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Sample records for absorption root

  1. Cation-Anion Balance during Potassium and Sodium Absorption by Barley Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. C.; Adams, H. R.

    1963-01-01

    Steady-state rates of potassium ion and sodium ion absorption by excised barley roots accompanied by various anions were compared with the rates of anion absorption and the concomitant H+ and base release by the roots. The cation absorption rates were found to be independent of the identities, concentrations, and rates of absorption of the anions of the external solution, including bicarbonate. Absorption of the anion of the salt plus bicarbonate could not account for the cation absorption. H+ is released during cation absorption and base during anion absorption. The magnitude by which one or the other predominates depends on the relative rates of anion and cation absorption under various conditions of pH, cation and anion concentration, and inhibitor concentrations. The conclusion is that potassium and sodium ions are absorbed independently of the anions of the absorption solution in exchange for H+, while anions are exchanged for a base. The H+ release reflects a specificity between K+ and Na+ absorption such that it appears to be H+ exchanged in the specific rate-limiting reactions of the cation absorption. PMID:13964256

  2. Effects of aluminum on root growth and absorption of nutrients by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum (Al) is a biotoxic which often influences the absorption of nutrients by plants in strongly acidic soils. In this experiment, the effect of Al on root growth, absorption of macronutrients; phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and micronutrients; iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and zinc ...

  3. [Clinical study on prevention root absorption after teeth replantation with Vitapex paste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun-li; He, Hong; Xu, Zhen; Gu, Tuo; Zhang, Lu-dong; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the result of using Vitapex paste for preventing root absorption after replanting the avulsed teeth. Thirty patients with 36 avulsed upper anterior teeth with fully developed apices within 5 hours of trauma were enrolled in this study. For each case, the tooth and its alveolar site were irrigated with 0.9%NaCl, then the tooth was put into its original site and fixed with steel wires and composite resin. Two weeks later,the involved teeth underwent pulpectomy and were randomly divided into two groups. Ca(OH)₂ paste was used for temporary root canal filling in group A, and Vitapex paste in group B. The patients were asked to recall every three months, X-ray film was taken to evaluate root absorption and the same temporary root canal filling material was replaced. The permanent root canal filling was performed about one and a half years after treatment when root absorption stopped. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS12.0 software package. The success rate of two groups was not significantly different, though which was a little higher one year after treatment in group A than group B (88.9% vs. 83.3%). Vitapex paste had the benefits of both Ca(OH)₂ and iodoform. The radiopaque of iodoform made Vitapex paste observed easily for the status of filling or absorption. The injection style of Vitapex paste makes it easily being manipulated. Vitapex paste is an ideal material for preventing root absorption of replanted avulsed teeth. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No. 08DZ2271100).

  4. A simple and effective system for foreign gene expression in plants via root absorption of agrobacterial suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Jingying; Li, Liang; Fan, Yajun; Wang, Xiufeng; Song, Yehua; Sun, Shaoguang; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xingzhi

    2008-04-30

    Due to the laborious and scale-up limitation we have developed a simple system named "root absorption" to express foreign proteins in plants successfully. It has been shown that GFP was expressed in tobacco plants by root absorbing the Agrobacterium suspension containing TMV-based P35S-30B-GFP vector. Various factors influencing the gene expression were studied including Agrobacterium cell density, seedling age, plant materials and inoculation conditions. This system has the special advantages as simple and convenient work process, ease to scale-up and higher level of expression than leaf infiltration. Interestingly, GFP was expressed at 24h post-absorption. We assume that the root absorption system will facilitate the large-scale production of the recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in plants by means of transient expression.

  5. Evidence for direct water absorption by shallow-rooted desert plants in desert-oasis ecotone, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing

    2014-05-01

    Besides the absorption by roots from the soil substrate, it has long been known that plants exhibit alternative water-absorption strategies, particularly in drought-prone environments. For many tropical epiphytic orchids, air moisture can be absorbed directly by aerial roots. Some conifers are also found to utilize air moisture by foliar absorption during the summer fog season. However, few studies have been carried out on the atmospheric water vapor absorption by shallow-rooted desert plants. We conducted experiments in desert-oasis ecotone and investigated the effects of dew absorbed by three kinds of shallow-rooted seedlings on net photosynthesis rate, as well as on other water relations variables. Three kinds of typical shallow-rooted desert species (Bassia dasyphylla, Salsola collina and Corispermum declinatum) have been chosen and potted. Each species were subjected to contrasting watering regimes (normal and deficient) and different air moisture conditions (having dew and having no dew) for 10 weeks. Net photosynthesis rate was measured on six occasions during the study. Other water relations variables (midday shoot water potential, relative water content, stomatal conductance) were also measured. Under the dew conditions, average net photosynthesis rate, shoot water potential, leaf relative water content and stomatal conductance increased, with greater responses observed for plants subjected to a deficient watering regime than for well-watered plants. These results indicated dew occurred in arid region could be utilized through foliar absorption by some shallow-rooted plants, and for the shallow-rooted plants, the presence of dew could significantly relieve the deficit of water in water-stressed regime.

  6. Absorption of Nickel, Chromium, and Iron by the Root Surface of Primary Molars Covered with Stainless Steel Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Keinan, David; Mass, Eliyahu; Zilberman, Uri

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to analyze the absorption of metal ions released from stainless steel crowns by root surface of primary molars. Study Design. Laboratory research: The study included 34 primary molars, exfoliated or extracted during routine dental treatment. 17 molars were covered with stainless-steel crowns for more than two years and compared to 17 intact primary molars. Chemical content of the mesial or distal root surface, 1 mm apically to the crown or the cemento-...

  7. Oxygen absorption by adventitious roots promotes the survival of completely submerged terrestrial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayi, Qiaoli; Zeng, Bo; Liu, Jianhui; Li, Siqi; van Bodegom, Peter M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2016-04-10

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants because it results in oxygen deficiency, which is considered a major problem for submerged plants. A common response of terrestrial plants to flooding is the formation of aquatic adventitious roots. Some studies have shown that adventitious roots on submerged plants are capable of absorbing water and nutrients. However, there is no experimental evidence for the possible oxygen uptake function of adventitious roots or for how important this function might be for the survival of plants during prolonged submergence. This study aims to investigate whether adventitious roots absorb oxygen from the water column, and whether this new function is beneficial to the survival of completely submerged plants. TakingAlternanthera philoxeroides(Mart.) Griseb. as a representative species, the profiling of the underwater oxygen gradient towards living and dead adventitious roots on completely submerged plants was conducted, the oxygen concentration in stem nodes with and without adventitious roots was measured, and the growth, survival and non-structural carbohydrate content of completely submerged plants with and without adventitious roots was investigated. Oxygen profiles in the water column of adventitious roots showed that adventitious roots absorbed oxygen from water. It is found that the oxygen concentration in stem nodes having adventitious roots was higher than that in stem nodes without adventitious roots, which implies that the oxygen absorbed by adventitious roots from water was subsequently transported from the roots to other plant tissues. Compared with plants whose adventitious roots had been pruned, those with intact adventitious roots had slower leaf shedding, slower plant mass reduction, more efficient carbohydrate economy and prolonged survival when completely submerged. The adventitious roots ofA. philoxeroidesformed upon submergence can absorb oxygen from ambient water, thereby alleviating the adverse effects of

  8. Evaluation of absorption of radionuclides via roots of plants at different growth stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambe, Shizuko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    For the environmental risk assessment of radionuclides and toxic elements which were released by nuclear power plants and factories, the absorption of trace elements by plants has been studied by a multitracer technique. The selective absorption coefficient, which is a parameter of an uptake model of radionuclides by plants, was determined for various radionuclides. The selective absorption coefficients of some elements varied greatly in experimental runs. Therefore, the selective absorption coefficients of radionuclides by komatsuna at different growth stages were determined. Moreover, the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in komatsuna at different growth stages was studied. Extraction of the radionuclides from the soil was carried out in order to study the correlation between the transfer factor and the aging effect of the radionuclides in soil. The effect of soil acidity on the absorption of radionuclides in soybean and tomato was studied using the plants at different growth stages. (author)

  9. Effects of aluminum on root growth and absorption of nutrients by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hydroponic solutions containing 0, 100, 200 and 300 M AlCl3. After treatments with Al for four weeks, the root elongation of Cayeen was increased with Al concentration, however, Tainung No.17 was decreased. The dry weight of Cayenne and Tainung No.17 was increased and decreased with Al concentration, respectively.

  10. Absorption of Nickel, Chromium, and Iron by the Root Surface of Primary Molars Covered with Stainless Steel Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan, David; Mass, Eliyahu; Zilberman, Uri

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to analyze the absorption of metal ions released from stainless steel crowns by root surface of primary molars. Study Design. Laboratory research: The study included 34 primary molars, exfoliated or extracted during routine dental treatment. 17 molars were covered with stainless-steel crowns for more than two years and compared to 17 intact primary molars. Chemical content of the mesial or distal root surface, 1 mm apically to the crown or the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), was analyzed. An energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) was used for chemical analysis. Results. Higher amounts of nickel, chromium, and iron (5-6 times) were found in the cementum of molars covered with stainless-steel crowns compared to intact molars. The differences between groups were highly significant (P crowns release nickel, chromium, and iron in oral environment, and the ions are absorbed by the primary molars roots. The additional burden of allergenic metals should be reduced if possible. PMID:21274429

  11. Absorption of Nickel, Chromium, and Iron by the Root Surface of Primary Molars Covered with Stainless Steel Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Keinan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to analyze the absorption of metal ions released from stainless steel crowns by root surface of primary molars. Study Design. Laboratory research: The study included 34 primary molars, exfoliated or extracted during routine dental treatment. 17 molars were covered with stainless-steel crowns for more than two years and compared to 17 intact primary molars. Chemical content of the mesial or distal root surface, 1 mm apically to the crown or the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ, was analyzed. An energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS was used for chemical analysis. Results. Higher amounts of nickel, chromium, and iron (5-6 times were found in the cementum of molars covered with stainless-steel crowns compared to intact molars. The differences between groups were highly significant (<.001. Significance. Stainless-steel crowns release nickel, chromium, and iron in oral environment, and the ions are absorbed by the primary molars roots. The additional burden of allergenic metals should be reduced if possible.

  12. Absorption of nickel, chromium, and iron by the root surface of primary molars covered with stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan, David; Mass, Eliyahu; Zilberman, Uri

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to analyze the absorption of metal ions released from stainless steel crowns by root surface of primary molars. Study Design. Laboratory research: The study included 34 primary molars, exfoliated or extracted during routine dental treatment. 17 molars were covered with stainless-steel crowns for more than two years and compared to 17 intact primary molars. Chemical content of the mesial or distal root surface, 1 mm apically to the crown or the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), was analyzed. An energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) was used for chemical analysis. Results. Higher amounts of nickel, chromium, and iron (5-6 times) were found in the cementum of molars covered with stainless-steel crowns compared to intact molars. The differences between groups were highly significant (P Stainless-steel crowns release nickel, chromium, and iron in oral environment, and the ions are absorbed by the primary molars roots. The additional burden of allergenic metals should be reduced if possible.

  13. Isolation and Expression Analysis of Novel Silicon Absorption Gene from Roots of Mangrove (Rhizophora apiculata) via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Azizi, Parisa; Nejat, Naghmeh; Idris, Abu Seman

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil after oxygen. It is not an essential element for plant growth and formation but plays an important role in increasing plant tolerance towards different kinds of abiotic and biotic stresses. The molecular mechanism of Si absorption and accumulation may differ between plants, such as monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Silicon absorption and accumulation in mangrove plants are affected indirectly by some proteins rich in serine and proline amino acids. The expression level of the genes responsible for Si absorption varies in different parts of plants. In this study, Si is mainly observed in the epidermal roots' cell walls of mangrove plants compared to other parts. The present work was carried out to discover further information on Si stress responsive genes in Rhizophora apiculata, using the suppression subtractive hybridization technique. To construct the cDNA library, two-month-old seedlings were exposed to 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mM SiO2 for 15 hrs and for 1 to 6 days resulting in a total of 360 high quality ESTs gained. Further examination by RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR showed the expression of a candidate gene of serine-rich protein. PMID:24516858

  14. Isolation and expression analysis of novel silicon absorption gene from roots of mangrove (Rhizophora apiculata) via suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Nejat, Naghmeh; Idris, Abu Seman

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil after oxygen. It is not an essential element for plant growth and formation but plays an important role in increasing plant tolerance towards different kinds of abiotic and biotic stresses. The molecular mechanism of Si absorption and accumulation may differ between plants, such as monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Silicon absorption and accumulation in mangrove plants are affected indirectly by some proteins rich in serine and proline amino acids. The expression level of the genes responsible for Si absorption varies in different parts of plants. In this study, Si is mainly observed in the epidermal roots' cell walls of mangrove plants compared to other parts. The present work was carried out to discover further information on Si stress responsive genes in Rhizophora apiculata, using the suppression subtractive hybridization technique. To construct the cDNA library, two-month-old seedlings were exposed to 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mM SiO2 for 15 hrs and for 1 to 6 days resulting in a total of 360 high quality ESTs gained. Further examination by RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR showed the expression of a candidate gene of serine-rich protein.

  15. Fine-tuning of root elongation by ethylene: a tool to study dynamic structure-function relationships between root architecture and nitrate absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Deunff, Erwan; Lecourt, Julien; Malagoli, Philippe

    2016-07-12

    Recently developed genetic and pharmacological approaches have been used to explore [Formula: see text]/ethylene signalling interactions and how the modifications in root architecture by pharmacological modulation of ethylene biosynthesis affect nitrate uptake. Structure-function studies combined with recent approaches to chemical genomics highlight the non-specificity of commonly used inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis such as AVG (l-aminoethoxyvinylglycine). Indeed, AVG inhibits aminotransferases such as ACC synthase (ACS) and tryptophan aminotransferase (TAA) involved in ethylene and auxin biosynthesis but also some aminotransferases implied in nitrogen (N) metabolism. In this framework, it can be assumed that the products of nitrate assimilation and hormones may interact through a hub in carbon (C) and N metabolism to drive the root morphogenetic programme (RMP). Although ethylene/auxin interactions play a major role in cell division and elongation in root meristems, shaping of the root system depends also on energetic considerations. Based on this finding, the analysis is extended to nutrient ion-hormone interactions assuming a fractal or constructal model for root development. Therefore, the tight control of root structure-function in the RMP may explain why over-expressing nitrate transporter genes to decouple structure-function relationships and improve nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) has been unsuccessful. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Isolation and Expression Analysis of Novel Silicon Absorption Gene from Roots of Mangrove (Rhizophora apiculata via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Sahebi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is the second most abundant element in soil after oxygen. It is not an essential element for plant growth and formation but plays an important role in increasing plant tolerance towards different kinds of abiotic and biotic stresses. The molecular mechanism of Si absorption and accumulation may differ between plants, such as monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Silicon absorption and accumulation in mangrove plants are affected indirectly by some proteins rich in serine and proline amino acids. The expression level of the genes responsible for Si absorption varies in different parts of plants. In this study, Si is mainly observed in the epidermal roots’ cell walls of mangrove plants compared to other parts. The present work was carried out to discover further information on Si stress responsive genes in Rhizophora apiculata, using the suppression subtractive hybridization technique. To construct the cDNA library, two-month-old seedlings were exposed to 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mM SiO2 for 15 hrs and for 1 to 6 days resulting in a total of 360 high quality ESTs gained. Further examination by RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR showed the expression of a candidate gene of serine-rich protein.

  17. Differential gene expression in Rhododendron fortunei roots colonized by an ericoid mycorrhizal fungus and increased nitrogen absorption and plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangying Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM fungi are specifically symbiotic with plants in the family Ericaceae. Little is known thus far about their symbiotic establishment and subsequent nitrogen (N uptake at the molecular level. The present study devised a system for establishing a symbiotic relationship between Rhododendron fortunei Lindl. and an ERM fungus (Oidiodendron maius var. maius strain Om19, quantified seedling growth and N uptake, and compared transcriptome profiling between colonized and uncolonized roots using RNA-Seq. The Om19 colonization induced 16,892 genes that were differentially expressed in plant roots, of which 14,364 were upregulated and 2,528 were downregulated. These genes included those homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporters, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, and symbiosis receptor-like kinases. N metabolism was particularly active in Om19-colonized roots, and 51 genes were upregulated, such as nitrate transporters, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, ammonium transporters, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase. Transcriptome analysis also identified a series of genes involving endocytosis, Fc-gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and GnRH signal pathway that have not been reported previously. Their roles in the symbiosis require further investigation. The Om19 colonization significantly increased N uptake and seedling growth. Total N content and dry weight of colonized seedlings were 36.6% and 46.6% greater than control seedlings. This is the first transcriptome analysis of a species from the family Ericaceae colonized by an ERM fungus. The findings from this study will shed light on the mechanisms underlying symbiotic relationships of ericaceous species with ERM fungi and the symbiosis-resultant N uptake and plant growth.

  18. Qualitative and Quantitative Content Determination of Macro-Minor Elements in Bryonia Alba L. Roots using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Uliana Vladimirovna; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Abudayeh, Zead Helmi Mahmoud; Kislichenko, Viktoria; Naddaf, Ahmad; Cholak, Irina; Yemelianova, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    To determine the elements in Bryonia alba L. roots, collected from the Crimean Peninsula region in Ukraine. Dry ashing was used as a flexible method and all elements were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) equipped with flame and graphite furnace. The average concentrations of the determined elements, expressed as mg/100 g dry weight of the sample, were as follow: 13.000 for Fe, 78.000 for Si, 88.000 for P, 7.800 for Al, 0.130 for Mn, 105.000 for Mg, 0.030 for Pb, 0.052 for Ni, 0.030 for Mo, 210.000 for Ca, 0.130 for Cu, 5.200 for Zn, 13.000 for Na, 1170.000 for K, 0.780 for Sr, 0.030 for Co, 0.010 for Cd, 0.010 for As, and 0.010 for Hg. Toxic elements such as Cd and Pb were also found but at very low concentration. Among the analyzed elements, K was the most abundant followed by Ca, Mg, P, Si, Fe, Na, and Zn, whereas Hg, As, Cd, Co, Mo, and Pb were found in low concentration. The results suggest that the roots of Bryonia alba L. plant has potential medicinal property through their high element contents present. Moreover, it showed that the AAS method is a simple, fast, and reliable for the determination of elements in plant materials. The obtained results of the current study provide justification for the usage of such fruit in daily diet for nutrition and for medicinal usage in the treatment of various diseases.

  19. The influence of ammonium and chloride on potassium and nitrate absorption by barley roots depends on time of exposure and cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A J; Finazzo, J

    1986-05-01

    Net uptakes of K(+) and NO(3) (-) were monitored simultaneously and continuously for two barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivars, Prato and Olli. The cultivars had similar rates of net K(+) and NO(3) (-) uptake in the absence of NH(4) (+) or Cl(-). Long-term exposure (over 6 hours) to media which contained equimolar mixtures of NH(4) (+), K(+), Cl(-), or NO(3) (-) affected the cultivars very differently: (a) the presence of NH(4) (+) as NH(4)Cl stimulated net NO(3) (-) uptake in Prato barley but inhibited net NO(3) (-) uptake in Olli barley; (b) Cl(-) inhibited net NO(3) (-) uptake in Prato but had little effect in Olli; and (c) NH(4) (+) as (NH(4))(2)SO(4) inhibited net K(+) uptake in Prato but had little effect in Olli. Moreover, the immediate response to the addition of an ion often varied significantly from the long-term response; for example, the addition of Cl(-) initially inhibited net K(+) uptake in Olli barley but, after a 4 hour exposure, it was stimulatory. For both cultivars, net NH(4) (+) and Cl(-) uptake did not change significantly with time after these ions were added to the nutrient medium. These data indicate that, even within one species, there is a high degree of genotypic variation in the control of nutrient absorption.

  20. Root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grierson, C.; Nielsen, E.; Ketelaar, T.; Schiefelbein, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair

  1. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  2. Narrative absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narrative Absorption brings together research from the social sciences and Humanities to solve a number of mysteries: Most of us will have had those moments, of being totally absorbed in a book, a movie, or computer game. Typically we do not have any idea about how we ended up in such a state. No...

  3. Absorção e infiltração de água por raízes de batata-doce, através de ferimentos durante a lavagem Water absorption and infiltration in sweet-potato wound roots during washing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonai Gimenez Calbo

    2000-09-01

    changes of root volume. Partially submerged intact roots and segments were less subject to intercellular water infiltration than the completely submerged ones. The mass increase of submerged intact roots was caused mainly by water absorption, a process which is known to exclude molecules with a size larger than a few nanometers. In transversely segmented roots most water entered by intercellular volume infiltration, which may introduce fungi spores and bacteria and other particles inside the damaged organ.

  4. Analysis of gene expression in the outer cell layers of Arabidopsis roots during lateral root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth-Tello, Luz Marina

    2005-01-01

    Lateral roots are an important means for the plant to increase its absorptive area and the volume of substrate exploited. Lateral roots originate in the pericycle, the outermost layer of the vascular cylinder, and by growing penetrate the overlaying cell layers before emergence. This process is

  5. Root resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Inger

    2014-01-01

    formerly been demonstrated how demyelinization of the myelin sheaths in the peripheral nerves close to the root provoke resorption. Accordingly, conditions affecting these tissue layers can be associated not only with different morphologies but also with general symptoms and diseases (e.g., ectodermal...

  6. Root (Botany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Plant roots can contribute significantly to the stability of steep slopes. They can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weakness to more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In deep soil, anchoring to bedrock becomes negligible, and lateral reinforcement predominates

  7. Adaptive root foraging strategies along a boreal-temperate forest gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostonen, Ivika; Truu, Marika; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Lukac, Martin; Borken, Werner; Vanguelova, Elena; Godbold, Douglas L; Lõhmus, Krista; Zang, Ulrich; Tedersoo, Leho; Preem, Jens-Konrad; Rosenvald, Katrin; Aosaar, Jürgen; Armolaitis, Kęstutis; Frey, Jane; Kabral, Naima; Kukumägi, Mai; Leppälammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Merilä, Päivi; Napa, Ülle; Nöjd, Pekka; Parts, Kaarin; Uri, Veiko; Varik, Mats; Truu, Jaak

    2017-08-01

    The tree root-mycorhizosphere plays a key role in resource uptake, but also in the adaptation of forests to changing environments. The adaptive foraging mechanisms of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) and fine roots of Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris and Betula pendula were evaluated along a gradient from temperate to subarctic boreal forest (38 sites between latitudes 48°N and 69°N) in Europe. Variables describing tree resource uptake structures and processes (absorptive fine root biomass and morphology, nitrogen (N) concentration in absorptive roots, extramatrical mycelium (EMM) biomass, community structure of root-associated EcM fungi, soil and rhizosphere bacteria) were used to analyse relationships between root system functional traits and climate, soil and stand characteristics. Absorptive fine root biomass per stand basal area increased significantly from temperate to boreal forests, coinciding with longer and thinner root tips with higher tissue density, smaller EMM biomass per root length and a shift in soil microbial community structure. The soil carbon (C) : N ratio was found to explain most of the variability in absorptive fine root and EMM biomass, root tissue density, N concentration and rhizosphere bacterial community structure. We suggest a concept of absorptive fine root foraging strategies involving both qualitative and quantitative changes in the root-mycorrhiza-bacteria continuum along climate and soil C : N gradients. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. The interactive impact of root branch order and soil genetic horizon on root respiration and nitrogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocha, Lidia K; Bulaj, Bartosz; Kutczynska, Paulina; Mucha, Joanna; Rutkowski, Pawel; Zadworny, Marcin

    2017-08-01

    In general, respiration (RS) is highly correlated with nitrogen concentration (N) in plant organs, including roots, which exhibit a positive N-RS relationship. Less is known, however, about the relationship between N and RS in roots of different branch orders within an individual tree along a vertical soil profile; this is especially true in trees with contrasting life strategies, such as pioneer Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) vs mid-successional sessile oak (Quercus petraea Liebl.). In the present research, the impact of root branch order, as represented by those with absorptive vs transporting ability, and soil genetic horizon on root N, RS and the N-RS relationship was examined. Mean RS and total N concentration differed significantly among root branch orders and was significantly higher in absorptive roots than in transporting roots. The soil genetic horizon differentially affected root RS in Scots pine vs sessile oak. The genetic horizon mostly affected RS in absorptive roots of Scots pine and transporting roots in sessile oak. Root N was the highest in absorptive roots and most affected by soil genetic horizon in both tree species. Root N was not correlated with soil N, although N levels were higher in roots growing in fertile soil genetic horizons. Overall, RS in different root branch orders was positively correlated with N in both species. The N-RS relationship in roots, pooled by soil genetic horizon, was significant in both species, but was only significant in sessile oak when roots were pooled by root branch order. In both tree species, a significant interaction was found between the soil genetic horizon and root branch order with root function; however, species-specific responses were found. Both root N, which was unaffected by soil N, and the positive N-RS relationship consistently observed in different genetic horizons suggest that root function prevails over environmental factors, such as soil genetic horizon. © The Author 2017. Published by

  9. Phosphorus cycle in Germiston Lake. III. Seasonal patterns in the absorption, translocation and release of phosphorus by Potamogeton pectinatus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaak, J.F.; Swanepoel, J.H.; Schoonbee, H.J. (Rand Afrikaans Univ., Johannesburg (South Africa))

    1982-07-01

    The seasonal fluctuation in the phosphorus absorption, translocation, and release by the roots and shoots of Potamogeton pectinatus L. in Germiston Lake, is discussed. Shoot absorption exceeds that by the roots during spring and winter, while the reverse applies for summer and autumn. The shoots consistently release more phosphorus per plant than the roots. Both shoots and roots absorb considerably more phosphorus than what they release to the environment. This macrophyte, therefore, mainly acts as a phosphorus reservoir in Germiston Lake.

  10. [Significance of senescence study on tree roots and its advances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chu; Wang, Zhengquan; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2004-07-01

    Root system is one of the important components of trees, and has some important physiological functions such as nutrient and water absorption, transport and storage, anchoring, and supporting. After tree root systems formed, roots often suffer from nutrient- and water-deficient stress, and thus, their absorption of nutrients and water appears more important. Soil nutrient and water have a great spatiotemporal heterogeneity. As the heterogeneity occurs, trees regulate carbon partitioning to roots, resulting in the senescence or death of some roots of the whole root system. In forestry, the senescence of tree roots is closely related to tree productivity, because there is a close relationship between the senescence of tree roots and the absorption of soil nutrient and water. At ecosystem and global scale, the senescence of tree roots influences the cycling of carbon and nutrients, because roots exhaust a great deal of carbon fixed by source leaves through photosynthesis, and there are great amounts of nutrients in tree roots. The senescence of tree roots is influenced by many environmental factors, biotic (e.g., fungi, bacteria, viruses, small edaphic animals) and abiotic (e.g., water, temperature, soil nutrients, heavy metals). These factors affect the senescence of tree roots by different mechanisms. Although we have much knowledge on the senescence of tree roots and some hypotheses have been proposed, some problems still remain to be resolved, and further experiments are needed to test these hypotheses. Interdisciplinary studies integrating cytology, biochemistry, soil science, and genetics are the prerequisite for rapid advances in understanding the essence of tree root senescence.

  11. Porosity and liquid absorption of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krus, M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Kunzel, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    be a slowing-down effect which is related to water because the absorption of organic liquids, such as hexane, is quite normal. Measurements of the porosity of hardened cement paste determined by helium pycnometry and water saturation show that water molecules can enter spaces in the microstructure which...... are not accessible to the smaller helium atoms. Considering the results of dilatation tests both before and after water and hexane saturation, it seems possible that a contraction of capillary pores due to moisture-related swelling of the cement gel leads to the non-linear water absorption over the square root...

  12. D-xylose absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  13. Seedling root targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  14. Mycorrhiza alters the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhang, De-Jian; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-Hua; Wu, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Root hairs and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) coexist in root systems for nutrient and water absorption, but the relation between AM and root hairs is poorly known. A pot study was performed to evaluate the effects of four different AM fungi (AMF), namely, Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Diversispora versiformis, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices on root hair development in trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings grown in sand. Mycorrhizal seedlings showed significantly higher root hair density than non-mycorrhizal seedlings, irrespective of AMF species. AMF inoculation generally significantly decreased root hair length in the first- and second-order lateral roots but increased it in the third- and fourth-order lateral roots. AMF colonization induced diverse responses in root hair diameter of different order lateral roots. Considerably greater concentrations of phosphorus (P), nitric oxide (NO), glucose, sucrose, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were found in roots of AM seedlings than in non-AM seedlings. Levels of P, NO, carbohydrates, IAA, and MeJA in roots were correlated with AM formation and root hair development. These results suggest that AMF could alter the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange through modulation of physiological activities. F. mosseae, which had the greatest positive effects, could represent an efficient AM fungus for increasing fruit yields or decreasing fertilizer inputs in citrus production.

  15. Collection of gravitropic effectors from mucilage of electrotropically-stimulated roots of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondren, W. M.; Moore, R.

    1987-01-01

    We placed agar blocks adjacent to tips of electrotropically stimulated primary roots of Zea mays. Blocks placed adjacent to the anode-side of the roots for 3 h induced significant curvature when subsequently placed asymmetrically on tips of vertically-oriented roots. Curvature was always toward the side of the root unto which the agar block was placed. Agar blocks not contacting roots and blocks placed adjacent to the cathode-side of electrotropically stimulated roots did not induce significant curvature when placed asymmetrically on tips of vertically-oriented roots. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry indicated that blocks adjacent to the anode-side of electrotropically-stimulated roots contained significantly more calcium than (1) blocks not contacting roots, and (2) blocks contacting the cathode-side of roots. These results demonstrate the presence of a gradient of endogenous Ca in mucilage of electrotropically-stimulated roots (i.e. roots undergoing gravitropic-like curvature).

  16. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  17. Anomalous water absorption in porous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Lockington, D A

    2003-01-01

    The absorption of fluid by unsaturated, rigid porous materials may be characterized by the sorptivity. This is a simple parameter to determine and is increasingly being used as a measure of a material's resistance to exposure to fluids (especially moisture and reactive solutes) in aggressive environments. The complete isothermal absorption process is described by a nonlinear diffusion equation, with the hydraulic diffusivity being a strongly nonlinear function of the degree of saturation of the material. This diffusivity can be estimated from the sorptivity test. In a typical test the cumulative absorption is proportional to the square root of time. However, a number of researchers have observed deviation from this behaviour when the infiltrating fluid is water and there is some potential for chemo-mechanical interaction with the material. In that case the current interpretation of the test and estimation of the hydraulic diffusivity is no longer appropriate. Kuentz and Lavallee (2001) discuss the anomalous b...

  18. ROOT Reference Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fuakye, Eric Gyabeng

    2017-01-01

    A ROOT Reference Documentation has been implemented to generate all the lists of libraries needed for each ROOT class. Doxygen has no option to generate or add the lists of libraries for each ROOT class. Therefore shell scripting and a basic C++ program was employed to import the lists of libraries needed by each ROOT class.

  19. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve

  20. Membrane Gas Absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.E.; Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Membrane gas absorption processes are absorption processes utilising hollow fibre membranes as contacting media for gas and liquid flows. The principle of operation and engineering aspects are discussed, followed by discussion of a number of typical applications. Benefits in terms of operation,

  1. Nutrition and magnesium absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true

  2. Solar absorption surface panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  3. Comparing root architectural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  4. Ability of phytoremediation for absorption of strontium and cesium from soils using Cannabis sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Seyed Hoseini

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings suggest that strontium can be absorbed by Cannabis sativa, with the highest absorption by the roots, stems, and leaves. However, cesium does not reach the plant because of its single capacity and inactive complex formation.

  5. Meniscus root repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dharmesh; Harner, Christopher D

    2012-06-01

    Root tears are a subset of meniscal injuries that result in significant knee joint pathology. Occurring on either the medial or lateral side, root tears are defined as radial tears or avulsions of the posterior horn attachment to bone. After a root tear, there is a significant increase in tibio-femoral contact pressure concomitant with altered knee joint kinematics. Previous cadaver studies from our institution have shown that root repair of the medial meniscus is successful in restoring joint biomechanics to within normal limits. Indications for operative management of meniscal root tears include (1) a symptomatic medial meniscus root tear with minimal arthritis and having failed non-operative treatment, and (2) a lateral root tear in associated with an ACL tear. In this review, we describe diagnosis, imaging, patient selection, and arthroscopic surgical technique of medial and lateral meniscus root injuries. In addition we highlight the pearls of repair technique, associated complications, post-operative rehabilitation regimen, and expected outcomes.

  6. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given. (WHK)

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  8. Tooth Eruption without Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the diffic...

  9. Optical absorption measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  10. Rooting an Android Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    o 8-GB Memory o Intel Xeon X5472 Central Processing Unit (CPU)  64-bit quad and dual-core  3.0 GHz 3. Rooting Android Devices The rooting...root access has been granted. 4. Conclusion This document serves as a tutorial on how to grant user administrative privilege to an Android device by

  11. Absorption cooling device. Absorptions-Kuehlvorrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, J.; Vardi, I.; Kimchi, Y.; Ben-Dror, J.

    1980-03-25

    The invention concerns improvements of absorption refrigerators, where a lithium chloride or lithium bromide/water cycle is used. According to the invention an inner separating or dividing structure between different functional parts of a machine of this type is provided. The structure contains two sections of wall, which are separated from one another by a suitable space, in order to achieve thermal insulation. This air space is provided with an opening in the direction towards the inside of the container and the opening is shielded to prevent the entry of liquids (in liquid or spray form).

  12. Central cooling: absorptive chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1977-08-01

    This technology evaluation covers commercially available single-effect, lithium-bromide absorption chillers ranging in nominal cooling capacities of 3 to 1,660 tons and double-effect lithium-bromide chillers from 385 to 1,060 tons. The nominal COP measured at operating conditions of 12 psig input steam for the single-effect machine, 85/sup 0/ entering condenser water, and 44/sup 0/F exiting chilled-water, ranges from 0.6 to 0.65. The nominal COP for the double-effect machine varies from 1.0 to 1.15 with 144 psig entering steam. Data are provided to estimate absorption-chiller performance at off-nominal operating conditions. The part-load performance curves along with cost estimating functions help the system design engineer select absorption equipment for a particular application based on life-cycle costs. Several suggestions are offered which may be useful for interfacing an absorption chiller with the remaining Integrated Community Energy System. The ammonia-water absorption chillers are not considered to be readily available technology for ICES application; therefore, performance and cost data on them are not included in this evaluation.

  13. Adaptive fine root foraging patterns in climate experiments and natural gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostonen, Ivika; Truu, Marika; Parts, Kaarin; Truu, Jaak

    2017-04-01

    Site based manipulative experiments and studies along climatic gradients have long been keystones of ecological research. We aimed to compare the response of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) and fine roots in manipulative studies and along climate gradient to describe the universal trends in root traits and to raise hypotheses about general mechanisms in fine root system adaptation of forest trees in global change. The root traits from two climate manipulation experiments - Bangor FACE and FAHM in Estonia, manipulated by CO2 concentration and relative air humidity in silver birch forest ecosystems, respectively and the data for three most ubiquitous tree species - Norway spruce (Picea abies), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and silver birch (Betula pendula) stands along natural gradient encompassing different climate and forest zones in Northern Europe were analysed. There are two main strategies in response of fine root system of trees: A) an extensive increase in absorptive root biomass, surface area and length, or B) a greater reliance on root-associated EcM fungi and bacterial communities with a smaller investment to absorptive root biomass. Trees in all studies tended to increase the EcM root biomass and the proportion of EcM root biomass of total fine root biomass towards harsh (northern boreal forests) or changed conditions (stress created by the increase in CO2 concentration or relative air humidity). We envisage a role of trilateral relation between the morphological traits of absorptive fine roots, exploration types of colonising EcM fungi and rhizosphere and bulk soil bacterial community structure. A significant change in EcM absorptive fine root biomass in all experiments and for all studied tree species coincided with changes in absorptive root morphology, being longer and thinner root tips with higher root tissue density in poor/treated sites. These changes were associated with significant shifts in community structure of dominating EcM fungi as well as soil and

  14. Absorption heat pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  15. Aquaporin‐mediated changes in hydraulic conductivity of deep tree roots accessed via caves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MCELRONE, ANDREW J; BICHLER, JUSTIN; POCKMAN, WILLIAM T; ADDINGTON, ROBERT N; LINDER, C. RANDAL; JACKSON, ROBERT B

    2007-01-01

    ...) fluctuated diurnally for both species and decreased under shading for B. lanuginosa . To assess whether these dynamic changes in RHC were regulated during initial water absorption by fine roots, we used an ultra...

  16. Tooth Eruption without Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the difficulties in studying late stages of tooth development and tooth movement and the lack of good model systems. Transgenic mice with eruption problems and short or no roots can be used as a powerful model for further deciphering of the cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms underlying root formation and tooth eruption. Better understanding of these processes can provide hints on delivering more efficient dental therapies in the future. PMID:23345536

  17. Visual Absorption Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Anderson; Jerry Mosier; Geoffrey Chandler

    1979-01-01

    Visual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool to assess a landscape's susceptibility to visual change caused by man's activities. This paper explores different descriptive approaches to VAC and addresses in depth the development of the VAC process used on the Klamath National Forest. Four biophysical factors were selected to assess VAC for the lands within the...

  18. Chemical Absorption Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Chemical absorption materials that potentially can be used for post combustion carbon dioxide capture are discussed. They fall into five groups, alkanolamines, alkali carbonates, ammonia, amino acid salts, and ionic liquids. The chemistry of the materials is discussed and advantages and drawbacks...

  19. Patterns of structural and defense investments in fine roots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) across a strong temperature and latitudinal gradient in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadworny, Marcin; McCormack, M Luke; Żytkowiak, Roma; Karolewski, Piotr; Mucha, Joanna; Oleksyn, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Plant functional traits may be altered as plants adapt to various environmental constraints. Cold, low fertility growing conditions are often associated with root adjustments to increase acquisition of limiting nutrient resources, but they may also result in construction of roots with reduced uptake potential but higher tissue persistence. It is ultimately unclear whether plants produce fine roots of different structure in response to decreasing temperatures and whether these changes represent a trade-off between root function or potential root persistence. We assessed patterns of root construction based on various root morphological, biochemical and defense traits including root diameter, specific root length (SRL), root tissue density (RTD), C:N ratio, phenolic compounds, and number of phellem layers across up to 10 root orders in diverse populations of Scots pine along a 2000-km climatic gradient in Europe. Our results showed that different root traits are related to mean annual temperature (MAT) and expressed a pattern of higher root diameter and lower SRL and RTD in northern sites with lower MAT. Among absorptive roots, we observed a gradual decline in chemical defenses (phenolic compounds) with decreasing MAT. In contrast, decreasing MAT resulted in an increase of structural protection (number of phellem layers) in transport fine roots. This indicated that absorptive roots with high capacity for nutrient uptake, and transport roots with low uptake capacity, were characterized by distinct and contrasting trade-offs. Our observations suggest that diminishing structural and chemical investments into the more distal, absorptive roots in colder climates is consistent with building roots of higher absorptive capacity. At the same time, roots that play a more prominent role in transport of nutrients and water within the root system saw an increase in structural investment, which can increase persistence and reduce long-term costs associated with their frequent

  20. Influence of Topography on Root Processes in the Shale Hills-Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, D. M.; Orr, A. S.; Adams, T. S.; Chen, W.; Gaines, K.

    2015-12-01

    Topography can strongly influence root and associated mycorrhizal fungal function in the Critical Zone. In the Shale Hills-Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO), soil depths range from more than 80 cm deep in the valley floor to about 25 cm on the ridge top. Tree height varies from about 28 m tall at the valley floor to about 17 m tall at the ridge top. Yet total absorptive root length to depth of refusal is quite similar across the hillslope. We find root length density to vary as much at locations only 1-2 m apart as at scales of hundreds of meters across the catchment. Tree community composition also varies along the hillslope, including tree species that vary widely in thickness of their absorptive roots and type of mycorrhiza (arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal). Studies of trees in a common garden of 16 tree species and in forests near SSCZO indicate that both root morphology and mycorrhizal type can strongly influence root foraging. Species that form thick absorptive roots appear more dependent on mycorrhizal fungi and thin-root species forage more by root proliferation. Ectomycorrhizal trees show more variation in foraging precision (proliferation in a nutrient-rich patch relative to that in an unenriched patch) of their mycorrhizal hyphae whereas AM trees show more variation in foraging precision by root proliferation, indicating alternative strategies among trees of different mycorrhizal types. Collectively, the results provide insight into how topography can influence foraging belowground.

  1. Spatial-specific regulation of root development by phytochromes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2011-12-01

    Distinct tissues and organs of plants exhibit dissimilar responses to light exposure--cotyledon growth is promoted by light, whereas hypocotyl growth is inhibited by light. Light can have different impacts on root development, including impacting root elongation, morphology, lateral root proliferation and root tropisms. In many cases, light inhibits root elongation. There has been much attention given to whether roots themselves are the sites of photoperception for light that impacts light-dependent growth and development of roots. A number of approaches including photoreceptor localization in planta, localized irradiation and exposure of dissected roots to light have been used to explore the site(s) of light perception for the photoregulation of root development. Such approaches have led to the observation that photoreceptors are localized to roots in many plant species, and that roots are capable of light absorption that can alter morphology and/or gene expression. Our recent results show that localized depletion of phytochrome photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana disrupts root development and root responsiveness to the plant hormone jasmonic acid. Thus, root-localized light perception appears central to organ-specific, photoregulation of growth and development in roots. © 2011 Landes Bioscience

  2. [Effects of drought stress on the root growth and development and physiological characteristics of peanut].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Meng; Dai, Liang-Xiang; Kang, Tao; Ci, Dun-Wei; Song, Wen-Wu

    2013-06-01

    Taking two peanut varieties Huayu 17 and Tangke 8 as test objects, a soil column culture experiment was conducted in a rainproof tank to study the peanut root morphological development and physiological characteristics at late growth stages under moderate drought and well-watered conditions. Tanke 8 had more developed root system and higher yield and drought coefficient, while Huayu 17 had poorer root adaptability to drought stress. For the two varieties, their root length density and root biomass were mainly distributed in 0-40 cm soil layer, whereas their root traits differed in the same soil layer. The total root length, total root surface area, and total root volume of Huayu 17 at each growth stage were smaller under drought stress than under well-balanced water treatment, while these root characteristics of Tangke 8 under drought stress only decreased at flowering-pegging stage. Drought stress increased the root biomass, surface area, and volume of the two varieties in 20-40 cm soil layer, but decreased these root traits in the soil layers below 40 cm. Under drought stress, the root activity of the two varieties in the soil layers below 40 cm at pod filling stage decreased, and the decrement was larger for Huayu 17. The differences in the root system development and physiological characteristics of the two varieties at late growth stages under drought stress suggested that the root system of the two varieties had different water absorption and utilization under drought stress.

  3. Near infrared hyperspectral imaging system for root phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Thomas; Leitner, Raimund; Bodner, Gernot

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the development and application of a hyper-spectral imaging system for root phenotyping. For sustainable plant production root systems optimized for growing conditions in the field are required. Therefore, the presented system is used for the research in the field of plant drought resistance. The system is used to acquire spatially resolved near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data of rhizoboxes. In contrast to using visible light (380 nm-780 nm) the NIR wavelength range (900 nm-1700 nm) allows to discriminate essential features for the root segmentation and water distribution mappings. The increased image contrast in the NIR range allows roots to be segmented from soil and additional information, e.g. basic root-architecture, to be extracted. In addition, the water absorption bands in the NIR wavelength range can be used to determine the water content and to estimate the age of the roots. In this paper the hardware setup of the hyper-spectral root imaging system, the data analysis, the soil water content estimations and the root segmentation using different methods to optimize separation between roots and soil, both constituting complex materials of variable properties, are presented.

