen in the same QSOs at blue wavelengths, and the properties of Mg II- and C IV-selected systems are compared. A sample is constructed of 129 QSOs for which are available published data suitable for detecting absorption-line systems that are optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation. A total of 53 such Lyman-limit systems are found, from which properties of the Lyman-limit systems are derived. It is found that the rate of incidence of the systems does not strongly evolved with redshift. This result is contrasted with the evolution found previously for systems selected on the basis of Mg II absorption. Spectroscopy at red wavelengths of eight QSOs with known damped Lyα absorption systems is presented. Spectroscopic and spectrophotometric observations aimed at detecting molecular hydrogen and dust in the z = 2.796 damped Lyα absorber toward Q1337 + 113 are presented

  4. Finger-shaped red light emitting diode to ascertain the depth of periungual wart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Nirmal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of periungual wart is a great challenge, especially when there is subungual extension. The major cause of recurrence of wart is improper clinical assessment of its extent and not directing therapy against the entire wart. This difficulty of ascertaining its extent could be overcome with this finger-shaped red light emitting diode device. Red light in the device penetrates the thick palmar skin and dark constitutive skin colour due to its longer wavelength.

  5. Blue-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Ishibashi, A.

    This paper reviews the recent results of blue-emitting laser diodes. These devices are based on ZnMgSSe alloy II-VI semiconductors. Recently we have achieved room temperature continuous-wave operation of ZnMgSSe blue lasers for the first time. ZnMgSSe alloys offer a wide range of band-gap energy from 2.8 to 4.5 eV, while maintaining lattice matching to GaAs substrates. These characteristics make ZnMgSSe suitable for cladding layers of blue lasers. In this article, the feasibilities of ZnMgSSe will be reviewed. The laser structures and characteristics will be also mentioned.

  6. Phototherapy with Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Within the field of dermatology, advances in the use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) have led to their clinical application for a variety of medical and cosmetic uses. Of note, one phototherapy device has demonstrated beneficial effects over a range of clinical applications (Omnilux™; GlobalMed Technologies, Glen Ellen, California). The study included a literature review of published studies. Using LEDs with frequencies of 415nm (blue), 633nm (red), and 830nm (infrared), this device has demonstrated significant results for the treatment of medical conditions, including mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris, wound healing, psoriasis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ (Bowen’s disease), basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, and cosmetic applications. Although photodynamic therapy with the photosensitizer 5-aminolevulinic acid might cause stinging and burning, phototherapy is free of adverse events. We determined that phototherapy using LEDs is beneficial for a range of medical and aesthetic conditions encountered in the dermatology practice. This treatment displays an excellent safety profile.

  7. All-optical wavelength-shifting technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Carsten; Mikkelsen, Benny; Danielsen, Søren Lykke

    1995-01-01

    State-of-the-art results for interferometric wavelength converters for WDM fiber networks have been presented. The interferometric converters are capable of high speed (10 Gbit/s), polarisation and wavelength independent (within 30 nn) wavelength conversion. In addition they offer unique features...... such as extinction ratio improvement and spectral cleaning. The 1-dB input power dynamic range is around 4 dB but can be increased to 8 dB by a simple control scheme...

  8. Ultraviolet part of transient absorption spectrum induced in liquid ammonia by nanosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhataziz

    1977-01-01

    The absorption spectra induced in neat liquid ammonia and ammoniacal solution of N 2 O by nanosecond pulse radiolysis have been measured for wavelength range 250 to 325 nm. The results indicate that the absorption spectrum induced in liquid ammonia is a composite of absorption spectra of e/sub am/ - and NH 2 . The absorptions due to e/sub am/ - decrease with decreasing wavelength, and are attributed to the tail of the absorption spectrum (maximum absorption in near infrared) of e/sub am/ - . The absorption spectrum for NH 2 has a shoulder at approximately 255 nm. In liquid ammonia at 23 0 C, the extinction coefficient for NH 2 at 250 nm is 1.1 x 10 3 M -1 cm -1

  9. Wavelength Red-Shift of Long Wavelength InGaN/GaN Multi-Quantum Well by Using an InGaN Underlying Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Rong, Huang; Feng, Wen; Liang-Zhu, Tong; De-Xiu, Huang

    2009-01-01

    Long-wavelength GaN based light-emitting diodes are of importance in full color displays, monolithic white light- emitting diodes and solid-state lighting, etc. However, their epitaxial growth faces great challenges because high indium (In) compositions of InGaN are difficult to grow. In order to enhance In incorporation and lengthen the emission wavelength of a InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW), we insert an InGaN underlying layer underneath the MQW. InGaN/GaN MQWs with various InGaN underlying layers, such as graded In y Ga 1−y N material with linearly increasing In content, or In y Ga 1−y N with fixed In content but different thicknesses, are grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Experimental results demonstrate the enhancement of In incorporation and the emission wavelength redshift by the insertion of an InGaN underlying layer. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  10. Multicolored Cd1-xZnxSe quantum dots with type-I core/shell structure: single-step synthesis and their use as light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ying-Chih; Hsu, Yung-Jung

    2014-03-01

    We developed a single-step hot-injection process to synthesize Cd1-xZnxSe quantum dots (QDs) with tunable emission wavelengths. The multiple emission colors of the Cd1-xZnxSe QDs resulted from the variation in their compositions (x value) with the reaction time. Because of the higher reactivity of the Cd precursor, QDs whose composition was rich in CdSe were generated at the beginning of the reaction. As the reaction proceeded, the later-formed ZnSe shell was simultaneously alloyed with the core, giving rise to a progressive alloying treatment for the grown QDs. During the reaction period, the emission color of the Cd1-xZnxSe QDs shifted from red to orange, to yellow, to green and finally to blue. A light emitting diode (LED) composed of multilayers of ITO/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)/poly(3-hexylthiophene) blended with Cd1-xZnxSe QDs/Al was fabricated to test the electroluminescence (EL) properties of the QDs. The EL results show high color purity for the emission from LED devices containing Cd1-xZnxSe QDs, revealing that the as-synthesized QDs can be easily processed and integrated into a light-emitting device without using a complicated procedure. The findings from the present work also demonstrate the advantage of using the current single-step synthetic approach to obtain a batch of Cd1-xZnxSe QDs that may emit different colors in prototype LEDs.We developed a single-step hot-injection process to synthesize Cd1-xZnxSe quantum dots (QDs) with tunable emission wavelengths. The multiple emission colors of the Cd1-xZnxSe QDs resulted from the variation in their compositions (x value) with the reaction time. Because of the higher reactivity of the Cd precursor, QDs whose composition was rich in CdSe were generated at the beginning of the reaction. As the reaction proceeded, the later-formed ZnSe shell was simultaneously alloyed with the core, giving rise to a progressive alloying treatment for the grown QDs. During the reaction period

  11. Capacity of Wavelength and Time Division Multiplexing for Quasi-Distributed Measurement Using Fiber Bragg Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Fajkus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analysis of the use of wavelength and time division multiplexing techniques for quasi-distributed measurement in uniform fiber Bragg gratings is presented. To date, publications have concentrated on the determination of the maximum number of fiber Bragg gratings on one optical fiber using wavelength and time division multiplexing. In this paper, these techniques will be extended to determine the spectral width of wavelength division multiplexing in terms of the spectral width of the light emitting diode, the spectral width of the Bragg gratings, the measurement ranges of the individual sensors, and the guard band between two adjacent Bragg gratings. For time division multiplexing, a description of the time and power conditions are given. In particular the reflected power, first order crosstalk and chromatic dispersion have been considered. Finally, these relationships were applied to verify a design in a simulation using OptiSystem software.

  12. Effective wavelength calibration for moire fringe projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, Daryl; Davies, Angela; Farahi, Faramarz

    2006-01-01

    The fringe patterns seen when using moire instruments are similar to the patterns seen in traditional interferometry but differ in the spacing between consecutive fringes. In traditional interferometry, the spacing is constant and related to the wavelength of the source. In moire fringe projection, the spacing (the effective wavelength) may not be constant over the field of view and the spacing depends on the system geometry. In these cases, using a constant effective wavelength over the field of view causes inaccurate surface height measurements. We examine the calibration process of the moirefringe projection measurement, which takes this varying wavelength into account to produce a pixel-by-pixel wavelength map. The wavelength calibration procedure is to move the object in the out-of-plane direction a known distance until every pixel intensity value goes through at least one cycle. A sinusoidal function is then fit to the data to extract the effective wavelength pixel by pixel, yielding an effective wavelength map. A calibrated step height was used to validate the effective wavelength map with results within 1% of the nominal value of the step height. The error sources that contributed to the uncertainty in determining the height of the artifact are also investigated

  13. Plasmonic Control of Radiation and Absorption Processes in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiella, Roberto [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Moustakas, Theodore D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This document reviews a research program funded by the DOE Office of Science, which has been focused on the control of radiation and absorption processes in semiconductor photonic materials (including III-nitride quantum wells and quantum dots), through the use of specially designed metallic nanoparticles (NPs). By virtue of their strongly confined plasmonic resonances (i.e., collective oscillations of the electron gas), these nanostructures can concentrate incident radiation into sub-wavelength “hot spots” of highly enhanced field intensity, thereby increasing optical absorption by suitably positioned absorbers. By reciprocity, the same NPs can also dramatically increase the spontaneous emission rate of radiating dipoles located within their hot spots. The NPs can therefore be used as optical antennas to enhance the radiation output of the underlying active material and at the same time control the far-field pattern of the emitted light. The key accomplishments of the project include the demonstration of highly enhanced light emission efficiency as well as plasmonic collimation and beaming along geometrically tunable directions, using a variety of plasmonic excitations. Initial results showing the reverse functionality (i.e., plasmonic unidirectional absorption and photodetection) have also been generated with similar systems. Furthermore, a new paradigm for the near-field control of light emission has been introduced through rigorous theoretical studies, based on the use of gradient metasurfaces (i.e., optical nanoantenna arrays with spatially varying shape, size, and/or orientation). These activities have been complemented by materials development efforts aimed at the synthesis of suitable light-emitting samples by molecular beam epitaxy. In the course of these efforts, a novel technique for the growth of III-nitride quantum dots has also been developed (droplet heteroepitaxy), with several potential advantages in terms of compositional and geometrical

  14. Improved light emitting UV curable PbS quantum dots-polymer composite optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kai; Baig, Sarfaraz; Jiang, Guomin; Paik, Young-hun; Kim, Sung Jin; Wang, Michael R.

    2017-11-01

    We present for the first-time light emitting ultraviolet (UV) curable active PbS quantum dots-polymer composite optical waveguides fabricated by vacuum assisted microfluidic (VAM) soft lithography technique. PbS quantum dots were synthesized by colloidal chemistry methods with tunable sizes resulting in light emissions in near infrared wavelengths. UV curable polymer of selective refractive index were synthesized facilitating waveguide mode confinement and good PbS quantum dots solubility. Photoluminescence of the composite exhibited ∼ 30 times better brightness than PbS-SU-8 composites. Light emitting multi-mode waveguides of about 50 × 42 μm cross-sectional dimension were successful demonstrated. Light emitting single-mode waveguides were fabricated by VAM technique with sectional flow tapers.

  15. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  16. Starbursts at space ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2006-06-01

    Starbursts are systems with very high star formation rate per unit area. They are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. The similarities between the physical properties of local starbursts and high-z star-forming galaxies, highlight the cosmological relevance of starbursts. On the other hand, nearby starbursts are laboratories where to study violent star formation processes and their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic media, in detail and deeply. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, as they are in the far-infrared, due to the ‘picket-fence’ interstellar dust distribution. After the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. Super-stellar clusters have properties similar to globular clusters. The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s-1 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. These metal-rich outflows and the ionizing radiation can travel to the halo of galaxies

  17. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr \\'1 m \\'2) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH 2 groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.© 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  18. Vacuum-Deposited Organometallic Halide Perovskite Light-Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Ming; Hsu, Bo-Wei; Chang, Yi-An; Yang, Lin; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2017-11-22

    In this work, a sequential vacuum deposition process of bright, highly crystalline, and smooth methylammonium lead bromide and phenethylammonium lead bromide perovskite thin films are investigated and the first vacuum-deposited organometallic halide perovskite light-emitting devices (PeLEDs) are demonstrated. Exceptionally low refractive indices and extinction coefficients in the emission wavelength range are obtained for these films, which contributed to a high light out-coupling efficiency of the PeLEDs. By utilizing these perovskite thin films as emission layers, the vacuum-deposited PeLEDs exhibit a very narrow saturated green electroluminescence at 531 nm, with a spectral full width at half-maximum bandwidth of 18.6 nm, a promising brightness of up to 6200 cd/m 2 , a current efficiency of 1.3 cd/A, and an external quantum efficiency of 0.36%.

  19. InP/ZnS nanocrystals for colour conversion in white light emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirazi, Roza

    , radiative and non-radiative recombination rates were determined and QE of 63% for the population of NCs that emit light was derived. A search for source of exciton losses in bright nanocrystals temperature resolved TRPL was studied and it revealed carrier trapping most likely at core-shell interface as well...... joined with a time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of NCs covering the visible light spectrum range revealed a presence of a population of NCs that does not emit light upon photon absorption and it is significantly higher for a larger particles. By modifying local density of optical states...

  20. Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromberg, Bruce J [Irvine, CA; Berger, Andrew J [Rochester, NY; Cerussi, Albert E [Lake Forest, CA; Bevilacqua, Frederic [Costa Mesa, CA; Jakubowski, Dorota [Irvine, CA

    2008-09-23

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

  1. Particulate absorption properties in the Red Sea from hyperspectral particulate absorption spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Tiwari, Surya Prakash

    2018-03-16

    This paper aims to describe the variability of particulate absorption properties using a unique hyperspectral dataset collected in the Red Sea as part of the TARA Oceans expedition. The absorption contributions by phytoplankton (aph) and non-algal particles (aNAP) to the total particulate absorption coefficients are determined using a numerical decomposition method (NDM). The NDM is validated by comparing the NDM derived values of aph and aNAP with simulated values of aph and aNAP are found to be in excellent agreement for the selected wavelengths (i.e., 443, 490, 555, and 676nm) with high correlation coefficient (R2), low root mean square error (RMSE), mean relative error (MRE), and with a slope close to unity. Further analyses showed that the total particulate absorption coefficients (i.e., ap(443)average = 0.01995m−1) were dominated by phytoplankton absorption (i.e., aph(443)average = 0.01743m−1) with a smaller contribution by non-algal particles absorption (i.e., aNAP(443)average = 0.002524m−1). The chlorophyll a is computed using the absorption based Line Height Method (LHM). The derived chlorophyll-specific absorption ((a⁎ph = aph(λ)/ChlLH)) showed more variability in the blue part of spectrum as compared to the red part of spectrum representative of the package effect and changes in pigment composition. A new parametrization proposed also enabled the reconstruction of a⁎ph(λ) for the Red Sea. Comparison of derived spectral constants with the spectral constants of existing models showed that our study A(λ) values are consistent with the existing values, despite there is a divergence with the B(λ) values. This study provides valuable information derived from the particulate absorption properties and its spectral variability and this would help us to determine the relationship between the phytoplankton absorption coefficients and chlorophyll a and its host of variables for the Red Sea.

  2. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  3. Investigation of IR absorption spectra of oral cavity bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrei V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Moroz, Boris T.; Pavlovskaya, Irina V.

    1996-12-01

    The results of comparative investigation for IR and visual absorption spectra of oral cavity bacteria are represented by this paper. There are also shown the main differences in absorption spectra of such pure bacteria cultures as : E- coli, Candida, Staph, Epidermidis, and absorption spectra of bacteria colonies cultured in tooth root canals suspected to harbour several endodontical problems. The results of experimental research targeted to investigate an effect of such combined YAG:Nd and YAG:Cr; Tm; Ho laser parameters like: wavelength, energy density, average power and etc., to oral cavity bacteria deactivation are given finally.

