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Sample records for absorption lidar dial

  1. Progress towards an Autonomous Field Deployable Diode-Laser-Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL for Profiling Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Repasky

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A laser transmitter has been developed and incorporated into a micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL for water vapor profiling in the lower troposphere as an important step towards long-term autonomous field operation. The laser transmitter utilizes two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR diode lasers to injection seed a pulsed tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA, and is capable of producing up to 10 mJ of pulse energy with a 1 ms pulse duration and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The on-line wavelength of the laser transmitter can operate anywhere along the water vapor absorption feature centered at 828.187 nm (in vacuum depending on the prevailing atmospheric conditions, while the off-line wavelength operates at 828.287 nm. This laser transmitter has been incorporated into a DIAL instrument utilizing a 35.6 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD operating in the photon counting mode. The performance of the DIAL instrument was demonstrated over a ten-day observation period. During this observation period, data from radiosondes were used to retrieve water vapor number density profiles for comparisons with the number density profiles retrieved from the DIAL data.

  2. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) in Alberta: A New Remote Sensing Tool for Wide Area Measurement of Particulates, CO2, and CH4 Emissions from Energy Extraction and Production Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, M.; Lemon, R.; Crowther, B. G.; Valupadas, P.; Fu, L.; Yang, Z.; Huda, Q.; Leung, B.; Chambers, A.

    2014-12-01

    Alberta Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting Agency (AEMERA) in cooperation with the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) of Utah State University, have developed a mobile DIAL sensor designed specifically for particle, CO2 and CH4 emissions measurement. Rapid expansion of the oil and gas industry in Alberta, including the oil sands, has challenged the Alberta Government to keep pace in its efforts to monitor and mitigate the environmental impacts of development. The limitations of current monitoring systems has pushed the provincial government to seek out advanced sensing technologies such as differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to help assess the impact of energy development and industrial operations. This instrument is housed inside a 36' trailer and can be quickly staged and used to characterize source emissions and to locate fugitive leaks. DIAL is capable of measuring concentrations for carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) at ranges of up to 3 km with a spatial resolution of 1.5 m. DIAL can map both CO2 and CH4, as well as particulate matter (PM) in a linear fashion; by scanning the laser beam in both azimuth and elevation, DIAL can create images of emissions concentrations and ultimately can be used to determine emission factors, locate fugitive leaks, assess plume dispersion and confirm air dispersion modeling. The DIAL system has been deployed at a landfill, a coal-fired power plant, and an oil sands production area. A system overview of the DIAL instrument and recent results will be discussed.

  3. Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-Safe Scanning Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for Monitoring/Verification/Accounting at Geologic Sequestration Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repasky, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for monitoring carbon dioxide has been developed. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto- optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 {micro}J, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 {micro}m. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL instrument has been operated from a laboratory environment on the campus of Montana State University, at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site located in the agricultural research area on the western end of the Montana State University campus, and at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership site located in north-central Montana. DIAL data has been collected and profiles have been validated using a co-located Licor LI-820 Gas Analyzer point sensor.

  4. First attempt to monitor atmospheric glyoxal using differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Lundin, Patrik; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Hu, Jiandong; Zhao, Guangyu; Svanberg, Sune; Bood, Joakim; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2012-11-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO), as an indicator of photochemical "hot spots", was for the first time the subject of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) campaign. The strongest absorption line of glyoxal in the blue wavelength region - 455.1 nm - was chosen as the experimental absorption wavelength. In order to handle the effects of absorption cross-section variation of the interfering gas - nitrogen dioxide (NO2) - three-wavelength DIAL measurements simultaneously detecting glyoxal and NO2, were performed. The differential absorption curves, recorded in July 2012, indicate an extremely low glyoxal concentration in Lund, Sweden, although it is expected to be peaking at this time of the year.

  5. Lidar and Dial application for detection and identification: a proposal to improve safety and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudio, P.; Malizia, A.; Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Parracino, S.; Poggi, L. A.; Lungaroni, M.; Ciparisse, J. F.; Di Giovanni, D.; Cenciarelli, O.; Carestia, M.; Peluso, E.; Gabbarini, V.; Talebzadeh, S.; Bellecci, C.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays the intentional diffusion in air (both in open and confined environments) of chemical contaminants is a dramatic source of risk for the public health worldwide. The needs of a high-tech networks composed by software, diagnostics, decision support systems and cyber security tools are urging all the stakeholders (military, public, research & academic entities) to create innovative solutions to face this problem and improve both safety and security. The Quantum Electronics and Plasma Physics (QEP) Research Group of the University of Rome Tor Vergata is working since the 1960s on the development of laser-based technologies for the stand-off detection of contaminants in the air. Up to now, four demonstrators have been developed (two LIDAR-based and two DIAL-based) and have been used in experimental campaigns during all 2015. These systems and technologies can be used together to create an innovative solution to the problem of public safety and security: the creation of a network composed by detection systems: A low cost LIDAR based system has been tested in an urban area to detect pollutants coming from urban traffic, in this paper the authors show the results obtained in the city of Crotone (south of Italy). This system can be used as a first alarm and can be coupled with an identification system to investigate the nature of the threat. A laboratory dial based system has been used in order to create a database of absorption spectra of chemical substances that could be release in atmosphere, these spectra can be considered as the fingerprints of the substances that have to be identified. In order to create the database absorption measurements in cell, at different conditions, are in progress and the first results are presented in this paper.

  6. Stabilized master laser system for differential absorption lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinovitser, Alex; Hamilton, Murray W; Vincent, Robert A

    2010-06-10

    Wavelength accuracy and stability are key requirements for differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We present a control and timing design for the dual-stabilized cw master lasers in a pulsed master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration, which forms a robust low-cost water-vapor DIAL transmitter system. This design operates at 823 nm for water-vapor spectroscopy using Fabry-Perot-type laser diodes. However, the techniques described could be applied to other laser technologies at other wavelengths. The system can be extended with additional off-line or side-line wavelengths. The on-line master laser is locked to the center of a water absorption line, while the beat frequency between the on-line and the off-line is locked to 16 GHz using only a bandpass microwave filter and low-frequency electronics. Optical frequency stabilities of the order of 1 MHz are achieved.

  7. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  8. Proposed standardized definitions for vertical resolution and uncertainty in the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature algorithms - Part 2: Ozone DIAL uncertainty budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Thierry; Sica, Robert J.; van Gijsel, Joanna A. E.; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Haefele, Alexander; Trickl, Thomas; Payen, Guillaume; Liberti, Gianluigi

    2016-08-01

    A standardized approach for the definition, propagation, and reporting of uncertainty in the ozone differential absorption lidar data products contributing to the Network for the Detection for Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) database is proposed. One essential aspect of the proposed approach is the propagation in parallel of all independent uncertainty components through the data processing chain before they are combined together to form the ozone combined standard uncertainty. The independent uncertainty components contributing to the overall budget include random noise associated with signal detection, uncertainty due to saturation correction, background noise extraction, the absorption cross sections of O3, NO2, SO2, and O2, the molecular extinction cross sections, and the number densities of the air, NO2, and SO2. The expression of the individual uncertainty components and their step-by-step propagation through the ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) processing chain are thoroughly estimated. All sources of uncertainty except detection noise imply correlated terms in the vertical dimension, which requires knowledge of the covariance matrix when the lidar signal is vertically filtered. In addition, the covariance terms must be taken into account if the same detection hardware is shared by the lidar receiver channels at the absorbed and non-absorbed wavelengths. The ozone uncertainty budget is presented as much as possible in a generic form (i.e., as a function of instrument performance and wavelength) so that all NDACC ozone DIAL investigators across the network can estimate, for their own instrument and in a straightforward manner, the expected impact of each reviewed uncertainty component. In addition, two actual examples of full uncertainty budget are provided, using nighttime measurements from the tropospheric ozone DIAL located at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Table Mountain Facility, California, and nighttime measurements from the JPL

  9. Optimization of the GSFC TROPOZ DIAL retrieval using synthetic lidar returns and ozonesondes – Part 1: Algorithm validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Sullivan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is to measure the vertical distribution of tropospheric ozone for science investigations. Because of the important health and climate impacts of tropospheric ozone, it is imperative to quantify background photochemical and aloft ozone concentrations, especially during air quality episodes. To better characterize tropospheric ozone, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet has recently been developed, which currently consists of five different ozone DIAL instruments, including the TROPOZ. This paper addresses the necessary procedures to validate the TROPOZ retrieval algorithm and develops a primary standard for retrieval consistency and optimization within TOLNet. This paper is focused on ensuring the TROPOZ and future TOLNet algorithms are properly quantifying ozone concentrations and the following paper will focus on defining a systematic uncertainty analysis standard for all TOLNet instruments. Although this paper is used to optimize the TROPOZ retrieval, the methodology presented may be extended and applied to most other DIAL instruments, even if the atmospheric product of interest is not tropospheric ozone (e.g. temperature or water vapor. The analysis begins by computing synthetic lidar returns from actual TROPOZ lidar return signals in combination with a known ozone profile. From these synthetic signals, it is possible to explicitly determine retrieval algorithm biases from the known profile, thereby identifying any areas that may need refinement for a new operational version of the TROPOZ retrieval algorithm. A new vertical resolution scheme is presented, which was upgraded from a constant vertical resolution to a variable vertical resolution, in order to yield a statistical uncertainty of opt has been effective in retrieving nearly 200 m lower to the surface. Also, as compared to the previous version of the

  10. Feasibility Study of Multi-Wavelength Differential Absorption LIDAR for CO2 Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengzhi Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a better understanding of carbon cycle and accurate climate prediction models, highly accurate and temporal resolution observation of atmospheric CO2 is necessary. Differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL remote sensing is a promising technology to detect atmospheric CO2. However, the traditional DIAL system is the dual-wavelength DIAL (DW-DIAL, which has strict requirements for wavelength accuracy and stability. Moreover, for on-line and off-line wavelengths, the system’s optical efficiency and the change of atmospheric parameters are assumed to be the same in the DW-DIAL system. This assumption inevitably produces measurement errors, especially under rapid aerosol changes. In this study, a multi-wavelength DIAL (MW-DIAL is proposed to map atmospheric CO2 concentration. The MW-DIAL conducts inversion with one on-line and multiple off-line wavelengths. Multiple concentrations of CO2 are then obtained through difference processing between the single on-line and each of the off-line wavelengths. In addition, the least square method is adopted to optimize inversion results. Consequently, the inversion concentration of CO2 in the MW-DIAL system is found to be the weighted average of the multiple concentrations. Simulation analysis and laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the inversion precision of MW-DIAL. For comparison, traditional DW-DIAL simulations were also conducted. Simulation analysis demonstrated that, given the drifting wavelengths of the laser, the detection accuracy of CO2 when using MW-DIAL is higher than that when using DW-DIAL, especially when the drift is large. A laboratory experiment was also performed to verify the simulation analysis.