  4. Rooting plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.

    2013-01-01

    In 1993, we published a paper in Development detailing the anatomical structure of the Arabidopsis root. The paper described how root growth was maintained by the precisely tuned activity of a small set of 'initials', which acted as the source of dividing and differentiating cells, and how these

  5. Effect of liming on the molybdenum content in the root and leaf of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three liming treatments were employed (1, 3 and 4 t/ha CaCO3). The liming operation used on pseudogley induced a statistically significant increase in molybdenum ion absorption into the root system of tomato. Independently from the aforementioned, the values for the root and leaf molybdenum content of tomato in each ...

  6. Produção de matéria seca, crescimento radicular e absorção de cálcio, fósforo e alumínio por coffea canephora e coffea arabica sob influência da atividade do alumínio em solução Dry matter production, root growth and calcium, phosphorus and aluminum absorption by coffea canephora and coffea arabica under influence of aluminum activity in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Marcio Mattiello

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a produção de matéria seca, o crescimento radicular e a absorção e distribuição do Ca, P e Al nas folhas, no caule e nas raízes de dois clones de café conilon (Coffea canephora (Mtl 25 e Mtl 27 e de uma variedade de café Catuaí Amarelo (Coffea arabica, cultivados em solução nutritiva com atividade crescente de Al3+. As plantas foram cultivadas em vasos com capacidade para 5 L, contendo solução nutritiva de Hoagland & Arnon, modificada. Após oito dias de adaptação, as plantas foram submetidas a concentrações de Al de 0, 500, 1.000 e 2.000 µmol L-1, que corresponderam a atividades de Al3+ em solução, estimadas pelo software GEOCHEM, de 20,68, 50,59, 132,9 e 330,4 µmol L-1, respectivamente. Foram determinados os teores de Ca, Al e P na planta. O sistema radicular foi separado, para determinação da área e do comprimento. A variedade Catuaí Amarelo (Coffea arabica apresentou-se menos sensível ao Al3+, quando comparada aos clones de conilon (Coffea canephora. O clone de conilon Mtl 25 foi menos sensível ao Al3+ em relação ao Mtl 27. O aumento da atividade de Al3+ promoveu redução nos teores de P e Ca nas folhas e raízes do cafeeiro, especialmente nos clones Mtl 25 e Mtl 27. O acúmulo de Al no sistema radicular e a restrição do transporte para a parte aérea são importantes fatores na tolerância de plantas ao Al3+.This study had the objective of evaluating the dry matter production, root growth, and the absorption and distribution of Ca, P and Al in the leaves, stem and roots of two Conilon (Coffea canephora coffee clones (Mtl 25 and Mtl 27 and the coffee variety Catuaí Amarelo (Coffea arabica grown in nutrient solution with increasing Al3+ activity. The plants were cultivated in 5 L pots, containing modified Hoagland & Arnold nutrient solution. After eight days of adaptation, the plants were subjected to Al concentrations of 0, 500, 1.000 and 2.000 mol L-1, which

  7. Phonon-assisted absorption of excitons in Cu2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Florian; Stolz, Heinrich; Naka, Nobuko

    2017-09-01

    The basic theoretical foundation for the modeling of phonon-assisted absorption spectra in direct band-gap semiconductors, introduced by Elliott 60 years ago [R. J. Elliott, Phys. Rev. 108, 1384 (1957), 10.1103/PhysRev.108.1384] using second order perturbation theory, results in a square root shaped dependency close to the absorption edge. A careful analysis of the experiments [N. Naka et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 44, 5096 (2005), 10.1143/JJAP.44.5096] reveals that for the yellow S excitons in Cu2O the lineshape does not follow that square root dependence. The reexamination of the theory shows that the basic assumptions of constant matrix elements and constant energy denominators is invalid for semiconductors with dominant exciton effects like Cu2O , where the phonon-assisted absorption proceeds via intermediate exciton states. The overlap between these and the final exciton states strongly determines the dependence of the absorption on the photon energy. To describe the experimental observed line shape of the indirect absorption of the yellow S exciton states we find it necessary to assume a momentum dependent deformation potential for the optical phonons.

  8. Chromatic roots and hamiltonian paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    We present a new connection between colorings and hamiltonian paths: If the chromatic polynomial of a graph has a noninteger root less than or equal to t(n) = 2/3 + 1/3 (3)root (26 + 6 root (33)) + 1/3 (3)root (26 - 6 root (33)) = 1.29559.... then the graph has no hamiltonian path. This result...

  9. Revisiting Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Araújo, Ana Luiza Lara; Ulhøi, John Parm; Lettl, Christopher

    Absorptive capacity has mostly been perceived as a 'passive' outcome of R&D investments. Recently, however, a growing interest into its 'proactive' potentials has emerged. This paper taps into this development and proposes a dynamic model for conceptualizing the determinants of the complementary ...... processes, with emphasis on exploitative learning. Before concluding, the paper addresses implications for theory and practice and limitations of this study....

  10. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  11. Monitoring Telluric Absorption with CAMAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ashley D.; Blake, Cullen H.; Sliski, David H.

    2017-08-01

    Ground-based astronomical observations may be limited by telluric water vapor absorption, which is highly variable in time and significantly complicates both spectroscopy and photometry in the near-infrared (NIR). To achieve the sensitivity required to detect Earth-sized exoplanets in the NIR, simultaneous monitoring of precipitable water vapor (PWV) becomes necessary to mitigate the impact of variable telluric lines on radial velocity measurements and transit light curves. To address this issue, we present the Camera for the Automatic Monitoring of Atmospheric Lines (CAMAL), a stand-alone, inexpensive six-inch aperture telescope dedicated to measuring PWV at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins. CAMAL utilizes three narrowband NIR filters to trace the amount of atmospheric water vapor affecting simultaneous observations with the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) and MINERVA-Red telescopes. Here, we present the current design of CAMAL, discuss our data analysis methods, and show results from 11 nights of PWV measurements taken with CAMAL. For seven nights of data we have independent PWV measurements extracted from high-resolution stellar spectra taken with the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrometer (TRES) also located on Mount Hopkins. We use the TRES spectra to calibrate the CAMAL absolute PWV scale. Comparisons between CAMAL and TRES PWV estimates show excellent agreement, matching to within 1 mm over a 10 mm range in PWV. Analysis of CAMAL’s photometric precision propagates to PWV measurements precise to better than 0.5 mm in dry (PWV < 4 mm) conditions. We also find that CAMAL-derived PWVs are highly correlated with those from a GPS-based water vapor monitor located approximately 90 km away at Kitt Peak National Observatory, with a root mean square PWV difference of 0.8 mm.

  12. Absorption in periodic layered structures

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Alexander; Tip, Adriaan; Combes, Jean-Michel

    2000-01-01

    Photonic band structure of metal-dielectric and semiconductor-dielectric layered structures are studied in the presence of a strong absorption. It is shown that absorption can enlarge some gaps by as much as 50%.

  13. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of fluorination.

  14. Absorption characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The analytical expression for the absorption coefficient of BR film is applied to study the absorption characteristics of BR molecules in a typical laser system operating at funda- mental wavelength 514 nm. The experimental data available for the absorption coefficients of the levels B and M corresponding to the wavelength ...

  15. ROOT User Workshop 2013

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Since almost two decades, ROOT has established itself as the framework for HENP data processing and analysis. The LHC upgrade program and the new experiments being designed at CERN and elsewhere will pose even more formidable challenges in terms of data complexity and size. The new parallel and heterogeneous computing architectures that are either announced or already available will call for a deep rethinking of the code and the data structures to be exploited efficiently. This workshop, following from a successful series of such events, will allow you to learn in detail about the new ROOT 6 and will help shape the future evolution of ROOT.

  16. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  17. Absorption in dielectric models

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, R J

    2015-01-01

    We develop a classical microscopic model of a dielectric. The model features nonlinear interaction terms between polarizable dipoles and lattice vibrations. The lattice vibrations are found to act as a pseudo-reservoir, giving broadband absorption of electromagnetic radiation without the addition of damping terms in the dynamics. The effective permittivity is calculated using a perturbative iteration method and is found to have the form associated with real dielectrics. Spatial dispersion is naturally included in the model and we also calculate the wavevector dependence of the permittivity.

  18. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ramesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and showed significant positive genotypic correlation with yield. Starch-fiber ratio (SFR, determinant of brittle root texture showed strong negative association with root yield. The total alkaloid content had positive genotypic correlation with root yield. So genetic upgradation should aim at optimum balance between two divergent groups of traits i.e. root yield traits (root morphometric traits and crude fiber content and root textural quality traits (starch content and SFR to develop superior genotypes with better yield and quality.

  19. Geospatial Absorption and Regional Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOAN MAC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The geospatial absorptions are characterized by a specific complexity both in content and in their phenomenological and spatial manifestation fields. Such processes are differentiated according to their specificity to pre-absorption, absorption or post-absorption. The mechanisms that contribute to absorption are extremely numerous: aggregation, extension, diffusion, substitution, resistivity (resilience, stratification, borrowings, etc. Between these mechanisms frequent relations are established determining an amplification of the process and of its regional effects. The installation of the geographic osmosis phenomenon in a given territory (a place for example leads to a homogenization of the geospatial state and to the installation of the regional homogeneity.

  20. Gravisensitivity of cress roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Dieter; Tewinkel, Martin

    The minimum dose (stimulus x time [gs]) eliciting a visible gravitropic response, has been determined using continuous and intermittent stimulation and two different accelerations at 1g and 0.1g. The minimum dose of 20 - 30 gs estimated for microgravity roots and of 50 - 60 gs for roots grown on a 1g-centrifuge indicated a higher sensitivity of microgravity roots. Applying intermittent stimuli to microgravity-grown roots, gravitropic responses were observed after two stimuli of 13.5 gs separated by a stimulus free interval of 118 s. The curvature of microgravity-grown roots to lateral stimulation by 0.1 g was remarkably smaller than by 1g in spite of the same doses which were applied to the seedlings. Microscopic investigations corresponding to stimulations in the range of the threshold values, demonstrated small displacement (< 2 μm) of statoliths in root statocytes. Accepting the statolith theory, one can conclude that stimulus transformation has to occur in the cytoplasm in close vicinity to the statoliths and that this transformation system was affected during seedling cultivation in microgravity.

  1. Root architecture impacts on root decomposition rates in switchgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, M.; Schadt, C.; Garten, C. T.; Jastrow, J. D.; Phillips, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Roots strongly contribute to soil organic carbon accrual, but the rate of soil carbon input via root litter decomposition is still uncertain. Root systems are built up of roots with a variety of different diameter size classes, ranging from very fine to very coarse roots. Since fine roots have low C:N ratios and coarse roots have high C:N ratios, root systems are heterogeneous in quality, spanning a range of different C:N ratios. Litter decomposition rates are generally well predicted by litter C:N ratios, thus decomposition of roots may be controlled by the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots. With this study we asked how root architecture (i.e. the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots) affects the decomposition of roots systems in the biofuels crop switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). To understand how root architecture affects root decomposition rates, we collected roots from eight switchgrass cultivars (Alamo, Kanlow, Carthage, Cave-in-Rock, Forestburg, Southlow, Sunburst, Blackwell), grown at FermiLab (IL), by taking 4.8-cm diameter soil cores from on top of the crown and directly next to the crown of individual plants. Roots were carefully excised from the cores by washing and analyzed for root diameter size class distribution using WinRhizo. Subsequently, root systems of each of the plants (4 replicates per cultivar) were separated in 'fine' (0-0.5 mm), 'medium' (0.5-1 mm) and 'coarse' roots (1-2.5 mm), dried, cut into 0.5 cm (medium and coarse roots) and 2 mm pieces (fine roots), and incubated for 90 days. For each of the cultivars we established five root-treatments: 20g of soil was amended with 0.2g of (1) fine roots, (2) medium roots, (3) coarse roots, (4) a 1:1:1 mixture of fine, medium and coarse roots, and (5) a mixture combining fine, medium and coarse roots in realistic proportions. We measured CO2 respiration at days 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 during the experiment. The 13C signature of the soil was -26‰, and the 13C signature

  2. Root architecture simulation improves the inference from seedling root phenotyping towards mature root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangsan; Rewald, Boris; Leitner, Daniel; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Nakhforoosh, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Root phenotyping provides trait information for plant breeding. A shortcoming of high-throughput root phenotyping is the limitation to seedling plants and failure to make inferences on mature root systems. We suggest root system architecture (RSA) models to predict mature root traits and overcome the inference problem. Sixteen pea genotypes were phenotyped in (i) seedling (Petri dishes) and (ii) mature (sand-filled columns) root phenotyping platforms. The RSA model RootBox was parameterized with seedling traits to simulate the fully developed root systems. Measured and modelled root length, first-order lateral number, and root distribution were compared to determine key traits for model-based prediction. No direct relationship in root traits (tap, lateral length, interbranch distance) was evident between phenotyping systems. RootBox significantly improved the inference over phenotyping platforms. Seedling plant tap and lateral root elongation rates and interbranch distance were sufficient model parameters to predict genotype ranking in total root length with an RSpearman of 0.83. Parameterization including uneven lateral spacing via a scaling function substantially improved the prediction of architectures underlying the differently sized root systems. We conclude that RSA models can solve the inference problem of seedling root phenotyping. RSA models should be included in the phenotyping pipeline to provide reliable information on mature root systems to breeding research. PMID:28168270

  3. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  4. Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2014-01-01

    into random incidence absorption coefficients for porous absorbers are investigated. Two optimization-based conversion methods are suggested: the surface impedance estimation for locally reacting absorbers and the flow resistivity estimation for extendedly reacting absorbers. The suggested conversion methods......Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a specimen and non-uniform intensity in the test chamber. In this study, several methods that convert Sabine absorption coefficients...

  5. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  6. Root Uptake of Lipophilic Zinc−Rhamnolipid Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Samuel P.; McLaughlin, Michael J.; Cakmak, Ismail; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Karkkainen, Michael (Sabanci); (EPA); (CSIRO/LW); (Adelaide)

    2009-06-16

    This study investigated the formation and plant uptake of lipophilic metal-rhamnolipid complexes. Monorhamnosyl and dirhamnosyl rhamnolipids formed lipophilic complexes with copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn). Rhamnolipids significantly increased Zn absorption by Brassica napus var. Pinnacle roots in {sup 65}Zn-spiked ice-cold solutions, compared with ZnSO{sub 4} alone. Therefore, rhamnolipid appeared to facilitate Zn absorption via a nonmetabolically mediated pathway. Synchrotron XRF and XAS showed that Zn was present in roots as Zn-phytate-like compounds when roots were treated with Zn-free solutions, ZnSO{sub 4}, or Zn-EDTA. With rhamnolipid application, Zn was predominantly found in roots as the Zn-rhamnolipid complex. When applied to a calcareous soil, rhamnolipids increased dry matter production and Zn concentrations in durum (Triticum durum L. cv. Balcali-2000) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. BDME-10) shoots. Rhamnolipids either increased total plant uptake of Zn from the soil or increased Zn translocation by reducing the prevalence of insoluble Zn-phytate-like compounds in roots.

  7. Drawing rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Daniel H

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a collection of species is usually represented by a phylogenetic tree. Sometimes, phylogenetic networks are used as a means of representing reticulate evolution or of showing uncertainty and incompatibilities in evolutionary datasets. This is often done using unrooted phylogenetic networks such as split networks, due in part, to the availability of software (SplitsTree) for their computation and visualization. In this paper we discuss the problem of drawing rooted phylogenetic networks as cladograms or phylograms in a number of different views that are commonly used for rooted trees. Implementations of the algorithms are available in new releases of the Dendroscope and SplitsTree programs.

  8. Stachbotrys Root Rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachybotrys root rot is caused by Stachybotrys chartarum, a cellulytic saprophytic hyphomycete fungus. The pathogen produces mycotoxins including a host of immunosupressant compounds for human and is one of the causes of the "sick building syndrome." Although S. chartarum is rarely known as a plan...

  9. computer-aided root aided root aided root aided root-locus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    simplified and coded into computer. -loci obtained with this technique are found to confor loci obtained with this technique are found to confor loci are drawn to scale instead of rough sketches. m, stability, transient response, root-locus, iteration he means by which any a machine, mechanism or d or altered in accordance.

  10. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Metagenomics at Grass Roots. Sudeshna ... benefit human health, agriculture, and ecosystemfunctions. This article provides a brief history of technicaladvances in metagenomics, including DNA sequencing methods,and some case studies.

  11. computer-aided root aided root aided root aided root-locus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    AIDED ROOT-LOCUS NUMERICAL TECHNIQUE. LOCUS NUMERICAL TECHNIQUE. A. R. Zubair1,* , A. ... -loci obtained with this technique are found to confor loci obtained with this technique are found to confor loci are .... approaches which use complex analytic or semi- analytic representation that involve the use of.

  12. Phytases for improved iron absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Phytase enzymes present an alternative to iron supplements, because they have been shown to improve iron absorption by means of catalysing the degradation of a potent iron absorption inhibitor: phytic acid. Phytic acid is a hexaphosphate of inositol and is particularly prevalent in cereal grains...

  13. Wave energy absorption by ducks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurniawan, Adi

    2017-01-01

    We study the absorption of wave energy by a single and multiple cam-shaped bodies referred to as ducks. Numerical models are developed under the assumptions of linear theory. We consider wave absorption by a single duck as well as by two lines of ducks meeting at an angle....

  14. Water absorption in brick masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Smolders, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The water absorption in brick, mortar that was cured separately, and masonry samples was studied using NMR. Models of the moisture transport are usually formulated on the basis of a diffusion equation. In the case of water absorption in separate brick and mortar samples, the moisture diffusivity in

  15. Root discrimination of closely related crop and weed species using FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina eMeinen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Root discrimination of species is a pre-condition for studying belowground competition processes between crop and weed species. In this experiment, we tested Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT MIR-attenuated total reflection (ATR spectroscopy to discriminate roots of closely related crop and weed species grown in the greenhouse: maize/barnyard grass, barley/wild oat, wheat/blackgrass (Poaceae, and sugar beet/common lambsquarters (Chenopodiaceae. Fresh (moist and dried root segments as well as ground roots were analyzed by FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy. Root absorption spectra showed species specific peak distribution and peak height. A clear separation according to species was not possible with fresh root segments. Dried root segments (including root basis, middle section and root tip of maize/barnyard grass and sugar beet/common lambsquarters formed completely separated species clusters. Wheat and blackgrass separated in species specific clusters when root tips were removed from cluster analysis. A clear separation of dried root segments according to species was not possible in the case of barley and wild oat. Cluster analyses of ground roots revealed a 100 % separation of all tested crop and weed species combinations. Spectra grouped in Poaceae and Chenopodiaceae clusters. Within the Poaceae cluster, C3 and C4 species differed significantly in heterogeneity. Thus, root spectra reflected the degree of kinship. To quantify species proportion in root mixtures, a two- and a three-species model for species quantification in root mixtures of maize, barnyard grass, and wild oat was calculated. The models showed low standard errors of prediction (RMSEP and high residual predictive deviation (RPD values in an external test set validation. Hence, FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy seems to be a promising tool for root research even between closely related plant species.

  16. Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activity of root and root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trianthema decandra L. root and root callus extracts of different solvents viz., petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and ethanol were tested against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and also against Fusarium spp. Root callus extract of chloroform and ethanol showed significant activity against Bacillus ...

  17. Genetic variants associated with the root system architecture of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under contrasting phosphate supply

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Yanling; Thomas, Catherine L.; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Ping; Shi, Dexu; Grandke, Fabian; Jin, Kemo; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen; Yi, Bin; Broadley, Martin R.; Shi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Breeding crops with ideal root system architecture for efficient absorption of phosphorus is an important strategy to reduce the use of phosphate fertilizers. To investigate genetic variants leading to changes in root system architecture, 405 oilseed rape cultivars were genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array in low and high P environments. A total of 285 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with root system architecture traits at varying phosphorus levels. Nine single-nuc...

  18. Roots of the Chromatic Polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrett, Thomas

    . In this thesis we study the real roots of the chromatic polynomial, termed chromatic roots, and focus on how certain properties of a graph affect the location of its chromatic roots. Firstly, we investigate how the presence of a certain spanning tree in a graph affects its chromatic roots. In particular we prove...... a tight lower bound on the smallest non-trivial chromatic root of a graph admitting a spanning tree with at most three leaves. Here, non-trivial means different from 0 or 1. This extends a theorem of Thomassen on graphs with Hamiltonian paths. We also prove similar lower bounds on the chromatic roots...... extend Thomassen’s technique to the Tutte polynomial and as a consequence, deduce a density result for roots of the Tutte polynomial. This partially answers a conjecture of Jackson and Sokal. Finally, we refocus our attention on the chromatic polynomial and investigate the density of chromatic roots...

  19. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  20. Introduction to the ROOT System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Introduction to the ROOT data handling system. ROOT is used in some for or another by all LHC experiments and will be used by all for final data analysis. The introduction gives an overview of the system. Prerequisite knowledge: C++

  1. Aconite poisoning following the percutaneous absorption of Aconitum alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2012-11-30

    In vitro experiment using the modified Franz-type diffusion cell has demonstrated that the human skin is permeable to aconitine and mesaconitine. To characterise the risk of systemic toxicity following the topical applications of aconite tincture and raw aconite roots, relevant reports of percutaneous absorption of Aconitum alkaloids and aconite poisoning are reviewed. Published reports indicate that aconite tincture and raw aconite roots can be absorbed through the skin into systemic circulation to cause fatal and non-fatal aconite poisoning. Both aconite tincture and raw aconite roots contain very high concentrations of Aconitum alkaloids, which allow penetration of the stratum corneum along the diffusion gradient. The risk of systemic toxicity is even higher if Aconitum alkaloids are held in occlusive contact with the skin and the epidermis (stratum corneum) is already damaged. The public should be warned of the danger in using these topical aconite preparations and the risk of systemic toxicity following percutaneous absorption of Aconitum alkaloids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The expected time until absorption when absorption is not certain

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers continuous-time Markov chains whose state space consists of an irreducible class, , and an absorbing state which is accessible from . The purpose is to provide a way to determine the expected time to absorption conditional on such time being finite, in the case where absorption occurs with probability less than 1. The results are illustrated by applications to the general birth and death process and the linear birth, death and catastrophe process.

  3. Adsorption of Eu(III) onto roots of water hyacinth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, C.; Mielke, R.E.; Dimaquibo, D.; Curtis, A.J. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dewitt, J.G. [San Francisco State Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) has drawn attention as a plant capable of removing pollutants, including toxic metals, from water. The authors are interested in the capacity of the water hyacinth to remediate aquatic environments that have been contaminated with the lanthanide metal, europium Eu(III). Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) they have been able to determine that Eu(III) is adsorbed onto the surface of the roots from water and that the highest concentration of Eu(III) is on the root hairs. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques were used to speciate the Eu(III) adsorbed onto the surface of the roots. The XAS data for Eu-contaminated water hyacinth roots provides evidence of a Eu-oxygen environment and establishes that Eu(III) is coordinated to 10--11 oxygen atoms at a distance of 2.44 {angstrom}. This likely involves binding of Eu(III) to the root via carboxylate groups and hydration of Eu(III) at the root surface.

  4. Strigolactones Effects on Root Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2012-07-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) were defined as a new group of plant hormones that suppress lateral shoot branching. Our previous studies suggested SLs to be regulators of root development. SLs were shown to alter root architecture by regulating lateral root formation and to affect root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. Another important effect of SLs on root growth was shown to be associated with root directional growth. Supplementation of SLs to roots led to alterations in root directional growth, whereas associated mutants showed asymmetrical root growth, which was influenced by environmental factors. The regulation by SLs of root development was shown to be conducted via a cross talk of SLs with other plant hormones, including auxin. SLs were shown to regulate auxin transport, and to interfere with the activity of auxin-efflux carriers. Therefore, it might be that SLs are regulators of root directional growth as a result of their ability to regulated auxin transport. However, other evidences suggest a localized effect of SLs on cell division, which may not necessarily be associated with auxin efflux. These and other, recent hypothesis as to the SLs mode of action and the associated root perception and response to environmental factors will be discussed.

  5. Adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massoumi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Adventitious root (AR) formation is indispensable in vegetative propagation and is widely used. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is needed to improve rooting treatments. We first established a system to study rooting in Arabidopsis, the model organism in plant biology but only

  6. Back to the roots!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woermann, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    This article argues that one can revive the critical edge that postmodernist theory has brought to marketing, thinking without subscribing to any particular school of (critical) theory by following the principle of methodological situationalism. The roots of postmodernist critique lie in careful...... in empirical observations of manifest meaning or social order in concrete situations. This does not mean that macro-processes or structures should be ignored, but that their roots and effects in local lived life have to be scrutinized. Critical theorizing does not need to resort to utopian or ideological...... arguments about the grand scheme of things. Careful empirical work zooming in on social life in concrete situations will provide plenty of novel insight and critical edge....

  7. Roots and routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann-Dorte; Jensen, Sune Qvotrup

    2011-01-01

    the national exclusion of transnational migrants marked as ‘strangers’ and border figures of the nation and a relatively high degree of local belonging to the neighbourhood. This is followed by an in-depth empirical analysis inspired by Alfred Schutz's distinction between the stranger and the homecomer......This article is about transnational migrants, how they construct belonging to ‘new’ places where they have arrived, and how the feelings of belonging to their places of origin change when they go back. The theoretical part of the article outlines the relationship between migration and belonging....... A somewhat paradoxical finding is that it appears to be more difficult for transnational migrants to maintain their roots in the country of origin when they go back than it was to establish new roots in the host country...

  8. Rooted in Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses...... period of European prehistory. In so doing, the text not only addresses transmission and reception, but also the conceptualization of mobility within a world which was literally Rooted in Movement....

  9. Expressing Parallelism with ROOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piparo, D. [CERN; Tejedor, E. [CERN; Guiraud, E. [CERN; Ganis, G. [CERN; Mato, P. [CERN; Moneta, L. [CERN; Valls Pla, X. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab

    2017-11-22

    The need for processing the ever-increasing amount of data generated by the LHC experiments in a more efficient way has motivated ROOT to further develop its support for parallelism. Such support is being tackled both for shared-memory and distributed-memory environments. The incarnations of the aforementioned parallelism are multi-threading, multi-processing and cluster-wide executions. In the area of multi-threading, we discuss the new implicit parallelism and related interfaces, as well as the new building blocks to safely operate with ROOT objects in a multi-threaded environment. Regarding multi-processing, we review the new MultiProc framework, comparing it with similar tools (e.g. multiprocessing module in Python). Finally, as an alternative to PROOF for cluster-wide executions, we introduce the efforts on integrating ROOT with state-of-the-art distributed data processing technologies like Spark, both in terms of programming model and runtime design (with EOS as one of the main components). For all the levels of parallelism, we discuss, based on real-life examples and measurements, how our proposals can increase the productivity of scientists.

  10. Expressing Parallelism with ROOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piparo, D.; Tejedor, E.; Guiraud, E.; Ganis, G.; Mato, P.; Moneta, L.; Valls Pla, X.; Canal, P.

    2017-10-01

    The need for processing the ever-increasing amount of data generated by the LHC experiments in a more efficient way has motivated ROOT to further develop its support for parallelism. Such support is being tackled both for shared-memory and distributed-memory environments. The incarnations of the aforementioned parallelism are multi-threading, multi-processing and cluster-wide executions. In the area of multi-threading, we discuss the new implicit parallelism and related interfaces, as well as the new building blocks to safely operate with ROOT objects in a multi-threaded environment. Regarding multi-processing, we review the new MultiProc framework, comparing it with similar tools (e.g. multiprocessing module in Python). Finally, as an alternative to PROOF for cluster-wide executions, we introduce the efforts on integrating ROOT with state-of-the-art distributed data processing technologies like Spark, both in terms of programming model and runtime design (with EOS as one of the main components). For all the levels of parallelism, we discuss, based on real-life examples and measurements, how our proposals can increase the productivity of scientists.

  11. Reproducibility of The Random Incidence Absorption Coefficient Converted From the Sabine Absorption Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Chang, Ji-ho

    2015-01-01

    Absorption coefficients measured in reverberation chambers, Sabine absorption coefficients, suffer from two major problems. Firstly, they sometimes exceed unity. Secondly, the reproducibility of the Sabine absorption coefficients is quite poor, meaning that the Sabine absorption coefficients vary...

  12. Balancing Absorptive Capacity and Inbound Open Innovation for Sustained Innovative Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongsun, Kim; Kim, Eonsoo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2016-01-01

    How can a firm develop new ideas and turn them into profitable innovations on a sustained basis? We address this fundamental issue in a novel way by developing an integrative framework of absorptive capacity (AC) and inbound open innovation that is rooted in the attention-based view of the firm. ...

  13. Absorption Kinetics and Subcellular Fractionation of Zinc in Winter Wheat in Response to Nitrogen Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojun Nie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is critical for zinc (Zn absorption into plant roots; this in turn allows for Zn accumulation and biofortification of grain in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L., an important food crop. However, little is known about root morphology and subcellular Zn distribution in response to N treatment at different levels of Zn supply. In this study, two nutrient solution culture experiments were conducted to examine Zn accumulation, Zn absorption kinetics, root morphology, and Zn subcellular distribution in wheat seedlings pre-cultured with different N concentrations. The results showed positive correlations between N and Zn concentrations, and N and Zn accumulation, respectively. The findings suggested that an increase in N supply enhanced root absorption and the root-to-shoot transport of Zn. Nitrogen combined with the high Zn (Zn10 treatment increased the Zn concentration and consequently its accumulation in both shoots and roots. The maximum influx rate (Vmax, root length, surface area, and volume of 14-d-old seedlings, and root growth from 7 to 14 d in the medium N (N7.5 treatment were higher, but the Michaelis constant (Km and minimum equilibrium concentrations (Cmin in this treatment were lower than those in the low (N0.05 and high (N15 N treatments, when Zn was supplied at a high level (Zn10. Meanwhile, there were no pronounced differences in the above root traits between the N0.05Zn0 and N7.5Zn10 treatments. An increase in N supply decreased Zn in cell walls and cell organelles, while it increased Zn in the root soluble fraction. In leaves, an increase in N supply significantly decreased Zn in cell walls and the soluble fraction, while it increased Zn in cell organelles under Zn deficiency, but increased Zn distribution in the soluble fraction under medium and high Zn treatments. Therefore, a combination of medium N and high Zn treatments enhanced Zn absorption, apparently by enhancing Zn membrane transport and stimulating root

  14. Effect of fluorine and of beta-indolacetic acid on the respiration of root tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilet, P.E.

    1964-01-01

    The auxin, beta-indolacetic acid, (BIAA) inhibited the elongation of Lens culinaris roots at all concentrations. At high concentrations fluoride had an inhibitor effect, but it had a stimulatory effect on root growth at low concentrations. BIAA mildly stimulated respiration at low concentrations and inhibited oxygen absorption at high concentrations. At concentrations stimulating respiration fluoride was found to reduce these stimulating effects caused by BIAA. Therefore, fluoride and BIAA acted as antagonists in their effect on respiration.

  15. Water absorption behaviour of hybrid interwoven cellulosic fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslinda, A. B.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Ridzuan, M. J. M.; Syayuthi, AR. A.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper investigated the water absorption behaviour of hybrid interwoven cellulosic fibre composites. Hybrid composites consisting of interwoven kenaf/jute and kenaf/hemp yarns were prepared by an infusion manufacturing technique that used epoxy as the polymer matrix. Water absorption test was conducted as elucidated in ASTM D570 standard by immersing the composite samples in tap water at room temperature until reaching their water content saturation point. For each composite type, average from five samples was recorded and the percentage of water uptake against the square root of time was plotted. As the effect of hybridization, the water uptake, diffusion and permeability coefficient of the hybrid composites were lesser than the individual woven composites.

  16. Matching roots to their environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Gregory, Peter J.; Bengough, A. Glyn; Hallett, Paul D.; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants form the base of the terrestrial food chain and provide medicines, fuel, fibre and industrial materials to humans. Vascular land plants rely on their roots to acquire the water and mineral elements necessary for their survival in nature or their yield and nutritional quality in agriculture. Major biogeochemical fluxes of all elements occur through plant roots, and the roots of agricultural crops have a significant role to play in soil sustainability, carbon sequestration, reducing emissions of greenhouse gasses, and in preventing the eutrophication of water bodies associated with the application of mineral fertilizers. Scope This article provides the context for a Special Issue of Annals of Botany on ‘Matching Roots to Their Environment’. It first examines how land plants and their roots evolved, describes how the ecology of roots and their rhizospheres contributes to the acquisition of soil resources, and discusses the influence of plant roots on biogeochemical cycles. It then describes the role of roots in overcoming the constraints to crop production imposed by hostile or infertile soils, illustrates root phenotypes that improve the acquisition of mineral elements and water, and discusses high-throughput methods to screen for these traits in the laboratory, glasshouse and field. Finally, it considers whether knowledge of adaptations improving the acquisition of resources in natural environments can be used to develop root systems for sustainable agriculture in the future. PMID:23821619

  17. Root caries: a periodontal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignozzi, I; Crea, A; Capri, D; Littarru, C; Lajolo, C; Tatakis, D N

    2014-04-01

    A prevailing dental problem in the periodontal patient is root caries. Specifically, periodontal involvement often results in root surfaces becoming exposed and at risk for this condition. Periodontal therapy often leads to increased gingival recession as well, and the associated increased root caries risk may compromise the long-term success and survival of periodontally treated teeth.This narrative review will address the topic of root caries in the periodontal patient, focusing on unmet research needs. The Medline database was searched to identify items dealing with root caries, in terms of clinical features, diagnosis, pathogenic mechanisms and histopathology, as well as epidemiology, focusing then on the relationship between root caries and periodontal disorders. Although there is extensive literature on root caries, consensus is lacking regarding certain aspects, such as diagnostic criteria, prevalence within populations and indisputable risk factors. Advancing age could be an aggravating factor in susceptibility to root caries for the periodontal patient; however, definitive evidence in this regard is still missing. Similarly, full awareness of the increased risk of root caries in patients with periodontal disease or long-term periodontal treatment appears to be still lacking. Research regarding root caries in age-specific (elderly) periodontal patients is needed. Improved oral hygiene practices, locally applied preventive measures, good dietary habits and regular dental check-ups are crucial approaches to prevent both periodontal disease progression and root caries. Periodontal patients with root exposure should follow a strict root caries prevention protocol, as an integral component of their periodontal maintenance therapy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Cold storage of rooted and non-rooted carnation cuttings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... 0.5 - 0°C, rooted chrysanthemum cuttings stored for 3 - 6 weeks at - 0.5 - 1.6°C, and rooted poinsettia cuttings stored for 1 week at 5°C can all be successfully used after storage. Laurie et al. (1969) do not recommend storage of rooted cuttings for more than 8 weeks because of a decreased survival rate ...

  19. Absorption and Metabolism of Xanthophylls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi Kotake-Nara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dietary carotenoids, especially xanthophylls, have attracted significant attention because of their characteristic biological activities, including anti-allergic, anti-cancer, and anti-obese actions. Although no less than forty carotenoids are ingested under usual dietary habits, only six carotenoids and their metabolites have been found in human tissues, suggesting selectivity in the intestinal absorption of carotenoids. Recently, facilitated diffusion in addition to simple diffusion has been reported to mediate the intestinal absorption of carotenoids in mammals. The selective absorption of carotenoids may be caused by uptake to the intestinal epithelia by the facilitated diffusion and an unknown excretion to intestinal lumen. It is well known that β-carotene can be metabolized to vitamin A after intestinal absorption of carotenoids, but little is known about the metabolic transformation of non provitamin A xanthophylls. The enzymatic oxidation of the secondary hydroxyl group leading to keto-carotenoids would occur as a common pathway of xanthophyll metabolism in mammals. This paper reviews the absorption and metabolism of xanthophylls by introducing recent advances in this field.

  20. Perennial roots to immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    Maximum lifespan greatly varies among species, and it is not strictly determined; it can change with species evolution. Clonal growth is a major factor governing maximum lifespan. In the plant kingdom, the maximum lifespans described for clonal and nonclonal plants vary by an order of magnitude, with 43,600 and 5,062 years for Lomatia tasmanica and Pinus longaeva, respectively. Nonclonal perennial plants (those plants exclusively using sexual reproduction) also present a huge diversity in maximum lifespans (from a few to thousands of years) and even more interestingly, contrasting differences in aging patterns. Some plants show a clear physiological deterioration with aging, whereas others do not. Indeed, some plants can even improve their physiological performance as they age (a phenomenon called negative senescence). This diversity in aging patterns responds to species-specific life history traits and mechanisms evolved by each species to adapt to its habitat. Particularities of roots in perennial plants, such as meristem indeterminacy, modular growth, stress resistance, and patterns of senescence, are crucial in establishing perenniality and understanding adaptation of perennial plants to their habitats. Here, the key role of roots for perennial plant longevity will be discussed, taking into account current knowledge and highlighting additional aspects that still require investigation. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. ROOT Tutorial for Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Piparo, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    ROOT is a "batteries-included" tool kit for data analysis, storage and visualization. It is widely used in High Energy Physics and other disciplines such as Biology, Finance and Astrophysics. This event is an introductory tutorial to ROOT and comprises a front lecture and hands on exercises. IMPORTANT NOTE: The tutorial is based on ROOT 6.04 and NOT on the ROOT5 series.  IMPORTANT NOTE: if you have ROOT 6.04 installed on your laptop, you will not need to install any virtual machine. The instructions showing how to install the virtual machine on which you can find ROOT 6.04 can be found under "Material" on this page.

  2. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  3. Comparing Leaf and Root Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Geldenhuys

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider two ways of inserting a key into a binary search tree: leaf insertion which is the standard method, and root insertion which involves additional rotations. Although the respective cost of constructing leaf and root insertion binary search trees trees, in terms of comparisons, are the same in the average case, we show that in the worst case the construction of a root insertion binary search tree needs approximately 50% of the number of comparisons required by leaf insertion.

  4. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorption systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.

  5. Absorption Efficiency of Receiving Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Bach; Frandsen, Aksel

    2005-01-01

    A receiving antenna with a matched load will always scatter some power. This paper sets an upper and a lower bound on the absorption efficiency (absorbed power over sum of absorbed and scattered powers), which lies between 0 and 100% depending on the directivities of the antenna and scatter...... patterns. It can approach 100% as closely as desired, although in practice this may not be an attractive solution. An example with a small endfire array of dipoles shows an efficiency of 93%. Several examples of small conical horn antennas are also given, and they all have absorption efficiencies less than...

  6. Nonlinear absorption in discrete systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spire, A; Leon, J [Physique Mathematique et Theorique, CNRS-UMR5825, Universite Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier (France)

    2004-10-01

    In the context of nonlinear scattering, a continuous wave incident onto a nonlinear discrete molecular chain of coupled oscillators can be partially absorbed as a result of a three-wave resonant interaction that couples two HF-waves of frequencies close to the edge of the Brillouin zone. Hence both nonlinearity and discreteness are necessary for generating this new absorption process which manifests itself by soliton generation in the medium. As a paradigm of this nonlinear absorption we consider here the Davydov model that describes exciton-phonon coupling in hydrogen-bonded molecular chains.

  7. Absorption-heat-pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  8. Root system in declining forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, F.H.

    1987-07-11

    Trees with obligate ectomycorrhiza are more sensitive to environmental stress than those without ectomycorrhiza or with facultative ectomycorrhiza. With spruce seedlings growing in humus material from a declining spruce forest an experimental proof was given, that reduction of the mineral nitrogen content by adding sawdust to the rooting substrate increases the share of root tips converted to ectomycorrhizas. A close correlation has been found between the mycorrhiza frequency and the number of root tips. This means, that the ramification of a root system is the more intense the better the conditions for mycorrhizal development are.

  9. Proteomics of Maize Root Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hochholdinger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  10. PEG-mediated osmotic stress induces premature differentiation of the root apical meristem and outgrowth of lateral roots in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongtao; Liu, Ling; Li, Kexue; Xie, Qingen; Wang, Zhijuan; Zhao, Xuhua; Li, Xia

    2014-09-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses causing growth retardation and yield loss of plants. In the past decades, osmotic adjustment, antioxidant protection, and stomatal movement have been extensively studied, but much less attention has been paid to the study of root system reprogramming to maximize water absorption and survival under water stress. Here, it is shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-simulated mild and moderate osmotic stress induced premature differentiation of the root apical meristem (RAM). It is demonstrated that RAM premature differentiation is a conserved adaptive mechanism that is widely adopted by various plants to cope with osmotic stress simulated by PEG 8000, and the occurrence of RAM premature differentiation is directly related to stress tolerance of plants. It is shown that the osmotic stress-induced premature differentiation caused growth cessation of primary roots allowing outgrowth of lateral roots. This work has uncovered a key mechanism for controlling the plastic development of the root system by which plants are capable of survival, growth, or reproduction under water stress. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  12. Lead accumulation and association with Fe on Typha latifolia root from an urban brownfield site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huan; Qian, Yu; Gallagher, Frank J; Wu, Meiyin; Zhang, Weiguo; Yu, Lizhong; Zhu, Qingzhi; Zhang, Kewei; Liu, Chang-Jun; Tappero, Ryan

    2013-06-01

    Synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence and X-ray absorption near-edge microstructure spectroscopy techniques were applied to Typha latifolia (cattail) root sections and rhizosphere soils collected from a brownfield site in New Jersey to investigate lead (Pb) accumulation in T. latifolia roots and the role of iron (Fe) plaque in controlling Pb uptake. We found that Pb and Fe spatial distribution patterns in the root tissues are similar with both metals present at high concentrations mainly in the epidermis and at low concentrations in the vascular tissue (xylem and phloem), and the major Pb and Fe species in T. latifolia root are Pb(II) and Fe(III) regardless of concentration levels. The sequestration of Pb by T. latifolia roots suggests a potential low-cost remediation method (phytostabilization) to manage Pb-contaminated sediments for brownfield remediation while performing wetland rehabilitation.

  13. Root Scaling Study ; Description of the DNS Root Scaling Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsen, B.; Jamakovic, A.; Roijers, F.

    2009-01-01

    In opdracht van de Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), de organisatie verantwoordelijk voor het beheren van de Root zone, heeft TNO onderzoek gedaan naar de schaalbaarheid van de Root zone. Welke impact kunnen de invoering van secure DNS (DNSSEC) en IPv6 en de uitbreiding

  14. Cold storage of rooted and non-rooted carnation cuttings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    showed differences depending on the cultivar tested. Specifically, the Vittorio cultivar had a better reaction to long-term storage. The survival and rooting rates of non-rooted cuttings after cold storage also showed differences depending on the cultivar tested. Vittorio cultivar reacted better to storage than the Dianora cultivar.

  15. Effects of different concentarions of auxins on rooting and root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of different concentarions of auxins on rooting and root characters of air and ground layers of jojoba ( Simmondsia chinensis (Link.) C.K. Schneider. ... The experiment was conducted during the rainy season from June to August in a randomised complete block design with three replications. Both air and ground ...