  4. Determination of phosphorus, sulfur and the halogens using high-temperature molecular absorption spectrometry in flames and furnaces-A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welz, Bernhard; Lepri, Fabio G.; Araujo, Rennan G.O.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C.; Huang Maodong; Okruss, Michael; Becker-Ross, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    The literature about the investigation of molecular spectra of phosphorus, sulfur and the halogens in flames and furnaces, and the use of these spectra for the determination of these non-metals has been reviewed. Most of the investigations were carried out using conventional atomic absorption spectrometers, and there were in essence two different approaches. In the first one, dual-channel spectrometers with a hydrogen or deuterium lamp were used, applying the two-line method for background correction; in the second one, a line source was used that emitted an atomic line, which overlapped with the molecular spectrum. The first approach had the advantage that any spectral interval could be accessed, but it was susceptible to spectral interference; the second one had the advantage that the conventional background correction systems could be used to minimize spectral interferences, but had the problem that an atomic line had to be found, which was overlapping sufficiently well with the maximum of the molecular absorption spectrum. More recently a variety of molecular absorption spectra were investigated using a low-resolution polychromator with a CCD array detector, but no attempt was made to use this approach for quantitative determination of non-metals. The recent introduction and commercial availability of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometers is offering completely new possibilities for molecular absorption spectrometry and its use for the determination of non-metals. The use of a high-intensity continuum source together with a high-resolution spectrometer and a CCD array detector makes possible selecting the optimum wavelength for the determination and to exclude most spectral interferences.

  5. Absorption spectrum of Mn2+ ions doped in diammonium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    containing stoichiometric quantities of ammonium sulfate and magnesium sulfate, to which 0.01 mol% of MnSO4 was added. The optical absorption spectrum was recorded in the wavelength range 195–725 nm at room temperature using UNICAM. 5625 spectrophotometer. The spectra recorded in the visible and ultraviolet ...

  6. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiaguo [Champaign, IL; Lu, Yonggi [Urbana, IL; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  7. The Effects of Various LED Light Wavelengths to the Physiological and Morphological Parameters of Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) Bertoni

    OpenAIRE

    Esra UCAR; Nuri CAGLAYAN; Kenan TURGUT

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated the growth of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni) under various wavelengths of LED lamp (Light Emitting Diodes), which can emit daylight (cool white; 400–700 nm), red (620–630 nm) and blue (465–485 nm) wavelengths of the light in the electromagnetic spectrum. In all applications, quantity of PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) was adjusted as 150 µmol.m-2 s-1. Study had maintained in plant breeding cabin 16 hours light and 8 hours dark environment. Resu...

  8. Integrated Wavelength-Tunable Light Source for Optical Gas Sensing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact instrument consisting of a distributed feedback laser (DFB at 1.65 μm was developed as a light source for gas sensing systems using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS technique. The wavelength of laser is tuned by adjusting the laser working temperature and injection current, which are performed by self-developed temperature controller and current modulator respectively. Stability test shows the fluctuation of the laser temperature is within the range of ±0.02°C. For gas detection experiments, the wavelength is tuned around the gas absorption line by adjusting laser temperature and is then shifted periodically to scan across the absorption line by the laser current modulator, which generates a 10 Hz saw wave signal. In addition, the current modulator is able to generate sine wave signal for gas sensing systems using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS technique involving extraction of harmonic signals. The spectrum test proves good stability that the spectrum was measured 6 times every 10 minutes at the constant temperature and current condition. This standalone instrument can be applied as a light source for detection systems of different gases by integrating lasers at corresponding wavelength.

  9. Nonlinear refraction and multiphoton absorption in polydiacetylenes from 1200 to 2200 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Sergey; Yoshino, Fumiyo; Liu, Mingguo; Stegeman, George

    2004-03-01

    We report femtosecond measurements of the dispersion in the nonlinear refraction and multiphoton absorption in polydiacetylenes, specifically in PTS [polymer poly (bis para-toluene sulfonate) of 2,4-hexadiyne -1,6 diol] over the spectral range 1200 to 2200 nm. Various modifications of the Z-scan technique were used to make the measurements. The nonlinear refractive index coefficient n2 decreased monotonically with wavelength and can be reasonably extrapolated to previous measurements at 1064 nm. It was found that multiple multiphoton absorption mechanisms contributed to the nonlinear absorption at most wavelengths so that the intensity dependence at each wavelength was needed to identify the different contributions. A two-photon absorption coefficient decreasing monotonically with increasing wavelength was identified with the long wavelength tail of the massive two-photon absorption peak measured previously at 930 nm. The three-photon absorption coefficient showed a weak resonance around 1850 nm associated with the one-photon absorption into the odd symmetry peak at 620 nm, but also exhibited larger values at shorter wavelengths whose assignment is not clear. The four-photon coefficient, measurable only around 1900 nm was associated with four-photon absorption into the even symmetry 465 nm state responsible for strong two-photon absorption measured previously at 930 nm. This resonance, normally much too weak to be observed, was measurable only because of the accidental degeneracy with the three-photon absorption resonance. This degeneracy also leads to a single photon excited state absorption into the 465 nm state via an initial three-photon absorption into the odd symmetry 620 nm state. It was shown that this (3+1) process is in the saturation regime over the intensity range of the measurements and does not contribute to absorption change proportional to the cube of the input intensity, which indicates the pure four-photon absorption process. Thus the measured

  10. Short wavelengths active bichromatic pulsed pyrometer for solids and liquids designed for measurements in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navello, L.; Lebedinsky, J.; Offret, J. P.; Serio, B.; Davin, T.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Optical passive methods for temperature measurements such as thermography or optical pyrometry are very interesting because they allow a non-intrusive measurement when the emissivity is known. The knowledge of this coefficient is critical for determining the actual temperature of a surface from the thermal radiation emitted in a wavelength band. The bichromatic pulsed pyrometer allows to overcome the knowledge of this parameter provided that precautions are taken in the choice of the values of wavelengths. When the object to be measured is placed in harsh environments, such passive optical methods are greatly disturbed by the presence of an optically absorbing medium. They are also distorted when the measured objects are located in very hot environments emitting intense disturbing radiation. In this study, we present an active bichromatic radiometric method for measuring the temperature of a surface in harsh environments. The method is based on a localized excitation by a modulated laser source in the infrared range. Detecting the temperature modulation, which is correlated with the excitation, is performed using a lock-in amplifier able to extract the signal embedded in a noise up to a million times superior. Working at short wavelengths (visible range and near infrared range) offers a large dynamic range and minimizes the error due to variations in emissivity with the wavelength. This system collects the radiation emitted by the object at a distance from a few meters up to dozens of meters depending on the configuration of the optical system. Both the principle and the design of the active bichromatic optical surface thermometer are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the method, results obtained on a molten ceramic stream are presented.

  11. Wavelength dependence of the ocular straylight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginis, Harilaos S; Perez, Guillermo M; Bueno, Juan M; Pennos, Alexandros; Artal, Pablo

    2013-05-01

    Ocular straylight is the combined effect of light scattering in the optical media and the diffuse reflectance from the various fundus layers. The aim of this work was to employ an optical technique to measure straylight at different wavelengths and to identify the optimal conditions for visually relevant optical measurements of straylight. The instrument, based on the double-pass (DP) principle, used a series of uniform disks that were projected onto the retina, allowing the recording of the wide-angle point spread function (PSF) from its peak and up to 7.3° of visual angle. A liquid crystal wavelength tunable filter was used to select six different wavelengths ranging from 500 to 650 nm. The measurements were performed in nine healthy Caucasian subjects. The straylight parameter was analyzed for small (0.5°) and large (6°) angles. For small angles, the wavelength dependence of straylight matches the transmittance spectrum of hemoglobin, which suggests that diffuse light from the fundus contributes significantly to the total straylight for wavelengths longer than 600 nm. Eyes with lighter pigmentation exhibited higher straylight at all wavelengths. For larger angles, straylight was less dependent on wavelength and eye pigmentation. Small-angle straylight in the eye is affected by the wavelength-dependent properties of the fundus. At those small angles, measurements using wavelengths near the peak of the spectral sensitivity of the eye might be better correlated with the visual aspects of straylight. However, the impact of fundus reflectance on the values of the straylight parameter at larger angles did not depend on the measuring wavelength.

  12. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  13. Absorption heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formigoni, C.

    1998-01-01

    A brief description of the difference between a compression and an absorption heat pump is made, and the reasons why absorption systems have spread lately are given. Studies and projects recently started in the field of absorption heat pumps, as well as criteria usually followed in project development are described. An outline (performance targets, basic components) of a project on a water/air absorption heat pump, running on natural gas or LPG, is given. The project was developed by the Robur Group as an evolution of a water absorption refrigerator operating with a water/ammonia solution, which has been on the market for a long time and recently innovated. Finally, a list of the main energy and cost advantages deriving from the use of absorption heat pumps is made [it

  14. On seeing yellow: the case for, and against, short-wavelength light-absorbing intraocular lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2012-07-01

    The normal human crystalline lens absorbs UV and short-wavelength visible electromagnetic radiation. Early intraocular lenses (IOLs) permitted the transmission of such radiation to the retina following cataract extraction. Experimental studies of the absorption profile of the crystalline lens and animal studies demonstrating the deleterious effects of short-wavelength radiation on the retina led to the development of UV-absorbing, and later, short-wavelength light-absorbing (SLA) IOLs. Short-wavelength light-absorbing IOLs were designed to mimic the absorption properties of the normal crystalline lens by absorbing some short-wavelength light in addition to UV radiation; however, debate continues regarding the relative merits of such lenses over UV-absorbing IOLs. Advocates of SLA IOLs suggest that they may theoretically offer increased photoprotection and decreased glare sensitivity and draw on in vitro, animal, and limited clinical studies that infer possible benefits. Detractors suggest that there is no direct evidence supporting a role for SLA IOLs in preventing retinal dysfunction in humans and suggest that they may have negative effects on color perception, scotopic vision, and circadian rhythms. This article examines the theoretical and empirical evidence for, and against, such lenses.

  15. Artificial absorption creation for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Chang, Jun; Cao, Lihua; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Cunguang; Qin, Zengguang

    2017-09-01

    A novel strategy for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement is presented. This method is immune to non-absorption transmission losses, and allows dead zone removal for ultra-low concentration detection, and reference point selection at atmospheric pressure. The method adjusts laser emission and creates artificial absorption peaks according to requirements. By creating an artificial absorption peak next to the real absorption zone, calibration is not necessary. The developed method can be applied to not only wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) but also direct absorption (DA). In WMS, the method does not need two harmonic signals, resulting in higher reliability, better performance, and no electro-optical gain uncertainty. At the same time, non-absorption transmission losses effect is suppressed from 70% to 0.425% with DA and from 70% to 0.225% with WMS method. When the artificial absorption peak coincides with the real one, the dead zone of measurement can be removed to give a lower detection limit, and water vapor still can be detected when concentration is lower than 0.2 ppm in our experiment. Reference point selection uncertainty with the DA method, especially when the signal-to-noise ratio is low and absorption line is broad, can also be facilitated. And the uncertainty of reference point selection is improved from 6% to 0.8% by measuring reference point amplitude. The method is demonstrated and validated by WMS and DA measurements of water vapor (1 atm, 296 K, 1368.597 nm). The measurement results obtained using the new method reveal its promise in TDLAS.

  16. Wavelength initialization employing wavelength recognition scheme in WDM-PON based on tunable lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sil-Gu; Lee, Eun-Gu; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jyung Chan

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a simple method to initialize the wavelength of tunable lasers in WDM-PON employing wavelength recognition scheme with an optical filter as a function of wavelength and accomplished plug and play operation. We also implemented a transceiver based on our proposed wavelength initialization scheme and then experimentally demonstrated the feasibility in WDM-PON configuration guaranteeing 16 channels with 100 GHz channel spacing. Our proposal is a cost-effective and easy-to-install method to realize the wavelength initialization of ONU. In addition, this method will support compatibility with all kind of tunable laser regardless of their structures and operating principles.

  17. Concentration and wavelength dependent frequency downshifting photoluminescence from a Tb3+ doped yttria nano-phosphor: A photochromic phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ram Sagar; Rai, Shyam Bahadur

    2018-03-01

    In this article, the Tb3+ doped Y2O3 nano-phosphor has been synthesized through solution combustion method. The structural measurements of the nano-phosphor have been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, which reveal nano-crystalline nature. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements reveal the presence of different molecular species in the nano-phosphor. The UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectrum of the nano-phosphor shows large number of bands due to charge transfer band (CTB) and 4f-4f electronic transitions of Tb3+ ion. The Tb3+ doped Y2O3 nano-phosphor emits intense green downshifting photoluminescence centered at 543 nm due to 5D4 → 7F5 transition on excitation with 350 nm. The emission intensity of the nano-phosphor is optimized at 1.0 mol% concentration of Tb3+ ion. When the as-synthesized nano-phosphor is annealed at higher temperature the emission intensity of the nano-phosphor enhances upto 5 times. The enhancement in the emission intensity is due to an increase in crystallinity of the nano-phosphor, reduction in surface defects and optical quenching centers. The CIE diagram reveals that the Tb3+ doped nano-phosphor samples show the photochromic nature (color tunability) with a change in the concentration of Tb3+ ion and excitation wavelength. The lifetime measurement indicates an increase in the lifetime for the annealed sample. Thus, the Tb3+ doped Y2O3 nano-phosphor may be used in photochromic displays and photonic devices.

  18. Wavelength feature mapping as a proxy to mineral chemistry for investigating geologic systems: An example from the Rodalquilar epithermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Freek; Kopačková, Veronika; Koucká, Lucie; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van Ruitenbeek, Frank J. A.; Bakker, Wim H.

    2018-02-01

    The final product of a geologic remote sensing data analysis using multi spectral and hyperspectral images is a mineral (abundance) map. Multispectral data, such as ASTER, Landsat, SPOT, Sentinel-2, typically allow to determine qualitative estimates of what minerals are in a pixel, while hyperspectral data allow to quantify this. As input to most image classification or spectral processing approach, endmembers are required. An alternative approach to classification is to derive absorption feature characteristics such as the wavelength position of the deepest absorption, depth of the absorption and symmetry of the absorption feature from hyperspectral data. Two approaches are presented, tested and compared in this paper: the 'Wavelength Mapper' and the 'QuanTools'. Although these algorithms use a different mathematical solution to derive absorption feature wavelength and depth, and use different image post-processing, the results are consistent, comparable and reproducible. The wavelength images can be directly linked to mineral type and abundance, but more importantly also to mineral chemical composition and subtle changes thereof. This in turn allows to interpret hyperspectral data in terms of mineral chemistry changes which is a proxy to pressure-temperature of formation of minerals. We show the case of the Rodalquilar epithermal system of the southern Spanish Gabo de Gata volcanic area using HyMAP airborne hyperspectral images.

  19. Wavelength dependence for the photoreactions of DNA-Psoralen monoadducts. 1. Photoreversal of monoadducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Y.; Hearst, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied the wavelength dependence for the photoreversal of a monoadducted psoralen derivative, HMT [4'(hydroxymethyl)-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen], in a single-stranded deoxyoligonucleotide (5'-GAAGCTACGAGC-3'). The psoralen was covalently attached to the thymidine residue in the oligonucleotide as either a furan-side monoadduct, which is formed through the cycloaddition between the 4',5' double bond of the psoralen and the 5,6 double bond of the thymidine, or a pyrone-side monoadduct, which is formed through the cycloaddition between the 3,4 double bond of the psoralen and the 5,6 double bond of the thymidine. As a comparison, they have also investigated the wavelength-dependent photoreversal of the isolated thymidine-HMT monoadducts. All photoreversal action spectra correlate with the extinction spectra of the isolate monoadducts. In the case of the pyrone-side monoadduct, two absorption bands contribute to the photoreversal with a quantum yield of 2 x 10 -2 at wavelengths below 250 nm and 7 x 10 -3 at wavelengths from 287 to 314 nm. The incorporation of the monoadduct into the DNA oligomer had little effect upon the photoreversal rate. For the furan-side monoadduct at least three absorption bands contribute to the photoreversal. The quantum yield varied from 5 x 10 -2 at wavelengths below 250 nm to 7 x 10 -4 at wavelengths between 295 and 365 nm. In contrast to the case of the pyrone-side monoadduct, the incorporation of the furan-side monoadduct into the DNA oligomer reduced the photoreversal rate constant at wavelengths above 285 nm

  20. Combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat Hossain, Md; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-04-15

    A combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated. The optical sources used in the system are the white flash LED of the smartphone and an orthogonally positioned and interchangeable UV (λex=370  nm) and blue (λex=450  nm) LED. The dispersive element is a low-cost, nano-imprinted diffraction grating coated with Au. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel resolution was carried out with the camera CMOS chip. By integrating the blue and UV excitation sources into the white LED circuitry, the entire system is self-contained within a 3D printed case and powered from the smartphone battery; the design can be scaled to add further excitation sources. Using a customized app, acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using a blue-absorbing and green-emitting pH-sensitive amino-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe and a UV-absorbing and blue-emitting Zn2+-sensitive fluoro-ionophore.

