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Sample records for absorption spectroscopy fluorescence

  1. The photochemical ring opening reaction of chromene as seen by transient absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herzog, Teja T.; Ryseck, Gerald; Ploetz, Evelyn; Cordes, Thorben

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the photochromic ring-opening reaction of 2,2-diphenyl-5,6-benzo(2H)-chromene. In particular, we study the uncertainties and contradictions in various published reaction models using a combination of transient absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy with femtosecond

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  3. Characterization of the photoreaction between DNA and aminomethyl-trimethylpsoralen using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, B.H.; Hearst, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy for following the progress of the photoreaction between DNA and 4'-aminomethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (AMT) has been investigated. Absorption at long wavelengths and fluorescence both decline upon intercalation of AMT into the DNA helix. The loss of fluorescence from AMT and the accompanying appearance of monoadduct fluorescence upon irradiation by UV light can be easily followed by using the excitation beam of a spectrofluorometer as the source of irradiation and monitoring the changing emission spectrum. Where cross-link formation is possible, the subsequent decline of monoadduct fluorescence is seen as well. This suggests that the 4',5'-monoadduct is a precursor of cross-links. Both monoaddition and cross-linking are more rapid with poly d(A-T) than with calf thymus DNA or poly d(A.T). Excitation spectra can be helpful in resolving the levels of AMT and 4',5'-monoadduct when both are contributing to the emission spectrum. Some changes are observed in the emission spectrum of AMT-poly d(A.T) monoadducts after prolonged irradiation which indicate further photoreaction. (author)

  4. Fluorescence Spectroscopy Applied to Monitoring Biodiesel Degradation: Correlation with Acid Value and UV Absorption Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maydla dos Santos Vasconcelos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The techniques used to monitor the quality of the biodiesel are intensely discussed in the literature, partly because of the different oil sources and their intrinsic physicochemical characteristics. This study aimed to monitor the thermal degradation of the fatty acid methyl esters of Sesamum indicum L. and Raphanus sativus L. biodiesels (SILB and RSLB, resp.. The results showed that both biodiesels present a high content of unsaturated fatty acids, ∼84% (SILB and ∼90% (RSLB. The SILB had a high content of polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18  :  2, about 49%, and the oleic monounsaturated (18  :  1, ∼34%. On the other hand, RSLB presented a considerable content of linolenic fatty acid (18  :  3, ∼11%. The biodiesel samples were thermal degraded at 110°C for 48 hours, and acid value, UV absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy analysis were carried out. The results revealed that both absorption and fluorescence presented a correlation with acid value as a function of degradation time by monitoring absorptions at 232 and 270 nm as well as the emission at 424 nm. Although the obtained correlation is not completely linear, a direct correlation was observed in both cases, revealing that both properties can be potentially used for monitoring the biodiesel degradation.

  5. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography and Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of the Photoswitchable Fluorescent Protein IrisFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Sliwa, Michel; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sugahara, Michihiro; Guillon, Virginia; Schirò, Giorgio; Coquelle, Nicolas; Woodhouse, Joyce; Roux, Laure; Gotthard, Guillaume; Royant, Antoine; Uriarte, Lucas Martinez; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Joti, Yasumasa; Byrdin, Martin; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Adam, Virgile; Cammarata, Marco; Schlichting, Ilme; Bourgeois, Dominique; Weik, Martin

    2016-03-03

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins find growing applications in cell biology, yet mechanistic details, in particular on the ultrafast photochemical time scale, remain unknown. We employed time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy on the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein IrisFP in solution to study photoswitching from the nonfluorescent (off) to the fluorescent (on) state. Evidence is provided for the existence of several intermediate states on the pico- and microsecond time scales that are attributed to chromophore isomerization and proton transfer, respectively. Kinetic modeling favors a sequential mechanism with the existence of two excited state intermediates with lifetimes of 2 and 15 ps, the second of which controls the photoswitching quantum yield. In order to support that IrisFP is suited for time-resolved experiments aiming at a structural characterization of these ps intermediates, we used serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free electron laser and solved the structure of IrisFP in its on state. Sample consumption was minimized by embedding crystals in mineral grease, in which they remain photoswitchable. Our spectroscopic and structural results pave the way for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography aiming at characterizing the structure of ultrafast intermediates in reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins.

  6. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  7. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Joon, E-mail: gjlee@kw.ac.kr; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center/Department of Electrical and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Wan [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan, E-mail: piceae@naver.com [Department of Microbiology and Institute of Basic Sciences, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-14

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  8. Study of the Photodegradation Process of Vitamin E Acetate by Optical Absorption, Fluorescence, and Thermal Lens Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburcio-Moreno, J. A.; Marcelín-Jiménez, G.; Leanos-Castaneda, O. L.; Yanez-Limon, J. M.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    The stability of vitamin E acetate exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light was studied using three spectroscopic methods. An ethanol solution of vitamin E acetate was treated with either UVC light (254 nm) or UVA light (366 nm) during a period of 10 min followed by a study of UV-Vis optical absorption, then by fluorescence spectroscopy excitation by UV radiation at either 290 nm or 368 nm and, finally the solution was studied by thermal lens spectroscopy. Immediately, the same solution of vitamin E acetate was subjected to the UV irradiation process until completion of six periods of irradiation and measurements. UVC light treatment induced the appearance of a broad absorption band in the range of 310 nm to 440 nm with maximum absorbance at 368 nm, which progressively grew as the time of the exposure to UVC light increases. In contrast, UVA light treatment did not affect the absorption spectra of vitamin E acetate. Fluorescence spectra of the vitamin E acetate (without UV light treatment) showed no fluorescence when excited with 368 nm while exciting with 290 nm, an intense and broad emission band (300 nm to 440 nm) with a maximum at 340 nm appeared. When vitamin E acetate was treated with UVC light, this emission band progressively decreased as the time of the UVC light irradiation grew. No signal from UV-untreated vitamin E acetate could be detected by the thermal lens method. Interestingly, as the time of the UVC light treatment increased, the thermal lens signal progressively grew. Additional experiments performed to monitor the time evolution of the process during continuous UVC treatment of the vitamin E acetate using thermal lens spectroscopy exhibited a progressive increase of the thermal lens signal reaching a plateau at about 8000 s. This study shows that the vitamin E acetate is stable when it is irradiated with UVA light, while the irradiation with UVC light induces the formation of photodegradation products. Interestingly, this photodegradation process using

  9. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy for warm dense matter studies and ICF plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    The burning core of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasma at stagnation is surrounded by a shell of warm, dense matter whose properties are difficult both to model (due to a complex interplay of thermal, degeneracy, and strong coupling effects) and to diagnose (due to low emissivity and high opacity). We demonstrate a promising technique to study the warm dense shells of ICF plasmas based on the fluorescence emission of dopants or impurities in the shell material. This emission, which is driven by x-rays produced in the hot core, exhibits signature changes in response to compression and heating. High-resolution measurements of absorption and fluorescence features can refine our understanding of the electronic structure of material under high compression, improve our models of density-driven phenomena such as ionization potential depression and plasma polarization shifts, and help diagnose shell density, temperature, mass distribution, and residual motion in ICF plasmas at stagnation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA-0003525. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Early Career Research Program, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under FWP-14-017426.

  10. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy for warm dense matter studies and ICF plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Gomez, M. R.; Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.

    2018-05-01

    The burning core of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasma produces bright x-rays at stagnation that can directly diagnose core conditions essential for comparison to simulations and understanding fusion yields. These x-rays also backlight the surrounding shell of warm, dense matter, whose properties are critical to understanding the efficacy of the inertial confinement and global morphology. We show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra of mid-Z impurities or dopants in the warm dense shell can reveal the optical depth, temperature, and density of the shell and help constrain models of warm, dense matter. This is illustrated by the example of a high-resolution spectrum collected from an ICF plasma with a beryllium shell containing native iron impurities. Analysis of the iron K-edge provides model-independent diagnostics of the shell density (2.3 × 1024 e/cm3) and temperature (10 eV), while a 12-eV red shift in Kβ and 5-eV blue shift in the K-edge discriminate among models of warm dense matter: Both shifts are well described by a self-consistent field model based on density functional theory but are not fully consistent with isolated-atom models using ad-hoc density effects.

  11. Time-resolved and steady-state studies of biologically and chemically relevant systems using laser, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Charles Ashley [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    In Chapter 2 several experimental and data analysis methods used in this thesis are described. In Chapter 3 steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of the efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, in the feces of animals and it was found that their levels far exceed those reported to be inhibitory to efflux pumps. In Chapter 4 the solvation dynamics of 6-Propionyl-2-(N,Ndimethyl) aminonaphthalene (PRODAN) was studied in reverse micelles. The two fluorescent states of PRODAN solvate on different time scales and as such care must be exercised in solvation dynamic studies involving it and its analogs. In Chapter 5 we studied the experimental and theoretical solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 (C153) in wild-type (WT) and modified myoglobins. Based on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence studies, we have concluded that it is important to thoroughly characterize the structure of a protein and probe system before comparing the theoretical and experimental results. In Chapter 6 the photophysical and spectral properties of a derivative of the medically relevant compound curcumin called cyclocurcumin was studied. Based on NMR, fluorescence, and absorption studies, the ground- and excited-states of cyclocurcumin are complicated by the existence of multiple structural isomers. In Chapter 7 the hydrolysis of cellulose by a pure form of cellulase in an ionic liquid, HEMA, and its aqueous mixtures at various temperatures were studied with the goal of increasing the cellulose to glucose conversion for biofuel production. It was found that HEMA imparts an additional stability to cellulase and can allow for faster conversion of cellulose to glucose using a pre-treatment step in comparison to only buffer.

  12. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Braillard, Aurélien; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Prat, Alain; Testemale, Denis; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; Arnaud, Stéphan; Berar, Jean-François; Boudet, Nathalie; Caillot, Bernard; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jérôme; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Martin, Philippe; Solari, Pier Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  14. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis ab...

  15. Characterization of biochar-derived dissolved organic matter using UV-visible absorption and excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Tyler; Sager, Eric; Guéguen, Céline

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, biochar has become of considerable interest for a variety of environmental applications. However, the feasibility of its application is entirely dependent on its physical and chemical properties, including the characteristics of biochar-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM). The goal of this study was to assess the use of optical analysis for the purpose of characterizing biochar-derived DOM. Three different biochars (slow pyrolysis birch and maple; fast pyrolysis maple) were produced and leached in distilled water over 17d. Samples were taken on days 3, 10, 13 and 17, filtered, and analyzed for DOC content. Samples were also subjected to optical analysis using UV-visible absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopies. EEM fluorescence data were further analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Absorbance and fluorescence results were combined and examined using principal component analysis (PCA). Significant differences in the water soluble organic carbon content were observed for all biochar types. The estimated aromaticity (SUVA254) and mean molecular weight (S275-295) of biochar-derived DOM were also found to differ based on biochar type. PARAFAC analysis identified three humic-like components and one protein-like component. Distinct DOM signatures were observed for each biochar type. Transformations in biochar DOM characteristics over time were also observed. The PCA showed a clear delineation in biochar types based on their optical properties. The results of this study indicate that optical analysis may provide valuable information regarding the characteristics of biochar-derived DOM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  17. Flame emission, atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlick, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirty references are cited in this review. The information in the review is divided into 12 major areas: books, reviews, and bibliographies; fundamental studies in flames; developments in instrumentation; measurement techniques and procedure; flame emission spectrometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; flame molecular absorption spectrometry; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy; hydride generation techniques; graphite furnace atomic emission spectrometry; atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and analytical comparisons

  18. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S N; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R

    2013-09-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years.

  19. Total Absorption Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of determining the distribution of beta decay strength (B(GT)) as a function of excitation energy in the daughter nucleus is discussed. Total Absorption Spectroscopy is shown to provide a way of determining the B(GT) precisely. A brief history of such measurements and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique, is followed by examples of two recent studies using the technique. (authors)

  20. First combined total reflection X-ray fluorescence and grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of aeolian dust archived in Antarctica and Alpine deep ice cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cibin, G. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX110DE (United Kingdom); IMONT/EIM, Ente Italiano della Montagna, P.za dei Caprettari 70, 00176 Roma (Italy); Universita' degli Studi di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, L.go S. Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: giannantonio.cibin@diamond.ac.uk; Marcelli, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Maggi, V. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Sala, M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra ' A. Desio' , Sez. Mineralogia, Via Mangiagalli 34, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marino, F.; Delmonte, B. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Albani, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Siena, Dottorato in Scienze Polari, via Laterina 8, 53100 Siena (Italy); Pignotti, S. [IMONT/EIM, Ente Italiano della Montagna, P.za dei Caprettari 70, 00176 Roma (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    Aeolian mineral dust archived in polar and mid latitude ice cores represents a precious proxy for assessing environmental and climatic variations at different timescales. In this respect, the identification of dust mineralogy plays a key role. In this work we performed the first preliminary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on mineral dust particles extracted from Antarctic and from Alpine firn cores using grazing incidence geometry at the Fe K-edge. A dedicated high vacuum experimental chamber was set up for normal-incidence and total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy analyses on minor amounts of mineral materials at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Results show that this experimental technique and protocol allows recognizing iron inclusion mineral fraction on insoluble dust in the 1-10 {mu}g range.

  1. Confocal depth-resolved fluorescence micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy for the study of cultural heritage materials: a new mobile endstation at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guang; Chu, Shengqi; Sun, Tianxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Zheng, Lirong; An, Pengfei; Zhu, Jian; Wu, Shurong; Du, Yonghua; Zhang, Jing

    2017-08-10

    A confocal fluorescence endstation for depth-resolved micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy is described. A polycapillary half-lens defines the incident beam path and a second polycapillary half-lens at 90° defines the probe sample volume. An automatic alignment program based on an evolutionary algorithm is employed to make the alignment procedure efficient. This depth-resolved system was examined on a general X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamline at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Sacrificial red glaze (AD 1368–1644) china was studied to show the capability of the instrument. As a mobile endstation to be applied on multiple beamlines, the confocal system can improve the function and flexibility of general XAS beamlines, and extend their capabilities to a wider user community.

  2. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  3. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, A. S.

    2016-07-26

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  4. Study of the contact charge transfer behavior between cryptophanes (A and E) and fullerene by absorption, fluorescence and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Caihong; Shen Weili; Fan Ruying; Zhang Guomei; Shangguan Lingzhi; Chao Jianbin; Shuang Shaomin [Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Dong Chuan, E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn [Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Choi, Martin M.F., E-mail: mfchoi@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-09-14

    A group of novel cage-like compounds cryptophanes A and E were synthesized from vanillin by a three-step method. The intermolecular interaction between cryptophanes (A and E) and fullerene (C{sub 60}) was investigated in detail by absorption, fluorescence and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The absorption of C{sub 60} at 410-650 nm decreased in the presence of cryptophanes A or E. The decrease in absorption intensity was proportional to the concentration of cryptophanes A or E. On the other hand, the fluorescence intensity of cryptophanes A or E decreased and the emission maxima were blue-shifted with the increase in C{sub 60} concentration. These results suggest that contact charge transfer (CCT) complexes can be formed from C{sub 60} with cryptophanes A or E. In addition, the electrochemical behavior of cryptophanes (A and E) and C{sub 60} was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The redox currents of cryptophanes (A and E) decreased and the peak potentials were shifted on addition of C{sub 60}. The changes in the chemical shifts ({Delta}{delta}) of aromatic protons of cryptophanes (A and E) in their NMR spectra further support that CCT complexes were formed with cryptophanes as the electron donors and C{sub 60} as the electron acceptor.

  5. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  6. Direct Determination of Oxidation States of Uranium in Mixed-Valent Uranium Oxides Using Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Kaushik; Khooha, Ajay; Das, Gangadhar; Tiwari, M K; Misra, N L

    2017-01-03

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF)-based X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy has been used to determine the oxidation state of uranium in mixed-valent U 3 O 8 and U 3 O 7 uranium oxides. The TXRF spectra of the compounds were measured using variable X-ray energies in the vicinity of the U L 3 edge in the TXRF excitation mode at the microfocus beamline of the Indus-2 synchrotron facility. The TXRF-based X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (TXRF-XANES) spectra were deduced from the emission spectra measured using the energies below and above the U L 3 edge in the XANES region. The data processing using TXRF-XANES spectra of U(IV), U(V), and U(VI) standard compounds revealed that U present in U 3 O 8 is a mixture of U(V) and U(VI), whereas U in U 3 O 7 is mixture of U(IV) and U(VI). The results obtained in this study are similar to that reported in literature using the U M edge. The present study has demonstrated the possibility of application of TXRF for the oxidation state determination and elemental speciation of radioactive substances in a nondestructive manner with very small amount of sample requirement.

  7. Portable ultrahigh-vacuum sample storage system for polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshihide, E-mail: e0827@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Suzuki, Ryo; Beniya, Atsushi; Isomura, Noritake [Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., Yokomichi 41-1, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Uehara, Hiromitsu; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Takakusagi, Satoru [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Kita 21-10, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0021 (Japan); Nimura, Tomoyuki [AVC Co., Ltd., Inada 1450-6, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0061 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    A portable ultrahigh-vacuum sample storage system was designed and built to investigate the detailed geometric structures of mass-selected metal clusters on oxide substrates by polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (PTRF-XAFS). This ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) sample storage system provides the handover of samples between two different sample manipulating systems. The sample storage system is adaptable for public transportation, facilitating experiments using air-sensitive samples in synchrotron radiation or other quantum beam facilities. The samples were transferred by the developed portable UHV transfer system via a public transportation at a distance over 400 km. The performance of the transfer system was demonstrated by a successful PTRF-XAFS study of Pt{sub 4} clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface.

  8. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  9. A structural study of bone changes in knee osteoarthritis by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhupakorn, Bura; Thienpratharn, Suwittaya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and thickening of subchondral bone. The present study investigated the changing of biochemical components of cartilage and bone compared between normal and OA people. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniquesincluding X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were employed for the bone changes in kneeosteoarthritisstudies. The bone samples were collected from various osteoarthritis patients with both male and female in the ages range between 20 and 74 years old. SR-XRF results excited at 4240 eV for Ca elements show a majority three main groups, based on their XRF intensities, 20-36 years, 40-60 years and over 70 years, respectively. By employing XAS techniques, XANES features can be used to clearly explain in term of electronic transitions occurring in bone samples which are affected from osteoarthritis symptoms. Moreover, a structural change around Ca ions in bone samples is obviously obtained by EXAFS results indicating an increase of Ca-amorphous phase when the ages increase.

  10. Static and dynamic interaction of a naturally occurring photochromic molecule with bovine serum albumin studied by UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Ortica, Fausto; Favaro, Gianna

    2008-12-25

    In this work, the interaction of a naturally occurring chromene, flindersine (FL), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved lifetime measurements, steady state photochemistry, and semiempirical calculations. The interplay of FL with tryptophan (Trp) has been studied in parallel. The interaction of FL with BSA causes fluorescence quenching of BSA through both static and dynamic quenching mechanisms. FL binds BSA with a stoichiometry that varies from 1.09:1 to 0.80:1 as the temperature increases from 293 to 308 K. The reaction is characterized by negative enthalpy (deltaH degrees = -193 kJ mol(-1)) and negative entropy (deltaS degrees = -550 J K(-1) mol(-1)), indicating that the predominant forces in the FL-BSA complex are hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. The binding distance between the protein and the photochrome was calculated as 2.5 nm, according to the Foerster theory on resonance energy transfer. The effect of FL concentration on the BSA fluorescence was analyzed according to the maximum entropy method. FL also quenches the emission of Trp with a mechanism that, based on the experimental evidence, excludes both static and dynamic effects. An alternative relaxation pathway, consisting in an electron transfer from a prefluorescent state of Trp to FL, is put forward. The photobehavior of FL is affected by the interplay with BSA but not with Trp. When FL is complexed with BSA, it becomes a more fluorescent and more reactive species. Semiempirical calculations of the lowest optically active electronic transitions of hypothetical FL photoproducts suggest the most likely structure for the photoproduct.

  11. Intrinsic deviations in fluorescence yield detected x-ray absorption spectroscopy : the case of the transition metal L-2,L-3 edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurian, Reshmi; Kunnus, Kristjan; Wernet, Philippe; Butorin, Sergei M.; Glatzel, Pieter; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence yield (FY) detected x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of 3d transition metal ions are calculated from the integrated 2p3d resonant x-ray emission spectra. The resulting FY-XAS spectra are compared with the normal XAS spectra corresponding to the absorption cross section and significant

  12. Probing Cu(I) in homogeneous catalysis using high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walroth, Richard C; Uebler, Jacob W H; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2015-06-18

    Metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitations in Cu(I) X-ray absorption spectra are introduced as spectroscopic handles for the characterization of species in homogeneous catalytic reaction mixtures. Analysis is supported by correlation of a spectral library to calculations and to complementary spectroscopic parameters.

  13. Microfluidic Integration on Detector Array for Absorption and Fluorescence Micro-Spectrometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adam, Mark L; Enzelberger, Markus; Quake, Stephen; Scherer, Axel

    2005-01-01

    .... Elastomers are excellent transparent materials, which provide hermetic seals to silicon dioxide and allow sensitive absorption and fluorescent spectroscopy in the visible and near-UV wavelength range...

  14. Novel Instrument to Measure Aerosol Fluorescence, Absorption, and Scattering, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Picarro, Inc proposes to develop the first cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) system to measure fluorescence, absorption, and scattering properties of atmospheric...

  15. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  16. The UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy indicators for monitoring the evolution of green waste composts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Stéphane; Abaker, Madi; Domeizel, Mariane; Rapetti, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    The maturity process of compost goes through several phases that have to be monitored in order to optimize the production process which in turn assure a good quality product and less time consumption. In order to estimate rapidly the phase where the compost is present and to measure the cellulose, the ratio C:N and the Stability Index Organic Matter (ISMO) a crucial parameter that needs to be monitored and controlled is the temperature. However, the temperature is not really a good indicator for the maturity of the compost because it is not constant and it depends on the mixing and environmental processes. The final measurements are performed at the end of the production process after certain time period that is subjectively determined by the producer. The work presented here is based on the optical properties of the organic matter that are observed each month for a period of six months. The organic matter of 5 composts was extracted by water and analyzed by UV-VIS spectroscopic technique [1] and 3D fluorescence emission technique [2]. The usual indexes were calculated (E2/E3, E4/E6, EBZ/EET, SUVA254), but also the PARAFAC decomposition of the 3D fluorescence response by Milori [3] and the Hx indexes [4]. The comparison of these results and the cellulose composition with the corresponding ISMO index indicates that the maturity process occurs more rapidly then the expectation of the producers. Further, the combination of the indicators gives useful information about different processes that take place during the maturity of the compost such as aromatization, the condensation and the stabilization of the parameters.

  17. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and its Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    derstanding of the chemical kinetics and molecular dynamics of the excited molecule. This special issue contains eighteen articles dealing with many dif- ferent aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy and applications in chemistry, which I hope would be useful to both chemists and spectroscopists. I thank the Indian Academy ...

  18. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  19. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy for FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, T.P.

    1995-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is based on the absorption of a short pulse of tuned laser light by a group of atoms and the observation of the resulting fluorescence radiation from the excited state. Because the excitation is resonant it is very efficient, and the fluorescence can be many times brighter than the normal spontaneous emission, so low number densities of the selected atoms can be detected and measured. Good spatial resolution can be achieved by using a narrow laser beam. If the laser is sufficiently monochromatic, and it can be tuned over the absorption line profile of the selected atoms, information can also be obtained about the velocities of the atoms from the Doppler effect which can broaden and shift the line. In this report two topics are examined in detail. The first is the effect of high laser irradiance, which can cause 'power broadening' of the apparent absorption line profile. The second is the effect of the high magnetic field in FTU. Detailed calculations are given for LIFS of neutral iron and molybdenum atoms, including the Zeeman effect, and the implementation of LIFS for these atoms on FTU is discussed

  20. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  1. Cellular Fates of Manganese(II) Pentaazamacrocyclic Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) Mimetics: Fluorescently Labeled MnSOD Mimetics, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekley, Claire M; Kenkel, Isabell; Lippert, Rainer; Wei, Shengwei; Lieb, Dominik; Cranwell, Tiffanny; Wedding, Jason L; Zillmann, Annika S; Rohr, Robin; Filipovic, Milos R; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Harris, Hugh H

    2017-06-05

    Manganese(II) pentaazamacrocyclic complexes (MnPAMs) can act as small-molecule mimics of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) with potential therapeutic application in conditions linked to oxidative stress. Previously, the in vitro mechanism of action has been determined, their activity has been demonstrated in cells, and some representatives of this class of MnSOD mimetics have entered clinical trials. However, MnPAM uptake, distribution, and metabolism in cells are largely unknown. Therefore, we have used X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study the cellular fate of a number of MnPAMs. We have also synthesized and characterized fluorescently labeled (pyrene and rhodamine) manganese(II) pyane [manganese(II) trans-2,13-dimethyl-3,6,9,12,18-pentaazabicyclo[12.3.1]octadeca-1(18),14,16-triene] derivatives and investigated their utility for cellular imaging of MnPAMs. Their SOD activity was determined via a direct stopped-flow technique. XFM experiments show that treatment with amine-based manganese(II) pyane type pentaazamacrocycles leads to a 10-100-fold increase in the overall cellular manganese levels compared to the physiological levels of manganese in control cells. In treated cells in general, manganese was distributed throughout the cell body, with a couple of notable exceptions. The lipophilicity of the MnPAMs, examined by partitioning in octanol-buffer system, was a good predictor of the relative cellular manganese levels. Analysis of the XAS data of treated cells revealed that some fraction of amine-based MnPAMs taken up by the cells remained intact, with the rest transformed into SOD-active manganese(II) phosphate. Higher phosphate binding constants, determined from the effect of the phosphate concentration on in vitro SOD activity, were associated with more extensive metabolism of the amine-based MnPAMs to manganese(II) phosphate. In contrast, the imine-based manganese(II) pydiene complex that is prone to

  2. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  3. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  4. Medieval glass from the Cathedral in Paderborn: a comparative study using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and inductively coupled laser ablation mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hormes, J. [University of Saskatchewan, Canadian Light Source Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Louisiana State University, CAMD, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Roy, A.; Bovenkamp, G.L. [Louisiana State University, CAMD, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Simon, K. [University of Goettingen, Geochemistry, Centre for Geosciences, Goettingen (Germany); Kim, C.Y. [University of Saskatchewan, Canadian Light Source Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Boerste, N. [Faculty for Theology Paderborn, Paderborn (Germany); Gai, S. [LWL - Archaeologie fuer Westfalen, Muenster (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    We have investigated four stained glass samples recovered from an archaeological excavation at the Cathedral in Paderborn (Germany) between 1978 and 1980. On two of the samples there are parts of paintings. Concentrations of major elements were determined using two independent techniques: LA-ICP-MS (a UV laser ablation microsampler combined with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and synchrotron radiation X-ray excited X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). The SR-XRF data were quantified by using the program package PyMCA developed by the software group of the ESRF in Grenoble. Significant differences were found between the concentrations determined by the two techniques that can be explained by concentration gradients near the surface of the glasses caused, for example, by corrosion/leaching processes and the different surface sensitivities of the applied techniques. For several of the elements that were detected in the glass and in the colour pigments used for the paintings X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were recorded in order to determine the chemical speciation of the elements of interest. As was expected, most elements in the glass were found as oxides in their most stable form. Two notable exceptions were observed: titanium was not found as rutile - the most stable form of TiO{sub 2} - but in the form of anatase, and lead was not found in one defined chemical state but as a complex mixture of oxide, sulphate, and other compounds. (orig.)

  5. Aggregation state and pKa values of (E)-resveratrol as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-visible absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Nicolás, José Manuel; García-Carmona, Francisco

    2008-09-10

    Whether or not (E)-resveratrol can be used as a functional ingredient in foods depends on its structure at different concentrations and pH values. For this reason, the aggregation state of (E)-resveratrol at acidic and basic pH is investigated here for the first time. The data show that (E)-resveratrol forms aggregates above a certain critical concentration, and this concentration is lower at acid (12.5 microM at pH 5.5) than at basic pH values (37 microM at pH 10.5). Moreover, although several papers have focused on the effect of the protonation state of (E)-resveratrol on its biological activity, different data concerning the acidic dissociation constants of this natural antioxidant have been reported in the literature. The present paper shows a way of determining the acidic dissociation constants (pKa1 = 8.8, pKa2 = 9.8, pKa3 = 11.4) of (E)-resveratrol in aqueous medium using both absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, the spectroscopic study of (E)-resveratrol under different ionization states corresponding to the deprotonation of the hydroxyl groups present in the molecule shows significant differences among the absorbance, excitation, and emission spectra of (E)-resveratrol that have not previously been reported.

  6. Combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat Hossain, Md; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-04-15

    A combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated. The optical sources used in the system are the white flash LED of the smartphone and an orthogonally positioned and interchangeable UV (λex=370  nm) and blue (λex=450  nm) LED. The dispersive element is a low-cost, nano-imprinted diffraction grating coated with Au. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel resolution was carried out with the camera CMOS chip. By integrating the blue and UV excitation sources into the white LED circuitry, the entire system is self-contained within a 3D printed case and powered from the smartphone battery; the design can be scaled to add further excitation sources. Using a customized app, acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using a blue-absorbing and green-emitting pH-sensitive amino-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe and a UV-absorbing and blue-emitting Zn2+-sensitive fluoro-ionophore.

  7. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies...... of the hole in this manner. In a second example, a hole is created in an inner shell by the first pulse, and the second probe pulse couples an even more tightly bound state to that hole. The hole decays in this example by Auger electron emission, and the absorption spectroscopy follows the decay of the hole...

  8. Polycapillary Optics Based Confocal Micro X-ray Fluorescence and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Setup at The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Collaborative Research Group Dutch-Belgian Beamline, BM26A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, Stephen; Tack, Pieter; Rudloff-Grund, Jennifer Helen; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Longo, Alessandro; Vekemans, Bart; Bras, Wim; Brenker, Frank E; van Silfhout, Roelof; Vincze, Laszlo

    2018-02-06

    A novel plug-and-play setup based on polycapillary X-ray optics enables three-dimensional (3D) confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy down to 8 × 8 × 11 μm 3 (17 keV) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Collaborative Research Group Dutch-Belgian Beamline, BM26A. A complete description and analytical characterization is presented, together with two recently performed experimental cases. In Deep Earth diamond São Luiz-Frankfurt am Main 16, an olivine-rich inclusion was mapped with full 3D XRF elemental imaging. The preliminary tests on Iron Gall ink contained in an historical document, a letter from the court of King Philip II of Spain, reveal both the delicate nature of Iron Gall ink and the lack of Fe-Ni chemical bonding.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  10. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy in turbid media using fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, Arjen; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Robinson, Dominic J.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new technique, fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy (FDPS), that enables the quantitative investigation of fluorophores in turbid media. FDPS measurements are made with the same probe geometry as differential path length spectroscopy (DPS) measurements. Phantom

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  12. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  13. Conformational changes in human serum albumin studied by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. Distance measurements as a function of pH and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Pedersen, A O

    1989-01-01

    pH- and fatty acid-induced conformational changes in human serum albumin were investigated by fluorescence-energy transfer, determining the distance between Trp-214 and bound bilirubin at 25 degrees C. This distance changes significantly with the pH, being 2.52 +/- 0.01 nm at pH 6, 2.31 +/- 0.04 nm...

  14. Conformational changes in human serum albumin studied by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. Distance measurements as a function of pH and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Pedersen, A O

    1989-01-01

    pH- and fatty acid-induced conformational changes in human serum albumin were investigated by fluorescence-energy transfer, determining the distance between Trp-214 and bound bilirubin at 25 degrees C. This distance changes significantly with the pH, being 2.52 +/- 0.01 nm at pH 6, 2.31 +/- 0.04 ...

  15. Applications of Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    fig. 3 Fluorescence decays of nitroxide derivatives ........................... 18 fig. 4 Absorption spectra of TEMPOL ...simply Wovelegt (,’ , shifting the site of substitution fro. the a.ftA) and $(IIIA) psiton Flgw 4. Absorption spectra of TEMPOL in a sen of solvents...constants have been normalized. k’ = 2.2.6.6-tetramethyll-piperdinyloxy ( TEMPOL ) krd’/o. to account for solvent dependent variations in lifetime. JF F

  16. Optical absorption and fluorescence studies on imidazolium ionic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra were recorded on a UV–Vis spectrophotometer (Cary100,. Varian) and a spectrofluorimeter (FluoroLog-3, Jobin. Yvon) respectively. The fluorescence spectra were corrected for instrumental response. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements were carried out using a.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy for medical and environmental diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Jonas.

    1993-09-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for diagnostics in medical and environmental applications. The many aspects of fluorescence emission are utilized to enhance the accuracy of the diagnosis. A fluorescence detection system, based on nitrogen laser or dye laser excitation and optical multichannel detection, was constructed, and fluorescence spectra from human malignant tumours of various origins, were recorded. Tumour demarcation was observed using exogenous chromophores, as well as the endogenous tissue fluorescence. In particular, δ-amino levulinic acid was found to provide very good tumour demarcation. A multi-colour imaging system capable of simultaneous recording of four fluorescence images at selected wavelengths, was developed. Examples of processed images, based on the four sub-images, are shown for malignant tumours. In addition, data from photodynamic treatment of human malignant tumours are presented. Autofluorescence spectra from excised pieces of human atherosclerotic aorta and atherosclerotic coronary segment were found to be different from those of non-diseased vessels. Furthermore, fluorescence decay curves from atherosclerotic samples were found to differ from those of non-diseased samples. It is concluded that both spectral and temporal information should be utilized to enhance the demarcation. Methods for obtaining fluorescence data free from interference from blood, with applications to in vivo laser angioplasty of atherosclerosis, are discussed. The optical multichannel system and the multi-colour imaging system were integrated with a remote sensing system, originally used for environmental measurements, to obtain fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence images of plants at a distance of up to 100 m. The fluorescence data from plants subject to environmental stress or senescent plants were found to differ from those obtained from healthy vegetation. 359 refs

  18. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  19. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  20. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-06-19

    We demonstrate measurement of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes using two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2DFS). The high-resolution, tunable CW-laser spectroscopy technique clearly distinguishes atomic absorption from 235U and 238U in natural and highly enriched uranium metal samples. We present analysis of spectral resolution and analytical performance of 2DFS as a function of ambient pressure. Simultaneous measurement using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy provides information on temporal dynamics of the laser ablation plume and saturation behavior of fluorescence signals. The rapid, non-contact measurement is promising for in-field, standoff measurements of uranium enrichment for nuclear safety and security applications.

  1. Remote laser evaporative molecular absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Cohen, Alexander; Madajian, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel method for probing bulk molecular and atomic composition of solid targets from a distant vantage. A laser is used to melt and vaporize a spot on the target. With sufficient flux, the spot temperature rises rapidly, and evaporation of surface materials occurs. The melted spot creates a high-temperature blackbody source, and ejected material creates a plume of surface materials in front of the spot. Molecular and atomic absorption occurs as the blackbody radiation passes through the ejected plume. Bulk molecular and atomic composition of the surface material is investigated by using a spectrometer to view the heated spot through the ejected plume. The proposed method is distinct from current stand-off approaches to composition analysis, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which atomizes and ionizes target material and observes emission spectra to determine bulk atomic composition. Initial simulations of absorption profiles with laser heating show great promise for Remote Laser-Evaporative Molecular Absorption (R-LEMA) spectroscopy. The method is well-suited for exploration of cold solar system targets—asteroids, comets, planets, moons—such as from a spacecraft orbiting the target. Spatial composition maps could be created by scanning the surface. Applying the beam to a single spot continuously produces a borehole or trench, and shallow subsurface composition profiling is possible. This paper describes system concepts for implementing the proposed method to probe the bulk molecular composition of an asteroid from an orbiting spacecraft, including laser array, photovoltaic power, heating and ablation, plume characteristics, absorption, spectrometry and data management.

  2. Infrared absorption spectroscopy with color center lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, P. G.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Koester, E.; Pfeiffer, J.; Kasper, J. V. V.

    Results are presented of the application of a computer controlled color center laser combined with Stark modulation and magnetic rotation effect modulation for obtaining high resolution spectra of molecular species. The lowest electronic transition of the C2H free radical, of interest in astrophysics, is observed near 3772/cm and the high resolution spectra of methanol and hydroxylamine in the OH stretching region are obtained. It is concluded that color center laser absorption spectroscopy combined with sensitivy enhancement through modulation techniques is a sensitive and versatile means of determining the spectra of free radicals and transient molecules in the infared region.

  3. Laser-induced absorption and fluorescence studies of photochromic Schiff bases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kownacki, K.; Mordzinski, A.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1994-01-01

    Three photochromic Schiff bases: N-salicylideneaniline (SA), N-salicylidene-1-naphthylamine (SN), and N,N-bis-(salicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (Bsp), were studied in acetonitrile by means of steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as semiempirical quantum...... chemical calculations. In all these molecules, the transient absorption and two-step laser-induced fluorescence spectra of long-lived transients are remarkably similar. The photochromic species is tentatively assigned to the non-hydrogen bonded form of the proton transfer reaction product...

  4. Various applications of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, H.

    1978-06-01

    The application of the Zeeman effect to atomic absorption spectroscopy has been studied over the past several years. This technique has a larger area of application than conventional AAS because of its high degree of selectivity. The ZAA technique can be used for organometallic species determination by interfacing with a high-pressure liquid chromatograph. Various kinds of eluents can be directly introduced in the ZAA system; even organic solvents or high-concentration salt solutions. For example, the Co atom in the functional center of Vitamin B12 molecule was separately analyzed in the presence of much larger amounts of inorganic Co. In the ZAA technique, interference caused by direct spectral overlap can also be corrected. As a typical example, the Sb line at 217.02 nm overlaps the Pb absorption line at 217.00 nm. However, 1000 ppM of Pb did not cause any interference signal in the Sb analysis by ZAA. This is especially important in the analysis of gun powder residue that is often carried out by chemists working in the forensic field. In the determination of trace elements in matrices of unknown composition, the ZAA technique achieved highly reliable results by employing the standard addition method to correct for chemical interferences, because any nonspecific absorption or emission does not give rise to interference signals with this technique

  5. Uranium concentrate analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Guerra, J.P.; Bayon, A.; Roca, R.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of As, Ca, Fe, Mo, P, S, Si. Th, V and U in uranium concentrates by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy has been studied. As and U are determined in nitric solutions and for the rest of elements analysis is performed by a bead fusion technique using Li 2 B 4 O 7 and Li 2 CO 3 as fluxes. Although the uranium matrix minimizes the absorption and enhancement effects, because of the content variations of this element it is advisable to operate at a constant level of U 3 O 8 . Despite the high matrix absorption and the large dilution of the samples, sensitivity and speed are found to be satisfactory as the result of the use of a high sensitivity automatic spectrometer. The spectral interferences of Mo on S and P, and of Pb on As have been particularly considered. (author) [es

  6. Precision Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy of H3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yu-chan; Liao, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Peng, Jin-Long; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-06-01

    In our previous work on the Lamb dips of the νb{2} fundamental band of H3+, the saturated absorption spectrum was obtained by the third-derivative spectroscopy using frequency modulation [1]. However, the frequency modulation also causes error in absolute frequency determination. To solve this problem, we have built an offset-locking system to lock the OPO pump frequency to an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser. With this modification, we are able to scan the OPO idler frequency precisely and obtain the profile of the Lamb dips. Double modulation (amplitude modulation of the idler power and concentration modulation of the ion) is employed to subtract the interference fringes of the signal and increase the signal-to-noise ratio effectively. To Determine the absolute frequency of the idler wave, the pump wave is offset locked on the R(56) 32-0 a10 hyperfine component of 127I2, and the signal wave is locked on a GPS disciplined fiber optical frequency comb (OFC). All references and lock systems have absolute frequency accuracy better than 10 kHz. Here, we demonstrate its performance by measuring one transition of methane and sixteen transitions of H3+. This instrument could pave the way for the high-resolution spectroscopy of a variety of molecular ions. [1] H.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Hsiao, J.-L. Peng, T. Amano, and J.-T. Shy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 263002 (2012).

  7. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Red Fluorescent Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Patrick Eugene

    Red-emitting homologues (RFPs) of the native Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with emission wavelengths beyond 650 nm are desirable probes for in vivo imaging experiments. They offer the potential for deeper tissue penetration and lower background scatter given a cleaner spectral window. However, bioimaging applications are hindered by poor photophysics ( e.g. low fluorescence quantum yield, high photobleaching), which limits experimental resolution and represents a significant obstacle towards utilization for low copy-number, long-duration imaging applications. In this thesis, a variety of femtosecond nonlinear electronic spectroscopies were employed jointly with site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the photophysical properties of RFPs. In one study, the molecular mechanism of red emission was pursued in two notable RFPs, mPlum and TagRFP675. Solvation dynamics observed with time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy were interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations to indicate that their red-emission is correlated with the ability of specific chromophore-sidechain hydrogen-bonding interactions to interconvert between direct and water-mediated states. In a second set of studies, two-dimensional double quantum coherence spectroscopy was used to probe the electronic transitions of mPlum. It was discovered that it displayed a response distinctly different from an organic dye in bulk solvent. Modeling indicate of these spectra indicate the spectral features may be attributed to the existence of multiple high-lying (n>1) excited states. The results provide new insight into the electronic structure of these widely used fluorescent probes.

  8. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  9. Intestinal absorption of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Song, Yunmei; Nann, Thomas; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-07-01

    Characterization of intestinal absorption of nanoparticles is critical in the design of noninvasive anticancer, protein-based, and gene nanoparticle-based therapeutics. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the characterization of the intestinal absorption of nanoparticles and for understanding the mechanisms active in their processing within healthy intestinal cells. It is generally accepted that the cellular processing represents a major drawback of current nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems. In particular, endolysosomal trafficking causes degradation of therapeutic molecules such as proteins, lipids, acid-sensitive anticancer drugs, and genes. To date, investigations into nanoparticle processing within intestinal cells have studied mass transport through Caco-2 cells or everted rat intestinal sac models. We developed an approach to visualize directly the mechanisms of nanoparticle processing within intestinal tissue. These results clearly identify a mechanism by which healthy intestinal cells process nanoparticles and point to the possible use of this approach in the design of noninvasive nanoparticle-based therapies. Advances in nanomedicine have resulted in the development of new therapies for various diseases. Intestinal route of administration remains the easiest and most natural. The authors here designed experiments to explore and characterize the process of nanoparticle transport across the intestinal tissue. In so doing, further insights were gained for future drug design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. APD detectors for biological fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeres, S.; Borrel, V.; Magenc, C.; Courrech, J.L.; Bazer-Bachi, R.

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very convenient and widely used method for studying the molecular background of biological processes [L. Salome, J.L. Cazeil, A. Lopez, J.F. Tocanne, Eur. Biophys. J. 27 (1998) 391-402]. Chromophores are included in the structure under study and a flash of laser light induces fluorescence (Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching), the decay of which yields information on the polarity, the speed of rotation, and the speed of diffusion as well as on the temporal and spatial evolution of interactions between molecular species. The method can even be used to study living cells [J.F. Tocanne, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, Prog. Lipid Res. 33 (1994) 203-237, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, F. Loste, G. Parnaud, O. Saurel, P. Demange, J.F. Tocanne, Biochemistry 38 (1999) 2779-2786]. This is classically performed with a PM-based system. For biological reasons a decrease of the excitation of the cells is highly desirable. Because the fluorescence response then becomes fainter a significant improvement in detector capability would be welcome. We present here results obtained with an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD)-based system. The small sensitive area of detection allows a very significant improvement in signal/noise ratio, improvement in gain, and the opening-up of a new parameter space. With these new detectors we can begin the study of information transmission between cells through morphine receptors. This work involves both electronics engineers and biophysicists, so results and techniques in both fields will be presented here

  11. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  12. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-01

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems.

  13. Analysis of the absorption layer of CIGS solar cell by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok H; Shim, Hee S; Kim, Chan K; Yoo, Jong H; Russo, Richard E; Jeong, Sungho

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the elemental analysis of the thin copper indium gallium diselenide (CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se(2) [CIGS]) absorption layer deposited on Mo-coated soda-lime glass by the co-evaporation technique. The optimal laser and detection parameters for LIBS measurement of the CIGS absorption layer (1.23 μm) were investigated. The calibration results of Ga/In ratio with respect to the concentration ratios measured by x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy showed good linearity. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  14. Method for rapid multidiameter single-fiber reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy through a fiber bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, A.; Hoy, C.L.; Gamm, U.A.; Sterenborg, H.J.C.M.; Robinson, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated a means for quantifying the absorption and scattering properties of biological tissue through multidiameter single-fiber reflectance (MDSFR) spectroscopy. These measurements can be used to correct single-fiber fluorescence (SFF) spectra for the influence of optical

  15. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  16. Valence-to-core-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Eleanor R.; Pollock, Christopher J.; Bendix, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can provide detailed insight into the electronic and geometric structures of transition-metal active sites in metalloproteins and chemical catalysts. However, standard XAS spectra inherently represent an average contribution from the entire coordination...

  17. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  18. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  19. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henderson, Grant S.; De Groot, Frank M F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Moulton, Benjamin J A

    2014-01-01

    The previous Reviews in Mineralogy volume on spectroscopic methods (Vol. 18 Spectroscopic Methods in Mineralogy and Geology, Frank C. Hawthorne, ed. 1988), contained a single chapter on X-ray absorption spectroscopy which reviewed aspects of both EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) and

  20. The effect of dimethylsulfoxide on absorption and fluorescence spectra of aqueous solutions of acridine orange base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markarian, Shiraz A; Shahinyan, Gohar A

    2015-12-05

    The photophysical properties of aqueous solutions of acridine orange base (AOB) in wide concentration range of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) were studied by using absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy techniques at room temperature. The absorption spectrum of acridine orange in water shows two bands at 468 and 490 nm which were attributed to the dimer ((AOBH)2(2+)) and monomer (AOBH(+)) species respectively. In DMSO solution for the same AOB concentration only the basic form was detected with the band at 428 nm. The addition of DMSO to AOB aqueous solution leads to the decrease of absorption band at 490 nm and the new absorption band increases at 428 nm due to deprotonated (basic) form of AO and the first isosbestic point occurs at 450 nm. The evolution of isosbestic point reveals that an other equilibrium, due to the self-association of DMSO molecules takes place. From the steady-state fluorescence spectra Stokes shifts were calculated for AOB in aqueous and DMSO solutions. The addition of DMSO into the aqueous solution induced the enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of the dye compared to those in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lixin; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently an advanced optical technology in medical applications. However, the application of PDT is limited by the detection of photosensitizers. This work focuses on the application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of an effective photosenzitizer, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME). Optical properties of HMME were measured and analyzed based on its absorption and fluorescence spectra. The production mechanism of its fluorescence emission was analyzed. The detection device for HMME based on fluorescence spectroscopy was designed. Ratiometric method was applied to eliminate the influence of intensity change of excitation sources, fluctuates of excitation sources and photo detectors, and background emissions. The detection limit of this device is 6 μg/L, and it was successfully applied to the diagnosis of the metabolism of HMME in the esophageal cancer cells. To overcome the limitation of the point measurement using fluorescence spectroscopy, a two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence imaging system was established. The algorithm of the 2D fluorescence imaging system is deduced according to the fluorescence ratiometric method using bandpass filters. The method of multiple pixel point addition (MPPA) was used to eliminate fluctuates of signals. Using the method of MPPA, SNR was improved by about 30 times. The detection limit of this imaging system is 1.9 μg/L. Our systems can be used in the detection of porphyrins to improve the PDT effect.