  11. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  12. In-cell measurements of smoke backscattering coefficients using a CO2 laser system for application to lidar-dial forest fire detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellecci, Carlo; Gaudio, Pasquale; Gelfusa, Michela; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Murari, Andrea; Richetta, Maria; de Leo, Leonerdo

    2010-12-01

    In the lidar-dial method, the amount of the water vapor present in the smoke of the vegetable fuel is detected to reduce the number of false alarms. We report the measurements of the smoke backscattering coefficients for the CO2 laser lines 10R20 and 10R18 as determined in an absorption cell for two different vegetable fuels (eucalyptus and conifer). These experimental backscattering coefficients enable us to determine the error to be associated to the water vapor measurements when the traditional first-order approximation is assumed. We find that this first-order approximation is valid for combustion rates as low as 100 g/s.

  13. Infrared differential absorption lidar for stand-off detection of chemical agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Razdan; S Veerabuthiran; M K Jindal; R K Sharma

    2014-02-01

    A compact trolley-mounted pulsed transverse electric atmospheric pressure (TEA) carbon dioxide laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system capable of stand-off detection of chemical clouds in aerosol and vapour form upto about 200 m range in the atmosphere has been developed and assembled at Laser Science and Technology Centre (LASTEC), Delhi. The system was tested successfully with diethyl ether (DEE) (a toxic industrial chemical (TIC)) and differential absorption signals at on (strong absorption, 9R16) and off (weak absorption, 10R26) wavelengths were recorded for stand-off distances upto ∼100 m (open air ground path). This paper discusses the technical details of trolley-mounted CO2 DIAL system and the data generated during the test and evaluation of this sensor using DEE aerosols.

  14. First open field measurements with a portable CO2 lidar/dial system for early forest fires detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudio, Pasquale; Gelfusa, Michela; Lupelli, Ivan; Malizia, Andrea; Moretti, Alessandro; Richetta, Maria; Serafini, Camilla; Bellecci, Carlo

    2011-11-01

    Lidar and dial are well established methods to explore the atmosphere. Different groups have already shown experimentally the possibility to measure the density variation of aerosol and particulate in the atmosphere due to plumes emitted in forest fires with this kind of systems. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the capabilities of our mobile Lidar system, based on a CO2 laser, to detect forest fires and minimizing false alarms. For this purpose, our system can be operated in both lidar and dial configurations in sequence. The first Lidar measurement is performed to evaluate the variation of the local density into the atmosphere, using a nonabsorption water wavelength 10R18 (10.571 μm). If the returned signal reports a backscattering peak, the presence of a fire is probable. To confirm this hypothesis, a second dial measurement is carried out to reveal a second component emitted during the combustion process. The chosen second component is water vapour, which is, as it is well-known, largely produced during the first combustion stage. Measuring the water concentration peak after the detection of the aerosol density increment (referred to the standard mean atmospheric value) represents a good method to reduce false alarms with a dial system. In order to test this methodology, a first set of measurements has been performed in a field near the Engineering Faculty of the University of Rome "Tor Vergata". A quite small controlled-fire has been lighted into a box at a distance of about one kilometre from the system. The data acquired at the two wavelengths (10R18 and 10R20) have been averaged on 100 elastic backscattered Lidar signals. The first results confirm the effectiveness of the measurement strategy for reducing the number of false alarm preserving the early detection.

  15. Optimization of the GSFC TROPOZ DIAL retrieval using synthetic lidar returns and ozonesondes - Part 1: Algorithm validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Leblanc, T.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) is to measure the vertical distribution of tropospheric ozone for science investigations. Because of the important health and climate impacts of tropospheric ozone, it is imperative to quantify background photochemical ozone concentrations and ozone layers aloft, especially during air quality episodes. For these reasons, this paper addresses the necessary procedures to validate the TROPOZ retrieval algorithm and confirm that it is properly representing ozone concentrations. This paper is focused on ensuring the TROPOZ algorithm is properly quantifying ozone concentrations, and a following paper will focus on a systematic uncertainty analysis. This methodology begins by simulating synthetic lidar returns from actual TROPOZ lidar return signals in combination with a known ozone profile. From these synthetic signals, it is possible to explicitly determine retrieval algorithm biases from the known profile. This was then systematically performed to identify any areas that need refinement for a new operational version of the TROPOZ retrieval algorithm. One immediate outcome of this exercise was that a bin registration error in the correction for detector saturation within the original retrieval was discovered and was subsequently corrected for. Another noticeable outcome was that the vertical smoothing in the retrieval algorithm was upgraded from a constant vertical resolution to a variable vertical resolution to yield a statistical uncertainty of <10 %. This new and optimized vertical-resolution scheme retains the ability to resolve fluctuations in the known ozone profile, but it now allows near-field signals to be more appropriately smoothed. With these revisions to the previous TROPOZ retrieval, the optimized TROPOZ retrieval algorithm (TROPOZopt) has been effective in retrieving nearly 200 m lower to the surface. Also, as compared to the

  16. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by the University of Alabama at Huntsville and NASA, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min temporal integration

  17. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  18. Application the laser in the teledetection of atmospheric contaminants (DIAL-LIDAR). Aplicacion del laser en la teledeteccion de contaminantes atmosfericos (DIAL-LIDAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llanos Lecumberri, C.; Marcos Penalba, J. de (ASINEL (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    In the last years technological progress in optic signal and lasers was developmented. In this way they are some tools to measure the atmospheric pollutants. The technique used is LIDAR. This article presents the equipment and the characteristics of LIDAR laser to apply it for the atmospheric contaminants.

  19. Data Analysis of a Pulsed 2-micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar For Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Yu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The study of climate change requires precise measurement of the production, migration, and sinking of greenhouse gases. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is one of the principal greenhouse gases. NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) has developed a pulsed 2-micron coherent differential absorption lidar (DiAL) for CO2 measurement, operating on the R30 absorption line. On April 5, 2010, the lidar instrument transmitted alternating On-line and Off-line pulses from LARC into a residential area in Poquoson, Virginia; while a passive in-situ sensor measured the local CO2 concentration. This paper outlines a procedure to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return signal using the DiAL method; our calculation produced results in line with the in-situ measurement and matched the current state of DiAL instrument accuracy. Data from April 5 is part of a series of experiments validating the measurement accuracy and precision of this lidar. After a summative verification, a packaged lidar may be installed on research aircraft to perform CO2 studies at a great range of latitudes throughout the year, and to discover sources, sinks, and migration trends for this key greenhouse gas. The following procedure is used to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return using the DiAL method. First, MATLAB software developed at LARC sorts the lidar return into On-only and Off-only files containing pulses of only that type. The sorted pulses are reexamined for quality based on the center frequency, energy, and power - unsatisfactory pulses are removed. A 512-point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) with 256-point shift is performed on each pulse to discretize the atmospheric return signal according to 63 distance 'bins'. Next, comparing decay rates of the On-line and Off-line atmospheric return intensity with distance yields the Differential Absorption Optical Slope (DAOD), which is proportional to the concentration of the desired gas. Then, in-situ meteorological data - pressure

  20. Compact, Rugged and Low-Cost Atmospheric Ozone DIAL Transmitter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Bridger Photonics Inc. (Bridger) proposes to develop the most compact, efficient and low-cost ultra-violet ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) transmitter...

  1. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  2. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  3. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  4. Evaluation of tropospheric water vapor profiling using eye-safe, infrared differential absorption lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rye, B.J. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences]|[National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Technology Lab.; Machol, J.L.; Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Technology Lab.

    1996-05-14

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. In addition, these should be acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. To date, application of profiles have been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness and high operating cost, or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost. Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the studies reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of solving some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameters representative of current technologies. These simulations are also applied to determine the strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application.

  5. Profiling tropospheric water vapour with a coherent infrared differential absorption lidar: a sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Mizutani, Kohei; Itabe, Toshikazu; Yasui, Motoaki

    2012-11-01

    In the last decade the precision of coherent Doppler differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been greatly improved in near and middle infra-red domains for measuring greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4 and winds. The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) has developed and is operating a CO2 and wind measuring ground-based coherent DIAL at 2.05 μm (4878 cm-1). The application of this technology from space is now considered. In this analysis we study the use of the NICT DIAL for profiling tropospheric water vapour from space. We present the methodology to select the spectral lines and summarized the results of the selected lines between 4000 and 7000 cm-1. The choice of the frequency offset, the pulse energy and repetition frequency are discussed. Retrieval simulations from the line at 4580 cm-1 (2.18 μm) suitable for the boundary layer and the stronger one at 5621 cm-1 (1.78 μm) for sounding the boundary layer and the middle troposphere, are shown.

  6. A robust optical parametric oscillator and receiver telescope for differential absorption lidar of greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Iain; Jack, James W.; Rae, Cameron F.; Moncrieff, John B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of a differential absorption lidar instrument (DIAL) designed and built specifically for the measurement of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The DIAL is integrated into a commercial astronomical telescope to provide high-quality receiver optics and enable automated scanning for three-dimensional lidar acquisition. The instrument is portable and can be set up within a few hours in the field. The laser source is a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) which outputs light at a wavelength tunable near 1.6 μm. This wavelength region, which is also used in telecommunications devices, provides access to absorption lines in both carbon dioxide at 1573 nm and methane at 1646 nm. To achieve the critical temperature stability required for a laserbased field instrument the four-mirror OPO cavity is machined from a single aluminium block. A piezoactuator adjusts the cavity length to achieve resonance and this is maintained over temperature changes through the use of a feedback loop. The laser output is continuously monitored with pyroelectric detectors and a custom-built wavemeter. The OPO is injection seeded by a temperature-stabilized distributed feedback laser diode (DFB-LD) with a wavelength locked to the absorption line centre (on-line) using a gas cell containing pure carbon dioxide. A second DFB-LD is tuned to a nearby wavelength (off-line) to provide the reference required for differential absorption measurements. A similar system has been designed and built to provide the injection seeding wavelengths for methane. The system integrates the DFB-LDs, drivers, locking electronics, gas cell and balanced photodetectors. The results of test measurements of carbon dioxide are presented and the development of the system is discussed, including the adaptation required for the measurement of methane.

  7. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  8. Tropospheric O3 measurement by simultaneous differential absorption lidar and null profiling and comparison with sonde measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Fujii, Takashi; Cao, Nianwen; Nemoto, Koshichi; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    2001-09-01

    A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system consisting of two identical tunable laser systems and a single optical receiver is applied to measurement of O3 concentration profiles in the lower troposphere. Each laser is capable of emitting two wavelengths on alternate pulses, so the system is capable of simultaneous measurement of two species in the same wavelength region. We set the two lasers to emit at identical wavelength pairs consisting of on wavelength 285.0 nm and off wavelength 290.1 nm for simultaneous measurement of two null profiles, one at each wavelength, and two DIAL profiles, or O3 concentration profiles. Null profiles are useful in estimating instrumental error and checking the vertical range interval in which the DIAL profiles are accurate. Null and DIAL profiles are obtained for vertical range 1000 to 4000 m using neutral density filters of different transmissions to prevent the strong return signals from close range from saturating the photodetector. The obtained O3 concentration profiles agree with simultaneous O3 sonde measurements. An evaluation of the measurement error shows that the average O3 measurement error for vertical range 1000 to 4000 m was 3.4 ppb, or 8% relative to the average O3 concentration of 42.3 ppb, most of which is due to statistical error. The error due to differential Mie attenuation and differential backscatter gradient was found to be 0.5 ppb.