  1. Dual-wavelength external cavity laser device for fluorescence suppression in Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuting; Cai, Zhijian; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in the detection of drugs, pesticides, explosives, food additives and environmental pollutants, for its characteristics of fast measurement, easy sample preparation, and molecular structure analyzing capability. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to these applications, with strong fluorescence background covering up the weak Raman signals. Recently shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) not only can completely remove the fluorescence background, but also can be easily integrated into portable Raman spectrometers. Usually, SERDS uses two lasers with small wavelength gap to excite the sample, then acquires two spectra, and subtracts one to the other to get the difference spectrum, where the fluorescence background will be rejected. So, one key aspects of successfully applying SERDS method is to obtain a dual-wavelength laser source. In this paper, a dual-wavelength laser device design based on the principles of external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is proposed, which is low-cost and compact. In addition, it has good mechanical stability because of no moving parts. These features make it an ideal laser source for SERDS technique. The experiment results showed that the device can emit narrow-spectral-width lasers of two wavelengths, with the gap smaller than 2 nanometers. The laser power corresponding to each wavelength can be up to 100mW.

  2. Measurement of the complex refractive index and complex dielectric permittivity of T.P.S. Space Shuttle tile materials at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed Nurul; Chi, Hua; Li, Xiaohui

    1990-01-01

    Complex refractive index and dielectric permittivity studies of presently used Space Shuttle tile materials at millimeter wavelengths reveal these tiles to exhibit similar absorption characteristics to those of fused silica materials. This absorption is mainly related to the water content in the specimen. A strong birefringence is observed at least in one of these fibrous refractory composite materials.

  3. 2 W high efficiency PbS mid-infrared surface emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, A.; Sugiyama, Y.; Isaji, Y.; Kodama, K.; Takano, Y.; Sakata, H.; Rahim, M.; Khiar, A.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Zogg, H.

    2011-09-01

    High efficiency laser operation with output power exceeding 2 W was obtained for vertical external-cavity PbS based IV-VI compound surface emitting quantum-well structures. The laser showed external quantum efficiency as high as 16%. Generally, mid-infrared III-V or II-VI semiconductor laser operation utilizing interband electron transitions are restricted by Auger recombination and free carrier absorption. Auger recombination is much lower in the IV-VI semiconductors, and the free-carrier absorption is significantly reduced by an optically pumped laser structure including multi-step optical excitation layers.

  4. Refraction and absorption of microwaves in wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziherl, Saša; Bajc, Jurij; Čepič, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    A demonstration experiment for physics students showing the dependence of the refractive index and absorption coefficient of wood on the direction of microwaves is presented. Wood and microwaves enable study of anisotropic properties, which are typically found in crystals. Wood is used as the persuasive representative of uniaxial anisotropic materials due to its visible structure and its consequent anisotropic properties. Wood can be cut in a general direction and wooden plates a few centimetres thick with well-defined fibre orientation are easily prepared. Microwaves are used because wood is transparent for microwaves and their centimetre-scale wavelength is comparable to the wood structure. (paper)

  5. Solar absorption surface panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  6. Nutrition and magnesium absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true

  7. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  8. Continuum and discrete pulsed cavity ring down laser absorption spectra of Br2 vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh C; Huang, Hong-Yi; Chuang, Wang-Ting; Lin, King-Chuen

    2005-07-01

    The absorption cross-sections at room temperature are reported for the first time, of Br2 vapor in overlapping bound-free and bound-bound transition of A(3)pi1u Br2. We obtained discrete absorption cross-section in the rotational structure, the continuum absorption cross-sections, and were also able to measure the absorption cross-section in separate contribution of A(3)pi1u Br2. The absorption cross-sections are increasing with increasing excitation energy in the wavelength region 510-535 nm.

  9. Midinfrared absorption measured at a lambda/400 resolution with an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houel, Julien; Homeyer, Estelle; Sauvage, Sébastien; Boucaud, Philippe; Dazzi, Alexandre; Prazeres, Rui; Ortéga, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-22

    Midinfrared absorption can be locally measured using a detection combining an atomic force microscope and a pulsed excitation. This is illustrated for the midinfrared bulk GaAs phonon absorption and for the midinfrared absorption of thin SiO(2) microdisks. We show that the signal given by the cantilever oscillation amplitude of the atomic force microscope follows the spectral dependence of the bulk material absorption. The absorption spatial resolution achieved with microdisks is around 50 nanometer for an optical excitation around 22 micrometer wavelength.

  10. General wavelength dependence of imaging through the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeika, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric MTF formulations are restated to include contrast reduction by thermal backgrounds received by the imaging system. These backgrounds should be of significance for infrared imaging through the atmosphere. Absorption windows such as 2.0--2.4 and 3.1--4.1-μm wavelengths, which contain minimum atmospheric background, are suggested as usually permitting the best resolution for long range atmospheric imaging of apparently bright objects despite the fact that received object beam radiation may even peak in the 8--13-μm window. The 8--13-μm window is generally better for thermal imaging of objects whose temperatures are close to those of the atmosphere

  11. Characterization of Plant Growth under Single-Wavelength Laser Light Using the Model Plant Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda

    2016-12-01

    Indoor horticulture offers a promising solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available lighting is suboptimal, therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. Lasers are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Besides, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plants. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that laser-grown plants can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteomic data show that the singlewavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture. Furthermore, stomatal movement partly determines the plant productivity and stress management. Abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomatal closure by promoting net K+-efflux from guard cells through outwardrectifying K+ (K+ out) channels to regulate plant water homeostasis. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ (ATGORK) channel is a direct target for ABA in the regulation of stomatal aperture and hence gas exchange and transpiration. Addition of (±)-ABA, but not the biologically inactive (−)-isomer, increases K+ out channel activity in Vicia faba guard cell protoplast. A similar ABA

  12. Organic light emitting devices for illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Michael; Lu, Min-Hao Michael; Weaver, Michael S.

    2010-02-16

    An organic light emitting device is provided. The device has a plurality of regions, each region having an organic emissive layer adapted to emit a different spectrum of light. The regions in combination emit light suitable for illumination purposes. The area of each region may be selected such that the device is more efficient that an otherwise equivalent device having regions of equal size. The regions may have an aspect ratio of at least about four. All parts of any given region may be driven at the same current.

  13. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  14. Hybrid perovskites: Approaches towards light-emitting devices

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2016-10-06

    The high optical gain and absorption of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have attracted extensive research for photonic device applications. Using the bromide halide as an example, we present key approaches of our work towards realizing efficient perovskites based light-emitters. The approaches involved determination of optical constants for the hybrid perovskites thin films, fabrication of photonic nanostructures in the form of subwavelength grating reflector patterned directly on the hybrid perovskites as light manipulation layer, and enhancing the emission property of the hybrid perovskites by using microcavity structure. Our results provide a platform for realization of hybrid perovskites based light-emitting devices for solid-state lighting and display applications. © 2016 IEEE.

  15. Tunable diode laser absorption sensor for temperature and velocity measurements of O2 in air flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, L. C.; Hanson, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A fast and nonintrusive velocity and temperature diagnostic based on oxygen absorption is presented. The system uses a GaAlAs tunable diode laser, ramped and modulated in wavelength at high frequency. Detection is performed at twice the modulating frequency, leading to second harmonic absorption lineshapes. Velocity is inferred from the wavelength shift of the absorption line center due to the Doppler effect. Temperature is determined by comparing experimental and calculated lineshapes. Capabilities of the technique for studies of transient high-speed flows are demonstrated in shock tube experiments. Good agreement is obtained with predicted temperatures and velocities when pressure-induced shifts are accounted for.

  16. A new blue-emitting phosphor, SrZnO{sub 2}:Pb{sup 2+}, synthesized by the adipic acid templated sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manavbasi, A. [Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Nevada, Mail Stop 388, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); LaCombe, J.C. [Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Nevada, Mail Stop 388, Reno, NV 89557 (United States)], E-mail: lacomj@unr.edu

    2008-01-15

    A new blue-emitting phosphor, Sr{sub 1-x}Pb{sub x}ZnO{sub 2}, was prepared by a novel adipic acid templated sol-gel route. Photoluminescence and crystalline properties were investigated as functions of calcination temperatures and the Pb{sup 2+} doping levels. It was found that under UV excitation with a wavelength of 283 or 317 nm, the phosphors gave emission from 374 to 615 nm with a peak centered at 451 nm. This broad-band was composed of UV and the visible range was attributed to an impurity-trapped exciton-type emission. The maximum emission intensity of the Sr{sub 1-x}Pb{sub x}ZnO{sub 2} phosphors occurred at a Pb concentration of x=0.01. The decay time was observed to be {approx}33 ms for the compound doped with 1 mol% Pb prepared at 1000 deg. C. Diffuse reflectance spectra revealed the characteristic absorption peaks and the bandgap energy of SrZnO{sub 2} was found to be 3.4 eV. SEM analysis indicated that phosphor particles have an irregularly rounded morphology and the average particle size was found to be approximately 1 {mu}m.

  17. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  18. Influence of incident light wavelength on time jitter of fast photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moszynski, M.; Vacher, J.

    1977-01-01

    The study of the single photoelectron time resolution as a function of the wavelength of the incident light was performed for a 56 CVP photomultiplier having an S-1 photocathode. The light flash from the XP22 light emitting diode generator was passed through passband filters and illuminated the 5 mm diameter central part of the photocathode. A significant increase of the time resolution above 30% was observed when the wavelength of the incident light was changed from 790 nm to 580 nm. This gives experimental evidence that the time jitter resulting from the spread of the initial velocity of photoelectrons is proportional to the square root of the maximal initial energy of photoelectrons. Based on this conclusion the measured time jitter of C31024, RCA8850 and XP2020 photomultipliers with the use of the XP22 light emitting diode at 560 nm light wavelength was recalculated to estimate the time jitter at 400 nm near the maximum of the photocathode sensitivity. It shows an almost twice larger time spread at 400 nm for the C31024 and RCA8850 with a high gain first dynode and an about 1.5 times larger time spread for the XP2020 photomultiplier, than those measured at 560 nm. (Auth.)

  19. Influence of ablation wavelength and time on optical properties of laser ablated carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni, Hanna, M. Yusrul; Pambudi, A. A.; Murdaka, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots, which are unique and applicable materials, have been produced using many techniques. In this work, we have fabricated carbon dots made of coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. The purpose of this work is to evaluate two ablation parameters, which are ablation wavelength and ablation time. We used pulsed laser from Nd:YAG laser with emit wavelength at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. We varied ablation time one hour and two hours. Photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence setup were used to study the optical properties of fabricated carbon dots. In general, fabricated carbon dots emit bluish green color emission upon excitation by blue laser. We found that carbon dots fabricated using 1064 nm laser produced the highest carbon dots emission among other samples. The peak wavelength of carbon dots emission is between 495 nm until 505 nm, which gives bluish green color emission. Two hours fabricated carbon dots gave four times higher emission than one hour fabricated carbon dot. More emission intensity of carbon dots means more carbon dots nanoparticles were fabricated during laser ablation process. In addition, we also measured electron dynamics of carbon dots using time-resolved photoluminescence. We found that sample with higher emission has longer electron decay time. Our finding gives optimum condition of carbon dots fabrication from coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. Moreover, fabricated carbon dots are non-toxic nanoparticles that can be applied for health, bio-tagging and medical applications.

  20. Wavelength selection of rolling grain ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo; Rousseaux, Germain; Baradel, Christian; Stegner, Alexandre

    2002-11-01

    A flat particle bed under an oscillatory viscous flow is generally unstable and leads to the formation of ripples. Using a cylindrical oscillating tank, we have studied in laboratory, at very high resolution, the wavelength selection, the morphology and the temporal evolution of theses ripples. Initially, the rolling of individual grains on the flat sand bed induces small rolling grain ripples. At this stage the wavelength selection depends on the grain diameter, the viscous boundary layer and the viscous length. In a second stage, the ripples follow a coarsening process which increase both the height and the wavelength of the patterns. For few cases, especially close to the onset of ripple formation, a logarithmic growth of the wavelength is observed. Then, if we wait long enough the system always evolves to a final vortex ripple state which is mainly controlled by the amplitude of the fluid excursion.

  1. Wavelength-versatile optical vortex lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omatsu, Takashige; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Lee, Andrew J.

    2017-12-01

    The unique properties of optical vortex beams, in particular their spiral wavefront, have resulted in the emergence of a wide range of unique applications for this type of laser output. These applications include optical tweezing, free space optical communications, microfabrication, environmental optics, and astrophysics. However, much like the laser in its infancy, the adaptation of this type of laser output requires a diversity of wavelengths. We report on recent progress on development of optical vortex laser sources and in particular, focus on their wavelength extension, where nonlinear optical processes have been used to generate vortex laser beams with wavelengths which span the ultraviolet to infrared. We show that nonlinear optical conversion can be used to not only diversify the output wavelength of these sources, but can be used to uniquely engineer the wavefront and spatial properties of the laser output.

  2. Submonolayer Quantum Dots for High Speed Surface Emitting Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov ND

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe report on progress in growth and applications of submonolayer (SML quantum dots (QDs in high-speed vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs. SML deposition enables controlled formation of high density QD arrays with good size and shape uniformity. Further increase in excitonic absorption and gain is possible with vertical stacking of SML QDs using ultrathin spacer layers. Vertically correlated, tilted or anticorrelated arrangements of the SML islands are realized and allow QD strain and wavefunction engineering. Respectively, both TE and TM polarizations of the luminescence can be achieved in the edge-emission using the same constituting materials. SML QDs provide ultrahigh modal gain, reduced temperature depletion and gain saturation effects when used in active media in laser diodes. Temperature robustness up to 100 °C for 0.98 μm range vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs is realized in the continuous wave regime. An open eye 20 Gb/s operation with bit error rates better than 10−12has been achieved in a temperature range 25–85 °Cwithout current adjustment. Relaxation oscillations up to ∼30 GHz have been realized indicating feasibility of 40 Gb/s signal transmission.

  3. Laser oscillator with a wavelength stabilizing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, T.; Yamaguchi, I.

    1975-01-01

    The laser tube constantly maintains a desired uniform wavelength of the laser beam. At least one of the two mirror members of the laser tube is movable, and is coupled magnetically with an electromagnetic stabilizing mechanism. The magnetic power of the electromagnetic mechanism is adjustable so that the distance between the two mirror members can be maintained constant irrespective of temperature changes and the like. As a result, a laser beam having a constant desired uniform wavelength is obtained. (auth)

  4. Luminescent properties of green- or red-emitting Eu2+-doped Sr3Al2O6 for LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jilin; Zhang Xinguo; Shi Jianxin; Gong Menglian

    2011-01-01

    Eu 2+ -doped Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 (Sr 3-x Eu x Al 2 O 6 ) was synthesized by a solid-state reaction under either H 2 and N 2 atmosphere or CO atmosphere. When H 2 was used as the reducing agent, the phosphor exhibited green emission under near UV excitation, while CO was used as the reducing agent, the phosphor mainly showed red emission under blue light excitation. Both emissions belong to the d-f transition of Eu 2+ ion. The relationship between the emission wavelengths and the occupation of Eu 2+ at different crystallographic sites was studied. The preferential substitution of Eu 2+ into different Sr 2+ cites at different reaction periods and the substitution rates under different atmospheres were discussed. Finally, green-emitting and red-emitting LEDs were fabricated by coating the phosphor onto near UV- or blue-emitting InGaN chips. - Highlights: →Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ is synthesized by a solid-state reaction under different atmospheres. →Phosphor obtained under H 2 +N 2 atmosphere emits green light under NUV excitation. →Phosphor obtained under CO atmosphere emits red light under blue light excitation. →Different emission wavelengths are due to Eu 2+ in different Sr 2+ sites. →The preferential substitution and the substitution rates of Eu 2+ are discussed.