  2. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-15

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Front face fluorescence spectroscopy and visible spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics have the potential to characterise ripening of Cabernet Franc grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, Marine; Dufour, Eric; Bertrand, Dominique; Maury, Chantal; Seraphin, Denis; Jourjon, Frédérique

    2008-07-21

    The potential of front-face spectroscopy for grape ripening dates discrimination was investigated on Cabernet Franc grapes from three parcels located on the Loire Valley and for six ripening dates. The 18 batches were analysed by front-face fluorescence spectroscopy and visible spectroscopy. The excitation spectra (250-310nm, emission wavelength=350nm) were characterised by a shoulder at 280nm. Grapes spectra were classified by factorial discriminant analysis (FDA). Ripening dates were well predicted by fluorescence spectra: grapes before veraison were separated from grapes after veraison and almost every ripening date was identified. The common spectroscopic space obtained by CCSWA showed that wavelengths corresponding to anthocyanin absorption in the visible were correlated to fluorescence wavelengths around the starting and ending points of the shoulder (263 and at 292nm). Then, regression models were investigated to predict total soluble solids (TSS), total acidity, malvidin-3G, total anthocyanins and total phenolics content from visible and fluorescence spectra. To predict technological indicators (TSS and total acidity), the PLS model with visible spectra (RMSECV=0.82 degrees Brix or 0.96gL(-1) H(2)SO(4)) was better than those with fluorescence one (RMSECV=1.39 degrees Brix or 2.06gL(-1) H(2)SO(4)). For malvidin-3G and total anthocyanins, all R(c)(2) and R(cv)(2) were superior to 0.90 and RMSECV were low. Visible and fluorescence spectroscopies succeeded in predicting anthocyanin content. Concerning total phenolic, the best prediction was provided by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy of synthetic melanin in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, G.; Frassanito, M.C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Palazzo, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gallone, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Mallardi, A. [ICPS-CNR, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Biagi, P.F. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Capozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy)], E-mail: v.capozzi@unifg.it

    2009-01-15

    We report a detailed investigation of fluorescence properties of synthetic eumelanin pigment in solution. A complete set of fluorescence spectra in the near-UV and visible range is analysed. Excitation spectra at a few selected emission energies are also investigated. Our measurements support the hypothesis that fluorescence in eumelanin is related to chemically distinct oligomeric units that can be selectively excited. Fluorescence due to large oligomer systems is spectrally differentiated from that due to monomers and small oligomer systems. Fluorescence excitation measurements show the contribution of 5,6-dihydroxyndole-2-carboxylic acid and 5,6-dihydroxyndole monomers to the emission of small-size oligomers.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental technics of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) is presented and several uses of it in atomic, molecular and bio physics are shown. The recent progresses of this technics, both theoretical and experimental, are discussed and the future perspectives on this subject are commented. (L.C.) [pt

  6. Absorption line spectroscopy of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jura, M.

    1983-01-01

    Absorption line studies of the interstellar medium are described. The discussion is in three parts. The first describes current views of diffuse interstellar clouds, while the second reports the results of recent extensive surveys of interstellar regions. The final part is an outline of possible future observations. (orig.)

  7. Two-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dertinger, T.

    2007-05-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) has been invented more than 30 years ago and experienced a renaissance after stable and affordable laser sources and low-noise single-photon detectors have become available. Its ability to measure diffusion coefficients at nanomolar concentrations of analyte made it a widely used tool in biophysics. However, in recent years it has been shown by many authors that aberrational (e.g. astigmatism) and photophysical effects (e.g. optical saturation) may influence the result of an FCS experiment dramatically, so that a precise and reliable estimation of the diffusion coefficient is no longer possible. In this thesis, we report on the development, implementation, and application of a new and robust modification of FCS that we termed two-focus FCS (2fFCS) and which fulfils two requirements: (i) It introduces an external ruler into the measurement by generating two overlapping laser foci of precisely known and fixed distance. (ii) These two foci and corresponding detection regions are generated in such a way that the corresponding molecule detection functions (MDFs) are sufficiently well described by a simple two-parameter model yielding accurate diffusion coefficients when applied to 2fFCS data analysis. Both these properties enable us to measure absolute values of the diffusion coefficient with an accuracy of a few percent. Moreover, it will turn out that the new technique is robust against refractive index mismatch, coverslide thickness deviations, and optical saturation effects, which so often trouble conventional FCS measurements. This thesis deals mainly with the introduction of the new measurement scheme, 2fFCS, but also presents several applications with far-reaching importance. (orig.)

  8. Two-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dertinger, T.

    2007-05-15

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) has been invented more than 30 years ago and experienced a renaissance after stable and affordable laser sources and low-noise single-photon detectors have become available. Its ability to measure diffusion coefficients at nanomolar concentrations of analyte made it a widely used tool in biophysics. However, in recent years it has been shown by many authors that aberrational (e.g. astigmatism) and photophysical effects (e.g. optical saturation) may influence the result of an FCS experiment dramatically, so that a precise and reliable estimation of the diffusion coefficient is no longer possible. In this thesis, we report on the development, implementation, and application of a new and robust modification of FCS that we termed two-focus FCS (2fFCS) and which fulfils two requirements: (i) It introduces an external ruler into the measurement by generating two overlapping laser foci of precisely known and fixed distance. (ii) These two foci and corresponding detection regions are generated in such a way that the corresponding molecule detection functions (MDFs) are sufficiently well described by a simple two-parameter model yielding accurate diffusion coefficients when applied to 2fFCS data analysis. Both these properties enable us to measure absolute values of the diffusion coefficient with an accuracy of a few percent. Moreover, it will turn out that the new technique is robust against refractive index mismatch, coverslide thickness deviations, and optical saturation effects, which so often trouble conventional FCS measurements. This thesis deals mainly with the introduction of the new measurement scheme, 2fFCS, but also presents several applications with far-reaching importance. (orig.)

  9. F K-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Tetsuro; Kawai, Jun; Maeda, Kuniko; Fukushima, Akiko; Shin, S.; Motoyama, Muneyuki; Nakajima Tsuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    We measured F X-ray absorption spectra of various fluorine compounds using a synchrotron radiation at KEK-PF. The absorption spectra were measured using X-ray fluorescence yield (XFY) and total electron yield (TEY) methods. Change of the spectral shape has a relation to the metal-fluorine bond distance. By comparing with the experimental spectrum and calculated spectrum, F 2p state density is divined into up and down states. (author)

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy and multi-way techniques. PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Graeber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC) is increasingly used to decompose fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) into their underlying chemical components. In the ideal case where fluorescence conforms to Beers Law, this process can lead to the mathematical identification and quantification...... of independently varying fluorophores. However, many practical and analytical hurdles stand between EEM datasets and their chemical interpretation. This article provides a tutorial in the practical application of PARAFAC to fluorescence datasets, demonstrated using a dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence...... dataset. A new toolbox for MATLAB is presented to support improved visualisation and sensitivity analyses of PARAFAC models in fluorescence spectroscopy. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  11. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS): Concepts, Applications and Outlook

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapusta, Peter; Macháň, Radek; Benda, A.; Hof, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2012), s. 12890-12910 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) * time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) * fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2012

  12. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  13. Absorption and Fluorescence Properties of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced by Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tong; Lu, Xiao-lan; Su, Rong-guo; Zhang, Dong-mei

    2015-09-01

    Four kinds of diatom (Chaetoceros curvisetus, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula halophile) and two kinds of dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum donghaiense and Gymnodinium) were cultured under laboratory conditions. Variations of optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were studied with absorption and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy(EEM) during growth of marine microalgae in incubation experiment. Absorption spectrum revealed absorption coefficient a(355) (CDOM absorption coefficients at 355 nm) of 6 kinds of marine microalgae above increased by 64.8%, 242.3%, 535.1%, 903.2%, 836% and 196.4%, respectively. Simultaneously, the absorption spectral slope (Sg), determined between 270 and 350 nm, representing the size of molecular weight of CDOM and humic-like composition, decreased by 8.7%, 34.6%, 39.4%, 53.1%, 46.7%, and 35.7%, respectively. Applying parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) together with EEM got four components of CDOM: C1(Ex/Em=350(260) nm/450 nm), C2 (Ex/Em=260(430) nm/525 nm), C3 (Ex/Em=325 nm/400 nm) and C4(Ex/Em=275 nm/325 nm), which were relative to three humic-like and one protein-like fluorescent components of Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula halophile. In incubation experiment, fluorescence intensity of these four components during growth of Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima increased by, respectively, 8.68, 24.9, 7.19 and 39.8 times, and those of Navicula halophile increased by 2.64, 0.07, 4.39 and 12.4 times, respectively. Significant relationships were found between the fluorescence intensity of four components of CDOM, a(355) and Sg. All results demonstrated that both content and molecular weight of CDOM produced by diatom and dinoflagellate studied in incubation experiment increased, but these two parameters changed more obviously of the diatom than those of dinoflagellate; the proportion of humic-like components in the composition of CDOM

  14. Single-particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Nizzero, Sara; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Cai, Yi-Yu; Su, Man-Nung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-05-13

    Removing effects of sample heterogeneity through single-molecule and single-particle techniques has advanced many fields. While background free luminescence and scattering spectroscopy is widely used, recording the absorption spectrum only is rather difficult. Here we present an approach capable of recording pure absorption spectra of individual nanostructures. We demonstrate the implementation of single-particle absorption spectroscopy on strongly scattering plasmonic nanoparticles by combining photothermal microscopy with a supercontinuum laser and an innovative calibration procedure that accounts for chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent excitation powers. Comparison of the absorption spectra to the scattering spectra of the same individual gold nanoparticles reveals the blueshift of the absorption spectra, as predicted by Mie theory but previously not detectable in extinction measurements that measure the sum of absorption and scattering. By covering a wavelength range of 300 nm, we are furthermore able to record absorption spectra of single gold nanorods with different aspect ratios. We find that the spectral shift between absorption and scattering for the longitudinal plasmon resonance decreases as a function of nanorod aspect ratio, which is in agreement with simulations.

  15. Two-Photon Absorption Spectroscopy of Rubidium with a Dual-Comb Tequnique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akiko; Yoshida, Satoru; Hariki, Takuya; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2017-06-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopies have great potential for high-resolution molecular and atomic spectroscopies, thanks to the broadband comb spectrum consisting of dense narrow modes. In this study, we apply the dual-comb system to Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopy. The outputs of two frequency combs excite several two-photon transitions of rubidium, and we obtained broadband Doppler-free spectra from dual-comb fluorescence signals. The fluorescence detection scheme circumvents the sensitivity limit which is effectively determined by the dynamic range of photodetectors in absorption-based dual-comb spectroscopies. Our system realized high-sensitive, Doppler-free high-resolution and broadband atomic spectroscopy. A part of observed spectra of 5S_{1/2} - 5D_{5/2} transition is shown in the figure. The hyperfine structures of the F" = 1 - F' = 3,2,1 transitions are fully-resolved and the spectral widths are approximately 5 MHz. The absolute frequency axis is precisely calibrated from comb mode frequencies which were stabilized to a GPS-disciplined clock. This work was supported by JST through the ERATO MINOSHIMA Intelligent Optical Synthesizer Project and Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (16J02345). A. Nishiyama, S. Yoshida, Y. Nakajima, H. Sasada, K. Nakagawa, A. Onae, K. and Minoshima, Opt. Express 24, 25894 (2016). A. Hipke, S. A. Meek, T. Ideguchi, T.W. Hänsch, and N. Picqué, Phys. Rev. A 90, 011805(R) (2014).

  16. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of

  17. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrne, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eakins, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  18. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  19. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  20. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  1. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  2. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  3. Nonlinear Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeev, Victor V.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.

    Principles of nonlinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy of complicated organic compounds and of the method capable of determining photophysical parameters are considered in this chapter. Special attention is paid to the peculiarities of the method connected with specific photophysical processes in natural organic compounds, especially in proteins, and to the major role of intramolecular energy transfer and presence of localized donor-acceptor pairs (LDAP) of fluorophores within single macromolecules. These facts stimulated the development of models based on the collective states formalism describing fluorescent response of LDAP to pulsed laser excitation. Unique features of the method are illustrated by the example of proteins (proteins with intrinsic fluorescence (HSA, BSA) and fluorescent protein mRFP1) that can be used as fluorescent tags of intracellular processes while their photophysical parameters can be used as the information channel.

  4. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of single particles using photophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.

    1985-01-01

    In situ absorption spectroscopy was performed on a single suspended salt particle using photophoresis. The charged ammonium sulfate particle was levitated in an electric-quadrpole field and illuminated by a CO 2 laser. The size-dependent absorption spectrum of ammonium sulfate particles was observed for the first time to our knowledge at 930-1080 cm -1 . The effects of gas pressure and laser power were also determined. For particles approximately 10 μm in diameter, the photophoretic force was observed to be negative

  5. Artificial absorption creation for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Chang, Jun; Cao, Lihua; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Cunguang; Qin, Zengguang

    2017-09-01

    A novel strategy for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement is presented. This method is immune to non-absorption transmission losses, and allows dead zone removal for ultra-low concentration detection, and reference point selection at atmospheric pressure. The method adjusts laser emission and creates artificial absorption peaks according to requirements. By creating an artificial absorption peak next to the real absorption zone, calibration is not necessary. The developed method can be applied to not only wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) but also direct absorption (DA). In WMS, the method does not need two harmonic signals, resulting in higher reliability, better performance, and no electro-optical gain uncertainty. At the same time, non-absorption transmission losses effect is suppressed from 70% to 0.425% with DA and from 70% to 0.225% with WMS method. When the artificial absorption peak coincides with the real one, the dead zone of measurement can be removed to give a lower detection limit, and water vapor still can be detected when concentration is lower than 0.2 ppm in our experiment. Reference point selection uncertainty with the DA method, especially when the signal-to-noise ratio is low and absorption line is broad, can also be facilitated. And the uncertainty of reference point selection is improved from 6% to 0.8% by measuring reference point amplitude. The method is demonstrated and validated by WMS and DA measurements of water vapor (1 atm, 296 K, 1368.597 nm). The measurement results obtained using the new method reveal its promise in TDLAS.

  6. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košovan, P.; Uhlík, F.; Kuldová, J.; Štěpánek, M.; Limpouchová, Z.; Procházka, K.; Benda, Aleš; Humpolíčková, Jana; Hof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 3 (2011), s. 207-222 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400621 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Monte Carlo Study * fluorescence * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2011

  8. The fast polarization modulation based dualfocus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefl, Martin; Benda, Aleš; Gregor, I.; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2014), s. 885-899 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence and luminiscence * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  9. "FluSpec": A Simulated Experiment in Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Bigger, Andrew S.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    The "FluSpec" educational software package is a fully contained tutorial on the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy as well as a simulator on which experiments can be performed. The procedure for each of the experiments is also contained within the package along with example analyses of results that are obtained using the software.

  10. Distribution of diffusion times determined by fluorescence (lifetime) correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Jiří; Loukotová, Lenka; Hrubý, Martin; Štěpánek, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 8 (2018), s. 2796-2804 ISSN 0024-9297 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer solution * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * diffusion time distribution Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 5.835, year: 2016

  11. Use of absorption spectroscopy for refined petroleum product discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michael

    1991-07-01

    On-line discrimination between arbitrary petroleum products is necessary for optimal control of petroleum refinery and pipeline operation and process control involving petroleum distillates. There are a number of techniques by which petroleum products can be distinguished from one another. Among these, optical measurements offer fast, non-intrusive, real-time characterization. The application examined here involves optically monitoring the interface between dissimilar batches of fluids in a gasoline pipeline. After examination of near- infrared and mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform mid-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was chosen as the best candidate for implementation. On- line FTIR data is presented, verifying the applicability of the technique for batch interface detection.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  13. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  14. Comparison of photoacoustic spectroscopy, conventional absorption spectroscopy, and potentiometry as probes of lanthanide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, R.A.; Palmer, C.E.A.; Baisden, P.A.; Russo, R.E.; Silva, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors measured the stability constants of praseodymium acetate and oxydiacetate complexes by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy, conventional UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and pH titration. For the spectroscopic studies, changes in the free Pr absorption peaks at 468 and 481 nm were monitored at varying ligand concentrations. The total Pr concentration was 1 x 10 -4 M in solutions used for the photoacoustic studies and 0.02 M for conventional spectroscopy. For the pH titrations, we used solutions whose Pr concentrations varied from 5 x 10 -3 to 5 x 10 -2 M, with total ligand-to-metal ratios ranging from 1 to 10. A comparison of the results obtained by the three techniques demonstrates that photoacoustic spectroscopy can give the same information about metal-ligand speciation as more conventional methods. It is particularly suited to those situations where the other techniques are insensitive because of limited metal concentrations

  15. Sucrose monoester micelles size determined by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A Sanchez

    Full Text Available One of the several uses of sucrose detergents, as well as other micelle forming detergents, is the solubilization of different membrane proteins. Accurate knowledge of the micelle properties, including size and shape, are needed to optimize the surfactant conditions for protein purification and membrane characterization. We synthesized sucrose esters having different numbers of methylene subunits on the substituent to correlate the number of methylene groups with the size of the corresponding micelles. We used Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS and two photon excitation to determine the translational D of the micelles and calculate their corresponding hydrodynamic radius, R(h. As a fluorescent probe we used LAURDAN (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene, a dye highly fluorescent when integrated in the micelle and non-fluorescent in aqueous media. We found a linear correlation between the size of the tail and the hydrodynamic radius of the micelle for the series of detergents measured.

  16. New insight in the template decomposition process of large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals: an in situ UV-Vis/fluorescence micro-spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karwacki, L.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of in situ UV-Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy was used to study the template decomposition process in large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals. Correlation of polarized light dependent UV-Vis absorption spectra with confocal fluorescence emission spectra in the 400–750 nm region

  17. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the neutral and anionic green fluorescent protein chromophore: Franck-Condon simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsung-wei; Yang, Ling; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2012-07-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the neutral and anionic green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore, namely p-hydroxybenzylideneimidazolidinone (p-HBDI), have been simulated using the Franck-Condon factors including inhomogeneous broadening of solvent effect. Ground and the first excited states were calculated by time dependent density functional theory with and without the polarizable continuum model environment. Simulated peak of the neutral/anionic p-HBDI at 380 nm (423 nm)/421 nm agrees with experiment value 370 nm (434 nm)/419 nm for absorption (fluorescence) spectrum. Simulated width of the neutral/anionic p-HBDI at 0.51 eV (0.54 eV)/0.57 eV agrees with experiment value 0.54 eV (0.66 eV)/0.56 eV for absorption (fluorescence) spectrum.

  18. Pathlength Determination for Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) has been extensively studied and applied during recent years in, e.g., food packaging, human sinus monitoring, gas diffusion studies, and pharmaceutical tablet characterization. The focus has been on the evaluation of the gas absorption pathlength in porous media, which a priori is unknown due to heavy light scattering. In this paper, three different approaches are summarized. One possibility is to simultaneously monitor another gas with known concentration (e.g., water vapor), the pathlength of which can then be obtained and used for the target gas (e.g., oxygen) to retrieve its concentration. The second approach is to measure the mean optical pathlength or physical pathlength with other methods, including time-of-flight spectroscopy, frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry and the frequency domain photon migration method. By utilizing these methods, an average concentration can be obtained and the porosities of the material are studied. The last method retrieves the gas concentration without knowing its pathlength by analyzing the gas absorption line shape, which depends upon the concentration of buffer gases due to intermolecular collisions. The pathlength enhancement effect due to multiple scattering enables also the use of porous media as multipass gas cells for trace gas monitoring. All these efforts open up a multitude of different applications for the GASMAS technique. PMID:24573311

  19. Pathlength Determination for Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Mei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS has been extensively studied and applied during recent years in, e.g., food packaging, human sinus monitoring, gas diffusion studies, and pharmaceutical tablet characterization. The focus has been on the evaluation of the gas absorption pathlength in porous media, which a priori is unknown due to heavy light scattering. In this paper, three different approaches are summarized. One possibility is to simultaneously monitor another gas with known concentration (e.g., water vapor, the pathlength of which can then be obtained and used for the target gas (e.g., oxygen to retrieve its concentration. The second approach is to measure the mean optical pathlength or physical pathlength with other methods, including time-of-flight spectroscopy, frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry and the frequency domain photon migration method. By utilizing these methods, an average concentration can be obtained and the porosities of the material are studied. The last method retrieves the gas concentration without knowing its pathlength by analyzing the gas absorption line shape, which depends upon the concentration of buffer gases due to intermolecular collisions. The pathlength enhancement effect due to multiple scattering enables also the use of porous media as multipass gas cells for trace gas monitoring. All these efforts open up a multitude of different applications for the GASMAS technique.

  20. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of Kα and Kβ emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS

  1. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  2. Application of fluorescent and vibration spectroscopy for septic serum human albumin structure deformation during pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyubin, A.; Konstantinova, E.; Slezhkin, V.; Matveeva, K.; Samusev, I.; Bryukhanov, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we perform results of conformational analysis of septic human serum albumin (HSA) carried out by Raman spectroscopy (RS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and fluorescent spectroscopy. The main vibrational groups were identified and analyzed for septic HSA and its health control. Comparison between Raman and IR results were done. Fluorescent spectral changes of Trp-214 group were analyzed. Application of Raman, IR spectroscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy for conformational changes study of HSA during pathology were shown.

  3. Microscale X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy on the GSECARS Sector 13 at the APS

    CERN Document Server

    Stephen-Sutto

    2000-01-01

    GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for frontier research in the earth sciences using synchrotrons radiation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides earth scientists with access to the high-brilliance hard x-rays from this third-generation synchrotrons light source. The research conducted at this facility will advance our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials, the processes they control and the processes that produce them. All principal synchrotron-based analytical techniques in demand by earth scientists are being brought to bear on earth science problems: (1) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography and spectroscopy using the diamond anvil cell; (2) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography using the large-volume press; (3) powder, single crystal and interface diffraction; (4) x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy; (5) x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis and microspectroscopy; and (6) mic...

  4. Variation of fluorescence spectroscopy during the menstrual cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Calum; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Utzinger, Urs; Fedyk, Amanda; Neely Atkinson, E.; Cox, Dennis; Follen, Michele

    2002-06-01

    Cervical autofluorescence has been demonstrated to have potential for real-time diagnosis. Inter-patient and intra-patient variations in fluorescence intensity have been measured. Inter-patient measurements may vary by a factor of ten, while intra-patient measurements may vary by a factor of two. Age and menopausal status have been demonstrated to account for some of the variations, while race and smoking have not. In order to explore in detail the role of the menstrual cycle in intra-patient variation, a study was designed to measure fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) in patients daily throughout one cycle. Ten patients with a history of normal menstrual cycles and normal Papanicolaou smears underwent daily measurements of fluorescence EEMs from three colposcopically normal sites throughout one menstrual cycle. Changes in signals from porphyrin, NADH, and FAD fluorescence and blood absorption were noted when the data was viewed in a graphical format. Visually interpreted features of the EEMs in this graphical format did not appear to correlate with the day of the menstrual cycle with the exception that blood absorption features were more prominent during the menstrual phase (during which bleeding occurs), suggesting that measurements during the menstrual phase should be avoided. Variations in cycle date likely do not account for inter- or intra-patient variations.

  5. Diagnostic potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Annihilation of extremely energetic cosmic neutrinos on the relic-neutrino background can give rise to absorption lines at energies corresponding to formation of the electroweak gauge boson Z{sup 0}. The positions of the absorption dips are set by the masses of the relic neutrinos. Suitably intense sources of extremely energetic (10{sup 21} - 10{sup 25}-eV) cosmic neutrinos might therefore enable the determination of the absolute neutrino masses and the flavor composition of the mass eigenstates. Several factors--other than neutrino mass and composition--distort the absorption lines, however. We analyze the influence of the time-evolution of the relic-neutrino density and the consequences of neutrino decay. We consider the sensitivity of the lineshape to the age and character of extremely energetic neutrino sources, and to the thermal history of the Universe, reflected in the expansion rate. We take into account Fermi motion arising from the thermal distribution of the relic-neutrino gas. We also note the implications of Dirac vs. Majorana relics, and briefly consider unconventional neutrino histories. We ask what kinds of external information would enhance the potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy, and estimate the sensitivity required to make the technique a reality.

  6. Using resonance light scattering and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy to study the interaction between gliclazide and bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-Ju; Liu, Bao-Sheng; Li, Gai-Xia; Han, Rong

    2016-08-01

    At different temperatures (298, 310 and 318 K), the interaction between gliclazide and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence quenching spectroscopy, resonance light scattering spectroscopy and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy. The first method studied changes in the fluorescence of BSA on addition of gliclazide, and the latter two methods studied the spectral change in gliclazide while BSA was being added. The results indicated that the quenching mechanism between BSA and gliclazide was static. The binding constant (Ka ), number of binding sites (n), thermodynamic parameters, binding forces and Hill's coefficient were calculated at three temperatures. Values for the binding constant obtained using resonance light scattering and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy were much greater than those obtained from fluorescence quenching spectroscopy, indicating that methods monitoring gliclazide were more accurate and reasonable. In addition, the results suggest that other residues are involved in the reaction and the mode 'point to surface' existed in the interaction between BSA and gliclazide. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  8. Evaluation of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Makoto; Matuo, Youichrou; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Sunagawa, Takeyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-strand break is important to elucidate the biological effect of ionizing radiations. The conventional methods for DNA-strand break evaluation have been achieved by Agarose gel electrophoresis and others using an electrical property of DNAs. Such kinds of DNA-strand break evaluation systems can estimate DNA-strand break, according to a molecular weight of DNAs. However, the conventional method needs pre-treatment of the sample and a relatively long period for analysis. They do not have enough sensitivity to detect the strand break products in the low-dose region. The sample is water, methanol and plasmid DNA solution. The plasmid DNA pUC118 was multiplied by using Escherichia coli JM109 competent cells. The resonance frequency and Q-value were measured by means of microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy. When a sample is located at a center of the electric field, resonance curve of the frequency that existed as a standing wave is disturbed. As a result, the perturbation effect to perform a resonance with different frequency is adopted. The resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in a concentration of methanol as the model of the biological material, and the Q-value decreased. The absorption peak in microwave power spectrum of the double-strand break plasmid DNA shifted from the non-damaged plasmid DNA. Moreover, the sharpness of absorption peak changed resulting in change in Q-value. We confirmed that a resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in concentration of the plasmid DNA. We developed a new technique for an evaluation of DNA damage. In this paper, we report the evaluation method of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy

  9. Evaluation of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, Makoto; Matuo, Youichrou; Izumi, Yoshinobu [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Sunagawa, Takeyoshi [Fukui University of Technology, Fukui (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-strand break is important to elucidate the biological effect of ionizing radiations. The conventional methods for DNA-strand break evaluation have been achieved by Agarose gel electrophoresis and others using an electrical property of DNAs. Such kinds of DNA-strand break evaluation systems can estimate DNA-strand break, according to a molecular weight of DNAs. However, the conventional method needs pre-treatment of the sample and a relatively long period for analysis. They do not have enough sensitivity to detect the strand break products in the low-dose region. The sample is water, methanol and plasmid DNA solution. The plasmid DNA pUC118 was multiplied by using Escherichia coli JM109 competent cells. The resonance frequency and Q-value were measured by means of microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy. When a sample is located at a center of the electric field, resonance curve of the frequency that existed as a standing wave is disturbed. As a result, the perturbation effect to perform a resonance with different frequency is adopted. The resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in a concentration of methanol as the model of the biological material, and the Q-value decreased. The absorption peak in microwave power spectrum of the double-strand break plasmid DNA shifted from the non-damaged plasmid DNA. Moreover, the sharpness of absorption peak changed resulting in change in Q-value. We confirmed that a resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in concentration of the plasmid DNA. We developed a new technique for an evaluation of DNA damage. In this paper, we report the evaluation method of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy.

  10. Detection of atomic oxygen in flames by absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheskis, S.; Kovalenko, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The absolute concentration of atomic oxygen in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen/air flame has been measured using Intracavity Laser Spectroscopy (ICLS) based on a dye laser pumped by an argon-ion laser. Absorptions at the highly forbidden transitions at 630.030 nm and 636.380 nm were observed at an equivalent optical length of up to 10 km. The relatively low intensity of the dye laser avoids photochemical interferences that are inherent to some other methods for detecting atomic oxygen. The detection sensitivity is about 6x10 14 atom/cm 3 and can be improved with better flame and laser stabilization. (orig.)

  11. Study on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy : Technique and its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    ln the first part of speech, with a description of the principle of DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy), the design and realization of two different kinds of DOAS systems are nresented. 0ne is using a slotted disc raoid scanning device with a photomultiplier, which is suitable for ambient air quality measurement. It can measure total 16 kinds of pollutants such as SO_2, NO, N02, NH_3, O_3, C_6H_6, C_7H_8 and CH_2O etc., with detection limits of 1-2ppb. The other is using a UV ...

  12. Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in Air Pollution Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz MIKOŁAJCZYK

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some practical aspects of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy application in detection of nitrogen dioxide (NO2, nitrous oxide (N2O, nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. These gases are very important for monitoring of environment. There are shown results of lab-setups for N2O, NO, CO detection and portable sensor of NO2. The portable instrument operates in the UV spectral range and reaches a level of single ppb. The lab–devices use high precision mid-infrared spectroscopy and they was demonstrated during testing the laboratory air. These sensors are able to measure concentration at the ppb level using quantum cascade lasers, high quality optical cavities and modern MCT detection modules. It makes it possible to apply such sensors in monitoring the atmosphere quality.

  13. Study on the interaction between promethazine hydrochloride and bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Lingling [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); College of Applied Chemistry, Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, Shenyang 110142 (China); Wang Xin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Liu Bin [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wang Jun [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Sun Yaguang; Gao Enjun [College of Applied Chemistry, Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, Shenyang 110142 (China); Xu Shukun, E-mail: xushukun46@126.co [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The interaction between promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in vitro was investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy. The fluorescence of BSA was quenched remarkably by PMT and the quenching mechanism was considered as static quenching by forming a complex. The association constants K{sub a} and the number of binding sites n were calculated at different temperatures. The BSA-PMT binding distance was determined to be less than 8 nm, suggesting that energy transfer from BSA to PMT may occur. The thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between PMT and BSA were measured according to the van't Hoff equation. The enthalpy change ({Delta}H) and entropy change ({Delta}S) were calculated to be -23.62 kJ mol{sup -1} and -0.10 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively, which indicated that the interaction of PMT with BSA was driven mainly by van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. The binding process was a spontaneous process in which Gibbs free energy change ({Delta}G) was negative. In addition, the results of synchronous fluorescence spectra and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that binding of PMT with BSA can induce conformational changes in BSA.

  14. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for analysis of wine and wine distillates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Ya.; Borisova, E.; Genova, Ts.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Avramov, L.

    2015-01-01

    Wine and brandies are multicomponent systems and conventional fluorescence techniques, relying on recording of single emission or excitation spectra, are often insufficient. In such cases synchronous fluorescence spectra can be used for revealing the potential of the fluorescence techniques. The technique is based on simultaneously scanning of the excitation and emission wavelength with constant difference (Δλ) maintained between them. In this study the measurements were made using FluoroLog3 spectrofluorimeter (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) and collected for excitation and emission in the wavelength region 220 - 700 nm using wavelength interval Δλ from 10 to 100 nm in 10 nm steps. This research includes the results obtained for brandy and red wine samples. Fluorescence analysis takes advantage in the presence of natural fluorophores in wines and brandies, such as gallic, vanillic, p-coumaric, syringic, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, scopoletin and etc. Applying of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for analysis of these types of alcohols allows us to estimate the quality of wines and also to detect adulteration of brandies like adding of a caramel to wine distillates for imitating the quality of the original product aged in oak casks.

  15. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of silanized silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntermann, Volker; Cimpean, Carla; Brehm, Georg; Sauer, Guido; Kryschi, Carola; Wiggers, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Excitonic properties of colloidal silicon quantum dots (Si qdots) with mean sizes of 4nm were examined using stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy. Chemically stable silicon oxide shells were prepared by controlled surface oxidation and silanization of HF-etched Si qdots. The ultrafast relaxation dynamics of photogenerated excitons in Si qdot colloids were studied on the picosecond time scale from 0.3psto2.3ns using femtosecond-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The time evolution of the transient absorption spectra of the Si qdots excited with a 150fs pump pulse at 390nm was observed to consist of decays of various absorption transitions of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band which overlap with both the photoluminescence and the photobleaching of the valence band population density. Gaussian deconvolution of the spectroscopic data allowed for disentangling various carrier relaxation processes involving electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scatterings or arising from surface-state trapping. The initial energy and momentum relaxation of hot carriers was observed to take place via scattering by optical phonons within 0.6ps . Exciton capturing by surface states forming shallow traps in the amorphous SiOx shell was found to occur with a time constant of 4ps , whereas deeper traps presumably localized in the Si-SiOx interface gave rise to exciton trapping processes with time constants of 110 and 180ps . Electron transfer from initially populated, higher-lying surface states to the conduction band of Si qdots (>2nm) was observed to take place within 400 or 700fs .

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of photoionised plasmas at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, R. C.

    2011-06-01

    Photoionised plasmas are found in astrophysical environments such as x-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, and in the accretion disks of compact objects. The Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is a powerful source of x-rays that enables us to produce and study in the laboratory photoionised plasmas relevant for astrophysics under well characterized conditions. We discuss an experimental and theory/modeling effort in which the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a z-pinch experiment conducted at Z is employed to produce a neon photoionized plasma. The broad-band x-ray radiation flux from the z-pinch is used to both create the neon photoionised plasma and provide a source of backlighting photons to study the atomic kinetics through K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The plasma is contained in a cm-scale gas cell located at about 5 cm from the z-pinch, and the filling pressure is carefully monitored all the way to shot time since it determines the particle number density of the plasma. Time-integrated and gated transmission spectra are recorded with a TREX spectrometer equipped with two elliptically-bent crystals and a set of slits to record up to six spatially-resolved spectra per crystal in the same shot. The spectral resolution is approximately 1000. The transmission data shows line absorption transitions in several ionization stages of neon including Be-, Li-, He- and H-like Ne ions. Detailed modeling calculations of the absorption spectra are used to interpret and model the high-resolution transmission spectra recorded in the Z experiments with the goal of extracting the ion population distribution of the plasma. Furthermore, the analysis of the gated data provides a window into the dynamics of the photoionized plasma. The data analysis is performed with the aid of a novel application of genetic algorithms to plasma spectroscopy.

  17. Investigation of pollutant gases with molecular absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izairi, N; Ajredini, F.; Shehabi, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contains the molecular absorption spectroscopic investigation on environmental pollution by many pollutants. For this purpose a laser absorption spectroscopy at 630 nm wavelength has been applied to excite the molecular spectra in order to identify the presence of main gas pollutants. The following was the experimental procedure. Preliminary the presence of pollutants was identified. The gas champions were taken in live environment, in Tetovo streets where cars moved, and in some points in Tetovo suburbia, during different periods of the day. A special civet, part of the apparatus, has been filled by environmental air, and latter, put into the apparatus. A laser beam pulse passes throughout absorbing gas medium in the civet to excite the gas, and the absorbing spectra were automatically registered. The molecular band spectra registration has been performed by an FT-IR Spectrometer (Spectrum BX FT-IR Perkin Elmer). For this purpose the measurements were focused in spectral region of 2075 cm -1 to 2384 cm -1 for CO 2 and CO bands investigation. The importance of such measurements is to investigate the spectral properties of absorption spectra and molecular structure, and for monitoring the environmental pollution. (Author)

  18. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 −5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm −3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  19. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 -5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm -3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  20. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, J. Brian, E-mail: b.leen@lgrinc.com; O’Keefe, Anthony [Los Gatos Research, 67 E. Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  1. The measurement of X-rays radiation temperature with a new developed filter-fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanfei; Lin Libin; Lou Fuhong; Peng Taiping

    2001-01-01

    The author introduces how to measure the energy spectra of X-rays by filter-fluorescence spectroscopy. The design principle and structure of new-developed double diaphragms and filter-fluorescence spectroscopy with 5 channels are depicted. The parameters of optimized spectroscopy by numerical method are given. The filter-fluorescence spectroscopy designed according as Rousseau balance principle improves signal-noises ratio

  2. Optimized Time-Gated Fluorescence Spectroscopy for the Classification and Recycling of Fluorescently Labeled Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Petr; Zhelondz, Dmitry; Kargel, Christian

    2017-05-01

    For the production of high-quality parts from recycled plastics, a very high purity of the plastic waste to be recycled is mandatory. The incorporation of fluorescent tracers ("markers") into plastics during the manufacturing process helps overcome typical problems of non-tracer based optical classification methods. Despite the unique emission spectra of fluorescent markers, the classification becomes difficult when the host plastics exhibit (strong) autofluorescence that spectrally overlaps the marker fluorescence. Increasing the marker concentration is not an option from an economic perspective and might also adversely affect the properties of the plastics. A measurement approach that suppresses the autofluorescence in the acquired signal is time-gated fluorescence spectroscopy (TGFS). Unfortunately, TGFS is associated with a lower signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, which results in larger classification errors. In order to optimize the S/N ratio we investigate and validate the best TGFS parameters-derived from a model for the fluorescence signal-for plastics labeled with four specifically designed fluorescent markers. In this study we also demonstrate the implementation of TGFS on a measurement and classification prototype system and determine its performance. Mean values for a sensitivity of [Formula: see text] = 99.93% and precision [Formula: see text] = 99.80% were achieved, proving that a highly reliable classification of plastics can be achieved in practice.

  3. Imaging fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy: new tools for quantitative bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Nirmalya; Wohland, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) techniques provide information at the single-molecule level with excellent time resolution. Usually applied at a single spot in a sample, they have been recently extended into imaging formats, referred to as imaging FFS. They provide spatial information at the optical diffraction limit and temporal information in the microsecond to millisecond range. This review provides an overview of the different modalities in which imaging FFS techniques have been implemented and discusses present imaging FFS capabilities and limitations. A combination of imaging FFS and nanoscopy would allow one to record information with the detailed spatial information of nanoscopy, which is ∼20 nm and limited only by fluorophore size and labeling density, and the time resolution of imaging FFS, limited by the fluorescence lifetime. This combination would provide new insights into biological events by providing spatiotemporal resolution at unprecedented levels.

  4. Determination of lead in mother's milk by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandarchian, F.; Assadian, F

    2002-01-01

    With due attention to increasing air pollution specially the lead amount that is generated from gasoline burning in automobiles, it seems that it is necessary to control the amount of it continuously. Because Pb has an easy absorbability to body and also damages the nervous system. For this reason determination of it in mother's milk has a special importance. In this research, the milks of 15 mothers twice a day were examined and the concentration of Pb were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In accordance the international organization, the permissible amount in body is 0.05 ppm. Fortunately, the obtained data was less than of it and it showed the absorbance of lead by babies is insignificant

  5. Mercury pollution surveys in Riga by Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavare, Z.; Bogans, E.; Svagere, A.

    2008-01-01

    Practical sessions of mercury pollution measurements in Riga (Latvia) have been performed in several districts using an RA-915+ Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer coupled with a global positioning system (GPS). The measurements were taken from a driving car and in different days at one particular location (the Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy) for monitoring the changes in atmospheric mercury concentration. GPS was used to relate the measurement results to particular places, which made it possible to create a digitalized database of pollution for different geographic coordinates in different time spans. The measurements have shown that the background level of mercury concentration in Riga does not exceed 5 ng/m 3 , although there are several areas of elevated mercury pollution that need particular attention. (Authors)

  6. Vanadium Oxidation State Determination by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Marc A.; Nakano, Jinichiro; Hu, Yongfeng; MacLennan, Aimee; Hughes, Robin W.; Bennett, James; Nakano, Anna

    Vanadium is found in slags produced during metal refinement and fossil fuel combustion/gasification. The oxidation state of vanadium in slag has technological and environmental implications. For example, it may affect slag flow and refractory wear inside reactors, as well as leachability and toxicity of industrial by-products. Determination of vanadium's oxidation state in crystalline phases can be achieved via the widely adopted X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. However, this technique does not provide information on vanadium in amorphous phases. The objective of this research is to determine the oxidation state of vanadium in petroleum coke gasification samples and laboratory samples using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with Canadian Light Source's soft X-ray micro-characterization beamline (SXRMB). Linear combination fitting of XAS spectra with reference samples allowed quantitative determination of vanadium speciation.

  7. Arsenic speciation in solids using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea L.; Kim, Chris S.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an in situ, minimally-destructive, element-specific, molecular-scale structural probe that has been employed to study the chemical forms (species) of arsenic (As) in solid and aqueous phases (including rocks, soils, sediment, synthetic compounds, and numerous types of biota including humans) for more than 20 years. Although several excellent reviews of As geochemistry and As speciation in the environment have been published previously (including recent contributions in this volume), the explosion of As-XAS studies over the past decade (especially studies employing microfocused X-ray beams) warrants this new review of the literature and of data analysis methods.

  8. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachón, Leonardo A. [Grupo de Física Atómica y Molecular, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Andrew H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Oregon Center for Optics, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Aspuru-Guzik, Alán [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  9. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of organic ligands by europium: Fluorescence quenching and lifetime properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Hajjoul, H.; Redon, R.; Gagné, J. P.; Mounier, S.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) has proved its usefulness in the fields of biophysics, life science and geochemistry to characterize the fluorescence probe molecule with its chemical environment. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of this powerful technique combined with Steady-State (S-S) measurements. A multi-mode factor analysis, in particular CP/PARAFAC, was used to analyze the interaction between Europium (Eu) and Humic substances (HSs) extracted from Saint Lawrence Estuary in Canada. The Saint Lawrence system is a semi-enclosed water stream with connections to the Atlantic Ocean and is an excellent natural laboratory. CP/PARAFAC applied to fluorescence S-S data allows introspecting ligands-metal interactions and the one-site 1:1 modeling gives information about the stability constants. From the spectral signatures and decay lifetimes data given by TRLFS, one can deduce the fluorescence quenching which modifies the fluorescence and discuss its mechanisms. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between europium and humic substances samples (Log K value varies from 3.38 to 5.08 at pH 7.00). Using the Stern-Volmer plot, it has been concluded that static and dynamic quenching takes places in the case of salicylic acid and europium interaction while for HSs interaction only a static quenching is observed.

  10. Sulfur K-edge absorption spectroscopy on selected biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberg, Henning

    2008-07-01

    Sulfur is an essential element in organisms. In this thesis investigations of sulfur compounds in selected biological systems by XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy are reported. XANES spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge provides an excellent tool to gain information about the local environments of sulfur atoms in intact biological samples - no extraction processes are required. Spatially resolved measurements using a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror focusing system were carried out to investigate the infection of wheat leaves by rust fungi. The results give information about changes in the sulfur metabolism of the host induced by the parasite and about the extension of the infection into visibly uninfected plant tissue. Furthermore, XANES spectra of microbial mats from sulfidic caves were measured. These mats are dominated by microbial groups involved in cycling sulfur. Additionally, the influence of sulfate deprivation and H 2 S exposure on sulfur compounds in onion was investigated. To gain an insight into the thermal degradation of organic material the influence of roasting of sulfur compounds in coffee beans was studied. (orig.)

  11. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  12. Probing lipid mobility of raft-exhibiting model membranes by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahya, N; Scherfeld, D; Bacia, K; Poolman, B; Schwille, P

    2003-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) have been employed to investigate the lipid spatial and dynamic organization in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) prepared from ternary mixtures of dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/ cholesterol. For a certain

  13. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, W. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chu, W.S.; Yang, F.F.; Yu, M.J.; Chen, D.L.; Guo, X.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, D.W.; Shi, N. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Marcelli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Niu, L.W.; Teng, M.K. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Gong, W.M. [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Benfatto, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Wu, Z.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy)], E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2007-09-21

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase (LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  14. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W.S.; Yang, F.F.; Yu, M.J.; Chen, D.L.; Guo, X.Y.; Zhou, D.W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L.W.; Teng, M.K.; Gong, W.M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase (LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations

  15. Absorption and fluorescence lineshape theory for polynomial potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; De Vico, Luca; Hansen, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    and fluorescence spectra. The first method, which constructs vibrational wave functions as linear combinations of the harmonic oscillator wave functions, is shown to be extremely robust and can handle large anharmonicities. The second method uses the cumulant expansion, which is readily solved, even at high orders...

  16. Implantable CMOS imaging device with absorption filters for green fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Takehara, Hironari; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Green fluorescent materials such as Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) and fluorescein are often used for observing neural activities. Thus, it is important to observe the fluorescence in a freely moving state in order to understand neural activities corresponding to behaviors. In this work, we developed an implantable CMOS imaging device for in-vivo green fluorescence imaging with efficient excitation light rejection using a combination of absorption filters. An interference filter is usually used for a fluorescence microscope in order to achieve high fluorescence imaging sensitivity. However, in the case of the implantable device, interference filters are not suitable because their transmission spectra depend on incident angle. To solve this problem we used two kinds of absorption filters that do not have angle dependence. An absorption filter consisting of yellow dye (VARYFAST YELLOW 3150) was coated on the pixel array of an image sensor. The rejection ratio of ideal excitation light (490 nm) against green fluorescence (510 nm) was 99.66%. However, the blue LED as an excitation light source has a broad emission spectrum and its intensity at 510 nm is 2.2 x 10-2 times the emission peak intensity. By coating LEDs with the emission absorption filters, the intensity of the unwanted component of the excitation light was reduced to 1.4 x 10-4. Using the combination of absorption filters, we achieved excitation light transmittance of 10-5 onto the image sensor. It is expected that high-sensitivity green fluorescence imaging of neural activities in a freely moving mouse will be possible by using this technology.

  17. Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of Er in sodium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Spectroscopic properties of Er3+ ions in sodium borate glass have been studied. The indirect and direct optical band gaps (Eopt) and energy level parameters (Racah (E1, E2 and E3), spin-orbit (ξ4f) and con- figurational interaction (α)) are evaluated. Spectral intensities for various absorption bands of Er3+ doped.