  9. Ground-based integrated path coherent differential absorption lidar measurement of CO2: hard target return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sato

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT have made a great deal of effort to develop a coherent 2-μm differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL for measuring CO2 and wind speed. First, coherent Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA lidar experiments were conducted using the Co2DiaWiL and a hard target (surface return located about 7.12 km south of NICT on 11, 27, and 28 December 2010. The detection sensitivity of a 2-μm IPDA lidar was examined in detail using the CO2 concentration measured by the hard target. The precisions of CO2 measurement for the hard target and 900, 4500 and 27 000 shot pairs were 6.5, 2.8, and 1.2%, respectively. The results indicated that a coherent IPDA lidar with a laser operating at a high pulse repetition frequency of a few tens of KHz is necessary for measuring the CO2 concentration of the hard target with a precision of 1–2 ppm. Statistical comparisons indicated that, although a small amount of in situ data and the fact that they were not co-located with the hard target made comparison difficult, the CO2 volume mixing ratio measured with the Co2DiaWiL was about 5 ppm lower than that measured with the in situ sensor. The statistical results indicated that there were no differences between the hard target and atmospheric return measurements. A precision of 1.5% was achieved from the atmospheric return, which is lower than that obtained from the hard-target returns. Although long-range DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL CO2 measurement with the atmospheric return can result in highly precise measurement, the precision of the atmospheric return measurement was widely distributed comparing to that of the hard target return. Our results indicated that it is important to use a Q-switched laser to measure the range-gated differential absorption optical depth with the atmospheric return and that it is better to simultaneously conduct both hard target and atmospheric return

  10. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  11. Mini-DIAL system measurements coupled with multivariate data analysis to identify TIC and TIM simulants: preliminary absorption database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudio, P.; Malizia, A.; Gelfusa, M.; Martinelli, E.; Di Natale, C.; Poggi, L. A.; Bellecci, C.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays Toxic Industrial Components (TICs) and Toxic Industrial Materials (TIMs) are one of the most dangerous and diffuse vehicle of contamination in urban and industrial areas. The academic world together with the industrial and military one are working on innovative solutions to monitor the diffusion in atmosphere of such pollutants. In this phase the most common commercial sensors are based on “point detection” technology but it is clear that such instruments cannot satisfy the needs of the smart cities. The new challenge is developing stand-off systems to continuously monitor the atmosphere. Quantum Electronics and Plasma Physics (QEP) research group has a long experience in laser system development and has built two demonstrators based on DIAL (Differential Absorption of Light) technology could be able to identify chemical agents in atmosphere. In this work the authors will present one of those DIAL system, the miniaturized one, together with the preliminary results of an experimental campaign conducted on TICs and TIMs simulants in cell with aim of use the absorption database for the further atmospheric an analysis using the same DIAL system. The experimental results are analysed with standard multivariate data analysis technique as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to develop a classification model aimed at identifying organic chemical compound in atmosphere. The preliminary results of absorption coefficients of some chemical compound are shown together pre PCA analysis.

  12. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  13. Simulation of Satellite Water Vapour Lidar Measurements: Performance Assessment under Real Atmospheric Conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Kiemle, Christoph; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Bauer, Heinz; Summa, Donato; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    A lidar simulator has been applied to assess the performances of a satellite water vapour differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. Measurements performed by the airborne Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) water vapour DIAL on 15 May 2002 during ESA’s Water Vapour Lidar Experiment (WALEX), in combination with MM5 mesoscale model output, were used to obtain backscatter and water vapour fields with high resolution and accuracy. These data and model output serve as input for the ...

  14. A New Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Fluctuation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore - Washington D.C. Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99 N, 76.84 W, 57 meters ASL) from 400 m to 12 km AGL. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19 percent from 0-1.5 km, 10-18 percent from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25 percent from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore

  15. A new differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington DC region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.) from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0-1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25% from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.

  16. Performance characterization and ground testing of an airborne CO2 differential absorption lidar system (phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Hamilton, Carla M.; Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Kelly, Brian T.

    1999-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Active Remote Sensing Branch has developed the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. The system is based on a high-power CO2 laser which can use either the standard 12C16O2 or the 13C16O2 carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies of up to 5 J on the stronger laser transitions. The lidar system is mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed for installation into the AFRL Argus C- 135E optical testbed aircraft. The Phase I ground tests were conducted at Kirtland AFB in 1997, prior to the LARS flight tests performed in September 1997 at Kirtland AFB and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Phase II ground tests were conducted in 1998 to determine the optimum performance of the LARS system, after the incorporation of modification and improvements suggested by the flight test results. This paper will present some of the chemical detection and radiometric results obtained during the Phase II ground tests.

  17. Development of Field-deployable Diode-laser-based Water Vapor Dial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Hoai Phong Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL has been developed for lower-tropospheric water vapor observation in Tokyo, Japan. A photoacoustic cell is used for spectroscopy experiment around absorption peaks of 829.022 nm and 829.054 nm. The water vapor density extracted from the observational data agrees with the referenced radiosonde data. Furthermore, we applied modulated pulse technique for DIAL transmitter. It enables DIAL to measure water vapor profile for both low and high altitude regions.

  18. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  19. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  20. FY05 FM Dial Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Batdorf, Michael T.

    2005-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Infrared Sensors team is focused on developing methods for standoff detection of nuclear proliferation. In FY05, PNNL continued the development of the FM DIAL (frequency-modulated differential absorption LIDAR) experiment. Additional improvements to the FM DIAL trailer provided greater stability during field campaigns which made it easier to explore new locations for field campaigns. In addition to the Hanford Townsite, successful experiments were conducted at the Marine Science Laboratory in Sequim, WA and the Nevada Test Site located outside Las Vegas, NV. The range of chemicals that can be detected by FM DIAL has also increased. Prior to FY05, distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCL) were used in the FM DIAL experiments. With these lasers, only simple chemicals with narrow (1-2 cm-1) absorption spectra, such as CO2 and N2O, could be detected. Fabry-Perot (FP) QC lasers have much broader spectra (20-40 cm-1) which allows for the detection of larger chemicals and a wider array of chemicals that can be detected. A FP-QCL has been characterized and used during initial studies detecting DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate).

  1. Differential absorption lidar measurements of H2O and O2 using a coherent white light continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somekawa, T.; Manago, N.; Kuze, H.; Fujita, M.

    2016-10-01

    We applied a broadband and coherent white light continuum to differential absorption lidar (DIAL) detection of H2O and O2 profiles in the troposphere. The white light continuum can be generated by focusing high intensity femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm into a Kr gas cell covering a broad spectral range from UV to mid-IR. Thus, the use of white light continuum potentially enables the DIAL measurement of several greenhouse and/or pollutant gases simultaneously while minimizing the lead time for developing a tunable light source. In order to demonstrate such capability, here we report the lidar measurements of H2O and O2. These molecular species exhibit absorption lines in the near IR region where relatively high intensity of the white light continuum is available. The white light continuum was transmitted through the atmosphere collinearly to the axis of a receiver telescope. Backscattered light was passed through bandpass filters (H2O On: 725 and 730 nm, H2O Off: 750 nm, O2 On: 760 nm, O2 Off: 780 nm), and was detected by a photomultiplier tube. The detection wavelengths were selected consecutively by rotating the filter wheels that contain five bandpass filters with an interval of 1 minute. In addition, we propose a method for retrieving vertical profiles of H2O by considering wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinction coefficient α and backscatter coefficient β. These results show that for achieving precise retrieval of H2O distribution, one needs to reduce the effect of aerosol temporal variations by means of long-time accumulation or simultaneous detection of the On- and Off-wavelength signals.

  2. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratoy, Boulder, CO (United States); Rye, B.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  3. IR differential-absorption lidars for ecological monitoring of the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasil'ev, B. I.; Mannoun, O. M.

    2006-01-01

    A review of studies on lidar sensing of the environment by the method of IR differential absorption is presented. The differential-absorption method is described and its various applications are considered. A comparison of this method with other methods of lidar sensing showed that a differential-ab

  4. Laser sources for lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmer, J.; Iadevaia, A.; Yin, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Advanced LIDAR applications such as next gen: Micro Pulse; Time of Flight (e.g., Satellite Laser Ranging); Coherent and Incoherent Doppler (e.g., Wind LIDAR); High Spectral Resolution; Differential Absorption (DIAL); photon counting LIDAR (e.g., 3D LIDAR); are placing more demanding requirements on conventional lasers (e.g., increased rep rates, etc.) and have inspired the development of new types of laser sources. Today, solid state lasers are used for wind sensing, 2D laser Radar, 3D scanning and flash LIDAR. In this paper, we report on the development of compact, highly efficient, high power all-solidstate diode pulsed pumped ns lasers, as well as, high average power/high pulse energy sub nanosecond (picosecond (lasers for these next gen LIDAR applications.

  5. A mobile differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground-based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.), from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the DIAL technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm, with multiple receivers. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high-pressure hydrogen and deuterium, using helium as buffer gas. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range-resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone is shown, to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as to assess the validation and calibration of data. There was a low amount of aerosol aloft, and an iterative aerosol correction has been performed on the retrieved data, which resulted in less than a 3 ppb correction to the final ozone concentration. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0 to 1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5 to 3 km, and 11-25% from 3 to 12 km according to the relevant aerosol concentration aloft. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area.

  6. AM-CW Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses NASA's science objectives with innovative lidar architecture for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Specifically, the proposed work can support...

  7. Airborne differential absorption lidar for water vapour measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the spectral region around 940 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poberaj, G.

    2000-07-01

    Two all-solid-state laser systems were developed and studied in detail to optimise their performance for an airborne water vapour differential absorption lidar (DIAL). Their special features are high average output powers and excellent spectral properties in the 940-nm spectral region relevant for monitoring very low water vapour contents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. One system is an injection-seeded pulsed Ti:sapphire ring laser with a spectral bandwidth of 105 MHz and an average power of 1.1 W. The other system is an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a ring configuration. Using KTP as nonlinear crystal, a signal output with a spectral bandwidth of 140 MHz and an average power of 1.2 W was achieved. Both systems, the Ti:sapphire ring laser and the KTP OPO, possess spectral purity values higher than 99%. The pump source for these systems is a frequency doubled diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at a repetition rate of 100 Hz. The KTP OPO system has been used as a transmitter in a new airborne water vapour DIAL instrument. For the first time, measurements of two-dimensional water vapour distributions with a high vertical (500 m) and horizontal (20 km) resolution across several potential vorticity streamers were performed. Very low water vapour mixing ratios (10-50 ppmv) and strong gradients were observed in the tropopause region. The sensitivity of the DIAL instrument in the centre of a stratospheric intrusion ranges from 3% in the near field to 12% in the far field (4 km). The first comparison experiments with in situ measuring instruments show a good agreement. Considerable differences are found between DIAL measurements and data obtained from the ECMWF operational analyses and a mesoscale numerical model. (orig.)