  5. Temperature dependence of the ozone obsorption spectrum over the wavelength range 410 to 760 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.

    1994-01-01

    The ozone, O3, absorption cross sections between 410 and 760 nm, the Chappuis band, were measured at 220, 240, 260, and 280 K relative to that at room temperature using a diode array spectrometer. The measured cross sections varied very slightly, less than 1%, with decreasing temperature between 550 and 660 nm, near the peak of the Chappuis band. At wavelengths away from the peak, the absorption cross sections decreased with decreasing temperature; e.g., about 40% at 420 nm between 298 and 220 K. These results are compared with previous measurements and the impact on atmospheric measurements are discussed.

  6. Light sensitive memristor with bi-directional and wavelength-dependent conductance control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, P.; Hartmann, F.; Emmerling, M.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Worschech, L.; Rebello Sousa Dias, M.; Castelano, L. K.; Marques, G. E.; Lopez-Richard, V.; Höfling, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical control of localized charge on positioned quantum dots in an electro-photo-sensitive memristor. Interband absorption processes in the quantum dot barrier matrix lead to photo-generated electron-hole-pairs that, depending on the applied bias voltage, charge or discharge the quantum dots and hence decrease or increase the conductance. Wavelength-dependent conductance control is observed by illumination with red and infrared light, which leads to charging via interband and discharging via intraband absorption. The presented memristor enables optical conductance control and may thus be considered for sensory applications in artificial neural networks as light-sensitive synapses or optically tunable memories.

  7. Multiple-wavelength neutron holography with pulsed neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Ohoyama, Kenji; Happo, Naohisa; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Shinya; Harada, Masahide; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Nitani, Hiroaki; Shishido, Toetsu; Yubuta, Kunio

    2017-08-01

    Local structures around impurities in solids provide important information for understanding the mechanisms of material functions, because most of them are controlled by dopants. For this purpose, the x-ray absorption fine structure method, which provides radial distribution functions around specific elements, is most widely used. However, a similar method using neutron techniques has not yet been developed. If one can establish a method of local structural analysis with neutrons, then a new frontier of materials science can be explored owing to the specific nature of neutron scattering-that is, its high sensitivity to light elements and magnetic moments. Multiple-wavelength neutron holography using the time-of-flight technique with pulsed neutrons has great potential to realize this. We demonstrated multiple-wavelength neutron holography using a Eu-doped CaF 2 single crystal and obtained a clear three-dimensional atomic image around trivalent Eu substituted for divalent Ca, revealing an interesting feature of the local structure that allows it to maintain charge neutrality. The new holography technique is expected to provide new information on local structures using the neutron technique.

  8. Organic emitters: Light-emitting fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortí, Enrique; Bolink, Henk J.

    2015-04-01

    Light-emitting fibres that suit integration with textiles are prepared by dip-coating a steel wire with an electroluminescent material and then cleverly wrapping the structure with a carbon nanotube sheet that functions as a transparent electrode.

  9. Radiation-emitting Electronic Product Codes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains product names and associated information developed by the Center for all products, both medical and non-medical, which emit radiation. It...

  10. Emissive Ion Thruster -EMIT, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A propulsion system is proposed that is based on acceleration of ions emitted from a thin, solid-state electrochemical ceramic membrane. This technology would...

  11. Radiation Emitting Product Corrective Actions and Recalls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database provides descriptions of radiation-emitting products that have been recalled under an approved corrective action plan to remove defective and...

  12. SiNx layers on nanostructured Si solar cells: Effective for optical absorption and carrier collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yunae; Kim, Eunah; Gwon, Minji; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2015-01-01

    We compared nanopatterned Si solar cells with and without SiN x layers. The SiN x layer coating significantly improved the internal quantum efficiency of the nanopatterned cells at long wavelengths as well as short wavelengths, whereas the surface passivation helped carrier collection of flat cells mainly at short wavelengths. The surface nanostructured array enhanced the optical absorption and also concentrated incoming light near the surface in broad wavelength range. Resulting high density of the photo-excited carriers near the surface could lead to significant recombination loss and the SiN x layer played a crucial role in the improved carrier collection of the nanostructured solar cells

  13. Development of Radiation-Resistant In-Water Wireless Transmission System Using Light Emitting Diodes and Photo Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Shibata, H.; Otsuka, N.; Uehara, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Shibagaki, T.; Komanome, H.

    2016-10-01

    Several kinds of commercially available light emitting diodes (LED) and photo diodes (PD) were irradiated with 60Co gamma ray up to 1 MGy for development of a radiation-resistant in-water wireless transmission system using visible light. The lens parts of the LEDs turned brown by the irradiation and their colors became dark with the absorbed dose. The total luminous fluxes decreased with the absorbed dose and the LED with shorter emission wavelength had the higher decrease rate. Meanwhile, the current-voltage characteristics hardly changed. These results indicate that the decreases of the total luminous flux of the LEDs were mainly caused not by the degradation of the semiconductor parts but by the coloring of the lens parts by the irradiation. On the other hand, the light sensitivities of the PDs decreased with the absorbed dose. The PDs with the window part which turned a darker color had the higher decrease rate. These results indicate that the decreases of light sensitivities of the PDs were also mainly caused by the coloring of the resin parts by the irradiation. If the wireless transmission is performed using the candidate LED and PD between 5 meters in water, using a few LEDs and PDs, the PD's output current generated by the emission light of the LED is estimated to be detectable even considering the effects of the absorption of the light in water and the increased dark current by the irradiation. Therefore, a radiation resistant in-water transmission system can be constructed using commercially available LEDs and PDs in principle.

  14. Nonlinear cyclotron absorption and stimulated scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    In electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), wave sources heating a plasma linearly with respect to intensity; but as the intensity of ECRH gets larger, there might appear nonlinear effects that would result in cutoff of net absorption. This thesis uses quantum mechanical theory to derive a threshold microwave intensity for nonlinear absorption. The quantum mechanical theory estimates that the threshold microwave intensity for nonlinear absorption is about 10 5 watts/cm 2 for a microwave heating experiment (T/sub e/ = 100 ev, λ = 3,783 cm, B = 2.5 kG). This value seems large considering the present power capabilities of microwave sources (10 2 ∼ 10 3 watts/cm 2 ), but for a low temperature plasma, this threshold will go down. There is another nonlinear phenomenon called stimulated cyclotron scattering that enhances photon scattering by electrons gyrating in a magnetic field. This is expected to prevent incoming photons from arriving at the central region of the fusion plasma, where absorption mainly takes place. Theory based on a photon transport model predicts that the threshold intensity for the stimulated cyclotron scattering is about 10 4 watts/cm 2 for the plasma parameters mentioned above. This value seems large also, but a longer wavelength of microwaves and a larger magnitude magnetic field, which will be the case in reactor type facilities, will lower the threshold intensity to levels comparable with the currently developed microwave sources

  15. Experimental methodology for obtaining sound absorption coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Macía M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the authors propose a new methodology for estimating sound absorption coefficients using genetic algorithms. Methodology: sound waves are generated and conducted along a rectangular silencer. The waves are then attenuated by the absorbing material covering the silencer’s walls. The attenuated sound pressure level is used in a genetic algorithm-based search to find the parameters of the proposed attenuation expressions that include geometric factors, the wavelength and the absorption coefficient. Results: a variety of adjusted mathematical models were found that make it possible to estimate the absorption coefficients based on the characteristics of a rectangular silencer used for measuring the attenuation of the noise that passes through it. Conclusions: this methodology makes it possible to obtain the absorption coefficients of new materials in a cheap and simple manner. Although these coefficients might be slightly different from those obtained through other methodologies, they provide solutions within the engineering accuracy ranges that are used for designing noise control systems.

  16. Blue emitting organic semiconductors under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Guha, Suchismita

    2016-01-01

    This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure and inter......This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure...

  17. Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    Devices utilizing an entirely new class of earth abundant, inexpensive phosphorescent emitters based on metal-halide nanoclusters are reported. Light-emitting diodes with tunable performance are demonstrated by varying cation substitution to these nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations provide insight about the nature of the phosphorescent emitting states, which involves a strong pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortion. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric

  19. Spectral broadening in anatase titanium dioxide waveguides at telecommunication and near-visible wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher C; Shtyrkova, Katia; Bradley, Jonathan D B; Reshef, Orad; Ippen, Erich; Mazur, Eric

    2013-07-29

    We observe spectral broadening of femtosecond pulses in single-mode anatase-titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) waveguides at telecommunication and near-visible wavelengths (1565 and 794 nm). By fitting our data to nonlinear pulse propagation simulations, we quantify nonlinear optical parameters around 1565 nm. Our fitting yields a nonlinear refractive index of 0.16 × 10(-18) m(2)/W, no two-photon absorption, and stimulated Raman scattering from the 144 cm(-1) Raman line of anatase with a gain coefficient of 6.6 × 10(-12) m/W. Additionally, we report on asymmetric spectral broadening around 794 nm. The wide wavelength applicability and negligible two-photon absorption of TiO(2) make it a promising material for integrated photonics.

  20. All-Si photodetector for telecommunication wavelength based on subwavelength grating structure and critical coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Taghizadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose an efficient planar all-Si internal photoemission photodetector operating at the telecommunication wavelength of 1550 nm and numerically investigate its optical and electrical properties. The proposed polarization-sensitive detector is composed of an appropriately engineered subwavelength grating structure topped with a silicide layer of nanometers thickness as an absorbing material. It is shown that a nearly-perfect light absorption is possible for the thin silicide layer by its integration to the grating resonator. The absorption is shown to be maximized when the critical coupling condition is satisfied. Simulations show that the external quantum efficiency of the proposed photodetector with a 2-nm-thick PtSi absorbing layer at the center wavelength of 1550 nm can reach up to ∼60%.

  1. Uranium absorption study pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Sautiez, B.

    1959-01-01

    The report describes a pile designed to measure the absorption of fuel slugs. The pile is of graphite and comprises a central section composed of uranium rods in a regular lattice. RaBe sources and BF 3 counters are situated on either side of the center. A given uranium charge is compared with a specimen charge of about 560 kg, and the difference in absorption between the two noted. The sensitivity of the equipment will detect absorption variations of about a few ppm boron (10 -6 boron per gr. of uranium) or better. (author) [fr

  2. Multi-wavelength fiber optical parametric oscillator with ultra-narrow wavelength spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daru; Sun, Bing

    2010-08-16

    We propose a novel multi-wavelength fiber optical parametric oscillator (MW-FOPO) based on a ring cavity. A highly nonlinear fiber and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed by two 3-dB optical couplers are used as the gain medium and the comb filter, respectively. Multi-wavelength lasing of the MW-FOPO with an ultra-narrow wavelength spacing of about 0.08 nm is achieved. The output spectrum of the MW-FOPO covers a wavelength regime from 1510 nm to 1615 nm (for lasing wavelengths with the power that exceeds -60 dBm). The stability of the MW-FOPO is discussed and experimentally demonstrated. A comparison of the output spectra between the MW-FOPO and the multi-wavelength Erbium-doped fiber laser is also presented.

  3. A 12 GHz wavelength spacing multi-wavelength laser source for wireless communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, P. C.; Shiu, R. K.; Bitew, M. A.; Chang, T. L.; Lai, C. H.; Junior, J. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a multi-wavelength laser source with 12 GHz wavelength spacing based on a single distributed feedback laser. A light wave generated from the distributed feedback laser is fed into a frequency shifter loop consisting of 50:50 coupler, dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator, optical amplifier, optical filter, and polarization controller. The frequency of the input wavelength is shifted and then re-injected into the frequency shifter loop. By re-injecting the shifted wavelengths multiple times, we have generated 84 optical carriers with 12 GHz wavelength spacing and stable output power. For each channel, two wavelengths are modulated by a wireless data using the phase modulator and transmitted through a 25 km single mode fiber. In contrast to previously developed schemes, the proposed laser source does not incur DC bias drift problem. Moreover, it is a good candidate for radio-over-fiber systems to support multiple users using a single distributed feedback laser.

  4. High-Power Genuine Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes Based On Colloidal Nanocrystal Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jeonghun; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Myeongjin; Lee, Seonghoon; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Changhee

    2015-06-10

    Thin-film ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission wavelengths below 400 nm are emerging as promising light sources for various purposes, from our daily lives to industrial applications. However, current thin-film UV-emitting devices radiate not only UV light but also visible light. Here, we introduce genuine UV-emitting colloidal nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) LEDs (QLEDs) using precisely controlled NQDs consisting of a 2.5-nm-sized CdZnS ternary core and a ZnS shell. The effective core size is further reduced during the shell growth via the atomic diffusion of interior Cd atoms to the exterior ZnS shell, compensating for the photoluminescence red shift. This design enables us to develop CdZnS@ZnS UV QLEDs with pure UV emission and minimal parasitic peaks. The irradiance is as high as 2.0-13.9 mW cm(-2) at the peak wavelengths of 377-390 nm, several orders of magnitude higher than that of other thin-film UV LEDs.

  5. Effects of particle size and laser wavelength on heating of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-15

    Jul 15, 2016 ... In the above equations, m = k/km, x = kmr0, ψn(x) = xjn(x), ξn(x) = xh. (1) n (x), r0 is the radius of the nanopar- ticles and km is the wavenumber in the ... As the absorption is the same in these wavelength ranges, it is expected that increasing the temperature of particles does not make much difference. 350.

  6. LITT on canine prostates: an in-vivo study to compare the effects of different wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Martin, Thomas; Muschter, Rolf

    1996-05-01

    Laser induced interstitial thermotherapy is a new minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Since high power laser diode lasers became available for clinical use a comparison of tissue effects of different wavelengths under controlled conditions is needed. In this study three different laser wavelengths were compared at output powers of 4 W and 8 W with 10 min and 90 s irradiation time, respectively, resulting in applied energies of 2700 J and 720 J. The results in both groups showed that the use of a wavelength close to the relative water absorption peak at 980 nm gave tendentiously but not significantly larger coagulated areas. Furthermore it became obvious that the use of 8 W for 90 sec results in higher maximum temperatures and larger lesions compared to the application of 4 W over a period of 10 min, although the energy used in the latter group was 4 fold higher.

  7. Long-Wavelength X-Ray Diffraction and Its Applications in Macromolecular Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Manfred S

    2017-01-01

    For many years, diffraction experiments in macromolecular crystallography at X-ray wavelengths longer than that of Cu-K α (1.54 Å) have been largely underappreciated. Effects caused by increased X-ray absorption result in the fact that these experiments are more difficult than the standard diffraction experiments at short wavelengths. However, due to the also increased anomalous scattering of many biologically relevant atoms, important additional structural information can be obtained. This information, in turn, can be used for phase determination, for substructure identification, in molecular replacement approaches, as well as in structure refinement. This chapter reviews the possibilities and the difficulties associated with such experiments, and it provides a short description of two macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beam lines dedicated to long-wavelength X-ray diffraction experiments.

  8. Fast gain recovery rates with strong wavelength dependence in a non-linear SOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Ciaran S; Power, Mark J; Schneider, Simon; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2010-12-06

    We report remarkably fast and strongly wavelength-dependent gain recovery in a single SOA without the aid of an offset filter. Full gain recovery times as short as 9 ps were observed in pump-probe measurements when pumping to the blue wavelength side of a continuous wave probe, in contrast to times of 25 to 30 ps when pumping to the red wavelength side. Experimental and numerical analysis indicate that the long effective length and high gain led to deep saturation of the second half of the SOA by the probe. The consequent absorption of blue-shifted pump pulses in this region resulted in device dynamics analogous to those of the Turbo-Switch.

  9. Electronic band-gap modified passive silicon optical modulator at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Qingming; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-11-13

    The silicon optical modulator is considered to be the workhorse of a revolution in communications. In recent years, the capabilities of externally driven active silicon optical modulators have dramatically improved. Self-driven passive modulators, especially passive silicon modulators, possess advantages in compactness, integration, low-cost, etc. Constrained by a large indirect band-gap and sensitivity-related loss, the passive silicon optical modulator is scarce and has been not advancing, especially at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, a passive silicon optical modulator is fabricated by introducing an impurity band in the electronic band-gap, and its nonlinear optics and applications in the telecommunications-wavelength lasers are investigated. The saturable absorption properties at the wavelength of 1.55 μm was measured and indicates that the sample is quite sensitive to light intensity and has negligible absorption loss. With a passive silicon modulator, pulsed lasers were constructed at wavelengths at 1.34 and 1.42 μm. It is concluded that the sensitive self-driven passive silicon optical modulator is a viable candidate for photonics applications out to 2.5 μm.