  16. Instrumental methods for studies of structure and function of root systems of large trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Cermak, Jan

    2003-06-01

    New methods using different physical principles have been successfully applied in studies of root systems of large trees. The ground-penetrating radar technique provides 3D images of coarse roots (starting with a diameter of about 20 mm) from the soil surface down to a depth of several metres. This can even be done under layers of undisturbed materials such as concrete, asphalt and water. Fine roots cannot be visualized by this method, but the total rooted volume of soil can be determined. The differential electric conductance method has been used for fast measurement of conducting (absorbing) root surfaces. However, more testing is needed. Both these methods are non-invasive. The results can be verified by an almost harmless excavation of whole root systems, including fine roots, using the ultrasonic air-stream (air-spade) method. This method is suitable for all studies, as well as practical operations on roots or objects in their vicinity, where a gentle approach is required. Sap flow measurements on their own or in tandem with soil moisture monitoring play a leading role in studying root function and hydraulic redistribution of flow in the soil. The water absorption function of roots can be studied by measuring sap flow on individual root branches directly (as on crown branches) and also indirectly, by measuring the radial pattern of sap flow in different sapwood depths at the base of a stem. Root zone architecture can also be estimated indirectly by studying its functionality. The heat field deformation method with multi-point sensors has been found to be very convenient for this purpose. A combination of several such methods is recommended whenever possible, in order to obtain detailed information about the root systems of trees.

  17. Root systems of chaparral shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerow, Jochen; Krause, David; Jow, William

    1977-06-01

    Root systems of chaparral shrubs were excavated from a 70 m2 plot of a mixed chaparral stand located on a north-facing slope in San Diego County (32°54' N; 900 m above sea level). The main shrub species present were Adenostoma fasciculatum, Arctostaphylos pungens, Ceanothus greggii, Erigonum fasciculatum, and Haplopappus pinifolius. Shrubs were wired into their positions, and the soil was washed out beneath them down to a depth of approximately 60 cm, where impenetrable granite impeded further washing and root growth was severely restricted. Spacing and interweaving of root systems were recorded by an in-scale drawing. The roots were harvested in accordance to their depths, separated into diameter size classes for each species, and their dry weights measured. Roots of shrubs were largely confined to the upper soil levels. The roots of Eriogonum fasciculatum were concentrated in the upper soil layer. Roots of Adenostoma fasciculatum tended to be more superficial than those from Ceanothus greggii. It is hypothesized that the shallow soil at the excavation site impeded a clear depth zonation of the different root systems. The average dry weight root:shoot ratio was 0.6, ranging for the individual shrubs from 0.8 to 0.4. The root area always exceeded the shoot area, with the corresponding ratios ranging from 6 for Arctostaphylos pungens to 40 for Haplopappus pinifolius. The fine root density of 64 g dry weight per m2 under the canopy was significantly higher than in the unshaded area. However, the corresponding value of 45 g dry weight per m2 for the open ground is still high enough to make the establishment of other shrubs difficult.

  18. Low-Absorption Laser Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-01

    ABSORPTION MEASUREMENTS AT 1.06 Urn James W. Davisson U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Washington, D.C. 20375 ABSTRACT A procedure for the chemical poli...W. Davisson , Fourth Laser Window Materials Conf. p. 466). The alkaline earth fluorides and LiF were mechanically polished by rubbing: till dry

  19. Theory of graphene saturable absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A.; Cox, J. D.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-03-01

    Saturable absorption is a nonperturbative nonlinear optical phenomenon that plays a pivotal role in the generation of ultrafast light pulses. Here we show that this effect emerges in graphene at unprecedentedly low light intensities, thus opening avenues to new nonlinear physics and applications in optical technology. Specifically, we theoretically investigate saturable absorption in extended graphene by developing a semianalytical nonperturbative single-particle approach, describing electron dynamics in the atomically-thin material using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions, which is recast in the form of generalized Bloch equations. By solving the electron dynamics nonperturbatively, we account for both interband and intraband contributions to the intensity-dependent saturated conductivity and conclude that the former dominates regardless of the intrinsic doping state of the material. We obtain results in qualitative agreement with atomistic quantum-mechanical simulations of graphene nanoribbons including electron-electron interactions, finite-size, and higher-band effects. Remarkably, such effects are found to affect mainly the linear absorption, while the predicted saturation intensities are in good quantitative agreement in the limit of extended graphene. Additionally, we find that the modulation depth of saturable absorption in graphene can be electrically manipulated through an externally applied gate voltage. Our results are relevant for the development of graphene-based optoelectronic devices, as well as for applications in mode-locking and random lasers.

  20. Aerosol absorption and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stier

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006 significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the short-wave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiative forcing clear-sky from −0.79 to −0.53 W m−2 (33% and all-sky from −0.47 to −0.13 W m−2 (72%. Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19 W m−2 (36% clear-sky and of 0.12 W m−2 (92% all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05 W

  1. Absorptive capacity and smart companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Moro González

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The current competitive environment is substantially modifying the organizations’ learning processes due to a global increase of available information allowing this to be transformed into knowledge. This opportunity has been exploited since the nineties by the tools of “Business Analytics” and “Business Intelligence” but, nevertheless, being integrated in the study of new organizational capacities engaged in the process of creating intelligence inside organizations is still an outstanding task. The review of the concept of absorptive capacity and a detailed study from the perspective of this new reality will be the main objective of study of this paper.Design/methodology/approach: By comparing classical absorptive capacity and absorptive capacity from the point of view of information management tools in each one of the three stages of the organizational learning cycle, some gaps of the former are overcome/fulfilled. The academic/bibliographical references provided in this paper have been obtained from ISI web of knowledge, Scopus and Dialnet data bases, supporting the state of affairs on absorptive capacity and thereafter filtering by "Business Intelligence" and "Business Analytics". Specialized websites and Business Schools` Publications there have also been included, crowning the content on information management tools used that are currently used in the strategic consulting.Findings: Our contribution to the literature is the development of "smart absorptive capacity". This is a new capacity emerging from the reformulation of the classical concept of absorptive capacity wherein some aspects of its definition that might have been omitted are emphasized. The result of this new approach is the creation of a new Theoretical Model of Organizational Intelligence, which aims to explain, within the framework of the Resources and Capabilities Theory, the competitive advantage achieved by the so-called smart companies

  2. Phosphorus cycle in Germiston Lake. II. The in vitro and in situ absorption of /sup 32/P by Potamogeton pectinatus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaak, J.F.; Swanepoel, J.H.; Schoonbee, H.J. (Rand Afrikaans Univ., Johannesburg (South Africa))

    1982-01-01

    The in vitro absorption of /sup 32/P by the organs of intact and dissected plants of the submerged freshwater macrophyte, Potamogeton pectinatus L, was investigated. /sup 32/P was absorbed by the roots, stems and leaves of intact and dissected plants under both light and dark conditions, and at both low and high phosphate concentrations. Absorption, translocation, and release of /sup 32/P by this species were also investigated using compartmentalized containers separating foliage and roots. It was found that a higher P-concentration in the root compartment (simulating natural conditions) influences absorption, translocation and release of /sup 32/P. An in situ study in Germiston Lake using /sup 32/P confirmed that the roots of P. pectinatus can absorb phosphorus from the sediment followed by its translocation to the foliage.

  3. Absorption capacity and toxicity of paper points after sterilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Marubayashi Hidalgo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of the sterilization process on paper cones as regards their absorption capacity, and consequently, root canal drying, in addition to the possible release of any antimicrobial or cytotoxic product. Methods: The cones used were of three of the brands found on the Brazilian market Dentsply (Dentsply Indústria e Comércio Ltda., Petrópolis, Brazil, Endopoints (Endopoints Indústria e Comércio Ltda., Paraíba do Sul, Brazil and Tanari (Tanari Industrial Ltda., São Paulo, Brazil. To evaluate the absorption capacity, the cones were submitted to four sterilization cycles, and the modified Holland technique was performed. The antimicrobial/cytotoxic capacity was verified by means of depositing the sterilized cones in Petri dishes containing Miller-Hinton Agar and Blood Agar, seeded with S.aureus and E. coli. Results: The Dentsply (Dentsply Indústria e Comércio Ltda., Petrópolis, Brazil and Tanari (Tanari Industrial Ltda., São Paulo, Brazilcones presented greater absorption after the first sterilization cycle, followed by a drop in the second and third cycles, and a new increase in the fourth cycle. For the Endopoints (Endopoints Indústria e Comércio Ltda., Paraíba do Sul, Brazil cones, the values were inverted, with a small drop in absorption after the first cycle, increase in the second and third cycles, and a new drop in the fourth cycle. None of the cones presented antimicrobial activity after the sterilization process. Conclusion: The sterilization process by damp heat does not alter the properties of absorption and there is no release of by-products from the tested paper cones.

  4. Particle-in-a-Box Model of Exciton Absorption and Electroabsorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2001-01-01

    The recently proposed particle-in-a-box model of one-dimensional excitons in conjugated polymers is applied in calculations of optical absorption and electroabsorption spectra. It is demonstrated that for polymers of long conjugation length a superposition of single exciton resonances produces a ...... a line shape characterized by a square-root singularity in agreement with experimental spectra near the absorption edge. The effects of finite conjugation length on both absorption and electroabsorption spectra are analyzed.......The recently proposed particle-in-a-box model of one-dimensional excitons in conjugated polymers is applied in calculations of optical absorption and electroabsorption spectra. It is demonstrated that for polymers of long conjugation length a superposition of single exciton resonances produces...

  5. Properties of Estimated Characteristic Roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent; Nielsen, Heino Bohn

    Estimated characteristic roots in stationary autoregressions are shown to give rather noisy information about their population equivalents. This is remarkable given the central role of the characteristic roots in the theory of autoregressive processes. In the asymptotic analysis the problems appear...

  6. Multiple idiopathic apical root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, Manish; Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand

    2013-04-23

    Idiopathic external root resorption is a rarely reported condition which has been observed in single or multiple teeth. This is a rare case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption (MIARR) in a 16-year-old boy. External root resorption of the permanent teeth is a multifactorial process. Well-recognised causes of apical root resorption in permanent teeth include orthodontic therapy, trauma, periapical or periodontal inflammation, tumours, cysts, occlusal stresses, impacted teeth, systemic conditions, endocrine imbalances and dietary habits. When none of these causes are present, it is termed idiopathic root resorption which may be either cervical or apical. MIARR is a rare condition which is usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. However, it may cause pain and mobility in severe cases.

  7. Physical root-soil interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Legue, Valérie; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2017-10-04

    Plant root system development is highly modulated by the physical properties of the soil and especially by its mechanical resistance to penetration. The interplay between the mechanical stresses exerted by the soil and root growth is of particular interest for many communities, in agronomy and soil science as well as in biomechanics and plant morphogenesis. In contrast to shoots, roots apices must exert a growth pressure to penetrate strong soils and reorient their growth trajectory to cope with obstacles like stones or hardpans or to follow the tortuous paths of the soil porosity. In this review, we present the main macroscopic investigations of soil-root physical interactions in the field and combine them with simple mechanistic modeling derived from model experiments at the scale of the individual root apex. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Roots and the stability of forested slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Abstract - Root decay after timber cutting can lead to slope failure. In situ measurements of soil with tree roots showed that soil strength increased linearly as root biomass increased. Forests clear-felled 3 years earlier contained about one-third of the root biomass of old-growth forests. Nearly all of the roots

  9. RootJS: Node.js Bindings for ROOT 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffart, Theo; Früh, Maximilian; Haas, Christoph; Rajgopal, Sachin; Schwabe, Jonas; Wolff, Christoph; Szuba, Marek

    2017-10-01

    We present rootJS, an interface making it possible to seamlessly integrate ROOT 6 into applications written for Node.js, the JavaScript runtime platform increasingly commonly used to create high-performance Web applications. ROOT features can be called both directly from Node.js code and by JIT-compiling C++ macros. All rootJS methods are invoked asynchronously and support callback functions, allowing non-blocking operation of Node.js applications using them. Last but not least, our bindings have been designed to platform-independent and should therefore work on all systems supporting both ROOT 6 and Node.js. Thanks to rootJS it is now possible to create ROOT-aware Web applications taking full advantage of the high performance and extensive capabilities of Node.js. Examples include platforms for the quality assurance of acquired, reconstructed or simulated data, book-keeping and e-log systems, and even Web browser-based data visualisation and analysis.

  10. Medico-legal aspects of vertical root fractures in root filled teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I; Tamse, A

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT).......To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT)....

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhiza and kinetic parameters of phosphorus absorption by bean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Adriana Parada Dias da

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that determine greater P absorption by mycorrhizal plants are still not completely clear, and are attributed, in part, to an increase in the number of absorption sites promoted by the hyphae, and/or to a greater affinity of the colonized hypha or root carriers to P. The effect of mycorrhizae formed by Glomus etunicatum on the kinetic parameters of P absorption by the roots and on P influx in bean plants of the IAC-Carioca cultivar was evaluated, in two distinct plant development periods: at the onset of flowering and at the pod-filling stage (35 and 50 days after sowing, respectively. A mixture of sand and silica (9:1 was utilized as substrate and irrigated with nutrient solution. The kinetics assay was performed by the method of 32P depletion from the solution (depletion curve, using intact plants. Mycorrhization promoted greater growth and P absorption by bean plants, which was more conspicuously observed at the pod-filling stage. Mycorrhizal plants showed higher values of maximum ion uptake rate (Vmax and net P influx at the flowering stage. Lower minimum ion concentration (Cmin and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km values were verified in mycorrhizal plants at the pod-filling stage. Mycorrhizal plants also presented higher net P influx per plant, in both stages. Cmin was the kinetic parameter more intimately related to P absorption, and a significant correlation was obtained between this parameter and shoot P content and accumulation in bean plants.

  12. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  13. Carotenoid absorption in chicken intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, R; Alonso, A; Martín, M

    1978-09-01

    The powdered flowers of marigold (Tagetes erecta) are used as a cheap source of carotenoids in avicultura. Lutein (3,3'-dyhydroxi-alpha-carotene) constitutes up to 85 to 90% of marigold carotenoids. In the plant, lutein is found esterified to palmitic or estearic acid. In chicken, carotenoid is hydrolized in the first portion of the small intestine, and absorbed as free lutein. After the absorption, lutein is not re-esterified in the different chicken tissues.

  14. Geometrical interpretation of optical absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L. [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M. [Departamento de Geometria y Topologia, Facultad de Matematicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of absorption appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.

  15. Non-canonical WOX11-mediated root branching contributes to plasticity in arabidopsis root system architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheng, Lihong; Hu, Xiaomei; Du, Yujuan; Zhang, Guifang; Huang, Hai; Scheres, Ben; Xu, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Lateral roots (LRs), which originate from the growing root, and adventitious roots (ARs), which are formed from non-root organs, are the main contributors to the post-embryonic root system in Arabidopsis. However, our knowledge of how formation of the root system is altered in response to diverse

  16. On the nature of absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, V; Halzen, F

    1972-01-01

    The imaginary helicity non-flip omega exchange amplitudes in KN and NN scattering are determined versus t and s from data on elastic differential cross section differences. The omega -universality prediction Im omega /sub N/(t)= 3 Im omega /sub K/(t), is found to be satisfied for 0absorptive cuts as small t preserve universality. The impact parameter distributions of the omega amplitudes show: (i) a peripheral peak centred around b approximately=1 fm, with Delta b approximately =+or-0.5 fm in KN and Delta b approximately=+or-0.75 fm in NN; (ii) a sizeable negative contribution at small b, more negative in NN than in KN, (iii) a smaller tail of negative contributions around b approximately=2 fm. Strong absorption of the omega -pole imaginary amplitude with lambda values around two is needed to reproduced this structure. A new version of the absorption model suggested by pi N amplitude analysis, is confirmed by the results. (20 refs).

  17. Topical absorption and systemic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikhan, Fatima Sasha; Maibach, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Dermal absorption of some chemicals and drugs can cause systemic toxicity. We evaluated several case reports from the past decade, which discuss the dermal absorption of a specific chemical and potential local and systemic effects. We focused on herbicide and pesticide exposure along with exposure to cutaneous medication, occupational contact, and cosmeceutical exposure. Although causality cannot be established in most cases, it is critical to be aware of the possible effects of topical absorption that may not be immediately apparent. We recommended further studies on specific chemicals to ascertain causality and determine the highest exposure level with no observed adverse affect level (NOAEL) and the reference dose (RfD). Post-marketing epidemiology data in most geographical areas are markedly limited. A weak link in public health resides in the inadequate reporting and workup of alleged chemically related adverse effects. This arena mandates a re-thinking of how to increase this reporting, and workup, as a backup to our preclinical and clinical studies. Public awareness and funding will be rewarded by increased evidence to backup pre-approval pre-marketing studies.

  18. Organizational forms and knowledge absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing the entire portion of knowledge in an organization is a challenging task. At the organizational level, there can be enormous quantities of unknown, poorly valued or inefficiently applied knowledge. This is normally followed with the underdeveloped potential or inability of organizations to absorb knowledge from external sources. Facilitation of the efficient internal flow of knowledge within the established communication network may positively affect organizational capacity to absorb or identify, share and subsequently apply knowledge to commercial ends. Based on the evidences that the adoption of different organizational forms affects knowledge flows within an organization, this research analyzed the relationship between common organizational forms and absorptive capacity of organizations. In this paper, we test the hypothesis stating that the organizational structure affects knowledge absorption and exploitation in the organization. The methodology included quantitative and qualitative research method based on a questionnaire, while the data has been statistically analyzed and the hypothesis has been tested with the use of cross-tabulation and chi-square tests. The findings suggest that the type of organizational form affects knowledge absorption capacity and that having a less formalized and more flexible structure in an organization increases absorbing and exploiting opportunities of potentially valuable knowledge.

  19. Effects of anaerobic growth conditions on biomass accumulation, root morphology, and efficiencies of nutrient uptake and utilization in seedlings of some southern coastal plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topa, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Seedlings of pond, and loblolly pines were grown in a non-circulating, continuously-flowing solution culture under anaerobic (0.75 mg/1 O/sub 2/) conditions to determine the effects of anaerobiosis on overall growth, root morphology and efficiencies of nutrient uptake and utilization. Although shoot growth of the 11-week old loblolly and pond was not affected by anaerobic treatment, it did significantly reduce root biomass. Sand pine suffered the largest biomass reduction. Flooding tolerance was positively correlated with morphological changes which enhanced root internal aeration. Oxygen transport from shoot to the root was demonstrated via rhizosphere oxidation experiments using indigo-carmine dye solutions and polarography. Stem and root collar lenticels were found to be the major sites of atmospheric O/sub 2/ entry for submerged roots. Longitudinal and radial pathways for gas diffusion via intercellular spaces in the pericycle and ray parenchyma, respectively, were elucidated histologically. Lenticel and aerenchyma development, and rhizosphere oxidation in roots of anaerobically-grown sand pine seedlings were minimal. Elemental analyses showed that anaerobic conditions interfered with nutrient absorption and utilization. Short-term /sup 32/P uptake experiments with intact seedlings indicated that net absorption decreased because of the reduction in root biomass. Phosphorus absorption rates were negatively correlated with internal tissue phosphorus concentrations, and root and shoot biomass. 315 refs., 25 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Inge; Schotte, Sébastien; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Wound-induced adventitious root (AR) formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR) and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LRs). In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid, and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in A. thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are distinct from LR

  1. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge eVerstraeten

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound-induced adventitious root (AR formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LR. In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are

  2. Organic acids enhance the uptake of lead by wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanhua; Shan, Xiaoquan; Liu, Tao; Xie, Yaning; Wen, Bei; Zhang, Shuzhen; Han, Fang; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    2007-05-01

    The uptake and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in soil-plant systems remain poorly understood. This study indicates that acetic and malic acids enhance the uptake of Pb by wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots under hydroponic conditions. The net concentration-dependent uptake influx of Pb in the presence and absence of organic acids was characterized by Michaelis-Menten type nonsaturating kinetic curves that could be resolved into linear and saturable components. Fitted maximum uptake rates (V (max)) of the Michaelis-Menton saturable component in the presence of acetic and malic acids were, respectively, 2.45 and 1.63 times those of the control, while the Michaelis-Menten K (m) values of 5.5, 3.7 and 2.2 microM, respectively, remained unchanged. Enhanced Pb uptake by organic acids was partially mediated by Ca(2+) and K(+) channels, and also depended upon the physiological function of the plasma membrane P-type ATPase. Uptake may have been further enhanced by an effectively thinner unstirred layer of Pb adjacent to the roots, leading to more rapid diffusion towards roots. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies provided evidence that the coordination environment of Pb in wheat roots was similar to that of Pb(CH(3)COO)(2)x3H(2)O in that one Pb atom was coordinated to four oxygen atoms via the carboxylate group.

  3. Competitive sorption of heavy metals by water hyacinth roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Liu, Hou-Qi; Feng, Hui-Min; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Lam, Paul Kwan-Sing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a global issue severely constraining aquaculture practices, not only deteriorating the aquatic environment but also threatening the aquaculture production. One promising solution is adopting aquaponics systems where a synergy can be established between aquaculture and aquatic plants for metal sorption, but the interactions of multiple metals in such aquatic plants are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the absorption behaviors of Cu(II) and Cd(II) in water by water hyacinth roots in both single- and binary-metal systems. Cu(II) and Cd(II) were individually removed by water hyacinth roots at high efficiency, accompanied with release of protons and cations such as Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ . However, in a binary-metal arrangement, the Cd(II) sorption was significantly inhibited by Cu(II), and the higher sorption affinity of Cu(II) accounted for its competitive sorption advantage. Ionic exchange was identified as a predominant mechanism of the metal sorption by water hyacinth roots, and the amine and oxygen-containing groups are the main binding sites accounting for metal sorption via chelation or coordination. This study highlights the interactive impacts of different metals during their sorption by water hyacinth roots and elucidates the underlying mechanism of metal competitive sorption, which may provide useful implications for optimization of phytoremediation system and development of more sustainable aquaculture industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in the anatomy, morphology and mycorrhizal infection of fine root systems of Cryptomeria japonica in relation to stand ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishi, Takuo; Tateno, Ryunosuke; Fukushima, Keitaro; Fujimaki, Reiji; Itoh, Masami; Tokuchi, Naoko; Näsholm, Torgny

    2017-01-31

    Biomass allocation to fine roots often increases under soil nutrient deficiency, but the fine root biomass does not often increase in old stands, even under nutrient limitation. Therefore, in old stands, the morphology, anatomy, branching architecture and mycorrhization of fine roots may compensate efficiently for nutrient acquisition by the low fine root biomass. In this study, changes in the morphology, anatomy and arbuscular mycorrhizal infection at each branching position of fine root clusters were evaluated in relation to stand age. A chronosequence (6–90 years of age) of stands in a Cryptomeria japonica D. Don plantation was used for these analyses. The fine root size parameters, such as length, weight and tip numbers of fine root clusters, increased with stand age. The specific root tip length (SRTL) decreased with increasing stand age, suggesting that the allocation to root active portions decreased with stand age. From the anatomical observation, the ephemeral root tips increased with stand age, suggesting that root tip turnover within a root cluster was high in old stands. The proportions of proto-xylem groups among branching positions indicated that the life cycles in branching hierarchy should be clearer in old stands than that in younger stands. The increasing in the mycorrhizal infection of root tips in old stands should enhance the root tip absorptive functions. The SRTL was correlated with the wood/needle ratio, suggesting that carbon limitation as the stand ages may result in decline of carbon allocation to maintain active root tips. However, increasing of the ephemeral tips and mycorrhizal infection rates may compensate the declines of tip allocation in old stands.

  5. Silicon modifies root anatomy, and uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in young maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaculík, Marek; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria; Luxová, Miroslava; Stoláriková, Miroslava; Lux, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 µm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of (109)Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots.

  6. Mechanistic Approaches to Predicting Oral Drug Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Weili; Lee, Sau Lawrence; Yu, Lawrence X.

    2009-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of oral drug absorption have been widely used in drug discovery, development, and regulation. Predictive absorption models are used to determine the rate and extent of oral drug absorption, facilitate lead drug candidate selection, establish formulation development strategy, and support the development of regulatory policies. This review highlights the development of recent drug absorption models including dispersion and compartmental models. The compartmental models i...

  7. Emission and Absorption Entropy Generation in Semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Reck, Kasper; Varpula, Aapo; Prunnila, Mika; Hansen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    While emission and absorption entropy generation is well known in black bodies, it has not previously been studied in semiconductors, even though semiconductors are widely used for solar light absorption in modern solar cells [1]. We present an analysis of the entropy generation in semiconductor materials due to emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the emission and absorption entropy generation reduces the fundamental limit on the efficiency of any semiconduc...

  8. Swarming behavior in plant roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Ciszak

    Full Text Available Interactions between individuals that are guided by simple rules can generate swarming behavior. Swarming behavior has been observed in many groups of organisms, including humans, and recent research has revealed that plants also demonstrate social behavior based on mutual interaction with other individuals. However, this behavior has not previously been analyzed in the context of swarming. Here, we show that roots can be influenced by their neighbors to induce a tendency to align the directions of their growth. In the apparently noisy patterns formed by growing roots, episodic alignments are observed as the roots grow close to each other. These events are incompatible with the statistics of purely random growth. We present experimental results and a theoretical model that describes the growth of maize roots in terms of swarming.

  9. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and...

  10. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and climate....

  11. Crenarchaeota colonize terrestrial plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, H M; Dodsworth, J A; Goodman, R M

    2000-10-01

    Microorganisms that colonize plant roots are recruited from, and in turn contribute substantially to, the vast and virtually uncharacterized phylogenetic diversity of soil microbiota. The diverse, but poorly understood, microorganisms that colonize plant roots mediate mineral transformations and nutrient cycles that are central to biosphere functioning. Here, we report the results of epifluorescence microscopy and culture-independent recovery of small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences showing that members of a previously reported clade of soil Crenarchaeota colonize both young and senescent plant roots at an unexpectedly high frequency, and are particularly abundant on the latter. Our results indicate that non-thermophilic members of the Archaea inhabit an important terrestrial niche on earth and direct attention to the need for studies that will determine their possible roles in mediating root biology.

  12. Phosphorus absorption (/sup 32/P) by apple trees under drip irrigation as influenced by the physical properties of the soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, R. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), 84 - Montfavet (France). Station d' Agronomie)

    1983-01-01

    P absorption by apple tree roots (Golden delicious/M2) is studied using carrier-free /sup 32/P. A qualitative model of the influence of some physical properties of the soil is proposed combining individual tree responses to /sup 32/P injection.

  13. Phytases for Improved Iron Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial phytases (EC 3.1.3.8) catalyse dephosphorylation of phytic acid, which is the primary storage compound for phosphorous in cereal kernels. The negatively charged phosphates in phytic acid chelate iron (Fe3+) and thus retards iron bioavailability in humans 1. Supplementation of microbial...... phytase can improve iron absorption from cereal-based diets 2. In order for phytase to catalyse iron release in vivo the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. Our work has compared the robustness of five different microbial phytases, evaluating thermal stability...

  14. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  15. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hrabina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions’ spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches.

  16. Circumgalactic Oxygen Absorption and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, William G.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2017-09-01

    O vi absorption in quasar spectra caused by intervening circumgalactic atmospheres suggests a downturn in the atmospheric column density in sightlines passing beyond about 100 kpc from central star-forming galaxies. This turnover supports the hypothesis that the oxygen originates in the central galaxies. When converted into oxygen space density using an Abel integral inversion, the O vi columns require ≳ {10}9 M ⊙ of oxygen concentrated near 100 kpc. Circumgalactic gas within this radius cools in less than 1 Gyr and radiates ˜ {10}42.2 erg s-1 overall. The feedback power necessary to maintain such oxygen-rich atmospheres for many Gyr cannot be easily supplied by galactic supernovae. However, massive central black holes in star-forming galaxies may generate sufficient accretion power and intermittent shock waves at r˜ 100 {kpc} to balance circumgalactic radiation losses in late-type {L}\\star galaxies. The relative absence of O vi absorption observed in early-type, passive {L}\\star galaxies may arise from enhanced AGN feedback from their more massive central black holes.

  17. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  18. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  19. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. PMID:25903914

  20. Live cell imaging of Arabidopsis root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Root hairs are tubular extensions from the root surface that expand by tip growth. This highly focused type of cell expansion, combined with position of root hairs on the surface of the root, makes them ideal cells for microscopic observation. This chapter describes the method that is routinely used

  1. MES buffer affects Arabidopsis root apex zonation and root growth by suppressing superoxide generation in root apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko eKagenishi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species. MES, 2-(N-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8. However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone. Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the reactive oxygen species (ROS homeostasis in root apex.

  2. Measuring the efficacy of a root biobarrier with x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollner, E.W.; Murphy, C.E. Jr. (Georgia Univ., Griffin, GA (USA). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1990-08-16

    X-ray computed tomography is a useful tool for investigating soil physical properties nondestructively. There is a need to develop proper calibration relationships between soil properties and the x-ray absorption coefficient. The objective of the work was to evaluate soil factors affecting the x-ray absorption coefficient. Based on a theoretical analysis, experimental data from five soils and on results of several other investigators, it was concluded that for many applications, one calibration relationship is applicable to a wide range of soils. The montmorillinitic clay used in the study required special handling due to the extreme shrinkage of this soil upon drying. Knowledge of chemical composition enables approximations but not exact predictions of the x-ray absorption coefficient. The results suggested some reasonable alternative to exhaustive calibration for each anticipated soil condition. Quantification of root activity in terms of root growth and indirectly through water uptake is necessary for understanding plant growth dynamics. X-ray computed tomography (CT) enables qualitative as well as two quantitative outputs, one of which can lead to conclusions regarding root activity. A greenhouse study involving soil columns (Lakeland sand, bulk density 1.4 Mg/m{sup 3}) planted to soybean, Bahiagras, and control (no vegetation) was conducted in 1989. A treflan based on chemical barrier was placed in half of the soil column of each species. The mean x-ray absorption correlated to water content. Results suggested that root presence can also be indirectly inferred based on water content drawn down during planned stress events. It was concluded that x-ray CT may have a niche in soil-water-plant relation studies, particularly when plant species have large roots. 35 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Comparison of cadmium absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between two radish cultivars (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Juan; Zhao, Xiaohu; Tan, Qiling; Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao

    2017-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) absorption and accumulation vary greatly not only among plant species but also among cultivars within the same species. In order to better understand the mechanisms of Cd absorption, transportation and distribution, we examined the differences of Cd absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between L19, a Cd-tolerant genotype, and H4, a Cd-sensitive genotype, using kinetic analysis and soil culture experiment. Kinetic assays showed that the different Cd concentrations between the two cultivars might be ascribed to root absorption and translocation from root to shoot. The investigations of subcellular distribution and chemical forms verified that Cd concentrations of all subcellular fractions in H4 were all higher than in L19. Meanwhile, most of the Cd was associated with cell walls in the root of H4, but the Cd in the root of L19 and leaf of the two cultivars was mainly stored in soluble fraction, which could be one possible mechanism of tolerance to Cd toxicity. In addition, Cd fractions extracted by 1M NaCl and 2% HAC were predominant in root and leaf of both cultivars and the concentrations and proportions extracted by water and 80% ethanol in root and 1M NaCl in leaf were all higher in H4 than in L19. These results indicate that the Cd in H4 is more active than L19, which could be responsible for the sensitivity of H4 to Cd damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alkaloid Production by Hairy Root Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In the present research, nicotine alkaloid production by Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) hairy roots and tropane alkaloid production by Hyoscyamus niger hairy roots were investigated. The first objective of this research was to improve the oxygen mass transfer in hairy root cultures with microbubbles. Oxygen was shown as a critical nutrient for the growth of tobacco and H. niger hairy roots. In a 1-liter fermentor, microbubble dispersion improved the oxygen mass transfer, tobacco hairy root growt...

  5. Arabidopsis lateral root development : an emerging story

    OpenAIRE

    Péret, B.; De Rybel, B.; Casimiro, I; Benkova, E.; Swarup, R; Laplaze, Laurent; Beeckman, T.; Bennett, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Lateral root formation is a major determinant of root systems architecture. The degree of root branching impacts the efficiency of water uptake, acquisition of nutrients and anchorage by plants. Understanding the regulation of lateral root development is therefore of vital agronomic importance. The molecular and cellular basis of lateral root formation has been most extensively studied in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). Significant progress has recently been made in identi...

  6. Capturing Arabidopsis Root Architecture Dynamics with root-fit Reveals Diversity in Responses to Salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julkowska, M.M.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Mol, S.; Feron, R.; de Boer, G.J.; Haring, M.A.; Testerink, C.

    2014-01-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles

  7. Application of Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Detecting Root Biomass in Coffee Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio Paglis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Roots play an important role in plants and are responsible for several functions; among them are anchorage and nutrient and water absorption. Several methodologies are being tested and used to study plant root systems in order to avoid destructive root sampling. Electrical resistivity tomography is among these methodologies. The aim of this preliminary study was to use electrical resistivity for detecting root biomass in coffee trees. Measurements were performed in a soil transect with an ABM AL 48-b resistivimeter with a pole-dipole configuration. The tomograms indicated variability in soil resistivity values ranging from 120 to 1400 Ω·m−1. At the first 0.30 cm soil layer, these values were between 267 and 952 Ω·m−1. Oriented by this result, root samples were taken at 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 m depths within 0.50 m intervals along the soil transect to compare soil resistivity with root mass density (RMD. RMD data, up to this depth, varied from 0.000019 to 0.009469 Mg·m−3, showing high spatial variability and significant relationship to the observed values of soil resistivity. These preliminary results showed that the electrical resistivity tomography can contribute to root biomass studies in coffee plants; however, more experiments are necessary to confirm the found results in Brazil coffee plantations.

  8. ALFIN-LIKE 6 is involved in root hair elongation during phosphate deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Yu, Su-May; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Phosphate (Pi) starvation in plants induces dense and elongated root hairs, which increase the absorptive surface area of the roots and play a critical role in Pi uptake. The molecular mechanism underlying these changes remains unclear. Forward and reverse genetic approaches were employed to identify novel genes involved in root hair formation on Pi starvation. The mutant per2, with defects in root hair elongation specifically under low Pi conditions, was identified in a large-scale genetic screen of T-DNA insertion lines. The phenotype was caused by a mutation in the homeodomain protein ALFIN-LIKE 6 (AL6). From a screen of mutants defective in genes that showed lower transcript abundance in per2 relative to wild-type roots on low Pi medium, we identified four putative downstream targets of AL6, namely ETC1, NPC4, SQD2 and PS2, all of which were critical in root hair elongation of Pi-deficient plants. The results further indicate that AL6 is involved in the control of growth and several key responses to Pi starvation. Our findings demonstrate that AL6 controls the transcription of a suite of genes critical for root hair elongation under low Pi conditions, suggesting a novel physiological function for an Alfin gene in Arabidopsis. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Root gravitropism and root hair development constitute coupled developmental responses regulated by auxin homeostasis in the Arabidopsis root apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Stamatis; Ditengou, Franck Anicet; Ljung, Karin; Daras, Gerasimos; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis

    2013-03-01

    Active polar transport establishes directional auxin flow and the generation of local auxin gradients implicated in plant responses and development. Auxin modulates gravitropism at the root tip and root hair morphogenesis at the differentiation zone. Genetic and biochemical analyses provide evidence for defective basipetal auxin transport in trh1 roots. The trh1, pin2, axr2 and aux1 mutants, and transgenic plants overexpressing PIN1, all showing impaired gravity response and root hair development, revealed ectopic PIN1 localization. The auxin antagonist hypaphorine blocked root hair elongation and caused moderate agravitropic root growth, also leading to PIN1 mislocalization. These results suggest that auxin imbalance leads to proximal and distal developmental defects in Arabidopsis root apex, associated with agravitropic root growth and root hair phenotype, respectively, providing evidence that these two auxin-regulated processes are coupled. Cell-specific subcellular localization of TRH1-YFP in stele and epidermis supports TRH1 engagement in auxin transport, and hence impaired function in trh1 causes dual defects of auxin imbalance. The interplay between intrinsic cues determining root epidermal cell fate through the TTG/GL2 pathway and environmental cues including abiotic stresses modulates root hair morphogenesis. As a consequence of auxin imbalance in Arabidopsis root apex, ectopic PIN1 mislocalization could be a risk aversion mechanism to trigger root developmental responses ensuring root growth plasticity. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Sound absorption with green materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria

    2017-07-01

    Green materials are a valid alternative to traditional materials that are by-products of processing oil. At the end of their useful life, green materials can be disposed of without polluting the environment. They are now being used in the construction and automotive industries. While, studies are currently being carried out in the aviation sector on the use of green materials for non-structural components of airplanes. Green materials can be used to improve the acoustic comfort inside buildings as well as mitigate reverberation, echoes effects and reduce the transmission of noise between rooms. In this paper, the acoustic measurements of the properties of green materials are reported. The absorption coefficient of samples of the materials were measured in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 2,000 Hz with an impedance tube, with the flow resistance being measured.

  11. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  12. Sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" to root mechanical properties and root distribution: Implication for shallow landslide stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Massimiliano; Giadrossich, Filippo; Cohen, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Root reinforcement is recognized as an important factor for shallow landslides stability. Due to the complexity of root reinforcement mechanisms and the heterogeneity of the root-soil system, the estimation of parameters used in root reinforcement models is difficult, time consuming, and often highly uncertain. For practical applications, it is necessary to focus on the estimation of the most relevant parameters. The objective of the present contribution is to review the state of the art in the development of root reinforcement models and to discuss the sensitivity of the "Root Bundle Model" (RBM) when considering the variability of root mechanical properties and the heterogeneity of root distributions. The RBM is a strain-step loading fiber bundle model extended to include the mechanical and geometrical properties of roots. The model allows the calculation of the force-displacement behavior of a root bundle. In view of new results of field pullout tests performed on coarse roots of spruce (Picea abies) and considering a consistent dataset of root distribution of alpine tree species, we quantify the sensitivity of the RBM and the uncertainty associated with the most important input parameters. Preliminary results show that the extrapolation of force-diameter values from incomplete datasets (i.e., when only small roots are tested and values for coarse roots are extrapolated) may result in considerable errors. In particular, in the case of distributions with root diameters larger than 5 mm, root reinforcement tends to be dominated by coarse roots and their mechanical properties need to be quantified. In addition to the results of the model sensitivity, we present a possible best-practice method for the quantification of root reinforcement in view of its application to slope stability calculations and implementations in numerical models.

  13. Facilitative root interactions in intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Jensen, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    nitrogen transfer between legumes and non-leguminous plants, exploitation of the soil via mycorrhizal fungi and soil-plant processes which alter the mobilisation of plant growth resources such as through exudation of amino acids, extra-cellular enzymes, acidification, competition-induced modification...... of root architecture, exudation of growth stimulating substances, and biofumigation. Facilitative root interactions are most likely to be of importance in nutrient poor soils and in low-input agroecosystems due to critical interspecific competition for plant growth factors. However, studies from more...

  14. Machine Learning Developments in ROOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagoly, A.; Bevan, A.; Carnes, A.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Moneta, L.; Moudgil, A.; Pfreundschuh, S.; Stevenson, T.; Wunsch, S.; Zapata, O.

    2017-10-01

    ROOT is a software framework for large-scale data analysis that provides basic and advanced statistical methods used by high-energy physics experiments. It includes machine learning tools from the ROOT-integrated Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA). We present several recent developments in TMVA, including a new modular design, new algorithms for pre-processing, cross-validation, hyperparameter-tuning, deep-learning and interfaces to other machine-learning software packages. TMVA is additionally integrated with Jupyter, making it accessible with a browser.

  15. Roots redefined: anatomical and genetic analysis of root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.; McKahnn, H.; Berg, C. van den

    1996-01-01

    The postembryonic development of plants is fueled by apical meristems, which are the local production sites of new cells that form a pattern of different cell types within an organ. The regularity of this pattern in the root yielded ideas on its formation from the meristem well before critical

  16. Impacts of the physiochemical properties of chlorinated solvents on the sorption of trichloroethylene to the roots of Typha latifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingmao; Wang, Chen

    2009-03-01

    Sorption to plant roots is the first step for organic contaminants to enter plant tissues. Mounting evidence is showing that sorption to plant roots is nonlinear and competitive. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of physiochemical properties of homologous chlorinated ethenes and ethanes on the competitive sorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) to the roots of Typha latifolia (cattail). The results showed that chlorinated ethenes exerted significantly stronger competition on the sorption of TCE than chlorinated ethanes. Individual physiochemical properties of organic compounds could be related to the competitive capacity of chlorinated ethenes, but the roles appeared secondary, with molecular structures showing primary effects. Based on these observations, a two-step sorption mechanism was proposed, consisting of the interactions between organic compounds and functional groups on the root surface and subsequent pore filling and absorption to the hydrophobic domains in the composition of roots.

  17. Oxytetracycline inactivation by putative reactive oxygen species released to nutrient medium of Helianthus annuus hairy root cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarathi, Ninad P; Linden, James C

    2005-11-20

    When subjected to stress, plants produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a part of the defense response. The oxidative response is also used to degrade organic pollutants. Hairy roots of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) are shown to oxidize oxytetracycline (OTC) through the action of the ROS released to the nutrient medium by the hairy root cultures. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicits ROS formation in the hairy root cultures. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), are reported for hairy root cultures treated with increasing concentrations of MeJA. A bioassay using Enterococcus hirae as the test microorganism demonstrates the root-catalyzed oxidation process results in conversion of OTC into product(s) devoid of antibiotic activity. Direct evidence for putative ROS oxidation of OTC is obtained by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPLC/MS showing first quinone formation followed possibly by ring cleavage, which disrupts UV absorption and destroys antibiotic activity.

  18. Effects and mechanisms of the combined pollution of lanthanum and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2013-09-01

    Rare earth pollution and acid rain pollution are both important environmental issues worldwide. In regions which simultaneously occur, the combined pollution of rare earth and acid rain becomes a new environmental issue, and the relevant research is rarely reported. Accordingly, we investigated the combined effects and mechanisms of lanthanum ion (La(3+)) and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings. The combined pollution of low-concentration La(3+) and acid rain exerted deleterious effects on the phenotype and growth of roots, which were aggravated by the combined pollution of high-concentration La(3+) and acid rain. The deleterious effects of the combined pollution were stronger than those of single La(3+) or acid rain pollution. These stronger deleterious effects on the root phenotype and growth of roots were due to the increased disturbance of absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients in roots. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. SRPP, a Cell Wall Protein is Involved in Development and Protection of Seeds and Root Hairs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Natsuki; Uno, Hiroshi; Okuda, Shohei; Gunji, Shizuka; Ferjani, Ali; Aoyama, Takashi; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2017-04-01

    Enhancement of root hair development in response to phosphate (Pi) deficit has been reported extensively. Root hairs are involved in major root functions such as the absorption of water, acquisition of nutrients and secretion of organic acids and enzymes. Individual root hair cells maintain these functions and appropriate structure under various physiological conditions. We carried out a study to identify protein(s) which maintain the structure and function of root hairs, and identified a protein (SEED AND ROOT HAIR PROTECTIVE PROTEIN, SRPP) that was induced in root hairs under Pi-deficient conditions. Promoter assay and mRNA quantification revealed that SRPP was expressed in root hairs and seeds. A knockout mutant, srpp-1, consistently displayed defects in root hairs and seeds. Root hairs in srpp-1 were short and the phenotypes observed under Pi-deficient conditions were also detected in ethylene-treated srpp-1 plants. Propidium iodide stained most root hairs of srpp-1 grown under Pi-deficient conditions, suggesting cell death. In addition to root hairs, most srpp-1 seeds were withered and their embryos were dead. SRPP tagged with green fluorescent protein was detected in the cell wall. Electron microscopy showed abnormal morphology of the cell wall. Wild-type phenotypes were restored when the SRPP gene was expressed in srpp-1. These data strongly suggest that SRPP contributes to the construction of robust cell walls, whereby it plays a key role in the development of root hairs and seeds. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Root Tip Shape Governs Root Elongation Rate under Increased Soil Strength1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgessner, Norbert; Walter, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Increased soil strength due to soil compaction or soil drying is a major limitation to root growth and crop productivity. Roots need to exert higher penetration force, resulting in increased penetration stress when elongating in soils of greater strength. This study aimed to quantify how the genotypic diversity of root tip geometry and root diameter influences root elongation under different levels of soil strength and to determine the extent to which roots adjust to increased soil strength. Fourteen wheat (Triticum aestivum) varieties were grown in soil columns packed to three bulk densities representing low, moderate, and high soil strength. Under moderate and high soil strength, smaller root tip radius-to-length ratio was correlated with higher genotypic root elongation rate, whereas root diameter was not related to genotypic root elongation. Based on cavity expansion theory, it was found that smaller root tip radius-to-length ratio reduced penetration stress, thus enabling higher root elongation rates in soils with greater strength. Furthermore, it was observed that roots could only partially adjust to increased soil strength. Root thickening was bounded by a maximum diameter, and root tips did not become more acute in response to increased soil strength. The obtained results demonstrated that root tip geometry is a pivotal trait governing root penetration stress and root elongation rate in soils of greater strength. Hence, root tip shape needs to be taken into account when selecting for crop varieties that may tolerate high soil strength. PMID:28600344

  1. Root Tip Shape Governs Root Elongation Rate under Increased Soil Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Tino; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Walter, Achim; Keller, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Increased soil strength due to soil compaction or soil drying is a major limitation to root growth and crop productivity. Roots need to exert higher penetration force, resulting in increased penetration stress when elongating in soils of greater strength. This study aimed to quantify how the genotypic diversity of root tip geometry and root diameter influences root elongation under different levels of soil strength and to determine the extent to which roots adjust to increased soil strength. Fourteen wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) varieties were grown in soil columns packed to three bulk densities representing low, moderate, and high soil strength. Under moderate and high soil strength, smaller root tip radius-to-length ratio was correlated with higher genotypic root elongation rate, whereas root diameter was not related to genotypic root elongation. Based on cavity expansion theory, it was found that smaller root tip radius-to-length ratio reduced penetration stress, thus enabling higher root elongation rates in soils with greater strength. Furthermore, it was observed that roots could only partially adjust to increased soil strength. Root thickening was bounded by a maximum diameter, and root tips did not become more acute in response to increased soil strength. The obtained results demonstrated that root tip geometry is a pivotal trait governing root penetration stress and root elongation rate in soils of greater strength. Hence, root tip shape needs to be taken into account when selecting for crop varieties that may tolerate high soil strength. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Absorption boundary conditions for geomertical acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, the absorption coefficients or surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed...... solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. It is concluded that the impedance and random incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials....