  8. Acousto-optic filtering of lidar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarov, G.; Deleva, A.; Mitsev, Ts.

    1992-07-01

    The predominant part of the noise in lidar receivers is created by the background radiation; therefore, one of the most important elements of the receiving optics is a spectrally selecting filter placed in front of the photodetector. Interference filters are usually used to transmit a given wavelength. Specific properties of the interference filters, such as simple design, reliability, small size, and large aperture, combined with high transmission coefficient and narrow spectral band, make them the preferred spectral device in many cases. However, problems arise in applications such as the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, where fast tuning within a wide spectral region is necessary. Tunable acousto-optical filters (TAOF), used recently in astrophysical observations to suppress the background radiation, can be employed with success in lidar sounding. They are attractive due to the possibility for fast spectral scanning with a narrow transmission band. The TAOF's advantages are fully evident in DIAL lidars where one must simultaneously receive signals at two laser frequencies.

  9. Evaluation of ECMWF water vapour analyses by airborne differential absorption lidar measurements: a case study between Brasil and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Flentje

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL observations of tropospheric water vapour over Brazil and between Brazil and south Europe in March 2004 are compared to 1-hourly short-range forecasts of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. On three along-flight sections across the tropical and sub-tropical Atlantic between 28° S and 37° N humidity fields are observed which represent typical low latitude conditions. H2O mixing ratios vary between q≈0.01–0.1 g/kg in the upper troposphere (UT, in subsiding air layers and a stratospheric intrusion. They reach up to 0.5 g/kg at UT levels inside the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ and exceed 10 g/kg at lower levels. Back-trajectories reveal that the humidity fields are largely determined by transport.

    The observed water vapour distributions are properly reproduced by 1-hourly ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS short-range forecasts at T799/L91 spectral resolution. As transport largely determines the water vapour fields, the IFS skill is to a large extend based on a good representation of the dynamics. The mean relative bias accounts to few percent (0%, 3% and 6% for the three sections being about or even below the accuracy of the DIAL measurements of 5%. The larger deviations between analyses and observations on small scales are due to relative spatial shifts of features with large gradients. The correlation is quite high, ranging between 0.71 and 0.88. Over sea the analyses tend to underestimate the PBL height. At mid-levels near deep convection the mid-troposphere tends to be analyzed too humid indicating shortcomings in the convection parameterization. Humid tendencies are also found in the upper troposphere, particularly in tropical regions.

  10. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the

  11. A user friendly Lidar system based on LabVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Mats; Weibring, P.

    1996-09-01

    Mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the last two decades. The lidar group in Lund has performed many DIAL measurements with a mobile lidar system which was first described in 1987. This report describes how that system was updated with the graphical programming language LabVIEW in order to get a user friendly system. The software controls the lidar system and analyses measurement data. The measurement results are shown as maps of species concentration. New electronics to support the new lidar program have also been installed. The report describes how all supporting electronics and the program work. A user manual for the new program is also given. 19 refs, 79 figs, 23 charts

  12. Monitoring Tropospheric Ozone Enhancement in the Front Range Using the Gsfc Tropoz DIAL during Discover - AQ 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Hoff, R. M.; Twigg, L.; Sumnicht, G. K.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Fort Collins, CO from 200 m to 16 km AGL. These measurements were taken as part of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ campaign in July/August 2014. Measurements were made during simultaneous aircraft spirals over the lidar site as well as collocated ozonesonde launches. Ozone enhancement from local sources typically occurred in the mid-afternoon convection period, especially when there was light winds and low cloud cover. Interesting ozone profiles and time series data will be shown. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. Three of these lidars, including the GSFC TROPOZ DIAL, recorded measurements during the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived.

  13. Results obtained with the Tropospheric Ozone DIAL System Using a YAG Laser and Raman Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    This poster will detail the findings of the ground based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system built and operated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Beltsville, MD 38.99° N, 76.84° W) in 2012. Current atmospheric satellites cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, NASA has funded the ground based Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNET) which currently consists of five stations across the US. The Goddard instrument is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, and has initially transmitted two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm, and the DIAL technique exploits this difference between the two returned signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman Cells, filled with high pressure Hydrogen and Deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering within the focus shifts the pump wavelength, and the first Stokes shift in each cell produces the required wavelengths. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the vertical number density can then be derived. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make long term ozone profile measurements in the Washington, DC - Baltimore area.

  14. A differential absorption lidar instrument for the measurment of carbon dioxide and methane in the lower troposphere (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinov, Daniel; Clements, Robert; Rae, Cameron F.; Moncrieff, John B.; Jack, James W.

    2016-12-01

    Developments in the remote detection of trace gases in the atmosphere using Differential Absorption Lidar have been driven largely by improvements in two key technologies: lasers and detectors. We have designed and built a narrow linewidth pulsed laser source with a well-controlled output wavelength and sufficient pulse energy to measure the concentration profile of CO2 and CH4 to a range in excess of 4km. We describe here the initial measurements of concentration profiles recorded with this instrument. The system is built around a custom-designed Newtonian telescope with a 40cm diameter primary mirror. Laser sources and detectors attach directly to the side of the telescope allowing for flexible customization with a range of additional equipment. The instrument features an all-solid-state laser source based on an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an YLF based diode-laser pumped solid-state laser and seeded by a tuned DFB seed. This provides a range of available wavelengths suitable for DIAL within the 1.5-1.6 μm spectral region. The output of the OPO is beam expanded and transmitted coaxially from the receiver telescope. A gas cell within the laser source controls the seed wavelength and allows the wavelength to be tuned to match a specific absorption feature of the selected gas species. The source can be rapidly tuned between the on-line and off-line wavelengths to make a DIAL measurement of either CO2 or CH4 The receiver is based on an InGaAs avalanche photodetector. Whilst photodiode detectors are a low-cost solution their limited sensitivity restricts the maximum range over which a signal can be detected. The receiver signal is digitised for subsequent processing to produce a sightline concentration profile. The instrument is mounted on a robust gimballed mount providing full directional movement within the upper hemisphere. Both static pointing and angular scan modes are available. Accurate angular position is available giving the sightline

  15. Development and Evaluation of a High Sensitivity DIAL System for Profiling Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady J.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. N.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    A ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system for atmospheric boundary layer studies and validation of space-based CO2 sensors is being developed and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. To capture the variability of CO2 in the lower troposphere a precision of 1-2 ppm of CO2 (less than 0.5%) with 0.5 to 1 km vertical resolution from near surface to free troposphere (4-5 km) is one of the goals of this program. In addition, a 1% (3 ppm) absolute accuracy with a 1 km resolution over 0.5 km to free troposphere (4-5 km) is also a goal of the program. This DIAL system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and other NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. This presentation describes the capabilities of this system for atmospheric CO2 and aerosol profiling. Examples of atmospheric measurements in the lidar and DIAL mode will be presented.

  16. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  17. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Subhourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar system, developed jointly by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min 17 temporal integration.

  18. Evaluation of ECMWF water vapour fields by airborne differential absorption lidar measurements: a case study between Brazil and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Flentje

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Three extended airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL sections of tropospheric water vapour across the tropical and sub-tropical Atlantic in March 2004 are compared to short-term forecasts of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. The humidity fields between 28° S and 36° N exhibit large inter air-mass gradients and reflect typical transport patterns of low- and mid-latitudes like convection (e.g. Hadley circulation, subsidence and baroclinic development with stratospheric intrusion. These processes re-distribute water vapour vertically such that locations with extraordinary dry/moist air-masses are observed in the lower/upper troposphere, respectively. The mixing ratios range over 3 orders of magnitude. Back-trajectories are used to trace and characterize the observed air-masses.

    Overall, the observed water vapour distributions are largely reproduced by the short-term forecasts at 0.25° resolution (T799/L91, the correlation ranges from 0.69 to 0.92. Locally, large differences occur due to comparably small spatial shifts in presence of strong gradients. Systematic deviations are found associated with specific atmospheric domains. The planetary boundary layer in the forecast is too moist and to shallow. Convective transport of humidity to the middle and upper troposphere tends to be overestimated. Potential impacts arising from data assimilation and model physics are considered. The matching of air-mass boundaries (transport is discussed with repect to scales and the representativity of the 2-D sections for the 3-D humidity field. The normalized bias of the model with respect to the observations is 6%, 11% and 0% (moist model biases for the three along-flight sections, whereby however the lowest levels are excluded.

  19. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  20. Alexandrite laser source for atmospheric lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelon, J.; Loth, C.; Flamant, P.; Megie, G.

    1986-01-01

    During the past years, there has been a marked increase in interest in the applications of vibronic solid state lasers to meteorology and atmospheric physics. Two airborne lidar programs are now under development in France. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) method with vibronic solid state lasers is very attractive for water vapor, temperature and pressure measurements. Alexandrite laser and titanium-sapphire are both suitable for these applications. However, only alexandrite rods are commercially available. The requirements on the laser source for airborne dial applications are two fold: (1) a restriction on laser linewidth and a requirement on stability and tunability with a good spectral purity; and (2) a requirement on the time separation between the two pulses. These constraints are summarized.

  1. Development and Integration of a Pulsed 2-micron Direct Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Lidar for CO2 Column Measurement from Airborne platform Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop, integrate and demonstrate a 2-micron pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument CO2 Column Measurement from Airborne platform...

  2. Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, R. T. H.

    1969-01-01

    Lidar is an optical radar technique employing laser energy. Variations in signal intensity as a function of range provide information on atmospheric constituents, even when these are too tenuous to be normally visible. The theoretical and technical basis of the technique is described and typical values of the atmospheric optical parameters given. The significance of these parameters to atmospheric and meteorological problems is discussed. While the basic technique can provide valuable information about clouds and other material in the atmosphere, it is not possible to determine particle size and number concentrations precisely. There are also inherent difficulties in evaluating lidar observations. Nevertheless, lidar can provide much useful information as is shown by illustrations. These include lidar observations of: cirrus cloud, showing mountain wave motions; stratification in clear air due to the thermal profile near the ground; determinations of low cloud and visibility along an air-field approach path; and finally the motion and internal structure of clouds of tracer materials (insecticide spray and explosion-caused dust) which demonstrate the use of lidar for studying transport and diffusion processes.