  10. Bigger, Brighter, Bluer-Better?Current light-emitting devices- adverse sleep properties and preventative strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eGringras

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveIn an effort to enhance the efficiency, brightness and contrast of light-emitting (LE devices during the day, displays often generate substantial short-wavelength (blue-enriched light emissions that can adversely affect sleep. We set out to verify the extent of such short-wavelength emissions, produced by a tablet (iPad Air, e-reader (Kindle Paperwhite 1st generation and smartphone (iPhone 5s and to determine the impact of strategies designed to reduce these light emissions. SettingUniversity of Surrey dedicated chronobiology facility.MethodsFirstly, the spectral power of all the light-emitting (LE devices was assessed when displaying identical text. Secondly, we compared the text output with that of ‘Angry Birds’-a popular top 100 ‘App Store’ game. Finally we measured the impact of two strategies that attempt to reduce the output of short-wavelength light emissions. The first strategy employed an inexpensive commercially available pair of orange-tinted ‘blue-blocking’ glasses. The second tested an app designed to be ‘sleep-aware’ whose designers deliberately attempted to reduce blue-enriched light emissions.ResultsAll the LE devices shared very similar enhanced blue-light peaks when displaying text. This included the output from the backlit Kindle Paperwhite device. The spectra when comparing text to the Angry Birds game were also very similar, although the

  11. Application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in cultivation of phototrophic microalgae: current state and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glemser, M; Heining, M; Schmidt, J; Becker, A; Garbe, D; Buchholz, R; Brück, T

    2016-02-01

    The quality and regulation of the incident light is crucial in microalgae cultivation processes. Depending on wavelength, spectrum, and intensity, growth characteristics and biochemical composition of these organisms vary. With mainly fluorescent lamps (FL) used previously for illumination, such variabilities could not be studied adequately due to their broad emission spectrum. In contrast, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) emit a very narrow wavelength band and enable flexible photobioreactor designs due to their small size. This review provides a condensed overview on the application of LEDs in microalgal cultivation processes. It summarizes the current availability and applicability of LED technologies as an illumination source for research-focused photobioreactor systems. A particular focus is the use of narrow-wavelength LEDs to address fundamental as well as applied aspects of light color on algae biomass and value-added compound formation. In this respect, the application of internal and external illumination systems is reviewed together with trends in the industrial use of LED systems to intensify algae process efficiency.

  12. Revisiting Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Araújo, Ana Luiza Lara; Ulhøi, John Parm; Lettl, Christopher

    learning processes of absorptive capacity, which comprise combinative and adaptive capabilities. Drawing on survey data (n=169), the study concludes that combinative capabilities primarily enhance transformative and exploratory learning processes, while adaptive capabilities strengthen all three learning......Absorptive capacity has mostly been perceived as a 'passive' outcome of R&D investments. Recently, however, a growing interest into its 'proactive' potentials has emerged. This paper taps into this development and proposes a dynamic model for conceptualizing the determinants of the complementary...

  13. On Spectral Invariance of Single Scattering Albedo for Weakly Absorbing Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The single scattering albedo omega (sub 0 lambda) in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the total extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength A and droplet size r. In this presentation we will show that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio omega (sub 0 lambda)(r). The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo omega (sub 0 lambda) via one known spectrum omega (sub 0 lambda)(r(sub o)). We will provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. In addition to water droplets, similar linear relationships were found for the single scattering albedo of non-spherical ice crystals. The single scattering albedo $\\omega _ {0\\lambda }$ in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the total extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, and thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength $\\lambda $ and droplet size $r$. We show that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio $\\omega _ {0\\lambda } (r)$/$\\omega _ {0\\lambda } (r_{0})$ of two single scattering albedo spectra for two different droplet sizes is a linear function of $\\omega _{0\\lambda }(r)$. The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo $\\omega_{0\\lambda }(r)$ via one known spectrum $\\omega_{0\\lambda }(r_{0})$. We provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. Similar linear relationships characterize the single scattering albedo of non-spherical ice crystals.

  14. THE TWO-WAVELENGTH METHOD OF MICROSPECTROPHOTOMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Mortimer L.

    1961-01-01

    In connection with the potential development of automatic two-wavelength microspectrophotometry, a new version of the two-wavelength method has been formulated. Unlike its predecessors, the Ornstein and Patau versions, the new method varies the area of the photometric field seeking to maximize a relationship between distributional errors at the two wavelengths. Stating this distributional error relationship in conventional photometric terms, the conditions at the maximum are defined by taking the first derivative with respect to field size and setting it equal to zero. This operation supplies two equations; one relates the transmittances at the two wavelengths, and a second states the relative amount of chromophore in the field in terms of transmittance at one wavelength. With the first equation to drive a servomechanism which sets the appropriate field size, the desired answer can then be obtained directly and continuously from the second equation. The result is identical in theory with those of the earlier methods, but the technique is more suitable for electronic computing. PMID:14472536

  15. Absorption fluids data survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  16. PHOTOINDUCED CURRENTS IN CDZNTE CRYSTALS AS A FUNCTION OF ILLUMINATION WAVELENGTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teague, L.; Washington, A.; Duff, M.

    2012-04-23

    We report variations in the currents of CdZnTe semiconductor crystals during exposure to a series of light emitting diodes of various wavelengths ranging from 470 to 950 nm. The changes in the steady-state current of one CdZnTe crystal with and without illumination along with the time dependence of the illumination effects are discussed. Analysis of the de-trapping and transient bulk currents during and after optical excitation yield insight into the behaviour of charge traps within the crystal. Similar behaviour is observed for illumination of a second CdZnTe crystal suggesting that the overall illumination effects are not crystal dependent.

  17. Terahertz digital holography using angular spectrum and dual wavelength reconstruction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbeck, Martin S; Kim, Myung K; Gregory, Don A; Everitt, Henry O

    2011-05-09

    Terahertz digital off-axis holography is demonstrated using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a highly coherent, frequency tunable, continuous wave terahertz source emitting around 0.7 THz and a single, spatially-scanned Schottky diode detector. The reconstruction of amplitude and phase objects is performed digitally using the angular spectrum method in conjunction with Fourier space filtering to reduce noise from the twin image and DC term. Phase unwrapping is achieved using the dual wavelength method, which offers an automated approach to overcome the 2π phase ambiguity. Potential applications for nondestructive test and evaluation of visually opaque dielectric and composite objects are discussed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Mid-IR Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Alrefae, Majed Abdullah

    2013-05-01

    Laser diagnostics are fast-response, non-intrusive and species-specific tools perfectly applicable for studying combustion processes. Quantitative measurements of species concentration and temperature require spectroscopic data to be well-known at combustion-relevant conditions. Absorption cross-section is an important spectroscopic quantity and has direct relation to the species concentration. In this work, the absorption cross-sections of basic hydrocarbons are measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, tunable Difference Frequency Generation laser and fixed wavelength helium-neon laser. The studied species are methane, methanol, acetylene, ethylene, ethane, ethanol, propylene, propane, 1-butene, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-heptane. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer is used for the measurements of the absorption cross-sections and the integrated band intensities of the 13 hydrocarbons. The spectral region of the spectra is 2800 – 3400 cm-1 (2.9 – 3.6 μm) and the temperature range is 673 – 1100 K. These valuable data provide huge opportunities to select interference-free wavelengths for measuring time-histories of a specific species in a shock tube or other combustion systems. Such measurements can allow developing/improving chemical kinetics mechanisms by experimentally determining reaction rates. The Difference Frequency Generation (DFG) laser is a narrow line-width, tunable laser in the 3.35 – 3.53 μm wavelength region which contains strong absorption features for most hydrocarbons due to the fundamental C-H vibrating stretch. The absorption cross-sections of propylene are measured at seven different wavelengths using the DFG laser. The temperature range is 296 – 460 K which is reached using a Reflex Cell. The DFG laser is very attractive for kinetic studies in the shock tube because of its fast time response and the potential possibility of making species-specific measurements. The Fixed wavelength

  19. Infrared light-emitting diode radiation causes gravitropic and morphological effects in dark-grown oat seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. F.; Brown, C. S.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Chapman, D. K.; Deitzer, G. F.

    1996-01-01

    Oat (Avena sativa cv Seger) seedlings were irradiated with IR light-emitting diode (LED) radiation passed through a visible-light-blocking filter. Infrared LED irradiated seedlings exhibited differences in growth and gravitropic response when compared to seedlings grown in darkness at the same temperature. Thus, the oat seedlings in this study were able to detect IR LED radiation. These findings call into question the use of IR LED as a safe-light for some photosensitive plant response experiments. These findings also expand the defined range of wavelengths involved in radiation-gravity (light-gravity) interactions to include wavelengths in the IR region of the spectrum.

  20. Improving the optical efficiency and concentration of a single-plate quantum dot solar concentrator using near infra-red emitting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, M.; McCormack, S.J.; Doran, J.; Norton, B. [Dublin Energy Lab., Dublin Institute of Technology, Focas Institute, DIT - Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Dublin (Ireland)

    2009-07-15

    Low luminescent quantum yields and large overlap between quantum dot (QD) emission and absorption spectra of present commercially-available visible-emitting QDs have led to low optical efficiencies for single-plate quantum dot solar concentrators (QDSCs). It is shown that using near infra-red (NIR) emitting QDs, re-absorption of QD emitted photons can be reduced greatly, thereby diminishing escape cone losses thus improving optical efficiencies and concentration ratios. Using Monte-Carlo ray-trace modelling, escape cone losses are quantified for different types of QD. A minimum 25% escape cone loss would be expected for a plate with refractive index of 1.5 containing QDs with no spectral overlap. It is shown that escape cone losses account for {proportional_to}57% of incident photons absorbed in QDSCs containing commercially-available visible-emitting QDs. (author)

  1. Development of Multi-Wavelength Raman Lidar and its Application on Aerosol and Cloud Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A movable multi-wavelength Raman lidar (TMPRL was built in Hefei, China. Emitting with three wavelengths at 1064, 532, and 355nm, receiving three above Mie scattering signals and two nitrogen Raman signals at 386 and 607nm, and depolarization signal at 532nm, TMPRL has the capacity to investigate the height resolved optical and microphysical properties of aerosol and cloud. The retrieval algorithms of optical parameters base on Mie-Raman technique and the microphysical parameters based on Bayesian optimization method were also developed and applied to observed lidar data. Designing to make unattended operation and 24/7 continuous working, TMPRL has joined several field campaigns to study on the aerosol, cloud and their interaction researches. Some observed results of aerosol and cloud optical properties and the first attempt to validate the vertical aerosol size distribution retrieved by TMPRL and in-situ measurement by airplane are presented and discussed.

  2. Two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-12-05

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization based on the controlled spontaneous emission, in which the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Due to the spatially dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the resulting spontaneously emission spectrum. The phase sensitive property of the atomic system leads to quenching of the spontaneous emission in some regions of the standing-waves, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in the position measurement of the atom. We find that the frequency measurement of the emitted light localizes the atom in half-wavelength domain. Especially the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can reach 100% when a photon with certain frequency is detected. By increasing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields, such 2D sub-half-wavelength atom localization can acquire high spatial resolution.

  3. Absorption cooling device. Absorptions-Kuehlvorrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, J.; Vardi, I.; Kimchi, Y.; Ben-Dror, J.

    1980-03-25

    The invention concerns improvements of absorption refrigerators, where a lithium chloride or lithium bromide/water cycle is used. According to the invention an inner separating or dividing structure between different functional parts of a machine of this type is provided. The structure contains two sections of wall, which are separated from one another by a suitable space, in order to achieve thermal insulation. This air space is provided with an opening in the direction towards the inside of the container and the opening is shielded to prevent the entry of liquids (in liquid or spray form).

  4. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Freyer, James P.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-04-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic- scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  5. Coumarins as wavelength shifters in polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G.W.; Zhang, G.

    1995-01-01

    A series of commercially available coumarins was tested as wavelength shifters in polystyrene for a tile/fiber calorimeter application. The objective was to find a compound that when incorporated in a polystyrene matrix absorbed in the 400-450 nm wavelength range, fluoresced in the green region of the visible spectrum (λ em =450-550 nm), and exhibited both short decay time and high quantum yield. Transmittance, fluorescence, and decay time determinations were performed in order to characterize each coumarin in polystyrene. Two coumarins (C510 and C515) were found to have faster decay times ( similar 8 ns vs. 12 ns) and superior light output (100-120%) compared to the commonly-used green wavelength shifter, K-27. (orig.)

  6. Enhancement of broadband optical absorption in photovoltaic devices by band-edge effect of photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Noda, Susumu

    2013-08-26

    We numerically investigate broadband optical absorption enhancement in thin, 400-nm thick microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si) photovoltaic devices by photonic crystals (PCs). We realize absorption enhancement by coupling the light from the free space to the large area resonant modes at the photonic band-edge induced by the photonic crystals. We show that multiple photonic band-edge modes can be produced by higher order modes in the vertical direction of the Si photovoltaic layer, which can enhance the absorption on multiple wavelengths. Moreover, we reveal that the photonic superlattice structure can produce more photonic band-edge modes that lead to further optical absorption. The absorption average in wavelengths of 500-1000 nm weighted to the solar spectrum (AM 1.5) increases almost twice: from 33% without photonic crystal to 58% with a 4 × 4 period superlattice photonic crystal; our result outperforms the Lambertian textured structure.

  7. Temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} UV absorption spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, J.B.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, < 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, {approximately} 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. The authors ClONO{sub 2} absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina.

  8. Temperature dependence of the ClONO2 UV absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, less than 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, about 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. Our ClONO2 absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina (1979).

  9. Near-Infrared Diode Laser Absorption Diagnostic for Temperature and Water Vapor in a Scramjet Combustor (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Jonathan T. C; Rieker, Gregory B; Jeffries, Jay B; Gruber, Mark R; Carter, Campbell D; Mathur, Tarun; Hanson, Ronald K

    2005-01-01

    ... to 1.47 mum spectral region (2v1 and v1 + v3 overtone bands). Ratio thermometry was performed using direct absorption wavelength scans of isolated features at a 4-kHz repetition rate, as well as 2f wavelength modulation scans at a 2-kHz scan rate...