  3. Vitamin B12 absorption from eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doscherholmen, A; McMahon, J; Ripley, D

    1975-09-01

    The assimilation of 57Co B12 from in vivo labeled eggs was much inferior to that of a comparable amount of crystalline 57Co B12. Furthermore, the absorption varied with the form in which the eggs were served. Judged by the urinary excretion test and the plasma absorption of radioactivity the average absorption from boiled and fried eggs was more than twice that from scrambled whole eggs, but less than half that absorbed from crystalline 57Co B12.

  4. Worldwide survey of absorption fluids data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macriss, R.A.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to develop improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse-screen the available worldwide data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a reference document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Absorption of cadmium in bean cultivars variety black Jamapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, M. C. V.; Gomez, R.; Arriaga, R. M.

    2003-05-01

    (4) The cadmium is highly toxic and for all biota in very small concentrations, these study was to know the limit of phitotoxicity and nutrition of cadmium in bean cultivars variety black Jamapa, and to measure absorption of cadmium in roots, stem, leaves and grain. The experiment was carried out in plots with bean of the black variety Jamapa, in greenhouse, 6 treatments in the water of irrigation with 0, 25, 50, 100 y 200 micromoles of cadmium, to quantification of cadmium in plant, is carried out with ICP previous acid digest(I) method D4638-86 of ASTM 1990. Was carried out analysis of variation and results indicate that, there were been significant for the variables : number of leaves, foliate area, dry weight from root, height of plant; the threshold of toxicity for the plant in the condition that it was carried out the experiment were 100 200micromoles of cadmium applied in water of irrigation weekly, the visual symptom were: yellow of leaves, morphologic changes in leaves showed leaves bi-foliate and tetra-foliate in treatments upper of 100micromoles of cadmium.

  6. Schools' absorptive capacity to innovate in health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschesnes, Marthe; Drouin, Nathalie; Couturier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive "health promoting schools" (HPS) approach is advocated by the World Health Organization to foster the health of students. To date, few studies have evaluated schools' capacity to implement it in an optimal way. The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework that identifies core features likely to facilitate the incorporation of innovation, such as HPS, into school functioning. The framework was built by combining dimensions derived from two major strands of literature, i.e. management and HPS. It has taken root in Zahra and George's model of organisation absorptive capacity (AC) for new knowledge but has been adapted to better explore AC in a school context. The contrasting cases of two secondary schools that adopted a HPS approach in Quebec, Canada, for at least three years were used to illustrate the value of the framework. The framework proposed is a multidimensional model that considers components such as modulators, antecedents, integration mechanisms and strategic levers as potential determinants of AC, i.e. acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation. The conceptual framework helped to qualify and compare AC regarding HPS in the two cases and holds promise to appreciate mechanisms having the greatest influence on it. The framework can serve as a conceptual guide to facilitate the absorption of innovation in schools and to design future empirical research to better understand the underlying process by which schools strengthen their capacities to become settings conducive to the health of youth.

  7. Differential Photoacoustic Particle Absorption Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We developed a highly sensitive and compact instrument to directly measure particulate matter (PM) optical absorption. This device is based on differential...

  8. Absorption bands in the spectrum of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Jones, T. J.; Pilcher, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra of Io in the region from 2.8 to 4.2 microns are reported which show distinct absorption features, the most notable at 4.1 microns. Frozen volatiles or atmospheric gases cannot account for these absorptions, nor do they resemble those seen in common silicate rocks. Several candidate substances, most notably nitrate and carbonate salts, show absorption features in this spectral region; the deepest band in the spectrum may be a nitrate absorption. The satellite surface is shown to be anhydrous, as indicated by the absence of the 3-micron bound water band.

  9. Arsenic rich iron plaque on macrophyte roots - an ecotoxicological risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taggart, M.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain)], E-mail: mark.taggart@uclm.es; Mateo, R. [Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain); Charnock, J.M.; Bahrami, F. [Synchrotron Radiation Department, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Green, A.J. [Department of Wetland Ecology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, CSIC, Pabellon del Peru, Avenida Maria Luisa s/n, 41013 Seville (Spain); Meharg, A.A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Bld, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Arsenic is known to accumulate with iron plaque on macrophyte roots. Three to four years after the Aznalcollar mine spill (Spain), residual arsenic contamination left in seasonal wetland habitats has been identified in this form by scanning electron microscopy. Total digestion has determined arsenic concentrations in thoroughly washed 'root + plaque' material in excess of 1000 mg kg{sup -1}, and further analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests arsenic exists as both arsenate and arsenite. Certain herbivorous species feed on rhizomes and bulbs of macrophytes in a wide range of global environments, and the ecotoxicological impact of consuming arsenic rich iron plaque associated with such food items remains to be quantified. Here, greylag geese which feed on Scirpus maritimus rhizome and bulb material in areas affected by the Aznalcollar spill are shown to have elevated levels of arsenic in their feces, which may originate from arsenic rich iron plaque. - Accumulation of metals with iron plaque on macrophyte roots in wetlands poses an ecotoxicological risk to certain herbivores.

  10. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  11. [Effects nutrients on the seedlings root hair development and root growth of Poncirus trifoliata under hydroponics condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiu; Xia, Ren-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Shu, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Ahydroponics experiment was conducted to study the effects of nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn) deficiency on the length of primary root, the number of lateral roots, and the root hair density, length, and diameter on the primary root and lateral roots of Poncirus trifoliata seedlings. Under the deficiency of each test nutrient, root hair could generate, but was mainly concentrated on the root base and fewer on the root tip. The root hair density on lateral roots was significantly larger than that on primary root, but the root hair length was in adverse. The deficiency of each test nutrient had greater effects on the growth and development of root hairs, with the root hair density on primary root varied from 55.0 to 174.3 mm(-2). As compared with the control, Ca deficiency induced the significant increase of root hair density and length on primary root, P deficiency promoted the root hair density and length on the base and middle part of primary root and on the lateral roots significantly, Fe deficiency increased the root hair density but decreased the root hair length on the tip of primary root significantly, K deficiency significantly decreased the root hair density, length, and diameter on primary root and lateral roots, whereas Mg deficiency increased the root hair length of primary root significantly. In all treatments of nutrient deficiency, the primary root had the similar growth rate, but, with the exceptions of N and Mg deficiency, the lateral roots exhibited shedding and regeneration.

  12. Cutting the Roots of Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziey, Paul W.

    1996-01-01

    Violence is rooted in obedience to authority and in comparisons--foundations of our institutions of parenting and schooling. Obedience brings reward and punishment, comparison perpetuates a cycle of competition and conflict. Television violence is especially harmful because children easily understand visual images. The Reality Research approach to…

  13. Contemporary root canal filling strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moinzadeh, A.T.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, clinicians can choose from a wide range of root canal filling materials and techniques, some of which have been evaluated in this thesis. Methacrylate resin-based sealers suffer from polymerization shrinkage stresses. This limitation may partly be overcome by a two-step cementation

  14. Topical Roots of Formal Dialectic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Erik C. W.

    Formal dialectic has its roots in ancient dialectic. We can trace this influence in Charles Hamblin's book on fallacies, in which he introduced his first formal dialectical systems. Earlier, Paul Lorenzen proposed systems of dialogical logic, which were in fact formal dialectical systems avant la

  15. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  16. Retention of Root Canal Posts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Flury, S

    2015-01-01

    ] and a self-etch adhesive resin cement [Panavia F2.0]) were used. After removal of the crowns of 360 extracted premolars, canines, or incisors, the root canals were prepared with a parallel-sided drill system to three different final diameters. Half the posts did not receive any pretreatment. The other half...

  17. Cell signaling in root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.

    1997-01-01

    Cell signaling has recently been shown to be of major importance in cell specification during Arabidopsis root development. In the ground tissue, cues of unknown molecular nature convey positional information and two genes provide an interesting link between asymmetric cell division and the

  18. Rapid shoot‐to‐root signalling regulates root hydraulic conductance via aquaporins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    VANDELEUR, REBECCA K; SULLIVAN, WENDY; ATHMAN, ASMINI; JORDANS, CHARLOTTE; GILLIHAM, MATTHEW; KAISER, BRENT N; TYERMAN, STEPHEN D

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the relationship between transpiration and root hydraulic conductance Vandeleur et al report that leaf area reduction reduces root hydraulic conductance in grapevine, soybean and maize...

  19. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  20. Measuring and Modeling Root Distribution and Root Reinforcement in Forested Slopes for Slope Stability Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D.; Giadrossich, F.; Schwarz, M.; Vergani, C.

    2016-12-01

    Roots provide mechanical anchorage and reinforcement of soils on slopes. Roots also modify soil hydrological properties (soil moisture content, pore-water pressure, preferential flow paths) via subsurface flow path associated with root architecture, root density, and root-size distribution. Interactions of root-soil mechanical and hydrological processes are an important control of shallow landslide initiation during rainfall events and slope stability. Knowledge of root-distribution and root strength are key components to estimate slope stability in vegetated slopes and for the management of protection forest in steep mountainous area. We present data that show the importance of measuring root strength directly in the field and present methods for these measurements. These data indicate that the tensile force mobilized in roots depends on root elongation (a function of soil displacement), root size, and on whether roots break in tension of slip out of the soil. Measurements indicate that large lateral roots that cross tension cracks at the scarp are important for slope stability calculations owing to their large tensional resistance. These roots are often overlooked and when included, their strength is overestimated because extrapolated from measurements on small roots. We present planned field experiments that will measure directly the force held by roots of different sizes during the triggering of a shallow landslide by rainfall. These field data are then used in a model of root reinforcement based on fiber-bundle concepts that span different spacial scales, from a single root to the stand scale, and different time scales, from timber harvest to root decay. This model computes the strength of root bundles in tension and in compression and their effect on soil strength. Up-scaled to the stand the model yields the distribution of root reinforcement as a function of tree density, distance from tree, tree species and age with the objective of providing quantitative

  1. MAIL1 is essential for development of the primary root but not of anchor roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ühlken, Christine; Hoth, Stefan; Weingartner, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    MAIN-LIKE1 (MAIL1) is a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein, which has a crucial function during root development. We have recently described loss of function mutants for MAIL1, in which the organization and function of the primary root meristem is lost soon after germination. Moreover cell differentiation is impaired resulting in primary root growth arrest soon after emergence. Here we show that mail1 mutants form several anchor roots from the hypocotyl to root junction. These anchor roots show similar defects in the organization of the stem cell niche as the primary root. In contrast, differentiation processes are not impaired and thus anchor roots seem to be able to compensate for the loss of primary root function. Our data show that MAIL1 is essential for specification of cell fate in the primary root but not in anchor roots.

  2. Absorption of ozone by porous particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanas' ev, V.P.; Dorofeev, S.B.; Sinitsyn, V.I.; Smirnov, B.M.

    1981-11-01

    The absorption of ozone by porous zeolite, silica gel, and activated carbon particles has been studied experimentally. It was shown that in addition to absorption, dissociation of ozone on the surface plays an important and sometimes decisive role. The results obtained were used to analyze the nature of ball lightning.

  3. Scalar absorption by charged rotating black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Luiz C. S.; Benone, Carolina L.; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2017-08-01

    We compute numerically the absorption cross section of planar massless scalar waves impinging upon a Kerr-Newman black hole with different incidence angles. We investigate the influence of the black hole electric charge and angular momentum in the absorption spectrum, comparing our numerical computations with analytical results for the limits of high and low frequency.

  4. Iron absorption from intrinsically-labeled lentils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low iron (Fe) absorption from important staple foods may contribute to Fe deficiency in developing countries. To date, there are few studies examining the Fe bioavailability of pulse crops as commonly prepared and consumed by humans. The objectives of this study were to characterize the Fe absorpt...

  5. High-Absorptance Radiative Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafferty, T.

    1983-01-01

    Absorptance of black-painted open-cell aluminum honeycomb improved by cutting honeycomb at angle or bias rather than straight across. This ensures honeycomb cavities escapes. At each reflection radiation attenuated by absorption. Applications include space-background simulators, space radiators, solar absorbers, and passive coolers for terrestrial use.

  6. Ultrafast THz Saturable Absorption in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in a nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy experiment. Saturable absorption is caused by sample conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite valley scattering in the field of a strong THz pulse....

  7. Absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollman, P.C.H.

    2004-01-01

    To unravel mechanisms of action of dietary flavonoids in their potential role in disease prevention, it is crucial to know the factors that determine their release from foods, their extent of absorption, and their fate in the organism. Research on absorption, metabolism, and bioavailability of

  8. Emission and Absorption Entropy Generation in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Varpula, Aapo; Prunnila, Mika

    2013-01-01

    materials due to emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the emission and absorption entropy generation reduces the fundamental limit on the efficiency of any semiconductor solar cell even further than the Landsberg limit. The results are derived from purely thermodynamical...

  9. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  10. Low absorptance porcelain-on-aluminum coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, H.

    1979-01-01

    Porcelain thermal-control coating for aluminum sheet and foil has solar absorptance of 0.22. Specially formulated coating absorptance is highly stable, changing only 0.03 after 1,000 hours of exposure to simulated sunlight and can be applied by standard commercial methods.

  11. A Low-Cost Quantitative Absorption Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Daniel R.; Todt, Michael A.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to make absorption spectrophotometry available to high school chemistry and physics classes, we have designed an inexpensive visible light absorption spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer was constructed using LEGO blocks, a light emitting diode, optical elements (including a lens), a slide-mounted diffraction grating, and a…

  12. Regularity of the interband light absorption coefficient

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Light absorption coefficient; density of states; random operators. 1. ... The operators H. ± ω may be unbounded. However, the finite volume operators H ,ω are symmetric finite-dimensional matrices when is a finite set, so their ...... [1] Atoyan M S, Kazaryan E M and Sarkisyan H A, Interband light absorption in parabolic.

  13. Flue gas treatment with membrane gas absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane gas absorption is a new, efficient and flexible way to carry out gas-liquid contacting operations with hollow fibre membranes. Advantages of gas absorption membranes over conventional G-L contactors are: -High specific surface area and rapid mass transfer resulting in very compact and low

  14. Terahertz absorption spectrum of triacetone triperoxide (TATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John; Konek, Christopher T.; Moran, Jesse S.; Witko, Ewelina M.; Korter, Timothy M.

    2009-08-01

    We report here, for the first time, the terahertz absorption spectrum of triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The experimental spectra are coupled with solid-state density functional theory, and preliminary assignments are provided to gain physical insight into the experimental spectrum. The calculated absorption coefficients are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  15. Root anatomy, morphology, and longevity among root orders in Vaccinium corymbosum (Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Estrada, Luis R; Vera-Caraballo, Vivianette; Ruth, Leah E; Eissenstat, David M

    2008-12-01

    Understanding root processes at the whole-plant or ecosystem scales requires an accounting of the range of functions within a root system. Studying root traits based on their branching order can be a powerful approach to understanding this complex system. The current study examined the highly branched root system of the ericoid plant, Vaccinium corymbosum L. (highbush blueberry) by classifying its root orders with a modified version of the morphometric approach similar to that used in hydrology for stream classification. Root anatomy provided valuable insight into variation in root function across orders. The more permanent portion of the root system occurred in 4th- and higher-order roots. Roots in these orders had radial growth; the lowest specific root length, N:C ratios, and mycorrhizal colonization; the highest tissue density and vessel number; and the coarsest root diameter. The ephemeral portion of the root system was mainly in the first three root orders. First- and 2nd-order roots were nearly anatomically identical, with similar mycorrhizal colonization and diameter, and also, despite being extremely fine, median lifespans were not very short (115-120 d; estimated with minirhizotrons). Our research underscores the value of examining root traits by root order and its implications to understanding belowground processes.

  16. EFFECT OF CALITROPIS PROCERA AQUEOUS ROOT EXTRACT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUBAKAR

    The C. Procera root extract was found to significantly (p<0.05) reduce the serum levels of AST, ... urea. These indicates the possible hepatocurative effects of aqueous root extract of C. ... extracts is an excellent source of therapeutic agents.

  17. Enriching Absorptive Capacity Through Social Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotho, Jasper Jaap; Becker-Ritterspach, Florian; Saka-Helmhout, Ayse

    absorptive capacity as it enables employees to participate in the transformation of new knowledge to the local context. Second, the findings illustrate how organizational conditions at the subsidiary level can impact subsidiary absorptive capacity by enabling or constraining local interaction patterns......Absorptive capacity is frequently highlighted as a key determinant of knowledge transfer within MNEs. But how individual behaviour translates to absorptive capacity at the subsidiary level, and exactly how this is contingent on subsidiaries’ social context, remains under-addressed. This not only...... limits our understanding of the causal linkage between individual and organizational level absorptive capacity, it also hampers further research on potentially relevant managerial and organizational antecedents, and limits the implications we can draw for practitioners in the field seeking to increase...

  18. Enriching Absorptive Capacity through Social Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotho, Jasper J.; Saka-Helmhout, Ayse; Becker-Ritterspach, Florian

    2012-01-01

    for subsidiary absorptive capacity as it enables employees to participate in the transformation of new knowledge to the local context and the development of local applications. The findings also illustrate how organizational conditions at the subsidiary level can impact subsidiary absorptive capacity by enabling......Absorptive capacity is frequently highlighted as a key determinant of knowledge transfer within multinational enterprises. But how individual behaviour translates into absorptive capacity at the subsidiary level, and how this is contingent on subsidiaries' social context, remains under......-addressed. This not only limits our understanding of the relationship between individual- and organizational-level absorptive capacity, but also hampers further research on potentially relevant managerial and organizational antecedents, and limits the implications we can draw for practitioners who seek to increase...

  19. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Yongjun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the μM level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  20. [Protein absorption in children with giardiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Franco, L; Alvarez, E L; Romo, G; Bernal, R M

    1982-01-01

    With the object of investigating if Giardiasis interferes in the intestinal absorption of proteins, a study was made testing the absorption of gelatin in eleven. The determination of alpha-aminonitrogen, before giving gelatin, and the increase shown two hours later, was the criterion used to measure the capacity of absorption. Once the estimated basal had been carried out each of the children received tinidazol for three days, after which the large amount of gelatin was given once again so as to estimate any changes in the absorption, one the parasite had been eliminated. The results demonstrate that the presence of giardia in the intestine significantly restricts the absorption of the gelatin. We offer as proof the results of these findings in the growth of children who harbour this parasite.

  1. A simplified model of radiation attenuation and energy absorption coefficients of the elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, John F

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a model to predict mass attenuation and mass energy absorption coefficients of the elements for photons of energy from 1keV to 20MeV. The Compton scattering component is modeled by the attenuation and energy absorption of hydrogen at photon energies above 10keV. Photoelectric attenuation and absorption is modeled as a simple power law of photon energy, modified by a simple function of the difference between the photon energy and the K shell binding energy of the absorber atoms. Attenuation and absorption by pair production above 1.022MeV is modeled as a quadratic function of the square root of the photon energy. The mass attenuation and mass energy absorption coefficients of compounds can be predicted by the mixture rule. The errors in the model are greatest at the lowest photon energies, in part due to a lack of experimental data for photon energies below 1keV. Worked examples are presented for the attenuation of photons at various energies in several elements and also in water over the whole range of photon energies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Absorption-Line Studies of Seyfert Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, J. Michael

    We propose to undertake a "reverberation analysis" of the variable absorption lines ill two Seyfert Galaxies (NGC 4051 and Mrk 279) to help understand the origin of intrinsic absorption lines in AGNs. Stich an analysis is a powerful tool for elucidating the radial distribution of absorbing gas in the broad-line region (BLR) and narrow-line region (NLR). Only two Seyferts have previously been studied with this technique: NGC 4151 (Bromage el al. 1985; Clavel et al. 1987) and NGC 3516 (Voit, Shull, and Begelman 1987). The absorption features have been interpreted as an outflow of ionized clouds from the nuclear region or from an accretion disk affected by UV/X-ray heating. Neither the source of the absorbing gas in these Seyferts nor the "gene" which distingishes them from other Seyferts is known. Until the 1984 onset of absorption in Mrk 279, broad self-absorbed. lines had been observed only in Seyferts of low intrinsic luminosity, such as NGC 4051. Mrk 279 is intrinsically much brighter, and therefore more quasar-like, than the other three absorptionline Seyfert I's in the CfA sample. Thus, it may show how the absorption phenomenon changes at higher luminosity and could bridge the gap between the low luminosity absorption-line Seyferts and the well-studied broad absorption-line (BAL) QSO's. In addition, Mrk 279's significant redshift will allow us to study, for the first time, the Ly-alpha line in an absorption-line Seyfert. With 3 US-1 shifts for each of these two underobserved Seyferts, we can double the number of objects in which absorption-line variability has been studied and investigate why the absorption-line strengths correlate or anti-correlate with the UV continuum.

  3. Intersect a quartic to extract its roots

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra G. Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    In this note we present a new method for determining the roots of a quartic polynomial, wherein the given quartic polynomial is intersected by a quadratic polynomial (which has two unknown coefficients) at its root point; so the root satisfies both the quartic and the quadratic equations. Elimination of the root term from the two equations leads to an expression in the two unknowns of quadratic polynomial. In addition, we introduce another expression in one unknown, which leads to determinati...

  4. On the use of antibiotics to reduce rhizoplane microbial populations in root physiology and ecology investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, D. R.; Ferro, A.; Ritchie, K.; Bugbee, B. G.

    1995-01-01

    No straightforward method exists for separating the proportion of ion exchange and respiration due to rhizoplane microbial organisms from that of root ion exchange and respiration. We examined several antibiotics that might be used for the temporary elimination of rhizoplane bacteria from hydroponically grown wheat roots (Triticum aestivum cv. Veery 10). Each antibiotic was tested for herbicidal activity and plate counts were used to enumerate bacteria and evaluate antibiotic kinetics. Only lactam antibiotics (penicillins and cephalosporins) did not reduce wheat growth rates. Aminoglycosides, the pyrimidine trimethoprim, colistin and rifampicin reduced growth rates substantially. Antibiotics acted slowly, with maximum reductions in rhizoplane bacteria occurring after more than 48 h of exposure. Combinations of nonphytotoxic antibiotics reduced platable rhizoplane bacteria by as much as 98%; however, this was generally a reduction from about 10(9) to 10(6) colony forming units per gram of dry root mass, so that many viable bacteria remained on root surfaces. We present evidence which suggests that insufficient bacterial biomass exists on root surfaces of nonstressed plants grown under well-aerated conditions to quantitatively interfere with root nitrogen absorption measurements.

  5. Transcriptome Profiling of Watermelon Root in Response to Short-Term Osmotic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Mo, Yanling; Yang, Xiaozheng; Zhang, Haifei; Wang, Yongqi; Li, Hao; Wei, Chunhua; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Osmotic stress adversely affects the growth, fruit quality and yield of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai). Increasing the tolerance of watermelon to osmotic stress caused by factors such as high salt and water deficit is an effective way to improve crop survival in osmotic stress environments. Roots are important organs in water absorption and are involved in the initial response to osmosis stress; however, few studies have examined the underlying mechanism of tolerance to osmotic stress in watermelon roots. For better understanding of this mechanism, the inbred watermelon accession M08, which exhibits relatively high tolerance to water deficits, was treated with 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. The root samples were harvested at 6 h after PEG treatment and untreated samples were used as controls. Transcriptome analyses were carried out by Illumina RNA sequencing. A total of 5246 differentially expressed genes were identified. Gene ontology enrichment and biochemical pathway analyses of these 5246 genes showed that short-term osmotic stress affected osmotic adjustment, signal transduction, hormone responses, cell division, cell cycle and ribosome, and M08 may repress root growth to adapt osmotic stress. The results of this study describe the watermelon root transcriptome under osmotic stress and propose new insight into watermelon root responses to osmotic stress at the transcriptome level. Accordingly, these results allow us to better understand the molecular mechanisms of watermelon in response to drought stress and will facilitate watermelon breeding projects to improve drought tolerance.

  6. Early nodulins in root nodule development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.

    1990-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between bacteria of the genus Rhizobium and leguminous plants leads to the formation of root nodules, which are specific nitrogen-fixing organs on the roots of plants. Bacteria enter the root by infection threads, and concomitantly cell

  7. Cellular organisation of the Arabidopsis thaliana root

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolan, L.; Janmaat, K.; Willemsen, V.; Linstead, P.; Poethig, S.; Roberts, R.; Scheres, B.J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The anatomy of the developing root of Arabidopsis is described using conventional histological techniques, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The root meristem is derived from cells of the hypophysis and adjacent cells of the embryo proper. The postembryonic organization of the root is

  8. Root Cause Analysis: Methods and Mindsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluch, Jacob H.

    This instructional unit is intended for use in training operations personnel and others involved in scram analysis at nuclear power plants in the techniques of root cause analysis. Four lessons are included. The first lesson provides an overview of the goals and benefits of the root cause analysis method. Root cause analysis techniques are covered…

  9. Winter Wheat Root Growth and Nitrogen Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Irene Skovby

    Root growth is an essential parameter regarding nitrogen (N) uptake efficiency, as more and deeper roots may improve the uptake from deeper soil layers and reduce nitrate leaching losses. During this PhD project, it was studied how different agronomic practices influence root growth and N relations...

  10. Rooting of microcuttings: Theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, de G.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Poor adventitious root formation is a major obstacle in micropropagation and in conventional propagation. This paper reviews recent progress in the understanding of adventitious root formation as a developmental process focusing on the role of plant hormones and on the effect of rooting conditions

  11. Evaluation of bacterial leakage of four root- end filling materials: Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA, Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarabian M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Today several materials have been used for root- end filling in endodontic surgery. Optimal properties of Pro Root MTA in in-vitro and in-vivo studies has been proven. On the other hand, based on some studies, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA and Portland cement are similar to Pro Root MTA in physical and biologic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial leakage (amount and mean leakage time of four root- end filling materials. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in-vitro study, seventy six extracted single- rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups for root-end filling with gray Pro Root MTA, white Pro Root MTA, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA, Portland Cement (type I and positive and negative control groups. Root canals were instrumented using the step- back technique. Root- end filling materials were placed in 3mm ultra sonic retro preparations. Samples and microleakage model system were sterilized in autoclave. The apical 3-4 mm of the roots were immersed in phenol red with 3% lactose broth culture medium. The coronal access of each specimen was inoculated every 24h with a suspension of Streptococcus sanguis (ATCC 10556. Culture media were observed every 24h for colour change indicating bacterial contamination for 60 days. Statistical analysis was performed using log- rank test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: At the end of study 50%, 56.25%, 56.25% and 50% of specimens filled with Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA. Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I had evidence of leakage respectively. The mean leakage time was 37.19±6.29, 36.44±5.81, 37.69±5.97 and 34.81±6.67 days respectively. Statistical analysis of data showed no significant difference among the leakage (amount and mean leakage time of the four tested root- end filling materials (P=0.9958. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, there were no significant differences in leakage among the four

  12. Printing Values In Interactive ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Perovic, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This project report summarizes the work I have been performing during the past twelve weeks as a Summer Student intern working on ROOT project in the SFT group, PH department, under the supervision of Axel Naumann and Danilo Piparo. One of the widely requested features for ROOT was improved interactive shell experience as well as improved printing of object values. Solving this issue was the goal of this project. Primarily, we have enabled printing of the collections. Secondly, we have unified the printing interface, making it much more robust and extendible. Thirdly, we have implemented printing of nested collections in a flexible and user-friendly manner. Finally, we have added an interactive mode, allowing for paginated output. At the beginning of the report, ROOT is presented with examples of where it is used and how important it is. Then, the motivation behind the project is elaborated, by presenting the previous state of the software package and its potential for improvement. Further, the process in wh...

  13. OpenSimRoot: widening the scope and application of root architectural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Johannes A; Kuppe, Christian; Owen, Markus R; Mellor, Nathan; Griffiths, Marcus; Bennett, Malcolm J; Lynch, Jonathan P; Watt, Michelle

    2017-08-01

    OpenSimRoot is an open-source, functional-structural plant model and mathematical description of root growth and function. We describe OpenSimRoot and its functionality to broaden the benefits of root modeling to the plant science community. OpenSimRoot is an extended version of SimRoot, established to simulate root system architecture, nutrient acquisition and plant growth. OpenSimRoot has a plugin, modular infrastructure, coupling single plant and crop stands to soil nutrient and water transport models. It estimates the value of root traits for water and nutrient acquisition in environments and plant species. The flexible OpenSimRoot design allows upscaling from root anatomy to plant community to estimate the following: resource costs of developmental and anatomical traits; trait synergisms; and (interspecies) root competition. OpenSimRoot can model three-dimensional images from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) of roots in soil. New modules include: soil water-dependent water uptake and xylem flow; tiller formation; evapotranspiration; simultaneous simulation of mobile solutes; mesh refinement; and root growth plasticity. OpenSimRoot integrates plant phenotypic data with environmental metadata to support experimental designs and to gain a mechanistic understanding at system scales. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Cytokinins act directly on lateral root founder cells to inhibit root initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laplaze, L.; Benkova, E.; Casimiro, I.; Maes, L.; Vanneste, S.; Swarup, R.; Weijers, D.; Calvo, V.; Parizot, B.; Herrera-Rodriguez, M.B.; Offringa, R.; Graham, N.; Doumas, P.; Friml, J.; Bogusz, D.; Beeckman, T.; Bennett, M.

    2007-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral roots are formed from root pericycle cells adjacent to the xylem poles. Lateral root development is regulated antagonistically by the plant hormones auxin and cytokinin. While a great deal is known about how auxin promotes lateral root development, the mechanism of

  15. Root caries, root surface restorations and lifestyle factors in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Jensen, Allan Bardow; Ekstrand, Kim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate selected lifestyle factors in relation to active caries and restored root surface lesions in adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Based on clinical examinations and questionnaires, data on root caries, socioeconomic status, body mass index, dietary habits, alcohol consumption, tobacco...... and restored root surface lesions, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of active root caries was 4%, while 26% displayed restored root surfaces. The sugar intake was not related to root caries. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that, in subjects aged 45 or over, smoking and wearing...... dentures were significantly associated with presence of active root caries (p alcohol intake (OR = 1.7; p alcohol...

  16. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  17. The effect of volatility on percutaneous absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Nicole C; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Topically applied chemicals may volatilize, or evaporate, from skin leaving behind a chemical residue with new percutaneous absorptive capabilities. Understanding volatilization of topical medications, such as sunscreens, fragrances, insect repellants, cosmetics and other commonly applied topicals may have implications for their safety and efficacy. A systematic review of English language articles from 1979 to 2014 was performed using key search terms. Articles were evaluated to assess the relationship between volatility and percutaneous absorption. A total of 12 articles were selected and reviewed. Key findings were that absorption is enhanced when coupled with a volatile substance, occlusion prevents evaporation and increases absorption, high ventilation increases volatilization and reduces absorption, and pH of skin has an affect on a chemical's volatility. The articles also brought to light that different methods may have an affect on volatility: different body regions; in vivo vs. in vitro; human vs. Data suggest that volatility is crucial for determining safety and efficacy of cutaneous exposures and therapies. Few articles have been documented reporting evaporation in the context of percutaneous absorption, and of those published, great variability exists in methods. Further investigation of volatility is needed to properly evaluate its role in percutaneous absorption.

  18. Inhibition of Cariogenic Plaque Formation on Root Surface with Polydopamine-Induced-Polyethylene Glycol Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Lei Mei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Root caries prevention has been a challenge for clinicians due to its special anatomical location, which favors the accumulation of dental plaque. Researchers are looking for anti-biofouling material to inhibit bacterial growth on exposed root surfaces. This study aimed to develop polydopamine-induced-polyethylene glycol (PEG and to study its anti-biofouling effect against a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on the root dentine surface. Hydroxyapatite disks and human dentine blocks were divided into four groups for experiments. They received polydopamine-induced-PEG, PEG, polydopamine, or water application. Contact angle, quartz crystal microbalance, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the wetting property, surface affinity, and an infrared spectrum; the results indicated that PEG was induced by polydopamine onto a hydroxyapatite disk. Salivary mucin absorption on hydroxyapatite disks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was confirmed using spectrophotometry. The growth of a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on dentine blocks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was assessed and monitored by colony-forming units, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that dentine with polydopamine-induced-PEG had fewer bacteria than other groups. In conclusion, a novel polydopamine-induced-PEG coating was developed. Its anti-biofouling effect inhibited salivary mucin absorption and cariogenic biofilm formation on dentine surface and thus may be used for the prevention of root dentine caries.

  19. Inhibition of Cariogenic Plaque Formation on Root Surface with Polydopamine-Induced-Polyethylene Glycol Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, May Lei; Li, Quan-Li; Chu, Chun Hung

    2016-05-25

    Root caries prevention has been a challenge for clinicians due to its special anatomical location, which favors the accumulation of dental plaque. Researchers are looking for anti-biofouling material to inhibit bacterial growth on exposed root surfaces. This study aimed to develop polydopamine-induced-polyethylene glycol (PEG) and to study its anti-biofouling effect against a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on the root dentine surface. Hydroxyapatite disks and human dentine blocks were divided into four groups for experiments. They received polydopamine-induced-PEG, PEG, polydopamine, or water application. Contact angle, quartz crystal microbalance, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the wetting property, surface affinity, and an infrared spectrum; the results indicated that PEG was induced by polydopamine onto a hydroxyapatite disk. Salivary mucin absorption on hydroxyapatite disks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was confirmed using spectrophotometry. The growth of a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on dentine blocks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was assessed and monitored by colony-forming units, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that dentine with polydopamine-induced-PEG had fewer bacteria than other groups. In conclusion, a novel polydopamine-induced-PEG coating was developed. Its anti-biofouling effect inhibited salivary mucin absorption and cariogenic biofilm formation on dentine surface and thus may be used for the prevention of root dentine caries.

  20. Genetic variants associated with the root system architecture of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) under contrasting phosphate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Yanling; Thomas, Catherine L; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Ping; Shi, Dexu; Grandke, Fabian; Jin, Kemo; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen; Yi, Bin; Broadley, Martin R; Shi, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Breeding crops with ideal root system architecture for efficient absorption of phosphorus is an important strategy to reduce the use of phosphate fertilizers. To investigate genetic variants leading to changes in root system architecture, 405 oilseed rape cultivars were genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array in low and high P environments. A total of 285 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with root system architecture traits at varying phosphorus levels. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms corroborate a previous linkage analysis of root system architecture quantitative trait loci in the BnaTNDH population. One peak single-nucleotide polymorphism region on A3 was associated with all root system architecture traits and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for primary root length at low phosphorus. Two more single-nucleotide polymorphism peaks on A5 for root dry weight at low phosphorus were detected in both growth systems and co-localized with a quantitative trait locus for the same trait. The candidate genes identified on A3 form a haplotype 'BnA3Hap', that will be important for understanding the phosphorus/root system interaction and for the incorporation into Brassica napus breeding programs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  1. Intersect a quartic to extract its roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra G. Kulkarni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this note we present a new method for determining the roots of a quartic polynomial, wherein the given quartic polynomial is intersected by a quadratic polynomial (which has two unknown coefficients at its root point; so the root satisfies both the quartic and the quadratic equations. Elimination of the root term from the two equations leads to an expression in the two unknowns of quadratic polynomial. In addition, we introduce another expression in one unknown, which leads to determination of the two unknowns and subsequently the roots of quartic polynomial.

  2. Asteroidal Quadruples in non Rooted Path Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutierrez Marisa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A directed path graph is the intersection graph of a family of directed subpaths of a directed tree. A rooted path graph is the intersection graph of a family of directed subpaths of a rooted tree. Rooted path graphs are directed path graphs. Several characterizations are known for directed path graphs: one by forbidden induced subgraphs and one by forbidden asteroids. It is an open problem to find such characterizations for rooted path graphs. For this purpose, we are studying in this paper directed path graphs that are non rooted path graphs. We prove that such graphs always contain an asteroidal quadruple.

  3. Gas treating absorption theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Eimer, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Gas Treating: Absorption Theory and Practice provides an introduction to the treatment of natural gas, synthesis gas and flue gas, addressing why it is necessary and the challenges involved.  The book concentrates in particular on the absorption-desorption process and mass transfer coupled with chemical reaction. Following a general introduction to gas treatment, the chemistry of CO2, H2S and amine systems is described, and selected topics from physical chemistry with relevance to gas treating are presented. Thereafter the absorption process is discussed in detail, column hardware is explain

  4. Psychological absorption. Affect investment in marijuana intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, W D; Fishkin, S M

    1991-01-01

    Absorption (a trait capacity for total attentional involvement) was reported to increase during episodes of marijuana intoxication. Several subsets of the absorption scale items specifically characterized marijuana intoxication, and groups of users and nonusers showed differential affective involvement with these experiences. Additionally, within the drug-using group, a positive correlation between frequency of marijuana use and affective ratings of these experiences was found. The findings support the hypothesis that a specific type of alteration in consciousness that enhances capacity for total attentional involvement (absorption) characterizes marijuana intoxication, and that this enhancement may act as a reinforcer, possibly influencing future use.

  5. Coherent Absorption of N00N States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Thomas; Restuccia, Sara; Lyons, Ashley; Giovannini, Daniel; Romero, Jacquiline; Jeffers, John; Padgett, Miles; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-07-08

    Recent results in deeply subwavelength thickness films demonstrate coherent control and logical gate operations with both classical and single-photon light sources. However, quantum processing and devices typically involve more than one photon and nontrivial input quantum states. Here we experimentally investigate two-photon N00N state coherent absorption in a multilayer graphene film. Depending on the N00N state input phase, it is possible to selectively choose between single- or two-photon absorption of the input state in the graphene film. These results demonstrate that coherent absorption in the quantum regime exhibits unique features, opening up applications in multiphoton spectroscopy and imaging.

  6. Understanding phosphorus status and P translocation within wheat plant in a split-root system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubya Shabnam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are not uniform in their nutritional requirements, most of them survive under adverse conditions of humidity, temperature, and nutrients. Because they are genetically adapted to their habitats and even some varieties of the same species show differences in absorption, translocation, accumulation and nutrient use. This study is aimed at examining the phosphorus (P status in the different parts of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. plant and its influence on plant growth and P translocation in a split-root soil culture. KH2PO4 was used as the source of phosphorus for the different level of P application. Two recently BARI developed wheat varieties namely BARI GOM 25 and BARI GOM 26 were used as testing plants. . Result showed the growth parameter increased with the increase of P application. Likewise, P uptake by wheat plant also increases with the elevated P application. However, no significant differences were observed between wheat varieties irrespective of growth and P uptake by wheat plant. Moreover, elevated P concentrations in the shoot of wheat plants probably provide more P for shoot unloading of P and for P assimilation in the controlled roots. This phenomenon results in increased P concentrations in the roots of wheat plants that mean translocation of P in the roots. These findings indicate that the added soluble P increases the absorption of nutrients from the soil solution. So, this study concluded that the application of elevated P in split-root system is efficient both for increasing shoot development and root growth and plays significant role in thePtranslocationwithin the wheat plants.

  7. Hydrogenase in actinorhizal root nodules and root nodule homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D R; Arp, D J; Burris, R H

    1980-04-01

    Hydrogenases were measured in intact actinorhizal root nodules and from disrupted nodules of Alnus glutinosa, Alnus rhombifolia, Alnus rubra, and Myrica pensylvanica. Whole nodules took up H2 in an O2-dependent reaction. Endophyte preparations oxidized H2 through the oxyhydrogen reaction, but rates were enhanced when hydrogen uptake was coupled to artificial electron acceptors. Oxygen inhibited artifical acceptor-dependent H2 uptake. The hydrogenase system from M. pensylvanica had a different pattern of coupling to various electron acceptors than the hydrogenase systems from the alders; only the bayberry system evolved H2 from reduced viologen dyes.

  8. Optimal root arrangement of cereal crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yeonsu; Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    The plant root absorbs water from the soil and supplies it to the rest part of the plant. It consists of a number of root fibers, through whose surfaces water uptake occurs. There is an intriguing observation that for most of cereal crops such as maize and wheat, the volume density of root in the soil declines exponentially as a function of depth. To understand this empirical finding, we construct a theoretical model of root water uptake, where mass transfer into root surface is modeled just as heat flux around a fin. Agreement between the theoretically predicted optimal root distribution in vertical direction and biological data supports the hypothesis that the plant root has evolved to achieve the optimal water uptake in competition with neighbors. This study has practical implication in the agricultural industry as well as optimal design of water transport networks in both micro- and macroscales. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

  9. Effects of fine root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghu Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The study was conducted to characterize the impacts of plant roots systems (e.g., root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems. Area of study: The study was carried out in Jiufeng National Forest Park, Beijing, China. Material and methods: The flow patterns were measured by field dye tracing experiments. Different species (Sophora japonica Linn,Platycladus orientalis Franco, Quercus dentata Thunbwere quantified in two replicates, and 12 soil depth were applied. Plant roots were sampled in the sieving methods. Root length density and root biomass were measured by WinRHIZO. Dye coverage was implied in the image analysis, and maximum depth of dye infiltration by direct measurement. Main results: Root length density and root biomass decreased with the increasing distance from soil surface, and root length density was 81.6% higher in preferential pathways than in soil matrix, and 66.7% for root biomass with respect to all experimental plots. Plant roots were densely distributed in the upper soil layers. Dye coverage was almost 100% in the upper 5-10 cm, but then decreased rapidly with soil depth. Root length density and root biomass were different from species: Platycladus orientalis Franco > Quercus dentata Thunb > Sophora japonica Linn. Research highlights: The results indicated that fine roots systems had strong effects on soil preferential flow, particularly root channels enhancing nutrition transport across soil profiles in forest dynamics.