  3. Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, J.-P.; Aubry, Y.

    1981-09-01

    It is noted that a photodetector at the telescope focal plane of a lidar produces a signal which is processed, giving information on the concentration of the species being monitored. The delay between the emitted and return signals indicates the distance to the interacting volume. Because of the poor efficiency of the interaction processes, the main difficulty in developing a good lidar has to do with the availability of sufficiently efficient lasers. Certain laser characteristics are discussed, and a CNES program for the development of lasers for lidar techniques is presented, future space applications being considered as mid-term objectives. The various components of the laser system developed by CNES are described. These are a dual frequency tunable oscillator, the amplifier chain, the beam control unit and wavelength servo-system, and the harmonic conversion subsystem.

  4. Ground-based integrated path coherent differential absorption lidar measurement of CO2: foothill target return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ishii

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT has made a great deal of effort to develop a coherent 2 μm differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL for measuring CO2 and wind speed. First, coherent Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA lidar experiments were conducted using the Co2DiaWiL and a foothill target (tree and ground surface located about 7.12 km south of NICT on 11, 27, and 28 December 2010. The detection sensitivity of a 2 μm IPDA lidar was examined in detail using the CO2 concentration measured by the foothill reflection. The precisions of CO2 measurements for the foothill target and 900, 4500 and 27 000 shot pairs were 6.5, 2.8, and 1.2%, respectively. The results indicated that a coherent IPDA lidar with a laser operating at a high pulse repetition frequency of a few tens of KHz is necessary for XCO2 (column-averaged dry air mixing ratio of CO2 measurement with a precision of 1–2 ppm in order to observe temporal and spatial variations in the CO2. Statistical comparisons indicated that, although a small amount of in situ data and the fact that they were not co-located with the foothill target made comparison difficult, the CO2 volume mixing ratio obtained by the Co2DiaWiL measurements for the foothill target and atmospheric returns was about −5 ppm lower than the 5 min running averages of the in situ sensor. Not only actual difference of sensing volume or the natural variability of CO2 but also the fluctuations of temperature could cause this difference. The statistical results indicated that there were no biases between the foothill target and atmospheric return measurements. The 2 μm coherent IPDA lidar can detect the CO2 volume mixing ratio change of 3% in the 5 min signal integration. In order to detect the position of the foothill target, to measure a range with a high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio, and to reduce uncertainty due to the presence of aerosols and clouds, it is

  5. Wavelength Locking to CO2 Absorption Line-Center for 2-Micron Pulsed IPDA Lidar Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-micron CW (Continuous Wave) laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nanometers, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  6. Spectroscopic measurements of a CO2 absorption line in an open vertical path using an airborne lidar

    CERN Document Server

    Ramanathan, Anand; Allan, Graham R; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J; Hasselbrack, William E; Browell, Edward V; Abshire, James B

    2013-01-01

    We use an airborne pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar to make spectroscopic measurements of the pressure-induced line broadening and line center shift of atmospheric CO2 at the 1572.335 nm absorption line. We measure the absorption lineshape in the vertical column between the aircraft and ground. A comparison of our measured absorption lineshape to calculations based on HITRAN shows excellent agreement with the peak optical depth accurate to within 0.3%. Additionally, we measure changes in the line center position to within 5.2 MHz of calculations, and the absorption linewidth to within 0.6% of calculations.

  7. A nonlinear merging method of analog and photon signals for CO2 detection in lower altitudes using differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhong; Zhang, Teng; Han, Ge; Li, Dongcang; Ma, Xin; Gong, Wei

    2017-04-01

    The current acquisition system of a lidar detects return signals in two modes (i.e., analog and photon counting); resulting in the lower (below 1500 m) and upper (higher than 1100 m) atmospheric parameters need analog and photon counting signal to retrieve, respectively. Hence, a lidar cannot obtain a continuous column of the concentrations of atmospheric components. For carbon cycle studies, the range-resolved concentration of atmospheric CO2 in the lower troposphere (below 1500 m) is one of the most significant parameters that should be determined. This study proposes a novel gluing method that merges the CO2 signal detected by ground-based DIAL in the lower troposphere. Through simulation experiments, the best uniform approximation polynomial theorem is utilized to determine the transformation coefficient to correlate signals from the different modes perfectly. The experimental results (both simulation experiments and actual measurement of signals) show that the proposed method is suitable and feasible for merging data in the region below 1500 m. Hence, the photon-counting signals whose SNRs are higher than those of the analog signals can be used to retrieve atmospheric parameters at an increased near range, facilitating atmospheric soundings using ground-based lidar in various fields.

  8. Recent lidar technology developments and their influence on measurements of tropospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the influences of recent technology developments in the areas of lasers, detectors, andoptical filters of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system on the measurenent of tropospheric water vapor (H2O) profiles are discussed. The lidar parameters selected are based upon a diode-seeded Ti:sapphire laser that is locked to an H2O line in the 820- or 930-nm band of H2O. To assess the influence of the mode of deployment on the measurement of tropospheric H2O, DIAL performance is evaluated for operation from a medium-altitude (12 km) aircraft, the ground, and space-based systems. It is found that incorporation of these developments could greatly enhance DIAL measurement capability.

  9. Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar (LMOL) results from the Denver, CO DISCOVER-AQ campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis; Ganoe, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar (LMOL) is a compact mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system that was developed at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric air quality campaigns. This lidar is part of the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) currently made up of six other ozone lidars across the U.S and Canada. This lidar has been deployed to Denver, CO July 15-August 15, 2014 for the DISCOVER-AQ air quality campaign. Ozone and aerosol profiles were taken showing the influence of emissions from the Denver region. Results of ozone concentration, aerosol scattering ratio, boundary layer height and clouds will be presented with emphasis on regional air quality.

  10. Simulation study for the monitoring of industrial exhaust dispersion using a DIAL system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerabuthiran, S.; Jindal, Mukesh Kumar; Dudeja, Jai Paul; Dubey, Deepak Kumar; Kumar, Anil

    2006-12-01

    Computer simulations have been carried out to optimize the IR Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system in order to measure the gaseous pollutants released by the industries. The concentration of the gaseous pollutants due to elevated sources is computed using the Gaussian dispersion model. For given atmospheric conditions and stack physical parameters, the downwind distance (x) at which the SO II reaches the safe limit of its toxicity has been computed at given other two coordinates (y, z) with respect to chimney. The gaseous pollutants released by the industries will be effectively monitored by the proposed DIAL system, which will be placed at New Delhi (28.35 degrees N, 77.12 degrees E), India. The performance of the Lidar has been optimized based on the various system parameters incorporating the atmospheric conditions and stack physical parameters. Further, the backscattered return powers at on- & -off line wavelengths, the required energy to be transmitted and the position at which the lidar system should be posted have been computed in order to monitor SO II.

  11. Atmospheric absorption versus deep ultraviolet (pre-)resonance in Raman lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, Hans D.; Willitsford, Adam H.; Neely, Ryan R.; Chadwick, C. Todd; Philbrick, C. Russell

    2016-05-01

    The Raman scattering of several liquids and solid materials has been investigated near the deep ultraviolet absorption features corresponding to the electron energy states of the chemical species present. It is found to provide significant enhancement, but is always accompanied by absorption due to that or other species along the path. We investigate this trade-off for water vapor, although the results for liquid water and ice will be quantitatively very similar. An optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was pumped by the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, and the output frequency doubled to generate a tunable excitation beam in the 215-600 nm range. We use the tunable laser excitation beam to investigate pre-resonance and resonance Raman spectroscopy near an absorption band of ice. A significant enhancement in the Raman signal was observed. The A-term of the Raman scattering tensor, which describes the pre-resonant enhancement of the spectra, is also used to find the primary observed intensities as a function of incident beam energy, although a wide resonance structure near the final-state-effect related absorption in ice is also found. The results suggest that use of pre-resonant or resonant Raman LIDAR could increase the sensitivity to improve spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric water vapor measurements. However, these shorter wavelengths also exhibit higher ozone absorption. These opposing effects are modeled using MODTRAN for several configurations relevant for studies of boundary layer water and in the vicinity of clouds. Such data could be used in studies of the measurement of energy flow at the water-air and cloud-air interface, and may help with understanding some of the major uncertainties in current global climate models.

  12. Performance evaluation of a 1.6-µm methane DIAL system from ground, aircraft and UAV platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F; Ismail, Syed; Nehrir, Amin R; Hair, John W; Crawford, James H; Leifer, Ira; Shuman, Timothy

    2013-12-16

    Methane is an efficient absorber of infrared radiation and a potent greenhouse gas with a warming potential 72 times greater than carbon dioxide on a per molecule basis. Development of methane active remote sensing capability using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique enables scientific assessments of the gas emission and impacts on the climate. A performance evaluation of a pulsed DIAL system for monitoring atmospheric methane is presented. This system leverages a robust injection-seeded pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) laser technology operating in the 1.645 µm spectral band. The system also leverages an efficient low noise, commercially available, InGaAs avalanche photo-detector (APD). Lidar signals and error budget are analyzed for system operation on ground in the range-resolved DIAL mode and from airborne platforms in the integrated path DIAL (IPDA) mode. Results indicate system capability of measuring methane concentration profiles with <1.0% total error up to 4.5 km range with 5 minute averaging from ground. For airborne IPDA, the total error in the column dry mixing ratio is less than 0.3% with 0.1 sec average using ground returns. This system has a unique capability of combining signals from the atmospheric scattering from layers above the surface with ground return signals, which provides methane column measurement between the atmospheric scattering layer and the ground directly. In such case 0.5% and 1.2% total errors are achieved with 10 sec average from airborne platforms at 8 km and 15.24 km altitudes, respectively. Due to the pulsed nature of the transmitter, the system is relatively insensitive to aerosol and cloud interferences. Such DIAL system would be ideal for investigating high latitude methane releases over polar ice sheets, permafrost regions, wetlands, and over ocean during day and night. This system would have commercial potential for fossil fuel leaks detection and industrial monitoring applications.

  13. MERLIN (Methane Remote Sensing Lidar Mission: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierangelo C.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, measurements of atmospheric composition will be performed from space thanks to an IPDA (Integrated Path Differential Absorption LIDAR (Light Detecting And Ranging. This payload is under the responsibility of the German space agency (DLR, while the platform (MYRIADE Evolutions product line is developed by the French space agency (CNES. The IPDA technique relies on DIAL (Differential Absorption LIDAR measurements using a pulsed laser emitting at two wavelengths, one wavelength accurately locked on a spectral feature of the methane absorption line, and the other wavelength free from absorption to be used as reference. This technique enables measurements in all seasons, at all latitudes. It also guarantees almost no contamination by aerosols or water vapour cross-sensitivity, and thus has the advantage of an extremely low level of systematic error on the dry-air column mixing ratio of CH4.