  18. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-04

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopy and photochemistry of novel branched fluorescent nitro-stilbene derivatives with benzopheonone groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Liu, Jian; Peng, Huayong; Hu, Nvdan; Li, Hongru; Zhang, Shengtao

    2010-05-01

    In this article, we presented novel nitro-stilbene derivatives with one or two benzophenone groups as photoinitiators via multi-steps synthesis. The ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy and the emission spectroscopy of the compounds were determined in various solvents. The results showed that the ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy of the derivatives with benzophenone moiety displayed overlap effects of nitro-stilbene and benzophenone parts. In non-polar solvents, the derivatives exhibited strong emission, while they displayed weak emission in modest and strong polar solvents. Dyes-linked benzopheonone groups displayed stronger fluorescence emission than simple chromophore parent molecules. Visible-light photoinitiating effects of the derivatives were investigated extensively. Methyl methacrylate could be photoinitiated efficiently by the derivatives with benzophenone moieties at very low concentration, even at 1 x 10(-5) mol/L. While the photopolymerization efficiency of styrene initiated by the derivatives was lower than that of methyl methacrylate. Our results showed that the dye-linked photoinitators had more efficient photoinitiating than the simple mixture of dye and photoinitator. Furthermore, the derivative with two benzophenone groups displayed more excellent photoiniatiating effects than the derivative with one benzophenone group. Thermodynamics driving for the occurrence of visible-light photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer from chromophore part to benzophenone part was evaluated. Benzopinacol moiety produced in photoreaction was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonant spectroscopy. Thermal stability of the derivatives was analyzed.

  20. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the precision of flame atomic absorption, fluorescence, and emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, N.W.; Ingle, J.D. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical equations and experimental evaluation procedures for the determination of the precision of flame atomic absorption, emission, and fluorescence measurements are presented. These procedures and noise power spectra are used to evaluate the precision and noise characteristics of atomic copper measurements with all three techniques under the same experimental conditions in a H 2 -air flame. At the detection limit, emission and fluorescence measurements are limited by background emission shot and flicker noise whereas absorption measurements are limited by flame transmission lamp flicker noise. Analyte flicker noise limits precision at higher analyte concentrations for all three techniques. Fluctutations in self-absorption and the inner filter effect are shown to contribute to the noise in atomic emission and fluorescence measurements

  1. Analysis of photoisomerizable dyes using laser absorption and fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchowicz, R.; Di Paolo, R.E.; Scaffardi, L.; Tocho, J.O.

    1992-01-01

    The attention of the present report has been directed mainly to the description of laser-based techniques developed in order to obtain kinetic and spectroscopic properties of polymethine cyanine dyes in solution. Special attention was dedicated to photoisomerizable molecules where the absorption spectra of both isomers are strongly overlapped. As an example, measurements of two different dyes of laser technological interest, DTCI and DODCI were performed. The developed methods provide a complete quantitative description of photophysical processes. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs

  2. Optical properties of the adaxial and abaxial faces of leaves. Chlorophyll fluorescence, absorption and scattering coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordón, Gabriela B; Lagorio, María G

    2007-08-01

    Emission fluorescence spectra were obtained for the adaxial and abaxial faces of dicotyledonous (Ficus benjamina L., Ficus elastica, Gardenia jasminoides and Hedera helix) and monocotyledonous leaves (Gladiolus spp. and Dracaena cincta bicolor). After correction by light-re-absorption processes, using a previously published physical model, the adaxial faces of dicotyledons showed a fluorescence ratio Fred/Ffar-red rather lower than the respective values for the abaxial faces. Monocotyledons and shade-adapted-plants showed similar values for the corrected fluorescence ratio for both faces. Even when differences in experimental fluorescence emission from adaxial and abaxial leaves in dicotyledons are mostly due to light re-absorption processes, the residual dissimilarity found after application of the correction model would point to the fact that fluorescence re-absorption is not the only responsible for the observed disparity. It was concluded that light re-absorption processes does not account entirely for the differences in the experimental emission spectra between adaxial and abaxial leaves. Differences that remains still present after correction might be interpreted in terms of a different photosystem ratio (PSII/PSI). Experiments at low temperature sustained this hypothesis. In dicotyledons, light reflectance for adaxial leaves was found to be lower than for the abaxial ones. It was mainly due to an increase in the scattering coefficient for the lower leaf-side. The absorption coefficient values were slightly higher for the upper leaf-side. During senescence of Ficus benjamina leaves, the scattering coefficient increased for both the upper and lower leaf-sides. With senescence time the absorption coefficient spectra broadened while the corrected fluorescence ratio (Fred/Ffar-red) decreased for both faces. The results pointed to a preferential destruction of photosystem II relative to photosystem I during senescence.

  3. Novel xenon calibration scheme for two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of neutral hydrogen and its isotopes are typically calibrated by performing TALIF measurements on krypton with the same diagnostic system and using the known ratio of the absorption cross sections [K. Niemi et al., J. Phys. D 34, 2330 (2001)]. Here we present the measurements of a new calibration method based on a ground state xenon scheme for which the fluorescent emission wavelength is nearly identical to that of hydrogen, thereby eliminating chromatic effects in the collection optics and simplifying detector calibration. We determine that the ratio of the TALIF cross sections of xenon and hydrogen is 0.024 ± 0.001.

  4. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in biology, chemistry, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevoshchikova, I V; Kotova, E A; Antonenko, Y N

    2011-05-01

    This review describes the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and its applications. FCS is used for investigating processes associated with changes in the mobility of molecules and complexes and allows researchers to study aggregation of particles, binding of fluorescent molecules with supramolecular complexes, lipid vesicles, etc. The size of objects under study varies from a few angstroms for dye molecules to hundreds of nanometers for nanoparticles. The described applications of FCS comprise various fields from simple chemical systems of solution/micelle to sophisticated regulations on the level of living cells. Both the methodical bases and the theoretical principles of FCS are simple and available. The present review is concentrated preferentially on FCS applications for studies on artificial and natural membranes. At present, in contrast to the related approach of dynamic light scattering, FCS is poorly known in Russia, although it is widely employed in laboratories of other countries. The goal of this review is to promote the development of FCS in Russia so that this technique could occupy the position it deserves in modern Russian science.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations on radioactive matter using MARS beamline at SOLEIL synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorens, Isabelle; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Sitaud, Bruno [Synchrotron SOLEIL - l' Orme des Merisiers Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2014-07-01

    The MARS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to the characterization of radioactive material samples. One great advantage of the beamline is the possibility to characterize about 380 radionuclides by different X-ray techniques in the same place. This facility is unique in Europe. A wide energy range from around 3.5 keV to 36 keV K-edges from K to Cs, and L3 edges from Cd to Am and beyond can be used. The MARS beamline is optimized for X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques (XANES/EXAFS), powder diffraction (XRD) but X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detected-XAS (HERFD-XAS), X-ray Emission (XES) and μ-XAS/XRD are also possible. A description of the beamline as well as its performances are given in a first part. Then some scientific examples of XAS studies from users are presented which cover a wide variety of topics in radiochemistry and nuclear materials.

  6. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes through transmembrane pores formed by each of the three representative antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The experimental results demonstrate that leakage assays based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy offer new...... highly warranted. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a biophysical technique that can be used to quantify leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes from large unilamellar vesicle, thereby potentially becoming such a new tool. However, the usage of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy...... to quantify leakage from large unilamellar vesicles is associated with a number of experimental pitfalls. Based on theoretical and experimental considerations, we discuss how to properly design experiments to avoid these pitfalls. Subsequently, we apply fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to quantify...

  7. Absorption spectrum of the green fluorescent protein chromophore anion in vacuo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S B; Lapierre, A; Andersen, J U; Pedersen, U V; Tomita, S; Andersen, L H

    2001-11-26

    A sensitive photoabsorption technique for studies of gas-phase biomolecules has been used at the ELISA electrostatic heavy-ion storage ring. We show that the anion form of the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein in vacuo has an absorption maximum at 479 nm, which coincides with one of the two absorption peaks of the protein. Its absorption characteristics are therefore ascribed to intrinsic chemical properties of the chromophore. Evidently, the special beta-can structure of the protein provides shielding of the chromophore from the surroundings without significantly changing the electronic structure of the chromophore through interactions with amino acid side chains.

  8. On the regularization for nonlinear tomographic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jinghang; Yu, Tao; Xu, Lijun; Cai, Weiwei

    2018-02-01

    Tomographic absorption spectroscopy (TAS) has attracted increased research efforts recently due to the development in both hardware and new imaging concepts such as nonlinear tomography and compressed sensing. Nonlinear TAS is one of the emerging modality that bases on the concept of nonlinear tomography and has been successfully demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. However, all the previous demonstrations were realized using only two orthogonal projections simply for ease of implementation. In this work, we examine the performance of nonlinear TAS using other beam arrangements and test the effectiveness of the beam optimization technique that has been developed for linear TAS. In addition, so far only smoothness prior has been adopted and applied in nonlinear TAS. Nevertheless, there are also other useful priors such as sparseness and model-based prior which have not been investigated yet. This work aims to show how these priors can be implemented and included in the reconstruction process. Regularization through Bayesian formulation will be introduced specifically for this purpose, and a method for the determination of a proper regularization factor will be proposed. The comparative studies performed with different beam arrangements and regularization schemes on a few representative phantoms suggest that the beam optimization method developed for linear TAS also works for the nonlinear counterpart and the regularization scheme should be selected properly according to the available a priori information under specific application scenarios so as to achieve the best reconstruction fidelity. Though this work is conducted under the context of nonlinear TAS, it can also provide useful insights for other tomographic modalities. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W R; Morris, K; Mosselmans, J F W; Thompson, O R; Banford, A W; Law, K; Pattrick, R A D

    2016-11-05

    Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly (137)Cs and (90)Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO2 particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO2 and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK's nuclear decommissioning efforts. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Observation of Climacteric-Like Behavior of Citrus Leaves Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio B. Wetterich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observation of climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves depends on the detection of ethylene. However, such detection requires a gas chromatographer and complex sample preparation procedures. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated as a diagnostic technique for climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves. Our results indicate that the chlorophyll fluorescence presents a time evolution consistent with the ethylene evolution. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy may be used to observe the climacteric-like behavior in citrus leaves.

  11. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in live cells using transient absorption microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Lu, Feng; Streets, Aaron M; Fei, Peng; Quan, Junmin; Huang, Yanyi

    2013-06-07

    We directly observe non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in living cells using transient absorption microscopy. This label-free technology provides a novel modality to study the dynamic behavior of nanodiamonds inside the cells with intrinsic three-dimensional imaging capability. We apply this method to capture the cellular uptake of nanodiamonds under various conditions, confirming the endocytosis mechanism.

  12. Interferometric measurement of lines shift in flames in connection with interpretation of lined absorption method in atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'vov, B.V.; Polzik, L.K.; Katskov, D.A.; Kruglikova, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is concerned with interferometric measuring of the line shift in flames in the view of interpretation of absorption lines in the atomic absorption spectroscopy. The newly measured line shifts were compared to the known data on Lorentz broadening of the same lines obtained by methods free of the systematic errors. The resonant lines of the alkaline earth elements (Sr, Ca, Ba) were investigated. To reduce self-absorption in the flame the solutions with minimum concentrations of the elements were used. The computation scheme includes the spectrometer apparatus width and line broadening due to the self-absorption. Formulae are given for computing the values studied. Good agreement was observed between the computed and experimental results. Error analysis was performed. It was concluded that any line shifts in the hydrocarbons were correctly taken into an account in the absolute computations of absorption

  13. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence in the gas phase: a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular spectroscopy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2017-11-01

    Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) extends the usual laser induced fluorescence technique by adding a second dimension, the wavelength at which excited states emit, thereby significantly enhancing the information that can be extracted. It allows overlapping absorption features, whether they arise from within the same molecule or from different molecules in a mixture, to be associated with their appropriate "parent" state and/or molecule. While the first gas phase version of the technique was published a decade ago, the technique is in its infancy, having been exploited by only a few groups to date. However, its potential in gas phase spectroscopy and dynamics is significant. In this article we provide an overview of the technique and illustrate its potential with examples, with a focus on those utilising high resolution in the dispersed fluorescence dimension.

  14. A polarizable embedding DFT study of one-photon absorption in fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerepoot, Maarten; Steindal, Arnfinn H.; Kongsted, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical study of the one-photon absorption of five fluorescent proteins (FPs) is presented. The absorption properties are calculated using a polarizable embedding approach combined with density functional theory (PE-DFT) on the wild-type green fluorescent protein (wtGFP) and several of its...... shift from vacuum to protein. This is the first computational study of a range of fluorescent proteins using a polarizable embedding potential....... optimization of the chromophores within a frozen protein environment is needed in order to reproduce the experimental trends. Explicit account of polarization in the force field is not needed to yield the correct trend between the different FPs, but is necessary for reproducing the experimentally observed red...

  15. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S; Farrell, Thomas J; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  16. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    A new channel producing ketenyl radical (HCCO) was discovered in the flash photolysis of ketene at 193 nm. H 2 CCO + hν(193 nm) → H + HCCO by observation near 2020 cm -1 of the infrared fundamental of ketenyl corresponding to the antisymmetric motion of the heavy atoms. This band has been partially rotationally analyzed and the rate constant for the reaction of ketenyl with NO has been determined. The OH stretching fundamental of hydroxymethyl radical (CH 2 OH) has been observed near 3600 cm -1 producing the radical either by the excimer flash photolysis of acetol (CH 3 COCH 2 OH) or by Cl atom abstraction of a methyl hydrogen from methanol. The assignment of the spectrum to CH 2 OH was confirmed by the agreement of the rate constant for the reaction of the species with O 2 with the literature value. The mechanism of the reaction of C 2 H with O 2 has been explored. There appear to be two channels producing CO product: a fast, direct one producing highly vibrationally excited CO up to v = 6 at the same rate C 2 H disappears and a slow, indirect one producing primarily ground state CO on a much longer timescale than the disappearance of C 2 H. The rate constants for the reactions of C 2 H with CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , C 2 H 4 , D 2 , and CO were determined by following the time decay of a C 2 H infrared transient absorption line originating from the ground vibronic state using diode laser spectroscopy creating the C 2 H by excimer laser flash photolysis (ArF, 193 nm) of CF 3 CCH. The branching ratio into OH of the reaction between NH 2 , and NO, which is the channel thought to propagate the radical chain of the Thermal deNOx process, has been measured up to 925 degree C. The OH yield thus obtained appears to be too small to maintain the process. 5 refs., 3 figs

  17. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, W.R.; Morris, K.; Mosselmans, J.F.W.; Thompson, O.R.; Banford, A.W.; Law, K.; Pattrick, R.A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A sample from a spent fuel pond wall has been analysed via X-ray spectroscopy. • Autoradiography shows a patchy distribution of radioactivity on the core face. • μXAS across a ‘hot spot’ showed Sr associates with the TiO 2 pigment in the paint. • Original concrete coatings prove effective at limiting radionuclide migration. • Sorption studies show Sr immobilisation by the concrete and Cs by aggregate clasts. - Abstract: Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly 137 Cs and 90 Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO 2 particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO 2 and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK’s nuclear decommissioning efforts.

  18. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, W.R. [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Centre for Radiochemistry Research, Chemistry Building, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Morris, K. [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mosselmans, J.F.W. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Thompson, O.R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Banford, A.W. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Law, K. [Centre for Radiochemistry Research, Chemistry Building, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Pattrick, R.A.D., E-mail: richard.pattrick@manchester.ac.uk [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • A sample from a spent fuel pond wall has been analysed via X-ray spectroscopy. • Autoradiography shows a patchy distribution of radioactivity on the core face. • μXAS across a ‘hot spot’ showed Sr associates with the TiO{sub 2} pigment in the paint. • Original concrete coatings prove effective at limiting radionuclide migration. • Sorption studies show Sr immobilisation by the concrete and Cs by aggregate clasts. - Abstract: Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO{sub 2} particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO{sub 2} and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK’s nuclear decommissioning efforts.

  19. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  20. Inference of protein diffusion probed via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    Fluctuations are an inherent part of single molecule or few particle biophysical data sets. Traditionally, ``noise'' fluctuations have been viewed as a nuisance, to be eliminated or minimized. Here we look on how statistical inference methods - that take explicit advantage of fluctuations - have allowed us to draw an unexpected picture of single molecule diffusional dynamics. Our focus is on the diffusion of proteins probed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). First, we discuss how - in collaboration with the Bustamante and Marqusee labs at UC Berkeley - we determined using FCS data that individual enzymes are perturbed by self-generated catalytic heat (Riedel et al, Nature, 2014). Using the tools of inference, we found how distributions of enzyme diffusion coefficients shift in the presence of substrate revealing that enzymes performing highly exothermic reactions dissipate heat by transiently accelerating their center of mass following a catalytic reaction. Next, when molecules diffuse in the cell nucleus they often appear to diffuse anomalously. We analyze FCS data - in collaboration with Rich Day at the IU Med School - to propose a simple model for transcription factor binding-unbinding in the nucleus to show that it may give rise to apparent anomalous diffusion. Here inference methods extract entire binding affinity distributions for the diffusing transcription factors, allowing us to precisely characterize their interactions with different components of the nuclear environment. From this analysis, we draw key mechanistic insight that goes beyond what is possible by simply fitting data to ``anomalous diffusion'' models.

  1. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  2. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Soft X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy includes three major types of spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This paper takes up XAS and XES of soft X-rays, and briefly describes the principle. XAS is roughly classified into XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), and XANES is mainly used in the analysis based on XAS of soft X-rays. As the examples of the latest soft X-ray analyses, the following are introduced: (1) bandgap of boron implantation diamond and the local structure of boron, (2) catalytic sites in solid fuel cell carbon electrode, and (3) soft X-ray analysis under atmospheric pressure. (A.O.)

  3. Study of the Many Fluorescent Lines and the Absorption Variability in GX 301-2 with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, F.; Suchy, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Barragan, L.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Caballero, I.; Kretschmar, P.; Ferrigno, C.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present an in-depth study of the High Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB) GX 301-2 during its pre-periastron flare using data from the XMM-Newton satellite. The energy spectrum shows a power law continuum absorbed by a large equivalent hydrogen column on the order of 10(exp 24)/ sq cm and a prominent Fe K-alpha fluorescent emission line. Besides the Fe K-alpha line, evidence for Fe K-Beta, Ni K-alpha, Ni K-Beta, S K-alpha, Ar K-alpha, Ca K-alpha, and Cr K-alpha fluorescent lines is found. The observed line strengths are consistent with fluorescence in a cold absorber. This is the first time that Cr K-alpha is seen in emission in the X-ray spectrum of a HMXB. In addition to the modulation by the strong pulse period of approx 685 sec the source is highly variable and shows different states of activity. We perform time-resolved as well as pulse-to-pulse resolved spectroscopy to investigate differences between these states of activity. We find that fluorescent line fluxes are strongly variable and generally follow the overall flux. The N-H value is variable by a factor of 2, but not correlated to continuum normalization. We find an interval of low flux in the light curve in which the pulsations cease almost completely, without any indication of an increasing absorption column. We investigate this dip in detail and argue that it is most likely that during the dip the accretion ceased and the afterglow of the fluorescent iron accounted for the main portion of the X-ray flux. A similar dip was found earlier in RXTE data, and we compare our findings to these results.

  4. Intracavity absorption spectroscopy of formaldehyde from 6230 to 6420 cm(-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.; Levinsky, Howard B.; Mokhov, Anatoli V.

    We apply intracavity absorption spectroscopy for measurements of the absorption spectrum of formaldehyde, CH2O, from 6230 to 6420 cm(-1), of which only a small fraction (6351-6362 cm(-1)) has been recorded elsewhere. The measurements are performed in the cavity of a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser,

  5. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    -quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  6. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  7. A global method for handling fluorescence spectra at high concentration derived from the competition between emission and absorption of colloidal CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, Thomas; Dreesen, Laurent; Hottechamps, Julie; Humbert, Christophe

    2017-10-11

    We investigate the effects of the concentration of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on their fluorescence in water. The emission spectra, acquired in right angle geometry, exhibit highly variable shapes. The measurements evidence a critical value of the concentration beyond which the intensity and the spectral bandwidth decrease and the fluorescence maximum is redshifted. To account for these observations, we develop a model based on the primary and secondary inner filter effects. The accuracy of the model ensures that the concentration dependent behaviour of QD fluorescence is completely due to inner filter effects. This result is all the more interesting because it precludes the assumption of dynamic quenching. As a matter of fact, the decrease of the emission intensity is not a consequence of collisional quenching but an effect of competition between fluorescence and absorption. We even show that this phenomenon is linked not only to the QD concentration but also to the geometric configuration of the setup. Hence, our analytical model can be easily adapted to every fluorescence spectroscopy configuration to quantitatively predict or correct inner filter effects in the case of QDs or any fluorophore, and thus improve the handling of fluorescence spectroscopy for highly concentrated solutions.

  8. Photon absorption in step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of Sepia melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles

    2013-02-01

    Previous research has shown that melanin goes through a step-wise three-photon absorption process when the fluorescence is activated with high laser intensity. We have conducted further research using even higher laser intensity for the activation, and have shown the possibility of observing power dependence other than third-order. This article discusses the possible energy states of Sepia melanin by studying the power dependence curves of the step-wise multi-photon activated fluorescence signal. Three different excitation channels are activated. Possible reasons causing the three channels are discussed.

  9. Ultrafast terahertz conductivity and transient optical absorption spectroscopy of silicon nanocrystal thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Harthy, Rahma Al; Cooke, David

    We use time-resolved THz spectroscopy and transient optical absorption spectroscopy as two complementary techniques to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in silicon nanocrystal thin films. We find that the photoconductive dynamics in these materials is dominated by interface trapping, and we observ...

  10. A high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for near edge absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanoff, V.; Hamalainen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Hastings, J.B.; Berman, L.E.; Cramer, S.; Smith, G.

    1991-01-01

    A high resolution fluorescence spectrometer using a Johann geometry in a back scattering arrangement was developed. The spectrometer, with a resolution of 0.3 eV at 6.5 keV, combined with an incident beam, with a resolution of 0.7 eV, form the basis of a high resolution instrument for measuring x-ray absorption spectra. The advantages of the instrument are illustrated with the near edge absorption spectrum of dysprosium nitrate. 10 refs., 4 figs

  11. Total Absorption Spectroscopy study of the 152Yb decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez, M.E.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Bernabeu, J.; Nacher, E.; Gadea, A.; Tain, J.L.; Cano, D.; Batist, L.; Burkard, K.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The study of neutrino oscillation phenomena, which could open the possibility for Charge Conjugation-Parity violation in the lepton sector, is one of the most exciting problems in physics. In the appearance probability for neutrino oscillations, the CP-even terms and the CP-odd terms have different energy dependence, so the control of the neutrino beam energy has an added value. To study these topics, the construction of a monochromatic neutrino beam facility has been proposed recently. As a source for this beam, accelerated nuclei that decay through electron capture (EC) in a storage ring with long straight sections could be used. In a recent annual report, a preliminary study of the candidate nucleus 152 Yb was discussed. In this report we present the results of the Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) analysis of these data. In the analysis, a coincidence between the X ray of 152 Tm (produced in the EC process) and the TAS spectrum is required. In the gated TAS spectrum the peaks are identified with levels fed in the decay, but it can also have contributions from contaminants and background, and it is modified by the detector response. The relation between the gated TAS spectrum and the feeding is: di = Σ j=1 jmax R ij f j , where d i is the number of counts in channel i of the measured spectrum, f j is the feeding to level j, and R ij is the probability that feeding to E j , gives counts on channel i of the measured spectrum. R is called the 'Response Function' of the detector, and depends on the decay scheme and on the detector. It was calculated by means of Montecarlo simulations. The problem of finding the feedings is reduced to solve this equation, for which the 'Expectation- Maximization Method' was used. It was shown that this algorithm is a very effective way to solve the TAS inverse problem. It is known that in some cases, the high resolution (HR) technique assigns incorrectly more feeding to low lying energy levels

  12. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopamine transporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika M; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Fog, Jacob U

    2007-01-01

    To investigate microdomain association of the dopamine transporter (DAT), we employed FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) and FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). In non-neuronal cells (HEK293), FCS measurements revealed for the YFP-DAT (DAT tagged with yellow fluorescent...... protein) a diffusion coefficient (D) of approximately 3.6 x 10(-9) cm2/s, consistent with a relatively freely diffusible protein. In neuronally derived cells (N2a), we were unable to perform FCS measurements on plasma membrane-associated protein due to photobleaching, suggesting partial immobilization...

  13. Hybrid Microfluidic Platform for Multifactorial Analysis Based on Electrical Impedance, Refractometry, Optical Absorption and Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio M. Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a novel microfluidic platform for multifactorial analysis integrating four label-free detection methods: electrical impedance, refractometry, optical absorption and fluorescence. We present the rationale for the design and the details of the microfabrication of this multifactorial hybrid microfluidic chip. The structure of the platform consists of a three-dimensionally patterned polydimethylsiloxane top part attached to a bottom SU-8 epoxy-based negative photoresist part, where microelectrodes and optical fibers are incorporated to enable impedance and optical analysis. As a proof of concept, the chip functions have been tested and explored, enabling a diversity of applications: (i impedance-based identification of the size of micro beads, as well as counting and distinguishing of erythrocytes by their volume or membrane properties; (ii simultaneous determination of the refractive index and optical absorption properties of solutions; and (iii fluorescence-based bead counting.

  14. Bias in the absorption coefficient determination of a fluorescent dye, standard reference material 1932 fluorescein solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeRose, Paul C.; Kramer, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    The absorption coefficient of standard reference material[registered] (SRM[registered]) 1932, fluorescein in a borate buffer solution (pH=9.5) has been determined at λ=488.0, 490.0, 490.5 and 491.0 nm using the US national reference UV/visible spectrophotometer. The purity of the fluorescein was determined to be 97.6% as part of the certification of SRM 1932. The solution measured was prepared gravimetrically by diluting SRM 1932 with additional borate buffer. The value of the absorption coefficient was corrected for bias due to fluorescence that reaches the detector and for dye purity. Bias due to fluorescence was found to be on the order of -1% for both monochromatic and polychromatic (e.g., diode-array based) spectrophotometers

  15. Theoretical experimental study of the factors that govern the molybdenum absorption signal by means of electro thermic atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaboto Farfan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The formation of molybdenum carbides in the atomizer, used in the electro thermic atomic absorption spectroscopy, is responsible for incomplete analyte removal in its analysis. This generates the apparition of the memory effect and little precision in the results. In this work, different variables that could affect the molybdenum absorption sign were investigated, as well as the influence of hydrochloric acid on the memory effect, by means of studies in the different stages: drying, calcination and atomization, and the samples deposition order in molybdenum solutions, either acidified or not acidified [es

  16. Method and apparatus for aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Lin, Horn-Bond

    1983-11-15

    A method and apparatus for determining the absorption spectra, and other properties, of aerosol particles. A heating beam source provides a beam of electromagnetic energy which is scanned through the region of the spectrum which is of interest. Particles exposed to the heating beam which have absorption bands within the band width of the heating beam absorb energy from the beam. The particles are also illuminated by light of a wave length such that the light is scattered by the particles. The absorption spectra of the particles can thus be determined from an analysis of the scattered light since the absorption of energy by the particles will affect the way the light is scattered. Preferably the heating beam is modulated to simplify the analysis of the scattered light. In one embodiment the heating beam is intensity modulated so that the scattered light will also be intensity modulated when the particles absorb energy. In another embodiment the heating beam passes through an interferometer and the scattered light reflects the Fourier Transform of the absorption spectra.

  17. Noninvasive skin fluorescence spectroscopy for detection of abnormal glucose tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Hull, PhD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ENGINE study evaluated noninvasive skin fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS for detection of abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT. The AGT detection performance of SFS was compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG and hemoglobin A1C (A1C. The study was a head-to-head comparison of SFS to FPG and A1C in an at-risk population of 507 subjects, with no prior diagnosis of diabetes, each of whom received a 75 g, two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. Subjects were measured by SFS on multiple days in fasting and non-fasting states. SFS data were acquired and analyzed with the SCOUT DS® device (VeraLight, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Disease truth was AGT, defined as OGTT ≥ 7.8 mmol/L. Sensitivity, false positive rate (FPR, ROC area, and equal error rate (EER for detection of AGT were computed. The reproducibility of SFS and FPG was assessed. The AGT sensitivity of SFS at the device's recommended screening threshold of 50 was 75.2%, higher than that of FPG (thresholds of 5.6 mmol/L or 6.1 mmol/L and A1C (thresholds of 5.7% or 6.0%. The SFS FPR was 42.1%, comparable to an A1C threshold of 5.7% (FPR = 43.5%. The EERs of SFS, FPG and A1C were similar, as were the partial ROC areas for FPRs of 20–50%. The reproducibility of SFS was 7.7% versus 8.1% for FPG. SFS had similar AGT detection performance to FPG and A1C and is a viable alternative to screening individuals for AGT.

  18. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for determination of tahini adulteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Havva Tumay; Tamer, Ugur; Berkkan, Aysel; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2017-05-15

    In this study, a quick and simple method was developed for detection of tahini adulteration with sunflower oil. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) data of oil samples were collected by scanning the excitation and emission monochromators simultaneously with 20, 40, 60 and 80nm wavelength intervals within the range of 250-600nm. Three different multivariate calibration methods, namely partial least squares (PLS) analysis, principal component regression (PCR), and multiple linear regression (MLR) were used for data analysis. Wavelength selection feature of the chemometric software was also used in order to determine the optimum range of each dataset collected at 20, 40, 60 and 80nm wavelength intervals. All regression methods with and without wavelength selection mode were applied to these each dataset individually. Application of wavelength selection mode adversely affected the root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) values and other quality parameters of all calibration and validation models which were built by using each dataset collected at 20, 40, 60 and 80nm wavelength intervals. Taking all parameters into consideration, the best results were obtained through the application of PLS analysis without wavelength selection mode on the SFS data collected at all wavelength intervals. The lowest detection limits of adulteration, 0.09% and 0.15% were obtained through the use of 40 and 80nm as wavelength intervals, respectively. RMSECV and RMSEP values were calculated as 0.74 and 1.26 for 40nm, and 0.65 and 0.81 for 80nm wavelength intervals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Force-detected nanoscale absorption spectroscopy in water at room temperature using an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, Alexander; Black, Jacob W.; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2018-04-01

    Measuring absorption spectra of single molecules presents a fundamental challenge for standard transmission-based instruments because of the inherently low signal relative to the large background of the excitation source. Here we demonstrate a new approach for performing absorption spectroscopy in solution using a force measurement to read out optical excitation at the nanoscale. The photoinduced force between model chromophores and an optically trapped gold nanoshell has been measured in water at room temperature. This photoinduced force is characterized as a function of wavelength to yield the force spectrum, which is shown to be correlated to the absorption spectrum for four model systems. The instrument constructed for these measurements combines an optical tweezer with frequency domain absorption spectroscopy over the 400-800 nm range. These measurements provide proof-of-principle experiments for force-detected nanoscale spectroscopies that operate under ambient chemical conditions.

  20. Vibration-rotational overtones absorption of solid hydrogens using optoacoustic spectroscopy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Vibrational-rotational overtones absorption solid hydrogens (H 2 , D 2 , HD) is studied using pulsed laser piezoeletric transducer (PULPIT) optoacoustic spectroscopy is studied. A general downward shift in energy from isolated molecular energies is observed. Studying normal-hydrogen it was observed that the phonon excitations associated with double-molecular transitions are predominantly transverse-optical phonons, whereas the excitations associated with single-molecular transitions are predominantly longitudinal - optical phonons. Multiplet structures were observed for certain double transitions in parahydrogen and orthodeuterium. The HD spectrum, besides presenting the sharp zero-phonon lines and the associated phonon side bands, like H 2 and D 2 , showed also two different features. This observation was common to all the transitions involving pure rotational excitation in H 2 and D 2 , which showed broad linewidths. This, together with some other facts (fluorescence lifetime *approx*10 5 sec; weak internal vibration and lattice coupling), led to the proposition of a mechanism for the fast nonradiative relaxation in solid hydrogens, implied from some observed experimental evidences. This relaxation, due to strong coupling, would happen in two steps: the internal vibration modes would relax to the rotational modes of the molecules, and then this rotational modes would relax to the lattice vibration modes. (Author) [pt

  1. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies on Pd-SnO2 based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziej, Dorota; Hübner, Michael; Barsan, Nicolae; Weimar, Udo; Sikora, Marcin; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2009-10-14

    SnO2 gas sensors with palladium as additive in the range of 0.2 wt% and 3 wt% were studied by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy under idealized and real operating conditions. Simultaneously to the structural studies, measurements of the sensing properties were undertaken allowing for the determination of structure-function relationships. For this purpose a new in situ spectroscopic cell was designed which permitted on the one hand sensing on conventional screen printed 50 microm thick sensing layers and on the other hand structural analysis with X-rays provided by an insertion device at a 3rd generation synchrotron facility in fluorescence mode. Pd K-edge XANES and EXAFS results on gas sensors showed that palladium, present in an oxidized state, is finely dispersed if it is added in small quantities (0.2 wt%) while it forms clusters at higher concentrations (3 wt%). This is also reflected by the much easier reduction of palladium in the latter, higher concentrated ones. Under realistic sensing conditions (30-200 ppm H2; 10-50 ppm CO in dry and humid air at 200 and 300 degrees C) for the low additive concentration samples, no change in oxidation state was observed, i.e. palladium remained in its oxidized state. This has important consequences on the understanding and modeling of the gas sensing mechanism.

  2. Incorporation of arsenic in mammal bone: X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, X.; Pingitore, N. E.; Cruz-Jimenez, G.

    2002-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the distal tibia of a modern deer, Odocoileus virginianus, revealed that the energy position of the As K edge matched that of a reference arsenic(V) model compound. Comparison of the x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of the deer spectrum to the spectra of model As compounds indicated a close match to arsenate(V), e.g., zinc orthoarsenate(5). This indicates that the nearest-neighbor shell of the arsenic in the bone consists of four oxygens in the tetrahedral arrangement typical of arsenic(V) oxysalts. The XANES analysis demonstrates that the arsenic in the deer bone is not associated with an organic compound as a result of methylation. This suggests that the arsenic is associated with the mineral fraction of the bone, most likely with As substituting for P at the latter's structural site in the hydroxyapatite. The XAS data for the deer bone were very noisy due to the low level of arsenic present, just over 1 ppm.. A total of 18 scans, taking nearly a full 8-hour beam shift, were averaged to obtain the spectrum studied. It is not clear that the second neighbor shell can be characterized sufficiently from these data to confirm that As substitutes for P in hydroxyapatite. We conducted our XAS experiments on beam line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Data were collected in the fluorescence mode, using a solid state, 13-element Ge-detector. The energy reference was As(0) metal foil run parasitically in transmission mode during collection of the bone spectra. The edge shift seen in the experimental and As(V) model compound relative to the energy position of the arsenic(0) foil is consistent with the additional energy required to photoeject the 1-s electron of As(V), relative to that required for As(0). Arsenic content of the deer bone was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  3. Structural study of aggregated β-carotene by absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li Ping; Wei, Liang Shu

    2017-10-01

    By UV-visible absorption spectroscope, the aggregated β-carotene in hydrated ethanol was studied in the temperature range of 5 55°C, with different ethanol/water ratio. And the structural evolutions of these aggregates with time were detected. The spectrophotometric analysis showed that the aggregate of β-carotene formed in 1:1 ethanol/water solution transfered from H-type to J-type with temperature increase. In 2:1 ethanol/water solution a new type of aggregate with strong coupling was predicated by the appearing absorption peak located at about 550 nm. In the time scales of 48 houses all the aggregated structures were stable, but the absorption intensity decreased with time. It was concluded that the types of aggregated β-carotene which wouldn't change with time depended on the solvent composition and temperature.

  4. Optical absorption and fluorescence studies of praseodymium ion in chloroborophosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Y.K.; Tandon, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The interest in optical absorption and fluorescence studies of rare earth ions in glassy materials is increasing continuously in connection with laser research and related application. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of praseodymium ion in chloroborophosphate glasses have been recorded at room temperature. The chloroborophosphate glass specimens having composition in mob.% Na 2 0 (26.08), B 2 0 3 (14.57), P 2 0 5 (44.85), ZnCl 2 (14.50), Pr 6 0 11 (R) [R= 0.0,0.1 and 0.2 moi.%] have been prepared by melt quenching technique. The spectra consists of seven absorption bands and three fluorescence bands. The observed optical spectra are discussed in terms of energy state and the intensity of the transitions. The various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon, Lande', Racah and bonding parameters have been computed. Judd-Ofeit intensity parameters and laser parameters have also been computed. These results shows that praseodymium doped chloroborophosphate glass specimen can be considered as good hosts for laser applications

  5. In situ gas temperature measurements by UV-absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2009-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A(2)Sigma(+) <- X(2)Pi gamma-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in t....... The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 degrees C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m....

  6. Optical absorption spectroscopy of natural and irradiated pink tourmaline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, M.B.; Isotani, S.

    1985-01-01

    The Brazilian natural pink tourmaline is studied through the polarized optical absorption measurements. The effect of increasing doses of γ-rays from 60 Co in the spectra were determined (maximum of 20MGy). The following optical absorption bands were observed: 8,500 and 14,800 cm -1 assigned to d-d transitions of Fe 2+ in b- and c-sites, respectively; 19,500 and 25,500 cm -1 assigned to 5 E → 5 A 1 and 5 B 2 → 5 A 1 d-d transitions of Mn 3+ , respectively. (Author) [pt

  7. Photochemistry of Bisphenol-A Based Polycarbonate: Early Detection of Photoproducts by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-13

    Reactor with 300 nm lamps. Figure 15b Expanded view of Figure 15a. Figure 16 UV - Visible spectra of salicylic acid (OD = 0.2 at 310 nm) in DCM for 0, 5...Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39406-0076. ABSTRACT The utility of fluorescence spectroscopy in detection of salicylic acid and 2,Z- biphenol type...1). In the ensuing discussion, we will describe a procedure which allows for detection via fluorescence spectroscopy of salicylic acid as well as

  8. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gaoming [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Qiu, Yishen [Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  9. Structure and dynamics in liquid water from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernet, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectra of water are discussed. The spectra of gas-phase water, liquid water and ice illustrate the sensitivity of oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy to hydrogen bonding in water. Transmission mode spectra of amorphous and crystalline ice are compared to x-ray Raman spectra of ice. The good agreement consolidates the experimental spectrum of crystalline ice and represents an incentive for theoretical calculations of the oxygen K-edge absorption spectrum of crystalline ice. Time-resolved infrared-pump and x-ray absorption probe results are finally discussed in the light of this structural interpretation.

  10. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to control ozone dosage in recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Martin, Richard; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy to be used as an ozone dosage determination tool in recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs), by studying the relationship between fluorescence intensities and dissolved organic matter (DOM) degradation by ozone...

  11. Portable instrument that integrates irradiation with fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopies during clinical photodynamic therapy of cutaneous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, W. J.; Oseroff, A. R.; Foster, T. H.

    2006-06-01

    We report a portable clinical instrument for delivering photodynamic therapy (PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivers the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performs reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument is being used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, blood volume, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation during a pilot clinical trial of 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 633nm PDT treatment laser is collected between 655 and 800nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programable time points, white light reflectance spectra between 475 and 800nm are acquired. Fluorescence spectra are corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provide information on blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Monitoring blood oxygenation and implicit dose metrics such as photosensitizer photobleaching during PDT allows the improved interpretation of clinical results and is helping to guide the treatment protocol for an anticipated low-irradiance PDT clinical trial of BCC.

  12. Fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of motile sperm cells and CHO cells in an optical trap (laser tweezers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Liu, Yagang; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Patrizio, Pasquale; Tadir, Yona; Sonek, Gregory J.; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    We describe fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging studies of optically trapped single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and motile human sperm cells. The NIR trapping beam was provided by a tunable, multimode continuous wave Ti:Sapphire laser. The beam was introduced into an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Fluorescence of cells in the single- beam gradient force optical trap was excited with a 488 nm microbeam (laser scanning microscopy) or with 365 nm radiation from a high- pressure mercury lamp. Modifications to NADH-attributed autofluorescence and Rhodamine- and Propidium Iodide-attributed xenofluorescence indicate a significant cell-damaging effect of 760 nm trapping beams. 760 nm effects produce a biological response comparable to UVA-induced oxidative stress and appear to be a consequence to two-photon absorption.

  13. Application of normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of gliquidone in presence of its fluorescent alkaline degradation product

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-ghobashy, Mohamed R.; Yehia, Ali M.; Helmy, Aya H.; Youssef, Nadia F.

    2018-01-01

    Simple, smart and sensitive normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed and validated for the determination of gliquidone in the drug substance and drug product. Normal spectrofluorimetric method of gliquidone was established in methanol at λ excitation 225 nm and λ emission 400 nm in concentration range 0.2-3 μg/ml with LOD equal 0.028. The fluorescence quantum yield of gliquidone was calculated using quinine sulfate as a reference and found to be 0.542. Stability-indicating first and third derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were successfully utilized to overcome the overlapped spectra in normal fluorescence of gliquidone and its alkaline degradation product. Derivative synchronous methods are based on using the synchronous fluorescence of gliquidone and its degradation product in methanol at Δ λ50 nm. Peak amplitude in the first derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra was measured at 309 nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing without interference. The peak amplitudes in the third derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra, peak to trough were measured at 316,329 nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing. The different experimental parameters affecting the normal and synchronous fluorescence intensity of gliquidone were studied and optimized. Moreover, the cited methods have been validated as per ICH guidelines. The peak amplitude-concentration plots of the derivative synchronous fluorescence were linear over the concentration range 0.05-2 μg/ml for gliquidone. Limits of detection were 0.020 and 0.022 in first and third derivative synchronous spectra, respectively. The adopted methods were successfully applied to commercial tablets and the results demonstrated that the derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful stability-indicating method, suitable for routine use with a short analysis time. Statistical comparison between

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS [Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure] and XANES [X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E.E.; Mini, S.M.; Ramanathan, M.

    1990-04-01

    The x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) had been an essential tool to gather spectroscopic information about atomic energy level structure in the early decades of this century. It has also played an important role in the discovery and systematization of rare-earth elements. The discovery of synchrotron radiation in 1952, and later the availability of broadly tunable synchrotron based x-ray sources have revitalized this technique since the 1970's. The correct interpretation of the oscillatory structure in the x-ray absorption cross-section above the absorption edge by Sayers et. al. has transformed XAS from a spectroscopic tool to a structural technique. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) yields information about the interatomic distances, near neighbor coordination numbers, and lattice dynamics. An excellent description of the principles and data analysis techniques of EXAFS is given by Teo. XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure), on the other hand, gives information about the valence state, energy bandwidth and bond angles. Today, there are about 50 experimental stations in various synchrotrons around the world dedicated to collecting x-ray absorption data from the bulk and surfaces of solids and liquids. In this chapter, we will give the basic principles of XAS, explain the information content of essentially two different aspects of the absorption process leading to EXAFS and XANES, and discuss the source and samples limitations

  15. Dye lasers in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Luther, J.; Steudel, A.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of dye lasers which are relevant to atomic spectroscopy are discussed. Several experiments made possible by tunable dye lasers are discussed. Applications of high spectral density dye lasers are covered in areas such as absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, photoionization and photodetachment, and two- and multi-photon processes. Applications which take advantage of the narrow bandwidth of tunable dye lasers are discussed, including saturation spectroscopy, fluorescence line narrowing, classic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, nonoptical detection of optical resonances, heterodyne spectroscopy, and nonlinear coherent resonant phenomena. (26 figures, 180 references) (U.S.)

  16. Analysis of binding interaction between the natural apocarotenoid bixin and human serum albumin by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Molnár, Péter; Deli, József

    2005-06-01

    Bixin is an important, pharmacologically active dietary cis-carotenoid, but its interaction with potential macromolecular targets is completely unexplored. This work was aimed to study the binding of bixin to human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in blood plasma. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in combination with UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching techniques were applied. Appearance of induced CD bands in the UV- and VIS-absorption spectral regions indicated the formation of non-covalent carotenoid-albumin complexes. Shape and spectral position of the extrinsic Cotton effects suggested the binding of a single bixin molecule to HSA in chiral conformation. Scatchard and non-linear regression analyses of CD titration data resulted in similar values for the association constant (Ka = 6.6 and 4.6x10(5) M(-1), resp.) and for the number of binding sites (n = 1). The binding interaction was independently confirmed by fluorescence-quenching experiment from which the binding parameters were also calculated. CD Displacement measurements performed with marker ligands established that the main drug binding sites of HSA are not involved in binding of bixin. Palmitic acid decreased the amplitude of the induced CD bands suggesting a common albumin binding site for bixin and long-chain fatty acids. The above data indicate that HSA plays a significant role in the plasma transportation of bixin and related dietary carboxylic acid carotenoids.

  17. [Rapid identification of potato cultivars using NIR-excited fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fen; Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Benjamin, Arnold Julian Vinoj; Hong, Tian-Sheng; Zhiwei, Huang

    2014-03-01

    Potato is one of the most important food in the world. Rapid and noninvasive identification of potato cultivars plays a important role in the better use of varieties. In this study, The identification ability of optical spectroscopy techniques, including near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy, for invasive detection of potato cultivars was evaluated. A rapid NIR Raman spectroscopy system was applied to measure the composite Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy of 3 different species of potatoes (98 samples in total) under 785 nm laser light excitation. Then pure Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy were abstracted from the composite spectroscopy, respectively. At last, the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was utilized to analyze and classify Raman spectra of 3 different types of potatoes. All the samples were divided into two sets at random: the calibration set (74samples) and prediction set (24 samples), the model was validated using a leave-one-out, cross-validation method. The results showed that both the NIR-excited fluorescence spectra and pure Raman spectra could be used to identify three cultivars of potatoes. The fluorescence spectrum could distinguish the Favorita variety well (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 0.86 and accuracy: 0.92), but the result for Diamant (sensitivity: 0.75, specificity: 0.75 and accuracy: 0. 75) and Granola (sensitivity: 0.16, specificity: 0.89 and accuracy: 0.71) cultivars identification were a bit poorer. We demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy uncovered the main biochemical compositions contained in potato species, and provided a better classification sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 1 and accuracy: 1 for all 3 potato cultivars identification) among the three types of potatoes as compared to fluorescence spectroscopy.