  10. Short wavelength sources and atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.T.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with atoms and ions is a key fundamental process. Experimental progress has depended in particular on the development of short wavelength light sources. Laser-plasma and synchrotron sources have been exploited for several decades and most recently the development of short wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) sources is revolutionizing the field. This paper introduces laser plasma and synchrotron sources through examples of their use in studies of the interaction of ionizing radiation with atoms and ions, ranging from few-electron atomic and ionic systems to the many-electron high atomic number actinides. The new FEL source (FLASH) at DESY is introduced. (author)

  11. Wavelength division multiplexing a practical engineering guide

    CERN Document Server

    Grobe, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In this book, Optical Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) is approached from a strictly practical and application-oriented point of view. Based on the characteristics and constraints of modern fiber-optic components, transport systems and fibers, the text provides relevant rules of thumb and practical hints for technology selection, WDM system and link dimensioning, and also for network-related aspects such as wavelength assignment and resilience mechanisms. Actual 10/40 Gb/s WDM systems are considered, and a preview of the upcoming 100 Gb/s systems and technologies for even higher bit rate

  12. Variable wavelength selection devices: Physics and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianyu, Haiqing

    Variable wavelength selection (VWS) achieved by implementing tunability to wavelength discriminating devices has generated great interest in basic science, applied physics, and technology. This thesis focuses on the underlying physics and application of several novel wavelength discriminating devices. Holographical polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) are switchable volume gratings formed by exposing a photopolymerizable monomer and liquid crystal mixture to interfering monochromatic light beams. An HPDLCs wavelength discriminating ability along with its switchability, allow it to be utilized in VWS devices. A novel mode HPDLC, total internal reflection (TIR) HPDLC, has been developed as a wavelength selective filter. The grating planes in this device are tilted so that the diffracted light experiences total internal reflection at the glass-air interface and is trapped in the cell until it eventually escapes from an edge. A VWS device is demonstrated by stacking TIR HPDLCs operating at different wavelengths. Converging or diverging recording beams are employed to fabricate chirped reflection HPDLCs with a pitch gradient along the designated direction, creating chirped switchable reflection gratings (CSRGs). A pixelated version of the CSRG is developed herein, and a dynamic spectral equalizer is presented by combining the pixelated CSRG with a prism (for wavelength discrimination). A switchable circular to point converter (SCPC), which enables the random selection of the wavelength bands divided by the Fabry-Perot interferometer utilizing the controllable beam steering capability of transmission HPDLCs, is demonstrated. A random optical cross-switch (TIROL) can be created by integrating a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a stack of SCPC units. The in-plane electric field generated by the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to elongate the helical pitch of a cholesteric liquid crystal and thereby induces a red shift of the transmission reflection peak

  13. New strategy for optimizing wavelength converter placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Y. C.; Chien, S. F.; Low, Andy L. Y.; Teo, C. F.; Lee, Youngseok

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new strategic alternate-path routing to be combined with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to better solve the wavelength converters placement problem. The strategic search heuristic is designed to provide network connectivity topologies for the converters to be placed more effectively. The new strategy is applied to the 14-node NSFNET to examine its efficiency in reducing the blocking probability in sparse wavelength conversion network. Computed results show that, when applied to the identical optimization framework, our search method outperforms both the equal-cost multipath routing and traffic-engineering-aware shortest-path routing.

  14. Continuous-wave wavelength conversion in a photonic crystal fiber with two zero-dispersion wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.V.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Nielsen, C.K.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous-wave wavelength conversion through four-wave mixing in an endlessly single mode photonic crystal fiber. Phasematching is possible at vanishing pump power in the anomalous dispersion regime between the two zero-dispersion wavelengths. By mixing appropriate pump and idler...... line width lasers....

  15. A Wavelength-shifting Optical Module (WOM) for in-ice neutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebecker, Dustin; Archinger, Markus Gerhard; Böser, Sebastian; Brostean-Kaiser, Jannes; Del Pino Rosendo, Esther; Di Lorenzo, Vincenzo; DuVernois, Michael; Falke, Peter Johannes; Fösig, Carl-Christian; Karg, Timo; Köpke, Lutz; Kowalski, Marek; Looft, Andreas; Sand, Krystina; Tosi, Delia

    2016-04-01

    We report on the development status of a single-photon sensor that employs wavelength-shifting and light-guiding techniques to maximize the collection area while minimizing the dark noise rate. The sensor is tailored towards application in ice-Cherenkov neutrino detectors embedded in inert and cold, low-radioactivity and UV transparent ice as a detection medium, such as IceCube-Gen2 or MICA. The goal is to decrease the energy threshold as well as to increase the energy resolution and the vetoing capability of the neutrino telescope, when compared to a setup with optical sensors similar to those used in IceCube. The proposed sensor captures photons with wavelengths between 250 nm and 400 nm. These photons are re-emitted with wavelengths above 400 nm by a wavelength shifting coating applied to a 90 mm diameter polymer tube. The tube guides the light towards a small-diameter PMT via total internal reflection. By scaling the results from smaller laboratory prototypes, the total efficiency of the proposed detector for a Cherenkov spectrum is estimated to exceed that of a standard IceCube optical module. The status of the prototype development and the performance of its main components will be discussed.

  16. A Wavelength-shifting Optical Module (WOM for in-ice neutrino detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebecker Dustin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development status of a single-photon sensor that employs wavelength-shifting and light-guiding techniques to maximize the collection area while minimizing the dark noise rate. The sensor is tailored towards application in ice-Cherenkov neutrino detectors embedded in inert and cold, low-radioactivity and UV transparent ice as a detection medium, such as IceCube-Gen2 or MICA. The goal is to decrease the energy threshold as well as to increase the energy resolution and the vetoing capability of the neutrino telescope, when compared to a setup with optical sensors similar to those used in IceCube. The proposed sensor captures photons with wavelengths between 250 nm and 400 nm. These photons are re-emitted with wavelengths above 400 nm by a wavelength shifting coating applied to a 90 mm diameter polymer tube. The tube guides the light towards a small-diameter PMT via total internal reflection. By scaling the results from smaller laboratory prototypes, the total efficiency of the proposed detector for a Cherenkov spectrum is estimated to exceed that of a standard IceCube optical module. The status of the prototype development and the performance of its main components will be discussed.

  17. Noncontact simultaneous dual wavelength photoplethysmography: A further step toward noncontact pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Kenneth; Ward, Tomas; Markham, Charles

    2007-04-01

    We present a camera-based device capable of capturing two photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals at two different wavelengths simultaneously, in a remote noncontact manner. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and dual wavelength array of light emitting diodes (760 and 880nm). By alternately illuminating a region of tissue with each wavelength of light, and detecting the backscattered photons with the camera at a rate of 16frames/wavelengths, two multiplexed PPG wave forms are simultaneously captured. This process is the basis of pulse oximetry, and we describe how, with the inclusion of a calibration procedure, this system could be used as a noncontact pulse oximeter to measure arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) remotely. Results from an experiment on ten subjects, exhibiting normal SpO2 readings, that demonstrate the instrument's ability to capture signals from a range of subjects under realistic lighting and environmental conditions are presented. We compare the signals captured by the noncontact system to a conventional PPG signal captured concurrently from a finger, and show by means of a J. Bland and D. Altman [Lancet 327, 307 (1986); Statistician 32, 307 (1983)] test, the noncontact device to be comparable to a contact device as a monitor of heart rate. We highlight some considerations that should be made when using camera-based "integrative" sampling methods and demonstrate through simulation, the suitability of the captured PPG signals for application of existing pulse oximetry calibration procedures.

  18. Noncontact simultaneous dual wavelength photoplethysmography: A further step toward noncontact pulse oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, Kenneth; Ward, Tomas; Markham, Charles

    2007-01-01

    We present a camera-based device capable of capturing two photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals at two different wavelengths simultaneously, in a remote noncontact manner. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and dual wavelength array of light emitting diodes (760 and 880 nm). By alternately illuminating a region of tissue with each wavelength of light, and detecting the backscattered photons with the camera at a rate of 16 frames/wavelength s, two multiplexed PPG wave forms are simultaneously captured. This process is the basis of pulse oximetry, and we describe how, with the inclusion of a calibration procedure, this system could be used as a noncontact pulse oximeter to measure arterial oxygen saturation (S p O 2 ) remotely. Results from an experiment on ten subjects, exhibiting normal S p O 2 readings, that demonstrate the instrument's ability to capture signals from a range of subjects under realistic lighting and environmental conditions are presented. We compare the signals captured by the noncontact system to a conventional PPG signal captured concurrently from a finger, and show by means of a J. Bland and D. Altman [Lancet 327, 307 (1986); Statistician 32, 307 (1983)] test, the noncontact device to be comparable to a contact device as a monitor of heart rate. We highlight some considerations that should be made when using camera-based ''integrative'' sampling methods and demonstrate through simulation, the suitability of the captured PPG signals for application of existing pulse oximetry calibration procedures

  19. Invariable optical properties of phosphor-free white light-emitting diode under electrical stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Long; Hao, Fang; Sheng-Li, Qi; Li-Wen, Sang; Wen-Yu, Cao; Jian, Yan; Jun-Jing, Deng; Zhi-Jian, Yang; Guo-Yi, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that a dual-wavelength white light-emitting diode is fabricated by using a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method. Through a 200-hours' current stress, the reverse leakage current of this light-emitting diode increases with the aging time, but the optical properties remained unchanged despite the enhanced reverse leakage current. Transmission electron microscopy and cathodeluminescence images show that indium atoms were assembled in and around V-shape pits with various compositions, which can be ascribed to the emitted white light. Evolution of cathodeluminescence intensities under electron irradiation is also performed. Combining cathodeluminescence intensities under electron irradiation and above results, the increase of leakage channels and crystalline quality degradation are realized. Although leakage channels increase with aging, potential fluctuation caused by indium aggregation can effectively avoid the impact of leakage channels. Indium aggregation can be attributed to the mechanism of preventing optical degradation in phosphor-free white light-emitting diode. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Transparent conductive graphene electrode in GaN-based ultra-violet light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Jae; Mastro, Michael A; Hite, Jennifer; Eddy, Charles R; Kim, Jihyun

    2010-10-25

    We report a graphene-based transparent conductive electrode for use in ultraviolet (UV) GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs). A few-layer graphene (FLG) layer was mechanically deposited. UV light at a peak wavelength of 368 nm was successfully emitted by the FLG layer as transparent contact to p-GaN. The emission of UV light through the thin graphene layer was brighter than through the thick graphene layer. The thickness of the graphene layer was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Our results indicate that this novel graphene-based transparent conductive electrode holds great promise for use in UV optoelectronics for which conventional ITO is less transparent than graphene.

  1. Enhancement and Quenching of Fluorescence by Silver Nanoparticles in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chung Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of silver nanoparticles (SNPs on the performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs is investigated in this study. The SNPs are introduced between the electron-transport layers by means of thermal evaporation. SNPs are found to have the surface plasmon resonance at wavelength 525 nm when the mean particle size of SNPs is 34 nm. The optimized OLED, in terms of the spacing between the emitting layer and SNPs, is found to have the maximum luminance 2.4 times higher than that in the OLED without SNPs. The energy transfer between exciton and surface plasmons with the different spacing distances has been studied.

  2. VCSELs Fundamentals, Technology and Applications of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The huge progress which has been achieved in the field is covered here, in the first comprehensive monograph on vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) since eight years. Apart from chapters reviewing the research field and the laser fundamentals, there are comprehensive updates on red and blue emitting VCSELs, telecommunication VCSELs, optical transceivers, and parallel-optical links for computer interconnects. Entirely new contributions are made to the fields of vectorial three-dimensional optical modeling, single-mode VCSELs, polarization control, polarization dynamics, very-high-speed design, high-power emission, use of high-contrast gratings, GaInNAsSb long-wavelength VCSELs, optical video links, VCSELs for optical mice and sensing, as well as VCSEL-based laser printing. The book appeals to researchers, optical engineers and graduate students.

  3. Monolithic electrically injected nanowire array edge-emitting laser on (001) silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Frost, Thomas

    2014-08-13

    A silicon-based laser, preferably electrically pumped, has long been a scientific and engineering goal. We demonstrate here, for the first time, an edge-emitting InGaN/GaN disk-in-nanowire array electrically pumped laser emitting in the green (λ = 533 nm) on (001) silicon substrate. The devices display excellent dc and dynamic characteristics with values of threshold current density, differential gain, T0 and small signal modulation bandwidth equal to 1.76 kA/cm2, 3 × 10-17 cm2, 232 K, and 5.8 GHz respectively under continuous wave operation. Preliminary reliability measurements indicate a lifetime of 7000 h. The emission wavelength can be tuned by varying the alloy composition in the quantum disks. The monolithic nanowire laser on (001)Si can therefore address wide-ranging applications such as solid state lighting, displays, plastic fiber communication, medical diagnostics, and silicon photonics. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Plasmon enhanced green GaN light-emitting diodes - Invited paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Fadil, Ahmed; Iida, Daisuke

    High-efficiency garnium nitride (GaN) based blue light-emitting diode (LED) paves the way for solid statelighting to take the place of the conventional incandescent bulbs and fluorescent light tubes.Compared to the traditional light sources, solid state lighting is more efficient, more flexible...... in spectral design, more compact etc. TheIII-nitride (GaN, InNetc.) semiconductors are attracting a lot of research effort because the combination of both could emit light with wavelength range from UV to infrared. Basically one material platform could provide all the solutions to light sources.However huge...... point of view, the efficiency of green LED is being improved by growing the GaInN material on non-polar or semi-polar surface of sapphire substrate. In parallel with the material growth effort, surface plasmons are implemented by taking use of the interactionbetween metals and active areas to increase...

  5. Influence of Pre-trimethylindium flow treatment on blue light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bing; Zhao, Jun Liang; Dai, Hai Tao; Wang, Shu Guo; Lin, Ray-Ming; Chu, Fu-Chuan; Huang, Chou-Hsiung; Yu, Sheng-Fu; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Pre-trimethylindium (TMIn) flow treatment prior to quantum well growth on blue light emitting diode properties were investigated. High-resolution X-ray diffraction indicated that Pre-TMIn flow treatment did not change the composition of indium in quantum wells, but influenced electrical and optical properties of blue light emitting diode. Electroluminescence exhibited redshift with increasing TMIn treatment time. Though, the forward voltage became a little larger with longer Pre-TMIn treatment time due to the slight phase separation and indium aggregation, the efficiency droop of the device was improved effectively. - Highlights: • Pre-trimethylindium treatment can lead to longer wavelength. • External quantum efficiency can be improved effectively. • Electrical properties are not decreased using Pre-trimethylindium treatment

  6. Influence of Pre-trimethylindium flow treatment on blue light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bing; Zhao, Jun Liang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Dai, Hai Tao, E-mail: htdai@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Shu Guo [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lin, Ray-Ming, E-mail: rmlin@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chu, Fu-Chuan; Huang, Chou-Hsiung [Graduate Institute of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Yu, Sheng-Fu [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: xwsun@sustc.edu.cn [South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China)

    2014-01-31

    The effects of Pre-trimethylindium (TMIn) flow treatment prior to quantum well growth on blue light emitting diode properties were investigated. High-resolution X-ray diffraction indicated that Pre-TMIn flow treatment did not change the composition of indium in quantum wells, but influenced electrical and optical properties of blue light emitting diode. Electroluminescence exhibited redshift with increasing TMIn treatment time. Though, the forward voltage became a little larger with longer Pre-TMIn treatment time due to the slight phase separation and indium aggregation, the efficiency droop of the device was improved effectively. - Highlights: • Pre-trimethylindium treatment can lead to longer wavelength. • External quantum efficiency can be improved effectively. • Electrical properties are not decreased using Pre-trimethylindium treatment.

  7. A novel single-cavity three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer for atmospheric aerosol research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Linke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The spectral light-absorbing behavior of carbonaceous aerosols varies depending on the chemical composition and structure of the particles. A new single-cavity three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer was developed and characterized for measuring absorption coefficients at three wavelengths across the visible spectral range. In laboratory studies, several types of soot with different organic content were generated by a diffusion flame burner and were investigated for changes in mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC values, absorption and scattering Ångström exponents (αabs and αsca, and single scattering albedo (ω. By increasing the organic carbonaceous (OC content of the aerosol from 50 to 90 % of the total carbonaceous mass, for 660 nm nearly no change of MAC was found with increasing OC content. In contrast, for 532 nm a significant increase, and for 445 nm a strong increase of MAC was found with increasing OC content of the aerosol. Depending on the OC content, the Ångström exponents of absorption and scattering as well as the single scattering albedo increased. These laboratory results were compared to a field study at a traffic-dominated urban site, which was also influenced by residential wood combustion. For this site a daily average value of αabs(445–660 of 1.9 was found.