  14. Dial-a-Ride

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The Dial-a-Ride problem is a Vehicle Routing problem in its most general form. The problem was formulated in the beginning of the 1970's and since then a large number of researchers have worked on developing efficient algorithms for use in automated planning of Dial-a-Ride transportation systems. In a Dial-a-Ride transportation system, passengers request a trip between two stops with either a desired time of departure from the pickup stop or a desired time of arrival at the destination. The t...

  15. Interpretation of DIAL Measurements of Lower Stratospheric Ozone in Regions with Pinatubo Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Fenn, Marta A.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Veiga, Robert E.; Mayor, Shane D.; Fishman, Jack; Nganga, D.; Minga, A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of volcanic aerosols on stratospheric ozone is a topic of current interest, especially with the June 15, 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines. Lidar has been used in the past to provide aerosol profiles which could be compared with ozone profiles measured using ozonesondes to look for coincidences between volcanic aerosols and ozone decreases. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique has the advantages of being able to measure ozone and aerosol profiles simultaneously as well as being able to cover large geographical regions rapidly. While there are problems associated with correcting the ozone profiles for the presence of aerosols, the corrections can be made reliably when the wavelengths are closely spaced and the Bernoulli method is applied. The DIAL measurements considered in this paper are those obtained in the tropical stratosphere in January 1992 during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE-II). The determination of ozone profiles in the presence of Pinatubo aerosols is discussed in a companion paper.

  16. Development of an Ozone UV DIAL System at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlome, M.; Simeonov, V.; Parlange, M.; van den Bergh, H.

    2009-04-01

    An ozone UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is developed and added to the existing multi-wavelength Lidar operated at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (HARSJ, 3580 m ASL, 46.55° N, 7.98° E). The system is based on a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (Continuum Powerlite 8000) providing the laser emission of 266 nm at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The initial radiation is focused through a high pressure Nitrogen-Raman cell responsible for the generation of the DIAL wavelengths suitable for ozone detection (284, 304 nm) by the stimulated Raman scattering technique. The 76 cm diameter Cassegrain telescope in the HARSJ's astronomical dome is used as receiver for measurements up to the tropopause. The existing multi-wavelength polychromator fixed at the telescopes rear end is equipped with the additional ozone detection channel. The performance of the system is illustrated by inter-comparison with an ECC ozone sonde launched by the Swiss Meteorological Institute at Payerne (SMI, 491 m ASL, 46.83°N, 6.96 E). The retrieved data are found to be in good agreement with the balloon sounding and cover an altitude range of 2 to 10 km above the HARSJ. Since the scientific community disagrees about the real amount of air mass exchange driven by stratosphere troposphere exchange (STE), this new instrument is capable to supply the STE research with remote sensing data from an unique location.

  17. Airborne Dial Remote Sensing of the Arctic Ozone Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Martin; Renger, Wolfgang; Ehret, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    A combined ozone and aerosol LIDAR was developed at the Institute of Physics of the Atmosphere at the DLR in Oberpfaffenhofen. It is an airborne version, that, based on the DIAL-principle, permits the recording of two-dimensional ozone profiles. This presentation will focus on the ozone-part; the aerosol subsection will be treated later.

  18. A New Technique for the Retrieval of Near Surface Water Vapor Using DIAL Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Kooi, Susan; Ferrare, Richard; Winker, David; Hair, Johnathan; Nehrir, Amin; Notari, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important atmospheric trace gas species and influences radiation, climate, cloud formation, surface evaporation, precipitation, storm development, transport, dynamics, and chemistry. For improvements in NWP (numerical weather prediction) and climate studies, global water vapor measurements with higher accuracy and vertical resolution are needed than are currently available. Current satellite sensors are challenged to characterize the content and distribution of water vapor in the Boundary Layer (BL) and particularly near the first few hundred meters above the surface within the BL. These measurements are critically needed to infer surface evaporation rates in cloud formation and climate studies. The NASA Langley Research Center Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system, which uses the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, has demonstrated the capability to provide high quality water vapor measurements in the BL and across the troposphere. A new retrieval technique is investigated to extend these DIAL water vapor measurements to the surface. This method uses signals from both atmospheric backscattering and the strong surface returns (even over low reflectivity oceanic surfaces) using multiple gain channels to cover the large signal dynamic range. Measurements can be made between broken clouds and in presence of optically thin cirrus. Examples of LASE measurements from a variety of conditions encountered during NASA hurricane field experiments over the Atlantic Ocean are presented. Comparisons of retrieved water vapor profiles from LASE near the surface with dropsonde measurements show very good agreement. This presentation also includes a discussion of the feasibility of developing space-based DIAL capability for high resolution water vapor measurements in the BL and above and an assessment of the technology needed for developing this capability.

  19. A versatile simulation software for performance analysis of DIAL system for the detection of toxic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Mukesh K.; Veerabuthiran, S.; Dudeja, Jai Paul; Dubey, Deepak K.

    2006-12-01

    Simulation studies have been carried out to analyze the performance of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for the remote detection of a large variety of toxic agents in the 2-5 μm and 9-11 μm spectral bands. Stand-alone Graphical User Interface (GUI) software has been developed in the MATLAB platform to perform the simulation operations. It takes various system inputs from the user and computes the required laser energy to be transmitted, backscattered signal strengths, signal-to-noise ratio and minimum detectable concentrations for various agents from different ranges for the given system parameters. It has the flexibility of varying any of the system parameters for computation in order to provide inputs for the required design of proposed DIAL system. This software has the advantage of optimizing system parameters in the design of Lidar system. As a case study, the DIAL system with specified pulse energy of OPO based laser transmitter (2-5 μm) and a TEA CO II laser transmitter (9-11μm) has been considered. The proposed system further consists of a 500-mm diameter Newtonian telescope, 0.5-mm diameter detector and 10-MHz digitizer. A toxic agent cloud with given thickness and concentration has been assumed to be detected in the ambient atmospheric conditions at various ranges between 0.2 and 5 km. For a given set of system parameters, the required energy of laser transmitter, power levels of the return signals, signal-to-noise ratio and minimum detectable concentrations from different ranges have been calculated for each of these toxic agents.

  20. Analysis of Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption from 3-13 km Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Weaver, Clark J.; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission [1]. It uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1575 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with the range profile of scattering in the path. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off-line signals via the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. The time of flight of the laser pulses is used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate an early version of the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar stepped the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 wavelength steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a NIR photomultiplier and is recorded on every other reading by a photon counting system [2]. During August 2009 we made a series of 2.5 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over locations in the US, including the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma, central Illinois, north-eastern North Carolina, and over the Chesapeake Bay and the eastern shore of Virginia. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made

  1. First lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols from a high-altitude aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed

    1995-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric processes related to radiation, climate change, atmospheric dynamics, meteorology, the global hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric chemistry, and yet our knowledge of the global distribution of water vapor is very limited. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique has the potential of providing needed high resolution water vapor measurements from aircraft and from space, and the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is a key step in the development of this capability. The LASE instrument is the first fully engineered, autonomous DIAL system, and it is designed to operate from a high-altitude aircraft (ER-2) and to make water vapor and aerosol profile measurements across the troposphere. The LASE system was flown from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in a series of engineering flights during September 1994. This paper discusses the characteristics of the LASE system and presents the first LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles.

  2. Atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing using Scheimpflug lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a new lidar technique for atmospheric remote sensing based on Scheimpflug principle, which describes the relationship between nonparallel image- and object-planes[1]. When a laser beam is transmitted into the atmosphere, the implication is that the backscattering echo of the entire illuminated probe volume can be in focus simultaneously without diminishing the aperture. The range-resolved backscattering echo can be retrieved by using a tilted line scan or two-dimensional CCD/CMOS camera. Rather than employing nanosecond-pulsed lasers, cascade detectors, and MHz signal sampling, all of high cost and complexity, we have developed a robust and inexpensive atmospheric lidar system based on compact laser diodes and array detectors. We present initial applications of the Scheimpflug lidar for atmospheric aerosol monitoring in bright sunlight, with a 3 W, 808 nm CW laser diode. Kilohertz sampling rates are also achieved with applications for wind speed and entomology [2]. Further, a proof-of-principle demonstration of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) based on the Scheimpflug lidar technique is presented [3]. By utilizing a 30 mW narrow band CW laser diode emitting at around 760 nm, the detailed shape of an oxygen absorption line can be resolved remotely with an integration time of 6 s and measurement cycle of 1 minute during night time. The promising results demonstrated in this work show potential for the Scheimpflug lidar technique for remote atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing, and renews hope for robust and realistic instrumentation for atmospheric lidar sensing. [1] F. Blais, "Review of 20 years of range sensor development," Journal of Electronic Imaging, vol. 13, pp. 231-243, Jan 2004. [2] M. Brydegaard, A. Gebru, and S. Svanberg, "Super resolution laser radar with blinking atmospheric particles - application to interacting flying insects " Progress In Electromagnetics Research, vol. 147, pp. 141-151, 2014. [3] L. Mei and M. Brydegaard

  3. Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rene Munk

    2003-01-01

    and vehicle positions. Unfortunately data from actual Dial-a-Ride transportation systems is not readily available, so tests are based on data generated in this project. While the algorithm performs as expected, other results such as the stable performance of the different modules in the developed software...

  4. Lidar Observation of Tropopause Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. A DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for vertical ozone profiles have been installed in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang, Indonesia (100.3E, 0.2S). We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13 - 17 km, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause at equatorial region.

  5. Observation of vertcal CO2 concentration profiles in the lower-atmosphere using a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, C.; Shibata, Y.; Abo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial profile and their variation in time is one of the essential informations for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. Moewover, for the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, the CO2 concentration measurement techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution are required in the lower atmosphere. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a compact direct detection 1.6 μm DIAL system for measuring CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at the analog mode and the 25 cm telescope. We have succeeded in observing the daytime temporal change of vertical CO2 concentration profiles for the range from 0.25 to 2.5 km with integration time of 30 minutes and range resolution of 300 m. This compact direct detection CO2 DIAL is usefull for the estimation of CO2 flux. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  6. Tropospheric water-vapor profiling using an airborne DIAL system: results from the EFEDA '91 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Ehret, Gerhard; Renger, Wolfgang

    1992-12-01

    An airborne near infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been completed for meteorological applications. This system is based on a Nd:YAG pumped narrow-band tunable dye laser for both the on- and off-line measurements. Performing H2O measurements within and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) up to an altitude of 4 km, it successfully participated in the European Field Experiment on Desertification Threatened Areas (EFEDA '91) conducted in Spain in the summer of 1991. Data processing of the lidar signals provides range resolved horizontal and vertical water vapor profiles, horizontal power spectra of turbulence, and aerosol backscattering profiles. Water vapor profiles are being calculated using gliding averages of single lidar returns. Typical horizontal resolutions range from 1.3 to 3 km with vertical resolutions varying from 300 to 600 m, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio, in order to meet a 5 to 10% accuracy. The systematic errors, however, are estimated to be around 6%. The vertical water vapor profiles agree well with radiosonde measurements.