  10. Hydraulic responses of whole vines and individual roots of kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) following root severance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Marykate Z; Patterson, Kevin J; Minchin, Peter E H; Gould, Kevin S; Clearwater, Michael J

    2011-05-01

    Whole vine (K(plant)) and individual root (K(root)) hydraulic conductances were measured in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planch. var. chinensis 'Hort16A') vines to observe hydraulic responses following partial root system excision. Heat dissipation and compensation heat pulse techniques were used to measure sap flow in trunks and individual roots, respectively. Sap flux and measurements of xylem pressure potential (Ψ) were used to calculate K(plant) and K(root) in vines with zero and ∼80% of roots severed. Whole vine transpiration (E), Ψ and K(plant) were significantly reduced within 24 h of root pruning, and did not recover within 6 weeks. Sap flux in intact roots increased within 24 h of root pruning, driven by an increase in the pressure gradient between the soil and canopy and without any change in root hydraulic conductance. Photosynthesis (A) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were reduced, without significant effects on leaf internal CO(2) concentration (c(i)). Shoot growth rates were maintained; fruit growth and dry matter content were increased following pruning. The woody roots of kiwifruit did not demonstrate a rapid dynamic response to root system damage as has been observed previously in monocot seedlings. Increased sap flux in intact roots with no change in K(root) and only a moderate decline in shoot A suggests that under normal growing conditions root hydraulic conductance greatly exceeds requirements for adequate shoot hydration. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  11. Thlaspi arvense binds Cu(II) as a bis-(L-histidinato) complex on root cell walls in an urban ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    MANCEAU, Alain; SIMIONOVICI, Alexandre; LANSON, Martine; PERRIN, Jonathan; TUCOULOU, Rémi; BOHIC, Sylvain; BOHIC, Sylvain; FAKRA, Sirine C; MARCUS, Matthew A.; BEDELL, Jean-Philippe; NAGY KATHRYN, L.

    2013-01-01

    Root cell walls accumulate metal cations both during acquisition from the environment and removal from the protoplast to avoid toxicity, but molecular forms of the metals under field conditions remain elusive. We have identified how copper is bound to cell walls of intact roots of native Thlaspi arvense by combining synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and absorption techniques (XANES and EXAFS) at the nano-, micro-, and bulk scales. The plants grew naturally in sediment in a stormwater runoff basi...

  12. Connecting X-ray absorption and 21 cm neutral hydrogen absorption in obscured radio AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, V. A.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Urquhart, R.; Soria, R.; Callingham, J. R.; Curran, S. J.; Musaeva, A.; Mahony, E. K.; Glowacki, M.; Farrell, S. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Reynolds, J. E.; Voronkov, M. A.; Wark, R. M.; Whiting, M. T.

    2017-11-01

    Many radio galaxies show the presence of dense and dusty gas near the active nucleus. This can be traced by both 21 cm H I absorption and soft X-ray absorption, offering new insight into the physical nature of the circumnuclear medium of these distant galaxies. To better understand this relationship, we investigate soft X-ray absorption as an indicator for the detection of associated H I absorption, as part of preparation for the First Large Absorption Survey in H I to be undertaken with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). We present the results of our pilot study using the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, a precursor to ASKAP, to search for new absorption detections in radio sources brighter than 1 Jy that also feature soft X-ray absorption. Based on this pilot survey, we detected H I absorption towards the radio source PKS 1657-298 at a redshift of z = 0.42. This source also features the highest X-ray absorption ratio of our pilot sample by a factor of 3, which is consistent with our general findings that X-ray absorption predicates the presence of dense neutral gas. By comparing the X-ray properties of active galactic nuclei with and without detection of H I absorption at radio wavelengths, we find that X-ray hardness ratio and H I absorption optical depth are correlated at a statistical significance of 4.71σ. We conclude by considering the impact of these findings on future radio and X-ray absorption studies.

  13. Gintonin absorption in intestinal model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Hwan Lee

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study shows that gintonin could be absorbed in the intestine through transcellular and paracellular diffusion, and active transport. In addition, the lipid component of gintonin might play a key role in its intestinal absorption.

  14. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  15. The Driving Forces of Subsidiary Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleimer, Stephanie C.; Pedersen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    capacity in order to compete in its focal market. The dual embeddedness of MNC subsidiaries plays a key role in this investigation, as subsidiaries belong to the MNC network and are simultaneously embedded in their host country environment. We argue that subsidiary absorptive capacity is formed...... as a purposeful response to this dual embeddedness. An analysis of marketing strategy absorptions undertaken by 213 subsidiaries reveals that MNCs can assist their subsidiaries to compete in competitive and dynamic focal markets by forming specific organizational mechanisms that are conducive to the development......The study investigates how a multinational corporation (MNC) can promote the absorptive capacity of its subsidiaries. The focus is on what drives the MNC subsidiary's ability to absorb marketing strategies that are initiated by the MNC parent, as well as how the subsidiary enacts on this absorptive...

  16. Differential Photoacoustic Particle Absorption Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a highly sensitive and compact monitor to measure light absorption from particulate matters. The fundamental of the proposed device is based on...

  17. Absorption fluids data survey: 1989 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macriss, R.A.; Zawacki, T.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This is an update of a series of prior reports on absorption fluids and data, ORNL/Sub/84-47989/1, 2, 3. It covers additional data developed and published mainly during 1985--88, and cites 44 additional references. Seventy-four different worldwide publications containing data relating to properties of binary, ternary, and multicomponent absorption fluids were identified. Of these, 30 manuscripts include applications of absorption fluid properties data toward evaluation, assessment, or design of chillers or heat pumps but do not include actual fluid properties data. The remaining 44 publications date as far back as 1929, but over 50% of these documents were published between 1985 and 1988. The texts of the 44 manuscripts are in English, German, Japanese, Russian, or French. The absorption fluids discussed in the 44 documents are combinations of 9 different refrigerant'' compounds and 30 single, 7 binary, and 1 ternary absorbent'' compounds. 44 refs., 21 tabs.

  18. Extending Organizational Antecedents Of Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Ana Luiza de Araújo; Lettl, Christopher; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    on organizational characteristics that encourage experimentation. Specifically, we argue that characteristics such as slack resources, tolerance for failure, willingness to cannibalize and external openness are important organizational antecedents for knowledge absorption activities as they prevent inertia. Drawing...

  19. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  20. Water Absorption Behavior of Hemp Hurds Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Nadezda Stevulova; Julia Cigasova; Pavol Purcz; Ivana Schwarzova; Frantisek Kacik; Anton Geffert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, water sorption behavior of 28 days hardened composites based on hemp hurds and inorganic binder was studied. Two kinds of absorption tests on dried cube specimens in deionized water bath at laboratory temperature were performed. Short-term (after one hour water immersion) and long-term (up to 180 days) water absorption tests were carried out to study their durability. Short-term water sorption behavior of original hemp hurds composites depends on mean particle length of hemp an...

  1. Systemic Absorption of Nanomaterials by Oral Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Mona-Lise; Bredsdorff, Lea; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches.......This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches....

  2. Enhancement of Kerr nonlinearity completely without absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong; Niu, Yueping; Deng, Li; Gong, Shangqing

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the enhancement of the Kerr nonlinearity in a four-level tripod-type atomic system completely without absorption. We study the effect of the incoherent pumping on the nonlinear susceptibility of the probe field and show that compared with that without the incoherent pumping, the Kerr nonlinearity can be enhanced with completely suppressed absorption at two different probe frequencies. Thus, we can get a symmetrical enhanced Kerr nonlinearity. Particularly, all of our results are in the case of Doppler broadening.

  3. The Automation of Sound Absorption Coefficient Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Hermawanto, Denny; Suwandi, Achmad

    2006-01-01

    By manual method, the sound absorption coefficient measurement should be done by utilizing many type of equipment such as: measuring amplifier, level recorder, band-pass filter, protactor, etc. However it caused inefficient and need longer time in processing measurement data, therefore the automation system of sound absorption coefficient has been realized. An acoustical real time analyzer type B&K 2144 has been used to record the decay of sound pressure level, thus the processing data is dri...

  4. Morphology of Southern Hemisphere Riometer Auroral Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Departamento de Geofísica Universidad de Concepción, Concepción CHILE foppiano@udec.cl ABSTRACT A morphology of riometer auroral absorption is...PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Departamento de Geofísica Universidad de...UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED MORPHOLOGY OF SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE RIOMETER AURORAL ABSORPTION Alberto J. Foppiano Departamento de

  5. Simulation of an absorption cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egrican, N. (Istanbul Technical Univ. (TR). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Yigit, A. (Uludag Univ., Bursa (TR). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    We describe a finite difference solution for combined heat and mass transfer on vapor absorption into a laminar liquid film. Heat- and mass-transfer coefficients are determined by calculating temperature and concentration variations at the film. A modular computer program has been developed for absorption systems to simulate various cycle configurations. The influence of component temperatures and heat-exchanger effectiveness on cooling coefficients of performance and component heat-transfer rates has been investigated to define optimum operating conditions. (author).

  6. Random roots and lineage sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Payne, Ansel; DeSalle, Rob

    2012-07-01

    Lineage sorting has been suggested as a major force in generating incongruent phylogenetic signal when multiple gene partitions are examined. The degree of lineage sorting can be estimated using the coalescent process and simulation studies have also pointed to a major role for incomplete lineage sorting as a factor in phylogenetic inference. Some recent empirical studies point to an extreme role for this phenomenon with up to 50-60% of all informative genes showing incongruence as a result of lineage sorting. Here, we examine seven large multi-partition genome level data sets over a large range of taxonomic representation. We took the approach of examining outgroup choice and its impact on tree topology, by swapping outgroups into analyses with successively larger genetics distances to the ingroup. Our results indicate a linear relationship of outgroup distance with incongruence in the data sets we examined suggesting a strong random rooting effect. In addition, we attempted to estimate the degree of lineage sorting in several large genome level data sets by examining triads of very closely related taxa. This exercise resulted in much lower estimates of incongruent genes that could be the result of lineage sorting, with an overall estimate of around 10% of the total number of genes in a genome showing incongruence as a result of true lineage sorting. Finally we examined the behavior of likelihood and parsimony approaches on the random rooting phenomenon. Likelihood tends to stabilize incongruence as outgroups get further and further away from the ingroup. In one extreme case, likelihood overcompensates for sequence divergence but increases random rooting causing long branch repulsion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Variations in the spectral values of specific absorption of phytoplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Lazzara, L.; Prieur, L.

    Absorption spectra of laboratory cultures of eight species of phytoplankton were studied. These spectra, normalized per unit of chlorophyll a concentration (specific absorption) show variability in magnitude and spectral form. Specific absorption...

  8. Small intestinal absorption during endotoxemia in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, S; Emil, S; Kosi, M; Monforte-Munoz, H; Atkinson, J

    1996-10-01

    We studied the effects of systemic endotoxemia on small intestinal absorption in an in vivo animal model. Seven adolescent Yorkshire swine underwent creation of 25 cm distal ileal Thiry-Vella fistulae. After 1 week recovery, the fistulae were perfused with a solution of glucose and electrolytes labeled with 14C-PEG, and net absorption of water, Na+, Cl-, and glucose was calculated. Animals were studied under three different conditions: (1) Basal fasting state, (2) immediately after intravenous injection of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 250 micrograms/kg), and (3) 24 hours after LPS. Water, Na+, and Cl- absorption was significantly reduced 2 hours after LPS, but recovered to baseline values by the third hour after LPS. Twenty-four hours after LPS water, Na+, and Cl- absorption was significantly decreased below baseline values. Glucose absorption after LPS paralleled that of water and electrolytes, except that the transient early recovery was not observed. Histological studies of the ileum after LPS showed marked epithelial inflammation at 6 hours, villous atrophy at 24 hours, and signs of recovery at 7 days. Intestinal absorption of water, electrolytes, and glucose is adversely affected in the immediate and early periods after an endotoxemic episode, but the histological epithelial injury secondary to endotoxemia is reversible.

  9. Inhibition of auxin movement from the shoot into the root inhibits lateral root development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. C.; Brady, S. R.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    In roots two distinct polar movements of auxin have been reported that may control different developmental and growth events. To test the hypothesis that auxin derived from the shoot and transported toward the root controls lateral root development, the two polarities of auxin transport were uncoupled in Arabidopsis. Local application of the auxin-transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) at the root-shoot junction decreased the number and density of lateral roots and reduced the free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in the root and [3H]IAA transport into the root. Application of NPA to the basal half of or at several positions along the root only reduced lateral root density in regions that were in contact with NPA or in regions apical to the site of application. Lateral root development was restored by application of IAA apical to NPA application. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis roots was also inhibited by excision of the shoot or dark growth and this inhibition was reversible by IAA. Together, these results are consistent with auxin transport from the shoot into the root controlling lateral root development.

  10. A statistical approach to root system classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot eBodner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for plant functional type identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. We demonstrate that combining principal component and cluster analysis yields a meaningful classification of rooting types based on morphological traits. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. Biplot inspection is used to determine key traits and to ensure stability in cluster based grouping. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Three rooting types emerged from measured data, distinguished by diameter/weight, density and spatial distribution respectively. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement

  11. Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. van Wijk

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this modelling study differences in vertical root distributions measured in four contrasting forest locations in the Netherlands were investigated. Root distributions are seen as a reflection of the plant’s optimisation strategy, based on hydrological grounds. The 'optimal' root distribution is defined as the one that maximises the water uptake from the root zone over a period of ten years. The optimal root distributions of four forest locations with completely different soil physical characteristics are calculated using the soil hydrological model SWIF. Two different model configurations for root interactions were tested: the standard model configuration in which one single root profile was used (SWIF-NC, and a model configuration in which two root profiles compete for the same available water (SWIF-C. The root profiles were parameterised with genetic algorithms. The fitness of a certain root profile was defined as the amount of water uptake over a simulation period of ten years. The root profiles of SWIF-C were optimised using an evolutionary game. The results showed clear differences in optimal root distributions between the various sites and also between the two model configurations. Optimisation with SWIF-C resulted in root profiles that were easier to interpret in terms of feasible biological strategies. Preferential water uptake in wetter soil regions was an important factor for interpretation of the simulated root distributions. As the optimised root profiles still showed differences with measured profiles, this analysis is presented, not as the final solution for explaining differences in root profiles of vegetation but as a first step using an optimisation theory to increase understanding of the root profiles of trees. Keywords: forest hydrology, optimisation, roots

  12. Arachidonic acid intestinal absorption: mechanism of transport and influence of luminal factors of absorption in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, S L; Hollander, D

    1978-11-01

    The mechanism and characteristics of intestinal absorption of arachidonic acid were studied in vitro using everted intestinal sacs of the rat. Arachidonic acid absorption was studied at concentrations of 5 micron to 8.36 mM. The plot of absorption rate vs. concentration fitted best to a rectangular hyperbola at low micron concentrations and to a straight linear relationship in the mM range of concentrations. Metabolic inhibitors and uncouplers did not change absorption in either range of concentrations. The absorption of arachidonic acid increased with thinning of the unstirred water-layer, decrease in the pH, or the substitution of sodium taurocholate by Pluronic F 68 OR Tween 80. Absorption decreased following the equimolar additions of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. Absorption rate did not change when the taurocholate concentration was varied from 5-15 mM or following the additions of butyric or glutamic acids, leucine, lysine, or dextrose. It was concluded that arachidonic acid is absorbed by a concentration-dependent dual mechanism of transport which is not energy dependent. At the low micron range of concentrations, facilitated diffusion is predominant, while at mM concentrations, simple diffusion is the dominant mechanism of absorption. Changes in the intestinal fluid composition, flow rate, and pH can modify the rate of absorption of arachidonic acid.

  13. Mueller matrix roots algorithm and computational considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, H D; Chipman, R A

    2012-01-02

    Recently, an order-independent Mueller matrix decomposition was proposed in an effort to elucidate the nine depolarization degrees of freedom [Handbook of Optics, Vol. 1 of Mueller Matrices (2009)]. This paper addresses the critical computational issues involved in applying this Mueller matrix roots decomposition, along with a review of the principal matrix root and common methods for its calculation. The calculation of the pth matrix root is optimized around p = 10(5) for a 53 digit binary double precision calculation. A matrix roots algorithm is provided which incorporates these computational results. It is applied to a statistically significant number of randomly generated physical Mueller matrices in order to gain insight on the typical ranges of the depolarizing Matrix roots parameters. Computational techniques are proposed which allow singular Mueller matrices and Mueller matrices with a half-wave of retardance to be evaluated with the matrix roots decomposition.

  14. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope

  15. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Denis; Schwarz, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel) tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope-parallel directions. Roots

  16. Systems approaches to study root architecture dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela eCuesta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant root system is essential for providing anchorage to the soil, supplying minerals and water, and synthesizing metabolites. It is a dynamic organ modulated by external cues such as environmental signals, water and nutrients availability, salinity and others. Lateral roots are initiated from the primary root post-embryonically, after which they progress through discrete developmental stages which can be independently controlled, providing a high level of plasticity during root system formation.Within this review, main contributions are presented, from the classical forward genetic screens to the more recent high-throughput approaches, combined with computer model predictions, dissecting how lateral roots and thereby root system architecture is established and developed.

  17. Evaluation of blood cell attachment on Er: YAG laser applied root surface using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekici, Ali; Maden, Ilay; Yildiz, Sercan; San, Tangul; Isik, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is dependent on the uninterrupted adhesion, maturation and absorption of fibrin clots to a periodontally compromised root surface. The modification of the root surface with different agents has been used for better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. It is known that Er:YAG laser application on dentin removes the smear layer succesfully. The aim of this study is to observe blood cell attachment and fibrin network formation following ER:YAG laser irradiation on periodontally compromised root surfaces in comparison to chemical root conditioning techniques in vitro. 40 dentin blocks prepared from freshly extracted periodontally compromised hopeless teeth. Specimens were divided in 5 groups; those applied with PBS, EDTA, Citric acid and Er:YAG. They were further divided into two groups: those which had received these applications, and the control group. The specimens were evaluated with scanning electron microscope and micrographs were taken. Smear layer and blood cell attachment scoring was performed. In the Er:YAG laser applied group, smear layer were totally removed. In the blood applied specimens, better fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment were observed in the Er:YAG group. In the group that had been applied with citric acid, the smear layer was also removed. The smear layer could not be fully removed in the EDTA group. Er:YAG laser application on the root dentin seems to form a suitable surface for fibrin clot formation and blood cell attachment. Further clinical studies to support these results are necessitated.

  18. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (˜1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  19. Signaling Pathways Critical for Tooth Root Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Feng, J Q

    2017-10-01

    Tooth is made of an enamel-covered crown and a cementum-covered root. Studies on crown dentin formation have been a major focus in tooth development for several decades. Interestingly, the population prevalence for genetic short root anomaly (SRA) with no apparent defects in crown is close to 1.3%. Furthermore, people with SRA itself are predisposed to root resorption during orthodontic treatment. The discovery of the unique role of Nfic (nuclear factor I C; a transcriptional factor) in controlling root but not crown dentin formation points to a new concept: tooth crown and root have different control mechanisms. Further genetic mechanism studies have identified more key molecules (including Osterix, β-catenin, and sonic hedgehog) that play a critical role in root formation. Extensive studies have also revealed the critical role of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath in tooth root formation. In addition, Wnt10a has recently been found to be linked to multirooted tooth furcation formation. These exciting findings not only fill the critical gaps in our understanding about tooth root formation but will aid future research regarding the identifying factors controlling tooth root size and the generation of a whole "bio-tooth" for therapeutic purposes. This review starts with human SRA and mainly focuses on recent progress on the roles of NFIC-dependent and NFIC-independent signaling pathways in tooth root formation. Finally, this review includes a list of the various Cre transgenic mouse lines used to achieve tooth root formation-related gene deletion or overexpression, as well as strengths and limitations of each line.

  20. Effect of two contemporary root canal sealers on root canal dentin microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Maram E

    2017-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment depends on proper cleaning, disinfecting and shaping of the root canal space. Pulpless teeth have lower dentin microhardness value compared to that of vital teeth. A material which can cause change in dentin composition may affect the microhardness. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two root canal sealers on dentin microhardness. Forty two single rooted teeth were selected and divided into 3 equal groups; Apexit, iRootSP and control groups (n=14) Each group was then divided into 2 subgroups according to the post evaluation period; 1 week and 2 months (n=7). Root canal procedure was done in the experimental groups and obturation was made using either; Apexit, iRootSP or left unprepared and unobturated in the control group. Roots were sectioned transversely into cervical, middle and apical segments. The three sections of each root were mounted in a plastic chuck with acrylic resin. The coronal dentin surfaces of the root segments werepolished. Microhardness of each section was measured at 500 µm and 1000 µm from the canal lumen. Four way-ANOVA revealed that different tested sealer materials, canal third, measuring distance from the pulp and time as independent variables had statistically non significant effect on mean microhardness values (VHN) at p≤0.001. Among iRootSP groups there was a statistically significant difference between iRoot SP at coronal root portion (87.79±17.83) and iRoot SP at apical root portion (76.26±9.33) groups where (p=0.01). IRoot SP at coronal canal third had higher statistically significant mean microhardness value (87.79±17.83) compared to Apexit at coronal third (73.61±13.47) where (p=0.01). Root canal sealers do not affect dentin microhardness. Key words:Root canal, dentin, sealers, microhardness, bioceramic.

  1. Quality of root canal fillings performed by undergraduate dental students on single-rooted teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Burke, F M

    2006-05-01

    Root canal therapy is an accepted and successful form of tooth conservation. Educational guidelines require dental schools to ensure that their graduates are competent on graduation at performing root canal therapy. The aim of this investigation was to assess the technical quality of root canal fillings placed by undergraduate students in single-rooted teeth. A total of 100 radiographs of root canal fillings placed by undergraduate students in single-rooted teeth were examined under even illumination in a darkened room using x2 magnification. These were graded as 'adequate', where the root canal filling was within 2 mm of the radiographic apex, 'under-filled', where the root canal filling was >2 mm from the radiographic apex, and 'over-filled', where the root canal filling was extruded beyond the radiographic apex. The presence of voids, fractured instruments, and root perforations were also noted. All teeth were obturated with gutta-percha and sealer (Roth Cement), using a cold lateral condensation technique. Of 100 teeth, 10% (n = 10) had voids. Of the remainder, 70% (n = 63) were judged to be 'acceptable', 21% (n = 19) were 'under-filled', and 9% (n = 8) were 'over-filled'. There was no evidence of fractured instruments or root perforations in any root filling examined. The quality of root canal fillings placed in single-rooted teeth by undergraduate dental students at the University Dental School and Hospital, Cork was acceptable (63% of root fillings placed in single rooted teeth were graded as 'adequate'). The probable reasons for this are multi-factorial, but may be linked to the amount of pre-clinical and clinical teaching in endodontics at the University Dental School and Hospital, Cork. It should be remembered that factors other than radiographic quality/evidence must be considered when determining the outcome of root canal therapy.

  2. Cytokinins Act Directly on Lateral Root Founder Cells to Inhibit Root Initiation[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplaze, Laurent; Benkova, Eva; Casimiro, Ilda; Maes, Lies; Vanneste, Steffen; Swarup, Ranjan; Weijers, Dolf; Calvo, Vanessa; Parizot, Boris; Herrera-Rodriguez, Maria Begoña; Offringa, Remko; Graham, Neil; Doumas, Patrick; Friml, Jiri; Bogusz, Didier; Beeckman, Tom; Bennett, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral roots are formed from root pericycle cells adjacent to the xylem poles. Lateral root development is regulated antagonistically by the plant hormones auxin and cytokinin. While a great deal is known about how auxin promotes lateral root development, the mechanism of cytokinin repression is still unclear. Elevating cytokinin levels was observed to disrupt lateral root initiation and the regular pattern of divisions that characterizes lateral root development in Arabidopsis. To identify the stage of lateral root development that is sensitive to cytokinins, we targeted the expression of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens cytokinin biosynthesis enzyme isopentenyltransferase to either xylem-pole pericycle cells or young lateral root primordia using GAL4-GFP enhancer trap lines. Transactivation experiments revealed that xylem-pole pericycle cells are sensitive to cytokinins, whereas young lateral root primordia are not. This effect is physiologically significant because transactivation of the Arabidopsis cytokinin degrading enzyme cytokinin oxidase 1 in lateral root founder cells results in increased lateral root formation. We observed that cytokinins perturb the expression of PIN genes in lateral root founder cells and prevent the formation of an auxin gradient that is required to pattern lateral root primordia. PMID:18065686

  3. Abscisic Acid Regulates Auxin Homeostasis in Rice Root Tips to Promote Root Hair Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA plays an essential role in root hair elongation in plants, but the regulatory mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that exogenous ABA can promote rice root hair elongation. Transgenic rice overexpressing SAPK10 (Stress/ABA-activated protein kinase 10 had longer root hairs; rice plants overexpressing OsABIL2 (OsABI-Like 2 had attenuated ABA signaling and shorter root hairs, suggesting that the effect of ABA on root hair elongation depends on the conserved PYR/PP2C/SnRK2 ABA signaling module. Treatment of the DR5-GUS and OsPIN-GUS lines with ABA and an auxin efflux inhibitor showed that ABA-induced root hair elongation depends on polar auxin transport. To examine the transcriptional response to ABA, we divided rice root tips into three regions: short root hair, long root hair and root tip zones; and conducted RNA-seq analysis with or without ABA treatment. Examination of genes involved in auxin transport, biosynthesis and metabolism indicated that ABA promotes auxin biosynthesis and polar auxin transport in the root tip, which may lead to auxin accumulation in the long root hair zone. Our findings shed light on how ABA regulates root hair elongation through crosstalk with auxin biosynthesis and transport to orchestrate plant development.

  4. Different pathways are involved in phosphate and iron stress-induced alterations of root epidermal cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W; Schikora, A

    2001-04-01

    Low bioavailability of phosphorus (P) and iron (Fe) induces morphogenetic changes in roots that lead to a higher surface-to-volume ratio. In Arabidopsis, an enlargement in the absorptive surface area is achieved by an increase in the length and frequency of hairs in roots of Fe- and P-deficient plants. The extra root hairs are often located in positions that are occupied with non-hair cells under normal conditions, i.e. over a tangential wall of underlying cortical cells. An involvement of auxin and ethylene in root epidermis cell development of Fe- and P-deficient plants was inferred from phenotypical analysis of hormone-related Arabidopsis mutants and from the application of substances that interfere with either synthesis, transport, or perception of the hormones. Application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid or the auxin analog 2,4-D caused a marked increase in root hair density in plants of all growth types and confers a phenotype characteristic of ethylene-overproducing mutants. Hormone insensitivity and application of hormone antagonists inhibited the initiation of extranumerary root hairs induced by Fe deficiency, but did not counteract the formation of extra hairs in response to P deprivation. A model is presented summarizing putative pathways for alterations in root epidermal cell patterning induced by environmental stress.

  5. [Construction of root library by SSH and preliminary analysis of genes responsible for phosphorus deficiency in maize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Q; Gao, S B; Zhang, Z M; Lin, H J; Pan, G T; Yang, K C; Rong, T Z

    2010-12-01

    An elite maize inbred line with high tolerance to low phosphorus, 178, was studied for constructing root library and analyzing some genes closely related to phosphorus (P) deficiency using SSH and Semi-quantitative RT-PCR. As a result, 3648 preliminary clones were obtained for root library under stress of P deficiency. By DNA sequencing of 34 random clones, we obtained 23 unique EST sequences which are involved in functions of root cell structure, tolerance and defense, protein modification and composition, transcription regulation, metabolism, and other unknown aspects. Five representative genes were further analyzed for their expression models. The results suggested that the molecular mechanism to adapt P deficiency in maize, performed by multi-genes with different contributions, is similar to rice, Arabidopsis and soybean. The expression order of 5 low P tolerant genes in maize root was PAP, GCS, TOM, PDI and AIP. And it was considered preliminarily that physiological and biochemical changes were prior to morphologic changes in maize root and the essential tolerance to low P may be determined by extending absorption of P to wide soil range through adaption of root architecture and root secretions, which is the greatest difference between tolerant and sensitive maize varieties under low P stress.

  6. Molecular and Morpho-Agronomical Characterization of Root Architecture at Seedling and Reproductive Stages for Drought Tolerance in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Tiwari, Sushma; Vinod; Naik, Bhojaraja K; Chand, Suresh; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Mallick, Niharika; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Nagendra Kumar; Tomar, S M S

    2016-01-01

    Water availability is a major limiting factor for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in rain-fed agricultural systems worldwide. Root architecture is important for water and nutrition acquisition for all crops, including wheat. A set of 158 diverse wheat genotypes of Australian (72) and Indian (86) origin were studied for morpho-agronomical traits in field under irrigated and drought stress conditions during 2010-11 and 2011-12.Out of these 31 Indian wheat genotypes comprising 28 hexaploid (Triticum aestivum L.) and 3 tetraploid (T. durum) were characterized for root traits at reproductive stage in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipes. Roots of drought tolerant genotypes grew upto137cm (C306) as compared to sensitive one of 63cm with a mean value of 94.8cm. Root architecture traits of four drought tolerant (C306, HW2004, HD2888 and NI5439) and drought sensitive (HD2877, HD2012, HD2851 and MACS2496) genotypes were also observed at 6 and 9 days old seedling stage. The genotypes did not show any significant variation for root traits except for longer coleoptiles and shoot and higher absorptive surface area in drought tolerant genotypes. The visible evaluation of root images using WinRhizo Tron root scanner of drought tolerant genotype HW2004 indicated compact root system with longer depth while drought sensitive genotype HD2877 exhibited higher horizontal root spread and less depth at reproductive stage. Thirty SSR markers were used to study genetic variation which ranged from 0.12 to 0.77 with an average value of 0.57. The genotypes were categorized into three subgroups as highly tolerant, sensitive, moderately sensitive and tolerant as intermediate group based on UPGMA cluster, STRUCTURE and principal coordinate analyses. The genotypic clustering was positively correlated to grouping based on root and morpho-agronomical traits. The genetic variability identified in current study demonstrated these traits can be used to improve drought tolerance and association

  7. Molecular and Morpho-Agronomical Characterization of Root Architecture at Seedling and Reproductive Stages for Drought Tolerance in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod; Naik, Bhojaraja K.; Chand, Suresh; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Mallick, Niharika; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Nagendra Kumar; Tomar, S. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Water availability is a major limiting factor for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in rain-fed agricultural systems worldwide. Root architecture is important for water and nutrition acquisition for all crops, including wheat. A set of 158 diverse wheat genotypes of Australian (72) and Indian (86) origin were studied for morpho-agronomical traits in field under irrigated and drought stress conditions during 2010–11 and 2011-12.Out of these 31 Indian wheat genotypes comprising 28 hexaploid (Triticum aestivum L.) and 3 tetraploid (T. durum) were characterized for root traits at reproductive stage in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipes. Roots of drought tolerant genotypes grew upto137cm (C306) as compared to sensitive one of 63cm with a mean value of 94.8cm. Root architecture traits of four drought tolerant (C306, HW2004, HD2888 and NI5439) and drought sensitive (HD2877, HD2012, HD2851 and MACS2496) genotypes were also observed at 6 and 9 days old seedling stage. The genotypes did not show any significant variation for root traits except for longer coleoptiles and shoot and higher absorptive surface area in drought tolerant genotypes. The visible evaluation of root images using WinRhizo Tron root scanner of drought tolerant genotype HW2004 indicated compact root system with longer depth while drought sensitive genotype HD2877 exhibited higher horizontal root spread and less depth at reproductive stage. Thirty SSR markers were used to study genetic variation which ranged from 0.12 to 0.77 with an average value of 0.57. The genotypes were categorized into three subgroups as highly tolerant, sensitive, moderately sensitive and tolerant as intermediate group based on UPGMA cluster, STRUCTURE and principal coordinate analyses. The genotypic clustering was positively correlated to grouping based on root and morpho-agronomical traits. The genetic variability identified in current study demonstrated these traits can be used to improve drought tolerance and association

  8. Designing new interfaces for ROOT data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Kalle Elmer

    2016-01-01

    ROOT is a C++ framework for data analysis provided with a Python interface (PyRoot). ROOT is used in every Large Hadron Collider experiment. This project presents a way of reading ROOT TTree by using a new class called DataFrame, which allows the usage of cache and functional chains. Reading TTrees in Python has been quite slow compared to the C++ way of doing it and for this reason we also bring the possibility to read them with just-in-time (JIT) compiled C++ code, using another new Python class called TreeReader.

  9. Nfic regulates tooth root patterning and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Yang, Siqin; Park, Joo-Cheol; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2015-09-01

    Molecular interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme are important for root formation. Nuclear factor I-C (Nfic) has been identified as a key regulator of root formation. However, the mechanisms of root formation and their interactions between Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and mesenchyme remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Nfic in root patterning and growth during molar root development. The molars of Nfic knockout mice exhibited an enlarged pulp chamber and apical displacement of the pulpal floor, characteristic features of taurodontism, due to delayed furcation formation. In developing molar roots of mutant mice at P14, BrdU positive cells decreased in the apical mesenchyme of the elongation region whereas those cells increased in the dental papilla of the furcation region. Whereas cytokeratin 14 and laminin were localized in HERS cells of mutant molars, Smoothened (Smo) and Gli1 were downregulated in preodontoblasts. In contrast, cytokeratin 14 and Smo were localized in the cells of the furcation region of mutant molars. These results indicate that Nfic regulates cell proliferation in the dental mesenchyme and affects the fate of HERS cells in a site-specific manner. From the results, it is suggested that Nfic is required for root patterning and growth during root morphogenesis.

  10. Unit roots, nonlinearities and structural breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Niels; Kruse, Robinson; Teräsvirta, Timo

    a persistent effect with resulting policy implications. From a statistical perspective on the other hand, the presence of unit roots has dramatic implications for econometric model building, estimation, and inference in order to avoid the so-called spurious regression problem. The present paper provides...... a selective review of contributions to the field of unit root testing over the past three decades. We discuss the nature of stochastic and deterministic trend processes, including break processes, that are likely to affect unit root inference. A range of the most popular unit root tests are presented...

  11. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  12. Mineral nutrition and adventitious rooting in microcuttings of Eucalyptus globulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwambach, Joséli; Fadanelli, Cristina; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2005-04-01

    We characterized the adventitious rooting response of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. to various concentrations of calcium, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, manganese, zinc, boron and copper. The parameters analyzed were percent rooting, root number, root length and mean rooting time. Root number and root length were significantly affected by mineral nutrition, whereas mean rooting time and rooting percentage seemed to be closely related to auxin availability. Root number was affected by calcium, nitrogen source and zinc, whereas root length was influenced by concentrations of phosphorus, iron and manganese, and by nitrogen source. Based on these results, we evaluated various combinations of several concentrations of these minerals in each rooting phase. Cuttings that were rooted in an optimized mineral nutrient medium and acclimatized to ex-vitro conditions for two months showed significantly higher survival after transplanting and drought stress than cuttings rooted in basal medium and treated in the same way.

  13. Identifying the perfect absorption of metamaterial absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, G.; Schalch, J.; Zhao, X.; Zhang, J.; Averitt, R. D.; Zhang, X.

    2018-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the conditions that result in unity absorption in metamaterial absorbers to guide the design and optimization of this important class of functional electromagnetic composites. Multilayer absorbers consisting of a metamaterial layer, dielectric spacer, and ground plane are specifically considered. Using interference theory, the dielectric spacer thickness and resonant frequency for unity absorption can be numerically determined from the functional dependence of the relative phase shift of the total reflection. Further, using transmission line theory in combination with interference theory we obtain analytical expressions for the unity absorption resonance frequency and corresponding spacer layer thickness in terms of the bare resonant frequency of the metamaterial layer and metallic and dielectric losses within the absorber structure. These simple expressions reveal a redshift of the unity absorption frequency with increasing loss that, in turn, necessitates an increase in the thickness of the dielectric spacer. The results of our analysis are experimentally confirmed by performing reflection-based terahertz time-domain spectroscopy on fabricated absorber structures covering a range of dielectric spacer thicknesses with careful control of the loss accomplished through water absorption in a semiporous polyimide dielectric spacer. Our findings can be widely applied to guide the design and optimization of the metamaterial absorbers and sensors.

  14. Tissue ultrasound absorption measurement with MRI calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Hunt, J W; Foster, F S; Plewes, D B

    1999-01-01

    The renewed interest in the use of high intensity focused ultrasound (US) for minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided thermal therapy has stimulated a review of the interaction mechanisms of US with tissue. Although the study of tissue US properties has been conducted extensively, agreements on the measured values of tissue US absorption are poor. We propose a noninvasive approach to measure tissue US absorption based on a form of MRI calorimetry. US absorption is measured in a small tissue sample through a knowledge of the US intensity distribution incident on the tissue and an MRI measurement of total absorbed energy arising from US exposure. US absorption measurements were conducted at room temperature for ex-vivo bovine liver tissue at 1 MHz, which led to a measured US absorption coefficient of 0.058 Np/cm or 0.504 dB/cm. Because this approach is noninvasive, the experimental complications exhibited in earlier studies are not present. Furthermore, this approach can be applied over a range of frequencies, tissues, and temperatures, which will aid in understanding of biothermal effects of high intensity US to improve thermal therapy.

  15. Dynamics of water absorption through superabsorbent polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sooyoung; Kim, Wonjung

    2017-11-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) consist of hydrophilic cross-linked polymer networks that can absorb and retain a great amount of water relative to their own mass, so that they are widely used for disposable diapers and holding soil moisture in agriculture. SAPs are typically available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles, and the water absorption is driven by capillary flows between particles as well as diffusion that entail swelling. Although the control of water absorption of SAPs is important in engineering applications, but the dynamics of water absorption in SAP particles has not been fully understood. We examine the dynamics of the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate, one of the most common SAP. We experimentally measured the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate particles in one-dimensional confined channel. The water flows through the particles were analyzed by capillarity dominant at the early stage and by diffusion involving volume expansion critical at a later stage. The results provide a quantitative basis of the hydrodynamic analysis of the water flow through SAP particles from a macroscopic point of view, facilitating the prediction of water uptake of SAPs in hygienic and agricultural applications. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No.2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  16. ROOT HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC CAPACITY OF EUCALYPT CLONAL CUTTINGS WITH ROOT MALFORMATION INDUCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Afonso Mazzei Moura de Assis Figueiredo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509814566The gain reduction of wood biomass in trees has been assigned to root deformations even in the nursery phase. The objective of this work was the evaluation of the root system hydraulic conductivity, gas exchanges and photochemical efficiency of eucalypt clonal cuttings with and without root deformation inductions. The treatments were: 1 operational cuttings without root malformation inductions (grown according to the used methodology of Fibria Cellulose S.A.; 2 root deformation inductions. These inductions did not promote decrease in the root volume. However, the deformations brought reduction of the root system hydraulic conductivity. Lower photosynthetic rates were also observed along the day in the cuttings in the root deformed cuttings. This decreasing rate is connected to stomatal and non stomatal factors.

  17. Water osmotic absorption in Coleus blumei plants under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ozinaldo Alves de Sena

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Three month old Coleus blumei plants in pots were treated with different NaCl concentrations: 0.00, 0.25, 0.50 and 1.00%. To determine the water osmotic absorption, the plants had their stems cut at 10 cm from the soil surface. The remaining stems were linked to glass tubes by flexible rubber tubes. Readings of the water column level in the glass tubes were performed at each 30 minutes, corresponding to the water osmotic absorption, with a total of eleven readings. Other Coleus blumei, with the same age, received the NaCl concentrations, and were evaluated under field conditions in terms of transpiration and stomatal resistance. A randomized complete block analysis was used with five replications. An increase of osmotic absorption was verified for all treatments up to three hours after application. Then a proportional reversion of osmotic absorption to the increases on saline concentration was observed, with a higher effect in the treatment with NaCl 1.00%, showing the increase of water loss by the roots. During this period time, the treatment showed a normal linear growth of the osmotic absorption. Transpiration was reduced proportionally to the increase of salinity concentration.Mudas envasadas de Coleus blumei, com três meses de idade, foram submetidas a diferentes concentrações de cloreto de sódio (NaCl: 0,00; 0,25; 0,50 e 1,00%. Visando determinar a absorção osmótica, as mudas tiveram seus caules cortados a 10 cm acima do solo. Os caules remanescentes foram interligados a tubos de vidro por tubos flexíveis de borracha. Foram feitas leituras (cm a cada 30 minutos dos níveis das colunas de água nos capilares, correspondentes às absorções osmóticas de água, sendo ao todo realizadas onze leituras. Em outro momento, mudas de C. blumei, com a mesma idade das anteriores, receberam as mesmas concentrações de NaCl descritas anteriormente, e, ao ar livre, foram avaliadas em termos de transpiração e resistência estomática, usando

  18. ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-05-02

    Root Cause Analysis (RCA) identifies the cause of an adverse condition that, if corrected, will preclude recurrence or greatly reduce the probability of recurrence of the same or similar adverse conditions and thereby protect the health and safety of the public, the workers, and the environment. This procedure sets forth the requirements for management determination and the selection of RCA methods and implementation of RCAs that are a result of significant findings from Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) violations, occurrences/events, Significant Adverse Conditions, and external oversight Corrective Action Requests (CARs) generated by the Office of Enforcement (PAAA headquarters), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and other oversight entities against Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Performance of an RCA may result in the identification of issues that should be reported in accordance with the Issues Management Program Manual.

  19. Absorption and metabolism of the absorption enhancer didecanoylphosphatidylcholine in rabbit nasal epithelium in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermehren, C.; Johansen, P.B.; Hansen, Harald S.

    1997-01-01

    The absorption enhancer, didecanoylphosphatidylcholine (DDPC), improves the nasal absorption of human growth hormone in rabbits. We elucidated the uptake and the metabolism of 1,2-di[1-C]decanoyl-L-3-phosphatidylcholine and 1,2-didecanoyl-L-3-phosphatidyl[N-methyl-H]choline in rabbit nasal mucosa...

  20. Piriformospora indica Root Colonization Triggers Local and Systemic Root Responses and Inhibits Secondary Colonization of Distal Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Mueller, Martin J.; Waller, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Piriformosporaindica is a basidiomycete fungus colonizing roots of a wide range of higher plants, including crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies have shown that P. indica improves growth, and enhances systemic pathogen resistance in leaves of host plants. To investigate systemic effects within the root system, we established a hydroponic split-root cultivation system for Arabidopsis. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that initial P. indica colonization triggers a local, transient response of several defense-related transcripts, of which some were also induced in shoots and in distal, non-colonized roots of the same plant. Systemic effects on distal roots included the inhibition of secondary P. indica colonization. Faster and stronger induction of defense-related transcripts during secondary inoculation revealed that a P. indica pretreatment triggers root-wide priming of defense responses, which could cause the observed reduction of secondary colonization levels. Secondary P. indica colonization also induced defense responses in distant, already colonized parts of the root. Endophytic fungi therefore trigger a spatially specific response in directly colonized and in systemic root tissues of host plants. PMID:23922705

  1. Piriformospora indica root colonization triggers local and systemic root responses and inhibits secondary colonization of distal roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pedrotti

    Full Text Available Piriformosporaindica is a basidiomycete fungus colonizing roots of a wide range of higher plants, including crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies have shown that P. indica improves growth, and enhances systemic pathogen resistance in leaves of host plants. To investigate systemic effects within the root system, we established a hydroponic split-root cultivation system for Arabidopsis. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that initial P. indica colonization triggers a local, transient response of several defense-related transcripts, of which some were also induced in shoots and in distal, non-colonized roots of the same plant. Systemic effects on distal roots included the inhibition of secondary P. indica colonization. Faster and stronger induction of defense-related transcripts during secondary inoculation revealed that a P. indica pretreatment triggers root-wide priming of defense responses, which could cause the observed reduction of secondary colonization levels. Secondary P. indica colonization also induced defense responses in distant, already colonized parts of the root. Endophytic fungi therefore trigger a spatially specific response in directly colonized and in systemic root tissues of host plants.