  8. Vitamin A absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    Investigation of the absorption of vitamin A and related substances is complicated by the multiplicity of forms in which they occur in the diet and by the possibility that they may be subject to different mechanisms of absorption. Present knowledge of these mechanisms is inadequate, especially in the case of carotenoids. Numerous tests of absorption have been developed. The most common has been the biochemical measurement of the rise in plasma vitamin A after an oral dose of retinol or retinyl ester, but standardization is inadequate. Radioisotope tests based upon assay of serum or faecal activity following oral administration of tritiated vitamin A derivaties hold considerable promise, but again standardization is inadequate. From investigations hitherto performed it is known that absorption of vitamin A is influenced by several diseases, although as yet the consistency of results and the correlation with other tests of intestinal function have often been poor. However, the test of vitamin A absorption is nevertheless of clinical importance as a specialized measure of intestinal function. (author)

  9. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia, E-mail: ottavia.jedrkiewicz@ifn.cnr.it [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR and CNISM UdR Como, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Minardi, Stefano [Institute of Applied Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, University of Insubria and CNISM UdR Como, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  10. Optical wavelength selection for portable hemoglobin determination by near-infrared spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Han; Li, Ming; Wang, Yue; Sheng, Dinggao; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Linna

    2017-11-01

    Hemoglobin concentration is commonly used in clinical medicine to diagnose anemia, identify bleeding, and manage red blood cell transfusions. The golden standard method for determining hemoglobin concentration in blood requires reagent. Spectral methods were advantageous at fast and non-reagent measurement. However, model calibration with full spectrum is time-consuming. Moreover, it is necessary to use a few variables considering size and cost of instrumentation, especially for a portable biomedical instrument. This study presents different wavelength selection methods for optical wavelengths for total hemoglobin concentration determination in whole blood. The results showed that modelling using only two wavelengths combination (1143 nm, 1298 nm) can keep on the fine predictability with full spectrum. It appears that the proper selection of optical wavelengths can be more effective than using the whole spectra for determination hemoglobin in whole blood. We also discussed the influence of water absorptivity on the wavelength selection. This research provides valuable references for designing portable NIR instruments determining hemoglobin concentration, and may provide some experience for noninvasive hemoglobin measurement by NIR methods.

  11. Light dilution via wavelength management for efficient high-density photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Matthew D; Graham, Percival J; Nguyen, Brian; Sargent, Edward H; Sinton, David

    2017-06-01

    The spectral distribution of light influences microalgae productivity; however, development of photobioreactors has proceeded largely without regard to spectral optimization. Here, we use monochromatic light to quantify the joint influence of path length, culture density, light intensity, and wavelength on productivity and efficiency in Synechococcus elongatus. The productivity of green light was ∼4× that of red at the highest levels of culture density, depth, and light intensity. This performance is attributed to the combination of increased dilution and penetration of this weakly absorbed wavelength over a larger volume fraction of the reactor. In contrast, red light outperformed other wavelengths in low-density cultures with low light intensities. Low-density cultures also adapted more rapidly to reduce absorption of longer wavelengths, allowing for prolonged cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that, particularly for artificially lit photobioreactors, wavelength needs to be included as a critical operational parameter to maintain optimal performance. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1160-1169. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The wavelength dependence of gold nanorod-mediated optical breakdown during infrared ultrashort pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davletshin, Yevgeniy R.; Kumaradas, J. Carl [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    This paper investigates the wavelength dependence of the threshold of gold nanorod-mediated optical breakdown during picosecond and femtosecond near infrared optical pulses. It was found that the wavelength dependence in the picosecond regime is governed solely by the changes of a nanorod's optical properties. On the other hand, the optical breakdown threshold during femtosecond pulse exposure falls within one of two regimes. When the ratio of the maximum electric field from the outside to the inside of the nanorod is less then 7 (the absorption regime) the seed electrons are initiated by photo-thermal emission, and the wavelength dependence in the threshold of optical breakdown is the result of optical properties of the nanoparticle. When the ratio is greater than 7 (the near-field regime) more seed electrons are initiated by multiphoton ionization, and the wavelength dependence of the threshold of optical breakdown results from a combination of nanorod's optical properties and transitions in the order of multiphoton ionization. The findings of this study can guide the design of nanoparticle based optical breakdown applications. This analysis also deepens the understanding of nanoparticle-mediated laser induced breakdown for picosecond and femtosecond pulses at near infrared wavelengths. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Electrodiagnostic and two-wavelength fundus autofluorescence imaging investigations in acute idiopathic maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Alexander C; Rotsos, Tryfon; Holder, Graham E; Tufail, Adnan; Robson, Anthony G

    2010-10-01

    The aim is to characterise a case of acute idiopathic maculopathy (AIM) using detailed electrophysiology and 2-wavelength fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging. A 32-year-old woman presented with reduced visual acuity in her right eye. Imaging investigations performed included 1 & 2 wavelength FAF, fluorescein and ICG angiography and Fourier domain OCT imaging. International-standard pattern and full-field electroretinography (PERG; ERG), electro-oculography (EOG) and multifocal ERG testing were performed. Multifocal ERGs demonstrated evidence of localised macular dysfunction consistent with mild right pattern ERG P50 reduction. Full-field ERGs were within normal limits. The EOG was normal bilaterally. The use of 1 & 2 wavelength FAF imaging revealed a low density macular area, not explained by luteal pigment absorption, that was associated with macular dysfunction. Two-wavelength FAF imaging allows the accurate quantification of macular pigment and the imaging of the underlying relative distribution of lipofuscin. AIM was characterised by a discrete area of disrupted retinal pigment epithelium metabolism and atrophy associated with localised macular dysfunction. Complimentary use of dual-wavelength FAF imaging and electrophysiology may have application to disorders other than AIM.

  14. Smart wavelength meter for integrated photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benelajla, Meryem; Taballione, Caterina; Boller, Klaus J.

    2017-01-01

    Thermally tunable SiN waveguide microring resonators in connection with neural network readout algorithms appear promising for use as integrated optical wavelength meters. So far, we have observed long-term reliability and a temperature immunity of the readout across several degrees of ambient

  15. Alien wavelength modeling tool and field trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambo, N.; Sgambelluri, A.; Secondini, M.

    2015-01-01

    A modeling tool is presented for pre-FEC BER estimation of PM-QPSK alien wavelength signals. A field trial is demonstrated and used as validation of the tool's correctness. A very close correspondence between the performance of the field trial and the one predicted by the modeling tool has been...

  16. Random-phase metasurfaces at optical wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anders; Ding, Fei; Chen, Yiting

    2016-01-01

    of an optically thick gold film overlaid by a subwavelength thin glass spacer and an array of gold nanobricks, we design and realize random-phase metasurfaces at a wavelength of 800 nm. Optical characterisation of the fabricated samples convincingly demonstrates the diffuse scattering of reflected light...

  17. Topology Optimization of Sub-Wavelength Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erentok, Aycan; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We propose a topology optimization strategy for the systematic design of a three-dimensional (3D), conductor-based sub-wavelength antenna. The post-processed finite-element (FE) models of the optimized structure are shown to be self-resonant, efficient and exhibit distorted omnidirectional...

  18. Adaptive multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayraktar, Muharrem

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the development of a new class of optical components to enhance the imaging performance by enabling adaptations of the optics. When used at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths, such ‘adaptive optics’ offers the potential to achieve the highest spatial resolution in

  19. Self Calibration of a 2-wavelength Pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometers require calibrations to determine their instrument constants before they can be used in remote temperature measurements. These constants reflect the combined effects of detector response, the transmissivities of intervening optical media (windows and gases) and the emissivity of the measured surface. We describe here the principal and the demonstration of self calibrating 2-wavelength pyrometer.

  20. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Simpson, John T.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Voelkl, Edgar

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  1. Effects of gamma radiation on superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs) for fibre optic gyroscope applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhi, L.; Rezzonico, R.; Vélez, C.; van Uffelen, M.; Berghmans, F.

    2017-11-01

    In this work we present a study on teh Super Luminescent LIght Emitting Diodes (SLEDs) performance under high doses of gamma radiation. We investigate GaAs SLEDs with emission wavelengths around 830 nm. The devices were exposed to ionising radiation at a dose rate of about 4.7 Gy/s, up to a cumulated dose of 10.1 MGy in the CMF facility of the Belgian nuclear research centre SCK•CEN. We measured the device characteristics before adn after irradiation. We show that the SLED performance is only marginally affected.

  2. The Biosynthesis of Infrared-Emitting Quantum Dots in Allium Fistulosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M.; Haigh, S. J.; Lewis, E. A.; Sandiford, L.; Burkitt-Gray, M.; Fleck, R.; Vizcay-Barrena, G.; Jensen, L.; Mirzai, H.; Curry, R. J.; Dailey, L.-A.

    2016-02-01

    The development of simple routes to emissive solid-state materials is of paramount interest, and in this report we describe the biosynthesis of infrared emitting quantum dots in a living plant via a mutual antagonistic reaction. Exposure of common Allium fistulosum to mercury and tellurium salts under ambient conditions resulted in the expulsion of crystalline, non-passivated HgTe quantum dots that exhibited emissive characteristics in the near-infrared spectral region, a wavelength range that is important in telecommunications and solar energy conversion.

  3. Plasma shifts of C VI Lyman lines to shorter wavelengths. Final report, November 4, 1981-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.

    1984-07-01

    The first two years of this ongoing research program were devoted to experimental observations of shifts and widths of hydrogenic ion lines emitted by very dense plasmas. This search is an essential step in the general study of the properties of bound states of multiply charged ions in dense plasmas. This research is of importance in a number of areas, notably equilibrium statistical mechanics (equation of state), plasma radiation physics (energy transport and diagnostics) and calibration of wavelengths in the extreme vacuum uv region (10 A < lambda < 200 A). In the latter case, the wavelengths of lines from one-electron ions are generally accepted to be well known theoretically and are considered as standards for plate calibration. The question nevertheless arises whether or not significant changes in wavelength can occur, e.g., in low-inductance sparks or laser produced plasma which are often used as line sources

  4. Enhanced biomass production and lipid accumulation of Picochlorum atomus using light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Chae Hun; Kang, Chang-Han; Jung, Jang-Hyun; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2016-10-01

    The effects of light-emitting diode (LED) wavelength, light intensity, nitrate concentration, and time of exposure to different LED wavelength stresses in a two-phase culture on lipid production were evaluated in the microalga, Picochlorum atomus. The biomass produced by red LED light was higher than that produced by purple, blue, green, or yellow LED and fluorescent lights from first phase of two-phase culture. The highest lipid production of P. atomus was 50.3% (w/w) with green LED light at 2days of second phase as light stress. Fatty acid analysis of the microalgae showed that palmitic acid (C16:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3) accounted for 84-88% (w/w) of total fatty acids from P. atomus. The two-phase culture of P. atomus is suitable for biofuel production due to higher lipid productivity and favorable fatty acid composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  6. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Moretti, E.S.; Austin, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the effect of the oxidation state of plutonium on its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. For mice and rats that have been starved prior to gastrointestinal administration, there is no significant difference between the absorption factors for Pu(IV) and Pu(VI). The value obtained for Pu(VI) is an order of magnitude lower than that reported previously. The value obtained for Pu(IV) is two orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously for nitrate solutions and the same as those reported for citrate solutions

  7. Quantum Absorption Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-01

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power Jc vanishes as Jc∝Tcα, when Tc→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  8. Wavelength Dependence of Light-Induced Cycloadditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Jan P; Noble, Benjamin B; Lauer, Andrea; Coote, Michelle L; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2017-11-08

    The wavelength-dependent conversion of two rapid photoinduced ligation reactions, i.e., the light activation of o-methylbenzaldehydes, leading to the formation of reactive o-quinodimethanes (photoenols), and the photolysis of 2,5-diphenyltetrazoles, affording highly reactive nitrile imines, is probed via a monochromatic wavelength scan at constant photon count. The transient species are trapped by cycloaddition with N-ethylmaleimide, and the reactions are traced by high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The resulting action plots are assessed in the context of Beer-Lambert's law and provide combined with time-dependent density functional theory and multireference calculations an in-depth understanding of the underpinning mechanistic processes, including conical intersections. The π → π* transition of the carbonyl group of the o-methylbenzaldehyde correlates with a highly efficient conversion to the cycloadduct, showing no significant wavelength dependence, while conversion following the n → π* transition proceeds markedly less efficient at longer wavelengths. The influence of absorbance and reactivity has critical consequences for an effective reaction design: At high concentrations of o-methylbenzaldehydes (c = 8 mmol L -1 ), photoligations with N-ethylmaleimide (possible for λ ≤ 390 nm) are ideally performed at 330 nm, whereas at high light penetration regimes at lower concentrations (c = 0.3 mmol L -1 ), 315 nm irradiation leads to the highest conversion. Activation and trapping of 2,5-diphenyltetrazoles (possible for λ ≤ 322 nm) proceeds best at a wavelength shorter than 295 nm, irrespective of concentration.

  9. Photo absorption studies of polyatomic molecules using Indus 1 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraswathy, P.; Sunanda, K.; Aparna, S.; Rajashekar, B.N.; Das, N.C.

    2004-06-01

    The Photophysics beamline is a medium resolution beamline designed for carrying out photo absorption and fluorescence experiments using the synchrotron radiation source Indus-l. This beamline has been commissioned recently and is in operation. An experimental setup for gas phase absorption studies has been developed and installed. Absorption spectra of a few polyatomicmolecules viz. benzene, ammonia, carbon disulphide and acetone were recorded in the wavelength region 1500 -3000 A. The results from this study indicated the satisfactory performance of the beam line as well as the experimental setup. Details of the first set of absorption experiments carried out are discussed in this report. (author)

  10. Plasmonic black gold by adiabatic nanofocusing and absorption of light in ultra-sharp convex grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, T.; Novikov, S. M.; Holmgaard, T.

    2012-01-01

    Excitation of localized and delocalized surface plasmon resonances can be used for turning excellent reflectors of visible light, such as gold and silver, into efficient absorbers, whose wavelength, polarization or angular bandwidths are however necessarily limited owing to the resonant nature......) absorption of unpolarized light, reaching an average level of 96%. Efficient absorption of visible light by nanostructured metal surfaces open new exciting perspectives within plasmonics, especially for thermophotovoltaics....... of surface plasmon excitations involved. Nonresonant absorption has so far been achieved by using combined nano- and micro-structural surface modifications and with composite materials involving metal nanoparticles embedded in dielectric layers. Here we realize nonresonant light absorption in a well...

  11. Absorption measurement s in InSe single crystal under an applied electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ates, A.; Guerbulak, B.; Guer, E.; Yildirim, T.; Yildirim, M.

    2002-01-01

    InSe single crystal was grown by Bridgman-Stockberger method. Electric field effect on the absorption measurements have been investigated as a function of temperature in InSe single crystal. The absorption edge shifted towards longer wavelengths and decreased of intensity in absorption spectra under an electric field. Using absorption measurements, Urbach energy was calculated under an electric field. Applied electric field caused a increasing in the Urbach energy. At 10 K and 320 K, the first exciton energies were calculated as 1.350 and 1.311 eV for zero voltage and 1.334 and 1.301 eV for electric field respectively

  12. Thermoluminescence dependence on the wavelength of monochromatic UV-radiation in Cu-doped KCl and KBr at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez R, A.; Piters, T.; Aceves, R.; Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R., E-mail: rperez@cifus.uson.mx [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigaciones en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) dependence on the UV irradiation wavelengths from 200 to 500 nm in Cu-doped KCl and KBr crystals with different thermal treatment has been analyzed. Spectrum of the Tl intensity of each material show lower intensity at wavelengths longer than 420 nm. The Tl intensity depends on the irradiation wavelength. Structure of the Tl intensity spectrum of each sample is very similar to the structure of its optical absorption spectrum, indicating that at each wavelength, monochromatic radiation is absorbed to produce electronic transitions and electron hole pairs. Thermoluminescence of materials with thermal treatment at high temperature shows electron-hole trapping with less efficiency. The results show that Cu-doped alkali-halide materials are good detectors of a wide range of UV monochromatic radiations and could be used to measure UV radiation doses. (Author)

  13. A tunable and switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength fiber laser with a simple linear cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoying; Fang, Xia; Liao, Changrui; Wang, D N; Sun, Junqiang

    2009-11-23

    A simple linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser based on a Fabry-Perot filter which consists of a pair of fiber Bragg gratings is proposed for tunable and switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength operation. The single-longitudinal-mode is obtained by the saturable absorption of an unpumed erbium-doped fiber together with a narrow-band fiber Bragg grating. Under the high pump power (>166 mW) condition, the stable dual-wavelength oscillation with uniform amplitude can be realized by carefully adjusting the polarization controller in the cavity. Wavelength selection and switching are achieved by tuning the narrow-band fiber Bragg grating in the system. The spacing of the dual-wavelength can be selected at 0.20 nm (approximately 25.62 GHz), 0.22 nm (approximately 28.19 GHz) and 0.54 nm (approximately 69.19 GHz).