  7. Lidar reflectance from snow at 2.05  μm wavelength as measured by the JPL Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph C

    2016-03-10

    We report airborne measurements of lidar directional reflectance (backscatter) from land surfaces at a wavelength in the 2.05 μm CO₂ absorption band, with emphasis on snow-covered surfaces in various natural environments. Lidar backscatter measurements using this instrument provide insight into the capabilities of lidar for both airborne and future global-scale CO₂ measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO₂ Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. Lidar measurement capability is particularly useful when the use of solar scattering spectroscopy is not feasible for high-accuracy atmospheric CO₂ measurements. Consequently, performance in high-latitude and winter season environments is an emphasis. Snow-covered surfaces are known to be dark in the CO₂ band spectral regions. The quantitative backscatter data from these field measurements help to elucidate the range of backscatter values that can be expected in natural environments.

  8. Fiber-Optic Gratings for Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Leila B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band filters in the form of phase-shifted Fabry-Perot Bragg gratings incorporated into optical fibers are being developed for differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) instruments used to measure concentrations of atmospheric water vapor. The basic idea is to measure the relative amounts of pulsed laser light scattered from the atmosphere at two nearly equal wavelengths, one of which coincides with an absorption spectral peak of water molecules and the other corresponding to no water vapor absorption. As part of the DIAL measurement process, the scattered light is made to pass through a filter on the way to a photodetector. Omitting other details of DIAL for the sake of brevity, what is required of the filter is to provide a stop band that: Surrounds the water-vapor spectral absorption peaks at a wavelength of 946 nm, Has a spectral width of at least a couple of nanometers, Contains a pass band preferably no wider than necessary to accommodate the 946.0003-nm-wavelength water vapor absorption peak [which has 8.47 pm full width at half maximum (FWHM)], and Contains another pass band at the slightly shorter wavelength of 945.9 nm, where there is scattering of light from aerosol particles but no absorption by water molecules. Whereas filters used heretofore in DIAL have had bandwidths of =300 pm, recent progress in the art of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters has made it feasible to reduce bandwidths to less than or equal to 20 pm and thereby to reduce background noise. Another benefit of substituting fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters for those now in use would be significant reductions in the weights of DIAL instruments. Yet another advantage of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters is that their transmission spectra can be shifted to longer wavelengths by heating or stretching: hence, it is envisioned that future DIAL instruments would contain devices for fine adjustment of transmission wavelengths through stretching or heating of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters

  9. A Fast, Locally Adaptive, Interactive Retrieval Algorithm for the Analysis of DIAL Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarov, D. V.; Rogers, R.; Hair, J. W.; Douglass, K. O.; Plusquellic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Differential absorption light detection and ranging (DIAL) is a laser-based tool which is used for remote, range-resolved measurement of particular gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon-dioxide and methane. In many instances it is of interest to study how these gases are distributed over a region such as a landfill, factory, or farm. While a single DIAL measurement only tells us about the distribution of a gas along a single path, a sequence of consecutive measurements provides us with information on how that gas is distributed over a region, making DIAL a natural choice for such studies. DIAL measurements present a number of interesting challenges; first, in order to convert the raw data to concentration it is necessary to estimate the derivative along the path of the measurement. Second, as the distribution of gases across a region can be highly heterogeneous it is important that the spatial nature of the measurements be taken into account. Finally, since it is common for the set of collected measurements to be quite large it is important for the method to be computationally efficient. Existing work based on Local Polynomial Regression (LPR) has been developed which addresses the first two issues, but the issue of computational speed remains an open problem. In addition to the latter, another desirable property is to allow user input into the algorithm. In this talk we present a novel method based on LPR which utilizes a variant of the RODEO algorithm to provide a fast, locally adaptive and interactive approach to the analysis of DIAL measurements. This methodology is motivated by and applied to several simulated examples and a study out of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) looking at the estimation of aerosol extinction in the atmosphere. A comparison study of our method against several other algorithms is also presented. References Chaudhuri, P., Marron, J.S., Scale-space view of curve estimation, Annals of Statistics 28 (2000) 408-428. Duong, T., Cowling

  10. Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Optimizations Based on Pre-Analyzed Atmospheric Data for ASCENDS Mission Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a modeling method based on data reductions is investigated which includes pre analyzed MERRA atmospheric fields for quantitative estimates of uncertainties introduced in the integrated path differential absorption methods for the sensing of various molecules including CO2. This approach represents the extension of our existing lidar modeling framework previously developed and allows effective on- and offline wavelength optimizations and weighting function analysis to minimize the interference effects such as those due to temperature sensitivity and water vapor absorption. The new simulation methodology is different from the previous implementation in that it allows analysis of atmospheric effects over annual spans and the entire Earth coverage which was achieved due to the data reduction methods employed. The effectiveness of the proposed simulation approach is demonstrated with application to the mixing ratio retrievals for the future ASCENDS mission. Independent analysis of multiple accuracy limiting factors including the temperature, water vapor interferences, and selected system parameters is further used to identify favorable spectral regions as well as wavelength combinations facilitating the reduction in total errors in the retrieved XCO2 values.

  11. Ground test results and analysis advancements for the AFRL airborne CO2 DIAL system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Hamilton, Carla M.; Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Kelly, Brian T.; Babnick, Robert D.; Pierrottet, Diego F.

    1999-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Active Remote Sensing Branch has developed the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar technique. The system is based on a high-power CO2 laser which can use either the standard 12C16O2 or the 13C16O2 carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies of up to 5 J on the stronger laser transitions. The lidar system is mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed for installation into the AFRL Argus C- 135E optical testbed aircraft. The Phase I ground tests were conducted at Kirtland AFB in 1997, prior to the LARS flight tests performed in September 1997 at Kirtland AFB and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Phase II ground tests were conducted in 1998 to determine the optimum performance of the LARS systems, after the incorporation of modifications and improvements suggested by the flight test results. This paper will present some of the chemical detection and radiometric results obtained during the Phase II ground tests. Following the presentation of the direct detection results, a summary of current work on a heterodyne DIAL system is given.

  12. Alexandrite lidar for the atmospheric water vapor detection and development of powerful tunable sources in IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiumi, M.; Maeda, M.; Muraoka, K.; Uchino, O.

    1992-01-01

    New tunable solid-state lasers, such as alexandrite and Ti-sapphire lasers, provide a powerful technique to detect various molecules in the atmosphere whose absorption bands are in the infrared region. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system to measure the tropospheric water vapor has been investigated by many authors, in an early stage, by dye and ruby lasers. Using the alpha band of water vapor, the longest detection range can be obtained with high accuracy, and the alexandrite laser is the most suitable laser for this purpose. In this paper, we describe the detection of water vapor in the atmosphere by an alexandrite lidar, and the development of powerful tunable sources based on Raman lasers in the infrared region.

  13. LIDAR for Detection of Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Veerabuthiran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Remote detection of chemical and biological warfare agents and toxic gases in the atmosphere is of current interest to both the military and civilian agencies. Out of all currently available techniques, no single technique provides efficient detection against such threats at significant standoff distances. Light detection and ranging (LIDAR technologies, based on the transmission of laser pulses and analysis of the return signals, have demonstrated impressive capabilities in remote detection of such toxic chemicals. LIDAR is a highly sensitive tool to detect the extremely low concentrations of various toxic agents present in the form of thin clouds at distances of few kilometer. The detection of these toxic clouds is based on the approach of first detecting and measuring the range of the clouds using the scattering phenomena and subsequently identifying the composition of toxic clouds using absorption and fluorescence phenomena. Laser Science and Technology Centre (LASTEC, Delhi has been working on the design and development of LIDAR systems for detection of chemical and biological warfare (CBW agents. In this paper, theoretical analysis of differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL for detection of chemical agents and fluorescence LIDAR for detection of biological agents has been discussed. For some typical parametric conditions, the received power levels from different ranges to detect specific concentrations of chemical or biological clouds have been computed and discussed. The technical details of the indigenously developed backscattering LIDAR, which detects and measures the distance of cloud layers up to 5 km is also presented.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.241-250, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.556

  14. A compact mobile ozone lidar for atmospheric ozone and aerosol profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis

    2014-10-01

    A compact mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone air quality campaigns. This lidar is integrated into the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consists of a Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. The system has been configured to enable mobile operation from a trailer and was deployed to Denver, CO July 15-August 15, 2014 supporting the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. Ozone curtain plots and the resulting science are presented.

  15. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  16. Analysis of a random modulation single photon counting differential absorption lidar system for space-borne atmospheric CO2 sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, X; Pérez-Serrano, A; Quatrevalet, M; Nock, R W; Dahnoun, N; Ehret, G; Esquivias, I; Rarity, J G

    2016-09-05

    The ability to observe the Earth's carbon cycles from space provides scientists an important tool to analyze climate change. Current proposed systems are mainly based on pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar, in which two high energy pulses at different wavelengths interrogate the atmosphere sequentially for its transmission properties and are back-scattered by the ground. In this work an alternative approach based on random modulation single photon counting is proposed and analyzed; this system can take advantage of a less power demanding semiconductor laser in intensity modulated continuous wave operation, benefiting from a better efficiency, reliability and radiation hardness. Our approach is validated via numerical simulations considering current technological readiness, demonstrating its potential to obtain a 1.5 ppm retrieval precision for 50 km averaging with 2.5 W average power in a space-borne scenario. A major limiting factor is the ambient shot noise, if ultra-narrow band filtering technology could be applied, 0.5 ppm retrieval precision would be attainable.