  18. Surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy for graphene functionalization on copper

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matulková, I.; Kovaříček, Petr; Šlouf, Miroslav; Němec, I.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, NOV 2017 (2017), s. 250-255 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S; GA MŠk LL1301; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Grant - others:AVČR PPPLZ(CZ) L200401551; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001821 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : chemical-vapor-deposition * diazonium salts * raman-spectroscopy * covalent functionalization * seira spectroscopy * grown graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Polymer science (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  19. Surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy for graphene functionalization on copper

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matulková, I.; Kovaříček, Petr; Šlouf, Miroslav; Němec, I.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, NOV 2017 (2017), s. 250-255 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S; GA MŠk LL1301; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Grant - others:AVČR PPPLZ(CZ) L200401551; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001821 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : chemical -vapor-deposition * diazonium salts * raman-spectroscopy * covalent functionalization * seira spectroscopy * grown graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Polymer science (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  20. Direct solid surface fluorescence spectroscopy of standard chemicals and humic acid in ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, S; Nicolodelli, G; Redon, R; Milori, D M B P

    2017-04-15

    The front face fluorescence spectroscopy is often used to quantify chemicals in well-known matrices as it is a rapid and powerful technique, with no sample preparation. However it was not used to investigate extracted organic matter like humic substances. This work aims to fully investigate for the first time front face fluorescence spectroscopy response of a ternary system including boric acid, tryptophan and humic substances, and two binaries system containing quinine sulfate or humic substance in boric acid. Pure chemicals, boric acid, tryptophan, quinine sulfate and humic acid were mixed together in solid pellet at different contents from 0 to 100% in mass. The measurement of excitation emission matrix of fluorescence (3D fluorescence) and laser induced fluorescence were then done in the front face mode. Fluorescence matrices were decomposed using the CP/PARAFAC tools after scattering treatments. Results show that for 3D fluorescence there is no specific component for tryptophan and quinine sulfate, and that humic substances lead to a strong extinction effect for mixture containing quinine sulfate. Laser induced fluorescence gives a very good but non-specific related response for both quinine sulfate and tryptophan. No humic substances fluorescence response was found, but extinction effect is observed as for 3D fluorescence. This effect is stronger for quinine sulfate than for tryptophan. These responses were modeled using a simple absorbance versus emission model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasque, J., Jr.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Marcassa, L. G.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants (Citrus limonia [L.] Osbeck) using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Due to its economic importance we have chosen to investigate the citrus canker disease, which is caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. Mechanical stress was also studied because it plays an important role in the plant's infection by such bacteria. A laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy system, composed of a spectrometer and a 532 nm10 mW excitation laser was used to perform fluorescence spectroscopy. The ratio of two chlorophyll fluorescence bands allows us to detect and discriminate between mechanical and disease stresses. This ability to discriminate may have an important application in the field to detect citrus canker infected trees.

  2. Optical Absorption Spectroscopy for Gas Analysis in Biomass Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge

    important gas species of the low-temperature circulating fluidized bed gasifier. At first, a special gas cell,the hot gas flow cell (HGC), was build up and veried. In this custom-made gas cell, the optical properties, the so-called absorption cross-sections, of the most important sulfur and aromatic...... compounds were determined in laboratory experiments. By means of the laboratory results and spectroscopic databases,the concentrations of the major gas species and the aromatic compounds phenol and naphthalene were determined in extraction and in-situ measurements....

  3. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  4. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    by estimation of the water content by thermogravimetric analysis. Bone tissue from dogs treated with strontiummalonate was studied using XAS. A new approach for analysing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model, from which the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone......-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... and R6) were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) to 1.40 Å, 1.30 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The zinc coordination in each conformation was studied by XAS including both extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES...

  5. Ammonia absorption in calcium graphite intercalation compound: in situ neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G; Lovell, A; Skipper, N T; Bennington, S M; Kurban, Z; Smith, R I

    2010-06-21

    The structure and superconducting properties of ammoniated calcium-graphite intercalation compound (Ca-GIC) have been investigated using in situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and magnetization studies. Ammonia absorption has been carried out by exposing preformed Ca-GIC to ammonia vapour at various pressures. Our in situ neutron diffraction data reveal a complex ammonia pressure dependent structural transformation, in which the growth of secondary ammoniated Ca-GIC phases are observed at the expense of the pristine CaC(6) and graphite. The ammonia absorption is irreversible in nature, and degassing the sample at elevated temperature leads to the formation of calcium amide and hydrogen. The Raman spectroscopy and magnetization studies show that the ammonia absorption not only leads to a large stacking disorder, but it also reduces the superconducting CaC(6) phase fraction. Finally, we propose a molecular stacking model which accounts for the observed ammonia absorption and concomitant structural phase transitions.

  6. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  7. Drug quantification in turbid media by fluorescence imaging combined with light-absorption correction using white Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Haiyan; Liu, Haichun; Svenmarker, Pontus

    2011-01-01

    in vivo by the fluorescence imaging technique. In this paper we present a novel approach to compensate for the light absorption in homogeneous turbid media both for the excitation and emission light, utilizing time-resolved fluorescence white Monte Carlo simulations combined with the Beer-Lambert law...

  8. Quasi zero-background tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy employing a balanced Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zuguang; Lewander, Märta; Svanberg, Sune

    2008-12-22

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) normally observes small fractional absorptive reductions in the light flux. We show, that instead a signal increase on a zero background can be obtained. A Michelson interferometer, which is initially balanced out in destructive interference, is perturbed by gas absorption in one of its arms. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration show that the proposed zero-background TDLS can improve the achievable signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated...... with the microfluidic channel system. This results in inherent stability and photolithographic alignment precision. Permanently attached optical fibers provide a rugged connection to the light source, detection, and data processing unit, which potentially allows field use of such systems. Fluorescence measurements...

  10. Charge Carrier Dynamics of Quantum Confined Semiconductor Nanoparticles Analyzed via Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Arthur Joseph, III

    were passivated for water solubility via two different methods: hydrosilylation produced 3-aminopropenyl-terminated Si quantum dots, and a modified Stöber process produced silica-encapsulated Si quantum dots. Both methods produce water-soluble quantum dots with maximum emission at 414 nm, and after purification, the quantum dots exhibit intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield efficiencies of 15 and 23%, respectively. Even though the quantum dots have different surfaces, they exhibit nearly identical absorption and fluorescence spectra. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy was used for temporal resolution of the photoexcited carrier dynamics between the quantum dots and ligand. The transient dynamics of the 3-aminopropenyl-terminated Si quantum dots is interpreted as a formation and decay of a charge-transfer excited state between the delocalized π electrons of the carbon linker and the Si core excitons. This charge transfer state is stable for ~4 ns before reverting back to a more stable, long-living species. The silica-encapsulated Si QDs show a simpler spectrum without charge transfer dynamics. Appendix I (Chem. Mat., 1220, 2010), addresses the long-time (μs) transient kinetics associated with TiO2 and layered titanates (TBA2 2Ti4O9), which were synthesized in the Osterloh laboratory (UCD). Transient absorption data reveal that photogenerated electrons become trapped in mid band-gap states, from which they decay exponentially with a time-constant of 43.67 + 0.28 ms in titanates, which is much slower than the 68 + 1 ns observed for TiO2 nanocrystals. The slower kinetics observed for the TBA 2Ti4O9 nanosheets originates either from the presence of deeper trap sites on the sheets vs. the nanoparticles, more trap sites, or from more effective electron-hole separation because of the micrometer dimensions of the 2D lattice. Appendix II, depicts the visible solar spectrum at sea level detailing the percentage of photons and energy that exist within certain

  11. Temperature effect on fluorescence and UV-vis absorption spectroscopic properties of Dy(III) in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Young [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jong-Il, E-mail: jiyun@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The spectroscopic properties of Dy(III) in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt at high temperature were investigated by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. For the first time, a visible fluorescence of Dy(III) in high-temperature LiCl-KCl eutectic salt was measured due to the electronic transitions from {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} to {sup 6}H{sub J/2} (J=7, Horizontal-Ellipsis ,15). The effect of temperature on hypersensitivity for the electronic transitions from the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} excited state ({approx}25700 cm{sup -1}) of Dy(III) was confirmed by altering temperature in chloride eutectic salt in accord with optical absorption measurements. The molar absorptivity of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} Leftwards-Arrow {sup 6}H{sub 15/2} was enhanced with increasing temperature. The fluorescence intensity of Dy(III) followed a simple mono-exponential decay curve, suggesting the formation of a single chemical species in high-temperature LiCl-KCl molten salt. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic characteristics of Dy(III) in the high-temperature LiCl-KCl salt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-situ chemical analysis of Dy(III) by fluorescence and absorbance measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature effect on hypersensitivity for electronic transitions from {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} excited state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single chemical species of Dy(III) exists in high-temperature LiCl-KCl salt.

  12. Time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of Gaq3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Gallium(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Gaq 3 ) belongs to a class of metal organic compounds, used as electron transport layer and emissive layer in organic light emitting diodes. Many research activities have concentrated on the optical and electronic properties, especially of the homologue molecule aluminum(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq 3 ). Knowledge of the first excited state S 1 structure of these molecules could provide deeper insight into the processes involved into the operation of electronic devices, such as OLEDs and, hence, it could further improve their efficiency and optical properties. Until now the excited state structure could not be determined experimentally. Most of the information about this structure mainly arises from theoretical calculations. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a well developed technique to determine both, the electronic and the geometric properties of a sample. The connection of ultrashort pulsed X-ray sources with a pulsed laser system offers the possibility to use XAFS as a tool for studying the transient changes of a sample induced by a laser pulse. In the framework of this thesis a new setup for time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy at PETRA III beamline P11 was developed for measuring samples in liquid form. In this setup the sample is pumped into its photo-excited state by a femtosecond laser pump pulse with 343 nm wavelength and after a certain time delay probed by an X-ray probe pulse. In this way the first excited singlet state S 1 of Gaq 3 dissolved in benzyl alcohol was analyzed. A structural model for the excited state structure of the Gaq 3 molecule based on the several times reproduced results of the XAFS experiments is proposed. According to this model it was found that the Ga-N A bond length is elongated, while the Ga-O A bond length is shortened upon photoexcitation. The dynamics of the structural changes were not the focus of this thesis. Nevertheless the excited state lifetime

  13. Absorption of copper(II) by creosote bush (Larrea tridentata): use of atomic and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardea-Torresdey, J L; Arteaga, S; Tiemann, K J; Chianelli, R; Pingitore, N; Mackay, W

    2001-11-01

    Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a common North American native desert shrub, exhibits the ability to take up copper(II) ions rapidly from solution. Following hydroponic studies, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 200.3 was used to digest the plant samples, and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) was used to determine the amount of copper taken up in different parts of the plant. The amount of copper(II) found within the roots, stems, and leaves was 13.8, 1.1, and 0.6 mg/g, respectively, after the creosote bush was exposed to a 63.5-ppm copper(II) solution for 48 h. When the plant was exposed to a 635-ppm copper(II) solution, the roots, stems, and leaves contained 35.0, 10.5, and 3.8 mg/g, respectively. In addition to FAAS analysis, x-ray microfluorescence (XRMF) analysis of the plant samples provided further confirmation of copper absorption by the various plant parts. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) elucidated the oxidation state of the copper absorbed by the plants. The copper(II) absorbed from solution remained as copper(II) bound to oxygen-containing ligands within the plant samples. The results of this study indicate that creosote bush may provide a useful and novel method of removing copper(II) from contaminated soils in an environmentally friendly manner.

  14. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  15. Microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy aiming at novel dosimetry using DNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Yoshinobu; Hirayama, Makoto; Matuo, Youichirou [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Sunagawa, Takeyoshi [Fukui University of Technology, Fukui (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    We are developing L-band and S-band microwave dielectric absorption systems aiming novel dosimetry using DNAs, such as plasmid DNA and genomic DNA, and microwave technology. Each system is composed of a cavity resonator, analog signal generator, circulator, power meter, and oscilloscope. Since the cavity resonator is sensitive to temperature change, we have made great efforts to prevent the fluctuation of temperature. We have developed software for controlling and measurement. By using this system, we can measure the resonance frequency, f, and ΔQ (Q is a dimensionless parameter that describes how under-damped an oscillator or resonator is, and characterizes a resonator’s bandwidth relative to its center frequency) within about 3 minutes with high accuracy. This system will be expected to be applicable to DNAs evaluations and to novel dosimetric system.

  16. The fluorescence and absorption of white and dyed cotton fabrics laundered with brightening agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakoma, Maseka

    2005-01-01

    The absorbtion and emmission spectra of white and coloured cotton treated with Fluorescent Brightening Agents,(FBA's) used in formulating domestic laundry products have been characterized using a BFC-450 Bispectra Colorimeter. It was found that on white bleached cotton treated with FBA's, the intensity of fluorescence increases with increasing FBA concentration, very rapidly at first and approaching a limiting value at higher concentration.On dyed goods, it was found that the intensity offluoresnce increases with increasing FBA concentration to a maximum limit too, but decreases with increase in dye concentration. It was found that the absorbtion is not significantly affected by the FBA concentration in most of the shades except for yellow dyeings. In the yellow dyeings it was found that at lower dye concentration, absorption increases with an increase in FBA concentration. (author)

  17. A structural study of ceramic oxides by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed structural study of ceramic oxides is presented by employing X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). In the present work X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) is used for the investigation of valence state of metal cations; whereas, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure EXAFS) is employed for the determination for bond lengths, coordination numbers and nature of the elements present in the near neighbour shells surrounding the absorbing atom. These results show that local environment of dopant and host cations are different; and this variation in local structure depends on the nature and concentration of the dopant ions. (author)

  18. Thyroid lesions diagnosis by Fourier transformed infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albero, Felipe Guimaraes

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common disorder, with 4-7% of incidence in the Brazilian population. Although the fine needle aspiration (FNA) is an accurate method for thyroid tumors diagnosis, the discrimination between benign and malignant neoplasm is currently not possible in some cases with high incidence of false negative diagnosis, leading to a surgical intervention due to the risk of carcinomas. The aim of this study was to verify if the Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) can contribute to the diagnosis of thyroid carcinomas and goiters, using samples of tissue and aspirates. Samples of FNA, homogenates and tissues of thyroid nodules with histopathological diagnosis were obtained and prepared for FTIR spectroscopy analysis. The FNA and homogenates samples were measured by μ-FTIR (between 950 . 1750 cm -1 ), at a nominal resolution of 4 cm -1 and 120 scans). Tissue samples were analyzed directly by ATR-FTIR technique, at a resolution 2 cm -1 , with 60 scans in the same region. All spectra were corrected by the baseline and normalized by amides area (1550-1640 cm -1 ) in order to minimize variations of sample homogeneity. Then, spectra were converted into second derivatives using the Savitzk-Golay algorithm with a 13 points window. The Ward's minimum variance algorithm and Euclidean distances among the points were used for cluster analysis. Some FNA samples showed complex spectral pattern. All samples showed some cell pellets and large amount of hormone, represented by the bands of 1545 and 1655 cm -1 . Bands in 1409, 1412, 1414, 1578 and 1579 cm -1 were also found, indicating possible presence of sugar, DNA, citric acid or metabolic products. In this study, it was obtained an excellent separation between goiter and malign lesion for the samples of tissues, with 100% of specificity in specific cluster and 67% sensibility and 50 of specificity. In homogenate and FNA samples this sensibility and specificity were lower, because among these samples, it were

  19. Hyperfine structure of 147,149Sm measured using saturated absorption spectroscopy in combination with resonance-ionization mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyunmin; Lee, Miran; Rhee, Yongjoo

    2003-01-01

    The hyperfine structures of four levels of the Sm isotopes have been measured by means of diode-laser-based Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy in combination with a diode-laser-initiated resonance-ionization mass spectroscopy. It was demonstrated that combining the two spectroscopic methods was very effective for the identification and accurate measurement of the spectral lines of atoms with several isotopes, such as the rare-earth elements. From the obtained spectra, the hyperfine constants A and B for the odd-mass isotopes 147 Sm and 149 Sm were determined for four upper levels of the studied transitions.

  20. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C 4 H 4 S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact

  1. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an innovative technique that has been used as a method for fast elemental analysis in real time. Conventional ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) LIBS has been applied to detect the elemental composition of different materials, including explosives, pharmaceutical drugs, and biological samples. The extension of conventional LIBS to the infrared region (˜1-12 mum) promises to provide additional information on molecular emission signatures due to rotational-vibrational transitions. In this research, a pulsed Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was focused onto several sodium compounds (NaCl, NaClO3, Na2CO3 and NaClO4) and potassium compounds (KCl, KClO3, K2CO3 and KClO4) to produce an intense plasma at the target surface. Several distinct infrared (IR) atomic emission signatures were observed from all sodium and potassium containing compounds. The atomic emission lines observed from the investigated samples matched assigned transitions of neutral sodium and potassium atoms published in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) atomic database. In addition to the intense atomic lines, the rst evidence of molecular LIBS emission structures were observed at ˜10.0 m in KClO3 and NaClO3 for the chlorate anion (ClO3 --1), at ˜6.7 to 8.0 mum in KNO3 and NaNO 3 for the nitrate anion (NO3--1 ), ˜8.0 to 10.0 mum in KClO4 and NaClO4 for perchlorate anion (ClO4--1 ), and ˜6.88 mum and 11.53 mum in Na2CO3 for the carbonate anion (CO3--1 ). The observed molecular emission showed strong correlation with the conventional Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) absorption spectra of the investigated samples. IR LIBS was also applied to determine the limit of detection (LOD) for the perchlorate anion in KClO4 using the 8.0 -11.0 mum IR-LIBS emission band. The calibration curve of ClO4 in KClO4 was constructed using peak and integrated emission intensities for known concentrations of mixed KClO4/NH4NO3 samples. The

  2. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy for the assessment of skin photoaging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    D´Almeida, Camila de Paula; Campos, Carolina; Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    pathology. The optical properties of these intrinsic fluorophores respond to the microenvironment and the metabolic status, thus making fluorescence spectroscopy a valuable tool to study the conditions of biological tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the hairless mice skin metabolic changes during the photoaging process through lifetime and fluorescence measurements targeting NADH and FAD. Two lasers centered at 378 nm and 445 nm, respectively, perform excitation of NADH and FAD. The fluorescence acquisition is carried out at mice dorsal and ventral regions throughout the photoaging protocol and aging process. Differences in fluorescence and lifetime data between young and photoaged mice measurements were observed. The endogenous fluorescence spectrum of photoaged dorsal skin showed an increase compared to young and aged skin. Lifetime of bound NADH and free FAD presented an increase in the first week that continued until the end of the protocol. Aging process is being investigated to complement the information obtained from fluorescence data and lifetime of photoaging process.

  3. Quartz crystal microbalance and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy characterization of bisphenol A absorption in the poly(acrylate) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guifeng; Morita, Shigeaki; Ye, Shen; Tanaka, Masaru; Osawa, Masatoshi

    2004-02-01

    The absorption process of bisphenol A (BPA) in a number of poly(acrylate) thin films, such as poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA), poly(ethyl acrylate) (PEA), poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), has been investigated by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) measurements. Both QCM and IRRAS measurements show that the BPA molecules absorb in PMEA, PEA, and PBMA thin films but not in PMMA thin film. The differences in the BPA absorption behavior are mainly attributed to the difference in the glass transition temperature (T(g)) between these polymers. This absorption behavior also depends on the BPA concentration and polymer film thickness. Furthermore, IRRAS characterization demonstrates that the hydrogen bonding is formed between the hydroxyl group in BPA and the carbonyl group in the poly(acrylate) thin films. BPA molecule absorbed in these polymer thin films can be removed by ethanol rinse treatment. By optimizing experimental conditions for the QCM electrode modified by PMEA thin film, detection limitation of approximately 1 ppb for BPA can be realized by the in situ QCM measurement. This method is expected to be a sensitive in situ detection way for trace BPA in the environmental study.

  4. The role of total-reflection x-ray fluorescence in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelg, G.; Klockenkaemper, R.

    1993-01-01

    Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a universal and economic method for the simultaneous determination of elements with atomic numbers > 11 down to the lower pg-level. It is a microanalytical tool for the analysis of small sample amounts placed on flat carriers and for contaminations on flat sample surfaces. Analyses of stratified near-surface layers are made possible by varying the incident angle of the primary beam in the region of total-reflection. This non-destructive method is especially suitable for thin layers of a few nanometres, deposited on wafer material although not usable as a microprobe method with a high lateral resolution. Furthermore, depth profiles of biological samples can be recorded by means of microtome sectioning of only a few micrometres, as, for example in the gradient analysis of human organs. In addition to micro- and surface-layer analysis, TXRF is effectively applied to element trace analysis. Homogeneous solutions, for example aqueous solutions, high-purity acids or body fluids, are pipetted onto carriers and, after evaporation, the dry residues are analyzed directly down to the pg/ml region. Particularly advantageous is the absence of matrix effects, so that an easy calibration can be carried out by adding a single internal standard element. A digestion or separation step preceding the actual determination becomes necessary if a more complex matrix is to be analysed or especially low detection limits have to be reached. A critical evaluation of the recent developments in atomic spectroscopy places TXRF in a leading position. Its outstanding features compete with those of e.g. electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), microwave induced plasma optical emission spectroscopy (MIP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the field of micro- and trace analysis and with Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in the surface-layer analysis. (author)

  5. Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields have been measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 + or - 2 percent and it falls off to 53.4 + or - 2 percent and 44.0 + or - 4 percent at 284 and 248 nm, respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I(asterisk) quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I(asterisk) yields reported here. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I(asterisk) quantum yield results.

  6. Detection of cancerous biological tissue areas by means of infrared absorption and SERS spectroscopy of intercellular fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicka, M.; Urboniene, V.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel approach to the detection of cancerous kidney tissue areas by measuring vibrational spectra (IR absorption or SERS) of intercellular fluid taken from the tissue. The method is based on spectral analysis of cancerous and normal tissue areas in order to find specific spectral markers. The samples were prepared by sliding the kidney tissue over a substrate - surface of diamond ATR crystal in case of IR absorption or calcium fluoride optical window in case of SERS. For producing the SERS signal the dried fluid film was covered by silver nanoparticle colloidal solution. In order to suppress fluorescence background the measurements were performed in the NIR spectral region with the excitation wavelength of 1064 nm. The most significant spectral differences - spectral markers - were found in the region between 400 and 1800 cm-1, where spectral bands related to various vibrations of fatty acids, glycolipids and carbohydrates are located. Spectral markers in the IR and SERS spectra are different and the methods can complement each other. Both of them have potential to be used directly during surgery. Additionally, IR absorption spectroscopy in ATR mode can be combined with waveguide probe what makes this method usable in vivo.

  7. The influence of magnetic fields on absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Richter, Philipp [Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP) (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Spectroscopic observations play essential roles in astrophysics. They are crucial for determining important physical parameters, providing information about the composition of various objects in the universe, as well as depicting motions in the universe. However, spectroscopic studies often do not consider the influence of magnetic fields. In this paper, we explore the influence of magnetic fields on the spectroscopic observations arising from Ground State Alignment (GSA). Synthetic spectra are generated to show the measurable changes of the spectra due to GSA. The influences of atomic alignment on absorption from DLAs, emission from H II Regions, submillimeter fine-structure lines from star forming regions are presented as examples to illustrate the effect in diffuse gas. Furthermore, we demonstrate the influence of atomic alignment on physical parameters derived from spectral line ratios, such as the alpha-to-iron ratio([X/Fe]), interstellar temperature, and ionization rate. Results in our paper show that due to GSA, magnetic fields will affect the spectra of diffuse gas with high signal-to-noise(S/N) ratio under the condition that photon-excitation is much more efficient than thermal collision.

  8. Modification of energy-transfer processes in the cyanobacterium, Arthrospira platensis, to adapt to light conditions, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Seiji; Yokono, Makio; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-11-01

    In cyanobacteria, the interactions among pigment-protein complexes are modified in response to changes in light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed excitation energy transfer from the phycobilisome and photosystem II to photosystem I in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis. The cells were grown under lights with different spectral profiles and under different light intensities, and the energy-transfer characteristics were evaluated using steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence rise and decay curves were analyzed by global analysis to obtain fluorescence decay-associated spectra. The direct energy transfer from the phycobilisome to photosystem I and energy transfer from photosystem II to photosystem I were modified depending on the light quality, light quantity, and cultivation period. However, the total amount of energy transferred to photosystem I remained constant under the different growth conditions. We discuss the differences in energy-transfer processes under different cultivation and light conditions.

  9. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  10. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Walker, Karolina; Haag, Rainer; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-12-24

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  11. Probing heme protein-ligand interactions by UV/visible absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for steady-state and time-resolved studies of protein-ligand interactions. Prosthetic groups in proteins frequently have strong electronic absorbance bands that depend on the oxidation, ligation, and conformation states of the chromophores. They are also sensitive to conformational changes of the polypeptide chain into which they are embedded. Steady-state absorption spectroscopy provides information on ligand binding equilibria, from which the Gibbs free energy differences between the ligated and unligated states can be computed. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy allows one to detect short-lived intermediate states that may not get populated significantly under equilibrium conditions, but may nevertheless be of crucial importance for biological function. Moreover, the energy barriers that have to be surmounted in the reaction can be determined. In this chapter, we present a number of typical applications of steady-state and ns time-resolved UV/vis absorption spectroscopy in the study of ligand binding to the central iron in heme proteins.

  12. Spectral line shapes in linear absorption and two-dimensional spectroscopy with skewed frequency distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farag, Marwa H.; Hoenders, Bernhard J.; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Gaussian dynamics on the line shapes in linear absorption and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy is well understood as the second-order cumulant expansion provides exact spectra. Gaussian solvent dynamics can be well analyzed using slope line analysis of two-dimensional

  13. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  14. Aggregation of Methylene Blue in Frozen Aqueous Solutions Studied by Absorption Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heger, D.; Jirkovský, Jaromír; Klán, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 30 (2005), s. 6702-6709 ISSN 1089-5639 Grant - others:GA ČR GA205/05/0819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : frozen aqueous solutions * methylene blue * absorption spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2005

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of CuO.sub.2./sub. chains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drechsler, S.L.; Hu, Z.; Málek, Jiří; Rosner, H.; Neudert, R.; Knupfer, M.; Golden, M. S.; Fink, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 131, 3/4 (2003), s. 369-373 ISSN 0022-2291 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : X-ray absorption spectroscopy * exact diagonalization techniques Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.171, year: 2003

  16. Electro-Optical Multichannel Spectrometer for Transient Resonance Raman and Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina Benthin; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1979-01-01

    An optical multichannel system is described, used for time‐dependent absorption measurements in the gas phase and the liquid phase and for resonance Raman spectroscopy of short‐lived transient species in the liquid phase in pulse radiolysis. It consists of either an image converter streak unit or...

  17. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  18. Measurement of Absorption Coefficient of Paraformaldehyde and Metaldehyde with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Xia, T.; Chen, Q.; Sun, Q.; Deng, Y.; Wang, C.

    2018-03-01

    The characteristic absorption spectra of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde in the terahertz frequency region are obtained by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). In order to reduce the absorption of terahertz (THz) wave by water vapor in the air and the background noise, the measurement system was filled with dry air and the measurements were conducted at the temperature of 24°C. Meanwhile, the humidity was controlled within 10% RH. The THz frequency domain spectra of samples and their references from 0 to 2.5 THz were analyzed via Fourier transform. The refractive index and absorption coefficients of the two aldehydes were calculated by the model formulas. From 0.1 to 2.5 THz, there appear two weak absorption peaks at 1.20 and 1.66 THz in the absorption spectra of paraformaldehyde. Only one distinct absorption peak emerges at 1.83 THz for metaldehyde. There are significant differences between the terahertz absorption coefficients of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde, which can be used as "fingerprints" to identify these substances. Furthermore, the relationship between the average absorption coefficients and mass concentrations was investigated and the average absorption coefficient-mass concentration diagrams of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde were shown. For paraformaldehyde, there is a linear relationship between the average absorption coefficient and the natural logarithm of mass concentration. For metaldehyde, there exists a simpler linear relationship between the average absorption coefficient and the mass concentration. Because of the characteristics of THz absorption of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde, the THz-TDS can be applied to the qualitative and quantitative detection of the two aldehydes to reduce the unpredictable hazards due to these substances.

  19. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  20. Study of high density polyethylene under UV irradiation or mechanical stress by fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douminge, L.

    2010-05-01

    Due to their diversity and their wide range of applications, polymers have emerged in our environment. For technical applications, these materials can be exposed to aggressive environment leading to an alteration of their properties. The effects of this degradation are linked to the concept of life duration, corresponding to the time required for a property to reach a threshold below which the material becomes unusable. Monitoring the ageing of polymer materials constitute a major challenge. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique able to provide accurate information concerning this issue. In this study, emphasis was placed on the use of fluorescence spectroscopy to study the phenomena involved in either the UV radiation or mechanical stresses of a polymer. In the case of high density polyethylene, the lack of intrinsic fluorescent signal leads to the use of a dye. This dye gives a fluorescent response depending on its microenvironment. All modifications in the macromolecular chain generate a shift of the fluorescent peak. This work can be dissociated in two major parts, on one hand the influence of UV aging on the fluorescent response and in another hand the influence of mechanical stresses. In the first part, complementary analyses like FTIR or DSC are used to correlate fluorescent results with known photo degradation mechanisms. The results show the great sensibility of the technique to the microstructural rearrangement in the polymer. In the second part, the dependence between the stress and the fluorescence emission gives opportunity to evaluate internal stresses in the material during cyclic solicitations. (author)

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G: Concentration and solvent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehentbauer, Florian M.; Moretto, Claudia; Stephen, Ryan; Thevar, Thangavel; Gilchrist, John R.; Pokrajac, Dubravka; Richard, Katherine L.; Kiefer, Johannes

    2014-03-01

    Rhodamine 6G (R6G), also known as Rhodamine 590, is one of the most frequently used dyes for application in dye lasers and as a fluorescence tracer, e.g., in the area of environmental hydraulics. Knowing the spectroscopic characteristics of the optical emission is key to obtaining high conversion efficiency and measurement accuracy, respectively. In this work, solvent and concentration effects are studied. A series of eight different organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, iso-propanol, n-butanol, n-pentanol, acetone, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) are investigated at constant dye concentration. Relatively small changes of the fluorescence spectrum are observed for the different solvents; the highest fluorescence intensity is observed for methanol and lowest for DMSO. The shortest peak wavelength is found in methanol (568 nm) and the longest in DMSO (579 nm). Concentration effects in aqueous R6G solutions are studied over the full concentration range from the solubility limit to highly dilute states. Changing the dye concentration provides tunability between ∼550 nm in the dilute case and ∼620 nm at high concentration, at which point the fluorescence spectrum indicates the formation of R6G aggregates.

  3. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  4. DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) urban pollution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Vossler, T. L.

    1991-05-01

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. Over path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (03), sulfur dioxide (SO2) nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous acid (HNO2) formaldehyde (HCHO), benzene, toluene, and o-xylene were measured. Nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH3) were monitored over path 3 (143 m). The data quality and data capture depended on the compound being measured and the path over which it was measured. Data quality criteria for each compound were chosen such that the average relative standard deviation would be less than 25%. Data capture ranged from 43% for o-xylene for path 1 to 95% for ozone for path 2. Benzene, toluene, and o-xylene concentrations measured over path 2, which crossed over an interstate highway, were higher than concentrations measured over path 1, implicating emissions from vehicles on the highway as a significant source of these compounds. Federal Reference Method (FRN) instruments were located near the DOAS light receivers and measurements of 03, NO2, and NO were made concurrently with the DOAS. Correlation coefficients greater than 0.85 were obtained between the DOAS and FRM's; however, there was a difference between the mean values obtained by the two methods for 03 and NO. A gas chromatograph for measuring volatile organic compounds was operated next to the FRN's. Correlation coefficients of about 0.66 were obtained between the DOAS and GC measurements of benzene and o- xylene. However, the correlation coefficient between the DOAS and GC measurements of toluene averaged only 0.15 for the two DOAS measurement paths. The lack of correlation and other factors indicate the possibility of a localized source of toluene near the GC. In general, disagreements between the two measurement methods could be caused by atmospheric inhomogeneities or interferences in the DOAS and other methods.

  5. Limitations of fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize organic matter in engineered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korak, J.

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in engineered systems, such as drinking water, municipal wastewater and industrial water treatment. While fluorescence data collected in water treatment applications has led to the development of strong empirical relationships between fluorescence responses and process performance, the use of fluorescence to infer changes in the underlying organic matter chemistry is often oversimplified and applied out of context. Fluorescence only measures a small fraction of DOM as fluorescence quantum yields are less than 5% for many DOM sources. Relying on fluorescence as a surrogate for DOM presence, character or reactivity may not be appropriate for systems where small molecular weight, hydrophilic constituents unlikely to fluoresce are important. In addition, some methods rely on interpreting fluorescence signals at different excitation wavelengths as a surrogate for operationally-defined humic- and fulvic-acids in lieu of traditional XAD fractionation techniques, but these approaches cannot be supported by other lines of evidence considering natural abundance and fluorescence quantum yields of these fractions. These approaches also conflict with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), a statistical approach that routinely identifies fluorescence components with dual excitation behavior. Lastly, methods developed for natural systems are often applied out of context to engineered systems. Fluorescence signals characteristic of phenols or indoles are often interpreted as indicators for biological activity in natural systems due to fluorescent amino acids and peptides, but this interpretation is may not be appropriate in engineering applications where non-biological sources of phenolic functional groups may be present. This presentation explores common fluorescence interpretation approaches, discusses the limitations and provides recommendations related to engineered systems.

  6. Applying fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate peptide-induced membrane disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used to quant......There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used...... to quantify leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles, thereby providing a tool for estimating the size of peptide-induced membrane disruptions. If fluorescently labeled lipids are incorporated into the membranes of the vesicles, FCS can also be used to obtain...

  7. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  8. Application of normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of gliquidone in presence of its fluorescent alkaline degradation product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghobashy, Mohamed R; Yehia, Ali M; Helmy, Aya H; Youssef, Nadia F

    2018-01-05

    Simple, smart and sensitive normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed and validated for the determination of gliquidone in the drug substance and drug product. Normal spectrofluorimetric method of gliquidone was established in methanol at λ excitation 225nm and λ emission 400nm in concentration range 0.2-3μg/ml with LOD equal 0.028. The fluorescence quantum yield of gliquidone was calculated using quinine sulfate as a reference and found to be 0.542. Stability-indicating first and third derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were successfully utilized to overcome the overlapped spectra in normal fluorescence of gliquidone and its alkaline degradation product. Derivative synchronous methods are based on using the synchronous fluorescence of gliquidone and its degradation product in methanol at Δ λ50nm. Peak amplitude in the first derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra was measured at 309nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing without interference. The peak amplitudes in the third derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra, peak to trough were measured at 316,329nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing. The different experimental parameters affecting the normal and synchronous fluorescence intensity of gliquidone were studied and optimized. Moreover, the cited methods have been validated as per ICH guidelines. The peak amplitude-concentration plots of the derivative synchronous fluorescence were linear over the concentration range 0.05-2μg/ml for gliquidone. Limits of detection were 0.020 and 0.022 in first and third derivative synchronous spectra, respectively. The adopted methods were successfully applied to commercial tablets and the results demonstrated that the derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful stability-indicating method, suitable for routine use with a short analysis time. Statistical comparison between the

  9. Investigation of nanoparticle coating by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Koňák, Čestmír; Šubr, Vladimír; Hof, Martin; Štěpánek, Petr; Ulbrich, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 209, č. 14 (2008), s. 1447-1453 ISSN 1022-1352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100500501; GA AV ČR IAA4050403; GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : coatings * drug delivery systems * fluorescence * light scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.202, year: 2008

  10. Lipid diffusion in planar membranes investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1798, č. 7 (2010), s. 1377-1391 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0114; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : supported lipid bilayer * giant unilamellar vesicle * fluorescence recovery after photobleaching Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.647, year: 2010

  11. [Study on UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra of sixteen tetra-substituted metallophthalocyanine complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zi-yang; Huang, Jian-dong; Chen, Nai-sheng; Huang, Jin-ling

    2009-05-01

    The UV-Visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of sixteen tetra-substituted metallo-phthalocyanine complexes {R4 PcM, where R = 2-[4-(2-sulfonic ethyl) piperazin-1-] ethoxyl (SPEO--), 2-(piperidin-1-yl) ethoxyl (PEO--); substitution position at alpha-position and beta-position of phthalocyanine ring; M = Zn(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II)} were measured. The influence of different central ion, substituted group and its position, as well as different solvent on the Q-band of phthalocyanine complex in its UV-Vis absorption spectra was investigated. The influence of different central ion, substituted group and its position on the fluorescence emission spectra was discussed. Some properties of the UV-Vis absorption spectra such as the maximum absorption wavelength (lamdamax ) of Q-band and its molar extinction coefficient (epsilon), and those of the fluorescence emission spectra such as fluorescence quantum yield (phiF), fluorescence lifetime (r) and excited state energy (Es) were studied. The results showed that the lamdamax of Qband of all complexes were located at 681-718 nm, which had a distinct red shift in contrast with unsubstituted metallophthalocyanines (669-671 nm). All complexes of R4 PcM possessed a very high molar extinction coefficient up to 10(5) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1). And the UV-Vis absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of all complexes exhibited mirror shape concurrently. Two beta-substituted zinc phthalocyanine complexes with formula beta-(SPEO)4PcZn and beta-(PEO)4PcZn possessed very high molar extinction coefficient, fluorescence quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime specially. Therefore, it is hoped that these two would be developing to be new photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT)and photodynamic diagnosis (PDD).

  12. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, Stephen C; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-10-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error pixel-by-pixel normalization of tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach.

  13. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach. PMID:25360349

  14. Intracavity absorption spectroscopy of formaldehyde from 6230 to 6420 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.; Levinsky, Howard B.; Mokhov, Anatoli V.

    2017-05-01

    We apply intracavity absorption spectroscopy for measurements of the absorption spectrum of formaldehyde, CH2O, from 6230 to 6420 cm-1, of which only a small fraction (6351-6362 cm-1) has been recorded elsewhere. The measurements are performed in the cavity of a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser, with a sensitivity corresponding to the effective absorption path length of 45 m and a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm-1. The noise-equivalent detection limit of CH2O achieved with the strongest absorption line at 6252.64 cm-1 is estimated to be 5 ppm. High tolerance to broadband losses and the accessible time resolution of 50 µs make it possible to apply this detection system for time-resolved monitoring of CH2O together with other molecules in harsh combustion environments, e.g., in combustion engines.

  15. Prediction of Ba, Co and Ni for tropical soils using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes Camargo, Livia; Marques Júnior, José; Reynaldo Ferracciú Alleoni, Luís; Tadeu Pereira, Gener; De Bortoli Teixeira, Daniel; Santos Rabelo de Souza Bahia, Angélica

    2017-04-01

    Environmental impact assessments may be assisted by spatial characterization of potentially toxic elements (PTEs). Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) are rapid, non-destructive, low-cost, prediction tools for a simultaneous characterization of different soil attributes. Although low concentrations of PTEs might preclude the observation of spectral features, their contents can be predicted using spectroscopy by exploring the existing relationship between the PTEs and soil attributes with spectral features. This study aimed to evaluate, in three geomorphic surfaces of Oxisols, the capacity for predicting PTEs (Ba, Co, and Ni) and their spatial variability by means of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). For that, soil samples were collected from three geomorphic surfaces and analyzed for chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties, and then analyzed in DRS (visible + near infrared - VIS+NIR and medium infrared - MIR) and XRF equipment. PTE prediction models were calibrated using partial least squares regression (PLSR). PTE spatial distribution maps were built using the values calculated by the calibrated models that reached the best accuracy using geostatistics. PTE prediction models were satisfactorily calibrated using MIR DRS for Ba, and Co (residual prediction deviation - RPD > 3.0), Vis DRS for Ni (RPD > 2.0) and FRX for all the studied PTEs (RPD > 1.8). DRS- and XRF-predicted values allowed the characterization and the understanding of spatial variability of the studied PTEs.

  16. Determination of dissolved organic matter removal efficiency in wastewater treatment works using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstea, Elfrida M.; Bridgeman, John

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate the removal efficiency of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in several wastewater treatment works, at different processing stages. The correlation between fluorescence values and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) has been examined. Fluorescence was measured for unfiltered and filtered (0.45 and 0.20 μm) samples of crude, settled and secondary treated wastewater (activated sludge), and final effluent. Moreover, the potential of using portable fluorimeters has been explored in a laboratory scale activated sludge process. Good correlations were observed for filtered and unfiltered wastewater samples between protein-like fluorescence intensity (excitation 280 nm, emission 350 nm) and BOD (r = 0.78), COD (r = 0.90) and TOC (r = 0.79). BOD displayed a higher correlation at the 0.20 μm filtered samples compared to COD and TOC. Slightly better relation was seen between fluorescence and conventional parameters at the portable fluorimeters compared to laboratory-based instruments. The results indicated that fluorescence spectroscopy, in particular protein-like fluorescence, could be used for continuous, real-time assessment of DOM removal efficiency in wastewater treatment works.

  17. In vivo study of the human skin by the method of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2000-01-01

    The goals of this study are to perform a preliminary evaluation of the diagnostic potential of noninvasive laser-induced auto-fluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) for human skin and optimize of detection and diagnosis of hollow organs and skin. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of laser-induced fluorescence to discriminate disease from normal surrounding tissue. The most fluorescence studies have used exogenous fluorophores of this discrimination. The laser-induced auto-fluorescence which is used for diagnosis of tissues in the human body avoids administration of any drugs. In this study a technique for optical biopsy of in vivo human skin is presented. The auto-fluorescence characterization of tissue relies on different spectral properties of tissues. It was demonstrated a differentiation between normal skin and skin with vitiligo. Two main endogenous fluorophores in the human skin account for most of the cellular auto-fluorescence for excitation wavelength 337 nm reduced from of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and collagen. The auto-fluorescence spectrum of human skin depend on main internal absorbers which are blood and melanin. In this study was described the effect caused by blood and melanin content on the shape of the auto-fluorescence spectrum of human skin. Human skin fluorescence spectrum might provide dermatologists with important information and such investigations are successfully used now in skin disease diagnostics, in investigation of the environmental factor impact or for evaluation of treatment efficiency. (authors)

  18. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Klein

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS. In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS. The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 µm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K. A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer.

  19. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  20. Real-time monitoring of atom vapor concentration with laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Fengying; Gao Peng; Jiang Tao

    2012-01-01

    The technology of laser absorption spectroscopy was used for real-time monitoring of gadolinium atom vapor concentration measurement and the solid state laser pumped ring dye laser was used as optical source. The optical fiber was taken to improve the stability of laser transmission. The multi-pass absorption technology combined with reference optical signal avoided the influence of laser power fluctuation. The experiment result shows that the system based on this detection method has a standard error of 4%. It is proved that the monitoring system provides reliable data for atom vapor laser isotope separation process and the separation efficiency can be improved. (authors)

  1. Spectral Behavior of White Pigment Mixtures Using Reflectance, Ultraviolet-Fluorescence Spectroscopy, and Multispectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronti, Lucilla; Felici, Anna Candida; Ménager, Matthieu; Vieillescazes, Cathy; Piacentini, Mario

    2017-12-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy, ultraviolet (UV)-fluorescence spectroscopy, and multispectral imaging have been widely employed for pigment identification on paintings. From ancient times to the present, lead white, zinc white, and titanium white have been the most important white pigments used for paintings and they are used as pigment markers for dating a work of art. The spectral behavior of these pigments is reported in several scientific papers and websites, but those of their mixtures are quite unknown. We present a combined nondestructive approach for identifying mixtures of lead white, zinc white, and titanium white as powder and dispersed in two different binder media (egg yolk and linseed oil) by using reflectance spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, multispectral reflectance and UV-fluorescence imaging. We propose a novel approach for mapping the presence of white pigments in paintings by false color images obtained from multispectral reflectance and UV-fluorescence images. We found that the presence of lead white mixed with either zinc white or titanium white is highly detectable. Zinc white mixed with lead white or titanium white can be identified due to its UV-fluorescence emission, whereas titanium white in association with lead white or zinc white is distinguishable by its reflectance spectral features. In most cases, the UV-fluorescence analyses also permit the recognition of the binder media in which the pigments are dispersed.

  2. Speciation of actinides in aqueous solution by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Takaumi; Kato, Yoshiharu; Meinrath, G.; Yoshida, Zenko; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) as a sensitive and selective method has been applied to the speciation of actinides in aqueous solution. Studies on hydrolysis and carbonate complexation of U(VI) and on determination of hydration number of Cm(III) are reported. (author)

  3. A statistical strategy to assess cleaning level of surfaces using fluorescence spectroscopy and Wilks’ ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoica, Iuliana-Madalina; Babamoradi, Hamid; van den Berg, Frans

    2017-01-01

    •A statistical strategy combining fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate analysis and Wilks’ ratio is proposed.•The method was tested both off-line and on-line having riboflavin as a (controlled) contaminant.•Wilks’ ratio signals unusual recordings based on shifts in variance and covariance...

  4. Biological Interaction of Molybdenocene Dichloride with Bovine Serum Albumin Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Moralba; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose´ E.; Meléndez, Enrique

    2018-01-01

    Bioinorganic topics are ubiquitous in the inorganic chemistry curriculum; however, experiments to enhance understanding of related topics are scarce. In this proposed laboratory, upper undergraduate students assess the biological interaction of molybdenocene dichloride (Cp2MoCl2) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by fluorescence spectroscopy.…

  5. Review of X-ray Tomography and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    This literature review will focus on both laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray tomography of materials and highlight the inner workings of these instruments. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy will also be reviewed and applications of the tandem use of these techniques will be explored. The real world application of these techniques during the internship will also be discussed.

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a tool to characterize humic substances in soil colonized by microorganisms?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Veronika; Gryndler, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2006), s. 215-221 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/0188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : fluorescence spectroscopy * humic substances * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2006

  7. Bilayer Localization of Membrane-Active Peptides Studied in Biomimetic Vesicles by Visible and Fluorescence Spectroscopies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sheynis, T.; Sýkora, Jan; Benda, Aleš; Kolusheva, S.; Hof, Martin; Jelinek, R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 270, č. 22 (2003), s. 4478-4487 ISSN 0014-2956 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : solvent relaxation * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * lipid bilayers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.001, year: 2003

  8. The performance of 2D array detectors for light sheet based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.P.; Krieger, J.W.; Buchholz, J.; Charbon, E.; Langowski, J.; Wohland, T.

    2013-01-01

    Single plane illumination microscopy based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SPIM-FCS) is a new method for imaging FCS in 3D samples, providing diffusion coefficients, transport, flow velocities and concentrations in an imaging mode. SPIM-FCS records correlation functions over a whole plane in

  9. Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy (FSCS) for probes with highly overlapping emission spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, A.; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin; Gaus, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2014), s. 2973-2988 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence and luminiscence * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  10. Macromolecule biosynthesis assay and fluorescence spectroscopy methods to explore antimicrobial peptide mode(s) of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jana, Bimal; Baker, Kristin Renee; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    the biosynthesis rate of macromolecules (e.g., DNA, RNA, protein, and cell wall) and the cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force (PMF) energy can help to unravel the diverse modes of action of AMPs. Here, we present an overview of macromolecule biosynthesis rate measurement and fluorescence spectroscopy methods...