  14. Phosphorescent light-emitting iridium complexes serve as a hypoxia-sensing probe for tumor imaging in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Shaojuan; Negishi, Kazuya; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Hosaka, Masahiro; Tobita, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Iridium complex, a promising organic light-emitting diode material for next generation television and computer displays, emits phosphorescence. Phosphorescence is quenched by oxygen. We used this oxygen-quenching feature for imaging tumor hypoxia. Red light-emitting iridium complex Ir(btp)2(acac) (BTP) presented hypoxia-dependent light emission in culture cell lines, whose intensity was in parallel with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 expression. BTP was further applied to imaging five nude mouse-transplanted tumors. All tumors presented a bright BTP-emitting image as early as 5 min after the injection. The BTP-dependent tumor image peaked at 1 to 2 h after the injection, and was then removed from tumors within 24 h. The minimal BTP image recognition size was at least 2 mm in diameter. By morphological examination and phosphorescence lifetime measurement, BTP is presumed to localize to the tumor cells, not to stay in the tumor microvessels by binding to albumin. The primary problem on suse of luminescent probe for tumor imaging is its weak penetrance to deep tissues from the skin surface. Since BTP is easily modifiable, we made BTP analogues with a longer excitation/emission wavelength to improve the tissue penetrance. One of them, BTPHSA, displayed 560/720 wavelength, and depicted its clear imaging from tumors transplanted over 6-7 mm deep from the skin surface. We suggest that BTP analogues have a vast potential for imaging hypoxic lesions such as tumor tissues.

  15. Magnetic and solar effects on ionospheric absorption at high latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pietrella

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Some periods of intense solar events and of strong magnetic storms have been selected and their effects on the ionospheric D region have been investigated on the basis of ionospheric absorption data derived from riometer measurements made at the Italian Antarctic Base of Terra Nova Bay (geographic coordinates: 74.69 S, 164.12 E; geomagnetic coordinates: 77.34 S, 279.41 E. It was found that sharp increases in ionospheric absorption are mainly due to solar protons emission with an energy greater than 10 MeV. Moreover, the day to night ratios of the ionospheric absorption are greater than 2 in the case of strong events of energetic protons emitted by the Sun, while during magnetic storms, these ratios range between 1 and 2.

  16. Hybrid solar concentrator with zero self-absorption loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenxuan; Wang, Tongxin; Wang, Xin; Wu, Si; Luo, Yanhua; Tian, Xiujie; Zhang, Qijin [CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Chemistry, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2010-12-15

    The use of a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) with a high geometric gain is one of the methods to achieve low cost of photovoltaic power. However, the self-absorption loss of the LSC is a restraining factor working against the gain. Differed from organic dyes, the hybrid dyes (rare earth complexes), composed of organic antenna and inorganic emitting ions, have very low self-absorption losses. A hybrid solar concentrator (HSC) has been fabricated by doping a rare earth complex, Eu(TTA){sub 3}Phen, into a polymer optical fiber (POF). Experiments on the HSC show that there is no self-absorption loss, and the emission photons increase linearly with geometric gain (increasing from around 50 to approximately 200). (author)

  17. Laser Irradiated Foam Targets: Absorption and Radiative Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Martina; Luigi Andreoli, Pier; Cipriani, Mattia; Consoli, Fabrizio; Cristofari, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Riccardo; di Giorgio, Giorgio; Giulietti, Danilo; Ingenito, Francesco; Gus'kov, Sergey Yu.; Rupasov, Alexander A.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental campaign to characterize the laser radiation absorption of foam targets and the subsequent emission of radiation from the produced plasma was carried out in the ABC facility of the ENEA Research Center in Frascati (Rome). Different targets have been used: plastic in solid or foam state and aluminum targets. The activated different diagnostics allowed to evaluate the plasma temperature, the density distribution, the fast particle spectrum and the yield of the X-Ray radiation emitted by the plasma for the different targets. These results confirm the foam homogenization action on laser-plasma interaction, mainly attributable to the volume absorption of the laser radiation propagating in such structured materials. These results were compared with simulation absorption models of the laser propagating into a foam target.

  18. Fluorescence Properties and Synthesis of Green-Emitting Tb3+-Activated Amorphous Calcium Silicate Phosphor by Ultraviolet Irradiation of 378 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kojima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The excitation wavelength of conventional Tb3+-activated phosphor is near 270 nm. This study describes novel green-emitting Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate by ultraviolet excitation at 378 nm. The Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate was prepared by heating a sample of Tb3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate (CSH at 900°C for 30 minutes. The emission wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 544 nm. The optimum excitation wavelength within the range 300–400 nm was 378 nm. The Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate emitted green by ultraviolet irradiation. The optimum initial Tb/Ca atomic ratio of this phosphor was about 0.5. A mechanism for the action of the phosphor is proposed, in which Tb3+ ions existing in the layer of the CSH lead to loss of water molecules and OH groups.

  19. Mid-infrared PbTe vertical external cavity surface emitting laser on Si-substrate with above 1 W output power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, M.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Chappuis, D.; Corda, M.; Zogg, H.

    2009-12-01

    Mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) emitting above 1 W output power in pulsed mode and up to 17 mW in continuous mode at -172 °C were realized. Emission wavelength changes from 5 μm at -172 °C to 3.6 μm at 20 °C heat sink temperature. The active medium is a one wavelength thick PbTe layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si-substrate. It is followed by a 2.5 pair Pb1-yEuyTe/EuTe epitaxial Bragg mirror. The cavity is completed with an external curved Pb1-yEuyTe/BaF2 mirror. The VECSEL is optically pumped with 1.55 μm wavelength laser and In-soldered to Cu heat sink. No microstructural processing is needed.

  20. Ultrafast transient-absorption of the solvated electron in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Y.; Alfano, J.C.; Walhout, P.K.; Barbara, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrafast near infrared (NIR)-pump/variable wavelength probe transient-absorption spectroscopy has been performed on the aqueous solvated electron. The photodynamics of the solvated electron excited to its p-state are qualitatively similar to previous measurements of the dynamics of photoinjected electrons at high energy. This result confirms the previous interpretation of photoinjected electron dynamics as having a rate-limiting bottleneck at low energies presumably involving the p-state

  1. Absorption and refractive index dynamics in waveguide semiconductor electroabsorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal

    2002-01-01

    in telecommunication systems.Both the amplitude and phase transfer functions of electroabsorption modulators as function of reverse bias and wavelength, are measured using a heterodyne detection technique. With this information, the bias and wavelength dependent áH-parameter is calculated and so...... is the electroabsorption modulator response to a 10 Gb/s modulation of the bias. It is concluded that operation close to the absorption edge is advantageous both chirp-wise and with respect to lowering the drive voltage. This however becomes at the expense of a higher insertion loss. A comparison between a component......, that the fabricated electroabsorption modulators can generate high quality pulses for optical fiber transmission. The all-optical wavelength conversion and demultiplexing capabilities of the electroabsorbers, when operated as saturable absorbers, are investigated using femtosecond laser pulses in an amplitude...

  2. Surface plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diodes by gold nanoparticles with different sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Chung [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Different varieties, sizes, and shapes for nanoparticles will generate different surface plasmon resonance effects in the devices. • The red-shift phenomenon for absorption peaks is because of an increasing contribution of higher-order plasmon modes for the larger gold nanoparticles. • The mobility of electrons in the electron-transport layer of organic light-emitting diodes is a few orders of magnitude lower than that of holes in the hole-transport layer of organic light-emitting diodes. - Abstract: The influence of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with different sizes doped into (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate)) (PEDOT:PSS) on the performance of organic light-emitting diodes is investigated in this study. The current efficiency of the device, at a current density of 145 mA/cm, with PEDOT:PSS doped with GNPs of 8 nm is about 1.57 times higher than that of the device with prime PEDOT:PSS because the absorption peak of GNPs is closest to the photoluminescence peak of the emission layer, resulting in maximum surface plasmon resonance effect in the device. In addition, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy also reveals the maximum surface plasmon resonance effect in the device when the mean particle size of GNPs is 8 nm.

  3. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general…

  4. Light-Emitting Diodes: Learning New Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the third paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide the readers with the description of experiments and pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper, published…

  5. Single side Emitting Transparent OLED lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lifka, H.; Verschuren, C.A.; Bruls, D.M.; Tanase, C.

    2011-01-01

    Transparent OLEDs offer great potential for novel applications. Preferably, the light should be emitted from one side only. This can bedone to some extent by modifying electrode thicknesses, but at the cost of reduced transparency. Here, we demonstrate a new approach tomake single side emissive

  6. Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinemann, Anne C.; MacGregor, Ian C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Davis, Amy L.; Ribeiro, Daniel S.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2011-01-01

    Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

  7. Quantum-cascade lasers with emission wavelength 3-5 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselink, W. T.; Semtsiv, M. P.

    2010-10-01

    Quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) operating in the 3-5 μm spectral region are increasingly finding application in a number of areas including gas sensing for both environmental and medical uses, communication, and infrared countermeasures. QCLs emitting at wavelengths near 4 μm and below have been especially challenging, requiring a very large conduction band discontinuity, a small electron effective mass, but also a relatively mature materials system. The focus of this contribution is on our own QCL designs based on the use of strain compensation with very high levels of strain in the individual layers; barriers based on AlAs, wells on In0.73Ga0.27As, and the entire structure on average lattice-matched to InP. For more flexibility to control both strain and conduction band potential, "composite barriers" are used, composed of AlAs and Al0.5In0.5As. Indirect valleys within the well material that can limit the photon energy to the energy difference between these valleys and the lower laser state are also pushed to higher energy by using strained In0.73Ga0.27As wells. Combining these design components, we have produced QCLs emitting at wavelengths covering the entire range down to 3 μm. These lasers have demonstrated high power in narrow stripes at cryogenic as well as room temperatures together with excellent beam quality.

  8. Infrared Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Carbon Nanotube Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Arko; Murawski, Caroline; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C

    2018-01-30

    While organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) covering all colors of the visible spectrum are widespread, suitable organic emitter materials in the near-infrared (nIR) beyond 800 nm are still lacking. Here, the first OLED based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the emitter is demonstrated. By using a multilayer stacked architecture with matching charge blocking and charge-transport layers, narrow-band electroluminescence at wavelengths between 1000 and 1200 nm is achieved, with spectral features characteristic of excitonic and trionic emission of the employed (6,5) SWCNTs. Here, the OLED performance is investigated in detail and it is found that local conduction hot-spots lead to pronounced trion emission. Analysis of the emissive dipole orientation shows a strong horizontal alignment of the SWCNTs with an average inclination angle of 12.9° with respect to the plane, leading to an exceptionally high outcoupling efficiency of 49%. The SWCNT-based OLEDs represent a highly attractive platform for emission across the entire nIR. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ag nanocluster-based color converters for white organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikitani, Yoshinori; Takizawa, Daisuke; Uchida, Soichi; Lu, Yue; Nishimura, Suzushi; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    The authors present Ag nanocluster-based color converters (Ag NC color converters), which convert part of the blue light from a light source to yellow light so as to create white organic light-emitting devices that could be suitable for lighting systems. Ag NCs synthesized by poly(methacrylic acid) template methods have a statistical size distribution with a mean diameter of around 4.5 nm, which is larger than the Fermi wavelength of around 2 nm. Hence, like free electrons in metals, the Ag NC electrons are thought to form a continuous energy band, leading to the formation of surface plasmons by photoexcitation. As for the fluorescence emission mechanism, the fact that the photoluminescence is excitation wavelength dependent suggests that the fluorescence originates from surface plasmons in Ag NCs of different sizes. By using Ag NC color converters and suitable blue light sources, white organic light-emitting devices can be fabricated based on the concept of light-mixing. For our blue light sources, we used polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs), which, like organic light-emitting diodes, are area light sources. The PLECs were fabricated with a blue fluorescent π-conjugated polymer, poly[(9,9-dihexylfluoren-2,7-diyl)-co-(anthracen-9,10-diyl)] (PDHFA), and a polymeric solid electrolyte composed of poly(ethylene oxide) and KCF3SO3. In this device structure, the Ag NC color converter absorbs blue light from the PDHFA-based PLEC (PDHFA-PLEC) and then emits yellow light. When the PDHFA-PLEC is turned on by applying an external voltage, pure white light emission can be produced with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (x = 0.32, y = 0.33) and a color rendering index of 93.6. This study shows that utilization of Ag NC color converters and blue PLECs is a very promising and highly effective method for realizing white organic light-emitting devices.

  10. Chemical Absorption Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Chemical absorption materials that potentially can be used for post combustion carbon dioxide capture are discussed. They fall into five groups, alkanolamines, alkali carbonates, ammonia, amino acid salts, and ionic liquids. The chemistry of the materials is discussed and advantages and drawbacks...

  11. Neutron resonance absorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.

    1991-11-01

    After some recalls on the physics of neutron resonance absorption during their slowing down, this paper presents the main features of the theoretical developments performed by the french school of reactor physics: the effective reaction rate method so called Livolant-Jeanpierre theory, the generalizations carried out by the author, and the probability table method [fr

  12. WDM cross-connect cascade based on all-optical wavelength converters for routing and wavelength slot interchanging using a reduced number of internal wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud; Mikkelsen, Benny; Jørgensen, Bo Foged

    1998-01-01

    Optical transport layers need rearrangeable wavelength-division multiplexing optical cross-connects (OXCs) to increase the capacity and flexibility of the network. It has previously been shown that a cross-connect based on all-optical wavelength converters for routing as well as wavelength slot...

  13. Saturn B and C ring studies at multiple wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Pilorz, Stu

    2015-04-01

    We can learn a great deal about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize higher optical depth regions in faint rings such as the outer C ring, where albedo differences may be present. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as

  14. Narrow Wavelength, Frequency Modulated Source at 1.5mm Wavelength, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs narrow linewidth lasers in the 1.5 or 2 micron wavelength regime for Lidar applications. The laser should be tunable by several nm and frequency modulated...

  15. Compact, Wavelength Stabilized Seed Source for Multi-Wavelength Lidar Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA LaRC is developing a compact, multi-wavelength High Spectral resolution Lidar (HSRL) system designed to measure various optical and microphysical properties of...

  16. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  17. Optical Detection in Ultrafast Short Wavelength Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K.; Hall, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to coherent detection of ionising radiation is briefly motivated and recounted. The approach involves optical scattering of coherent light fields by colour centres in transparent solids. It has significant potential for diffractive imaging applications that require high detection dynamic range from pulsed high brilliance short wavelength sources. It also motivates new incarnations of Bragg's X-ray microscope for pump-probe studies of ultrafast molecular structure-dynamics.

  18. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-01-01

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length

  19. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  20. Morphological and light-absorption characteristics of individual BC particles collected in an urban seaside area at Tokaimura, eastern central Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Fengfu; Watanabe, Kazuo; Shinohara, Nobuo; Xu Xueqin; Xu Liangjun; Akagi, Tasuku

    2008-01-01

    To observe surface morphology and light-absorption property of different black carbon (BC) particles, different-sized aerosols were collected in Tokaimura (36.27 o N, 140.36 o E), an urban seaside area of eastern central Japan, using a high-volume Andersen type sampler during a whole year (Jan. to Dec. in 2004). The morphology of individual BC particle separated from different-sized aerosols was observed with Scanning Electron Microscope with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDX) and four types of morphology were observed: 50 nm spherical particles, micrometer-sized plates with homogeneous surfaces, micrometer-sized spherical particles with homogeneous surfaces and micrometer-sized spherical particles with small holes on surfaces. The light-absorption property of BC particles with different morphology has been determined by infrared spectrometry (IRS) with a photoacoustic technique in a region of 400-4000 wavenumbers (cm -1 ). All morphology BC particles showed a strong light-absorption during 500-3000 wavenumbers (cm -1 ) with two strong broad peaks in 750-1100 and 1200-2200 wavenumbers (cm -1 ), implying that all morphology BC particles can absorb a significant part of thermal infrared emitted from the earth (wavelength 4000-50,000 nm). The seasonal variation and the size-distribution of aerosols and its chemical components (e.g. C, Na, Cl, NH 4 + , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , Al, Ca, Mg and Fe) were also measured in this study. More than 55% of non-inorganic carbon (OC + BC) in the atmosphere was detected in the aerosols with a size smaller than 1.1 μm and the concentration of non-inorganic carbon in the atmosphere showed only a faint variation during a whole year, although the concentrations of total aerosols and its chemical components exhibited a distinct variation