  2. Piriformospora indica root colonization triggers local and systemic root responses and inhibits secondary colonization of distal roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Mueller, Martin J; Waller, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Piriformosporaindica is a basidiomycete fungus colonizing roots of a wide range of higher plants, including crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies have shown that P. indica improves growth, and enhances systemic pathogen resistance in leaves of host plants. To investigate systemic effects within the root system, we established a hydroponic split-root cultivation system for Arabidopsis. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that initial P. indica colonization triggers a local, transient response of several defense-related transcripts, of which some were also induced in shoots and in distal, non-colonized roots of the same plant. Systemic effects on distal roots included the inhibition of secondary P. indica colonization. Faster and stronger induction of defense-related transcripts during secondary inoculation revealed that a P. indica pretreatment triggers root-wide priming of defense responses, which could cause the observed reduction of secondary colonization levels. Secondary P. indica colonization also induced defense responses in distant, already colonized parts of the root. Endophytic fungi therefore trigger a spatially specific response in directly colonized and in systemic root tissues of host plants.

  3. The absorption and translocation of imazaquin in green manures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Garcia Florido

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Green manure species that are tolerant to the herbicide imazaquin can be used in crop rotation schemes that aim to reduce herbicide carryover to sensitive plants such as sunflower or corn. Three different doses of imazaquin (0, 0.15 and 0.28 kgha-1 were applied during the pre-emergence growth stage to Dolichos lablab, Cajanus cajan, Canavalia ensiformis, Crotalaria juncea, C. breviflora, C. spectabilis, Mucuna deeringiana, M. cinerea, M. aterrima, Lupinus albus, Helianthus annuus, Pennisetum glaucum, Avena strigosa and Raphanus sativus, and the results were evaluated in a greenhouse. C. ensiformis and M. cinerea were selected from these species for being the most tolerant, and they were then evaluated for absorption and translocation of 14C-imazaquin in two different growth stages: the cotyledonary stage and the emergence of the first pair of true leaves. M. cinerea individuals showed the best potential for translocating imazaquin to the shoot when compared to C. ensiformes, which accumulated the herbicide mostly in its roots. These plants had a higher ability to accumulate herbicide during their most advanced stage of development, which demonstrates their potential for use in areas that have residual imazaquin.

  4. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    OpenAIRE

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta [UNESP; Manuela Favarin SANTINI; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods: eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Man...

  5. Semiconductor laser irradiation improves root canal sealing during routine root canal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dandan; Hu, Xingxue; Wang, Dashan; Cui, Ting; Yao, RuYong; Sun, Huibin

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of semiconductor laser irradiation on root canal sealing after routine root canal therapy (RCT). Methods Sixty freshly extracted single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). The anatomic crowns were sectioned at the cementoenamel junction and the remaining roots were prepared endodontically with conventional RCT methods. Groups A and B were irradiated with semiconductor laser at 1W for 20 seconds; Groups C and D were ultrasonically...

  6. Selective gas absorption by ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Kegnæs, Søren; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Reversible absorption performance for the flue gas components CO 2, NO and SO2 has been tested for several different ionic liquids (ILs) at different temperatures and flue gas compositions. Furthermore, different porous, high surface area carriers have been applied as supports for the ionic liquids...... to obtain Supported Ionic Liquid-Phase (SILP) absorber materials. The use of solid SILP absorbers with selected ILs were found to significantly improve the absorption capacity and sorption dynamics at low flue gas concentration, thus making the applicability of ILs viable in technical, continuous flow...... processes for flue gas cleaning. The results show that CO 2, NO and SO2 can be reversible and selective absorbed using different ILs and that Supported Ionic Liquid-Phase (SILP) absorbers are promising materials for industrial flue gas cleaning. Absorption/desorption dynamics can be tuned by temperatures...

  7. Nanofibrous membrane-based absorption refrigeration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isfahani, RN; Sampath, K; Moghaddam, S

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a study on the efficacy of highly porous nanofibrous membranes for application in membrane-based absorbers and desorbers. Permeability studies showed that membranes with a pore size greater than about one micron have a sufficient permeability for application in the absorber heat exchanger. Membranes with smaller pores were found to be adequate for the desorber heat exchanger. The membranes were implemented in experimental membrane-based absorber and desorber modules and successfully tested. Parametric studies were conducted on both absorber and desorber processes. Studies on the absorption process were focused on the effects of water vapor pressure, cooling water temperature, and the solution velocity on the absorption rate. Desorption studies were conducted on the effects of wall temperature, vapor and solution pressures, and the solution velocity on the desorption rate. Significantly higher absorption and desorption rates than in the falling film absorbers and desorbers were achieved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. EMPLOYMENT ABSORPTION IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY: YOGYAKARTA CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Indra Putri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment has been a main problem in economic development, especially in developing countries. Unemployment stems from the inability of the economy to absorb the growing labor force. This paper investigates factors influencing absorbtion of labor in Yogyakarta manufacturing industries. Variables hypothesized to affect the absorbtion are wage, labor productivity, non-wage spending, and output of production. It collects data from Indonesia Centre Bureau of Statistics, and uses panel data regression, namely common effect approach, to estimate the model. Employing Eviews software package, it finds that wage, labor productivity, and output production significantly influence labor absorption. However, non-wage spending does not significantly influence the absorption.Keywords: Labor absorption, wage, labor productivity, non-wage spendingJEL classification numbers: J01, J23, J24

  9. Metamaterial with electromagnetic transparency under multiband absorptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Qi, Limei

    2017-02-01

    We propose a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) metamaterial that has an electromagnetic (EM) transparency spectrum under multiband absorptions in the C and the X bands. The ground continuous metal film used in the conventional metamaterial absorber (MA) is replaced by a structured ground plane (SGP) in our design. The band-pass properties of the front patterned metal film and the SGP determine the EM transparency spectrum, while the magnetic and the electric resonances in the MDM structure contribute to the multiband absorptions. Due to the symmetric structure of the unit cell, the absorption bands and the EM transparency spectrum of the metamaterial have the property of polarization independency. Despite the normal incidence, the metamaterial can also be used for non-normal incidence.

  10. Absorption of Soluble Gases by Atmospheric Nanoaerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, Tov; Krasovitov, Boris; Lushnikov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    We investigate mass transfer during absorption of atmospheric trace soluble gases by a single droplet whose size is comparable to the molecular mean free path in air at normal conditions. It is assumed that the trace reactant diffuses to the droplet surface and then reacts with the substances inside the droplet according to the first order rate law. Our analysis applies a flux-matching theory of transport processes in gases and assumes constant thermophysical properties of the gases and liquids. We derive an integral equation of Volterra type for the transient molecular flux density to a liquid droplet and solve it numerically. Numerical calculations are performed for absorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2), dinitrogen trioxide (N2O3) and chlorine (Cl2) by liquid nanoaerosols accompanied by chemical dissociation reaction. It is shown that during gas absorption by nanoaerosols the kinetic effects play significant role, and neglecting kinetic effects leads to significant overestimation of the soluble gas flux into a...

  11. Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Davids, Paul

    2014-07-15

    Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods are disclosed. A plasmon absorption modulator system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and a metal layer formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers. A method for modulating plasmonic current includes enabling propagation of the plasmonic current along a metal layer, and applying a voltage across the stack of quantum well layers to cause absorption of a portion of energy of the plasmonic current by the stack of quantum well layers. A metamaterial switching system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and at least one metamaterial structure formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers.

  12. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Ulrich eLuder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on

  13. Malformations of the tooth root in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luder, Hans U

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation.

  14. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  15. Fine root production at drained peatland sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finer, L. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Joensuu Research Station; Laine, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1996-12-31

    The preliminary results of the Finnish project `Carbon balance of peatlands and climate change` show that fine roots play an important role in carbon cycling on peat soils. After drainage the roots of mire species are gradually replaced by the roots of trees and other forest species. Pine fine root biomass reaches a maximum level by the time of crown closure, some 20 years after drainage on pine mire. The aim of this study is to compare the results of the sequential coring method and the ingrowth bag method used for estimating fine root production on three drained peatland sites of different fertility. The results are preliminary and continuation to the work done in the study Pine root production on drained peatlands, which is part of the Finnish project `Carbon cycling on peatlands and climate change`. In this study the fine root biomass was greater on the poor site than on the rich sites. Pine fine root production increased with the decrease in fertility. Root turnover and the production of field layer species were greater on the rich sites than on the poor site. The results suggested that the in growth bag method measured more root activity than the magnitude of production. More than two growing seasons would have been needed to balance the root dynamics in the in growth bags with the surrounding soil. That time would probably have been longer on the poor site than on the rich ones and longer for pine and field layer consisting of dwarf shrubs than for field layer consisting of sedge like species and birch. (11 refs.)

  16. Investigation of two-photon absorption induced excited state absorption in a fluorenyl-based chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changwei; Yang, Kun; Feng, Yan; Su, Xinyan; Yang, Junyi; Jin, Xiao; Shui, Min; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru; Song, Yinglin; Xu, Hongyao

    2009-12-03

    Two-photon absorption induced excited state absorption in the solution of a new fluorenyl-based chromophore is investigated by a time-resolved pump-probe technique using femtosecond pulses. With the help of an additional femtosecond open-aperture Z-scan technique, numerical simulations based on a three-energy level model are used to interpret the experimental results, and we determine the nonlinear optical parameters of this new chromophore uniquely. Large two-photon absorption cross section and excited state absorption cross section for singlet excited state are obtained, indicating a good candidate for optical limiting devices. Moreover, the influence of two-beam coupling induced energy transfer in neat N,N'-dimethylformamide solvent is also considered, although this effect is strongly restrained by the instantaneous two-photon absorption.

  17. Review on absorption technology with emphasis on small capacity absorption machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus Jerko M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the past achievements in the field of absorption systems, their potential and possible directions for future development. Various types of absorption systems and research on working fluids are discussed in detail. Among various applications, solar cooling and combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP are identified as two most promising applications for further development of absorption machines. Under the same framework, special attention is given to the small capacity absorption machines and their current status at the market. Although this technology looks promising, it is still in development and many issues are open. With respect to that fact, this paper covers all the relevant aspects for further development of small capacity absorption machines.

  18. Equivalent sound absorption area in a rectangular reverberant room (Sabine's sound absorption factor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, M.

    1986-07-01

    The equivalent sound absorption area in a rectangular reverberant room can be derived from the initial first and second derivatives (initial decay rate of the time derivative) of the ensemble and space-averaged sound energy decay curve. At low frequency bands, how to estimate the equivalent sound absorption area from the reverberation time has not been theoretically interpreted. This is because the decay curve is not linear in logarithmic scales. The formula for the absorption area derived here, however, does not contain the reverberation time. It shows the theoretical relation between the absorption area and the initial slopes of the decay curve. The equivalent absorption area and averaged damping constants can be estimated theoretically according to the relation derived here for low frequency bands.

  19. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  20. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperatures boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorptions systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system`s components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H{sub 2}O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H{sub 2}O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the User`s Manual.

  1. Non-canonical WOX11-mediated root branching contributes to plasticity in Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lihong; Hu, Xiaomei; Du, Yujuan; Zhang, Guifang; Huang, Hai; Scheres, Ben; Xu, Lin

    2017-09-01

    Lateral roots (LRs), which originate from the growing root, and adventitious roots (ARs), which are formed from non-root organs, are the main contributors to the post-embryonic root system in Arabidopsis However, our knowledge of how formation of the root system is altered in response to diverse inductive cues is limited. Here, we show that WOX11 contributes to root system plasticity. When seedlings are grown vertically on medium, WOX11 is not expressed in LR founder cells. During AR initiation, WOX11 is expressed in AR founder cells and activates LBD16LBD16 also functions in LR formation and is activated in that context by ARF7/19 and not by WOX11 This indicates that divergent initial processes that lead to ARs and LRs may converge on a similar mechanism for primordium development. Furthermore, we demonstrated that when plants are grown in soil or upon wounding on medium, the primary root is able to produce both WOX11-mediated and non-WOX11-mediated roots. The discovery of WOX11-mediated root-derived roots reveals a previously uncharacterized pathway that confers plasticity during the generation of root system architecture in response to different inductive cues. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Root diversity in alpine plants: root length, tensile strength and plant age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, M.; Stroude, R.; Körner, C.; Buttler, A.; Rixen, C.

    2009-04-01

    A high diversity of plant species and functional groups is hypothesised to increase the diversity of root types and their subsequent effects for soil stability. However, even basic data on root characteristics of alpine plants are very scarce. Therefore, we determined important root characteristics of 13 plant species from different functional groups, i.e. grasses, herbs and shrubs. We excavated the whole root systems of 62 plants from a machine-graded ski slope at 2625 m a.s.l. and analysed the rooting depth, the horizontal root extension, root length and diameter. Single roots of plant species were tested for tensile strength. The age of herbs and shrubs was determined by growth-ring analysis. Root characteristics varied considerably between both plant species and functional groups. The rooting depth of different species ranged from 7.2 ± 0.97 cm to 20.5 ± 2.33 cm, but was significantly larger in the herb Geum reptans (70.8 ± 10.75 cm). The woody species Salix breviserrata reached the highest horizontal root extensions (96.8 ± 25.5 cm). Most plants had their longest roots in fine diameter classes (0.5

  3. Root canal treatment of mandibular second premolar with four root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bander Al-Abdulwahhab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in the morphology of the root canal system of mandibular premolars has been demonstrated. This diverse morphology challenges for the clinician to clean, shape, and fill the entire root canal system. A case report of a mandibular second premolar with four root canals separated at the apical third and underwent endodontic treatment is presented.

  4. Low Light Availability Alters Root Exudation and Reduces Putative Beneficial Microorganisms in Seagrass Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda C. Martin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass roots host a diverse microbiome that is critical for plant growth and health. Composition of microbial communities can be regulated in part by root exudates, but the specifics of these interactions in seagrass rhizospheres are still largely unknown. As light availability controls primary productivity, reduced light may impact root exudation and consequently the composition of the root microbiome. Hence, we analyzed the influence of light availability on root exudation and community structure of the root microbiome of three co-occurring seagrass species, Halophila ovalis, Halodule uninervis and Cymodocea serrulata. Plants were grown under four light treatments in mesocosms for 2 weeks; control (100% surface irradiance (SI, medium (40% SI, low (20% SI and fluctuating light (10 days 20% and 4 days 100%. 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing revealed that microbial diversity, composition and predicted function were strongly influenced by the presence of seagrass roots, such that root microbiomes were unique to each seagrass species. Reduced light availability altered seagrass root exudation, as characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy, and altered the composition of seagrass root microbiomes with a reduction in abundance of potentially beneficial microorganisms. Overall, this study highlights the potential for above-ground light reduction to invoke a cascade of changes from alterations in root exudation to a reduction in putative beneficial microorganisms and, ultimately, confirms the importance of the seagrass root environment – a critical, but often overlooked space.

  5. Assessment of the nonoperated root after apical surgery of the other root in mandibular molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Riccardo D; von Arx, Thomas; Gfeller, David

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: If a surgical approach is chosen to treat a multirooted tooth affected by persistent periapical pathosis, usually only the affected roots are operated on. The present study assessed the periapical status of the nonoperated root 5 years after apical surgery of the other root in mandi...

  6. Root form and clinical radiographic estimation of the number of root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The root form of 100 extracted maxillary premolars, the pre-operative radiographic estimation and clinical radiographic determination of the number of root canals in 340 maxillary premolars of Nigerian patients attending the dental hospital for endodontic treatment were studied. The maxillary second premolars had one root ...

  7. Changes of Root Length and Root-to-Crown Ratio after Apical Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Jensen, Simon S; Bornstein, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with post-treatment periodontitis. Although apical surgery involves root-end resection, no morphometric data are yet available about root-end resection and its impact on the root-to-crown ratio (RCR). The present study assess...

  8. Rock physics investigation of seismic wave absorption in reservoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The difference between modulus estimated at high and low frequencies is translated to the coefficient of absorption (or inverse quality factor). Absorption estimated at ... interpret for fluid units. Information about seismic absorption can also be used, by means of absorption compensation, to enhance seismic data resolution.

  9. X-ray computed tomography uncovers root-root interactions: quantifying spatial relationships between interacting root systems in three dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Martin Paya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Research in the field of plant biology has recently demonstrated that inter- and intra-specific interactions belowground can dramatically alter root growth. Our aim was to answer questions related to the effect of inter- vs. intra-specific interactions on the growth and utilization of undisturbed space by fine roots within three dimensions (3D using micro X-ray computed tomography. To achieve this, Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen and Picea mariana (black spruce seedlings were planted into containers as either solitary individuals, or inter-/intra-specific pairs, allowed to grow for two months, and 3D metrics developed in order to quantify their use of belowground space. In both aspen and spruce, inter-specific root interactions produced a shift in the vertical distribution of the root system volume, and deepened the average position of root tips when compared to intra-specifically growing seedlings. Inter-specific interactions also increased the minimum distance between root tips belonging to the same root system. There was no effect of belowground interactions on the radial distribution of roots, or the directionality of lateral root growth for either species. In conclusion, we found that significant differences were observed more often when comparing controls (solitary individuals and paired seedlings (inter- or intra-specific, than when comparing inter- and intra-specifically growing seedlings. This would indicate that competition between neighboring seedlings was more responsible for shifting fine root growth in both species than was neighbor identity. However, significant inter- vs. intra-specific differences were observed, which further emphasizes the importance of biological interactions in competition studies.

  10. ABRASIVE ABSORPTION STUDY IN AWJ CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan BARABAŞ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the forming process of the hydro abrasive jet and the factors that determine its behaviour after leaving the nozzle until the moment of impact with the piece, in order to obtain an optimized configuration of the processing. The objectives are those of obtaining optimal surfaces in terms of quality, increased productivity and reduced costs. The paper specifies the model of the jet forming through air and abrasive absorption. The obtained results have confirmed the importance of exactly configuring the abrasive quantity in the jet through modifying the size of the abrasive grains and the attraction force required for their absorption.

  11. Absorptive routines and international patent performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando E. García-Muiña

    2017-04-01

    We enrich the treatment of the absorptive capacity phases including the moderating effects between routines associated to the traditional potential-realized absorptive capacities. Taking into account external knowledge search strategies, the deeper external relationships, the better transference and appropriation of specific external knowledge. Nevertheless, when the moderating role of assimilation is included, cooperation agreements appear as the most efficient source of external knowledge. Finally, we show that technological tools let firms store and structure the information making easier its use for international patenting. This positive effect is reinforced in the presence of exploitation routines, since technological knowledge will better fit to the industry's key factors of success.

  12. Spectral line absorption measurement using optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanaru, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A simple technique using a conventional gas laser with spherical mirrors having identical radii of curvature in the nonoscillating regime for spectral line absorption measurements is described and applications for laser work are suggested. The theory of the measurement carried out in the geometrical optical approach for Doppler-broadened lines was checked experimentally and conditions are specified for which measurement inaccuracies of the order of 1% for the peak value of the line absorption coefficient can be obtained. Since the device provides a fine adjustment of the cavity losses, formation of the diffraction modes could be observed in the preoscillating regime of the optical cavity.

  13. Unveiling the Microfoundations of Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    2017-01-01

    explores the multilevel antecedents of absorptive capacity using survey data gathered from 342 informants at different levels of analysis in 106 medical technology firms. Multilevel structural equation modeling analyses indicate that formal and informal integration mechanisms are positively related......Although the concept of absorptive capacity has gained wide acceptance in the literature, our understanding of the origins of a firm’s ability to absorb and leverage new knowledge is limited. Drawing on Coleman’s (1990) bathtub framework for macro-micro-macro-relations in social science, this study...

  14. Achromatic THz absorption of conductive nanofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory, an ultrathin conductive film can achromatically dissipate electromagnetic waves with frequency ranging from radio to terahertz. A moderate absorption effect, which gives rise to a maximal absorbance of 50%, can be found if an impedance matching condition is satisfied. We have experimentally demonstrated the frequency-irrelevant, maximal absorption by employing a conductive nanofilm and launching terahertz waves at Brewster angle when the sheet (square resistance of the film meets the impedance matching condition. In the entire terahertz spectral range covered by our experiments, the frequency-independent optical properties were consistent with the theoretical calculations.

  15. Comparing irradiation parameters on disinfecting enterrecoccus faecalis in root canal disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarp, Ayşe. S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Although conventional method carries all the debris, studies on persisting infections in root canals show bacteria and their toxins spread from the root canal and contaminate the apical region. Thus developes apical periodontitis or symptoms, and loss of tooth. Even if the treatment has adequate success, anatomy of root canal system can be very complexwith accessory canals. The disinfecting effect of laser radiation has only recently been used in dentistry. Laser irradiation has a bactericidal effect. Each wavelength has its own advantages and limitations according to their different absorption characteristics, depending on their 'absorption coefficient'. The sterilizing efficiency of two types of wavelengths, a new fiber laser 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser and an 2940 nm Er:YAG Laser were compared in this study. Irradiation with a power of 0.50 W with 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser disinfected 95,15% of bacteria, however irradiation with same laser power with Er:YAG Laser caused a reduction of 96,48 %. But there was no significant difference in the disinfection effect of two different laser groups ( p Laser caused three times more reduction from its own positive control group where 1940- nm Thulium fiber Laser caused 2,5 times effective disinfection.

  16. Localization an speciation of Zn in mycorrhized roots by μSXRF and μEXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarret, G.; Schroeder, W. H.; Marcus, M. A.; Geoffroy, N.; Manceau, A.

    2003-05-01

    Mycorrhizae are symbiotic associations between soil fungi and plant mots, which enhance mineral nutrition for the plant, and might play an important role in metals acquisition and accumulation. The processes allowing metals mobilizaiion in the soil, absorption by the root and/or the fungus, transfert or bioaccumulation we still poorly understood. However, the properties of mycorrhizal fungi could be used for phytoremediation, a soft technique using plants for the clean-up of metal polluted soils. In this work, mycorrhized roots of tomato plants grown in a Zn-contaminated sail were investigated. The distribution of metals and the speciation of Zn were studied at the micron scale using micro synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μEXAFS). Zn associated to the root was Zn malate and/or Zn citrate, and Zn associated to the fungus was Zn phyllosilicate. This study illustrates the great potential of X-ray microbeams for the study of biological samples containing various amounts of metals.

  17. Effect of lipid/polysaccharide ratio on surface activity of model root mucilage in its solid and liquid states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengxian; Arye, Gilboa

    2016-04-01

    The rhizosphere can be defined as the volume of soil around living roots, which is influenced by root activity. The biological, chemical and physical conditions that prevail in the rhizosphere are significantly different from those of the bulk soil. Plant roots can release diverse organic materials in the rhizosphere which may have different effects on its bio-chemo-physical activity. Among these exudates is the root mucilage which can play a role on the maintenance of root-soil contact, lubrication of the root tip, protection of roots from desiccation and disease, stabilization of soil micro-aggregates and the selective absorption and storage of ions. The surface activity of the root mucilage at the liquid-air interface deduced from its surface tension depression relative to water, implying on its amphiphilic nature. Consequently as the rhizosphere dry out, hydrophobic functional groups may exhibit orientation at the solid-air interface and thus, the wettability of the rhizosphere may temporarily decrease. The major fraction of the root mucilage comprise of polysaccharides and to a much lesser extent, amino acids, organic acids, and phospholipids. The most frequent polysaccharide and phospholipids detected in root mucilage are polygalacturonic acid (PGA) and Phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. The latter, is thought to be main cause for the surface active nature of root mucilage. Nevertheless, the role and function of root mucilage in the rhizosphere is commonly studied based on model root mucilage that comprise of only one component, where the most frequent ones are PGA or PC (or lecithin). The main objective of this study was to quantify the effect of concentration and PGA/PC ratios on the wettability of a model rhizosphere soil and the surface tension of the model root mucilage at the liquid-air interface. The PGA/PC mixtures were measured for their equilibrium and dynamic surface tension using the Wilhelmy-Plate method. Quartz sand or glass slides were

  18. On König's root finding algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buff, Xavier; Henriksen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we first recall the definition of a family of root-finding algorithms known as König's algorithms. We establish some local and some global properties of those algorithms. We give a characterization of rational maps which arise as König's methods of polynomials with simple roots. We...

  19. Sugarbeet root rot in drought conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasnić Stevan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years several types of sugarbeet root rot have occurred in our country causing significant economic damage. The most frequent symptoms are leaf chlorosis and brown-black wet necrosis of the root. The necrosis spread through the entire root and vascular strands. In the course of this study F. oxysporum was the most frequently isolated from infected sugar beet roots. The incidence of other fungi (Fusarium solani, Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina was much lower and it depended on weather conditions. High temperatures occurring during dry years encourage the development of F. oxysporum, the causer of sugar beet root rot. In 2000, an extremely dry year, plant vitality was satisfactory in the experiment with irrigation and the average root rot incidence was low (2,91%. In the nonirrigated variant the average incidence was high (71,02%. It may be concluded on the basis of the results from five years (2000-2004 that the major causal agents of sugarbeet root rot in our country are species from genus Fusarium, especially F. oxysporum. Fusarium wilt and root rot are due to the increased frequency of dry and warm years.

  20. Root foraging theory put to the test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, de H.; Mommer, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roots have a tremendous plasticity that has long fascinated plant scientists. Root proliferation into enriched soil patches is commonly considered as a way for plants to acquire patchily distributed soil resources. In a recent synthetic study involving the responses of over 100 species, Kembel and

  1. Root resection: Apropos of 6 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Root resection procedures are indicated in the treatment of advanced Grade II and Grade III furcation involvement. Their long-term prognosis is comparable to that of implants. The objective of this article is to present case reports of hemisection in mandibular first molar and root amputation in maxillary second molar, employed successfully as a part of the oral rehabilitation procedure.

  2. Layers of root nouns in Germanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Simmelkjær Sandgaard

    2017-01-01

    The root-noun declension became productive in early Germanic, containing (I) inherited root nouns, (IIa) original substrate or loan words, and transitions from other declensions in (IIb) Proto-Germanic and (III) North Germanic. As ablaut was abolished, the inherited type would display ablaut grad...

  3. Root development: cytokinin transport matters, too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Daniele; Wilson, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2011-06-07

    Unlike the plant hormone auxin, the mechanism and function of cytokinin transport is poorly characterised. Two new studies now demonstrate that cytokinins transported from shoot to roots via the phloem are critical for creating mutually exclusive auxin and cytokinin signalling domains that control root vascular patterning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Square Root of a Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Abadir, Karim M.

    2012-01-01

    This note derives an explicit formula for the numerical calculation of the square root of a matrix, when this function exists. An example is given as an illustration of the formula. The condition for the existence of the square root is also given.

  5. Improving rooting uniformity in rose cuttings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, van H.J.; Eveleens-Clark, B.A.; Garcia Victoria, N.

    2007-01-01

    Studies to improve rooting uniformity of single node stem cuttings for rose are reported. We found that the variation in shoot growth in a young rose crop depended on the variation in root number of the cuttings, which, in turn, was related to the auxin concentration applied to the cutting before

  6. Rapid phenotyping of alfalfa root system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root system architecture (RSA) influences the capacity of an alfalfa plant for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, nutrient uptake and water use efficiency, resistance to frost heaving, winterhardiness, and some pest and pathogen resistance. However, we currently lack a basic understanding of root system d...

  7. On the Denesting of Nested Square Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    We present the basic theory of denesting nested square roots, from an elementary point of view, suitable for lower level coursework. Necessary and sufficient conditions are given for direct denesting, where the nested expression is rewritten as a sum of square roots of rational numbers, and for indirect denesting, where the nested expression is…

  8. Bayesian unit root tests and marginal likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, A.F.; Francke, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    Unit root tests based on classical marginal likelihood are practically uniformly most powerful (Francke and de Vos, 2007). Bayesian unit root tests can be constructed that are very similar, however in the Bayesian analysis the classical size is determined by prior considerations. A fundamental

  9. Interactions of Root Disease and Bark Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    George T. Ferrell; J. Richard Parmeter Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Associations between root diseases and bark beetles (Scolytidae) constitute some of the most serious pest complexes affecting forests in North America and elsewhere. The interactive functioning of these pests derives from the following relationships: 1) root diseases predispose trees to bark beetle infestation by lowering resistance, and perhaps...

  10. Posterior root tears of the lateral meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Matthias J; Salzmann, Gian M; Bode, Gerrit; Pestka, Jan M; Kühle, Jan; Südkamp, Norbert P; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    To summarize and discuss the current knowledge on posterior lateral meniscus root tears. A comprehensive review of the MEDLINE database was carried out to identify relevant articles using different keywords (e.g. "meniscus root", "root tear", "meniscus avulsion", "radial tear" and "lateral meniscus"). The reference lists of the reviewed articles were searched for additional relevant articles. Posterior lateral meniscus root tears are found in 7-12% of patients with a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Biomechanical studies have found an increase in lateral compartment contact pressure of approximately 50% after creation of a posterior lateral meniscus root tear. There is some evidence that the biomechanical consequences of these injuries are significantly influenced by the presence and integrity of the meniscofemoral ligaments. Clinical studies have found encouraging results after repair of posterior lateral meniscus root tears. Whether root repair can prevent the development of osteoarthritis is currently unknown. A posterior lateral meniscus root tear is a clinical relevant but most likely underrecognized concomitant injury in patients with a tear of the ACL. This article may support clinicians in diagnosing and treating this unique type of meniscus tear. V.

  11. Salt stress signals shape the plant root

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galvan-Ampudia, C.S.; Testerink, C.

    2011-01-01

    Plants use different strategies to deal with high soil salinity. One strategy is activation of pathways that allow the plant to export or compartmentalise salt. Relying on their phenotypic plasticity, plants can also adjust their root system architecture (RSA) and the direction of root growth to

  12. Tree root mapping with ground penetrating radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Abraham M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the application of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for the mapping of near surface tree roots is demonstrated. GPR enables tree roots to be mapped in a non-destructive and cost-effective manner and is therefore a useful prospecting...

  13. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  14. Root-flipped multiband refocusing pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Lustig, Michael; Grissom, William A

    2016-01-01

    To design low peak power multiband refocusing radiofrequency pulses, with application to simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. Multiband Shinnar-Le Roux β polynomials were designed using convex optimization. A Monte Carlo algorithm was used to determine patterns of β polynomial root flips that minimized the peak power of the resulting refocusing pulses. Phase-matched multiband excitation pulses were also designed to obtain linear-phase spin echoes. Simulations compared the performance of the root-flipped pulses with time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses. Phantom and in vivo experiments at 7T validated the function of the root-flipped pulses and compared them to time-shifted spin echo signal profiles. Averaged across number of slices, time-bandwidth product, and slice separation, the root-flipped pulses have 46% shorter durations than time-shifted pulses with the same peak radiofrequency amplitude. Unlike time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses, the root-flipped pulses' excitation errors do not increase with decreasing band separation. Experiments showed that the root-flipped pulses excited the desired slices at the target locations, and that for equivalent slice characteristics, the shorter root-flipped pulses allowed shorter echo times, resulting in higher signal than time-shifted pulses. The proposed root-flipped multiband radiofrequency pulse design method produces low peak power pulses for simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  16. The method for potato root system measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Głuska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracting of a root system from the soil without losses is the main difficulty in investigations of the potato root system. In the years 1992-1998 at The Potato Research Institute, Jadwisin (Poland an original method for potato root system investigation was developed.A special pot (40 cm in diameter, 100 cm high made of zinc coated steel sheet 0,8 mm was constructed. This device may be opened lengthwise to obtain the whole intact root system of potato plant. Soil profile in the pot is formed in 10 horizontal layers separated by circles made of plastic mesh which enable distinguishing of roots related to certain soil horizons. The method described makes possible (in a relatively easy way taking measurements of weight and length of roots in every 10-cm layer of soil up to depth of 1 meter, so as to assess: the weight of fresh and/or dry matter and length of the whole potato plant root system and its distribution in the soil profile. This method might be useful also for investigation of root systems of another species.

  17. Bilateral mandibular second premolars with three separate roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Hakam Mukhaimer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mandibular second premolar is usually described as a single-rooted tooth with a single root canal. However, three root canals may be found but the occurrence of three separate roots is extremely rare. This report describes the case of a patient with bilateral mandibular second premolar with three roots and three root canals. The pre-operative radiograph of the right premolar revealed the presence of three roots, while the radiograph of the left premolar looked unusual and showed two roots. The access cavity preparation was extended and three orifices leading to three roots were found. All root canals were cleaned, shaped, and obturated. The post-operative radiograph showed a satisfactory root canal filling. Clinicians should always consider the presence of anatomical variations in the teeth during endodontic treatments. Despite the low prevalence, variations may occur in the number of roots and root canals of mandibular second premolars, as demonstrated in this case report.

  18. Branching Out in Roots: Uncovering Form, Function, and Regulation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jonathan A.; Rasmussen, Amanda; Traini, Richard; Voß, Ute; Sturrock, Craig; Mooney, Sacha J.; Wells, Darren M.; Bennett, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Root branching is critical for plants to secure anchorage and ensure the supply of water, minerals, and nutrients. To date, research on root branching has focused on lateral root development in young seedlings. However, many other programs of postembryonic root organogenesis exist in angiosperms. In cereal crops, the majority of the mature root system is composed of several classes of adventitious roots that include crown roots and brace roots. In this Update, we initially describe the diversity of postembryonic root forms. Next, we review recent advances in our understanding of the genes, signals, and mechanisms regulating lateral root and adventitious root branching in the plant models Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), maize (Zea mays), and rice (Oryza sativa). While many common signals, regulatory components, and mechanisms have been identified that control the initiation, morphogenesis, and emergence of new lateral and adventitious root organs, much more remains to be done. We conclude by discussing the challenges and opportunities facing root branching research. PMID:25136060

  19. Effect of lead on root growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna eFAHR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminants in soils. It is highly toxic to living organism. Pb has no biological function but can cause morphological, physiological and biochemical dysfunctions in plants. Plants have developed a wide range of tolerance mechanisms that are activated in response to lead exposure. Pb affects plants primarily through their root systems. Plant roots rapidly respond either (i by the synthesis and deposition of callose, creating a barrier that stops lead entering (ii through the uptake of large amounts of Pb and its sequestration in the vacuole accompanied by changes in root growth and branching pattern or (iii by its translocation to the aboveground parts of plant in the case of hyperaccumulators plants. Here we review the interactions of roots with the presence of Pb in the rhizosphere and the effect of Pb on the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of root development.

  20. Arabinogalactan proteins in root-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Cannesan, Marc-Antoine; Driouich, Azeddine

    2013-08-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are among the most intriguing sets of macromolecules, specific to plants, structurally complex, and found abundantly in all plant organs including roots, as well as in root exudates. AGPs have been implicated in several fundamental plant processes such as development and reproduction. Recently, they have emerged as interesting actors of root-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere. Indeed, recent findings indicate that AGPs play key roles at various levels of interaction between roots and soil-borne microbes, either beneficial or pathogenic. Therefore, the focus of this review is the role of AGPs in the interactions between root cells and microbes. Understanding this facet of AGP function will undoubtedly improve plant health and crop protection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A review on the molecular mechanism of plants rooting modulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adventitious root formation is a key step in vegetative propagation of woody or horticul-tural species, and it is a complex process known to be affected by multiple factors. The process of roots development could be divided into three stages: root induction, root initiation, and root protrusion. Phytohormones, especially auxin ...

  2. Effect of tree roots on shallow-seated landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazutoki Abe Abe; Robert R. Ziemer

    1991-01-01

    Forest vegetation, especially tree roots, helps stabilize hillslopes by reinforcing soil shear strength. To evaluate the effect of tree roots on slope stability, information about the amount of roots and their strength should be known. A simulation model for the root distribution of Cryptomeria japonica was proposed where the number of roots in each 0.5-cm diameter...

  3. The influence of root rot incidence on cassava genotype on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... root rot incidence, was less preferred for color, texture and odor compared to gari from TMS 30572; with lesser root rot incidence. This clearly shows that high root rot incidence of a cassava genotype in the field can reduce consumer's acceptability of the gari produced from its roots, even though, such roots ...

  4. Chemical root pruning of conifer seedlings in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulfo Aldrete; John G. Mexal

    2002-01-01

    Many countries grow seedlings for reforestation in polybags where root spiraling and root egression can decrease seedling survival and growth following outplanting. The overall objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of chemical root pruning on root spiraling, root egression, and nursery performance of Pinus pseudostrobus, P...

  5. Root apex transition zone: a signalling-response nexus in the root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, Frantisek; Mancuso, Stefano; Volkmann, Dieter; Barlow, Peter W

    2010-07-01

    Longitudinal zonation, as well as a simple and regular anatomy, are hallmarks of the root apex. Here we focus on one particular root-apex zone, the transition zone, which is located between the apical meristem and basal elongation region. This zone has a unique role as the determiner of cell fate and root growth; this is accomplished by means of the complex system of a polar auxin transport circuit. The transition zone also integrates diverse inputs from endogenous (hormonal) and exogenous (sensorial) stimuli and translates them into signalling and motoric outputs as adaptive differential growth responses. These underlie the root-apex tropisms and other aspects of adaptive root behaviour.

  6. Myelography for nerve root avulsion in birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Mitomo, Masanori; Hirabuki, Norio; Miura, Takashi; Kawai, Ryuji; Imakita, Satoshi; Harada, Koshi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    Myelography and CT myelography (CMT) were reviewed in 18 cases of birth palsy with clinically suspected avulsion injury. Root-somatosensory evoked potential (root-SEP) was also reviewed for myelographic evaluation of the nerve root avolusion in birth palsy. Root-SEP is not induced in case of avulsed nerve roots, but is induced in case of both normal and incompletely avulsed roots. Myelography demonstrated 58 abnormal nerve roots in 18 cases (19 limbs); 45 (78%) complete and 13 (22%) incomplete nerve root avulsions. Each of complete and incomplete avulsions was defined as total absence and partial presence of rootlets on myelography, respectively. Traumatic meningoceles were detected at 46 roots (79%) on myelography and/or CTM; 35 roots on myelography and 45 roots on CTM. CTM could not detect only a very small meningocele at one root. At 11 roots CTM was superior to myelography in delineating a meningocele because CTM is sensitive to a poorly enhanced meningocele. CTM, however, could not diagnose nerve root avulsions so accurately as myelography, since myelography detected 12 (7 completely and 5 incompletely) avulsed roots without meningocele, whereas CTM could not delineate the nerve roots clearly. Thus, myelography is indispensable to evaluate nerve root avulsions without meningocele. Root-SEP was examined in 9 patients who underwent branchial plexus exploration. SEP was negative at 22/25 roots with complete avulsion and was positive at 7/7 roots with myelographically incomplete avulsion, regardless of presence or absence of any traumatic meningocele. Myelography and root-SEP correlated well at 29 (92%) out of 32 roots in evaluating complete and incomplete avulsion injuries. Myelography and root-SEP were not considered in 3 roots. Though myelography demonstrated complete avulsions with traumatic meningocele, SEP was positive in these three roots, which were interpreted as partially avulsed roots. (J.P.N.).

  7. Water absorption characteristic of interlocking compressed earth brick units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, B. H. Abu; Saari, S.; Surip, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the water absorption characteristic of interlocking compressed earth brick (ICEB) units. Apart from compressive strength, water absorption is an important property in masonry. This property can affect the quality of the brick itself and the bond strength between the brick and mortar in masonry structures and can result in reducing its strength properties. The units were tested for 24 h water absorption and 5 h boiling water absorption. A total of 170 ICEB units from four ICEB types underwent both tests. For the 24 h water absorption, the ICEB units were dried in the oven for 24 h and then cooled before being weighed. Thereafter, each brick was immersed in water for 24 h and weighed. The same specimens used for the 24 h water absorption test were re-used for the 5 h boiling water absorption test. After completing the 24 h water absorption test, the brick was boiled for 5-hours and weighed. The highest water absorption for the ICEBs in the 24-hour water absorption and 5 h boiling water absorption tests are 15.09% and 17.18%, respectively. The half brick has the highest water absorption (15.87%), whereas the beam brick has the lowest (13.20%). The water absorption of an ICEB unit is higher than that of normal bricks, although the water absorption of the former remains below the maximum rate of the brick water absorption (21%).

  8. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  9. Realistic absorption coefficient of ultrathin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaria, M.; Caricato, A. P.; Martino, M.

    2012-10-01

    Both a theoretical algorithm and an experimental procedure are discussed of a new route to determine the absorption/scattering properties of thin films deposited on transparent substrates. Notably, the non-measurable contribution of the film-substrate interface is inherently accounted for. While the experimental procedure exploits only measurable spectra combined according to a very simple algorithm, the theoretical derivation does not require numerical handling of the acquired spectra or any assumption on the film homogeneity and substrate thickness. The film absorption response is estimated by subtracting the measured absorption spectrum of the bare substrate from that of the film on the substrate structure but in a non-straightforward way. In fact, an assumption about the absorption profile of the overall structure is introduced and a corrective factor accounting for the relative film-to-substrate thickness. The method is tested on films of a well known material (ITO) as a function of the film structural quality and influence of the film-substrate interface, both deliberately changed by thickness tuning and doping. Results are found fully consistent with information obtained by standard optical analysis and band gap values reported in the literature. Additionally, comparison with a conventional method demonstrates that our route is generally more accurate even if particularly suited for very thin films.

  10. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  11. Oral Exposure and Absorption of Toxicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides an overview of the toxicokinetics of orally absorbed xenobiotics. This includes a description of the basic anatomy and physiology of the digestive tract most relevant to the absorption process. In addition, differences in anatomy and physiology between human...

  12. Simple parametrization of photon mass energy absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we provide polynomial coefficients and a semi-empirical relation using which one can derive photon mass energy absorption coefficient of any H-, C-, N-,. O-based sample of biological interest containing any other elements in the atomic number range 2–40 and energy range 200–1500 keV.

  13. Experimental methodology for obtaining sound absorption coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Macía M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the authors propose a new methodology for estimating sound absorption coefficients using genetic algorithms. Methodology: sound waves are generated and conducted along a rectangular silencer. The waves are then attenuated by the absorbing material covering the silencer’s walls. The attenuated sound pressure level is used in a genetic algorithm-based search to find the parameters of the proposed attenuation expressions that include geometric factors, the wavelength and the absorption coefficient. Results: a variety of adjusted mathematical models were found that make it possible to estimate the absorption coefficients based on the characteristics of a rectangular silencer used for measuring the attenuation of the noise that passes through it. Conclusions: this methodology makes it possible to obtain the absorption coefficients of new materials in a cheap and simple manner. Although these coefficients might be slightly different from those obtained through other methodologies, they provide solutions within the engineering accuracy ranges that are used for designing noise control systems.

  14. The Absorption Refrigerator as a Thermal Transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F.

    2009-01-01

    The absorption refrigerator can be considered a thermal transformer, that is, a device that is analogous to the electric transformer. The analogy is based on the correspondence between the extensive quantities, entropy and electric charge and the intensive variables, temperature and electric potential. (Contains 1 footnote and 6 figures.)

  15. Resonant Light Absorption by Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Lang

    2009-01-01

    calculated in the case of a resonance with an exciton Γ6×Γ7 in cubical crystals of class. The interference of stimulating and induced electric and magnetic fields is taken into account. The cross-section of light absorption is proportional to the exciton nonradiative damping .