  11. Fluorescence kinetics of Trp-Trp dipeptide and its derivatives in water via ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Menghui; Yi, Hua; Chang, Mengfang; Cao, Xiaodan; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhongneng; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Sanjun; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of Tryptophan-Tryptophan (Trp-Trp/Trp2) dipeptide and its derivatives in water have been investigated using a picosecond resolved time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus together with a femtosecond resolved upconversion spectrophotofluorometer. The fluorescence decay profiles at multiple wavelengths were fitted by a global analysis technique. Nanosecond fluorescence kinetics of Trp2, N-tert-butyl carbonyl oxygen-N'-aldehyde group-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan (NBTrp2), l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (Trp2Me), and N-acetyl-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (NATrp2Me) exhibit multi-exponential decays with the average lifetimes of 1.99, 3.04, 0.72 and 1.22ns, respectively. Due to the intramolecular interaction between two Trp residues, the "water relaxation" lifetime was observed around 4ps, and it is noticed that Trp2 and its derivatives also exhibit a new decay with a lifetime of ∼100ps, while single-Trp fluorescence decay in dipeptides/proteins shows 20-30ps. The intramolecular interaction lifetime constants of Trp2, NBTrp2, Trp2Me and NATrp2Me were then calculated to be 3.64, 0.93, 11.52 and 2.40ns, respectively. Candidate mechanisms (including heterogeneity, solvent relaxation, quasi static self-quenching or ET/PT quenching) have been discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  13. Laboratory micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy instrumentation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Haschke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence offers the possibility for a position- sensitive and non-destructive analysis that can be used for the analysis of non-homogeneous materials and layer systems. This analytical technique has shown a dynamic development in the last 15 years and is used for the analysis of small particles, inclusions, of elemental distributions for a wide range of different applications both in research and quality control. The first experiments were performed on synchrotrons but there is a requirement for laboratory instruments which offers a fast and immediate access for analytical results. The book discuss the main components of a µ-XRF instrument and the different measurement modes, it gives an overview about the various instruments types, considers the special requirements for quantification of non-homogeneous materials and presents a wide range of application for single point and multi-point analysis as well as for distribution analysis in one, two and three dimensions.

  14. Gold nephropathy: tissue analysis by x-ray fluorescent spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viol, G.W.; Minielly, J.A.; Bistricki, T.

    1977-01-01

    Three patients developed proteinuria following gold therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical syndrome was a self-limiting proteinuria with normal renal function. By light and electron microscopic appearances the renal lesion was an epimembranous deposit form of membranous glomerulopathy. Immunofluorescent study showed granular deposits of IgG and C3 complement along glomerular basement membranes. By X-ray fluorescent spectroscopic examination, gold was seen to be present within the proximal convoluted tubular cells but was not identified in the glomerular subepithelial deposits. These findings are consistent with an immune-complex form of glomerulopathy in which gold is neither the antigen nor a hapten in the glomerular deposits, and they suggest the hypothesis that antibodies to tubular epithelial antigens induced by gold therapy may be a causative factor in the renal disease associated with gold therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

  15. A total internal reflection-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup with pulsed diode laser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Lukas; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations in a (sub-)femtoliter volume to analyze the diffusive behavior of fluorescent particles. This highly sensitive method has proven to be useful for the analysis of dynamic biological systems as well as in chemistry, physics, and material sciences. It is routinely performed with commercial fluorescence microscopes, which provide a confined observation volume by the confocal technique. The evanescent wave of total internal reflectance (TIR) is used in home-built systems to permit a surface sensitive FCS analysis. We present a combined confocal and TIR-FCS setup which uses economic low-power pulsed diode lasers for excitation. Excitation and detection are coupled to time-correlated photon counting hardware. This allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and FCS measurements in a surface-sensitive mode. Moreover, the setup supports fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy at surfaces. The excitation can be easily switched between TIR and epi-illumination to compare the surface properties with those in liquid bulk. The capabilities of the presented setup are demonstrated by measuring the diffusion coefficients of a free dye molecule, a labeled polyethylene glycol, and a fluorescent nanoparticle in confocal as well as in TIR-FCS.

  16. Interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with metal ions in micellar medium using fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujar, Varsha; Pundge, Vijaykumar; Ottoor, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Steady state and life time fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to study the interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with biologically important metal ions i.e. Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ in various micellar media (anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), nonionic TX-100 (triton X-100) and cationic CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide)). It was observed that fluorescence properties of drug remain unaltered in the absence of micellar media with increasing concentration of metal ions. However, addition of Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ and Ni 2+ caused fluorescence quenching of amiloride in the presence of anionic micelle, SDS. Binding of drug with metal ions at the charged micellar interface could be the possible reason for this pH-dependent metal-mediated fluorescence quenching. There were no remarkable changes observed due to metal ions addition when drug was present in cationic and nonionic micellar medium. The binding constant and bimolecular quenching constant were evaluated and compared for the drug–metal complexes using Stern–Volmer equation and fluorescence lifetime values. - Highlights: • Interaction of amiloride with biologically important metal ions, Fe 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ . • Monitoring the interaction in various micelle at different pH by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Micelles acts as receptor, amiloride as transducer and metal ions as analyte in the present system. • Interaction study provides pH dependent quenching and binding mechanism of drug with metal ions

  17. Assessment of the unidentified organic matter fraction in fogwater using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsaraj, K.; Birdwell, J.

    2010-07-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in fogwaters from southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to obtain a qualitative assessment of the large fraction of fogwater organic carbon (~40 - 80% by weight) that cannot be identified in terms of specific chemical compounds. The method has the principle advantage that it can be applied at natural abundance concentrations, thus eliminating the need for large sample volumes required to isolate DOM for characterization by other spectroscopic (NMR, FTIR) and chemical (elemental) analyses. It was anticipated that the fogwater organic matter fluorescence spectra would resemble those of surface and rain waters, containing peaks indicative of both humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices had values comparable to other natural waters. Biological character (intensity of tyrosine and tryptophan peaks) was found to increase with organic carbon concentration. Fogwater organic matter appears to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived material. The fluorescence results show that most of the unidentified fogwater organic carbon can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems.

  18. Pt and Ru X-ray absorption spectroscopy of PtRu anode catalysts in operating direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Chung, Eun-Hyuk; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Segre, Carlo U; Smotkin, Eugene S

    2006-05-25

    In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, ex situ X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray powder diffraction enabled detailed core analysis of phase segregated nanostructured PtRu anode catalysts in an operating direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). No change in the core structures of the phase segregated catalyst was observed as the potential traversed the current onset potential of the DMFC. The methodology was exemplified using a Johnson Matthey unsupported PtRu (1:1) anode catalyst incorporated into a DMFC membrane electrode assembly. During DMFC operation the catalyst is essentially metallic with half of the Ru incorporated into a face-centered cubic (FCC) Pt alloy lattice and the remaining half in an amorphous phase. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis suggests that the FCC lattice is not fully disordered. The EXAFS indicates that the Ru-O bond lengths were significantly shorter than those reported for Ru-O of ruthenium oxides, suggesting that the phases in which the Ru resides in the catalysts are not similar to oxides.

  19. Capturing molecular structural dynamics by 100 ps time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Tomita, Ayana; Chollet, Matthieu; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. The X-ray positional active feedback to crystals in a monochromator combined with a figure-of-merit scan of the laser beam position has been utilized as an essential tool to stabilize the spatial overlap of the X-ray and laser beams at the sample position. As a typical example, a time-resolved XAFS measurement of a photo-induced spin crossover reaction of the tris(1,10-phenanthrorine)iron(II) complex in water is presented

  20. Insights into the physics and chemistry of chalcogenides obtained from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobov, Alexander V.; Fons, Paul

    2017-12-01

    In this review, after a brief description of the underlying principles of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we describe the results that enable one to obtain fundamental new insights into the rich physics and chemistry of chalcogenides. We start with chalcogenide glasses taking the readers from the structure of amorphous selenium and confined single Se chains and carry on to photo-induced structural changes. We subsequently describe application of EXAFS to monolayers of transition-metal dichalcogenides. The review is concluded by the results that were seminal to understand the phase-transition mechanism in so-called phase-change alloys that are widely used in optical and non-volatile memory devices. We place special accent on the conclusions that were only possible to draw based on the local nature of x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  1. The application of two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on the interaction between bovine serum albumin and prulifloxacin

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Mao-Yun; Yang, Ai-Ping; Ma, Mei-Hua; Li, Xiao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and prulifloxacin was investigated by ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UV) and fluorescence spectroscopy in this paper. Two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy was applied to the analysis of fluorescence spectra. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that prulifloxacin (PL) have a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine serum albumin through static quenching procedure. Thermodynamic parameter enthalpy c...

  2. On-Line Monitoring of Fermentation Processes by Near Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Carina

    Monitoring and control of fermentation processes is important to ensure high product yield, product quality and product consistency. More knowledge on on-line analytical techniques such as near infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy is desired in the fermentation industry to increase the efficiency...... of on-line monitoring systems. The primary aim of this thesis is to elucidate and explore the dynamics in fermentation processes by spectroscopy. Though a number of successful on-line lab-scale monitoring systems have been reported, it seems that several challenges are still met, which limits the number......-time monitoring of bioprocesses and it also highlights that the applied techniques with different measurement orders deliver specific but also complementary sources of information. Furthermore, it was shown that valuable process information can be obtained both by near infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence...

  3. Feasibility of Raman spectroscopy in vitro after 5-ALA-based fluorescence diagnosis in the bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbergen, M. C. M.; van Swol, C. F. P.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; Mahadevan-Jansen, A.,; Stone, N.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) has become popular in bladder cancer detection. Several studies have however shown an increased false positive biopsies rate under PDD guidance compared to conventional cystoscopy. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that utilizes molecular specific, inelastic scattering of light photons to interrogate biological tissues, which can successfully differentiate epithelial neoplasia from normal tissue and inflammations in vitro. This investigation was performed to show the feasibility of NIR Raman spectroscopy in vitro on biopsies obtained under guidance of 5-ALA induced PPIX fluorescence imaging. Raman spectra of a PPIX solution was measured to obtain a characteristic signature for the photosensitzer without contributions from tissue constituents. Biopsies were obtained from patients with known bladder cancer instilled with 50ml, 5mg 5-ALA two hours prior to trans-urethral resection of tumor (TURT). Additional biopsies were obtained at a fluorescent and non-fluorescent area, snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C. Each biopsy was thawed before measurements (10sec integration time) with a confocal Raman system (Renishaw Gloucestershire, UK). The 830 nm excitation (300mW) source is focused on the tissue by a 20X ultra-long-working-distance objective. Differences in fluorescence background between the two groups were removed by means of a special developed fluorescence subtraction algorithm. Raman spectra from ALA biopsies showed different fluorescence background which can be effectively removed by a fluorescence subtraction algorithm. This investigation shows that the interaction of the ALA induced PPIX with Raman spectroscopy in bladder samples. Combination of these techniques in-vivo may lead to a viable method of optical biopsies in bladder cancer detection.

  4. Diagnosis of laser ablated carbon particles measured by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, T.; Murakami, K.

    1995-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using LPX as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibited several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak from 1s→2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 was stronger as the probing position was closer to the sample surface and decreased rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speeds of highly charged ions were faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions were emitted from the sample even after laser irradiation. The spatial distributions of the laser ablated carbon particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume was depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  5. High-throughput assessment of antigen conformational stability by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and its application to excipient screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasnoy, Sébastien; Le Bras, Vivien; Préat, Véronique; Lemoine, Dominique

    2012-02-01

    In high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, the use of ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (UA) is commonly limited to concentration and turbidity measurements. Our aim was to evaluate microplate-based UA and its second-derivative [(2d)UA] for measuring the conformational stability of two recombinant antigenic proteins in the presence of 44 excipients. Protein conformational stability was assessed by (2d)UA upon titration with guanidine hydrochloride. (2d)UA was compared with tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy (TF) and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), both commonly used techniques for measuring protein conformational stability. The HTS data were corrected for plate, row and column effects by applying a median polish procedure. Irrespective of the unfolding method applied, similar stabilizing excipients were identified by all analytical methods for a given antigen. The native forms of both antigens were destabilized by arginine, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and sodium docusate, and were protected by polyols. The median polish correction improved the quality of the prediction models and the screening resolution. The higher sensitivities of TF and DSF compared with (2d)UA allowed the identification of a larger number of stabilizing excipients. However, similar screening resolutions (z'-factor > 0.8) were observed for 2dUA, TF, and DSF in a HTS of excipients applied to one of the antigens. Therefore, (2d)UA deserves more attention in HTS studies focused on protein conformational stability. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy for art conservation: looking back and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Marine; Susini, Jean; Dik, Joris; Janssens, Koen

    2010-06-15

    A variety of analytical techniques augmented by the use of synchrotron radiation (SR), such as X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), are now readily available, and they differ little, conceptually, from their common laboratory counterparts. Because of numerous advantages afforded by SR-based techniques over benchtop versions, however, SR methods have become popular with archaeologists, art historians, curators, and other researchers in the field of cultural heritage (CH). Although the CH community now commonly uses both SR-XRF and SR-XRD, the use of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS) techniques remains marginal, mostly because CH specialists rarely interact with SR physicists. In this Account, we examine the basic principles and capabilities of XAS techniques in art preservation. XAS techniques offer a combination of features particularly well-suited for the chemical analysis of works of art. The methods are noninvasive, have low detection limits, afford high lateral resolution, and provide exceptional chemical sensitivity. These characteristics are highly desirable for the chemical characterization of precious, heterogeneous, and complex materials. In particular, the chemical mapping capability, with high spatial resolution that provides information about local composition and chemical states, even for trace elements, is a unique asset. The chemistry involved in both the object's history (that is, during fabrication) and future (that is, during preservation and restoration treatments) can be addressed by XAS. On the one hand, many studies seek to explain optical effects occurring in historical glasses or ceramics by probing the molecular environment of relevant chromophores. Hence, XAS can provide insight into craft skills that were mastered years, decades, or centuries ago but were lost over the course of time. On the other hand, XAS can also be used to characterize unwanted reactions, which are then considered

  7. Charge Carrier Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxides Studied by Femtosecond Transient Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    With the ability to disentangle electronic transitions that occur on different elements and local electronic structures, time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in condensed phase systems. In this dissertation, a visible-pump/XUV-probe transient absorption apparatus with femtosecond resolution was constructed to investigate the carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductors after photo-excitation. This includes timesca...

  8. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  9. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of pulsed plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Petr; Olejníček, Jiří; Čada, Martin; Kment, Š.; Hubička, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 14 (2013), s. 2428-2430 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12045; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA MŠk LD12002; GA MŠk LH12043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diode lasers * plasma diagnostics * absorption spectroscopy * time resolved Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  10. UV Absorption Spectroscopy in Water-Filled Antiresonant Hollow Core Fibers for Pharmaceutical Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mona Nissen; Brenda Doherty; Jonas Hamperl; Jens Kobelke; Karina Weber; Thomas Henkel; Markus A. Schmidt

    2018-01-01

    Due to a worldwide increased use of pharmaceuticals and, in particular, antibiotics, a growing number of these substance residues now contaminate natural water resources and drinking supplies. This triggers a considerable demand for low-cost, high-sensitivity methods for monitoring water quality. Since many biological substances exhibit strong and characteristic absorption features at wavelengths shorter than 300 nm, UV spectroscopy presents a suitable approach for the quantitative identifica...

  11. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Atmospheric Transmission Using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    reflectivity of the background. This device can be configured to detect hydrogen fluoride , hydrogen sulfide, or methane. Other related papers with the...absorption spectroscopy and in-situ gas chromatography ”. volume 3758, 109–115. SPIE, October 1999. 42. Hunsmann, S., K. Wunderle, S. Wagner, U. Rascher, U...black), 1 atm He (dashed black) and 10 atm He (short dash back), each with a buffer gas mixture including 100 Torr C2H6. Gain profiles are normalized

  12. Procedure for intercomparison study for trace elements determination in soil samples by absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez P, L.A.; Benavides M, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    In the environmental sampling analysis there is very important to establish an adequate methodologies on the laboratories for improvement the quality of the results obtained, so the establishment of a qualified laboratories network for environmental analysis. The objective of this work is to show the working plan for the analysis of eight elements on a Russian soil sample for an interlaboratory comparison with IAEA, by the Absorption spectroscopy technique using flame. (Author)

  13. Micro-beam X-ray fluorescence and absorption imaging techniques at the IAEA Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegrzynek, Dariusz; Markowicz, A.; Bamford, S.; Chinea-Cano, E.; Bogovac, M.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray tube based, micro-beam X-ray fluorescence scanning spectrometer has been equipped with two energy dispersive X-ray detectors. The two-detector configuration allows for simultaneous collection of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and transmitted X-ray beam signals with a spatial resolution in the range of 10-50 μm, depending on the X-ray focussing element in use. The XRF signal is collected with a standard, liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector. The X-ray beam transmitted through the sample is acquired with a thermoelectrically cooled, silicon drift (SD) detector. The data acquisition is carried out in a fully automatic way under control of the SPECTOR-LOCATOR software. The software controls the scanning procedure and X-ray spectra acquisition during the scan. The energy dispersive X-ray spectra collected at every 'pixel' are stored for off-line processing. For selected regions of interest (ROI's), the element maps are constructed and displayed on-line. The spectrometer has been used for mapping elemental distributions and for performing 2D- and 3D-tomograpic imaging of minute objects in X-ray absorption and in X-ray fluorescence mode. A unique feature of the described system is simultaneous utilization of the two detectors, Si(Li) and SD, which adds new options for quantitative analysis and data interpretation. Examples of elemental mapping and 3D tomographic imaging as well as the advanced features of the SPECTOR-LOCATOR measurement control and data acquisition software are presented in this work

  14. Pulmonary absorption of aerosolized fluorescent markers in the isolated rabbit lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahnstein, Kerstin; Schmehl, Thomas; Rüsch, Ute; Rieger, Monika; Seeger, Werner; Gessler, Tobias

    2008-03-03

    For the development of aerosolized controlled release formulations such as liposomes or nanoparticles, the use of suitable model drugs is necessary. This study compared the pulmonary absorption of the three structurally diverse fluorescent markers 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF), 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (MPTS) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) after nebulization in an isolated, perfused and ventilated rabbit lung. Aerosol particle size and lung deposition as well as lipophilicity of the fluorescent markers were determined. Dye concentrations were measured in the recirculating buffer and in the bronchoalveolar lavage. The MMAD of the dye aerosols ranged between 4.70 and 4.88 microm, total lung deposition was 0.40+/-0.05 ml. The 1-octanol/water partition coefficient as measure for lipophilicity was -3.45+/-0.16 for CF, -4.95+/-0.21 for MPTS and 2.69+/-0.18 for R6G. The perfusate concentration showed an increase to approximately 400 ng/ml (53.4+/-6.8% of the intrapulmonary deposited dye) for CF and approximately 230 ng/ml (29.1+/-2.0%) for MPTS, respectively; R6G concentration increased in the first 30 min to approximately 38 ng/ml followed by a gradual decrease to approximately 26 ng/ml (3.3+/-0.7%). In conclusion, these data suggest that the hydrophilic dye CF is suitable to study drug transport from aerosolized controlled release formulations across the lung barrier. In contrast, the highly water-soluble fluorescent probe MPTS demonstrates insufficient recovery and the lipophilic R6G high accumulation in lung tissue.

  15. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. ► It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. ► Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. ► By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 ± 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 ± 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 ± 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  16. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  17. Iodine flow rate measurement for COIL with the chemical iodine generator based on absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weili; Zhang, Yuelong; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Mingxiu; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    A dual-components absorption method based on absorption spectroscopy was described in the paper. It can easily eliminate the influence of the serious contamination and aerosol scattering on IFR measurement by utilizing the absorptions of iodine vapor and chlorine on two different wavelengths respectively. According to the character that there is no other gaseous product in the reaction besides iodine vapor, IFR in real time can be obtained by the connections of the pressure and the flow rate among chlorine remainder, iodine vapor, and the buffer gas. We used this method to measure IFR for the first time at the exit of a chemical iodine generator. The average of IFR is coincident with that calculated by chemical weighting mass.

  18. Novel Semi-Parametric Algorithm for Interference-Immune Tunable Absorption Spectroscopy Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Michelucci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common limits to gas sensor performance is the presence of unwanted interference fringes arising, for example, from multiple reflections between surfaces in the optical path. Additionally, since the amplitude and the frequency of these interferences depend on the distance and alignment of the optical elements, they are affected by temperature changes and mechanical disturbances, giving rise to a drift of the signal. In this work, we present a novel semi-parametric algorithm that allows the extraction of a signal, like the spectroscopic absorption line of a gas molecule, from a background containing arbitrary disturbances, without having to make any assumption on the functional form of these disturbances. The algorithm is applied first to simulated data and then to oxygen absorption measurements in the presence of strong fringes.To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the algorithm enables an unprecedented accuracy particularly if the fringes have a free spectral range and amplitude comparable to those of the signal to be detected. The described method presents the advantage of being based purely on post processing, and to be of extremely straightforward implementation if the functional form of the Fourier transform of the signal is known. Therefore, it has the potential to enable interference-immune absorption spectroscopy. Finally, its relevance goes beyond absorption spectroscopy for gas sensing, since it can be applied to any kind of spectroscopic data.

  19. Novel Semi-Parametric Algorithm for Interference-Immune Tunable Absorption Spectroscopy Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelucci, Umberto; Venturini, Francesca

    2017-10-07

    One of the most common limits to gas sensor performance is the presence of unwanted interference fringes arising, for example, from multiple reflections between surfaces in the optical path. Additionally, since the amplitude and the frequency of these interferences depend on the distance and alignment of the optical elements, they are affected by temperature changes and mechanical disturbances, giving rise to a drift of the signal. In this work, we present a novel semi-parametric algorithm that allows the extraction of a signal, like the spectroscopic absorption line of a gas molecule, from a background containing arbitrary disturbances, without having to make any assumption on the functional form of these disturbances. The algorithm is applied first to simulated data and then to oxygen absorption measurements in the presence of strong fringes.To the best of the authors' knowledge, the algorithm enables an unprecedented accuracy particularly if the fringes have a free spectral range and amplitude comparable to those of the signal to be detected. The described method presents the advantage of being based purely on post processing, and to be of extremely straightforward implementation if the functional form of the Fourier transform of the signal is known. Therefore, it has the potential to enable interference-immune absorption spectroscopy. Finally, its relevance goes beyond absorption spectroscopy for gas sensing, since it can be applied to any kind of spectroscopic data.

  20. In-situ Characterization of Molecular Processes in Liquids by Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed

    The need to visualize molecular and electronic structure in the course of a chemical reaction, a phase transformation a biological function has been the dream of scientists for decades. The development of time-resolved X-ray and electron based methods is making this true. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is ideal for the study of structural dynamics in liquids, because it can be implemented in amorphous media and it is chemically selective. Using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in laser pump/X-ray probe experiments allows the retrieval of the local geometric structure of the system under study, but also the underlying photoinduced electronic structure changes that drive the structural dynamics. We review the recent development in picosecond and femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy applied to molecular systems in solution: examples on ultrafast photoinduced processes such as intramolecular electron transfer, high-to-low spin change, bond formation and water dynamics are presented.

  1. Rapid screening test for porphyria diagnosis using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Stepp, H.; Homann, C.; Hennig, G.; Brittenham, G. M.; Vogeser, M.

    2015-07-01

    Porphyrias are rare genetic metabolic disorders, which result from deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the enzyme defect, different types of porphyrins and heme precursors accumulate for the different porphyria diseases in erythrocytes, liver, blood plasma, urine and stool. Patients with acute hepatic porphyrias can suffer from acute neuropathic attacks, which can lead to death when undiagnosed, but show only unspecific clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain. Therefore, in addition to chromatographic methods, a rapid screening test is required to allow for immediate identification and treatment of these patients. In this study, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were conducted on blood plasma and phantom material, mimicking the composition of blood plasma of porphyria patients. Hydrochloric acid was used to differentiate the occurring porphyrins (uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III) spectroscopically despite their initially overlapping excitation spectra. Plasma phantom mixtures were measured using dual wavelength excitation and the corresponding concentrations of uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III were determined. Additionally, three plasma samples of porphyria patients were examined and traces of coproporphyrin-III and uroporphyrin-III were identified. This study may therefore help to establish a rapid screening test method with spectroscopic differentiation of the occurring porphyrins, which consequently allows for the distinction of different porphyrias. This may be a valuable tool for clinical porphyria diagnosis and rapid or immediate treatment.

  2. I20; the Versatile X-ray Absorption spectroscopy beamline at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Moreno, S; Hayama, S; Amboage, M; Freeman, A; Sutter, J; Duller, G

    2009-01-01

    The Versatile Spectroscopy beamline at Diamond Light Source, I20, is currently under construction and aims to begin operation in late 2009 and early 2010. The beamline aims to cover applications from physics, chemistry and biology through materials, environmental and geological science. Three very distinctive modes of operation will be offered at the beamline: scanning X-ray Absorption spectroscopy (XAS), XAS in dispersive mode, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). To achieve this, the beamline has been designed around two independent experimental end-stations operating from a pair of canted wigglers located in a 5m diamond straight section. One branch of the beamline will deliver monochromatic x-ray radiation of high spectral purity to one of the experimental hutches, whilst the other branch will constitute an energy dispersive spectrometer. The novel design of the beamline allows both branches to operate simultaneously.

  3. Classification of Aroma Styles and Geographic Origins of Chinese Liquors Using Chemometrics Based on Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Huo, D.-Q.; Qin, H.; Shen, C.-H.; Yang, P.; Hou, C.-J.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the feasibility of fluorescence spectroscopy as a reliable method for discrimination of Chinese liquor according to different aroma styles and geographic origins. The 84 Chinese liquors were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy and chemometrics. The results showed that Chinese liquors exhibit characteristic fluorescence spectra recorded at special excitation wavelengths that may be considered as fingerprints. Both principal component analysis (PCA) and stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) were carried out on the emission spectra (330-435 nm) recorded at excitation wavelength 300 nm to classify different aroma styles of Chinese liquors. The first two principal components explained 98.87% of the total variance, and the SLDA classified correctly 100%. Both hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were carried out on the emission spectra (325-420 nm) recorded at excitation wavelength 300 nm to identify different geographic origins of Chinese liquors. HCA accurately identified all the samples and the first three PCA explained 98.25% of the total variance. This study indicates that fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics offers a promising approach for identifying Chinese liquors according to different flavor types and geographic origins.

  4. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, William WL; Thong, Patricia SP; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Soo, Khee Chee; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2009-01-01

    Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer

  5. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy at the Mn K-edge in highly homogeneous GaMnN diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancho-Juan, O.; Cantarero, A.; Garro, N.; Cros, A. [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, PO Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Martinez-Criado, G.; Salome, M.; Susini, J. [ESRF, Polygone Scientifique Louis Neel, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Olguin, D. [Dept. de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, 07300 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Dhar, S.; Ploog, K. [Paul Drude Institute, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    We have studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy the local environment of Mn in highly homogeneous Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N (0.06fluorescence mode around the Ga and Mn K-edges. In this report, we focus our attention to the X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) results. The comparison of the XANES spectra corresponding to the Ga and Mn edges indicates that Mn is substitutional to Ga in all samples studied. The XANES spectra measured at the Mn absorption edge shows in the near-edge region a double peak and a shoulder below the absorption edge and the main absorption peak after the edge, separated around 15 eV above the pre-edge structure. We have compared the position of the edge with that of MnO (Mn{sup 2+}) and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Mn{sup 3+}). All samples studied present the same Mn oxidation state, 2{sup +}. In order to interprete the near-edge structure, we have performed ab initio calculations with a 2 x 2 x 1supercell ({proportional_to}6% Mn) using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method as implemented in the Wien2k code. The calculations show the appearance of Mn anti-bonding t{sub 2g} bands, which are responsible for the pre-edge absorption. The shoulder and main absorption peaks are due to transitions from the valence band 1s-states of Mn to the p-contributions of the conduction bands. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Dips and peaks in fluorescence yield X-ray absorption are due to state-dependent decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2012-01-01

    In a 2010 paper Aziz, Chergui and colleagues observe fluorescence yield (FY) detected X-ray absorption spectra that are concentration-dependent and show both dips and peaks. In this comment I will show that all observed spectral features are a consequence of the relative ratio of background and edge

  7. Applicability of Fluorescence and Absorbance Spectroscopy to Estimate Organic Pollution in Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Heloise Garcia; Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo; de Azevedo, Júlio Cesar Rodrigues; do Amaral Porto, Monica Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the applicability of fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy for estimating organic pollution in polluted rivers. The relationship between absorbance, fluorescence intensity, dissolved organic carbon, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and other water quality parameters were used to characterize and identify the origin and the spatial variability of the organic pollution in a highly polluted watershed. Analyses were performed for the Iguassu River, located in southern Brazil, with area about 2,700 km 2 and ∼3 million inhabitants. Samples were collect at six monitoring sites covering 107 km of the main river. BOD, COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentration indicates a high input of sewage to the river. Specific absorbance at 254 and 285 nm (SUVA 254 and A 285 /COD) did not show significant variation between sites monitored, indicating the presence of both dissolved compounds found in domestic effluents and humic and fulvic compounds derived from allochthonous organic matter. Correlations between BOD and tryptophan-like fluorescence peak (peak T 2 , r =0.7560, and peak T 1 , r =0.6949) and tyrosine-like fluorescence peak (peak B, r =0.7321) indicated the presence of labile organic matter and thus confirmed the presence of sewage in the river. Results showed that fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy provide useful information on pollution in rivers from critical watersheds and together are a robust method that is simpler and more rapid than traditional methods employed by regulatory agencies.

  8. Comparison of fluorescence rejection methods of baseline correction and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhijian; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used in biochemical tests, explosive detection, food additive and environmental pollutants. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to the applications of portable Raman spectrometer. Currently, baseline correction and shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) methods are the most prevailing fluorescence suppressing methods. In this paper, we compared the performances of baseline correction and SERDS methods, experimentally and simulatively. Through the comparison, it demonstrates that the baseline correction can get acceptable fluorescence-removed Raman spectrum if the original Raman signal has good signal-to-noise ratio, but it cannot recover the small Raman signals out of large noise background. By using SERDS method, the Raman signals, even very weak compared to fluorescence intensity and noise level, can be clearly extracted, and the fluorescence background can be completely rejected. The Raman spectrum recovered by SERDS has good signal to noise ratio. It's proved that baseline correction is more suitable for large bench-top Raman system with better quality or signal-to-noise ratio, while the SERDS method is more suitable for noisy devices, especially the portable Raman spectrometers.

  9. Dataset of the absorption, emission and excitation spectra and fluorescence intensity graphs of fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Brigitte; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2017-02-01

    This article describes data related to a research article entitled "Fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA" (B. Bruijns, R. Tiggelaar, J. Gardeniers, 2016) [1]. Six cyanine dsDNA dyes - EvaGreen, SYBR Green, PicoGreen, AccuClear, AccuBlue NextGen and YOYO-1 - are investigated and in this article the absorption spectra, as well as excitation and emission spectra, for all six researched cyanine dyes are given, all recorded under exactly identical experimental conditions. The intensity graphs, with the relative fluorescence in the presence of low amounts of dsDNA, are also provided.

  10. Rapid detection of authenticity and adulteration of walnut oil by FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingning; Wang, Haixia; Zhao, Qiaojiao; Ouyang, Jie; Wu, Yanwen

    2015-08-15

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) and partial least square (PLS) were used to detect the authenticity of walnut oil and adulteration amount of soybean oil in walnut oil. A SIMCA model of FTIR spectra could differentiate walnut oil and other oils into separate categories; the classification limit of soybean oil in walnut oil was 10%. Fluorescence spectroscopy could differentiate oil composition by the peak position and intensity of emission spectrum without multivariate analysis. The classification limit of soybean oil adulterated in walnut oil by fluorescence spectroscopy was below 5%. The deviation of the prediction model for fluorescence spectra was lower than that for FTIR spectra. Fluorescence spectroscopy was more applicable than FTIR in the adulteration detection of walnut oil, both from the determination limit and prediction deviation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new screening method for flunitrazepam in vodka and tequila by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leesakul, Nararak; Pongampai, Sirintip; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Sudkeaw, Pravit; Tantirungrotechai, Yuthana; Buranachai, Chittanon

    2013-01-01

    A new screening method for flunitrazepam in colourless alcoholic beverages based on a spectroscopic technique is proposed. Absorption and steady-state fluorescence of flunitrazepam and its protonated form with various acids were investigated. The redshift of the wavelength of maximum absorption was distinctively observed in protonated flunitrazepam. An emissive fluorescence at 472 nm was detected in colourless spirits (vodka and tequila) at room temperature. 2-M perchloric acid was the most appropriated proton source. By using electron ionization mass spectrometry and time-dependent density functional theory calculations, the possible structure of protonated flunitrazepam was identified to be 2-nitro-N-methylacridone, an acridone derivative as opposed to 2-methylamino-5-nitro-2'-fluorobenzophenone, a benzophenone derivative. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Assessing the blinking state of fluorescent quantum dots in free solution by combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with ensemble spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chaoqing; Liu, Heng; Ren, Jicun

    2014-11-04

    The current method for investigating the blinking behavior is to immobilize quantum dots (QDs) in the matrix and then apply a fluorescent technique to monitor the fluorescent trajectories of individual QDs. So far, no method can be used to directly assess the blinking state of ensemble QDs in free solution. In this study, a new method was described to characterize the blinking state of the QDs in free solution by combining single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with ensemble spectroscopic methods. Its principle is based on the observation that the apparent concentration of bright QDs obtained by FCS is less than its actual concentration measured by ensemble spectroscopic method due to the QDs blinking. We proposed a blinking index (Kblink) for characterizing the blinking state of QDs, and Kblink is defined as the ratio of the actual concentration (Cb,actual) measured by the ensemble spectroscopic method to the apparent concentration (Cb,app) of QDs obtained by FCS. The effects of certain factors such as laser intensity, growth process, and ligands on blinking of QDs were investigated. The Kblink data of QDs obtained were successfully used to characterize the blinking state of QDs and explain certain experimental results.

  13. Dynamic Optoelectronic Properties in Perovskite Oxide Thin Films Measured with Ultrafast Transient Absorption & Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Sergey Y.

    Ultrafast transient absorption and reflectance spectroscopy are foundational techniques for studying photoexcited carrier recombination mechanisms, lifetimes, and charge transfer rates. Because quantifying photoexcited carrier dynamics is central to the intelligent design and improvement of many solid state devices, these transient optical techniques have been applied to a wide range of semiconductors. However, despite their promise, interpretation of transient absorption and reflectance data is not always straightforward and often relies on assumptions of physical processes, especially with respect to the influence of heating. Studying the material space of perovskite oxides, the careful collection, interpretation, and analysis of ultrafast data is presented here as a guide for future research into novel semiconductors. Perovskite oxides are a class of transition metal oxides with the chemical structure ABO3. Although traditionally studied for their diverse physical, electronic, and magnetic properties, perovskite oxides have gained recent research attention as novel candidates for light harvesting applications. Indeed, strong tunable absorption, unique interfacial properties, and vast chemical flexibility make perovskite oxides a promising photoactive material system. However, there is limited research characterizing dynamic optoelectronic properties, such as recombination lifetimes, which are critical to know in the design of any light-harvesting device. In this thesis, ultrafast transient absorption and reflectance spectroscopy was used to understand these dynamic optoelectronic properties in highquality, thin (gap of LFO at 2.4 eV and at the higher energy absorption edge at 3.5 eV. Using a combination of temperature-dependent, variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and time-resolved ultrafast optical spectroscopy on a type I heterostructure, we clarify thermal and electronic contributions to spectral transients in LaFeO3. Upon comparison to thermally

  14. Study of influencing factors to chromophoric dissolved organic matter absorption properties from fluorescence features in Taihu lake in autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Chun Huang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the components of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM, confirm the influence of components to the absorption coefficient of CDOM (aCDOM, and estimate aCDOM from fluorescence spectra, fluorescence and optical measurements of CDOM were carried out in November 2008. The results indicate that, the primary component of CDOM is humic-like. The secondary component is tryptophan-like, which is the product of phytoplankton and aquatic debris rather than the wastewater treatment drainaged from city. In this study, six fluorophores with multiple excitation-emission matrices (EEMs peaks (A, B, C, N, M, T were identified according to the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. The average contribution of each component to the CDOM is 19.93, 18.82, 16.88, 16.39, 12.26, and 15.72%, respectively. Red Shifted phenomenon will happen with the increase of fluorescence intensity for ultraviolet and terrestrially humic-like. Conversely, marine humic-like will appear Reverse Red Shifted with the increase of fluorescence intensity. The primary contributor to the shoulder value of CDOM’s absorption coefficient at 275 nm is phytoplankton productivity, followed by marine humic-like. The main contributors to the shoulder shape are UV humic-like and phytoplankton productivity, followed by marine humic-like and tryptophan-like. A strong correlation between CDOM absorption and fluorescence intensity at emission wavelength of 424 nm and excitation wavelength ranging from 280 to 360 nm was found. The absorption coefficient can be retrieved successfully from the same excitation wavelength’s fluorescence intensity by an exponential model.

  15. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  16. Parameter study of self-absorption effects in Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis of arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirer, F.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.; Zoeger, N.; Falkenberg, G.

    2008-01-01

    Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis in combination with X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis is a powerful method to perform chemical speciation studies at trace element levels. However, when measuring samples with higher concentrations and in particular standards, damping of the oscillations is observed. In this study the influence of self-absorption effects on TXRF-XANES measurements was investigated by comparing measurements with theoretical calculations. As(V) standard solutions were prepared at various concentrations and dried on flat substrates. The measurements showed a correlation between the damping of the oscillations and the As mass deposited. A Monte-Carlo simulation was developed using data of the samples shapes obtained from confocal white light microscopy. The results showed good agreement with the measurements; they confirmed that the key parameters are the density of the investigated atom in the dried residues and the shape of the residue, parameters that combined define the total mass crossed by a certain portion of the incident beam. The study presents a simple approach for an a priori evaluation of the self-absorption in TXRF X-ray absorption studies. The consequences for Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and XANES measurements under grazing incidence conditions are discussed, leading to the conclusion that the damping of the oscillations seems to make EXAFS of concentrated samples non feasible. For XANES 'fingerprint' analysis samples should be prepared with a deposited mass and sample shape leading to an acceptable absorption for the actual investigation

  17. Photoacoustic-fluorescence in vitro flow cytometry for quantification of absorption, scattering and fluorescence properties of the cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosekin, D. A.; Sarimollaoglu, M.; Foster, S.; Galanzha, E. I.; Zharov, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence flow cytometry is a well-established analytical tool that provides quantification of multiple biological parameters of cells at molecular levels, including their functional states, morphology, composition, proliferation, and protein expression. However, only the fluorescence and scattering parameters of the cells or labels are available for detection. Cell pigmentation, presence of non-fluorescent dyes or nanoparticles cannot be reliably quantified. Herewith, we present a novel photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry design for simple integration of absorbance measurements into schematics of conventional in vitro flow cytometers. The integrated system allow simultaneous measurements of light absorbance, scattering and of multicolor fluorescence from single cells in the flow at rates up to 2 m/s. We compared various combinations of excitation laser sources for multicolor detection, including simultaneous excitation of PA and fluorescence using a single 500 kHz pulsed nanosecond laser. Multichannel detection scheme allows simultaneous detection of up to 8 labels, including 4 fluorescent tags and 4 PA colors. In vitro PA-fluorescence flow cytometer was used for studies of nanoparticles uptake and for the analysis of cell line pigmentation, including genetically encoded melanin expression in breast cancer cell line. We demonstrate that this system can be used for direct nanotoxicity studies with simultaneous quantification of nanoparticles content and assessment of cell viability using a conventional fluorescent apoptosis assays.

  18. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy for degradation monitoring of machinery lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovski, Oleg; Suresh, Pooja; Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Green, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Lubrication oil is a vital component of heavy rotating machinery defining the machine's health, operational safety and effectiveness. Recently, the focus has been on developing sensors that provide real-time/online monitoring of oil condition/lubricity. Industrial practices and standards for assessing oil condition involve various analytical methods. Most these techniques are unsuitable for online applications. The paper presents the results of studying degradation of antioxidant additives in machinery lubricants using Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) Spectroscopy and Machine Learning techniques. EEM Spectroscopy is capable of rapid and even standoff sensing; it is potentially applicable to real-time online monitoring.

  19. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, Earl E.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude and spatial dependence of neutral density in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is a key physical parameter, particularly in the plasma edge. Modeling codes require precise measurements of the neutral density to calculate charge-exchange power losses and drag forces on rotating plasmas. However, direct measurements of the neutral density are problematic. In this work, we proposed to construct a laser-based diagnostic capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of the neutral density in the edge of plasma in the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic concept is based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). By injecting two beams of 205 nm light (co or counter propagating), ground state hydrogen (or deuterium or tritium) can be excited from the n = 1 level to the n = 3 level at the location where the two beams intersect. Individually, the beams experience no absorption, and therefore have no difficulty penetrating even dense plasmas. After excitation, a fraction of the hydrogen atoms decay from the n = 3 level to the n = 2 level and emit photons at 656 nm (the H α line). Calculations based on the results of previous TALIF experiments in magnetic fusion devices indicated that a laser pulse energy of approximately 3 mJ delivered in 5 ns would provide sufficient signal-to-noise for detection of the fluorescence. In collaboration with the DIII-D engineering staff and experts in plasma edge diagnostics for DIII-D from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), WVU researchers designed a TALIF system capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of neutral deuterium densities in the DIII-D edge plasma. The laser systems were specified, purchased, and assembled at WVU. The TALIF system was tested on a low-power hydrogen discharge at WVU and the plan was to move the instrument to DIII-D for installation in collaboration with ORNL researchers. After budget cuts at DIII-D, the DIII-D facility declined to support installation on their

  20. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The magnitude and spatial dependence of neutral density in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is a key physical parameter, particularly in the plasma edge. Modeling codes require precise measurements of the neutral density to calculate charge-exchange power losses and drag forces on rotating plasmas. However, direct measurements of the neutral density are problematic. In this work, we proposed to construct a laser-based diagnostic capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of the neutral density in the edge of plasma in the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic concept is based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). By injecting two beams of 205 nm light (co or counter propagating), ground state hydrogen (or deuterium or tritium) can be excited from the n = 1 level to the n = 3 level at the location where the two beams intersect. Individually, the beams experience no absorption, and therefore have no difficulty penetrating even dense plasmas. After excitation, a fraction of the hydrogen atoms decay from the n = 3 level to the n = 2 level and emit photons at 656 nm (the Hα line). Calculations based on the results of previous TALIF experiments in magnetic fusion devices indicated that a laser pulse energy of approximately 3 mJ delivered in 5 ns would provide sufficient signal-to-noise for detection of the fluorescence. In collaboration with the DIII-D engineering staff and experts in plasma edge diagnostics for DIII-D from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), WVU researchers designed a TALIF system capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of neutral deuterium densities in the DIII-D edge plasma. The laser systems were specified, purchased, and assembled at WVU. The TALIF system was tested on a low-power hydrogen discharge at WVU and the plan was to move the instrument to DIII-D for installation in collaboration with ORNL researchers. After budget cuts at DIII-D, the DIII-D facility declined to support

  1. [Quantitative determination of melamine by fluorescence spectroscopy and radial basis function neural networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-qing; Wei, Bai-lin; Wang, Jun; Wu, Ya-min; Gao, Shu-mei; Kong, Yan; Zhu, Tuo

    2010-01-01

    Based on the experimental study, it was found that melamine solution excited by UV light can generate a strong fluorescence. The fluorescence spectrum is within a range from 310 to 600 nm, the peak wavelength of the fluorescence is about 420 nm, and the relationship between fluorescence intensity and melamine solution concentration is nonlinear. A method for the determination of melamine solution concentration was presented, which was based on fluorescence spectroscopy and radial basis function neural networks. For each sample, 30 emission wavelength values were selected, the fluorescence intensity corresponding to the selected wavelength was used as the network data, and a radial basis function neural network was trained and constructed. The trained radial basis function neural network was employed to predict the melamine solution concentration in five kinds of samples, and the relative errors of the results were 0.93%, 0.09%, 0.31%, 1.55% and 4.61%, respectively. The results show that this method can determine the content of melamine quickly and accurately. The whole research outcomes will provide a new method for determining the content of melamine and food safety supervision.

  2. High-performance dispersive Raman and absorption spectroscopy as tools for drug identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Andrey, Sam; Nogas, Paul; Roy, Andrew; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2009-02-01

    Due to increasing availability of pharmaceuticals from many sources, a need is growing to quickly and efficiently analyze substances in terms of the consistency and accuracy of their chemical composition. Differences in chemical composition occur at very low concentrations, so that highly sensitive analytical methods become crucial. Recent progress in dispersive spectroscopy with the use of 2-dimensional detector arrays, permits for signal integration along a long (up to 12 mm long) entrance slit of a spectrometer, thereby increasing signal to noise ratio and improving the ability to detect small concentration changes. This is achieved with a non-scanning, non-destructive system. Two different methods using P&P Optica high performance spectrometers were used. High performance optical dispersion Raman and high performance optical absorption spectroscopy were employed to differentiate various acetaminophen-containing drugs, such as Tylenol and other generic brands, which differ in their ingredients. A 785 nm excitation wavelength was used in Raman measurements and strong Raman signals were observed in the spectral range 300-1800 cm-1. Measurements with the absorption spectrometer were performed in the wavelength range 620-1020 nm. Both Raman and absorption techniques used transmission light spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings and provided sufficient spectral differences, often structural, allowing for drug differentiation.

  3. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Carrier Formation Dynamics in Prototypical Organic Solar Cells as Investigated by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Moritomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subpicosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to clarify the exciton and carrier dynamics within the organic solar cells (OSCs. In this review article, we introduce a method to determine the absolute numbers of the excitons and carriers against delay time (t only from the photoinduced absorption (PIA and electrochemically induced absorption (EIA spectra. Application of this method to rr-P3HT-, PTB7-, and SMDPPEH-based OSCs revealed common aspects of the carrier formation dynamics. First, the temporal evolution of the numbers of the excitons and carriers indicates that the late decay component of exciton does not contribute to the carrier formation process. This is probably because the late component has not enough excess energy to separate into the electron and hole across the donor/acceptor (D/A interface. Secondly, the spectroscopy revealed that the exciton-to-carrier conversion process is insensitive to temperature. This observation, together with the fast carrier formation time in OSCs, is consistent with the hot exciton picture.

  5. Surface arsenic speciation of a drinking-water treatment residual using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2007-07-15

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing >90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg(-1)) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg(-1)) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  6. High speed engine gas thermometry by Fourier-domain mode-locked laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranendonk, Laura A; An, Xinliang; Caswell, Andrew W; Herold, Randy E; Sanders, Scott T; Huber, Robert; Fujimoto, James G; Okura, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yasuhiro

    2007-11-12

    We present a novel method for low noise, high-speed, real-time spectroscopy to monitor molecular absorption spectra. The system is based on a rapidly swept, narrowband CW Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser source for spectral encoding in time and an optically time-multiplexed split-pulse data acquisition system for improved noise performance and sensitivity. An acquisition speed of ~100 kHz, a spectral resolution better than 0.1 nm over a wavelength range of ~1335-1373 nm and a relative noise level of ~5 mOD (~1% minimum detectable base-e absorbance) are achieved. The system is applied for crank-angle-resolved gas thermometry by H(2)O absorption spectroscopy in an engine motoring at 600 and 900 rpm with a precision of ~1%. Influences of various noise sources such as laser phase and intensity noise, trigger and synchronization jitter in the electronic detection system, and the accuracy of available H(2)O absorption databases are discussed.

  7. Molecular environment of iodine in naturally iodinated humic substances: Insight from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Michel L.; Mercier-Bion, Florence; Barre, Nicole; Reiller, Pascal; Moulin, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    The molecular environment of iodine in reference inorganic and organic compounds, and in dry humic and fulvic acids (HAs and FAs) extracted from subsurface and deep aquifers was probed by iodine L-3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of iodine spectra from HAs and FAs resembled those of organic references and displayed structural features consistent with iodine forming covalent bonds with organic molecules. Simulation of XANES spectra by linear combination of reference spectra suggested the predominance of iodine forming covalent bonds to aromatic rings (aromatic-bound iodine). Comparison of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of reference and samples further showed that iodine was surrounded by carbon shells at distances comparable to those for references containing aromatic-bound iodine. Quantitative analysis of EXAFS spectra indicated that iodine was bound to about one carbon at a distance d(I-C) of 2.01(4)-2.04(9) angstrom, which was comparable to the distances observed for aromatic-bound iodine in references (1.99(1)-2.07(6) angstrom), and significantly shorter than that observed for aliphatic-bound iodine (2.15(2)-2.16(2) angstrom). These results are in agreement with previous conclusions from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and from electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. These results collectively suggest that the aromatic-bound iodine is stable in the various aquifers of this study. (authors)

  8. Structural and functional probing of the biogenic amine transporters by fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren G F; Adkins, Erika M; Carroll, F Ivy

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy techniques have proven extremely powerful for probing the molecular structure and function of membrane proteins. In this review, it will be described how we have applied a series of these techniques to the biogenic amine transporters, which are responsible for the cleara......Fluorescence spectroscopy techniques have proven extremely powerful for probing the molecular structure and function of membrane proteins. In this review, it will be described how we have applied a series of these techniques to the biogenic amine transporters, which are responsible...... for the clearance of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In our studies, we have focused on the serotonin transporter (SERT) for which we have established a purification procedure upon expression of the transporter in Sf-9 insect cells. Importantly, the purified transporter displays...

  9. Underresolved absorption spectroscopy of OH radicals in flames using broadband UV LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Logan; Gamba, Mirko

    2018-04-01

    A broadband absorption spectroscopy diagnostic based on underresolution of the spectral absorption lines is evaluated for the inference of species mole fraction and temperature in combustion systems from spectral fitting. The approach uses spectrally broadband UV light emitting diodes and leverages low resolution, small form factor spectrometers. Through this combination, the method can be used to develop high precision measurement sensors. The challenges of underresolved spectroscopy are explored and addressed using spectral derivative fitting, which is found to generate measurements with high precision and accuracy. The diagnostic is demonstrated with experimental measurements of gas temperature and OH mole fraction in atmospheric air/methane premixed laminar flat flames. Measurements exhibit high precision, good agreement with 1-D flame simulations, and high repeatability. A newly developed model of uncertainty in underresolved spectroscopy is applied to estimate two-dimensional confidence regions for the measurements. The results of the uncertainty analysis indicate that the errors in the outputs of the spectral fitting procedure are correlated. The implications of the correlation between uncertainties for measurement interpretation are discussed.

  10. The role of fluorescent pseudo monad's siderophore on Zn absorption in wheat by using 65Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasouli Sadaghiani, M. H.; Malakouti, M. J.; Khavazi, K.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the potentials of some indigenous fluorescent Pseudomonads for siderophore production and their effects on 65Z n absorption in 2005. For this purpose, 201 strains of Pseudomonas putida, P. fluorescence, and P. aeruginosa were isolated from different locations representing rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The potentials of these strains for siderophore production were evaluated by chrome azo rel-S assay (CAS blue agar) through color change. High siderophore producing super-strains were selected for the extraction of siderophores. These isolates were grown in standard succinate medium for 72 hours at 28 d eg C . The bacterial cells were removed by centrifugation (10000 g for 20 minutes) and the supernatant was filtered through filter membrane (0.22 μ) and used as the source of siderophore source. The evaluations of Zn uptake and translocation were carried out with the complexes of bacterial siderophores and 65Z n compared with the standard siderophore Desferrioxamine in a randomized complete block design with three replications. This experiment was conducted on two wheat genotypes different in Zn-efficiency under hydroponic condition. The results revealed that among the three most effective siderophores producing strains considered, the P. putida produced a siderophore complex that showed efficiencies of 83% compared with the standard siderophore (DFOB) in the uptake of Zn and was statistically in the same group as the control. The effect of bacterial siderophores in the uptake of labeled 65Z n by wheat was significant, indicating that the chemical structures of the siderophores from different strains were different. The effects of wheat variety on 65Z n translocation to shoots was also significant, where the efficient Tabasi variety contained 46% more Zn in shoots than the inefficient Yavarous variety. It was concluded that the siderophore complex from P. putida was the most effective in translocation

  11. Quantum dots in bioanalysis: a review of applications across various platforms for fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W Russ; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are brightly luminescent nanoparticles that have found numerous applications in bioanalysis and bioimaging. In this review, we highlight recent developments in these areas in the context of specific methods for fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. Following a primer on the structure, properties, and biofunctionalization of QDs, we describe select examples of how QDs have been used in combination with steady-state or time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to develop a variety of assays, bioprobes, and biosensors that function via changes in QD photoluminescence intensity, polarization, or lifetime. Some special attention is paid to the use of Förster resonance energy transfer-type methods in bioanalysis, including those based on bioluminescence and chemiluminescence. Direct chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, and charge transfer quenching are similarly discussed. We further describe the combination of QDs and flow cytometry, including traditional cellular analyses and spectrally encoded barcode-based assay technologies, before turning our attention to enhanced fluorescence techniques based on photonic crystals or plasmon coupling. Finally, we survey the use of QDs across different platforms for biological fluorescence imaging, including epifluorescence, confocal, and two-photon excitation microscopy; single particle tracking and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy; super-resolution imaging; near-field scanning optical microscopy; and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. In each of the above-mentioned platforms, QDs provide the brightness needed for highly sensitive detection, the photostability needed for tracking dynamic processes, or the multiplexing capacity needed to elucidate complex systems. There is a clear synergy between advances in QD materials and spectroscopy and imaging techniques, as both must be applied in concert to achieve their full potential.

  12. Lipopolyamine-mediated single nanoparticle formation of calf thymus DNA analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adjimatera, N.; Kral, Teresa; Hof, Martin; Blagbrough, I. S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2006), s. 1564-1573 ISSN 0724-8741 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400621; GA ČR GA203/05/2308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : N1-cholesteryl spermine carbamate * N4, N9-dioleoyl spermine * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * lipopolyamines Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.848, year: 2006

  13. Oxidation Changes Physical Properties of Phospholipid Bilayers: Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Molecular Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beranová, Lenka; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 9 (2010), s. 6140-6144 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : oxidized phospholipides * membranes * fluorescence spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.269, year: 2010

  14. Recent Developments in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Diffusion Measurements in Planar Lipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2010), s. 427-457 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0114; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : lateral diffusion * fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.279, year: 2010

  15. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy combined with lifetime tuning: New perspectives in supported phospholipid bilayer research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, Aleš; Fagulová, Veronika; Deyneka, Alexander; Enderlain, J.; Hof, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 23 (2006), s. 9580-9585 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2308; GA MŠk LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence * FLCS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2006

  16. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, S.; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2016), s. 290-299 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476; GA ČR(CZ) GPP501/12/P951 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : raster image correlation spectroscopy * fluorescence recovery after photobleaching * auxin influx Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  17. Transition probability of the 5971-A line in neutral uranium from collision-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, J.M.; Mongeau, B.; Demers, Y.; Pianarosa, P.

    1981-01-01

    From collision-induced fluorescence spectroscopy measurements, we have determined the transition probability Aof the 5971-A transition in neutral uranium. Our value, A 5971 = (5.9 +- 1.8) x 10 5 sec -1 , is, within experimental error, in good agreement with the previous determination of Corliss, A 5971 = (7.3 +- 3.0) x 10 5 sec -1 [J. Res. Nat. Bur. Stand. Sect. A 80,1 (1976)

  18. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the characterization of membranes : A short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS is a highly sensitive fluorescence microscopy technique that can be used to probe a wide range of biophysical processes including diffusion, Ligand-receptor binding and molecular aggregation on artificial and cell membranes. FCS is able to measure very small volumes at nanomolar concentrations. In this work, we review the different types of diffusion on cell membranes,describe the theory of FCS and illustrate several of its applications for the characterization of membranes and membrane associated proteins. For comparison with other techniques we discuss the differences of FCS and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP,a widely used technique for diffusion measurements on membranes, in detail

  19. Quantitative structural modeling on the wavelength interval (Δλ) in synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samari, Fayezeh; Yousefinejad, Saeed

    2017-11-01

    Emission fluorescence spectroscopy has an extremely restricted scope of application to analyze of complex mixtures since its selectivity is reduced by the extensive spectral overlap. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) is a technique enables us to analyze complex mixtures with overlapped emission and/or excitation spectra. The difference of excitation and emission wavelength of compounds (interval wavelength or Δλ) is an important characteristic in SFS. Thus a multi-parameter model was constructed to predict Δλ in 63 fluorescent compounds and the regression coefficient in training set, cross validation and test set were 0.88, 0.85 and 0.91 respectively. Furthermore, the applicability and validity of model were evaluated using different statistical methods such as y-scrambling and applicability domain. It was concluded that increasing average valence connectivity, number of Al2-NH functional group and Geary autocorrelation (lag 4) with electronegative weights can lead to increasing Δλ in the fluorescent compounds. The current study obtained an insight into the structural properties of compounds effective on their Δλ as an important parameter in SFS.

  20. Dual-wavelength external cavity laser device for fluorescence suppression in Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuting; Cai, Zhijian; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in the detection of drugs, pesticides, explosives, food additives and environmental pollutants, for its characteristics of fast measurement, easy sample preparation, and molecular structure analyzing capability. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to these applications, with strong fluorescence background covering up the weak Raman signals. Recently shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) not only can completely remove the fluorescence background, but also can be easily integrated into portable Raman spectrometers. Usually, SERDS uses two lasers with small wavelength gap to excite the sample, then acquires two spectra, and subtracts one to the other to get the difference spectrum, where the fluorescence background will be rejected. So, one key aspects of successfully applying SERDS method is to obtain a dual-wavelength laser source. In this paper, a dual-wavelength laser device design based on the principles of external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is proposed, which is low-cost and compact. In addition, it has good mechanical stability because of no moving parts. These features make it an ideal laser source for SERDS technique. The experiment results showed that the device can emit narrow-spectral-width lasers of two wavelengths, with the gap smaller than 2 nanometers. The laser power corresponding to each wavelength can be up to 100mW.

  1. Interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with metal ions in micellar medium using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gujar, Varsha; Pundge, Vijaykumar; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Steady state and life time fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to study the interaction of antihypertensive drug amiloride with biologically important metal ions i.e. Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} in various micellar media (anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), nonionic TX-100 (triton X-100) and cationic CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide)). It was observed that fluorescence properties of drug remain unaltered in the absence of micellar media with increasing concentration of metal ions. However, addition of Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} caused fluorescence quenching of amiloride in the presence of anionic micelle, SDS. Binding of drug with metal ions at the charged micellar interface could be the possible reason for this pH-dependent metal-mediated fluorescence quenching. There were no remarkable changes observed due to metal ions addition when drug was present in cationic and nonionic micellar medium. The binding constant and bimolecular quenching constant were evaluated and compared for the drug–metal complexes using Stern–Volmer equation and fluorescence lifetime values. - Highlights: • Interaction of amiloride with biologically important metal ions, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. • Monitoring the interaction in various micelle at different pH by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Micelles acts as receptor, amiloride as transducer and metal ions as analyte in the present system. • Interaction study provides pH dependent quenching and binding mechanism of drug with metal ions.

  2. Concentration of atomic hydrogen in a dielectric barrier discharge measured by two-photon absorption fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, P.; Talába, M.; Obrusník, A.; Kratzer, J.; Dědina, J.

    2017-08-01

    Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) was utilized for measuring the concentration of atomic hydrogen in a volume dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ignited in mixtures of Ar, H2 and O2 at atmospheric pressure. The method was calibrated by TALIF of krypton diluted in argon at atmospheric pressure, proving that three-body collisions had a negligible effect on quenching of excited krypton atoms. The diagnostic study was complemented with a 3D numerical model of the gas flow and a zero-dimensional model of the chemistry in order to better understand the reaction kinetics and identify the key pathways leading to the production and destruction of atomic hydrogen. It was determined that the density of atomic hydrogen in Ar-H2 mixtures was in the order of 1021 m-3 and decreased when oxygen was added into the gas mixture. Spatially resolved measurements and simulations revealed a sharply bordered region with low atomic hydrogen concentration when oxygen was added to the gas mixture. At substoichiometric oxygen/hydrogen ratios, this H-poor region is confined to an area close to the gas inlet and it is shown that the size of this region is not only influenced by the chemistry but also by the gas flow patterns. Experimentally, it was observed that a decrease in H2 concentration in the feeding Ar-H2 mixture led to an increase in H production in the DBD.

  3. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  4. Identifying anthropogenic uranium compounds using soft X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark; Tom Resch, C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, David; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium ores mined for industrial use are typically acid-leached to produce yellowcake and then converted into uranium halides for enrichment and purification. These anthropogenic chemical forms of uranium are distinct from their mineral counterparts. The purpose of this study is to use soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize several common anthropogenic uranium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle. Non-destructive chemical analyses of these compounds is important for process and environmental monitoring and X-ray absorption techniques have several advantages in this regard, including element-specificity, chemical sensitivity, and high spectral resolution. Oxygen K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl nitrate, uranyl fluoride, and uranyl chloride, and fluorine K-edge spectra were collected for uranyl fluoride and uranium tetrafluoride. Interpretation of the data is aided by comparisons to calculated spectra. These compounds have unique spectral signatures that can be used to identify unknown samples.

  5. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ron; Carr, Zak; MacLean, Mathew; Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement of several water transitions that were interrogated during a hot-fire testing of the Space Launch Systems (SLS) sub-scale vehicle installed in LENS II. The temperature of the recirculating gas flow over the base plate was found to increase with altitude and is consistent with CFD results. It was also observed that the gas above the base plate has significant velocity along the optical path of the sensor at the higher altitudes. The line-by-line analysis of the H2O absorption features must include the effects of the Doppler shift phenomena particularly at high altitude. The TDLAS experimental measurements and the analysis procedure which incorporates the velocity dependent flow will be described.

  6. Measurement of He neutral temperature in detached plasmas using laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, M.; Tsujihara, T.; Kajita, S.; Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.

    2018-01-01

    The reduction of the heat load onto plasma-facing components by plasma detachment is an inevitable scheme in future nuclear fusion reactors. Since the control of the plasma and neutral temperatures is a key issue to the detached plasma generation, we have developed a laser absorption spectroscopy system for the metastable helium temperature measurements and used together with a previously developed laser Thomson scattering system for the electron temperature and density measurements. The thermal relaxation process between the neutral and the electron in the detached plasma generated in the linear plasma device, NAGDIS-II was studied. It is shown that the electron temperature gets close to the neutral temperature by increasing the electron density. On the other hand, the pressure dependence of electron and neutral temperatures shows the cooling effect by the neutrals. The possibility of the plasma fluctuation measurement using the fluctuation in the absorption signal is also shown.

  7. Investigation of a high-pressure pressed powder pellet technique for the analysis of coal by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; An, Shu-Qing; Liu, Ya-Xuan; Yu, Zhao-Shui; Zhang, Qin

    2018-02-01

    Using the proposed high-pressure pressed powder pellet technique, a coal sample was pressed into an ideal pellet without binders, which provides a solution to the poor self-binding quality of coal for the determination by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The pellet produced by this method was more compact and smoother, which was particularly meaningful for spectrometer, where the sample is placed over the tube window. Additionally, the high-pressure sample preparation technique effectively eliminated the effect of falling powder and contamination in the Measuring chamber of the spectrometer. Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (WDXRF) was applied successfully to the determination of carbon, nitrogen and ash content in coal samples. This could provide an alternative method for the rapid analysis of carbon, nitrogen and ash content in the coal rather than the combustion method or the high-frequency infrared absorption with a slow ashing method. Furthermore, WDXRF could provide simultaneous determination of other major, minor and trace elements by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The XRF results indicated that the sensitivity, precision, and limit of detection for most components were improved when the coal sample was pressed at 1600kN compared with preparation at 400kN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Empirical model description of photon path length for differential path length spectroscopy: combined effect of scattering and absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Amelink, Arjen

    2008-01-01

    Differential path length spectroscopy (DPS) is a method of reflectance spectroscopy that utilizes a specialized fiber geometry to make the photon path length (tau) insensitive to variations in tissue optical properties over a wide range of absorption (mu(a)) and total scattering (mu(s))

  9. SU-F-J-46: Feasibility of Cerenkov Emission for Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraiqat, I; Rehemtulla, A; Lam, K; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Clarke, R [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission (CE) is a promising tool for online tumor microenvironment interrogation and targeting during radiotherapy. In this work, we utilize CE generated during radiotherapy as a broadband excitation source for real-time absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of CE spectroscopy using a controlled experiment of materials with known emission/absorption properties. Methods: A water tank is irradiated with 20 MeV electron beam to induce Cerenkov emission. Food coloring dyes (Yellow #5, Red #40, and Blue #1), which have known emission/absorption properties were added to the water tank with increasing concentration (1 drop (0.05 mL), 2 drops, and 4 drops from a dispenser bottle). The signal is collected using a condensing lens which is coupled into a 20m optical fiber that is fed into a spectrometer that measures the emitted spectra. The resulting spectra from water/food coloring dye solutions were normalized by the reference spectrum, which is the Cerenkov spectrum of pure water, correcting for both the nonlinearity of the broadband Cerenkov emission spectrum as well as the non-uniform spectral response of the spectrometer. The emitted spectra were then converted into absorbance and their characteristics were analyzed. Results: The food coloring dye had a drastic change on the Cerenkov emission, shifting its wavelength according to its visible color. The collected spectra showed various absorbance peaks which agrees with tabulated peak positions of the dyes added within 0.3% for yellow, 1.7% for red, and 0.16% for blue. The CE peak heights proportionally increased as the dye concentration is increased. Conclusion: This work shows the potential for real-time functional spectroscopy using Cerenkov emission during radiotherapy. It was demonstrated that molecule identification as well as relative concentration can be extracted from the Cerenkov emission color shift.

  10. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  11. Platinum assay by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy in cisplatin treated pregnant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M.; Collecchi, P.; Oddone, M.; Meloni, S.

    1987-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is an antineoplastic drug used in the treatment of a wide variety of tumors. This paper describes an investigation carried out on pregnant mice after intragastric or intraperitoneal treatment with CDDP from the 11st to 13rd day of gestation. Platinum content in different liver, kidney, placenta and brain tissues, was determined at 18. day of pregnancy. Neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy were used. Results of both techniques are presented and discussed in terms of precision, accuracy and sensitivity. Neutron activation analysis appears to provide better results correlated with the drug treatment. (author) 10 refs.; 4 tables

  12. Detection of nitric oxide in exhaled air using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrzycki, R.; Wojtas, J.; Rutecka, B.; Bielecki, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The article describes an application one of the most sensitive optoelectronic method - Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in investigation of nitric oxide in exhaled breath. Measurement of nitric oxide concentration in exhaled breath is a quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe method of respiratory inflammation and asthma diagnosis. For detection of nitric oxide by developed optoelectronic sensor the vibronic molecular transitions were used. The wavelength ranges of these transitions are situated in the infrared spectral region. A setup consists of the optoelectronic nitric oxide sensor integrated with sampling and sample conditioning unit. The constructed detection system provides to measure nitric oxide in a sample of 0-97% relative humidity.

  13. [Gas pipeline leak detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Xing; Wang, Jin-Jun; Liu, Bing-Hai; Cai, Ting-Li; Qiao, Li-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2009-08-01

    The principle of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and harmonic detection technique was introduced. An experimental device was developed by point sampling through small multi-reflection gas cell. A specific line near 1 653. 7 nm was targeted for methane measurement using a distributed feedback diode laser as tunable light source. The linearity between the intensity of second harmonic signal and the concentration of methane was determined. The background content of methane in air was measured. The results show that gas sensors using tunable diode lasers provide a high sensitivity and high selectivity method for city gas pipeline leak detection.

  14. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy--digital detection of gas absorption harmonics based on Fourier analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-03-20

    This work presents a detailed study of the theoretical aspects of the Fourier analysis method, which has been utilized for gas absorption harmonic detection in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lock-in detection of the harmonic signal is accomplished by studying the phase term of the inverse Fourier transform of the Fourier spectrum that corresponds to the harmonic signal. The mathematics and the corresponding simulation results are given for each procedure when applying the Fourier analysis method. The present work provides a detailed view of the WMS technique when applying the Fourier analysis method.

  15. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  16. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  17. Strontium Localization in Bone Tissue Studied by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Ståhl, Kenny

    2014-01-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X...... highly ordered sites, and at least 30 % is located at less ordered sites where only the first solvation shell is resolved, suggesting that strontium is sur- rounded by only oxygen atoms similar to Sr2? in solution. Strontium was furthermore shown to be absorbed in collagen in which it obtains a higher...

  18. Absolute frequency atlas from 915 nm to 985 nm based on laser absorption spectroscopy of iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölleke, Christian; Raab, Christoph; Neuhaus, Rudolf; Falke, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    This article reports on laser absorption spectroscopy of iodine gas between 915 nm and 985 nm. This wavelength range is scanned utilizing a narrow linewidth and mode-hop-free tunable diode-laser whose frequency is actively controlled using a calibrated wavelength meter. This allows us to provide an iodine atlas that contains almost 10,000 experimentally observed reference lines with an uncertainty of 50 MHz. For common lines, good agreement is found with a publication by Gerstenkorn and Luc (1978). The new rich dataset allows existing models of the iodine molecule to be refined and can serve as a reference for laser frequency calibration and stabilization.

  19. Study of cancer cell lines with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)/vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uceda Otero, E. P.; Eliel, G. S. N.; Fonseca, E. J. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) / vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy to study two cancer cell lines: the Henrietta Lacks (HeLa) human cervix carcinoma and 5637 human bladder carcinoma cell lines. Our goal is to experimentally investigate biochemical changes...... and differences in these cells lines utilizing FTIR spectroscopy. We have used the chemometrical and statistical method principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate the spectral differences. We have been able to identify certain bands in the spectra which are so-called biomarkers for two types of cell lines......, three groups for the 5637 human bladder carcinoma cell line (5637A, 5637B and 5637C), and another one for the HeLa human cervix carcinoma cell line. The vibrational modes can be assigned to specific bands involving characteristic motions of the protein backbone. This work shows that infrared vibrational...

  20. SO2 EMISSION MEASUREMENT BY DOAS (DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND COSPEC (CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY AT MERAPI VOLCANO (INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Humaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The SO2 is one of the volcanic gases that can use as indicator of volcano activity. Commonly, SO2 emission is measured by COSPEC (Correlation Spectroscopy. This equipment has several disadvantages; such as heavy, big in size, difficulty in finding spare part, and expensive. DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy is a new method for SO2 emission measurement that has advantages compares to the COSPEC. Recently, this method has been developed. The SO2 gas emission measurement of Gunung Merapi by DOAS has been carried out at Kaliadem, and also by COSPEC method as comparation. The differences of the measurement result of both methods are not significant. However, the differences of minimum and maximum result of DOAS method are smaller than that of the COSPEC. It has range between 51 ton/day and 87 ton/day for DOAS and 87 ton/day and 201 ton/day for COSPEC. The measurement of SO2 gas emission evaluated with the seismicity data especially the rockfall showed the presence of the positive correlation. It may cause the gas pressure in the subsurface influencing instability of 2006 eruption lava.   Keywords: SO2 gas, Merapi, DOAS, COSPEC

  1. Identifying the origins of microbially derived aquatic DOM using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Bethany; Thorn, Robin; Anesio, Alexandre; Reynolds, Darren

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic systems is an essential support of the microbial population and, therefore, of the entire aquatic ecosystem. Aquatic DOM is also key for global biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and connects land processes to the marine environment via hydrological transportation. There have been multiple advances in technological assessments of the characteristics of aquatic DOM, with spectroscopy becoming widely used. The extensive use of benchtop spectroscopic instruments has led to the development of in situ sensors, improving the spatiotemporal scale of data acquisition. Whilst this has greatly improved understanding of DOM characteristics and patterns, there are still unknown variables, parameters and interactions of DOM within the aquatic environment. In particular, the interactions of aquatic DOM with the microbial population is still mostly unidentified. It is generally accepted that certain DOM fluorescence regions are autochthonous and microbially derived, such as "peak T" fluorescence. However, the origins and metabolic pathways involved in the production and release of these fluorescent molecules is, as yet, not definitively known. Our work focuses on the identification of these metabolic pathways from whence this microbially derived DOM originates. The most recent stage of the research has utilised traditional microbiological techniques, such as growth curves and chemostat experiments, alongside DOM fluorescence spectroscopic analysis and flow cytometry. The information gained regarding the microbial production and processing of DOM is central for the development of novel in situ fluorescence technology, the ultimate aim of this project.

  2. Cure monitoring of an epoxy-anhydride system by means of fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, D.H.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.K. [Kumoh National Univeristy of Technology, Kumi (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    In the present study the cure behavior of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) using an anhydride-based hardener in the presence of N,N-dimethyl benzyl amine (BDMA) or 1-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4-methyl imidazole (2E4MZ-CN) as an accelerator has been monitored and interpreted from the viewpoint of photophysical properties by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. To do this, 1,3-bis-(1-pyrene)propane (BPP) was well incorporated in the epoxy resin system by mechanical blending. The BPP probe, which is very sensitive to conformational change of the molecule influenced by the surrounding medium, successfully formed intramolecular excimer fluorescence. It is susceptible to the micro-viscosity or local viscosity and molecular mobility according to the epoxy cure. The cure behavior was explained with monomer fluorescence intensity (I{sub M}), excimer fluorescence intensity (I{sub E}) and I{sub M}/I{sub E} ratio as a function of cure time, cure temperature and accelerator. The present work agreed with the previous report on the cure behavior of an epoxy-anhydride system studied using DSc or torsion pendulum method. This study also suggests that the use of fluorescence technique may provide information on cure behavior of a thermosetting resin in a low temperature region, which has not been well interpreted by other analytical methods. (author). 31 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy for predicting percent wastewater in an urban stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jami H.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Needoba, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a significant organic carbon reservoir in many ecosystems, and its characteristics and sources determine many aspects of ecosystem health and water quality. Fluorescence spectroscopy methods can quantify and characterize the subset of the DOC pool that can absorb and re-emit electromagnetic energy as fluorescence and thus provide a rapid technique for environmental monitoring of DOC in lakes and rivers. Using high resolution fluorescence techniques, we characterized DOC in the Tualatin River watershed near Portland, Oregon, and identified fluorescence parameters associated with effluent from two wastewater treatment plants and samples from sites within and outside the urban region. Using a variety of statistical approaches, we developed and validated a multivariate linear regression model to predict the amount of wastewater in the river as a function of the relative abundance of specific fluorescence excitation/emission pairs. The model was tested with independent data and predicts the percentage of wastewater in a sample within 80% confidence. Model results can be used to develop in situ instrumentation, inform monitoring programs, and develop additional water quality indicators for aquatic systems.

  4. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widom, Julia R; Marcus, Andrew H; Johnson, Neil P; Von Hippel, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analogue of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS)—a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy—to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point–dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R 12 = 3.5 ± 0.5 Å , twist angle θ 12 = 5° ± 5° ), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV–2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein–nucleic acid complexes. (paper)

  5. Structure and property investigations of TDO in aqueous phase by density functional theory, UV absorption, and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jianzhong; Liu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Pin; Wu, Qiuxia; Zheng, Xuming; Pei, Kemei

    2014-05-01

    Density functional theory, UV absorption, and Raman spectroscopy are used to investigate the structure and properties of TDO in aqueous solution. The equilibrium structures, UV absorption spectra, interaction energies, and Raman spectroscopy data of TDO, AIMSA, and 12 TDO or AIMSA clusters are calculated. Raman spectroscopy experiments are carried out by 488 and 208 nm laser excitation. The Raman spectra of TDO in solid and aqueous phases have been compared, and the most possible structure for TDO in aqueous phase was deduced from analysis of the DFT calculations for the examined models, the experimental UV absorption spectrum, and Raman spectra of TDO. The interaction energy results show that TDO's solubility in water is originated from the TDO-water cyclic oligomer. The calculated UV absorption and Raman spectra of the I2·2H2O-cyc cluster model agree with the experimental results of TDO in aqueous solution very well.

  6. On mechanism of intermediate-sized circular DNA compaction mediated by spermine: Contribution of fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíčková, Jana; Štěpánek, M.; Kral, Teresa; Benda, Aleš; Procházka, K.; Hof, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3-4 (2008), s. 679-684 ISSN 1053-0509 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400621; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : DNA compaction * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * dynamic light scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.880, year: 2008

  7. Monitoring of petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in surface waters by a direct comparison of fluorescence spectroscopy and remote sensing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Domenico, L.; Crisafi, E. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Messina (Italy). Thalassografic Inst.); Magazzu, G. (Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biology); Puglisi, A. (Mediterranean Oceanological Centre (CEOM), Palermo (Italy)); La Rosa, A. (Air-Survey, Italy s.r.l., Catania (Italy))

    1994-10-01

    Oil pollution levels were estimated using simultaneous acquisition of data from remote sensing by helicopter and fluorescence spectroscopy on surface samples. Laboratory quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons was used to calibrate remotely sensed data. The data were treated using a computer to generate a colour-coded map not attainable with conventional methods representing seawater pollution. Results were in good agreement and indicated that remotely sensed data together with those achieved by fluorescence spectroscopy are applicable for monitoring hydrocarbon pollution. (author)

  8. A comparative evaluation of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, S. K.; Krishna, H.; Sidramesh, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-08-01

    We report the results of a comparative evaluation of in vivo fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of oral neoplasia. The study carried out at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, involved 26 healthy volunteers and 138 patients being screened for neoplasm of oral cavity. Spectral measurements were taken from multiple sites of abnormal as well as apparently uninvolved contra-lateral regions of the oral cavity in each patient. The different tissue sites investigated belonged to one of the four histopathology categories: 1) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 2) oral sub-mucous fibrosis (OSMF), 3) leukoplakia (LP) and 4) normal squamous tissue. A probability based multivariate statistical algorithm utilizing nonlinear Maximum Representation and Discrimination Feature for feature extraction and Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression for classification was developed for direct multi-class classification in a leave-one-patient-out cross validation mode. The results reveal that the performance of Raman spectroscopy is considerably superior to that of fluorescence in stratifying the oral tissues into respective histopathologic categories. The best classification accuracy was observed to be 90%, 93%, 94%, and 89% for SCC, SMF, leukoplakia, and normal oral tissues, respectively, on the basis of leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with an overall accuracy of 91%. However, when a binary classification was employed to distinguish spectra from all the SCC, SMF and leukoplakik tissue sites together from normal, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy were seen to have almost comparable performances with Raman yielding marginally better classification accuracy of 98.5% as compared to 94% of fluorescence.

  9. Field Measurements of Water Continuum and Water Dimer Absorption by Active Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Lotter, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in Earth's radiative budget since water molecules strongly absorb the incoming solar shortwave and the outgoing thermal infrared radiation. Superimposed on the water monomer absorption, a water continuum absorption has long been recognized, but its true nature still remains controversial. On the one hand, this absorption is explained by a deformation of the line shape of the water monomer absorption lines as a consequence of a molecular collision. One the o...

  10. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankelevich, Diego R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, 3101 Kemper Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura, E-mail: lmarcu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Elson, Daniel S. [Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  11. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes: identifying fingerprints of glucose-related metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshin, Evgeny; Cherkasova, Olga; Tikhonova, Tatiana; Berlovskaya, Elena; Priezzhev, Alexander; Fadeev, Victor

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a native fluorescence spectroscopy study of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes. It was shown that the fluorescence emission band shape at 320 nm excitation is the most indicative of hyperglycemia in the blood plasma samples. We provide the interpretation of this fact based on the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration due to glucose-related metabolic pathways and protein fluorescent cross-linking formation following nonenzymatic glycation.

  12. Fusion of Ultraviolet-Visible and Infrared Transient Absorption Spectroscopy Data to Model Ultrafast Photoisomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, Bruno; Orio, Maylis; Rehault, Julien; Burdzinski, Gotard; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Sliwa, Michel

    2017-08-03

    Ultrafast photoisomerization reactions generally start at a higher excited state with excess of internal vibrational energy and occur via conical intersections. This leads to ultrafast dynamics which are difficult to investigate with a single transient absorption spectroscopy technique, be it in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) or infrared (IR) domain. On one hand, the information available in the UV-vis domain is limited as only slight spectral changes are observed for different isomers. On the other hand, the interpretation of vibrational spectra is strongly hindered by intramolecular relaxation and vibrational cooling. These limitations can be circumvented by fusing UV-vis and IR transient absorption spectroscopy data in a multiset multivariate curve resolution analysis. We apply this approach to describe the spectrodynamics of the ultrafast cis-trans photoisomerization around the C-N double bond observed for aromatic Schiff bases. Twisted intermediate states could be elucidated, and isomerization was shown to occur through a continuous complete rotation. More broadly, data fusion can be used to rationalize a vast range of ultrafast photoisomerization processes of interest in photochemistry.

  13. The use of absorption spectroscopy of plutonium to minimize waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughn, R.B.; Berg, J.; Cisneros, M.

    1997-01-01

    Through the use of absorption spectroscopy we are better able to understand the chemical reactions of plutonium and other actinide elements in solution. In many cases such an understanding can minimize the generation of waste streams by suggesting more optimal chemical conditions for separating these radioactive elements from their host matrix. Many processes are developed using an empirical approach with little understanding of what is actually taking place. One such example is the anion exchange process for Plutonium purification. Various resins have been tested in various solutions and workable outcomes have been produced. However, absorption spectroscopy provides an understanding of why ion exchange works and can determine which compounds complex best with actinides in order to obtain a more efficient and effective separations process. This presentation will touch on the chemistry involved, the spectroscopic instrumentation, and the environmental impacts. Primarily the talk will focus on the chemical technicians involvement in the day to day research, the obstacles encountered, and the environment in which this research was conducted

  14. A method of reducing background fluctuation in tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rendi; Dong, Xiaozhou; Bi, Yunfeng; Lv, Tieliang

    2018-03-01

    Optical interference fringe is the main factor that leads to background fluctuation in gas concentration detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The interference fringes are generated by multiple reflections or scatterings upon optical surfaces in optical path and make the background signal present an approximated sinusoidal oscillation. To reduce the fluctuation of the background, a method that combines dual tone modulation (DTM) with vibration reflector (VR) is proposed in this paper. The combination of DTM and VR can make the unwanted periodic interference fringes to be averaged out and the effectiveness of the method in reducing background fluctuation has been verified by simulation and real experiments in this paper. In the detection system based on the proposed method, the standard deviation (STD) value of the background signal is decreased to 0.0924 parts per million (ppm), which is reduced by a factor of 16 compared with that of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The STD value of 0.0924 ppm corresponds to the absorption of 4 . 328 × 10-6Hz - 1 / 2 (with effective optical path length of 4 m and integral time of 0.1 s). Moreover, the proposed method presents a better stable performance in reducing background fluctuation in long time experiments.

  15. Redox Behavior of Fe2+/Fe3+ Redox Couple by Absorption Spectroscopy and Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J. Y.; Park, S.; Yun, J. I.

    2010-01-01

    Redox behavior has influences on speciation and other geochemical reactions of radionuclides such as sorption, solubility, and colloid formation, etc. It is one of the factors for evaluation of long-term safety assessment under high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal conditions. Accordingly, redox potential (Eh) measurement in aquatic system is important to investigate the redox conditions. Eh is usually measured with redox active electrodes (Pt, Au, glassy carbon, etc.). Nevertheless, Eh measurements by general methods using electrodes provide low accuracy and high uncertainty problem. Therefore, Eh calculated from the concentration of redox active elements with a proper complexing reagent by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is progressed. Iron exists mostly as spent nuclear waste container material and in hydro-geologic minerals. In this system, iron controls the redox condition in near-field area and influences chemical behavior and speciation of radionuclides including redox sensitive actinides such as U, Np, and Pu. In the present work, we present the investigation on redox phenomena of iron in aquatic system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of structurally modified lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitova, Tonya

    2008-02-15

    The type and concentration of impurity centers in different valence states are crucial for tuning the photorefractive properties of doped Lithium Niobate (LN) crystals. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is an appropriate tool for studying the local structure of impurity centers. XAS combined with absorption in UV/VIS/IR and High Resolution X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (HRXES) provide information about the valence state of the dopant ions in as-grown, reduced or oxidized doped LN crystals. Cu (Cu{sup 1+} and Cu{sup 2+}) and Fe (Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) atoms are found in two different valence states, whereas there are indications for a third Mn valency, in addition to Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} in manganese-doped LN crystals. One of the charge compensation mechanisms during reduction of copper- doped LN crystals is outgassing of oxygen atoms. Cu ions in the reduced crystals have at least two different site symmetries: twofold (Cu{sup 1+}) and sixfold (Cu{sup 2+}) coordinated by O atoms. Fe and Mn atoms are coordinated by six O atoms. Cu and Fe ions are found to occupy only Li sites, whereas Mn ions are also incorporated into Li and Nb sites. The refractive index change in LN crystals irradiated with {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions is caused by structurally disordered centers, where Nb atoms are displaced from normal crystallographic sites and Li or/and O vacancies are present. (orig.)

  17. Probing the CZTS/CdS heterojunction utilizing photoelectrochemistry and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Matthew J.; Vaccarello, Daniel; Wong, Jonathan; Yiu, Yun Mui; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Ding, Zhifeng

    2018-04-01

    The importance of renewable resources is becoming more and more influential on research due to the depletion of fossil fuels. Cost-effective ways of harvesting solar energy should also be at the forefront of these investigations. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells are well within the frame of these goals, and a thorough understanding of how they are made and processed synthetically is crucial. The CZTS/CdS heterojunction was examined using photoelectrochemistry and synchrotron radiation (SR) spectroscopy. These tools provided physical insights into this interface that was formed by the electrophoretic deposition of CZTS nanocrystals and chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS for the respective films. It was discovered that CBD induced a change in the local and long range environment of the Zn in the CZTS lattice, which was detrimental to the photoresponse. X-ray absorption near-edge structures and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXAFSs) of the junction showed that this change was at an atomic level and was associated with the coordination of oxygen to zinc. This was confirmed through FEFF fitting of the EXAFS and through IR spectroscopy. It was found that this change in both photoresponse and the Zn coordination can be reversed with the use of low temperature annealing. Investigating CZTS through SR techniques provides detailed structural information of minor changes from the zinc perspective.

  18. Combined characterization of bovine polyhemoglobin microcapsules by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, Marcos Camargo; Dell'Anno, Filippo; Salerno, Marco; Larosa, Claudio; Polakiewicz, Bronislaw; Eggenhöffner, Roberto; Converti, Attilio

    2017-03-01

    Polyhemoglobin produced from pure bovine hemoglobin by reaction with PEG bis(N-succynimidil succinate) as a cross-linking agent was encapsulated in gelatin and dehydrated by freeze-drying. Free carboxyhemoglobin and polyhemoglobin microcapsules were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy in the absorption range 450-650 nm and cyclic voltammetry in the voltage range from -0.8 to 0.6 mV to evaluate the ability to break the bond with carbon monoxide and to study the carrier's affinity for oxygen, respectively. SEM used to observe the shape of cross-linked gelatin-polyhemoglobin microparticles showed a regular distribution of globular shapes, with mean size of ~750 nm, which was ascribed to gelatin. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was also performed to detect iron presence in microparticles. Cyclic voltammetry using an Ag-AgCl electrode highlighted characteristic peaks at around -0.6 mV that were attributed to reversible oxygen bonding with iron in oxy-polyhemoglobin structure. These results suggest this technique as a powerful, direct and alternative method to evaluate the extent of hemoglobin oxygenation.

  19. Improved Sensitivity of Spectroscopic Quantification of Stable Isotope Content Using Capillary Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Wilcox Freeburg, E.; Kriesel, J.; Linley, T. J.; Kelly, J.; Coleman, M. L.; Christensen, L. E.; Vance, S.

    2016-12-01

    Spectroscopy-based platforms have recently risen to the forefront for making stable isotope measurements of methane, carbon dioxide, water, or other analytes. These spectroscopy systems can be relatively straightforward to operate (versus a mass spectrometry platform), largely relieve the analyst of mass interference artifacts, and many can be used in the field. Despite these significant advantages, however, existing spectroscopy techniques suffer from a lack of measurement sensitivity that can ultimately limit select applications including spatially resolved and compound-specific measurements. Here we present a capillary absorption spectroscopy (CAS) system that is designed to mitigate sensitivity issues in spectroscopy-based stable isotope evaluation. The system uses mid-wave infrared excitation generated from a continuous wave quantum cascade laser. Importantly, the sample `chamber' is a flexible capillary with a total volume of less than one cc. Proprietary coatings on the internal surface of the fiber improve optical performance, guiding the light to a detector and facilitating high levels of interaction between the laser beam and gaseous analytes. We present data demonstrating that a tapered hollow fiber cell, with an internal diameter that broadens toward the detector, reduces optical feedback to further improve measurement sensitivity. Sensitivity of current hollow fiber / CAS systems enable measurements of only 10's of picomoles CO2 while theoretical improvements should enable measurements of as little as 10's of femtomoles. Continued optimization of sample introduction and improvements to optical feedback are being explored. Software is being designed to provide rapid integration of data and generation of processed isotope measurements using a graphical user interface. Taken together, the sensitivity improvements of the CAS system under development could, when coupled to a laser ablation sampling device, enable up to 2 µm spatial resolution (roughly the

  20. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Impact of oxygen chemistry on the emission and fluorescence spectroscopy of laser ablation plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, K. C.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Harilal, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen present in the ambient gas medium may affect both laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) emission through a reduction of emission intensity and persistence. In this study, an evaluation is made on the role of oxygen in the ambient environment under atmospheric pressure conditions in LIBS and laser ablation (LA)-LIF emission. To generate plasmas, 1064 nm, 10 ns pulses were focused on an aluminum alloy sample. LIF was performed by frequency scanning a CW laser over the 396.15 nm (3s24s 2S1/2 → 3s23p 2P°3/2) Al I transition. Time-resolved emission and fluorescence signals were recorded to evaluate the variation in emission intensity caused by the presence of oxygen. The oxygen partial pressure (po) in the atmospheric pressure environment using N2 as the makeup gas was varied from 0 to 400 Torr O2. 2D-fluorescence spectroscopy images were obtained for various oxygen concentrations for simultaneous evaluation of the emission and excitation spectral features. Results showed that the presence of oxygen in the ambient environment reduces the persistence of the LIBS and LIF emission through an oxidation process that depletes the density of atomic species within the resulting laser-produced plasma (LPP) plume.

  2. [Commercial orange juice beverages detection by fluorescence spectroscopy combined with PCA-ED and PLSR methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang-jun; Zhu, Chun; Chen, Guo-qing; Zhang, Yong; Kong, Fan-biao; Li, Run; Zhu, Zhuo-wei; Wang, Xu; Gao, Shu-mei

    2014-08-01

    In order to classify the orange juiice beverages effectively, the fluorescence character differences of two kinds of orange juice beverages including 100% orange juice and orange drink were analyzed and compared, principal component analysis combined with Euclidean distance was adopted to classify two kinds of orange juice beverages, and ideal classification results were obtained. Meanwhile, the orange juice content estimation model was established by using fluorescence spectroscopy combined with partial least squares regression method, and the correlation coefficient R, root mean square error of calibration RMSEC and root mean square error of prediction RMSEP were 0.997, 0.87% and 2.05%, respectively. The experimental results indicate that the calibration model offers comparatively accurate content estimation, which reflect the actual orange juice content in the commercial orange juice beverages. The exploration to classify orange juice beverages was carried out from two aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis by employing fluorescence spectroscopy combined with chemometrics method, which can provide a new idea for the classification and adulteration detection of commercial orange juice beverages, and also can give certain reference basis for the quality control of orange juice raw material.

  3. Exhaust gas monitoring based on absorption spectroscopy in the process industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Shu, Xiao-wen; Kan, Rui-feng; Cui, Yi-ben; He, Ying; Xu, Zhen-yu; Geng, Hui; Liu, Jian-guo

    2009-07-01

    This non-invasive gas monitor for exhaust gas monitoring must has high reliability and requires little maintenance. Monitor for in-situ measurements using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) in the near infrared, can meet these requirements. TDLAS has evolved over the past decade from a laboratory especially to an accepted, robust and reliable technology for trace gas sensing. With the features of tunability and narrow linewidth of the distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser and by precisely tuning the laser output wavelength to a single isolated absorption line of the gas, TDLAS technique can be utilized to measure gas concentration with high sensitivity. Typical applications for monitoring of H2S, NH3, HC1 and HF are described here together by wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic(WMS-2F) detection. This paper will illustrate the problems related to on-line applications, in particular, the overfall effects, automatic light intensity correction, temperature correction, which impacted on absorption coefficient and give details of how effect of automatic correction is necessary. The system mainly includes optics and electronics, optical system mainly composed of fiber, fiber coupler and beam expander, the electron part has been placed in safe analysis room not together with the optical part. Laser merely passes through one-meter-long pipes by the fiber coupling technology, so the system itself has anti-explosion. The results of the system are also presented in the end, the system's response time is only 0.5s, and can be achieved below 1×10-5 the detection limit at the volume fraction, it can entirely replace the traditional methods of detection exhaust gas in the process industry.