  16. Absorption heat pump cycles with NH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.; Infante Ferreira, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs), as novel absorbents, draw considerable attention for their potential roles in replacing water or LiBr aqueous solutions in conventional NH3/H2O or H2O/LiBr absorption refrigeration or heat pump cycles. In this paper, performances of 9

  17. A method optimization study for atomic absorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sensitive, reliable and relative fast method has been developed for the determination of total zinc in insulin by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This designed study was used to optimize the procedures for the existing methods. Spectrograms of both standard and sample solutions of zinc were recorded by measuring ...

  18. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Paracetamol absorption from Paramax, Panadol and Solpadeine.

    OpenAIRE

    Dougall, J R; Cunningham, B; Nimmo, W S

    1983-01-01

    Plasma paracetamol concentrations were measured after oral administration of three pharmaceutical preparations to four healthy volunteers. The formulations were Paramax (paracetamol with metoclopramide), Solpadeine (paracetamol with codeine and caffeine) and Panadol (paracetamol alone). After Solpadeine, concentrations at 15 min were significantly higher than after Panadol. Absorption of paracetamol from Paramax tablets did not differ significantly from Solpadeine or Panadol.

  20. Intestinal absorption of specific structured triacylglycerols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the intestinal absorption pathway of medium-chain fatty acids from MMM-type structured triaclyglycerols containing both medium- and long-chain fatty acids, we studied the lymphatic transport of 1,3-dioctanoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn- glycerol (8:0/18:2/8:0), 1,3-didecanoyl-2-linoleoyl......-sn-glycerol (10:0/18:2/10:0), and 1,3-didodecanoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycerol (12:0/18:2/12:0) in a rat model. Safflower oil was used in the absorption study in order to compare the absorption of medium- chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty acids, The triacylglycerol species of lymph Lipids were separated......-type triacylglycerols. From the present study we conclude that the medium-chain fatty acids from STAG, in addition to absorption into the portal blood as free fatty acids, are absorbed by the same pathway as the conventional long-chain triacylglycerols, that is, they are hydrolyzed into free fatty acids, absorbed...

  1. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies...

  2. Dermal absorption of chlorpyrifos in human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuling, W.J.; Ravensberg, L.C.; Roza, L.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The methods and results are described of a study on the dermal absorption of chlorpyrifos (CPF) in humans established via urinary excretion of the metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP). Methods: Two dermal, single, doses of CPF were applied in two study groups (A and B) each

  3. Plasmonic absorption properties of bimetallic metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Atmatzakis, Evangelos; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate polarization controlled absorption in plasmonic bimetallic metamaterials. We fabricate and experimentally characterize Au/Ni ring resonator arrays, where by varying the wavelength and polarization of the incident wave, local electromagnetic fields and dissipation can be suppressed or enhanced in the Au and Ni areas of the rings.

  4. Probing ultrafast carrier dynamics, nonlinear absorption and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 471–481. Probing ultrafast carrier dynamics, nonlinear absorption and refraction in core–shell silicon nanowires. SUNIL KUMAR1,∗, M KHORASANINEJAD2, M M ADACHI2,. K S KARIM2, S S SAINI2 and A K SOOD1. 1Department of Physics and Centre for Ultrafast Laser Applications, Indian Institute of Science,.

  5. Measuring sound absorption using local field assumptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    To more effectively apply acoustically absorbing materials, it is desirable to measure angle-dependent sound absorption coefficients, preferably in situ. Existing measurement methods are based on an overall model of the acoustic field in front of the absorber, and are therefore sensitive to

  6. Dermal absorption and toxicological risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of toxic substances via the skin is an important phenomenon in the assessment of the risk of exposure to these substances. People are exposed to a variety of substances and products via the skin, either directly or indirectly, while at work, at home or in public space. Pesticides, organic

  7. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  8. Evaluation of atomic absorption Spectrophotometry (ashing, non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three commonly used techniques, namely atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS-Ashing and AAS-Non Ashing) and titrimetry (potassium permanganate titration) have been evaluated in this study to determine the calcium content in six food samples whose calcium levels ranged from 0 to more than 250mg/100g ...

  9. Diphenamid metabolism in pepper and an ozone effect. I. Absorption, translocation, and the extent of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, R.H.; Hoffer, B.L.

    1977-07-01

    Nutrient-solution-grown pepper (Capsicum frutescens L. Early Calwonder) absorbed 62% of the diphenamid (N,N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide) supplied via the roots for 48 h, and 74% in 150 h. Extensive translocation accompanied absorption, and 70 +/- 3% of the absorbed /sup 14/C was present in shoots of plants harvested after 24- to 150-h treatments. Diphenamid was metabolized rapidly to chloroform-soluble and water-soluble compounds, and to unextracted residues. Chloroform-soluble compounds persisted for 150 h and accounted for more than 50% of the /sup 14/C in leaves. Water-soluble compounds other than N-hydroxymethyl-..beta..-D-glycosides accounted for 25% of the water-soluble metabolites in leaves of nonfumigated plants. Ozone fumigation did not affect diphenamid absorption or translocation significantly. In leaves, ozone-enhanced accumulation of water-soluble metabolites more polar than N-hydroxymethyl-N-methyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide-..beta..-D-glucoside (MDAG) and unextracted residues was observed. Ozone fumigation reduced the accumulation of these /sup 14/C-fractions in roots. 16 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  10. Resistance to compression of weakened roots subjected to different root reconstruction protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Villaça Zogheib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated, in vitro, the fracture resistance of human non-vital teeth restored with different reconstruction protocols. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty human anterior roots of similar shape and dimensions were assigned to four groups (n=10, according to the root reconstruction protocol: Group I (control: non-weakened roots with glass fiber post; Group II: roots with composite resin by incremental technique and glass fiber post; Group III: roots with accessory glass fiber posts and glass fiber post; and Group IV: roots with anatomic glass fiber post technique. Following post cementation and core reconstruction, the roots were embedded in chemically activated acrylic resin and submitted to fracture resistance testing, with a compressive load at an angle of 45º in relation to the long axis of the root at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. All data were statistically analyzed with bilateral Dunnett's test (α=0.05. RESULTS: Group I presented higher mean values of fracture resistance when compared with the three experimental groups, which, in turn, presented similar resistance to fracture among each other. None of the techniques of root reconstruction with intraradicular posts improved root strength, and the incremental technique was suggested as being the most recommendable, since the type of fracture that occurred allowed the remaining dental structure to be repaired. CONCLUSION: The results of this in vitro study suggest that the healthy remaining radicular dentin is more important to increase fracture resistance than the root reconstruction protocol.

  11. PHIV-RootCell: a supervised image analysis tool for rice root anatomical parameter quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eLartaud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed the PHIV-RootCell software to quantify anatomical traits of rice roots transverse section images. Combined with an efficient root sample processing method for image acquisition, this program permits supervised measurements of areas (those of whole root section, stele, cortex and central metaxylem vessels, number of cell layers and number of cells per cell layer. The PHIV-RootCell toolset runs under ImageJ, an independent operating system that has a license-free status. To demonstrate the usefulness of PHIV-RootCell, we conducted a genetic diversity study and an analysis of salt-stress responses of root anatomical parameters in rice (Oryza sativa L.. Using 16 cultivars, we showed that we could discriminate between some of the varieties even at the 6 day-old stage, and that tropical japonica varieties had larger root sections due to an increase in cell number. We observed, as described previously, that root sections become enlarged under salt stress. However, our results show an increase in cell number in ground tissues (endodermis and cortex but a decrease in external (peripheral tissues (sclerenchyma, exodermis and epidermis. Thus, the PHIV-RootCell program is a user-friendly tool that will be helpful for future genetic and physiological studies that investigate root anatomical trait variations.

  12. Using coloured roots to study root interaction and competition in intercropped legumes and non-legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosti, Giacomo; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Root interactions between neighbour plants represent a fundamental aspect of the competitive dynamics in pure stand and mixed cropping systems. The comprehension of such phenomena places big methodological challenges, and still needs clarification. The objectives of this work were (i) to test...... if a species with coloured roots can be used to examine the interaction in a legume-non-legume intercropping system; (ii) to verify the importance of initial root growth on the successive root development of mixture component plants; (iii) to test if the root interaction in the shallow layers has consequences...... for deep root growth and (iv) to compare the effect of intraspecific and interspecific competition on root development and biomass growth....

  13. Modeling root growth in granular soils: effects of root stiffness and packing fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mahmoud; Delenne, Jean Yves; Radjai, Farhang; Fourcaud, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of root bending stiffness and packing fraction on the path followed by a growing root in 2D packings of grains representing a soil. The root is modeled as a chain of elements that can grow in length and change their direction depending on the forces exerted by soil grains. We show that the root shape is mainly controlled by the bending stiffness of its apex. At low stiffness, the root randomly explores the pore space whereas at sufficiently high stiffness, of the order of soil hardness multiplied by mean grain size, the root follows a straight path across the soil. Between these two limits, the root shape can be characterized by the standard deviation of its re-directions at the scale of soil grains. We find that this shape parameter varies as a power-law function of the normalized bending stiffness.

  14. Analogue of electromagnetically induced absorption with double absorption windows in a plasmonic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianfa Zhong

    Full Text Available We report the observation of an analog of double electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA in a plasmonic system consisting of two disk resonators side-coupled to a discrete metal-insulator-metal (MIM waveguide. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD simulation calculations show that two absorption windows are obtained and can be easily tuned by adjusting the parameters of the two resonance cavities. The consistence between the coupled-model theory and FDTD simulation results verify the feasibility of the proposed system. Since the scheme is easy to be fabricated, our proposed configuration may thus be applied to narrow-band filtering, absorptive switching, and absorber applications.

  15. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  16. Scalable encryption using alpha rooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Eric J.; Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2008-04-01

    Full and partial encryption methods are important for subscription based content providers, such as internet and cable TV pay channels. Providers need to be able to protect their products while at the same time being able to provide demonstrations to attract new customers without giving away the full value of the content. If an algorithm were introduced which could provide any level of full or partial encryption in a fast and cost effective manner, the applications to real-time commercial implementation would be numerous. In this paper, we present a novel application of alpha rooting, using it to achieve fast and straightforward scalable encryption with a single algorithm. We further present use of the measure of enhancement, the Logarithmic AME, to select optimal parameters for the partial encryption. When parameters are selected using the measure, the output image achieves a balance between protecting the important data in the image while still containing a good overall representation of the image. We will show results for this encryption method on a number of images, using histograms to evaluate the effectiveness of the encryption.

  17. Longleaf Pine Root System Development and Seedling Quality in Response to Copper Root Pruning and Cavity Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Anne Sword Sayer; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; James D. Haywood

    2011-01-01

    Cultural practices that modify root system structure in the plug of container-grown seedlings have the potential to improve root system function after planting. Our objective was to assess how copper root pruning affects the quality and root system development of longleaf pine seedlings grown in three cavity sizes in a greenhouse. Copper root pruning increased seedling...

  18. Ecology of root colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Ofek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae, a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance were positively related, and peaked (up to 85% at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. CONCLUSIONS: In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche.

  19. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  20. Meniscal root tears: significance, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; LaPrade, Christopher M; Ellman, Michael B; LaPrade, Robert F

    2014-12-01

    Meniscal root tears, less common than meniscal body tears and frequently unrecognized, are a subset of meniscal injuries that often result in significant knee joint disorders. The meniscus root attachment aids meniscal function by securing the meniscus in place and allowing for optimal shock-absorbing function in the knee. With root tears, meniscal extrusion often occurs, and the transmission of circumferential hoop stresses is impaired. This alters knee biomechanics and kinematics and significantly increases tibiofemoral contact pressure. In recent years, meniscal root tears, which by definition include direct avulsions off the tibial plateau or radial tears adjacent to the root itself, have attracted attention because of concerns that significant meniscal extrusion dramatically inhibits normal meniscal function, leading to a condition biomechanically similar to a total meniscectomy. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of early diagnosis and treatment; fortunately, these processes have been vastly improved by advances in magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy. This article presents a review of the clinically relevant anatomic, biomechanical, and functional descriptions of the meniscus root attachments, as well as current strategies for accurate diagnosis and treatment of common injuries to these meniscus root attachments. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. How to bond to root canal dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  2. Is pulp regeneration necessary for root maturation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Ali; Li, Kevin L; Vir, Kunwar; Hicks, M Lamar; Fouad, Ashraf F

    2013-10-01

    True regeneration of the dental pulp-dentin complex in immature teeth with necrotic pulps has not been shown histologically. It is not known to what extent this true tissue regeneration is necessary to achieve clinically acceptable outcomes. This case report describes the treatment of a patient with an immature maxillary right central incisor with a history of impact trauma and enamel-dentin crown fracture. A diagnosis of pulp necrosis with acute apical abscess was established. A regenerative endodontic protocol that used a paste containing Augmentin for 5 weeks as an intracanal medicament was used. Follow-ups at 9, 12, 17, and 31 months revealed complete osseous healing of the periapical lesion and formation of the root apex, but without increase in root length. Clinically, the tooth was functional, asymptomatic, and nonresponsive to pulp vitality tests. The crown discolored over time. On reentering the root canal, no tissues were observed under magnification inside the root canal space. The root canal treatment was completed with mineral trioxide aggregate obturation. Augmentin might be an acceptable choice for root canal disinfection in regenerative endodontic procedures. The protocol for regenerative endodontic treatment is not predictable for pulp-dentin regeneration. Formation of the root apex is possible without pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Root distribution of rootstocks for 'Tahiti' lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Carmen Silvia Vieira Janeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies on citrus roots are important for genetic selection of cultivars and for management practices such as localized irrigation and fertilization. To characterize root systems of six rootstocks, taking into consideration chemical and physical characteristics of a clayey Typic Hapludox of the Northern State of Paraná, this study was performed having as scion the 'IAC-5 Tahiti' lime [Citrus latifolia (Yu. Tanaka]. The rootstocks 'Rangpur' lime (C. limonia Osbeck, 'Africa Rough' lemon (C. jambhiri Lush., 'Sunki' mandarin [C. sunki (Hayata hort. ex Tan.], Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf., 'C13' citrange [C. sinensis (L. Osb. x P. trifoliata (L. Raf] and 'Catânia 2' Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq. were used applying the trench profile method and the SIARCS® 3.0 software to determine root distribution. 'C-13' citrange had the largest root system. 'Volkamer' lemon and 'Africa Rough' lemon presented the smallest amount of roots. The effective depth for 80 % of roots was 31-53 cm in rows and 67-68 cm in inter-rows. The effective distance of 80 % of roots measured from the tree trunk exceeded the tree canopy for P. trifoliata, 'Sunki' mandarin, and 'Volkamer' and 'Africa Rough' lemons.

  4. Infection of Narcissus Roots by Aphelenchoides subtenuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, M.; Spiegel, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The widespread destruction of commercially grown bulbs of Narcissus tazetta papyraceus (Paper White) has been reported in Israel. This phenomenon is usually characterized by a premature yellowing of the foliage, accompanied by root rot and dark, sunken basal plates. This study confirmed thatAphelenchoides subtenuis is the main cause of the basal plate disease of Narcissus. In contrast to other Aphelenchoides species, which feed on stems or leaves, A. subtenuis penetrates Narcissus roots. In our experiments, in winter (6 to 8 weeks after penetration), nematodes laid their eggs in the root parenchymal cells without inducing obvious symptoms on foliage or roots. Toward spring, juveniles became numerous throughout the parenchymal cells of the root cortex. Consequently, the root system collapsed rapidly, at the usual peak of bulb and foliage production. Bulbs of infected plants were small and weighed less than those of uninfected plants, and foliage became necrotic prematurely. At that time, in field conditions, secondary elements like Fusarium penetrate the bulb and cause it to rot, given this syndrome the common name of basal plate disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an Aphelenchoides species as a root pathogen. PMID:19279798

  5. Infection of Narcissus Roots by Aphelenchoides subtenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, M; Spiegel, Y

    1993-09-01

    The widespread destruction of commercially grown bulbs of Narcissus tazetta papyraceus (Paper White) has been reported in Israel. This phenomenon is usually characterized by a premature yellowing of the foliage, accompanied by root rot and dark, sunken basal plates. This study confirmed thatAphelenchoides subtenuis is the main cause of the basal plate disease of Narcissus. In contrast to other Aphelenchoides species, which feed on stems or leaves, A. subtenuis penetrates Narcissus roots. In our experiments, in winter (6 to 8 weeks after penetration), nematodes laid their eggs in the root parenchymal cells without inducing obvious symptoms on foliage or roots. Toward spring, juveniles became numerous throughout the parenchymal cells of the root cortex. Consequently, the root system collapsed rapidly, at the usual peak of bulb and foliage production. Bulbs of infected plants were small and weighed less than those of uninfected plants, and foliage became necrotic prematurely. At that time, in field conditions, secondary elements like Fusarium penetrate the bulb and cause it to rot, given this syndrome the common name of basal plate disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an Aphelenchoides species as a root pathogen.

  6. Global Distribution of Fine Root Biomass in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: A global data set of root biomass, rooting profiles, and concentrations nutrients in roots was compiled from the primary literature and used to study...

  7. Effects of acid deposition on tree roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    1995-12-31

    Large forest regions in SW Sweden have been exposed to high levels of acid deposition for many decades, causing soil acidification in forest soils. Historically, SO{sub 2} has been the major acidification agent, but lately nitrogen compounds increasingly have become important. The amount and chemical form of nitrogen strongly affects the pH in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane. Many forest stands show a positive growth response to increased nitrogen input, even in heavily N-loaded areas. Nitrogen fertilization experiments suggest that part of the increased forest production is caused by a translocation of biomass production from below-ground to above-ground parts. At the same time fine-root growth dynamics are strongly affected by the high N supply. Deficiencies of various nutrients (Mg,Ca,K,Mn and Zn) obtained from needle analyses have been reported from different Picea abies stands. In areas with more extensive acidification and nutrient leaching, a decline in tree vitality has been observed. Although deficiency symptoms in forest trees may be reflected in nitrogen/cation ratios in fine roots, few attempts have been made to explain forest damage symptoms from fine-root chemistry. Root damage is often described as a decline in the amount of living fine roots, an increase in the amount of dead versus live fine roots (a lower live/dead ratio) and an increasing amount of dead medium and coarse roots. The primary objectives of the present presentation were to analyse available data on the effects of high nitrogen and sulphur deposition on mineral nutrient balance in tree fine roots and to evaluate the risk of Al interference with cation uptake by roots

  8. Impacts of the physiochemical properties of chlorinated solvents on the sorption of trichloroethylene to the roots of Typha latifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Xingmao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 1230 Lincoln Drive, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)], E-mail: ma@engr.siu.edu; Wang Chen [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 1230 Lincoln Drive, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Sorption to plant roots is the first step for organic contaminants to enter plant tissues. Mounting evidence is showing that sorption to plant roots is nonlinear and competitive. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of physiochemical properties of homologous chlorinated ethenes and ethanes on the competitive sorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) to the roots of Typha latifolia (cattail). The results showed that chlorinated ethenes exerted significantly stronger competition on the sorption of TCE than chlorinated ethanes. Individual physiochemical properties of organic compounds could be related to the competitive capacity of chlorinated ethenes, but the roles appeared secondary, with molecular structures showing primary effects. Based on these observations, a two-step sorption mechanism was proposed, consisting of the interactions between organic compounds and functional groups on the root surface and subsequent pore filling and absorption to the hydrophobic domains in the composition of roots. - Molecular structures and physiochemical properties of homologous chlorinated aliphatics are important factors affecting competitive sorption of TCE to plant roots.

  9. Absorption enhancement and total absorption in a graphene-waveguide hybrid structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Guo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a graphene/planar waveguide hybrid structure, and demonstrate total absorption in the visible wavelength range by means of attenuated total reflectance. The excitation of planar waveguide mode, which has strong near field enhancement and increased light interaction length with graphene, plays a vital role in total absorption. We analyze the origin and physical insight of total absorption theoretically by using an approximated reflectance, and show how to design such hybrid structure numerically. Utilizing the tunability of doped graphene, we discuss the possible application in optical modulators. We also achieve broadband absorption enhancement in near-IR range by cascading multiple graphene-waveguide hybrid structures. We believe our results will be useful not only for potential applications in optical devices, but also for studying other two-dimension materials.

  10. Phosphorus absorption and use efficiency by Lotus spp. under water stress conditions in two soils: A pot experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Castillo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The response to P and water deficiencies of forage Lotus species has not been sufficiently studied in the Andisol and Vertisol soil orders in Chile's marginal areas. A pot experiment under cover was carried out between October 2007 and March 2008 to study the effects of P and soil water availability (SWA on DM production, P absorption, and P use efficiency in Lotus spp. The experiment included three Lotus (L. corniculatus L., L. tenuis Waldst. & Kit. ex Willd., and L. uliginosus Schkuhr species, two soils (Andisol and Vertisol, two contrasting P levels (low and high, and two SWA levels (10% and 100%. A completely randomized design with a 3 x 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement with four replicates was used. Accumulated shoot and root DM, P absorption and efficiency, and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM colonization were measured. Phosphorus absorption was significantly higher in Andisol with 100% SWA and high P in the three species, which was reflected in P efficiency where the species exhibited higher P absorption efficiency (PAE and P utilization efficiency (PUE with low P, and mean of the three species with low P and high SWA. When the P level was low, L. uliginosus showed the highest PAE and L. corniculatus exhibited the highest PUE. Phosphorus efficiency was also influenced by AM colonization since on the average mycorrhization in the three species was significantly higher in the low P treatments. Differences existed among species for DM production, response to P, P absorption, PAE, and PUE.

  11. Adventitious root induction in Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for in vitro root organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Inge; Beeckman, Tom; Geelen, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Adventitious root formation, the development of roots on non-root tissue (e.g. leaves, hypocotyls and stems) is a critical step during micropropagation. Although root induction treatments are routinely used for a large number of species micropropagated in vitro as well as for in vivo cuttings, the mechanisms controlling adventitious rooting are still poorly understood. Researchers attempt to gain better insight into the molecular aspects by studying adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana. The existing assay involves etiolation of seedlings and measurements of de novo formed roots on the elongated hypocotyl. The etiolated hypocotyls express a novel auxin-controlled signal transduction pathway in which auxin response factors (ARFs), microRNAs and environmental conditions that drive adventitious rooting are integrated. An alternative assay makes use of so-called thin cell layers (TCL), excised strips of cells from the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, both the etiolated seedling system and the TCL assay are only distantly related to industrial rooting processes in which roots are induced on adult stem tissue. Here, we describe an adventitious root induction system that uses segments of the inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a histological structure similar to cuttings or in vitro micropropagated shoots. The system allows multiple treatments with chemicals as well as the evaluation of different environmental conditions on a large number of explants. It is therefore suitable for high throughput chemical screenings and experiments that require numerous data points for statistical analysis. Using this assay, the adventitious root induction capacity of classical auxins was evaluated and a differential response to the different auxins could be demonstrated. NAA, IBA and IAA stimulated adventitious rooting on the stem segment, whereas 2,4-D and picloram did not. Light conditions profoundly influenced the root induction capacity

  12. Sparse DOA estimation with polynomial rooting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2015-01-01

    Direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation involves the localization of a few sources from a limited number of observations on an array of sensors. Thus, DOA estimation can be formulated as a sparse signal reconstruction problem and solved efficiently with compressive sensing (CS) to achieve...... highresolution imaging. Utilizing the dual optimal variables of the CS optimization problem, it is shown with Monte Carlo simulations that the DOAs are accurately reconstructed through polynomial rooting (Root-CS). Polynomial rooting is known to improve the resolution in several other DOA estimation methods...

  13. Retrograde root filling with amalgam and Cavit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finne, K; Nord, P G; Persson, G; Lennartsson, B

    1977-04-01

    In a 3-year review of 218 teeth with retrograde root filling with amalgam orCavit, the results obtained with the former proved significantly better than those obtained with the latter. The difference seemed to be due to a better obliteration of the canal by amalgam. The obliterating effect of amalgam probably eliminates the need for revision of incomplete othograde root filling, for example, in cases with a post in the root canal. Irrespective of type of filling materials, the results were less good in cases with marginal bone loss.

  14. Biosynthesis of luminescent CdS quantum dots using plant hairy root culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovaya, Mariya N.; Naumenko, Antonina P.; Matvieieva, Nadia A.; Blume, Yaroslav B.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles have a great potential for application in chemical research, bioscience and medicine. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient and environmentally-friendly method of plant-based biosynthesis of CdS quantum dots using hairy root culture of Linaria maroccana L. By incubating Linaria root extract with inorganic cadmium sulfate and sodium sulfide we synthesized stable luminescent CdS nanocrystals with absorption peaks for UV-visible spectrometry at 362 nm, 398 nm and 464 nm, and luminescent peaks at 425, 462, 500 nm. Transmission electron microscopy of produced quantum dots revealed their spherical shape with a size predominantly from 5 to 7 nm. Electron diffraction pattern confirmed the wurtzite crystalline structure of synthesized cadmium sulfide quantum dots. These results describe the first successful attempt of quantum dots synthesis using plant extract.

  15. Terahertz absorption of dilute aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, Matthias; Tobias, Douglas J; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-12-21

    Absorption of terahertz (THz) radiation by aqueous solutions of large solutes reports on the polarization response of their hydration shells. This is because the dipolar relaxation of the solute is dynamically frozen at these frequencies, and most of the solute-induced absorption changes, apart from the expulsion of water, are caused by interfacial water. We propose a model expressing the dipolar response of solutions in terms of a single parameter, the interface dipole moment induced in the interfacial water by electromagnetic radiation. We apply this concept to experimental THz absorption of hydrated sugars, amino acids, and proteins. None of the solutes studied here follow the expectations of dielectric theories, which predict a negative projection of the interface dipole on the external electric field. We find that this prediction is not able to describe the available experimental data, which instead suggests a nearly zero interface dipole for sugars and a more diverse pattern for amino acids. Hydrophobic amino acids, similarly to sugars, give rise to near zero interface dipoles, while strongly hydrophilic ones are best described by a positive projection of the interface dipole on the external field. The sign of the interface dipole is connected to the slope of the absorption coefficient with the solute concentration. A positive slope, implying an increase in the solution polarity relative to water, mirrors results frequently reported for protein solutions. We therefore use molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated glucose and lambda repressor protein to calculate the interface dipole moments of these solutes and the concentration dependence of the THz absorption. The absorption at THz frequencies increases with increasing solute concentration in both cases, implying a higher polarity of the solution compared to bulk water. The structure of the hydration layer, extracted from simulations, is qualitatively similar in both cases, with spatial correlations

  16. Light as Stress Factor to Plant Roots – Case of Root Halotropism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eYokawa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite growing underground, largely in darkness, roots emerge to be very sensitive to light. Recently, several important papers have been published which reveal that plant roots not only express all known light receptors but also that their growth, physiology and adaptive stress responses are light-sensitive. In Arabidopsis, illumination of roots speeds-up root growth via ROS-mediated and F-actin dependent process. On the other hand, keeping Arabidopsis roots in darkness alter F-actin distribution, polar localization of PIN proteins as well as polar transport of auxin. Several signaling components activated by phytohormones are overlapping with light-related signaling cascade. We also demonstrated that the sensitivity of roots to salinity is altered in the light-grown Arabidopsis roots. Particularly, light-exposed roots are less effective in their salt-avoidance behavior known as root halotropism. Here we discuss these new aspects of light-mediated root behavior from cellular, physiological and evolutionary perspectives.

  17. Root chemistry and soil fauna, but not soil abiotic conditions explain the effects of plant diversity on root decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongmei; Oram, Natalie J; Barry, Kathryn E; Mommer, Liesje; van Ruijven, Jasper; de Kroon, Hans; Ebeling, Anne; Eisenhauer, Nico; Fischer, Christine; Gleixner, Gerd; Gessler, Arthur; González Macé, Odette; Hacker, Nina; Hildebrandt, Anke; Lange, Markus; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Scheu, Stefan; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wagg, Cameron; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Wirth, Christian; Weigelt, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    Plant diversity influences many ecosystem functions including root decomposition. However, due to the presence of multiple pathways via which plant diversity may affect root decomposition, our mechanistic understanding of their relationships is limited. In a grassland biodiversity experiment, we simultaneously assessed the effects of three pathways-root litter quality, soil biota, and soil abiotic conditions-on the relationships between plant diversity (in terms of species richness and the presence/absence of grasses and legumes) and root decomposition using structural equation modeling. Our final structural equation model explained 70% of the variation in root mass loss. However, different measures of plant diversity included in our model operated via different pathways to alter root mass loss. Plant species richness had a negative effect on root mass loss. This was partially due to increased Oribatida abundance, but was weakened by enhanced root potassium (K) concentration in more diverse mixtures. Equally, grass presence negatively affected root mass loss. This effect of grasses was mostly mediated via increased root lignin concentration and supported via increased Oribatida abundance and decreased root K concentration. In contrast, legume presence showed a net positive effect on root mass loss via decreased root lignin concentration and increased root magnesium concentration, both of which led to enhanced root mass loss. Overall, the different measures of plant diversity had contrasting effects on root decomposition. Furthermore, we found that root chemistry and soil biota but not root morphology or soil abiotic conditions mediated these effects of plant diversity on root decomposition.

  18. Root System Architecture and Abiotic Stress Tolerance: Current Knowledge in Root and Tuber Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Awais Khan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The challenge to produce more food for a rising global population on diminishing agricultural land is complicated by the effects of climate change on agricultural productivity. Although great progress has been made in crop improvement, so far most efforts have targeted above-ground traits. Roots are essential for plant adaptation and productivity, but are less studied due to the difficulty of observing them during the plant life cycle. Root system architecture, made up of structural features like root length, spread, number, and length of lateral roots, among others, exhibits great plasticity in response to environmental changes, and could be critical to developing crops with more efficient roots. Much of the research on root traits has thus far focused on the most common cereal crops and model plants. As cereal yields have reached their yield potential in some regions, understanding their root system may help overcome these plateaus. However, root and tuber crops such as potato, sweetpotato, cassava, and yam may hold more potential for providing food security in the future, and knowledge of their root system additionally focuses directly on the edible portion. Root-trait modeling for multiple stress scenarios, together with high-throughput phenotyping and genotyping techniques, robust databases, and data analytical pipelines, may provide a valuable base for a truly inclusive ‘green revolution’. In the current review, we discuss root system architecture with special reference to root and tuber crops, and how knowledge on genetics of root system architecture can be manipulated to improve their tolerance to abiotic stresses.

  19. Plant roots use a patterning mechanism to position lateral root branches toward available water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yun; Aggarwal, Pooja; Robbins, Neil E; Sturrock, Craig J; Thompson, Mark C; Tan, Han Qi; Tham, Cliff; Duan, Lina; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Vernoux, Teva; Mooney, Sacha J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Dinneny, José R

    2014-06-24

    The architecture of the branched root system of plants is a major determinant of vigor. Water availability is known to impact root physiology and growth; however, the spatial scale at which this stimulus influences root architecture is poorly understood. Here we reveal that differences in the availability of water across the circumferential axis of the root create spatial cues that determine the position of lateral root branches. We show that roots of several plant species can distinguish between a wet surface and air environments and that this also impacts the patterning of root hairs, anthocyanins, and aerenchyma in a phenomenon we describe as hydropatterning. This environmental response is distinct from a touch response and requires available water to induce lateral roots along a contacted surface. X-ray microscale computed tomography and 3D reconstruction of soil-grown root systems demonstrate that such responses also occur under physiologically relevant conditions. Using early-stage lateral root markers, we show that hydropatterning acts before the initiation stage and likely determines the circumferential position at which lateral root founder cells are specified. Hydropatterning is independent of endogenous abscisic acid signaling, distinguishing it from a classic water-stress response. Higher water availability induces the biosynthesis and transport of the lateral root-inductive signal auxin through local regulation of tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 and PIN-formed 3, both of which are necessary for normal hydropatterning. Our work suggests that water availability is sensed and interpreted at the suborgan level and locally patterns a wide variety of developmental processes in the root.

  20. The Effect of Humic Acid on Nutrient Composition in Broad Bean (Vicia faba L. Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sener AKINCI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids promote the conversion of mineral nutrients into forms available to plants. It also stimulates seed germination and viability, and its main effect usually being more prominent in the roots. The objective of this study was to determine of the influence of humic acid on broad bean (Vicia faba L. cultivar �Eresen 87� on root growth and development as well as nutrient uptake, during investigation in a pot experiment. Treatment with leonardite, as humic acid source positively affected both germination and harvesting, enhancing root length and biomass. Humic acid (HA caused significant increase of fresh (RFW and dry (RDW weights by 30.1% and 56.6% of broad bean roots, respectively. Flame photometer and atomic absorption spectrophotometry analyses revealed that K content was major nutrient among the tested elements. Humic acid increased the contents of Na and K significantly. The content of Ca and Fe was not significantly increased whereas Cu, Mn and Zn content decreased under HA treatment.

  1. Correlation of toxicity with lead content in root tip cells (Allium cepa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruyo, Ingrid; Fernández, Yusmary; Marcano, Letty; Montiel, Xiomara; Torrealba, Zaida

    2008-12-01

    The present study determines lead content in onion root tip cells (Allium cepa L.), correlating it with its toxicity. The treatment was carried at 25 +/- 0.5 degrees C using aqueous solutions of lead chloride at 0.1, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1 ppm for 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. For each treatment, a control where the lead solution was substituted by distilled water was included. After treatment, the meristems were fixed with a mixture of alcohol-acetic acid (3:1) and colored according to the technique of Feulgen. Lead content was quantified by graphite furnace absorption atomic spectrometry. The lead content in the roots ranged from 3.25 to 244.72 microg/g dry weight, with a direct relation with the concentration and time of exposure. A significant negative correlation was presented (r = -0.3629; p < 0.01) among lead content and root growth increment, and a positive correlation (r = 0.7750; p < 0.01) with the induction of chromosomic aberrations. In conclusion, lead is able to induce a toxic effect in the exposed roots, correlated with its content.

  2. Microscopic biomineralization processes and Zn bioavailability: a synchrotron-based investigation of Pistacia lentiscus L. roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giudici, G; Medas, D; Meneghini, C; Casu, M A; Gianoncelli, A; Iadecola, A; Podda, S; Lattanzi, P

    2015-12-01

    Plants growing on polluted soils need to control the bioavailability of pollutants to reduce their toxicity. This study aims to reveal processes occurring at the soil-root interface of Pistacia lentiscus L. growing on the highly Zn-contaminated tailings of Campo Pisano mine (SW Sardinia, Italy), in order to shed light on possible mechanisms allowing for plant adaptation. The study combines conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with advanced synchrotron-based techniques, micro-X-ray fluorescence mapping (μ-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Data analysis elucidates a mechanism used by P. lentiscus L. as response to high Zn concentration in soil. In particular, P. lentiscus roots take up Al, Si and Zn from the rhizosphere minerals in order to build biomineralizations that are part of survival strategy of the species, leading to formation of a Si-Al biomineralization coating the root epidermis. XAS analysis rules out Zn binding to organic molecules and indicates that Zn coordinates Si atoms stored in root epidermis leading to the precipitation of an amorphous Zn-silicate. These findings represent a step forward in understanding biological mechanisms and the resulting behaviour of minor and trace elements during plant-soil interaction and will have significant implications for development of phytoremediation techniques.

  3. MODIFICATION OF SILICON ABSORPTIVITY UNDER FEMTOSECOND LASER PULSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Guk,

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoreticalmodeling results of the combined influence of nonlinear absorptivity and absorption coefficient on the spatial and temporal distribution of the electron-hole plasma and the dynamics of the specific absorption flux in silicon under femtosecond laser pulse. It is shown thatincreased absorption of the hot electron gas makes the main contribution to the change in specific absorption flux. Obtained results were compared with the known views about the polariton mechanism,which is usedfor the interpretation of femtosecond laser silicon microstructuring. There aredemonstratedThe need to consider absorption capacity dynamics in the regimes assessment of ultra short laser semiconductor processing.

  4. Allometry of root branching and its relationship to root morphological and functional traits in three range grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several studies have documented the existence of correlative mechanisms that control lateral root emergence in plants. To better understand root branching responses to nutrients, root growth in three range grasses [Whitmar cultivar of bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) Love), Hyc...

  5. Environment friendly route of iron oxide nanoparticles from Zingiber officinale (ginger) root extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin Hui, Yau; Yi Peng, Teoh; Wei Wen, Liu; Zhong Xian, Ooi; Peck Loo, Kiew

    2016-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared from the reaction between the Zingiber officinale (ginger) root extracts and ferric chloride solution at 50°C for 2 h in mild stirring condition. The synthesized powder forms of nanoparticles were further characterized by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction spectrometry. UV-Vis analysis shows the absorption peak of iron oxide nanoparticles is appeared at 370 nm. The calculation of crystallite size from the XRD showed that the average particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles was 68.43 nm. Therefore, this eco-friendly technique is low cost and large scale nanoparticles synthesis to fulfill the demand of various applications.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Sealing Ability, Water Absorption, and Solubility of Three Temporary Restorative Materials: Anin vitroStudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, A R; Shantha Rani, N; V Naik, Saraswathi

    2017-01-01

    The quality of the coronal seal of root canal filling material is important for periapical health. Absorption of water or saliva by the temporary restorative materials leads to dimensional changes, loss of retention, staining and breaking in margin contours. Hence this study was carried out to evaluate and compare the sealing properties, water absorption and solubility of IRM (intermediate restorative material), Cavit G and GC Caviton. Experimental, in vitro intergroup randomized control trial. 36 non carious premolars were randomly selected assigned to three groups, 12 teeth in each. Standard endodontic access cavities of approximately 4x4mm wide were prepared followed by the root canal obturation with Gutta-percha and restoration with experimental materials. For microleakage testing dye penetration method was used with 2% methylene blue dye. Followed by evaluation and scoring under stereomicroscope at 40x magnification. Disc shaped 12 specimens for each group were prepared for each material, stored in desiccator at 37° C, weighed daily to verify mass stabilization (dry mass,m1). Thereafter, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7days to obtain the mass after saturation with water (m2). The specimens were placed in the desiccators again, at 37° C, and reweighed until a constant dry mass is obtained (m3). Water absorption (WS) and solubility (SL) was determined by using the formulas, WS = m3 - m2/V and SL= ml - m3/ V. GC Caviton showed least microleakage and least water absorption followed by IRM and Cavit G, the differences were statistically highly significant ( p Cavit G. Prabhakar AR, Rani NS, Naik SV. Comparative Evaluation of Sealing Ability, Water Absorption, and Solubility of Three Temporary Restorative Materials: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(2):136-141.

  7. In silico prediction of percutaneous absorption and disposition kinetics of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longjian; Han, Lujia; Saib, Ouarda; Lian, Guoping

    2015-05-01

    To develop in-silico model for predicting percutaneous absorption and disposition kinetics of chemicals in skin layers so as to facilitate the design of transdermal drug delivery systems and skin care products, and risk assessment of occupational or consumer exposure. A general-purpose computer model for simulating skin permeation, absorption and disposition kinetics in the stratum corneum, viable dermis and dermis has been developed. Equations have been proposed for determining the partition and diffusion properties of chemicals by considering molecular partition, binding and mobility in skin layers. In vitro skin penetration data of 12 chemicals was used to validate the model. The observed and simulated permeation and disposition in skin layers were compared for 12 tested chemicals. For most tested chemicals, the experimental and model results are in good agreement with the coefficient of determination >0.80 and relative root mean squared error silico simulation of percutaneous permeation, absorption and disposition kinetics of wide chemical space. The model produced results in good agreement with experimental data of 12 chemicals, suggesting a much improved framework to support transdermal delivery of drug and cosmetic actives as well as integrated risk assessment.

  8. Grapevine water absorption in different soils. A spatio-temporal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillante, Luca; Bois, Benjamin; Lévêque, Jean; Mathieu, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Hillslope vineyards show complex water dynamics between soil and plants. To gain further insight of this relationship, 8 grapevine plots were monitored during two vintages (2011-2013), on Corton Hill, Burgundy, France. Grapevine water status was monitored weekly by surveying water potential, and at harvest, using δ13C analysis of grape juice. Soil volumetric humidity was also measured weekly, using TDR probes. A pedotransfer function was developed to transform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) into Soil Volume Water and therefore to spatialise and describe variations in space and time in the Fraction of Transpirable Soil Water (FTSW). During the two years of monitoring, grapevines experienced great variation in water status, which ranged from low to substantial water deficit. With this freshly developed method, it was possible to observe differences in water absorption pattern by roots, in different soils, and at different depth. Great heterogeneity was observed, both laterally and vertically in grapevine water absorption. The contribution of each soil region to plant water status varies according to grapevine water status. It is different between day and night and depends from soil characteristics. It is to our knowledge the first time that water absorption by grapevine is revealed in space (2D) and time, and has therefore allowed a deeper comprehension of plant and soil dynamics in grapevine.

  9. Exciton absorption in narrow armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monozon, B.S. [Physics Department, Marine Technical University, 3 Lotsmanskaya Str., 190008 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schmelcher, P., E-mail: pschmelc@physnet.uni-hamburg.de [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    We develop an analytical approach to the exciton optical absorption for narrow gap armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNR). We focus on the regime of dominant size quantization in combination with the attractive electron–hole interaction. An adiabatic separation of slow and fast motions leads via the two-body Dirac equation to the isolated and coupled subband approximations. Discrete and continuous exciton states are in general coupled and form quasi-Rydberg series of purely discrete and resonance type character. The corresponding oscillator strengths and widths are derived. We show that the exciton peaks are blue-shifted, become broader and increase in magnitude upon narrowing the ribbon. At the edge of a subband the singularity related to the 1D density of states is transformed into finite absorption via the presence of the exciton. Our analytical results are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods including numerical approaches. Estimates of the expected experimental values are provided for realistic AGNR.

  10. Salicylate absorption from a bismuth subsalicylate preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, S; Chen, S L; Pickering, L K; Cleary, T G; Ericsson, C D; Hulse, M

    1981-06-01

    The active ingredient in Pepto-Bismol (PB) (Norwich-Eaton), a common antidiarrheal, is bismuth subsalicylate. The absorption of salicylate after oral PB was studied in six fasted men. Plasma concentrations of total salicylate and the urinary excretion profile of salicylate were determined as a function of time and dose. After 60 ml PB, 500.1 +/- 33.6 mg (mean +/- SD) salicylate were recovered in urine, representing 95.0 +/- 6.4% of salicylic acid equivalents in 60 ml of the formulation. Peak plasma salicylate levels were reached 0.5 to 3 hr after ingestion and averaged 40.1 +/- 17.3 micrograms/ml. Absorption of salicylate was also essentially complete after 15- and 30-ml doses of the antidiarrheal preparation, and a linear relationship between dose and recovery of salicylate in the urine was found. Salicylate kinetics was nonlinear after a multiple-dose regimen of 60 ml every 6 hr for five doses.

  11. Medication absorption for patients with an ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan

    The Association of Stoma Care Nurses UK (2013) has stressed that it is the role of the stoma care nurse to provide education to patients, carers, prescribers and other nurses. This includes the area of medication management. Ensuring patients with an ileostomy receive their medication in a form they can absorb is of importance to every stoma care nurse. Prescribing for patients with a stoma calls for special care. Each patient with an ileostomy requires assessment of their medication regimen for the purpose of identifying potential medical absorption issues. However, from an extensive literature search, it is evident that there is very little literature published on this subject. This article looks at the considerations to take into account when prescribing medication for ileostomy patients, and examines the results of a clinical audit on medication prescribers' knowledge of the impact of ileostomy formation on the absorption of medication.