  4. Initial Results of Optical Vortex Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the HYPER-I Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Asai, Shoma; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ozawa, Naoya; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortex beams have a potential to make a new Doppler measurement, because not only parallel but perpendicular movement of atoms against the beam axis causes the Doppler shift of their resonant absorption frequency. As the first step of a proof-of-principle experiment, we have performed the optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy for metastable argon neutrals in an ECR plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. An external cavity diode laser (TOPTICA, DL100) of which center wavelength was 696.735 nm in vacuum was used for the light source. The Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam was converted into the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam (optical vortex) by a computer-generated hologram displayed on the spatial light modulator (Hamamatsu, LCOS-SLM X10468-07). In order to make fast neutral flow across the LG beam, a high speed solenoid valve system was installed on the HYPER-I device. Initial results including the comparison of absorption spectra for HG and LG beams will be presented. This study was supported by NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI grant number 15K05365.

  5. Use of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy for the measurement of mercury in oil shale gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girvin, D.C.; Hadeishi, T.; Fox, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    A technique to continuously measure total mercury in a gas stream in the presence of high concentrations of organics, smoke, oil mist, and other interfering substances is described. The technique employees Zeeman atomic absorption (ZAA) spectroscopy as the mercury detector, which has been successfully used to measure mercury in oil shale offgases. The instrument consists of a light source which provides the 2537 A mercury emission line; a furnace-absorption tube assembly where the sample is vaporized and swept into the light path and a detector which converts the signal into an ac voltage for processing. Sample gas is heated to 900/sup 0/C in the furnace-absorption tube assembly aligned with the optical axis of the ZAA spectrometer. The 2537 A mercury emission line (..pi..) and a reference line (sigma) are generated by a single discharge lamp operated in a 15 kG magnetic field. The difference between the ..pi.. and sigma components is taken by a lock-in-amplifier and converted to a signal which is proportional to the amount of mercury in the gas.

  6. Measurements of Iodine Monoxide Levels During the CAST Campaign Using Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N. R. P.; Popoola, O. A.; McLeod, M.; Ouyang, B.; Jones, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Iodine monoxide (IO) has been regarded as an important radical involved in the ozone destruction in the remote marine boundary layer. Here we presented the first in situ aircraft measurements of IO using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with 1s -sensitivity of ~1.5 ppt Hz-1/2 on the surface level during the Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) campaign between January - February 2014. IO was retrieved from analysis of absorption spectrum recorded between 415 nm - 452.5 nm. Instrument baseline corresponding to the "zero" signal of IO was obtained by injection of ~20 ppb of nitric oxide (NO) into the sample air at chosen frequency and period. No clear absorption feature was observable from the spectra by eye with up to 100 seconds averaging, pointing to very low mixing ratios (<~0.5 ppt) of IO over the sampled area. A small positive bias (~0.3 ppt) of IO (against the baseline signal during NO titration) was obtained in the statistical histogram of retrieved IO from average of each straight and level run, but little altitude dependence was noted. In summary, our observation appears to support the existence of IO in the remote marine boundary above the Pacific Ocean at sub ppt levels, but the limited sensitivity precludes us from quantifying spatial gradients more accurately.

  7. Collison-Induced Absorption of Oxygen Molecule as Studied by High Sensitivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Wataru; Shoji, Atsushi; Kawai, Akio

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen dimol is transiently generated when two oxygen molecules collide. At this short period, the electron clouds of molecules are distorted and some forbidden transition electronic transitions become partially allowed. This transition is called CIA (Collision-induced absorption). There are several CIA bands appearing in the spectral region from UV to near IR. Absorption of solar radiation by oxygen dimol is a small but significant part of the total budget of incoming shortwave radiation. However, a theory predicting the lineshape of CIA is still under developing. In this study, we measured CIA band around 630 nm that is assigned to optical transition, a^{1}Δ_{g}(v=0):a^{1}Δ_{g}(v=0)-X^{3}Σ_{g}^{-}(v=0):X^{3}Σ_{g}^{-}(v=0) of oxygen dimol. CRDS(Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy) was employed to measure weak absorption CIA band of oxygen. Laser beam around 630 nm was generated by a dye laser that was pumped by a YAG Laser. Multiple reflection of the probe light was performed within a vacuum chamber that was equipped with two high reflective mirrors. We discuss the measured line shape of CIA on the basis of collision pair model.

  8. Polarized x-ray absorption spectroscopy for the study of superconductors and magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Mohan; Alp, Esen E.; Mini, Susan M.; Salem-Sugui, S.; Bommannavar, A.

    1991-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a good source of polarized radiation in the x-ray regime. The radiation obtained from a bending magnet source is linearly polarized in the bending plane and has a varying degree of circular polarization away from the bending plane. This feature of synchrotron radiation can be taken advantage of with proper optics to selectively use the type of polarized radiation required for the experiment in question. Linear polarized radiation is used to study the anisotropic nature of electronic and atomic structure by x-ray absorption techniques from single crystal and oriented powder samples. We will give a specific example of the use of linearly polarized x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements for the study of the magnetically oriented layered copper oxide superconductors. While such linear dichroism measurements help identify the symmetry of the empty electronic states, circular dichroism measurements in magnetic systems help in determining the spin contribution to the absorption process. We will discuss magnetic circular dichroism measurements of the ordered-disordered invar alloy Fe(subscript 3)Pt.

  9. Measurement of isotope shift of recycled uranium by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Miyabe, Masabumi

    1999-07-01

    Isotope shift of the recycled uranium atoms including the 236 U was measured by laser induced fluorescence method. Eight even levels at 2 eV and three odd levels at 4 eV were measured with isotope shifts among 238 U, 236 U and 235 U obtained. As for the measurement of the 4 eV levels, the Doppler free two photon absorption method was used, and the hyperfine structure of the 235 U was analyzed simultaneously. The isotope shift of 234 U was also observed in the three transition. (J.P.N.)

  10. Extreme ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy of pure and core-shell rare gas clusters at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroedter, Lasse

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of rare gas clusters with short-wavelength radiation of free-electron lasers (FELs) has been studied extensively over the last decade by means of electron and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. This thesis describes the design and construction of a fluorescence spectrometer for the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range and discusses the cluster experiments performed at FLASH, the Free-electron LAser in Hamburg. Fluorescence of xenon and of argon clusters was studied, both in dependence on the FEL pulse intensity and on the cluster size. The FEL wavelength was set to the giant 4d-resonance of xenon at 13.5 nm and the FEL pulse intensity reached peak values of 2.7.10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. For xenon clusters, charge states of at least 11+ were identified. For argon, charge states up to 7+ were detected. The cluster-size dependent study revealed a decrease of the fluorescence yield per atom with increasing cluster size. This decrease is explained with the help of a geometric model. It assumes that virtually the entire fluorescence yield stems from shells of ions on the cluster surface, whereas ions in the cluster core predominantly recombine non-radiatively with electrons. However, the detailed analysis of fluorescence spectra from clusters consisting of a core of Xe atoms and a surrounding shell of argon atoms shows that, in fact, a small fraction of the fluorescence signal comes from Xe ions in the cluster core. Interestingly, these ions are as highly charged as the ions in the shells of a pure Xe cluster. This result goes beyond the current understanding of charge and energy transfer processes in these systems and points toward the observation of ultrafast charging dynamics in a time window where mass spectrometry is inherently blind. (orig.)

  11. Effect of photoelectric fluorescence on the formation of x-ray absorption lines in laser-plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.; Yaakobi, B.

    1991-01-01

    In laser-plasma experiments, conditions in an embedded layer in a target shell can be inferred from the spectral attenuation of x-ray continuum radiation by the layer [B. Yaakobi et al., Opt. Commun. 34, 213 (1980)]. In such experiments, absorption lines are formed by 1s-2p absorption transitions in heliumlike through fluorinelike species of certain ions in the layer to be diagnosed. The areal density of each species can be inferred from the attenuation in the spectrum within its respective band, provided the average 1s-2p absorption cross sections for each species are known and provided competing line-forming mechanisms are taken into account. In photoelectric fluorescence, which is one such potentially important competing mechanism, the formation of a 1s vacancy by photoionization is followed by 2p-1s spontaneous emission within the same spectral range as the 1s-2p absorption band of the same ion. The importance of photoelectric fluorescence depends on the supply of ionizing photons, which is sensitive to the design of the experiment. This process should be considered when analyzing experiments where the continuum is hardened by high core temperatures, by opacity effects, or by core components that radiate efficiently at ionizing energies

  12. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants.

  13. Applications of time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy to the environmental biogeochemistry of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Richard N; Saito, Takumi; Aoyagi, Noboru; Payne, Timothy E; Kimura, Takaumi; Waite, T David

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is a useful means of identifying certain actinide species resulting from various biogeochemical processes. In general, TRLFS differentiates chemical species of a fluorescent metal ion through analysis of different excitation and emission spectra and decay lifetimes. Although this spectroscopic technique has largely been applied to the analysis of actinide and lanthanide ions having fluorescence decay lifetimes on the order of microseconds, such as UO , Cm, and Eu, continuing development of ultra-fast and cryogenic TRLFS systems offers the possibility to obtain speciation information on metal ions having room-temperature fluorescence decay lifetimes on the order of nanoseconds to picoseconds. The main advantage of TRLFS over other advanced spectroscopic techniques is the ability to determine in situ metal speciation at environmentally relevant micromolar to picomolar concentrations. In the context of environmental biogeochemistry, TRLFS has principally been applied to studies of (i) metal speciation in aqueous and solid phases and (ii) the coordination environment of metal ions sorbed to mineral and bacterial surfaces. In this review, the principles of TRLFS are described, and the literature reporting the application of this methodology to the speciation of actinides in systems of biogeochemical interest is assessed. Significant developments in TRLFS methodology and advanced data analysis are highlighted, and we outline how these developments have the potential to further our mechanistic understanding of actinide biogeochemistry. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

  14. Studies of hydrogen incorporation in hydrogenated amorphous carbon films by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameh, R.; Bounouh, Y.; Sadki, A.; Naud, C.; Theye, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    Author.Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films presently attract considerable interest because of their potential applications in the domain of multifunctional coatings: transparent in the infrared, very hard, chemically inert, etc...This material is rather complex since it contains C atoms in both sp 3 (diamond) and sp 2 (graphite) electronic configurations, as well as a large concentration of H atoms. Its properties are strongly dependent on the deposition conditions which determine the film microstructure, i.e. the relative proportions of sp 3 and sp 2 C sites, their connection in the network and the hydrogen bonding modes. It has been suggested that the sp 2 C sites tend to cluster into unsaturated chains ans rings, which are then embedded in the sp 3 C sites m atrix . Hydrogen incorporation plays a crucial role in this intrinsic microheterogeneity, which determines the electronic properties, and especially the gap value, of a-C:H. We here present and discuss the results of Fourrier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy measurements performed on a-C:H films prepared under different conditions and submitted to controlled annealing cycles, which exhibit quite different optical gap values (from 1 to 2.5 eV). We carefully analyze the absorption bands detected in the 400-7500 cm -1 spectral range in terms of the vibration modes of C-H and C-C bonds in different local environments and we interpret the results in relation with the film microstructure and optical properties. Special attention is also paid to the absorption background and to the variations of the whole absorption spectra with measurement temperature

  15. INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF AGN ABSORPTION OUTFLOWS: MRK 509 AND IRAS F04250–5718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guilin; Arav, Nahum [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Rupke, David S. N., E-mail: glliu@vt.edu [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN 38112 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption lines provide abundant spectroscopic information enabling the probe of the physical conditions in active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows, but the outflow radii (and the energetics consequently) can only be determined indirectly. We present the first direct test of these determinations using integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy. We have conducted Gemini IFU mapping of the ionized gas nebulae surrounding two AGNs, whose outflow radii have been constrained by UV absorption line analyses. In Mrk 509, we find a quasi-spherical outflow with a radius of 1.2 kpc and a velocity of ∼290 km s{sup −1}, while IRAS F04250–5718 is driving a biconical outflow extending out to 2.9 kpc, with a velocity of ∼580 km s{sup −1} and an opening angle of ∼70°. The derived mass flow rate ∼5 and >1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, respectively, and the kinetic luminosity ≳1 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} for both. Adopting the outflow radii and geometric parameters measured from IFU, absorption line analyses would yield mass flow rates and kinetic luminosities in agreement with the above results within a factor of ∼2. We conclude that the spatial locations, kinematics, and energetics revealed by this IFU emission-line study are consistent with pre-existing UV absorption line analyses, providing a long-awaited direct confirmation of the latter as an effective approach for characterizing outflow properties.

  16. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, U.

    1996-01-01

    Argon L 2.3 -M 2.3 M 2.3 Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with Kα fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons

  17. Photo-initiated dynamics and spectroscopy of the deprotonated Green Fluorescent Protein chromophore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochenkova, Anastasia; Andersen, Lars Henrik

    2013-01-01

    . Knowledge of intrinsic properties of the GFP photoabsorbing molecular unit is a prerequisite in understanding the atomic-scale interactions that play a key role for the diverse functioning of these proteins. Here, we show how recent developments in action and photoelectron spectroscopy combined with state-of-the......This chapter combines recent advances in understanding the photophysics of the chromophore anion of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea Victoria. GFP and its homologues are widely used for in vivo labeling in biology through their remarkable fluorescent properties...... dynamics, where non-radiative decay occurs on a (sub)picosecond timescale. Deactivation includes resonant electron emission and fast internal conversion followed by slow statistical decay in the vibrationally hot ground state. Remarkably, both electronic and nuclear excited-state decay channels may here...

  18. [Measurement on gas temperature distribution by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Yan, Jian-hua; Wang, Fei; Chi, Yong; Cen, Ke-fa

    2008-08-01

    The technique of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) can be used for gas temperature distribution measurement by scanning multiple gas absorption lines with a tunable diode laser. The fundamental of gas temperature distribution measurement by TDLAS is introduced in the present paper, and the discretization strategy of equation for gas absorption is also given here. Using constrained linear least-square fitting method, the gas temperature distribution can be calculated with the help of physical constraints under the condition of uniform gas concentration and pressure. Based on the spectral parameters of four CO absorption lines near 6330 cm(-1) from HITRAN database, the model of two-temperature distribution at 300 and 600 K with each path length of 55 cm was set up. The effects of relative measurement error and different path length constraints of temperature bins on the gas temperature distribution measurement results were simulated by constrained linear least-square fitting. The results show that the temperature distribution calculation error increases as the relative measurement error rises. A measurement error of 5% could lead to a maximum relative error of 11%, and an average relative error of 2.2% for calculation result. And the weak physical constraints of path length for temperature bins could increase the calculation result error during the process of constrained linear least-square fitting. By setting up the model of two-temperature distribution with gas cells at room temperature as the cold section and in tube furnace as the hot section, the experiment of gas temperature distribution measurement in lab was carried out. Using four absorption lines of CO near 6330 cm(-1) scanned by VCSEL diode laser, and fitting the background laser intensity without absorption by the cubic polynomial to get the baseline signal, the integrals of spectral absorbance for gas temperature distribution measurement can be calculated. The relative calculation

  19. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  20. Sample preparation of waste water to determine metallic contaminants by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Olivos, Javier.

    1987-01-01

    Trace X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analysis in liquid samples is preceded by sample preparation, which usually consists in the precipitation of the metallic ions and concentration over a thin cellulose filter. The samples preparation of waste water by this method is not efficient, due to the great amount of organic and insoluble matter that they contain. The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal value of pH in order to adsorbe all the insoluble matter contained in a waste water sample in the activated charcoal, so that the metallic ions could be precipitated and concentrated on a thin filter and determinated by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A survey about the adsorption of some ions in activated charcoal in function of the pH was made for the following: Cr 3+ , Fe 3+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , Se 2+ , Hg 2+ , and Pb 2+ . It was observed that at pH 0, the ions are not adsorbed, but Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ are adsorbed in small amount; at pH 14, the ions are adsorbed, excluding Se, which is not adsorbed at any value of pH. If a waste water sample is treated at pH 0 with activated charcoal to adsorbe the organic and insoluble matter, most of the metallic ions are not adsorbed by the activated charcoal and could be precipitated with APDC (ammonium 1-pirrolidine dithio carbamate salt) and concentrated on a thin filter. The analysis of the metallic ions contained on the filter and those adsorbed in the activated charcoal by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, gave the total amount of the ions in the sample. (author)

  1. Molecular characterization of copper in soils using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strawn, Daniel G.; Baker, Leslie L.

    2009-01-01

    Bioavailability of Cu in the soil is a function of its speciation. In this paper we investigated Cu speciation in six soils using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and synchrotron-based micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF). The XANES and EXAFS spectra in all of the soils were the same. μ-XRF results indicated that the majority of the Cu particles in the soils were not associated with calcium carbonates, Fe oxides, or Cu sulfates. Principal component analysis and target transform of the XANES and EXAFS spectra suggested that Cu adsorbed on humic acid (HA) was an acceptable match. Thus it appears that Cu in all of the soils is primarily associated with soil organic matter (SOM). Theoretical fitting of the molecular structure in the soil EXAFS spectra revealed that the Cu in the soils existed as Cu atoms bound in a bidentate complex to O or N functional groups. - Copper speciation in six soils was investigated using XANES, EXAFS, and μ-XRF.

  2. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz....

  3. Detection of orange juice frauds using front-face fluorescence spectroscopy and Independent Components Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Faten; Redjdal, Lamia; Rutledge, Douglas N

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find simple objective analytical methods to assess the adulteration of orange juice by grapefruit juice. The adulterations by addition of grapefruit juice were studied by 3D-front-face fluorescence spectroscopy followed by Independent Components Analysis (ICA) and by classical methods such as free radical scavenging activity and total flavonoid content. The results of this study clearly indicate that frauds by adding grapefruit juice to orange juice can be detected at percentages as low as 1%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of Concentration of Living Immobilized Yeast Cells by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podrazký, Ondřej; Kuncová, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2005), s. 126-134 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /7./. Madrid, 04.04.2004-07.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0461; GA MŠk(CZ) OC 840.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : immobilization of cells * 2-D fluorescence spectroscopy * sol–gel Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2005

  5. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Unveils the Formation of Gold Nanoparticles in Corn X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Unveils the Formation of Gold Nanoparticles in Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Cruz-Jiménez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se determinó, mediante espectroscopía de absorción de rayos-X, la posible biotransformación de oro en maíz (variedad Golden que se germinó y creció en KAuCl4. Adicionalmente se investigó el efecto de la tiourea y el tiocianato de amonio en la absorción de oro por la planta de maíz. Los resultados indicaron que concentraciones menores a 160 mg Au/L, no afectaron la germinación o el crecimiento de las plántulas. Tanto la tiourea como el tiocianato de amonio incrementaron 6 veces el contenido de oro en las raíces, mientras que la tiourea provocó un incremento de 10 veces la concentración de oro en tallos con respecto a los tratamientos sin este compuesto. El 91% del oro en el maíz se encontró como Au(0 y el resto como Au(III. Los análisis de estructura fi na revelaron que el oro se encontraba con un número de coordinación de 9,5 aproximadamente a 2,86 Å, indicando una esfera de coordinación incompleta, lo cual implica la presencia de una nano-fase. Usando la ecuación de Borowski se determinó que las nanopartículas tenían un tamaño promedio de 10,36 nm.In this study, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the possible gold biotransformation by Zea mays (corn var. Golden, germinated and grown in a medium spikedwith KAuCl4. In addition, the gold uptake capacity of corn assisted by thiourea and ammoniumthiocyanate was investigated. Results showed that up to 160 mg/L, gold did no treduce corn seed germination or plant growth. Both thiourea and ammonium thiocyanateresulted in a 6-fold increase of gold concentration in roots and thiourea promoted a 10-fold increase of gold concentration in shoots. X-ray absorption near edge structure studies demonstrated that approximately 91% of the gold present in plant samples was Au(0. Theremaining 9% was present as Au(III. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fi ne structureresults showed that in corn roots, the gold coordination number was around 9

  6. Laser absorption spectroscopy using lead salt and quantum cascade tunable lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjou-Khales, Khosrow

    A new class of analytic instruments based on the detection of chemical species through their spectroscopic absorption 'fingerprint' is emerging based on the use of tunable semiconductor lasers as the excitation source. Advantages of this approach include compact device size, in-line measurement capability, and large signal-bandwidth product. To realize these advantages will require the marriage of laser devices with broad tunability in the infrared spectral range with sophisticated signal processing techniques. Currently, commercial devices based on short wavelength telecommunications type lasers exist but there is potential for much more versatile instruments based on longer wavelength operation. This thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part I present a theoretical analysis and experimental characterization of frequency and wavelength modulation spectroscopy using long wavelength infrared tunable lasers. The experimental measurements were carried out using commercially available lead salt lasers and excellent agreement is found between theoretically predicted performance and experimental verification. The lead salt laser has several important drawbacks as a source in practical instrumentation. In the second part of the thesis I report on the use of the quantum cascade (QC) laser for use in sensitive absorption spectroscopy. The QC laser is a new type of tunable device developed at Bell Laboratories. It features broad infrared tunability, single mode distributed feedback operation, and near room temperature lasing. Using the modulation techniques developed originally for the lead salt lasers, the QC laser was used to detect Nsb2O and other small molecules with absorption features near 8 mum wavelength. The noise equivalent absorption for our measurements was 5× 10sp{-5}/sqrt{Hz} which corresponds to a detection limit of ˜0.25 ppm-m/sqrt{Hz} for Nsb2O. The QC laser sensitivity was found to be limited by excess amplitude modulation in the detection

  7. Combining Sequential Extractions and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Quantitative and Qualitative Zinc Speciation in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Tatiana; Minkina, Tatiana; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Nevidomskaya, Dina; Burachevskaya, Marina; Tsitsuashvili, Viktoriya; Urazgildieva, Kamilya

    2017-04-01

    The combined use of X-ray absorption spectrometry and extractive fractionation is an effective approach for studying the interaction of metal ions with soil compounds and identifying the phases-carriers of metals in soil and their stable fixation. These studies were carried out using the technique of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and chemical extractive fractionation. In a model experiment the samples taken in Calcic Chernozem were artificially contaminated with higher portion of Zn(NO3)2 (2000 mg/kg). The metal were incubated in soil samples for 2 year. The samples of soil mineral and organic phases (calcite, kaolinite, bentonite, humic acids) were saturated with Zn2+ from a solution of nitrate salts of metal. The total content of Zn in soil and soil various phases was determined using the X-ray fluorescence method. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) Zn was measured at the Structural Materials Science beamline of the Kurchatov Center for Synchrotron Radiation. Sequential fractionation of Zn in soil conducted by Tessier method (Tessier et al., 1979) which determining 5 fractions of metals in soil: exchangeable, bound to Fe-Mn oxide, bound to carbonate, bound to the organic matter, and bound to silicate (residual). This methodology has so far more than 4000 citations (Web of Science), which demonstrates the popularity of this approach. Much Zn compounds are contained in uncontaminated soils in stable primary and secondary silicates inherited from the parental rocks (67% of the total concentrations in all fractions), which is a regional trait of soils in the fore-Caucasian plain. Extracted fractionation of metal compounds in soil samples, artificially contaminated with Zn salts, indicates the priority holding of Zn2+ ions by silicates, carbonates and Fe-Mn oxides. The Zn content significantly increases in the exchangeable fraction. Atomic structure study of the soil various phases saturated with Zn2+ ion by using (XANES) X-ray absorption spectroscopy

  8. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  9. Polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy of MnWO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmann, Nils; Hu, Zhiwei; Tjeng, Liu Hao [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Bohaty, Ladislav; Becker-Bohaty, Petra [Kristallographisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Tanaka, Arata [Department of Quantum Matter, Hiroshima University (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Multiferroic materials which combine magnetism and ferroelectricity currently attract considerable attention. One of the recently discovered multiferroic materials is MnWO{sub 4} (Huebnerite). It belongs to the group of multiferroics where a spontaneous electric polarization is caused by a spiral magnetic structure with a spin rotation axis not coinciding with the propagation vector. To investigate the details of this astonishing combination of electronic and magnetic properties, we look at the electronic structure with the use of polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy on single crystals of MnWO{sub 4}. The analysis of the experimental data on the L-edge of Mn is done by a configuration interaction calculation and is discussed.

  10. [Desmoid fibromatosis in absorption infrared spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and roentgen diffraction recording].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zejkan, A; Bejcek, Z; Horejs, J; Vrbová, H; Bakosová, M; Macholda, F; Rykl, D

    1989-10-01

    The authors present results of serial quality and quantity microanalyses of bone patterns and dental tissue patterns in patient with desmoid fibromatosis. Methods of absorption spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis with follow-up to x-ray examination are tested. The above mentioned methods function in a on-line system by means of specially adjusted monitor unit which is controlled centrally by the computer processor system. The whole process of measurement is fully automated and the data obtained are recorded processed in the unit data structure classified into index sequence blocks of data. Serial microanalyses offer exact data for the study of structural changes of dental and bone tissues which manifest themselves in order of crystal grid shifts. They prove the fact that microanalyses give new possibilities in detection and interpretation of chemical and structural changes of apatite cell.

  11. Degree of dissociation measured by FTIR absorption spectroscopy applied to VHF silane plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansonnens, L.; Howling, A.A.; Hollenstein, C.

    1997-10-01

    In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the fractional depletion of silane in a radio-frequency (rf) glow discharge. The technique used a simple single pass arrangement and was implemented in a large area industrial reactor for deposition of amorphous silicon. Measurements were made on silane plasmas for a range of excitation frequencies. It was observed that at constant plasma power, the fractional depletion increased from 35% at 13.56 MHz to 70% at 70 MHz. With a simple model based on the density continuity equations in the gas phase, it was shown that this increase is due to a higher dissociation rate and is largely responsible for the observed increase in the deposition rate with the frequency. (author) 5 figs., 30 refs

  12. Determination of cadmium in whole blood and urine by Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleban, P A; Pearson, K H

    1979-12-17

    Direct determination of cadmium in whole blood and urine can be achieved using Zeeman effect flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. Within-run precision studies for whole blood cadmium determinations gave relative standard deviations of 11.3% and 6.3% for 0.53 micrograms/l and 3.16 micrograms/l, respectively. Within-run precision studies for the urine analyses yielded relative standard deviations of 11.3% and 5.2% for 0.62 micrograms/l and 2.48 micrograms/l, respectively. The detection limit is 0.12 micrograms/l in the diluted specimens. Thus, this methodology may be used to quantitate normal and toxic cadmium levels in whole blood and urine.

  13. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  14. The Optical Absorption Coefficient of Maize Grains Investigated by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Páez, C. L.; Carballo-Carballo, A.; Rico-Molina, R.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Moreno-Martínez, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the maize and tortilla industry, it is important to characterize the color of maize ( Zea mays L.) grain, as it is one of the attributes that directly affect the quality of the tortillas consumed by the population. For this reason, the availability of alternative techniques for assessing and improving the quality of grain is valued. Photoacoustic spectroscopy has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing maize grain. So, the objective of the present study was to determine the optical absorption coefficient β of the maize grain used to make tortillas from two regions of Mexico: (a) Valles Altos, 2012-2013 production cycle and (b) Guasave, Sinaloa, 2013-2014 production cycle. Traditional reflectance measurements, physical characteristics of the grain and nutrient content were also calculated. The experimental results show different characteristics for maize grains.

  15. The application of synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy to problems of industrial heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meitzner, G.

    1994-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of catalytic chemistry is valuable for fine-tuning existing processes and for inventing new ones. However, active phases are hard to study, being typically dilute species in amorphous solids comprising many elements. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) can be applied to most catalysts under the appropriate in situ conditions. The ability is unique in observing all the trace elements in the catalysts forming active phases, poisons, and catalysts for unwanted side reactions. Every spectrum contains independent information on the average chemical state, and physical environment, of absorbing atoms. This information can yield new processes, and improvements in existing ones, after the rate of empirical advances in a technology has diminished. The authors discuss XAS studies of metallic and non-metallic components in industrial heterogeneous catalysts. The novel observations made possible by in situ measurement conditions are emphasized

  16. Identification of minority compounds in natural ilmenites by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepka, M.T.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Wolska, A.; Jablonski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → White pigment TiO 2 production process. → The principal component analysis using XANES. → Ilmenite accompanying chemical compounds identification. → Chemical binding of Mg in ilmenite depends on the climatic and geological conditions. -- Abstract: Natural ilmenites are used all over the world as raw materials in white pigment (TiO 2 ) production. Besides the FeTiO 3 in the raw material many other compounds are present. The chemical compounds based on the minority elements influence quality of the final product and are difficult to identify. The knowledge about chemical bonding of the minor elements enables to properly adjust chemical reactions during production processes and to improve quality of the final product. In this paper the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) identification of the chemical compounds formed by Mg, Mn and Cr in natural ilmenites originating from different places is presented.

  17. Tin Valence and Local Environments in Silicate Glasses as Determined From X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeown, D.; Buechele, A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to characterize the tin (Sn) environments in four borosilicate glass nuclear waste formulations, two silicate float glasses, and three potassium aluminosilicate glasses. Sn K-edge XAS data of most glasses investigated indicate Sn4+O6 units with average Sn-O distances near 2.03 Angstroms. XAS data for a float glass fabricated under reducing conditions show a mixture of Sn4+O6 and Sn2+O4 sites. XAS data for three glasses indicate Sn-Sn distances ranging from 3.43 to 3.53 Angstroms, that suggest Sn4+O6 units linking with each other, while the 4.96 Angstroms Sn-Sn distance for one waste glass suggests clustering of unlinked Sn4+O6 units.

  18. Diode laser absorption spectroscopy for process control: Sensor system design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, L.V.; Anklam, T.M.; Chambers, F.; Galanti, S.; Haynam, C.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1995-03-01

    A laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for process control. LAS has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both density and composition. In this paper the important features and components of an industrial LAS diagnostic are described. Application of this approach to vaporization processes requires careful selection of the species and transitions to be monitored The relative vapor pressure, hyperfine structure, isotopic frequency shifts, and electronic temperature all effect the selection of a particular transition. In this paper we describe the methodology for choosing the optimal transition or transitions. Coevaporation of a titanium-niobium alloy is used to illustrate the methodology. In a related paper, T.M. Anklam et al describe the application of this diagnostic to monitoring and controlling composition in a physical vapor deposition process of industrial interest

  19. Instrument for x-ray absorption spectroscopy with in situ electrical control characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Shu-Jui; Yang, Chao-Yao; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh; Chou, Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    We report a synchrotron-based setup capable of performing x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism with simultaneous electrical control characterizations. The setup can enable research concerning electrical transport, element- and orbital-selective magnetization with an in situ fashion. It is a unique approach to the real-time change of spin-polarized electronic state of a material/device exhibiting magneto-electric responses. The performance of the setup was tested by probing the spin-polarized states of cobalt and oxygen of Zn 1-x Co x O dilute magnetic semiconductor under applied voltages, both at low (∼20 K) and room temperatures, and signal variations upon the change of applied voltage were clearly detected

  20. An Attosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy Setup with a Water Window Attosecond source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Andrew; Yin, Yanchun; Li, Jie; Ren, Xiaoming; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yi; Chang, Zenghu

    2017-04-01

    Attosecond transient absorption, or time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, are excellent tools that can be used to investigate fast electron dynamics for a given atomic or molecular system. Recent push for high energy long wavelength few cycle laser sources has resulted in the production of x-ray spectra that would allow the probing of electron dynamics at the carbon k-edge in molecules such as CH4 and CO2. The motion of charges can be caused by photo-dissociation and charge migration. We present here the first results from our experimental setup where we produce a broadband attosecond pulse with spectra that stretches into the water window. National Science Foundation (1068604), Army Research Oce (W911NF-14-1-0383), Air Force Oce of Scientic Research (FA9550-15-1-0037, FA9550-16-1-0013) and the DARPA PULSE program by a Grant from AMRDEC (W31P4Q1310017).

  1. Diode laser absorption spectroscopy for studies of gas exchange in fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, L.; Gao, H.; Sjöholm, M.; Svanberg, S.

    2006-07-01

    Gas exchange in fruits, in particular oxygen transport in apples, was studied non-intrusively using wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectroscopy at about 761 nm, applied to the strongly scattering intact fruit structure. The applicability of the technique was demonstrated by studies of the influence of the skin to regulate the internal oxygen balance and of cling film in modifying it by observing the response of the signal from the internal oxygen gas to a transient change in the ambient gas concentration. Applications within controlled atmosphere fruit storage and modified atmosphere packaging are discussed. The results suggest that the technique could be applied to studies of a large number of problems concerning gas exchange in foods and in food packaging.

  2. Novel opportunities for time-resolved absorption spectroscopy at the X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B D; Abela, R

    2010-06-07

    Time-dependent X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of chemical reaction dynamics have a time resolution which is limited by: (a) the speed and efficiency of the reaction initiation; (b) the duration of the X-ray pulses used for the measurement; and (c) the brightness of the X-ray source. X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL), which will deliver 20-100 fs pulses of X-rays, with a peak brightness which is 10(10) times that of a synchrotron, will alleviate limitations (b) and (c). Furthermore, by including a synchronized source of UV, visible, IR or THz pump radiation, the XFEL will contribute to the solution of limitation (a). The present article describes the XFEL operating principle and the generic design of an XFEL facility, emphasizing the features of particular interest to the XAS investigator.

  3. Highly sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Watabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because H(2O(2 is generated by various oxidase-catalyzed reactions, a highly sensitive determination method of H(2O(2 is applicable to measurements of low levels of various oxidases and their substrates such as glucose, lactate, glutamate, urate, xanthine, choline, cholesterol and NADPH. We propose herein a new, highly sensitive method for the measurement of H(2O(2 and glucose using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: FCS has the advantage of allowing us to determine the number of fluorescent molecules. FCS measures the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity caused by fluorescent probe movement in a small light cavity with a defined volume generated by confocal illumination. We thus developed a highly sensitive determination system of H(2O(2 by FCS, where horseradish peroxidase (HRP catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between fluorescent molecules and proteins in the presence of H(2O(2. Our developed system gave a linear calibration curve for H(2O(2 in the range of 28 to 300 nM with the detection limit of 8 nM. In addition, by coupling with glucose oxidase (GOD-catalyzed reaction, the method allows to measure glucose in the range of 80 nM to 1.5 µM with detection limit of 24 nM. The method was applicable to the assay of glucose in blood plasma. The mean concentration of glucose in normal human blood plasma was determined to be 4.9 mM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In comparison with commercial available methods, the detection limit and the minimum value of determination for glucose are at least 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive in our system. Such a highly sensitive method leads the fact that only a very small amount of plasma (20 nL is needed for the determination of glucose concentration in blood plasma.

  4. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EIImtl in detergent micelles : Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaving Dijkstra, Dolf; Broos, J.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; van Hoek, A.; Robillard, George

    1997-01-01

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C

  5. Charge Carrier Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxides Studied by Femtosecond Transient Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang-Ming

    With the ability to disentangle electronic transitions that occur on different elements and local electronic structures, time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in condensed phase systems. In this dissertation, a visible-pump/XUV-probe transient absorption apparatus with femtosecond resolution was constructed to investigate the carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductors after photo-excitation. This includes timescales for carrier thermalization by carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering. The 30 -- 72 eV photon energy coverage (17 -- 40 nm wavelength) generated by a table-top XUV light source is suitable for probing the 3p-to-3d core level absorptions of various transition metal oxides (TMOs) with specificities to elements and oxidation states. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor-based materials is given. In addition, fundamentals of core-level spectroscopy and the high harmonic generation (HHG) process are also addressed in this introductory chapter. Specifications of the experimental apparatus that was constructed are summarized in Chapter 2, including the design concepts and characterization of performance. Chapter 3 presents the spectral tunability of the XUV pulses generated from a semi-infinite gas cell (SIGC), as well as the data acquisition procedures. Charge carrier relaxation dynamics in Co3O4 following the charge transfer excitation pathway at 400 nm are documented in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, various visible pump wavelengths are used to excite Co3O4 and the differences in the carrier dynamics versus excitation wavelength are considered. After selectively photoexciting a Si/TiO2 heterojunction, the resulted electron transfer process is observed and reported in Chapter 6. The concluding remarks of the dissertation are made in Chapter 7, while several ongoing time-resolved experiments are addressed in the Appendix sections.

  6. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. (topical review)

  7. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for evaluation of iron concentration in ferrofluids and yeast samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesh, N.A., E-mail: nikita.kulesh@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Mira 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Novoselova, I.P. [Ural Federal University, Mira 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, 236041 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Safronov, A.P. [Ural Federal University, Mira 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsen 106, 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Beketov, I.V.; Samatov, O.M. [Institute of Electrophysics UD RAS, Amundsen 106, 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kurlyandskaya, G.V. [Ural Federal University, Mira 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); University of the Basque Country UPV-EHU, 48940 Leioa (Spain); Morozova, M. [Ural Federal University, Mira 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Denisova, T.P. [Irkutsk State University, Karl Marks 1, 664003 Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    In this study, total reflection x-ray fluorescent (TXRF) spectrometry was applied for the evaluation of iron concentration in ferrofluids and biological samples containing iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles obtained by the laser target evaporation technique. Suspensions of maghemite nanoparticles of different concentrations were used to estimate the limitation of the method for the evaluation of nanoparticle concentration in the range of 1–5000 ppm in absence of organic matrix. Samples of single-cell yeasts grown in the nutrient media containing maghemite nanoparticles were used to study the nanoparticle absorption mechanism. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of applicability of TXRF for quantitative analysis in a wide range of iron oxide nanoparticle concentrations for biological samples and ferrofluids with a simple established protocol of specimen preparation. - Highlights: • Ferrofluids and yeasts samples were analysed by TXRF spectroscopy. • Simple protocol for iron quantification by means of TXRF was proposed. • Results were combined with magnetic, structural, and morphological characterization. • Preliminary conclusion on nanoparticles uptake mechanism was made.

  8. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for evaluation of iron concentration in ferrofluids and yeast samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulesh, N.A.; Novoselova, I.P.; Safronov, A.P.; Beketov, I.V.; Samatov, O.M.; Kurlyandskaya, G.V.; Morozova, M.; Denisova, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, total reflection x-ray fluorescent (TXRF) spectrometry was applied for the evaluation of iron concentration in ferrofluids and biological samples containing iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles obtained by the laser target evaporation technique. Suspensions of maghemite nanoparticles of different concentrations were used to estimate the limitation of the method for the evaluation of nanoparticle concentration in the range of 1–5000 ppm in absence of organic matrix. Samples of single-cell yeasts grown in the nutrient media containing maghemite nanoparticles were used to study the nanoparticle absorption mechanism. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of applicability of TXRF for quantitative analysis in a wide range of iron oxide nanoparticle concentrations for biological samples and ferrofluids with a simple established protocol of specimen preparation. - Highlights: • Ferrofluids and yeasts samples were analysed by TXRF spectroscopy. • Simple protocol for iron quantification by means of TXRF was proposed. • Results were combined with magnetic, structural, and morphological characterization. • Preliminary conclusion on nanoparticles uptake mechanism was made.

  9. Excitation relaxation dynamics and energy transfer in pigment-protein complexes of a dinoflagellate, revealed by ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazunori; Iida, Satoko; Takaichi, Shinichi; Mimuro, Mamoru; Murakami, Akio; Akimoto, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, found in aquatic photosynthetic organisms, contain a variety of carotenoids and chlorophylls. Most of the photosynthetic dinoflagellates possess two types of light-harvesting antenna complexes: peridinin (Peri)-chlorophyll (Chl) a/c-protein, as an intrinsic thylakoid membrane complex protein (iPCP), and water-soluble Peri-Chl a-protein, as an extrinsic membrane protein (sPCP) on the inner surface of the thylakoid. Peri is a unique carotenoid that has eight C=C bonds and one C=O bond, which results in a characteristic absorption band in the green wavelength region. In the present study, excitation relaxation dynamics of Peri in solution and excitation energy transfer processes of sPCP and the thylakoid membranes, prepared from the photosynthetic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium sp., are investigated by ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that Peri-to-Chl a energy transfer occurs via the Peri S 1 state with a time constant of 1.5 ps or 400 fs in sPCP or iPCP, respectively, and that Chl c-to-Chl a energy transfer occurs in the time regions of 350-400 fs and 1.8-2.6 ps.

  10. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puķīte

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS. While the Beer-Lambert law is strictly valid for a single light path only, the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of any absorber can be approximated as linear also for scattered light observations at a single wavelength if the absorption is weak. If the light path distribution is approximated not to vary with wavelength, also linearity between the optical depth and the product of the cross-section and the concentration of an absorber can be assumed. These assumptions are widely made for DOAS applications for scattered light observations.

    For medium and strong absorption of scattered light (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is no longer linear. In addition, for broad wavelength intervals the differences in the travelled light-paths at different wavelengths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength.

    However, the DOAS method can be extended to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals by the so called air mass factor modified (or extended DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs, but also require a priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function from radiative transfer modelling.

    We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as

  11. Development of a saturated absorption spectroscopy setup at IGISOL for characterisation of Fabry-Pérot interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldhof, S., E-mail: sarina.m.geldhof@jyu.fi; El Youbi, S.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I. [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland); Sonnenschein, V.; Terabayashi, R. [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering (Japan); Voss, A. [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    A saturated absorption spectroscopy setup was developed and optimised for the characterisation of a home-built and a commercial Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI). The free spectral range of these FPIs has been determined with reliable statistical and systematic errors. These FPIs will be used for accurate wavelength determination of broad- and narrowband pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers used in resonance ionisation spectroscopy experiments.

  12. Damped Lyman-alpha absorption by disk galaxies with large redshifts. III. Intermediate-resolution spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnshek, D.A.; Wolfe, A.M.; Lanzetta, K.M.; Briggs, F.H.; Cohen, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    New intermediate-resolution spectroscopy for six members of a sample of 68 moderate- to high-redshift QSOs is presented. Evidence is reported which indicates that seven strong absorption features in the QSO spectra are due to damped Ly-alpha absorption. A standard curve-of-growth analysis on five of the damped systems is performed, and relevant properties are tabulated and discussed. Six of the seven damped Ly-alpha systems have H I column densities of 2 x 10 to the 20th/sq cm or larger, while the remaining system has an H I column density of about 10 to the 20th/sq cm. It is suggested that damped Ly-alpha systems arise when a sight line intercepts a high-redshift protogalaxy disk containing a quiescent cloud component characterized by high column density and low effective velocity dispersion. At the same time, the sight line usually intercepts a broader turbulent component, which is identified as the halo, characterized by much lower column density and higher effective velocity dispersion. 42 refs

  13. FeS-Quantum-Dot Sensitized Metal Oxide Photoelectrodes: Photoelectrochemistry and Photoinduced Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idriss Bedja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2, ZnO nanoparticulate(-np, and ZnO-nanorod(-nr electrodes have been modified with FeS2 (pyrite nanoparticles. Quantum size effect is manifested by a blue shift in both absorption and photocurrent action spectra. PIA (photoinduced absorption spectroscopy, a multipurpose tool in the study of dye-sensitized solar cells, is used to study quantum-dot modified metal oxide (MO nanostructured electrodes. The PIA spectra showed an evidence for long-lived photoinduced charge separation. Time-resolved PIA showed that recombination between electrons and holes occurs on a millisecond timescale. Incident-photon-to-current efficiencies at 400 nm are ranged between 13% and 25%. The better solar cell performance of FeS2 on ZnO-nr over ZnO-np can be ascribed to the faster, unidirectional e-transport channels through the ZnO-nr as well as the longer electron lifetimes. The lower performances of electrodes can be explained by the presence of FeS2 phases other than the photoactive pyrite phase, as evidenced from XRD study.

  14. Optical and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in lead doped lithium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somma, F; Aloe, P; D' Acapito, F; Montereali, R M; Polosan, S; Secu, M; Vincenti, M A, E-mail: somma@fis.uniroma3.it

    2010-11-15

    LiF:Pb doped crystals were successfully grown by Kyropoulos method, starting with drying powders. The presence of Pb{sup 2+} ions in the LiF crystals were evidenced by the absorption band at 278 nm and by 375 nm photoluminescence. The presence of some other Pb structures with oxygen compounds in the as made samples was evidenced, decreasing after some annealing procedures. The local environment and valence state of Pb in LiF were studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at the Pb L{sub III} and L{sub I} edges. XANES data reveal that Pb is present as Pb{sup 2+} whereas EXAFS data show that it is incorporated in the crystal and not forming PbF{sub 2} precipitates. Identical spectra are obtained for samples as prepared and after thermal annealing up to 650 deg. C demonstrating the stability of the incorporation site. Also the concentration of Pb in the crystal has no effect on the location site of the metal as the same spectrum is obtained for specimens with different dopant concentrations.

  15. NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Wenig

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 levels in the Kowloon Tong and Mongkok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to mixing ratios reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74. Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84 when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time (13:30–14:30 LT – local time.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Structural Biology Div.

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  17. Atomic and ionic density measurement by laser absorption spectroscopy of magnetized or non-magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gourrierec, P.

    1989-11-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy is an appreciated diagnostic in plasma physics to measure atomic and ionic densities. We used it here more specifically on metallic plasmas. Firstly, a uranium plasma was created in a hollow cathode. 17 levels of U.I and U.II (12 for U.I and 5 for U.II) are measured by this method. The results are compared with the calculated levels of two models (collisional-radiative and LTE). Secondly, the theory of absorption in presence of a magnetic field is recalled and checked. Then, low-density magnetized plasma produced on our ERIC experiment (acronym for Experiment of Resonance Ionic Cyclotron), have been diagnosed successfully. The use of this technique on a low density plasma has not yet been published to our knowledge. The transverse temperature and the density of a metastable atomic level of a barium plasma has been derived. The evolution of a metastable ionic level of this element is studied in terms of two source parameters (furnace temperature and injected hyperfrequency power) [fr

  18. Use of interfacial layers to prolong hole lifetimes in hematite probed by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradzah, Alexander T.; Diale, Mmantsae; Maabong, Kelebogile; Krüger, Tjaart P. J.

    2018-04-01

    Hematite is a widely investigated material for applications in solar water oxidation due primarily to its small bandgap. However, full realization of the material continues to be hampered by fast electron-hole recombination rates among other weaknesses such as low hole mobility, short hole diffusion length and low conductivity. To address the problem of fast electron-hole recombination, researchers have resorted to growth of nano-structured hematite, doping and use of under-layers. Under-layer materials enhance the photo-current by minimising electron-hole recombination through suppressing of back electron flow from the substrate, such as fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), to hematite. We have carried out ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy on hematite in which Nb2O5 and SnO2 materials were used as interfacial layers to enhance hole lifetimes. The transient absorption data was fit with four different lifetimes ranging from a few hundred femtoseconds to a few nanoseconds. We show that the electron-hole recombination is slower in samples where interfacial layers are used than in pristine hematite. We also develop a model through target analysis to illustrate the effect of under-layers on electron-hole recombination rates in hematite thin films.