  12. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  13. AGN warm absorption with the ATHENA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różańska, Agata; Gronkiewicz, Dominik; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof; Adhikari, Tek Prasad; Rataj, Mirosław; Skup, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    X-ray astronomy requires satellites to make progress in searching the distribution of hot matter in the Universe. Approximately 15 years period of time is needed for full construction of the flight instrument from the mission concept up to the launch. A new generation X-ray telescope ATHENA (the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) was approved by European Space Agency as a large mission with a launch foreseen in 2028. In this paper we show how microcalorimeter on the board of ATHENA will help us to study warm absorption observed in active galactic nuclei (AGN). We show that future observations will allow us to identify hundreds of lines from highly ionized elements and to measure Galactic warm absorption with very high precision.

  14. Absorption and photoluminescence in organic cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Felipe; Spano, Frank C.

    2017-05-01

    Organic microcavities can be engineered to reach exotic quantum regimes of strong and ultrastrong light-matter coupling. However, the microscopic interpretation of their spectroscopic signals can be challenging due to the competition between coherent and dissipative processes involving electrons, vibrations, and cavity photons. We develop here a theoretical framework based on the Holstein-Tavis-Cummings model and a Markovian treatment of dissipation to account for previously unexplained spectroscopic features of organic microcavities consistently. We identify conditions for the formation of dark vibronic polaritons, a class of light-matter excitations that are not visible in absorption but lead to strong photoluminescence lines. We show that photon leakage from dark vibronic polaritons can be responsible for enhancing photoluminescence at the lower polariton frequency, and also can explain the apparent breakdown of reciprocity between absorption and emission in the vicinity of the bare molecular transition frequency. Successful comparison with experimental data demonstrates the applicability of our theory.

  15. Optical absorption spectra of Ag-11 isomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of the three most; stable structural isomers of the Ag-11 cluster were calculated using the time-dependent, density functional theory within the Casida formalism. The slightly different, spectra, of the isomers may permit the identification of the ground-stale confi......The optical absorption spectra of the three most; stable structural isomers of the Ag-11 cluster were calculated using the time-dependent, density functional theory within the Casida formalism. The slightly different, spectra, of the isomers may permit the identification of the ground......-stale configuration predominantly present in the laboratory beams based on a direct comparison between the calculated photoabsorptiou response for the Ag-11 isomers and the measured spectra of medium-size silver clusters trapped in noble gas Ar and Ne matrices at different, temperatures. This assignment is confirmed...

  16. S-wave pion absorption by nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachenberg, F.; Huefner, J.; Pirner, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The absorption of pions by nuclei leads to an imaginary part in the optical potential for pionic atoms. The imaginary part is calculated by assuming the rescattering mechanism to dominate. The pion scatters off-shell by one nucleon and is absorbed by a second one. The ..pi..N scattering amplitude is constructed from a field theoretical model. Its off-mass shell properties prove important to reproduce the data.

  17. Improving the system of absorption unit refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokhol'chenko V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problems of improving the absorption stove cooling system for high quality liquid smoke producing have been discussed in the paper. There is absorption stove construction presented which includes absorber, heat exchanger, low-temperature chamber, ultrasound radiator, and water spray generator. The data on the color depending of the experimental liquid smoke on main factors influencing the process – the coolant temperature and amount of fuel burned – have been presented. The specific surface of the fuel mass fraction of water in the fuel has been determined according to standard procedures. Transparency, color and intensity of staining smoke fluid have been determined organoleptically. The liquid smoke according to the requirements of the current normative documents on safety performance indicators has been tested by standard methods: determination of benzo(apyrene, phenol compounds and heavy metals. The equation for estimation the complex quality criterion of experimental liquid smoke on the basis of its chemical composition has been presented. The main factors influencing the complex quality criteria of experimental liquid smoke have been given there. They include the sound pressure level, amount of wood raw material required for pyrolysis, heat exchanging surface, refrigerant temperature, and ultrasound water spray generator efficiency. After processing the experimental data the regression equation of producing liquid smoke by absorption has been received. With the help of the mathematical modeling for absorption process of smoke components by fine-dispersed spray the rational parameters of liquid smoke processing have been founded. The project of technological instructions for the liquid smoke production by using the wood smoke and acoustically generated aerosol has been designed. The project of technical requirement "Liquid smoke Antonio Silver" has been designed as well; it has been tested at producing the commercial batch of dried

  18. Macromolecular absorption and cows' milk allergy.

    OpenAIRE

    Juvonen, P; Jakobsson, I; Lindberg, T.

    1991-01-01

    The absorption of macromolecules was analysed by measuring serum concentrations of human alpha-lactalbumin after feeding human milk, using a competitive radioimmunoassay. The control group consisted of 78 children fed by cows' milk formula; concentrations of alpha-lactalbumin in their serum were low. The median concentrations in the different age groups varied between 7-13 micrograms alpha-lactalbumin/1 serum/1 human milk/kg body weight. Twenty-eight children with cows' milk allergy were stud...

  19. Physicochemical patterns of ozone absorption by wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Results from studying aspen and pine wood ozonation are presented. The effect the concentration of ozone, the reagent residence time, and the content of water in a sample of wood has on ozone consumption rate and ozone demand are analyzed. The residence time is shown to determine the degree of ozone conversion degree and the depth of substrate destruction. The main patterns of ozone absorption by wood with different moisture content are found. Ways of optimizing the ozonation of plant biomass are outlined.

  20. Aortic root reoperations after pulmonary autograft implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bekkers (Jos); L.M.A. Klieverik (Loes Maria Anne); G. Bol-Raap (Goris); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To report the results of aortic root reoperations after pulmonary autograft implantation. Methods: All consecutive patients in our prospective Ross research database were selected for analysis, and additional information for patients requiring reoperation was obtained from the

  1. Naine objektistab meest / Fideelia-Signe Roots

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roots, Fideelia-Signe, 1976-

    2009-01-01

    Fideelia-Signe Roots Eesti Kunstiakadeemias 2009. a. kevadsemestril enda poolt läbi viidud valikainekursusest "Kunstiteose anatoomiast mehe anatoomiani", mis lõppes näitusega "Tõuseb / ei tõuse" Eesti Tervishoiumuuseumis, avatud 31. maini

  2. Power Efficient Division and Square Root Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    shows that division and square root units based on the digit-recurrence algorithm offer the best tradeoff delay-area-power. Moreover, the two operations can be combined in a single unit. Here, we present a radix-16 combined division and square root unit obtained by overlapping two radix-4 stages......Although division and square root are not frequent operations, most processors implement them in hardware to not compromise the overall performance. Two classes of algorithms implement division or square root: digit-recurrence and multiplicative (e.g., Newton-Raphson) algorithms. Previous work....... The proposed unit is compared to similar solutions based on the digit-recurrence algorithm and it is compared to a unit based on the multiplicative Newton-Raphson algorithm....

  3. Hidden branches: developments in root system architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmont, Karen S; Sibout, Richard; Hardtke, Christian S

    2007-01-01

    The root system is fundamentally important for plant growth and survival because of its role in water and nutrient uptake. Therefore, plants rely on modulation of root system architecture (RSA) to respond to a changing soil environment. Although RSA is a highly plastic trait and varies both between and among species, the basic root system morphology and its plasticity are controlled by inherent genetic factors. These mediate the modification of RSA, mostly at the level of root branching, in response to a suite of biotic and abiotic factors. Recent progress in the understanding of the molecular basis of these responses suggests that they largely feed through hormone homeostasis and signaling pathways. Novel factors implicated in the regulation of RSA in response to the myriad endogenous and exogenous signals are also increasingly isolated through alternative approaches such as quantitative trait locus analysis.

  4. Coumarins from roots of Clausena excavata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wen-Wen; Zheng, Yu-Qing; Chen, Yi-Shan; Zhao, Si-Meng; Ji, Chang-Jiu; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Two new coumarins, clauexcavatins A (1) and B (2), along with seven known ones (3-9), were isolated from the roots of Clausena excavata Burm. f. (Rutaceae). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data.

  5. Electromagnetic-radiation absorption by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunkenheimer, P.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Köhler, M.; Wolf, M.; Schwab, M.; Loidl, A.

    2017-12-01

    Why does a microwave oven work? How does biological tissue absorb electromagnetic radiation? Astonishingly, we do not have a definite answer to these simple questions because the microscopic processes governing the absorption of electromagnetic waves by water are largely unclarified. This absorption can be quantified by dielectric loss spectra, which reveal a huge peak at a frequency of the exciting electric field of about 20 GHz and a gradual tailing off toward higher frequencies. The microscopic interpretation of such spectra is highly controversial and various superpositions of relaxation and resonance processes ascribed to single-molecule or molecule-cluster motions have been proposed for their analysis. By combining dielectric, microwave, THz, and far-infrared spectroscopy, here we provide nearly continuous temperature-dependent broadband spectra of water. Moreover, we find that corresponding spectra for aqueous solutions reveal the same features as pure water. However, in contrast to the latter, crystallization in these solutions can be avoided by supercooling. As different spectral contributions tend to disentangle at low temperatures, this enables us to deconvolute them when approaching the glass transition under cooling. We find that the overall spectral development, including the 20 GHz feature (employed for microwave heating), closely resembles the behavior known for common supercooled liquids. Thus water's absorption of electromagnetic waves at room temperature is not unusual but very similar to that of glass-forming liquids at elevated temperatures, deep in the low-viscosity liquid regime, and should be interpreted along similar lines.

  6. Falling Liquid Films in Absorption Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshihiko

    The absorption machines of the lithium bromide-water type have recently been established as heat source equipments for residential and industrial use, which include refrigerating machines, heat pumps, and heat transformers. Several advanced cycle machines have also been proposed and tested. All of the absorption machines consist fundamentally of four kinds of heat exchangers, i.e. evaporator, absorber, generator, and condenser. The horizontal or vertical falling film system is usually applied to these heat exchangers, since the pressure drop which causes an undesirable change in the fluid temperature is relatively small in either system. The horizontal system is popular for the present, while the vertical system is going to be developed promisingly. This may save an installation space and also fit a plan for the Lorentz cycle. The purpose of this paper is to survey the available information for increasing heat and mass transfer rates in the heat exchangers of absorption machines. Emphasis is placed on the hydrodynamic characteristics of falling liquid films in absorbers and generators. The following topics are covered in this paper: 1. Characteristics of thin liquid films over horizontal tubes 2. Characteristics of wavy thin liquid films flowing down the vertical or inclined wall surface 3. Effect of the artificial surface roughness on the heat and mass transfer rates 4. Enhancement in the heat and mass transfer rates by the Marangoni convection 5. Conditions of film breakdown and the minimum wetting rates.

  7. Endovascular vein harvest: systemic carbon dioxide absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew M; Schwartz, Carl S; Bert, Arthur; Hurlburt, Peter; Gough, Jeffrey; Stearns, Gary; Singh, Arun K

    2006-06-01

    Endovascular vein harvest (EDVH) requires CO(2) insufflation to expand the subcutaneous space, allowing visualization and dissection of the saphenous vein. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of CO(2) absorption during EDVH. Prospective observational study. Single tertiary care hospital. Sixty patients (30 EDVH and 30 open-vein harvest) undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Hemodynamic, procedural, and laboratory data were collected prior to (baseline), during, and at it the conclusion (final) of vein harvesting. Data were also collected during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Data were compared by using t tests, analysis of variance, and correlation statistics when needed. There were significant increases in arterial CO(2) (PaCO(2), 35%) and decreases in pH (1.35%) during EDVH. These were associated with increases in heart rate, mean blood pressure, and cardiac output. Within the EDVH group, greater elevations (>10 mmHg) in PaCO2 were more likely during difficult harvest procedures, and these patients exhibited greater increase in heart rate. Elevated CO(2) persisted during CPB, requiring higher systemic gas flows and greater use of phenylephrine to maintain desired hemodynamics. EDVH was associated with systemic absorption of CO(2). Greater absorption was more likely in difficult procedures and was associated with greater hemodynamic changes requiring medical therapy.

  8. Absorption toward Red BL Lac Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocke, J. T.; Rector, T. A.

    Based upon the prototypical high-z molecular absorber, PKS 1413+135, we present a summary of properties and search strategies for new high-z absorbers. It is suspicious that two of the four high-z molecular absorbers are BL Lac Objects (PKS 1413+135 & B2 0218+357), suggesting a link between the presence of the foreground absorber and the low equivalent width emission lines of BL Lacs. Also, based upon a new optical absorption line study of radio-selected BL Lac Objects (Stocke & Rector 1997), we find a large overabundance of intervening Mg II absorption line systems in these objects compared to quasars, which also seems to link low equivalent width emission lines to the presence of foreground absorption. Not only does this suggest that the optical characteristics of BL Lacs can be created by microlensing due to stars associated with foreground absorbing gas but also that red BL Lacs are a rich sample to search for new examples of foreground absorbers.

  9. The absorption spectrum of cis-azobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetráková, Ľubica; Ladányi, Vít; Al Anshori, Jamaludin; Dvořák, Pavel; Wirz, Jakob; Heger, Dominik

    2017-12-06

    Azobenzene is a prototypical photochromic molecule existing in two isomeric forms, which has numerous photochemical applications that rely on a precise knowledge of the molar absorption coefficients (ε). Careful analysis revealed that the previously reported absorption spectra of the "pure" isomers were in fact mutually contaminated by small amounts of the other isomer. Therefore, the absorption spectra of both trans- and cis-azobenzene in methanol were re-determined at temperatures of 5-45 °C. The thermodynamically more stable trans-azobenzene was prepared by warming the solution in the dark. To obtain the spectrum of cis-azobenzene three methods were used, which gave consistent results within the limits of error. The method based on the subtraction of derivative spectra coupled with a global analysis of the spectra recorded during thermal cis-trans isomerization is shown to give slightly more reliable results than the method using isomeric ratios determined by 1 H-NMR. The described methods are readily generalizable to other azobenzene derivatives and to other photochromic systems. The practical implication of the re-determined ε values is demonstrated by a very high precision of spectrophotometric species analysis in azobenzene isomeric mixtures. The new ε values imply that the previously reported quantum yields must be revised.

  10. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharti, Vineet [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Wasan, Ajay [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Natarajan, Vasant [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-07-15

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch—near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers. - Highlights: • Wavelength mismatch effect is investigated in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). • An experimental realization of 4-level vee + ladder system using energy levels of rubidium atom is presented. • EIA resonances are studied under different conditions of wavelength mismatch. • Possibility of observation of EIA using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  11. Coherent perfect absorption in photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The ability to drive a system with an external input is a fundamental aspect of light-matter interaction. The coherent perfect absorption (CPA) phenomenon extends to the general multibeam interference phenomenology the well known critical coupling concepts. This interferometric control of absorption can be employed to reach full delivery of optical energy to nanoscale systems such as plasmonic nanoparticles, and multi-port interference can be used to enhance the absorption of a nanoscale device when it is embedded in a strongly scattering system, with potential applications to nanoscale sensing. Here we review the two-port CPA in reference to photonic structures which can resonantly couple to the external fields. A revised two-port theory of CPA is illustrated, which relies on the Scattering Matrix formalism and is valid for all linear two-port systems with reciprocity. Through a semiclassical approach, treating two-port critical coupling conditions in a non-perturbative regime, it is demonstrated that the st...

  12. ROOT I/O in Javascript - Reading ROOT files in a browser

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    A JavaScript version of the ROOT I/O subsystem is being developed, in order to be able to browse (inspect) ROOT files in a platform independent way. This allows the content of ROOT files to be displayed in most web browsers, without having to install ROOT or any other software on the server or on the client. This gives a direct access to ROOT files from new (e.g. portable) devices in a light way. It will be possible to display simple graphical objects such as histograms and graphs (TH1, TH2, TH3, TProfile, TGraph, ...). The rendering will first be done with an external JavaScript graphic library, before investigating a way to produce graphics closer to what ROOT supports on other platforms (X11, Windows).

  13. Immunology of root resorption: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Root resorption seems to be related to a complex combination of mechanical factors and biological activity, which comprehends the role of immunologic structures including specialized cells. The aim of this research was to explain the development of the process - from mineralization to the destruction of hard tissues - and the possible relationship between root resorption and immunology, along with discussing current concepts described in the literature.

  14. Anatomical aspects of angiosperm root evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, James L; Fernando, Danilo D

    2013-07-01

    Anatomy had been one of the foundations in our understanding of plant evolutionary trends and, although recent evo-devo concepts are mostly based on molecular genetics, classical structural information remains useful as ever. Of the various plant organs, the roots have been the least studied, primarily because of the difficulty in obtaining materials, particularly from large woody species. Therefore, this review aims to provide an overview of the information that has accumulated on the anatomy of angiosperm roots and to present possible evolutionary trends between representatives of the major angiosperm clades. This review covers an overview of the various aspects of the evolutionary origin of the root. The results and discussion focus on angiosperm root anatomy and evolution covering representatives from basal angiosperms, magnoliids, monocots and eudicots. We use information from the literature as well as new data from our own research. The organization of the root apical meristem (RAM) of Nymphaeales allows for the ground meristem and protoderm to be derived from the same group of initials, similar to those of the monocots, whereas in Amborellales, magnoliids and eudicots, it is their protoderm and lateral rootcap which are derived from the same group of initials. Most members of Nymphaeales are similar to monocots in having ephemeral primary roots and so adventitious roots predominate, whereas Amborellales, Austrobaileyales, magnoliids and eudicots are generally characterized by having primary roots that give rise to a taproot system. Nymphaeales and monocots often have polyarch (heptarch or more) steles, whereas the rest of the basal angiosperms, magnoliids and eudicots usually have diarch to hexarch steles. Angiosperms exhibit highly varied structural patterns in RAM organization; cortex, epidermis and rootcap origins; and stele patterns. Generally, however, Amborellales, magnoliids and, possibly, Austrobaileyales are more similar to eudicots, and the

  15. Infection of Narcissus Roots by Aphelenchoides subtenuis

    OpenAIRE

    Mor, M.; Spiegel, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The widespread destruction of commercially grown bulbs of Narcissus tazetta papyraceus (Paper White) has been reported in Israel. This phenomenon is usually characterized by a premature yellowing of the foliage, accompanied by root rot and dark, sunken basal plates. This study confirmed thatAphelenchoides subtenuis is the main cause of the basal plate disease of Narcissus. In contrast to other Aphelenchoides species, which feed on stems or leaves, A. subtenuis penetrates Narcissus roots. In o...

  16. Relationships between root respiration rate and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy in Larix gmelinii and Fraxinus mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shuxia; McLaughlin, Neil B; Gu, Jiacun; Li, Xingpeng; Wang, Zhengquan

    2013-06-01

    Tree roots are highly heterogeneous in form and function. Previous studies revealed that fine root respiration was related to root morphology, tissue nitrogen (N) concentration and temperature, and varied with both soil depth and season. The underlying mechanisms governing the relationship between root respiration and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy along the root branch order have not been addressed. Here, we examined these relationships of the first- to fifth-order roots for near surface roots (0-10 cm) of 22-year-old larch (Larix gmelinii L.) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica L.) plantations. Root respiration rate at 18 °C was measured by gas phase O2 electrodes across the first five branching order roots (the distal roots numbered as first order) at three times of the year. Root parameters of root diameter, specific root length (SRL), tissue N concentration, total non-structural carbohydrates (starch and soluble sugar) concentration (TNC), cortical thickness and stele diameter were also measured concurrently. With increasing root order, root diameter, TNC and the ratio of root TNC to tissue N concentration increased, while the SRL, tissue N concentration and cortical proportion decreased. Root respiration rate also monotonically decreased with increasing root order in both species. Cortical tissue (including exodermis, cortical parenchyma and endodermis) was present in the first three order roots, and cross sections of the cortex for the first-order root accounted for 68% (larch) and 86% (ash) of the total cross section of the root. Root respiration was closely related to root traits such as diameter, SRL, tissue N concentration, root TNC : tissue N ratio and stele-to-root diameter proportion among the first five orders, which explained up to 81-94% of variation in the rate of root respiration for larch and up to 83-93% for ash. These results suggest that the systematic variations of root respiration rate within tree fine root system are possibly due to the

  17. Root growth movements: waving and skewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rahul; Bassham, Diane C

    2014-05-01

    Roots anchor a plant in the soil, acquire nutrition and respond to environmental cues. Roots perform these functions using intricate movements and a variety of pathways have been implicated in mediating their growth patterns. These include endogenous genetic factors, perception of multiple environmental stimuli, signaling pathways interacting with hormonal dynamics and cellular processes of rapid cell elongation. In this review we attempt to consolidate our understanding of two specific types of root movements, waving and skewing, that arise on the surface of growth media, and how they are regulated by various genes and factors. These include crucial factors that are part of a complex nexus of processes including polar auxin transport and cytoskeletal dynamics. This knowledge can be extrapolated in the future for engineering plants with root architecture better suited for different soil and growth conditions such as abiotic stresses or even extended spaceflight. Technological innovations and interdisciplinary approaches promise to allow the tracking of root movements on a much finer scale, thus helping to expedite the discovery of more nodes in the regulation of root waving and skewing and movement in general. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptive significance of root grafting in trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.; Jones, R.

    1988-12-31

    Root grafting has long been observed in forest trees but the adaptive significance of this trait has not been fully explained. Various authors have proposed that root grafting between trees contributes to mechanical support by linking adjacent root systems. Keeley proposes that this trait would be of greatest advantage in swamps where soils provide poor mechanical support. He provides as evidence a greenhouse study of Nyssa sylvatica Marsh in which seedlings of swamp provenance formed between-individual root grafts more frequently than upland provenance seedlings. In agreement with this within-species study, Keeley observed that arid zone species rarely exhibit grafts. Keeley also demonstrated that vines graft less commonly than trees, and herbs never do. Since the need for mechanical support coincides with this trend, these data seem to support his model. In this paper, the authors explore the mechanisms and ecological significance of root grafting, leading to predictions of root grafting incidence. Some observations support and some contradict the mechanical support hypothesis.

  19. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  1. Root Branching Is a Leading Root Trait of the Plant Economics Spectrum in Temperate Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Rebecca; Alings, Katrin; Meier, Ina C

    2017-01-01

    Global vegetation models use conceived relationships between functional traits to simulate ecosystem responses to environmental change. In this context, the concept of the leaf economics spectrum (LES) suggests coordinated leaf trait variation, and separates species which invest resources into short-lived leaves with a high expected energy return rate from species with longer-lived leaves and slower energy return. While it has been assumed that being fast (acquisitive) or slow (conservative) is a general feature for all organ systems, the translation of the LES into a root economics spectrum (RES) for tree species has been hitherto inconclusive. This may be partly due to the assumption that the bulk of tree fine roots have similar uptake functions as leaves, despite the heterogeneity of their environments and resources. In this study we investigated well-established functional leaf and stature traits as well as a high number of fine root traits (14 traits split by different root orders) of 13 dominant or subdominant temperate tree species of Central Europe, representing two phylogenetic groups (gymnosperms and angiosperms) and two mycorrhizal associations (arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal). We found reflected variation in leaf and lower-order root traits in some (surface areas and C:N) but not all (N content and longevity) traits central to the LES. Accordingly, the LES was not mirrored belowground. We identified significant phylogenetic signal in morphological lower-order root traits, i.e., in root tissue density, root diameter, and specific root length. By contrast, root architecture (root branching) was influenced by the mycorrhizal association type which developed independent from phylogeny of the host tree. In structural equation models we show that root branching significantly influences both belowground (direct influence on root C:N) and aboveground (indirect influences on specific leaf area and leaf longevity) traits which relate to resource investment and

  2. Capturing Arabidopsis root architecture dynamics with ROOT-FIT reveals diversity in responses to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, Magdalena M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Mol, Selena; Feron, Richard; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Haring, Michel A; Testerink, Christa

    2014-11-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles in water extraction efficiency and ion exclusion. To establish which RSA parameters are responsive to salt stress, we performed a detailed time course experiment in which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings were grown on agar plates under different salt stress conditions. We captured RSA dynamics with quadratic growth functions (root-fit) and summarized the salt-induced differences in RSA dynamics in three growth parameters: MR elongation, average LR elongation, and increase in number of LRs. In the ecotype Columbia-0 accession of Arabidopsis, salt stress affected MR elongation more severely than LR elongation and an increase in LRs, leading to a significantly altered RSA. By quantifying RSA dynamics of 31 different Arabidopsis accessions in control and mild salt stress conditions, different strategies for regulation of MR and LR meristems and root branching were revealed. Different RSA strategies partially correlated with natural variation in abscisic acid sensitivity and different Na(+)/K(+) ratios in shoots of seedlings grown under mild salt stress. Applying root-fit to describe the dynamics of RSA allowed us to uncover the natural diversity in root morphology and cluster it into four response types that otherwise would have been overlooked. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Hydraulic conductivity in roots of ponderosa pine infected with black-stain (Leptographium wageneri) or annosus (Heterobasidion annosum) root disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Gladwin; Kelsey, Rick G.; Thies, Walter G.

    1998-05-01

    Roots from healthy and diseased mature ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Laws., trees were excavated from a site near Burns, Oregon. The diseased trees were infected with black-stain root disease, Leptographium wageneri Kendrick, or annosus root disease, Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref., or both. Axial hydraulic conductivity of the roots was measured under a positive head pressure of 5 kPa, and the conducting area was stained with safranin dye to determine specific conductivity (k(s)). In diseased roots, only 8-12% of the cross-sectional xylem area conducted water. Resin-soaked xylem completely restricted water transport and accounted for 13-16% of the loss in conducting area. In roots with black-stain root disease, 17% of the loss in conducting area was associated with unstained xylem, possibly resulting from occlusions or embolisms. Based on the entire cross-sectional area of infected roots, the k(s) of roots infected with black-stain root disease was 4.6% of that for healthy roots, whereas the k(s) of roots infected with annosus root disease was 2.6% of that for healthy roots. Although these low values were partly the result of the presence of a large number of diseased roots (72%) with no conducting xylem, the k(s) of functional xylem of diseased roots was only 33% of that for healthy roots. The low k(s) values of functional xylem in diseased roots may be caused by fungus induced occlusions preceding cavitation and embolism of tracheids. The k(s) of disease-free roots from diseased trees was only 70% of that for healthy roots from healthy trees. The disease-free roots had the same mean tracheid diameter and tissue density as the healthy roots, suggesting that the lower k(s) in disease-free roots of diseased trees may also have been caused by partial xylary occlusions.

  4. THE ABSORPTION OF ADRENALIN AFTER INTRATRACHEAL INJECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, J; Gates, F L

    1916-06-01

    In the preceding pages we have submitted evidence which shows that a simple intratracheal injection of a solution in a normally breathing rabbit penetrates within a few seconds to the alveoli, chiefly those of the left lower lobe; that absorption is rapid and well maintained; and that the procedure may be repeated effectively a number of times even with a substance like adrenalin which decreases absorption. It was also shown that absorption of adrenalin from the lung could be obtained at a time when double the dose given intramuscularly exerted no blood pressure effect whatever, and that absorption could still take place after the development of pulmonary edema, when there was an undoubted dilution of the injected solution with a serum-containing liquid and when a diminution of the absorptive field had occurred. The solution injected, after reaching the alveoli, is probably largely taken up by the capillaries of the pulmonary veins. This is indicated by the great rapidity with which an intratracheal injection of adrenalin may cause a rise of blood pressure. In numerous instances, for example, the pressure began to rise less than 5 seconds after the completion of an injection, equaling and even surpassing in rapidity of effect an intramuscular injection. Absorption by the lymphatics probably plays a secondary part, an assumption rendered all themore likely if we consider that lymph nodes are interpolated in the lymphatic pulmonary path, where the bed of the lymph stream becomes greatly widened and the current slowed. Injection into the lungs, however, offers another advantage due to the vascular arrangement of the absorbing field which could be of value therapeutically. Absorption of liquids injected into the lung probably takes place largely through the capillaries of the pulmonary veins; to a slight extent possibly through the capillaries of the bronchial veins which empty partly into the pulmonary veins, partly into the azygos veins; and probably some absorption

  5. Optical absorption of charged excitons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the absorption coefficient of charged excitons in carbon nanotubes. We investigate the temperature and damping dependence of the absorption spectra. We show that the trion peak in the spectrum is asymmetric for temperatures greater than approximately 1 K whereas...... the absorption peak arising from excitons is symmetric. We expect the positive and negative trion absorption line shapes to be identical, independently of the chiral index (n,m)....

  6. Laser ultrasonic absorption measurement in fatigue-damaged materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxenburger, S; Arnold, W

    2002-05-01

    Changes in the materials microstructure caused by fatigue processes affect the ultrasonic absorption. Thus, quantitative measurement of the ultrasonic absorption should provide an indirect measure of fatigue damage. In this paper we present a study of the ultrasonic absorption in fatigue-damaged metals using the reverberation technique in combination with laser-based ultrasound. The reverberation technique allows one to measure absorption independently of scattering.

  7. Model Persamaan Massa Karbon Akar Pohon dan Root-Shoot Ratio Massa Karbon (Equation Models of Tree Root Carbon Mass and Root-Shoot Carbon Mass Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias .

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The case study was conducted in the area of Acacia mangium plantation at BKPH Parung Panjang, KPH Bogor. The objective of the study was to formulate equation models of tree root carbon mass and root to shoot carbon mass ratio of the plantation. It was found that carbon content in the parts of tree biomass (stems, branches, twigs, leaves, and roots was different, in which the highest and the lowest carbon content was in the main stem of the tree and in the leaves, respectively. The main stem and leaves of tree accounted for 70% of tree biomass. The root-shoot ratio of root biomass to tree biomass above the ground and the root-shoot ratio of root biomass to main stem biomass was 0.1443 and 0.25771, respectively, in which 75% of tree carbon mass was in the main stem and roots of tree. It was also found that the root-shoot ratio of root carbon mass to tree carbon mass above the ground and the root-shoot ratio of root carbon mass to tree main stem carbon mass was 0.1442 and 0.2034, respectively. All allometric equation models of tree root carbon mass of A. mangium have a high goodness-of-fit as indicated by its high adjusted R2.Keywords: Acacia mangium, allometric, root-shoot ratio, biomass, carbon mass

  8. Modelling water uptake efficiency of root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Tron, Stefania; Schröder, Natalie; Bodner, Gernot; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake is crucial for plant productivity. Trait based breeding for more water efficient crops will enable a sustainable agricultural management under specific pedoclimatic conditions, and can increase drought resistance of plants. Mathematical modelling can be used to find suitable root system traits for better water uptake efficiency defined as amount of water taken up per unit of root biomass. This approach requires large simulation times and large number of simulation runs, since we test different root systems under different pedoclimatic conditions. In this work, we model water movement by the 1-dimensional Richards equation with the soil hydraulic properties described according to the van Genuchten model. Climatic conditions serve as the upper boundary condition. The root system grows during the simulation period and water uptake is calculated via a sink term (after Tron et al. 2015). The goal of this work is to compare different free software tools based on different numerical schemes to solve the model. We compare implementations using DUMUX (based on finite volumes), Hydrus 1D (based on finite elements), and a Matlab implementation of Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes 2000 (based on finite differences). We analyse the methods for accuracy, speed and flexibility. Using this model case study, we can clearly show the impact of various root system traits on water uptake efficiency. Furthermore, we can quantify frequent simplifications that are introduced in the modelling step like considering a static root system instead of a growing one, or considering a sink term based on root density instead of considering the full root hydraulic model (Javaux et al. 2008). References Tron, S., Bodner, G., Laio, F., Ridolfi, L., & Leitner, D. (2015). Can diversity in root architecture explain plant water use efficiency? A modeling study. Ecological modelling, 312, 200-210. Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes, R. A. (2000). Numerical simulation of infiltration, evaporation and shallow

  9. Microdialysis of Soil P: A means to mimic root uptake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack-Kirschner, Helmer; Demand, Dominic; Lang, Friederike

    2017-04-01

    Standard procedures to assess P availability in soils are based on batch experiments with various extractants. However, in most soils P nutrition is less limited by bulk stocks but by slow diffusion of phosphate through the soil solution. More comparable to the root's approach is to strip phosphate locally from the solid phase by lowering the soil-solution concentration, which can be achieved by establishing an infinite diffusional sink, such as DGT. An alternative diffusive sampling technique is microdialysis (MD), well established in pharmacokinetics. Briefly, this method uses miniaturized flow-through probes where the perfusate gets in diffusive contact to the external solution by a semipermeable membrane. Important aspects of P supply to roots resemble MD sampling. This is not only the mostly diffusive transport, but also an elongated capillary tube-like geometry of absorption. The diameter of typical commercial MD probes is around 500μm. One additional inherent feature of microdialysis is the possibility to release low-molecular substances from the perfusate by diffusion into the matrix, such as carboxylates. However, microdialysis has yet not been used for P in soils. We tested microdialysis in topsoils of an acid beech forest, of an unfertilized grassland and of a fertilized crop site. Three perfusates have been used: 1 mM KNO3, electrolyte + 0.1 mM citric acid, and electrolyte + 1 mM citric acid. We observed rates of uptake into the probes in a range between 1.5*10-15 and 6.7*10-14 mol s-1cm-1 in case of no citrate addition. Surprisingly, these uptake rates were mostly independent of the bulk stocks. Citrate addition increased P yields only in the higher concentration but not in the forest soil. The order of magnitude of MD uptake rates from the soil samples matched root-length related uptake rates from other studies. The micro-radial citrate release in MD reflects the processes controlling phosphate mobilization in the rhizosphere better than measurements

  10. Synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence measurement of metal distributions in Phragmites australis root system in the Yangtze River intertidal zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Huan; Zhang, Weiguo; Qian, Yu; Liu, Wenliang; Yu, Lizhong; Yoo, Shinjae; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jia-Jun; Eng, Christopher; Liu, Chang-Jun; Tappero, Ryan

    2016-06-15

    This study investigates the distributions of Br, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, K, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ti, V and Zn inPhragmites australisroot system and the function of Fe nanoparticles in scavenging metals in the root epidermis using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence, synchrotron transmission X-ray microscope measurement and synchrotron X-ray absorption near-edge structure techniques. The purpose of this study is to understand the mobility of metals in wetland plant root systems after their uptake from rhizosphere soils.Phragmites australissamples were collected in the Yangtze River intertidal zone in July 2013. The results indicate that Fe nanoparticles are present in the root epidermis and that other metals correlate significantly with Fe, suggesting that Fe nanoparticles play an important role in metal scavenging in the epidermis.

  11. A microscopic description of sound absorption in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    The various mechanisms which contribute to sound absorption in the atmosphere are identified and a technique for computing the contribution from each is presented. The similarities between sound absorption, laser fluorescence measurements, and the opto-acoustic effect are discussed. Finally, experimental sound absorption results are compared to predictions to test the microscopic energy transfer approach.

  12. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  13. Enhancing effect of bile salts on gastrointestinal absorption of insulin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of co-administration of two absorption enhancing bile alts, sodium glycocholate (NaGc) and sodium salicylate (NaSal), on insulin absorption via intestinal targeted delivery system. Methods: Insulin (10 IU/kg), associated with and without absorption enhancers (5 % enhancer solution of ...

  14. Is oral absorption of vigabatrin carrier-mediated?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, M. K.; Juul, R. V.; Thale, Z. I.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the intestinal transport mechanisms responsible for vigabatrin absorption in rats by developing a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model of vigabatrin oral absorption. The PK model was used to investigate whether vigabatrin absorption was carrier-mediated an...

  15. Page 1 Ultrasonic absorption in carboxylic acids 46; annular rubber ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure 1a shows that the measured ultrasonic absorption for the oxalic acid dihydrate, benzoic acid and succinic acid increases with increase in the concentration of the solute, reaches a maximum (the concentration at which the absorption maximum occurs is. Figure 1. Absorption vs concentration of carboxylic acids in ...

  16. Root exudates from grafted-root watermelon showed a certain contribution in inhibiting Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ling

    Full Text Available Grafting watermelon onto bottle gourd rootstock is commonly used method to generate resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON, but knowledge of the effect of the root exudates of grafted watermelon on this soil-borne pathogen in rhizosphere remains limited. To investigate the root exudate profiles of the own-root bottle gourd, grafted-root watermelon and own-root watermelon, recirculating hydroponic culture system was developed to continuously trap these root exudates. Both conidial germination and growth of FON were significantly decreased in the presence of root exudates from the grafted-root watermelon compared with the own-root watermelon. HPLC analysis revealed that the composition of the root exudates released by the grafted-root watermelon differed not only from the own-root watermelon but also from the bottle gourd rootstock plants. We identified salicylic acid in all 3 root exudates, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in root exudates from own-root bottle gourd and grafted-root watermelon but not own-root watermelon, and abundant cinnamic acid only in own-root watermelon root exudates. The chlorogenic and caffeic acid were candidates for potentiating the enhanced resistance of the grafted watermelon to FON, therefore we tested the effects of the two compounds on the conidial germination and growth of FON. Both phenolic acids inhibited FON conidial germination and growth in a dose-dependent manner, and FON was much more susceptible to chlorogenic acid than to caffeic acid. In conclusion, the key factor in attaining the resistance to Fusarium wilt is grafting on the non-host root stock, however, the root exudates profile also showed some contribution in inhibiting FON. These results will help to better clarify the disease resistance mechanisms of grafted-root watermelon based on plant-microbe communication and will guide the improvement of strategies against Fusarium-mediated wilt of watermelon plants.

  17. Effects of silicon on Oryza sativa L. seedling roots under simulated acid rain stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuming Ju

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si has an important function in reducing the damage of environmental stress on plants. Acid rain is a serious abiotic stress factor, and Si can alleviate the stress induced by acid rain on plants. Based on these assumptions, we investigated the effects of silicon on the growth, root phenotype, mineral element contents, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and antioxidative enzymes of rice (Oryza sativa L. seedling roots under simulated acid rain (SAR stress. The results showed that the combined or single effects of Si and/or SAR on rice roots depend on the concentration of Si and the pH of the SAR. The combined or single effects of a low or moderate concentration of Si (1.0 or 2.0 mM and light SAR (pH 4.0 enhanced the growth of rice roots, and the combined effects were stronger than those of the single treatment. A high concentration of Si (4.0 mM or severe SAR (pH 2.0 exerted deleterious effects. The incorporation of Si (1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mM into SAR with pH 3.0 or 2.0 promoted the rice root growth, decreased the H2O2 content, increased the Si concentration and the superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, peroxidase (POD and ascorbate peroxidase (APX activities, maintained the balance of mineral element (K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Cu concentrations in the roots of rice seedlings compared with SAR alone. The alleviatory effects observed with a moderate concentration of Si (2.0 mM were better than the effects obtained with a low or high concentration of Si (1.0 or 4.0 mM. The observed effects were due to disruptions in the absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients and impacts on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in roots, and this conclusion suggests that the degree of rice root damage caused by acid rain might be attributed to not only acid rain but also the level of Si in the soil.

  18. Effects of silicon on Oryza sativa L. seedling roots under simulated acid rain stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Shuming; Yin, Ningning; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Cuiying; Wang, Yukun

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) has an important function in reducing the damage of environmental stress on plants. Acid rain is a serious abiotic stress factor, and Si can alleviate the stress induced by acid rain on plants. Based on these assumptions, we investigated the effects of silicon on the growth, root phenotype, mineral element contents, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and antioxidative enzymes of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedling roots under simulated acid rain (SAR) stress. The results showed that the combined or single effects of Si and/or SAR on rice roots depend on the concentration of Si and the pH of the SAR. The combined or single effects of a low or moderate concentration of Si (1.0 or 2.0 mM) and light SAR (pH 4.0) enhanced the growth of rice roots, and the combined effects were stronger than those of the single treatment. A high concentration of Si (4.0 mM) or severe SAR (pH 2.0) exerted deleterious effects. The incorporation of Si (1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mM) into SAR with pH 3.0 or 2.0 promoted the rice root growth, decreased the H2O2 content, increased the Si concentration and the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities, maintained the balance of mineral element (K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Cu) concentrations in the roots of rice seedlings compared with SAR alone. The alleviatory effects observed with a moderate concentration of Si (2.0 mM) were better than the effects obtained with a low or high concentration of Si (1.0 or 4.0 mM). The observed effects were due to disruptions in the absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients and impacts on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in roots, and this conclusion suggests that the degree of rice root damage caused by acid rain might be attributed to not only acid rain but also the level of Si in the soil.

  19. Can Crops with Greater Rooting Systems Improve Nitrogen Retention and Mitigate Emissions of Nitrous Oxide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decock, Charlotte; Lee, Juhwan; Barthel, Matti; Mikita, Chris; Wilde, Benjamin; Verhoeven, Elizabeth; Hund, Andreas; Abiven, Samuel; Friedli, Cordula; Conen, Franz; Mohn, Joachim; Wolf, Benjamin; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that crops with deeper root systems could improve agricultural sustainability, because scavenging of nitrogen (N) in the subsoil would increase overall N retention and use efficiency in the system. However, the effect of plant root depth and root architecture on N-leaching and emissions of the potent greenhouse N2O remains largely unknown. We aimed to assess the effect of plant rooting depth on N-cycling and N2O production and reduction within the plant-soil system and throughout the soil profile. We hypothesized that greater root depth and root biomass will (1) increase N use efficiency and decrease N losses in the form of N leaching and N2O emissions; (2) increase N retention by shifting the fate of NH4+ from more nitrification toward more plant uptake and microbial immobilization; and (3) increase the depth of maximum N2O production and decrease the ratio of N2O:(N2O+N2) in denitrification end-products. To test these hypotheses, 4 winter wheat cultivars were grown in lysimeters (1.5 m tall, 0.5 m diameter, 3 replications per cultivar) under greenhouse conditions. Each lysimeter was equipped with an automated flux chamber for the determination of N2O surface fluxes. At 7.5, 30, 60, 90 and 120 cm depth, sampling ports were installed for the determination of soil moisture contents, as well as the collection of soil pore air and soil pore water samples. We selected two older and two newer varieties from the Swiss winter wheat breeding program, spanning a 100-year breeding history. The selection was based on previous experiments indicating that the older varieties have deeper rooting systems than the newer varieties under well watered conditions. N2O fluxes were determined twice per day on a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer interfaced with the automated flux chambers. Once per week, we determined concentrations of mineral N in pore water and of CO2 and N2O in the pore air. For mineral N and N2O, also natural abundance isotope deltas

  20. Accumulation of phenanthrene by roots of intact wheat (Triticum acstivnm L. seedlings: passive or active uptake?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Ting-Hui

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are of particular concern due to their hydrophobic, recalcitrant, persistent, potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic properties, and their ubiquitous occurrence in the environment. Most of the PAHs in the environment are present in surface soil. Plants grown in PAH-contaminated soils or water can become contaminated with PAHs because of their uptake. Therefore, they may threaten human and animal health. However, the mechanism for PAHs uptake by crop roots is little understood. It is important to understand exactly how PAHs are transported into the plant root system and into the human food chain, since it is beneficial in governing crop contamination by PAHs, remedying soils or waters polluted by PAHs with plants, and modeling potential uptake for risk assessment. Results The possibility that plant roots may take up phenanthrene (PHE, a representative of PAHs, via active process was investigated using intact wheat (Triticum acstivnm L. seedlings in a series of hydroponic experiments. The time course for PHE uptake into wheat roots grown in Hoagland solution containing 5.62 μM PHE for 36 h could be separated into two periods: a fast uptake process during the initial 2 h and a slow uptake component thereafter. Concentration-dependent PHE uptake was characterized by a smooth, saturable curve with an apparent Km of 23.7 μM and a Vmax of 208 nmol g-1 fresh weight h-1, suggesting a carrier-mediated uptake system. Competition between PHE and naphthalene for their uptake by the roots further supported the carrier-mediated uptake system. Low temperature and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP could inhibit PHE uptake equally, indicating that metabolism plays a role in PHE uptake. The inhibitions by low temperature and DNP were strengthened with increasing concentration of PHE in external solution within PHE water solubility (7.3 μM. The contribution of active uptake to total absorption was almost 40