  19. Experimental study of radiative energy transport in dense plasmas by emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozieres, Maylis

    2016-01-01

    This PhD work is an experimental study, based on emission and absorption spectroscopy of hot and dense nanosecond laser-produced plasmas. Atomic physics in such plasmas is a complex subject and of great interest especially in the fields of astrophysics or inertial confinement fusion. On the atomic physics point of view, this means determining parameters such as the average ionization or opacity in plasmas at given electronic temperature and density. Atomic physics codes then need of experimental data to improve themselves and be validated so that they can be predictive for a wide range of plasmas. With this work we focus on plasmas whose electronic temperature varies from 10 eV to more than a hundred and whose density range goes from 10 -5 ato10 -2 g/cm 3 . In this thesis, there are two types of spectroscopic data presented which are both useful and necessary to the development of atomic physics codes because they are both characteristic of the state of the studied plasma: 1) some absorption spectra from Cu, Ni and Al plasmas close to local thermodynamic equilibrium; 2) some emission spectra from non local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas of C, Al and Cu. This work highlights the different experimental techniques and various comparisons with atomic physics codes and hydrodynamics codes. (author) [fr

  20. Hydrological and Biogeochemical Controls on Absorption and Fluorescence of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Guo, Weidong; Li, Yan; Stubbins, Aron; Li, Yizhen; Song, Guodong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Yuanyue

    2017-12-01

    The Kuroshio intrusion from the West Philippine Sea (WPS) and mesoscale eddies are important hydrological features in the northern South China Sea (SCS). In this study, absorption and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM) were determined to assess the impact of these hydrological features on DOM dynamics in the SCS. DOM in the upper 100 m of the northern SCS had higher absorption, fluorescence, and degree of humification than in the Kuroshio Current of the WPS. The results of an isopycnal mixing model showed that CDOM and humic-like FDOM inventories in the upper 100 m of the SCS were modulated by the Kuroshio intrusion. However, protein-like FDOM was influenced by in situ processes. This basic trend was modified by mesoscale eddies, three of which were encountered during the fieldwork (one warm eddy and two cold eddies). DOM optical properties inside the warm eddy resembled those of DOM in the WPS, indicating that warm eddies could derive from the Kuroshio Current through Luzon Strait. DOM at the center of cold eddies was enriched in humic-like fluorescence and had lower spectral slopes than in eddy-free waters, suggesting inputs of humic-rich DOM from upwelling and enhanced productivity inside the eddy. Excess CDOM and FDOM in northern SCS intermediate water led to export to the Pacific Ocean interior, potentially delivering refractory carbon to the deep ocean. This study demonstrated that DOM optical properties are promising tools to study active marginal sea-open ocean interactions.

  1. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of Electrochemical Processes in Renewable Energy Storage and Conversion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmand, Maryam [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-05-19

    The development of better energy conversion and storage devices, such as fuel cells and batteries, is crucial for reduction of our global carbon footprint and improving the quality of the air we breathe. However, both of these technologies face important challenges. The development of lower cost and better electrode materials, which are more durable and allow more control over the electrochemical reactions occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interface, is perhaps most important for meeting these challenges. Hence, full characterization of the electrochemical processes that occur at the electrodes is vital for intelligent design of more energy efficient electrodes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a short-range order, element specific technique that can be utilized to probe the processes occurring at operating electrode surfaces, as well for studying the amorphous materials and nano-particles making up the electrodes. It has been increasingly used in recent years to study fuel cell catalysts through application of the and #916; and mgr; XANES technique, in combination with the more traditional X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) techniques. The and #916; and mgr; XANES data analysis technique, previously developed and applied to heterogeneous catalysts and fuel cell electrocatalysts by the GWU group, was extended in this work to provide for the first time space resolved adsorbate coverages on both electrodes of a direct methanol fuel cell. Even more importantly, the and #916; and mgr; technique was applied for the first time to battery relevant materials, where bulk properties such as the oxidation state and local geometry of a cathode are followed.

  2. Far-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy of amorphous and polycrystalline gallium arsenide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    We have reported far-infrared reflection absorption spectra (30-320CM -1 ) at 30 and 310K for nine films of non-stoichiometric GaAs. The FIRRAS measurements were performed using the grazing incidence FIR double-modulation spectroscopy technique first described by DaCosta and Coleman. The films were fabricated by molecular beam deposition on metallized substrates for two As/Ga molecular beam flux ratios. The films were characterized by depth profilometry, IRAS, XRD, and x-ray microprobe analysis. Film thicknesses ranged from 800 to 5800 angstrom and compositions were 45-50% As for a MB flux ratio of 0.29 and 60-70% As for a ratio of 1.12. FIRRAS measurements were made and characterizations performed for as-deposited films and for 5 hour anneals at 473, 573, 673 and 723 degrees C. Vibrational spectra of the crystallized films were interpreted in terms of the exact reflectivity of a thin dielectric film on a conducting substrate, using a classical Lorentzian dielectric function for the response of the film. Resonances appearing in the open-quote forbidden close-quote region between the TO and LO frequencies were modelled with an effective medium approximation and are interpreted as arising from small-scale surface roughness. The behavior of the amorphous film spectra were examined within two models. The effective force constant model describes the variation of the reflection-absorption maxima with measured crystallite size in terms of the effective vibration frequency of 1-D atomic chains having force constants distributed according to the parameters of the crystalline-to-amorphous relaxation length and the crystalline to amorphous force constant ratio. The dielectric function continuum model uses the relaxation of the crystal momentum selection rule to calculate the reflection-absorption spectrum based on a dielectric function in which the oscillator strength is the normalized product of a constant dipole strength and the smoothed vibrational density of states

  3. Study of high density polyethylene under UV irradiation or mechanical stress by fluorescence spectroscopy; Etude du comportement du polyethylene haute densite sous irradiation ultraviolette ou sollicitation mecanique par spectroscopie de fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douminge, L.

    2010-05-15

    Due to their diversity and their wide range of applications, polymers have emerged in our environment. For technical applications, these materials can be exposed to aggressive environment leading to an alteration of their properties. The effects of this degradation are linked to the concept of life duration, corresponding to the time required for a property to reach a threshold below which the material becomes unusable. Monitoring the ageing of polymer materials constitute a major challenge. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique able to provide accurate information concerning this issue. In this study, emphasis was placed on the use of fluorescence spectroscopy to study the phenomena involved in either the UV radiation or mechanical stresses of a polymer. In the case of high density polyethylene, the lack of intrinsic fluorescent signal leads to the use of a dye. This dye gives a fluorescent response depending on its microenvironment. All modifications in the macromolecular chain generate a shift of the fluorescent peak. This work can be dissociated in two major parts, on one hand the influence of UV aging on the fluorescent response and in another hand the influence of mechanical stresses. In the first part, complementary analyses like FTIR or DSC are used to correlate fluorescent results with known photo degradation mechanisms. The results show the great sensibility of the technique to the microstructural rearrangement in the polymer. In the second part, the dependence between the stress and the fluorescence emission gives opportunity to evaluate internal stresses in the material during cyclic solicitations. (author)

  4. Fiber-based time-resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmanova, M.; Lukina, M.; Orlova, A.; Studier, H.; Zagaynova, E.; Becker, W.; Shcheslavskiy, V.

    2017-07-01

    The study of metabolic and oxygen states of cells in a tumor in vivo is crucial for understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the tumor development and provides background for the relevant tumor's treatment. Here, we show that a specially designed implantable fiber-optical probe provides a promising tool for optical interrogation of metabolic and oxygen states of a tumor in vivo. In our experiments, the excitation light from a ps diode laser source is delivered to the sample through an exchangeable tip via a multimode fiber, and the emission light is transferred to the detector by another multimode fiber. Fluorescence lifetime of nicotinamid adenine dinucleotide (NAD(P)H) and phosphorescence lifetime of an oxygen sensor based on iridium (III) complex of enzothienylpyridine (BTPDM1) are explored both in model experiment in solutions, and in living mice. The luminescence spectroscopy data is substantiated with immunohistochemistry experiments. To the best of our knowledge, the measurements of both metabolic status and oxygenation of tumor in vivo by fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime spectroscopy with a fiber-optic probe are done for the first time.

  5. A flexible gas flow reaction cell for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroner, Anna B., E-mail: anna.kroner@diamond.ac.uk; Gilbert, Martin; Duller, Graham; Cahill, Leo; Leicester, Peter; Woolliscroft, Richard; Shotton, Elizabeth J. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110DE (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Khaled M. H. [UK Catalysis Hub, Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110FA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A capillary-based sample environment with hot air blower and integrated gas system was developed at Diamond to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of materials under time-resolved, in situ conditions. The use of a hot air blower, operating in the temperature range of 298-1173 K, allows introduction of other techniques e.g. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy for combined techniques studies. The flexibility to use either quartz or Kapton capillaries allows users to perform XAS measurement at energies as low as 5600 eV. To demonstrate performance, time-resolved, in situ XAS results of Rh catalysts during the process of activation (Rh K-edge, Ce L{sub 3}-edge and Cr K-edge) and the study of mixed oxide membrane (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3−δ}) under various partial oxygen pressure conditions are described.

  6. Multipitched Diffraction Gratings for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the application of metal-coated diffraction gratings possessing multiple simultaneous pitch values for surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. SEIRA increases the magnitude of vibrational signals in infrared measurements by one of several mechanisms, most frequently involving the enhanced electric field associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). While the majority of SEIRA applications to date have employed nanoparticle-based plasmonic systems, recent advances have shown how various metals and structures lead to similar signal enhancement. Recently, diffraction grating couplers have been demonstrated as a highly tunable platform for SEIRA. Indeed, gratings are an experimentally advantageous platform due to the inherently tunable nature of surface plasmon excitation at these surfaces since both the grating pitch and incident angle can be used to modify the spectral location of the plasmon resonance. In this work, we use laser interference lithography (LIL) to fabricate gratings possessing multiple pitch values by subjecting photoresist-coated glass slides to repetitive exposures at varying orientations. After metal coating, these gratings produced multiple, simultaneous plasmon peaks associated with the multipitched surface, as identified by infrared reflectance measurements. These plasmon peaks could then be coupled to vibrational modes in thin films to provide localized enhancement of infrared signals. We demonstrate the flexibility and tunability of this platform for signal enhancement. It is anticipated that, with further refinement, this approach might be used as a general platform for broadband enhancement of infrared spectroscopy.

  7. X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopy studies of molybdenum environments in borosilicate waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, David A.; Gan, Hao; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-05-01

    Mo-containing high-level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses were investigated as part of an effort to improve Mo loading while avoiding yellow phase crystallization. Previous work showed that additions of vanadium decrease yellow phase formation and increases Mo solubility. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize Mo environments in HLW borosilicate glasses and to investigate possible structural relationships between Mo and V. Mo XAS spectra for the glasses indicate isolated tetrahedral Mo6+O4 with Mo-O distances near 1.75 Å. V XANES indicate tetrahedral V5+O4 as the dominant species. Raman spectra show composition dependent trends, where Mo-O symmetrical stretch mode frequencies (ν1) are sensitive to the mix of alkali and alkaline earth cations, decreasing by up to 10 cm-1 for glasses that change from Li+ to Na+ as the dominant network-modifying species. This indicates that MoO4 tetrahedra are isolated from the borosilicate network and are surrounded, at least partly, by Na+ and Li+. Secondary ν1 frequency effects, with changes up to 7 cm-1, were also observed with increasing V2O5 and MoO3 content. These secondary trends may indicate MoO4-MoO4 and MoO4-VO4 clustering, suggesting that V additions may stabilize Mo in the matrix with respect to yellow phase formation.

  8. UV Absorption Spectroscopy in Water-Filled Antiresonant Hollow Core Fibers for Pharmaceutical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Nissen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to a worldwide increased use of pharmaceuticals and, in particular, antibiotics, a growing number of these substance residues now contaminate natural water resources and drinking supplies. This triggers a considerable demand for low-cost, high-sensitivity methods for monitoring water quality. Since many biological substances exhibit strong and characteristic absorption features at wavelengths shorter than 300 nm, UV spectroscopy presents a suitable approach for the quantitative identification of such water-contaminating species. However, current UV spectroscopic devices often show limited light-matter interaction lengths, demand sophisticated and bulky experimental infrastructure which is not compatible with microfluidics, and leave large fractions of the sample analyte unused. Here, we introduce the concept of UV spectroscopy in liquid-filled anti-resonant hollow core fibers, with large core diameters and lengths of approximately 1 m, as a means to overcome such limitations. This extended light-matter interaction length principally improves the concentration detection limit by two orders of magnitude while using almost the entire sample volume—that is three orders of magnitude smaller compared to cuvette based approaches. By integrating the fibers into an optofluidic chip environment and operating within the lowest experimentally feasible transmission band, concentrations of the application-relevant pharmaceutical substances, sulfamethoxazole (SMX and sodium salicylate (SS, were detectable down to 0.1 µM (26 ppb and 0.4 µM (64 ppb, respectively, with the potential to reach significantly lower detection limits for further device integration.

  9. UV Absorption Spectroscopy in Water-Filled Antiresonant Hollow Core Fibers for Pharmaceutical Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Mona; Doherty, Brenda; Hamperl, Jonas; Kobelke, Jens; Weber, Karina; Henkel, Thomas; Schmidt, Markus A

    2018-02-06

    Due to a worldwide increased use of pharmaceuticals and, in particular, antibiotics, a growing number of these substance residues now contaminate natural water resources and drinking supplies. This triggers a considerable demand for low-cost, high-sensitivity methods for monitoring water quality. Since many biological substances exhibit strong and characteristic absorption features at wavelengths shorter than 300 nm, UV spectroscopy presents a suitable approach for the quantitative identification of such water-contaminating species. However, current UV spectroscopic devices often show limited light-matter interaction lengths, demand sophisticated and bulky experimental infrastructure which is not compatible with microfluidics, and leave large fractions of the sample analyte unused. Here, we introduce the concept of UV spectroscopy in liquid-filled anti-resonant hollow core fibers, with large core diameters and lengths of approximately 1 m, as a means to overcome such limitations. This extended light-matter interaction length principally improves the concentration detection limit by two orders of magnitude while using almost the entire sample volume-that is three orders of magnitude smaller compared to cuvette based approaches. By integrating the fibers into an optofluidic chip environment and operating within the lowest experimentally feasible transmission band, concentrations of the application-relevant pharmaceutical substances, sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sodium salicylate (SS), were detectable down to 0.1 µM (26 ppb) and 0.4 µM (64 ppb), respectively, with the potential to reach significantly lower detection limits for further device integration.

  10. Quantifying the Aggregation Factor in Carbon Nanotube Dispersions by Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Pathangi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR wavelength region has been used to quantify the aggregation factor of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in liquid media through a series of controlled experiments. SWCNT bundles are dispersed in selected solvents using a calibrated ultrasonicator, which helps in determining the true amount of energy used in the exfoliation process. We also establish the selectivity of the centrifugation process, under the conditions used, in removing the nanotube aggregates as a function of the sonication time and the dispersion solvent. This study, along with the calibration of the sonication process, is shown to be very important for measuring the true aggregation factor of SWCNTs through a modified approach. We also show that the systematic characterization of SWCNT dispersions by optical spectroscopy significantly contributes to the success of dielectrophoresis (DEP of nanotubes at predefined on-chip positions. The presence of individually dispersed SWCNTs in the dispersions is substantiated by dielectrophoretic assembly and post-DEP electromechanical measurements.

  11. Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy of Polymer-Based Organophotoredox Catalysts Mimicking Transition-Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamhawi, Abdelqader; Paul, Anam C.; Smith, Justin D.; Handa, Sachin; Liu, Jinjun

    2017-06-01

    Transition-metal complexes of rare earth metals including ruthenium and iridium are most commonly employed as visible-light photocatalysts. Despite their highly important and broad applications, they have many disadvantages including high cost associated with low abundance in earth crust, potential toxicity, requirement of specialized ligands for desired activity, and difficulty in recycling of metal contents as well as associated ligands. Polymer-based organophotoredox catalysts are promising alternatives and possess unique advantages such as easier synthesis from inexpensive starting material, longer excited state life time, broad range of activity, sustainability, and recyclability. In this research talk, time-resolved photoluminescence and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy measurements of three novel polymer-based organophotoredox catalysts will be presented. By our synthetic team, their catalytic activity has been proven in some highly valuable chemical transformations, that otherwise require transition metal complexes. Time-resolved spectroscopic investigations have demonstrated that photoinduced processes in these catalysts are similar to the transition metal complexes. Especially, intramolecular vibrational relaxation, internal conversion, and intersystem crossing from the S1 state to the T1 state all occur on a sub-picosecond timescale. The long lifetime of the T1 state ( 2-3 microsecond) renders these polymers potent oxidizing and reducing agents. A spectroscopic and kinetic model has been developed for global fitting of TA spectra in both the frequency and time domains. Implication of the current ultrafast spectroscopy studies of these novel molecules to their roles in photocatalysis will be discussed.

  12. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  13. Characterization of Germanium Speciation in Sphalerite (ZnS from Central and Eastern Tennessee, USA, by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Bonnet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy was used on zoned sphalerites (ZnS from two world-class Mississippi Valley Type deposits, the Central and Eastern Tennessee Mining district, USA, in order to investigate germanium oxidation states. Due to the low germanium concentrations of these samples, it was necessary to perform the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS in fluorescence mode. The overlapping of the Zn Kβ and Ge Kα emission lines meant that a high energy-resolution was required. This was achieved using crystal analysers and allowed a bandwidth of 1.3 eV to be obtained. Experimental spectra were compared to XANES calculations and three configurations of germanium incorporation into sphalerite were identified. The first two, the most prevalent, show germanium (II and (IV surrounded by sulphur atoms in tetrahedral coordination, suggesting the replacement of Zn by Ge. In the third configuration, germanium (IV is surrounded by oxygen atoms. This third configuration is unexpected for a zinc sulphide mineral and it resembles that of argutite (GeO2.

  14. Evaluation of self-absorption coefficients of aluminum emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sherbini, A.M.; El Sherbini, Th.M.; Hegazy, H.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In quantitative Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements it is essential to account for the effect of self-absorption on the emission lines intensity. In order to quantify this effect, in this paper we propose a simple method for evaluating the ratio between the actual measured line intensity and the intensity expected in absence of self-absorption and, if necessary, correcting the effect of self-absorption on line intensity. The method, based on a homogeneous plasma model, is applicable when the plasma electron density is known and in particular to lines whose Stark broadening parameter is available

  15. Distinct local structure of nanoparticles and nanowires of V2O5 probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, B.; Iadecola, A.; Maugeri, L.; Bendele, M.; Okubo, M.; Li, H.; Zhou, H.; Mizokawa, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2013-12-01

    We have used V K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy to study local structures of bulk, nanoparticles and nanowires of V2O5. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements show different local displacements in the three morphologically different V2O5 samples. It is found that the nanowires have a significantly ordered chain structure in comparison to the V2O5 bulk. In contrast, nanoparticles have larger interlayer disorder. The x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra show different electronic structure that appears to be related with the local atomic disorder in the three V2O5 samples.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the keV range with laser generated high harmonic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seres, Enikoe; Seres, Jozsef; Spielmann, Christian

    2006-01-01

    By irradiating He and Ne atoms with 3 mJ, 12 fs, near infrared laser pulses from a tabletop laser system, the authors generated spatially and temporally coherent x rays up to a photon energy of 3.5 keV. With this source it is possible to use high-harmonic radiation for x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the keV range. They were able to clearly resolve the L absorption edges of titanium and copper and the K edges of aluminum and silicon. From the fine structure of the x-ray absorption they estimated the interatomic distances

  17. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to measure molecular autofluorescence in diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Cinthia Zanini

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) comprises a complex metabolic syndrome, caused by reduced or absent secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta cells, leading to hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia promotes glycation of proteins and, consequently, the appearance of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Currently, diabetic patients are monitored by determining levels of glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The complications caused by hyperglycemia may be divided into micro and macrovascular complications, represented by retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease. Albumin (HSA) is the most abundant serum protein in the human body and is subject to glycation. The Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is the precursor molecule of heme synthesis, structural component of hemoglobin. The in vitro and animals studies have indicated that hyperglycemia promotes a decrease in its concentration in erythrocytes. The fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique widely used in biomedical field. The autofluorescence corresponds to the intrinsic fluorescence present in some molecules, this being associated with the same structure. The aim of this study was to use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure levels of erythrocyte PpIX autofluorescence and AGE-HSA in diabetic and healthy subjects and compare them with levels of blood glucose and HbA1c. This study was conducted with 151 subjects (58 controls and 93 diabetics). Epidemiological data of patients and controls were obtained from medical records. For control subjects, blood glucose levels were obtained from medical records and levels of Hb1Ac obtained by using commercial kits. The determination of the PpIX autofluorescence was performed with excitation at 405 nm and emission at 632 nm. Determination of AGE-HSA was performed with excitation at 370 nm and emission at 455 nm. Approximately 50% of diabetic had micro and macrovascular lesions resulting from hyperglycemia. There were no significant differences in the PpIX emission intensity values

  18. Absorption Spectroscopy in Hollow-Glass Waveguides Using Infrared Diode Lasers[4817-25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Kelly, James F.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hartman, John S.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Alan Fried

    2002-01-01

    Near- and mid-infrared diode lasers combined with flexible, hollow waveguides hold the promise of light weight, field portable, fast response gas sensors. The advantages of using the waveguides compared to White or Herriott multireflection cells include a small gas volume, a high photon fill factor in the waveguide, which increases molecule-light interactions, and reduction or elimination of optical fringing, which usually sets the practical limit of detectivity in absorption spectroscopy. Though hollow waveguides have been commercially available for several years, relatively few results have been reported in the literature. We present here results from our laboratory where we have injected infrared laser light into straight and coiled lengths of hollow waveguides and performed direct and wavelength modulated absorption spectroscopy on nitrous oxide, ethylene, and nitric oxide. Using a 1 mm bore, 3 meter long coiled waveguide coated for the near infrared, nitrous oxide transitions near 6595 cm-1 were observed under flowing conditions. Signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 1500:1 with RMS noise equal to 2 X 10-5 were measured. In the mid-infrared light from either a 10.1 or 5.3 micron lead salt diode laser was injected into a three meter length of 1 mm bore hollow waveguide coated for the mid-infrared. The waveguide was coiled with one loop at a diameter of 52 cm. Ethylene transitions were observed in the vicinity of 985 cm-1 with a static fill of 0.2 Torr of pure ethylene in the waveguide and nitric oxide transitions were observed in the vicinity of 1906 cm-1 using either a flow or a static fill of 1 ppm NO in nitrogen. In direct absorption the NO transitions are observed to have a signal-to-noise of approximately 5:1 for transitions with absorbances on the order of 10-3. Using wavelength modulated techniques the signal-to-noise ratio improves at least an order of magnitude. These encouraging results indicate that waveguides can be used for in situ gas monitoring

  19. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Difference Spectroscopy to Characterize Nanoparticles and their Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Miranda N.; Delong, Robert K.

    2016-09-01

    Two dimensional fluorescence difference spectroscopy (2D FDS) detects nanoparticle interactions following surface functionalization and biomolecule loading by generating a spectral signature of the fluorescent intensity per excitation and emission wavelengths. Comparing metal oxide nanoparticles revealed a unique spectral signature per material composition. 2D FDS showed to be sensitive to changes in surface properties between ZnO NPs synthesized by different methods. ZnO NP loaded with glycol chitosan, polyacrylic acid (PAA), or methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) exhibited a distinct spectral signature shift. ZnO NP loaded with Torula Yeast RNA (TYRNA)(640 nm), polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (pIC)(680 nm), or splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO)(650 nm) each revealed a shift in emission. Ras-Binding domain (RBD) at three concentrations (25, 37.5, 50 μg/mL) showed that fluorescent intensity was inversely related to the concentration of protein loaded. These data support 2D FDS as a novel technique in identifying nanoparticles and their surface interactions as a quality assurance tool.

  20. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  1. Probing GFP-actin diffusion in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelke, Hanna; Heinrich, Doris; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2010-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells is continuously remodeled by polymerization and depolymerization of actin. Consequently, the relative content of polymerized filamentous actin (F-actin) and monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is subject to temporal and spatial fluctuations. Since fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) can measure the diffusion of fluorescently labeled actin it seems likely that FCS allows us to determine the dynamics and hence indirectly the structural properties of the cytoskeleton components with high spatial resolution. To this end we investigate the FCS signal of GFP-actin in living Dictyostelium discoideum cells and explore the inherent spatial and temporal signatures of the actin cytoskeleton. Using the free green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reference, we find that actin diffusion inside cells is dominated by G-actin and slower than diffusion in diluted cell extract. The FCS signal in the dense cortical F-actin network near the cell membrane is probed using the cytoskeleton protein LIM and is found to be slower than cytosolic G-actin diffusion. Furthermore, we show that polymerization of the cytoskeleton induced by Jasplakinolide leads to a substantial decrease of G-actin diffusion. Pronounced fluctuations in the distribution of the FCS correlation curves can be induced by latrunculin, which is known to induce actin waves. Our work suggests that the FCS signal of GFP-actin in combination with scanning or spatial correlation techniques yield valuable information about the local dynamics and concomitant cytoskeletal properties

  2. Confined diffusion in tubular structures analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on a mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etienne, Emilien; Lenne, Pierre-Francois; Sturgis, James N.; Rigneault, Herve

    2006-01-01

    In fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis it is generally assumed that molecular species diffuse freely in volumes much larger than the three-dimensional FCS observation volume. However, this standard assumption is not valid in many measurement conditions, particularly in tubular structures with diameters in the micrometer range, such as those found in living cells (organelles, dendrites) and microfluidic devices (capillaries,reaction chambers). As a result the measured autocorrelation functions (ACFs) deviate from those predicted for free diffusion, and this can shift the measured diffusion coefficient by as much as ∼50% when the tube diameter is comparable with the axial extension of the FCS observation volume. We show that the range of validity of the FCS measurements can be drastically improved if the tubular structures are located in the close vicinity of a mirror on which FCS is performed. In this case a new fluctuation time in the ACF, arising from the diffusion of fluorescent probes in optical fringes,permits measurement of the real diffusion coefficient within the tubular structure without assumptions about either the confined geometry orthe FCS observation volume geometry. We show that such a measurement can be done when the tubular structure contains at least one pair of dark and bright fringes resulting from interference between the incoming and the reflected excitation beams on the mirror surface. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and IscS-EGFP in the cytoplasm of living Escherichiacoli illustrates the capabilities of the technique

  3. Spatially resolved x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of beryllium capsule implosions at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Bishel, D. T.; Saunders, A. M.; Scott, H. A.; Kyrala, G.; Kline, J.; MacLaren, S.; Thorn, D. B.; Yi, S. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Falcone, R. W.; Doeppner, T.

    2017-10-01

    Beryllium ablators used in indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are doped with copper to prevent preheat of the cryogenic hydrogen fuel. Here, we present analysis of spatially resolved copper K- α fluorescence spectra from the beryllium ablator layer. It has been shown that K- α fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to measure plasma conditions of partially ionized dopants in high energy density systems. In these experiments, K-shell vacancies in the copper dopant are created by the hotspot emission at stagnation, resulting in K-shell fluorescence at bang time. Spatially resolved copper K- α emission spectra are compared to atomic kinetics and radiation code simulations to infer density and temperature profiles. This work was supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DE-NA0001859, under the auspices of the US DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and by Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA52396.

  4. Pancreatic tumor detection using hypericin-based fluorescence spectroscopy and cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Harish; Geary, Kevin; Fetterman, Harold R.; Saxton, Romaine E.

    2005-04-01

    Hypericin is a novel, highly fluorescent photosensitizer that exhibits selective tumor cell uptake properties and is particularly resistant to photobleaching. In this study, we have characterized hypericin uptake in human pancreatic tumor cells with relation to incubation time, cell number, and drug concentration. Ex vivo hypericin based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed to detect the presence of MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c nude mice, as well as to quantify gross tumor burden. Hypericin based cytology of peritoneal lavage samples, using both one and two photon laser confocal microscopy, demonstrated more than a two-fold increase in fluorescence emission of pancreatic tumor cells as compared to control samples. In vitro treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with hypericin based photodynamic therapy showed tumor cell cytotoxicity in a drug dose, incident laser power, and time dependent manner. For these experiments, a continuous wavelength solid-state laser source (532 nm) was operated at power levels in the range of 100-400 mW. Potential applications of hypericin in tumor diagnosis, staging, and therapy will be presented.

  5. A closed form for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments in submicrometer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguigno, Luigi; De Santo, Ilaria; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful technique for measuring low concentrations of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion coefficients in an open detection volume. However, in several practical cases, when FCS measurements are carried out in small compartments like microchannels, neglecting boundary effects could lead to erroneous results. Here, a close form solution is proposed to explicitly account for the presence of walls located at a distance comparable with the characteristic detection volume lengths. We derive a one-dimensional diffusion constrained model and then generalize the solution to the two- and the three-dimensional constrained cases. We further indicate within which limits the standard autocorrelation function (ACF) model gives reliable results in microconfinement. Our model relies just on the assumption of elastic hits at the system walls and succeeds in describing the ACF of fluorescent probes confined along one direction. Through the analysis of FCS experimental data, we are able to predict the correct shape of the ACF in channels of micrometric and submicrometric width and measure the extent of lateral confinement. In addition, it permits the investigation of microstructured material features such as cages and cavities having dimensions on the micrometric range. On the basis of the proposed model, we also show in which conditions confinement could generate an apparent time dependent probe mobility, thus allowing a proper interpretation of the transport process taking place in submicrometric compartments.

  6. Tracking variations of fluorescent dissolved organic matter during wastewater treatment by accumulative fluorescence emission spectroscopy combined with principal component, second derivative and canonical correlation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xujing; Yu, Huibin; Yan, Zongcheng; Gao, Hongjie; Zhang, Yizhang

    2018-03-01

    Accumulative fluorescence emission (AFE) spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis (PCA), second derivative and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was firstly developed into an available tool to track variations in dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions and contents during wastewater treatment. Samples were collected from a wastewater treatment plant with a traditional anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) process. The AFE spectroscopy deduced from the sum of intensities along the excitation wavelengths of fluorescence excitation emission matrix (EEM), could distinctly track tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, fulvic-like substances. The AFE spectroscopy with the PCA not only disaggregated DOM fractions into the tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, microbial humic-like, fulvic-like and humic-like substances, but discriminated DOM fractions from the physical sedimentation, anaerobic/anoxic and oxic processes. Absolute areas of fluorescence components obtained by the second derivative AFF spectra had positive liner correlations with Fmax of the relevant components modeling from EEM-PARAFAC, especially the tryptophan-like (R 2  = 0.95, p < 0.01) and tyrosine-like (R 2  = 0.83, p < 0.01) substances. The CCA of the sites presented that the potential factors contained the tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like substances. This indirectly proved that the tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like substances were the dominant components of fluorescent DOM, which were further removed in A2O than the other fluorescent components. The CCA of the fluorescent components exhibited that the potential factors included the sites #1 to #6, which were located in the original wastewater, sand setting, primary sedimentation, anaerobic, anoxic, facultative units. This elaborated that the fluorescent components were mainly degraded in the physical sedimentation, anaerobic and anoxic processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding charge carrier relaxation processes in terbium arsenide nanoparticles using transient absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoef, Laura R.

    Erbium arsenide nanoparticles epitaxially grown within III-V semiconductors have been shown to improve the performance of devices for applications ranging from thermoelectrics to THz pulse generation. The small size of rare-earth nanoparticles suggests that interesting electronic properties might emerge as a result of both spatial confinement and surface states. However, ErAs nanoparticles do not exhibit any signs of quantum confinement or an emergent bandgap, and these experimental observations are understood from theory. The incorporation of other rare-earth monopnictide nanoparticles into III-V hosts is a likely path to engineering carrier excitation, relaxation and transport dynamics for optoelectronic device applications. However, the electronic structure of these other rare-earth monopnictide nanoparticles remains poorly understood. The objective of this research is to explore the electronic structure and optical properties of III-V materials containing novel rare-earth monopnictides. We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of TbAs nanoparticles in III-V hosts. We start with TbAs:GaAs, which was expected to be similar to ErAs:GaAs. We study the dynamics of carrier relaxation into the TbAs states using optical pump terahertz probe transient absorption spectroscopy. By analyzing how the carrier relaxation rates depend on pump fluence and sample temperature, we conclude that the TbAs states are saturable. Saturable traps suggest the existence of a bandgap for TbAs nanoparticles, in sharp contrast with previous results for ErAs. We then apply the same experimental technique to two samples of TbAs nanoparticles in InGaAs with different concentrations of TbAs. We observe similar relaxation dynamics associated with trap saturation, though the ability to resolve these processes is contingent upon a high enough TbAs concentration in the sample. We have also constructed an optical pump optical probe transient absorption

  8. [In-situ monitoring algorithm of gases poisonous elements concentration with ultraviolet optical absorption spectroscopy based on recursion iterative method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-feng; Jiang, Xu-qian

    2012-01-01

    The key and challenge problem of in-situ monitoring poisonous elements of gases is how to separate the various gases absorption signal from mixed gases absorption spectroscopy and compute it's accuracy concentration? Here we present a new algorithms in return recursion iteration based on Lambert-Beer principle. In the algorithms, recurred by the character of absorption peak of various gases in the band of 190-290 nm UV rays continuous spectroscopy and the character of twin element fold for absorbance are used. Firstly, the authors suppose that there is no absorption for others gases in the character absorption band for a certain gas, the authors can inference the initial concentration of the gas. Then the authors switch to another character spectroscopy, and put the photons that gases absorption out of the total number of absorbed photons that are measured. So we could get the initial concentration of another gas. By analogy the authros can get the initial concentration of all kinds of other poisonous elements. Then come back to the character spectroscopy of the first gas, the authors can get a new concentration of the first gas from the difference between the total number of absorbed photons and the photons that other gases absorption. By analogy the authors can get the iterative concentration of other gases, by irterating this process repeatly for some times until the measurement error of the adjacent gas concentration is smaller than a certain numerical value. Finally the authors can get the real and accurate concentration of all kinds of gases. Experiment shows that the authors can get the accurate concentration of all kinds of gases with the algorithm. The accuracy can be within 2%, and at the same time, it is easy enough to satisfy the necessity of real-time requirement. In addition it could be used to measure the concentration of many kinds of gas at a time. It is robust and suitable to be taken into practice.

  9. Arsenic speciation in tissues of the hyperacumulator P. calomelanos var. austroamericana using x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heald, S. M.; Kachenko, A.; Graefe, M.; Singh, B.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Sydney

    2010-06-15

    The fate and chemical speciation of arsenic (As) uptake, translocation and storage by the As hyperaccumulating fern Pityogramma calomelanos var. austroamericana (Pteridaceae) were examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and synchrotron-based {mu}-X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) and {mu}-X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) spectroscopies. Chemical analysis revealed total As concentration was ca. 6.5 times greater in young fronds (5845 mg kg {sup -1} dry weight) than in old frons (903 mg kg {sup -1} DW) pinnae, As concentration decreased from the base (6822 mg kg {sup -1} DW) to the apex (4301 mg kg {sup -1}DW) of the fronds. The results from {mu}-XANES and {mu}-XRF of living tissues suggested that more than 60% of arsenate (As{sup v}) absorbed was reduced to arsenite (As{sup III}) in roots, prior to transport through vascular tissues as As{sup v} and As{sup III}. In pinnules, As{sup III} was the predominate redox species (72-90%), presumably as solvated, oxygen coordinated compounds. The presence of putative As{sup III}-sulphide (S{sup -2}) coordinationthroughout the fern tissues (4-25%) suggests that S{sup 2-} functional groups may contribute in the biochemical reduction of As{sup v} to As{sup III} during uptake and transport at a whole plant level. Organic arsenicals and thiol-rich compounds were not detected in the species and are unlikely to play a role in As hyperaccumulation in this fern. The study provides important insights into homeostatic regulation of As following As uptake in P. calomelanos var. austroamericana.

  10. Quantitative generalized ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy for turbid media based on probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Zeng-Ping, E-mail: zpchen2002@hotmail.com; Cui, Yin-Yin; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-05-19

    PEBBLE (probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding) nanosensor encapsulating an intensity-based fluorescence indicator and an inert reference fluorescence dye inside the pores of stable matrix can be used as a generalized wavelength-ratiometric probe. However, the lack of an efficient quantitative model render the choices of inert reference dyes and intensity-based fluorescence indicators used in PEBBLEs based generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes rather limited. In this contribution, an extended quantitative fluorescence model was derived specifically for generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes based on PEBBLE technique (QFM{sub GRP}) with a view to simplify the design of PEBBLEs and hence further extend their application potentials. The effectiveness of QFM{sub GRP} has been tested on the quantitative determination of free Ca{sup 2+} in both simulated and real turbid media using a Ca{sup 2+} sensitive PEBBLE nanosensor encapsulating Rhod-2 and eosin B inside the micropores of stable polyacrylamide matrix. Experimental results demonstrated that QFM{sub GRP} could realize precise and accurate quantification of free Ca{sup 2+} in turbid samples, even though there is serious overlapping between the fluorescence excitation peaks of eosin B and Ca{sup 2+} bound Rhod-2. The average relative predictive error value of QFM{sub GRP} for the test simulated turbid samples was 5.9%, about 2–4 times lower than the corresponding values of partial least squares calibration model and the empirical ratiometric model based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities at the excitation peaks of Ca{sup 2+} bound Rhod-2 and eosin B. The recovery rates of QFM{sub GRP} for the real and spiked turbid samples varied from 93.1% to 101%, comparable to the corresponding results of atomic absorption spectrometry. - Highlights: • An advanced model was derived for generalized wavelength-ratiometric PEBBLEs. • The model can simplify the design of generalized wavelength

  11. Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins and high-valent metal-complexes at room temperature using free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kubin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the L-edge of 3d transition metals provides unique information on the local metal charge and spin states by directly probing 3d-derived molecular orbitals through 2p-3d transitions. However, this soft x-ray technique has been rarely used at synchrotron facilities for mechanistic studies of metalloenzymes due to the difficulties of x-ray-induced sample damage and strong background signals from light elements that can dominate the low metal signal. Here, we combine femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser with a novel x-ray fluorescence-yield spectrometer to overcome these difficulties. We present L-edge absorption spectra of inorganic high-valent Mn complexes (Mn ∼ 6–15 mmol/l with no visible effects of radiation damage. We also present the first L-edge absorption spectra of the oxygen evolving complex (Mn4CaO5 in Photosystem II (Mn < 1 mmol/l at room temperature, measured under similar conditions. Our approach opens new ways to study metalloenzymes under functional conditions.

  12. Retrieval interval mapping, a tool to optimize the spectral retrieval range in differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, L.; Sihler, H.; Lampel, J.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2012-06-01

    Remote sensing via differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard technique to identify and quantify trace gases in the atmosphere. The technique is applied in a variety of configurations, commonly classified into active and passive instruments using artificial and natural light sources, respectively. Platforms range from ground based to satellite instruments and trace-gases are studied in all kinds of different environments. Due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used, a specific challenge of a DOAS retrieval is to optimize the parameters for each specific case and particular trace gas of interest. This becomes especially important when measuring close to the detection limit. A well chosen evaluation wavelength range is crucial to the DOAS technique. It should encompass strong absorption bands of the trace gas of interest in order to maximize the sensitivity of the retrieval, while at the same time minimizing absorption structures of other trace gases and thus potential interferences. Also, instrumental limitations and wavelength depending sources of errors (e.g. insufficient corrections for the Ring effect and cross correlations between trace gas cross sections) need to be taken into account. Most often, not all of these requirements can be fulfilled simultaneously and a compromise needs to be found depending on the conditions at hand. Although for many trace gases the overall dependence of common DOAS retrieval on the evaluation wavelength interval is known, a systematic approach to find the optimal retrieval wavelength range and qualitative assessment is missing. Here we present a novel tool to determine the optimal evaluation wavelength range. It is based on mapping retrieved values in the retrieval wavelength space and thus visualize the consequence of different choices of retrieval spectral ranges, e.g. caused by slightly erroneous absorption cross sections, cross correlations and

  13. Role of non-Condon vibronic coupling and conformation change on two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuejie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) often show a blue-shift band compared to their conventional one-photon absorption spectra, which is an intriguing feature that has not been well understood. We present here a systematic study on one- and two-photon spectra of GFP chromophore by means of the density functional response theory and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods. It shows that the popular density functional fails to provide correct vibrational progression for the spectra. The non-Condon vibronic coupling, through the localised intrinsic vibrational modes of the chromophore, is responsible for the blue-shift in the TPA spectra. The cis to trans isomerisation can be identified in high-resolution TPA spectra. Our calculations demonstrate that the high level ab initio multiconfigurational CASSCF method, rather than the conventional density functional theory is required for investigating the essential excited-state properties of the GFP chromophore.

  14. Evaluation of the overall quality of olive oil using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Elena; Baeten, Vincent; Pierna, Juan Antonio Fernández; García-Mesa, José A

    2015-04-15

    The fluorescence spectra of some olive oils were examined in their natural and oxidised state, with wavelength range emissions of 300-800 nm and 300-400 nm used as excitation radiation. The fluorescence emissions were measured and an assessment was made of the relationship between them and the main quality parameters of olive oils, such as peroxide value, K232, K270 and acidity. These quality parameters (peroxide value, K232, K270 and acidity) are determined by laboratory methods, which though not too sophisticated, they are required solvents and materials as well as time consuming and sample preparation; there is a need for rapid analytical techniques and a low-cost technology for olive oil quality control. The oxidised oils studied had a strong fluorescence band at 430-450 nm. Extra virgin olive oil gave a different but interesting fluorescence spectrum, composed of three bands: one low intensity doublet at 440 and 455 nm; one strong band at 525 nm; and one of medium intensity at 681 nm. The band at 681 nm was identified as the chlorophyll band. The band at 525 nm was derived, at least partially, from vitamin E. The results presented demonstrate the ability of the fluorescence technique, combined with multivariate analysis, to characterise olive oils on the basis of all the quality parameters studied. Prediction models were obtained using various methods, such as partial least squares (PLS), N-way PLS (N-PLS) and external validation, in order to obtain an overall evaluation of oil quality. The best results were obtained for predicting K270 with a root mean square (RMS) prediction error of 0.08 and a correlation coefficient obtained with the external validation of 0.924. Fluorescence spectroscopy facilitates the detection of virgin olive oils obtained from defective or poorly maintained fruits (high acidity), fruits that are highly degraded in the early stages (with a high peroxide value) and oils in advanced stages of oxidation, with secondary oxidation compounds

  15. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  16. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  17. UV?Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications

    OpenAIRE

    Antosiewicz, Jan M.; Shugar, David

    2016-01-01

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV?Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  18. [Use of parallel factor and two dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy correlation technique for measurement of reaction between MDA and cooked ground meat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Hui; Jia, Xiao-Li; Meng, Jin-Xiu; Peng, Man-Li

    2013-04-01

    The fluorescence characteristics of oxidation reaction between MDA and cooked ground meat were analyzed by front face three dimensional synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, parallel factor and two dimensional correlation technique. The results showed that the reaction system has two synchronous fluorescence peaks, one is Ex 292 nm and deltalambda 50 nm, assigned to the fluorescence characteristics of tryptophan residues in proteins; the other is Ex 400 nm, delta 70 nm, corresponding with the fluorescence characteristics of MDA-protein adducts formed during oxidation; The synchronous fluorescence landscape was analyzed using PARAFAC. The loading profiles of 1st and 2nd components had an optimal lambda 50 and 70 nm, respectively. During oxidation reaction, the synchronous fluorescence intensity of tryptophan gradually decreased, while the synchronous fluorescence intensity of MDA-protein adducts gradually increased. Two dimensional correlation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy technique showed that the variation ratio of fluorescence intensity of tryptophan preceded that of MDA-protein adducts.

  19. Two-Dimensional UV Absorption Correlation Spectroscopy as a Method for the Detection of Thiamethoxam Residue in Tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhao, Zh.; Wang, L.; Zhu, X.; Shen, L.; Yu, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) combined with UV absorption spectroscopy was evaluated as a technique for the identification of spectral regions associated with the residues of thiamethoxam in tea. There is only one absorption peak at 275 nm in the absorption spectrum of a mixture of thiamethoxam and tea, which is the absorption peak of tea. Based on 2D-COS, the absorption peak of thiamethoxam at 250 nm is extracted from the UV spectra of the mixture. To determine the residue of thiamethoxam in tea, 250 nm is selected as the measured wavelength, at which the fitting result is as follows: the residual sum of squares is 0.01375, standard deviation R2 is 0.99068, and F value is 426. Statistical analysis shows that there is a significant linear relationship between the concentration of thiamethoxam in tea and the absorbance at 250 nm in the UV spectra of the mixture. Moreover, the average prediction error is 0.0033 and the prediction variance is 0.1654, indicating good predictive result. Thus, the UV absorption spectrum can be used as a measurement method for rapid detection of thiamethoxam residues in tea.

  20. The Lowest Triplet of Tetracyanoquinodimethane via UV-vis Absorption Spectroscopy with Br-Containing Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvostenko, Olga G; Kinzyabulatov, Renat R; Khatymova, Laysan Z; Tseplin, Evgeniy E

    2017-10-05

    This study was undertaken to find the previously unknown lowest triplet of the isolated molecule of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), which is a widely used organic semiconductor. The problem is topical because the triplet excitation of this compound is involved in some processes which occur in electronic devices incorporating TCNQ and its derivatives, and information on the TCNQ triplet is needed for better understanding of these processes. The lowest triplet of TCNQ was obtained at 1.96 eV using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy with Br-containing solvents. Production of the triplet band with sufficient intensity in the spectra was provided by the capacity of the Br atom to augment the triplet excitation and through using a 100 mm cuvette. The assignment of the corresponding spectral band to the triplet transition was made by observation that this band appeared only in the spectra recorded in Br-containing solvents but not in spectra recorded in other solvents. Additional support for the triplet assignment came from the overall UV-vis absorption spectra of TCNQ recorded in various solvents, using a 10 mm cuvette, in the 1.38-6.5 eV energy range. Singlet transitions of the neutral TCNQ o molecule and doublet transitions of the TCNQ ¯ negative ion were identified in these overall spectra and were assigned with TD B3LYP/6-31G calculations. Determination of the lowest triplet of TCNQ attained in this work may be useful for theoretical studies and practical applications of this important compound.