  17. First airborne water vapor lidar measurements in the tropical upper troposphere and mid-latitudes lower stratosphere: accuracy evaluation and intercomparisons with other instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schiller

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the tropics, deep convection is the major source of uncertainty in water vapor transport to the upper troposphere and into the stratosphere. Although accurate measurements in this region would be of first order importance to better understand the processes that govern stratospheric water vapor concentrations and trends in the context of a changing climate, they are sparse because of instrumental shortcomings and observational challenges. Therefore, the Falcon research aircraft of the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR flew a zenith-viewing water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL during the Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment (TROCCINOX in 2004 and 2005 in Brazil. The measurements were performed alternatively on three water vapor absorption lines of different strength around 940 nm. These are the first aircraft DIAL measurements in the tropical upper troposphere and in the mid-latitudes lower stratosphere. Sensitivity analyses reveal an accuracy of 5% between altitudes of 8 and 16 km. This is confirmed by intercomparisons with the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH and the Fluorescent Advanced Stratospheric Hygrometer (FLASH onboard the Russian M-55 Geophysica research aircraft during five coordinated flights. The average relative differences between FISH and DIAL amount to −3%±8% and between FLASH and DIAL to −8%±14%, negative meaning DIAL is more humid. The average distance between the probed air masses was 129 km. The DIAL is found to have no altitude- or latitude-dependent bias. A comparison with the balloon ascent of a laser absorption spectrometer gives an average difference of 0%±19% at a distance of 75 km. Six tropical DIAL under-flights of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on board ENVISAT reveal a mean difference of −8%±49% at an average distance of 315 km. While the comparison with MIPAS is somewhat less significant due to poorer

  18. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  19. Boundary layer ozone differential-absorption lidar%边界层臭氧差分吸收激光雷达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹开法; 黄见; 胡顺星

    2015-01-01

    差分吸收激光雷达是测量边界层臭氧空间分布的一种重要工具.研制了一台边界层臭氧差分吸收激光雷达系统,系统采用Nd:YAG四倍频激光266 nm泵浦H2/D2混合气体产生受激拉曼光作为光源,采用牛顿型望远镜接收大气回波,288.9 nm和299 nm的弹性散射信号被分成两路,被光电倍增管转换为电信号,然后通过A/D采集卡采集保存用以反演大气臭氧分布廓线.给出了系统的探测结果以及和臭氧探空仪地对比验证实验.结果显示该激光雷达可以大大降低几何因子的影响,提供0.2~2 km区间的边界层大气臭氧分布廓线.%Differential absorption lidar is one of important tools for measurement of spatial distribution of ozone in boundary layer. A boundary layer ozone differential absorption lidar system was developed. The stimulated Raman laser in H2/D2 mixtures pumped by the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm was adopted in lidar system. A new Newton telescope received the lidar atmospheric echo. The elastic scattering signals at 288.9 nm and 299 nm were divided into two channels and converted to electrical signals by photomultiplier. Finally the signals were collected by A/D acquisition card for inversion of atmospheric ozone distribution profile. Some ozone data results were given and comparison of ozone profiles between ozone lidar and ozonesonde was displayed. Results show that the influence of the geometrical factor is reduced greatly in the lidar system. Atmospheric ozone profiles from 0.2 km to 2 km can be provided reliably by the lidar system.

  20. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  1. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  2. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and correspondi...

  3. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and 0.28% additional bias. Sensitivity analysis of environmental

  4. Ground-based, integrated path differential absorption LIDAR measurement of CO2, CH4, and H2O near 1.6  μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gerd A; Plusquellic, David F

    2016-08-10

    A ground-based, integrated path, differential absorption light detection and ranging (IPDA LIDAR) system is described and characterized for a series of nighttime studies of CO2, CH4, and H2O. The transmitter is based on an actively stabilized, continuous-wave, single-frequency external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) operating from 1.60 to 1.65 μm. The fixed frequency output of the ECDL is microwave sideband tuned using an electro-optical phase modulator driven by an arbitrary waveform generator and filtered using a confocal cavity to generate a sequence of 123 frequencies separated by 300 MHz. The scan sequence of single sideband frequencies of 600 ns duration covers a 37 GHz region at a spectral scan rate of 10 kHz (100 μs per scan). Simultaneously, an eye-safe backscatter LIDAR system at 1.064 μm is used to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer. IPDA LIDAR measurements of the CO2 and CH4 dry air mixing ratios are presented in comparison with those from a commercial cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument. Differences between the IPDA LIDAR and CRD concentrations in several cases appear to be well correlated with the atmospheric aerosol structure from the backscatter LIDAR measurements. IPDA LIDAR dry air mixing ratios of CO2 and CH4 are determined with fit uncertainties of 2.8 μmol/mol (ppm) for CO2 and 22 nmol/mol (ppb) for CH4 over 30 s measurement periods. For longer averaging times (up to 1200 s), improvements in these detection limits by up to 3-fold are estimated from Allan variance analyses. Two sources of systematic error are identified and methods to remove them are discussed, including speckle interference from wavelength decorrelation and the seed power dependence of amplified spontaneous emission. Accuracies in the dry air retrievals of CO2 and CH4 in a 30 s measurement period are estimated at 4 μmol/mol (1% of ambient levels) and 50 nmol/mol (3%), respectively.

  5. Air Quality Campaign Results from the Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Gano, R.

    2014-12-01

    A compact differential absorption ozone lidar (DIAL) system has been developed called the Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar (L-MOL) which can provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric profiles from a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric air quality campaigns. This lidar is integrated into the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars, three of which are mobile, across the country. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser. The transmitter transmits ~60 mW at two wavelengths between 280 and 293-nm for ozone and 2.5-W at 527-nm for aerosol profiling. The lidar operates at 1-kHz with 500-Hz at each 0f two UV wavelength. A fiber coupled 40-cm diameter parabolic telescope collets the backscattered return and records analog and photon counting signals. A separate 30-cm diameter telescope collects very near field returns for ozone profiles close to the surface. The lidar is capable of recording ozone profiles from 100-500-m with the very near field telescope and from 800-m to approximately 6000-m with the far field channel depending on sky background conditions. The system has been configured to enable mobile operation from a trailer which is environmentally controlled, and is towed with a truck with the objective to make the system mobile such that it can be setup at remote sites to support air quality field campaigns such as the July-August 2014 Denver, CO DISCOVER_AQ campaign. Before the lidar was deployed in the DISCOVER-AQ campaign the lidar operated for 15 hours at NASA Langley in Hampton, VA to test the ability of the system to accurately record ozone profiles. The figure below shows the results of that test. Six ozonesondes were launched during this period and show reasonable agreement with the ozone (ppbv) curtain plot. Ozone of stratospheric origin at 4-14 UTC was noted as well as local ozone

  6. Design and simulation of a biconic multipass absorption cell for the frequency stabilization of the reference seeder laser in IPDA lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yongji; Du, Juan; Yang, Zhongguo; Sun, Yanguang; Liu, Jiqiao; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2016-09-01

    The design process and simulation method of a multipass absorption cell used for the frequency stabilization of the reference seeder laser in integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar are presented. On the basis of the fundamental theory of the Herriott multipass cell comprising two spherical mirrors, the initial parameters of the multipass cell, which has an optical path greater than 10 m and consists of two biconic mirrors, were calculated. More than 30 light spots were distributed on each mirror, and the distance between adjacent spots was mostly optimized to greater than six times the beam waist. After optimization, the simulated transmittance spectrum and associated differential signal were obtained. The interference induced by surface scattering was also simulated, and its influence on the differential signal was analyzed. A correspondence between the simulated results and the testing data was observed.

  7. Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Ozone in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seabrook Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on differential absorption lidar (DIAL measurements of tropospheric ozone in the Canadian Arctic during springtime. Measurements at Eureka Weather Station revealed that mountains have a significant effect on the vertical structure of ozone above Ellesmere Island. Ozone depletion events were observed when air that had spent significant time near to the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean reached Eureka. This air arrived at Eureka by flowing over the surrounding mountains. Surface level ozone depletions were not observed during periods when the flow of air from over the sea ice was blocked by mountains. In the case of blocking there was an enhancement in the amount of ozone near the surface as air from the mid troposphere descended in the lee of the mountains. Three case studies will be shown in the presentation, while one is described in this paper.

  8. Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Ozone in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Jeffrey; Whiteway, James

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of tropospheric ozone in the Canadian Arctic during springtime. Measurements at Eureka Weather Station revealed that mountains have a significant effect on the vertical structure of ozone above Ellesmere Island. Ozone depletion events were observed when air that had spent significant time near to the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean reached Eureka. This air arrived at Eureka by flowing over the surrounding mountains. Surface level ozone depletions were not observed during periods when the flow of air from over the sea ice was blocked by mountains. In the case of blocking there was an enhancement in the amount of ozone near the surface as air from the mid troposphere descended in the lee of the mountains. Three case studies will be shown in the presentation, while one is described in this paper.

  9. Characterizing the Vertical Processes of Ozone in Colorado's Front Range Using the GSFC Ozone DIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, John T.; McGee, Thomas J.; Hoff, Raymond M.; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Although characterizing the interactions of ozone throughout the entire troposphere are important for health and climate processes, there is a lack of routine measurements of vertical profiles within the United States. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) has been developed and validated within the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet). Two scientifically interesting ozone episodes are presented that were observed during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER AQ) campaign at Ft. Collins, Colorado. The first case study, occurring between 22-23 July 2014, indicates enhanced concentrations of ozone at Ft. Collins during nighttime hours, which was due to the complex recirculation of ozone within the foothills of the Rocky Mountain region. Although quantifying the ozone increase aloft during recirculation episodes has been historically difficult, results indicate that an increase of 20 - 30 ppbv of ozone at the Ft. Collins site has been attributed to this recirculation. The second case, occurring between Aug 4-8th 2014, characterizes a dynamical exchange of ozone between the stratosphere and the troposphere. This case, along with seasonal model parameters from previous years, is used to estimate the stratospheric contribution to the Rocky Mountain region. Results suggest that a large amount of stratospheric air is residing in the troposphere in the summertime near Ft. Collins, CO. The results also indicate that warmer tropopauses are correlated with an increase in stratospheric air below the tropopause in the Rocky Mountain Region.

  10. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  11. Development of Laser, Detector, and Receiver Systems for an Atmospheric CO2 Lidar Profiling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Singh, Upendra

    2008-01-01

    A ground-based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is being developed with the capability to measure range-resolved and column amounts of atmospheric CO2. This system is also capable of providing high-resolution aerosol profiles and cloud distributions. It is being developed as part of the NASA Earth Science Technology Office s Instrument Incubator Program. This three year program involves the design, development, evaluation, and fielding of a ground-based CO2 profiling system. At the end of a three-year development this instrument is expected to be capable of making measurements in the lower troposphere and boundary layer where the sources and sinks of CO2 are located. It will be a valuable tool in the validation of NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) measurements of column CO2 and suitable for deployment in the North American Carbon Program (NACP) regional intensive field campaigns. The system can also be used as a test-bed for the evaluation of lidar technologies for space-application. This DIAL system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under a number of NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements.

  12. Advanced 2-micron solid-state laser for wind and CO II lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-12-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Diffrencial Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO II concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  13. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  14. Dialética do Concreto

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Leonice Matilde

    2012-01-01

    A autora Leonice Matilde Richter, escreveu esta resenha baseada no livro "Dialética do Concreto", pelo autor Karel Kosik. Referência:KOSIK, Karel. Dialética do concreto. Trad. NEVES, Célia; TORÍBIO, Alderico. Rio de Janeiro: Paz e Terra, 2010.

  15. Development and Field Testing of a Continuously Operating CO2 Lidar Profiling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Refaat, T.; Koch, G. J.; Davis, K.; Abedin, N. M.; Rubio, M. A.; Singh, U. N.

    2009-05-01

    A ground-based 2-micron DIAL system for profiling atmospheric CO2 was developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. This system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under a number of NASA programs to develop new solid-state YLF laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. The DIAL system was integrated and tested at LaRC, and then incorporated in a field experiment for evaluation. The field experiment was conducted during June-July 2008, at West Branch, Iowa, which is located at the center of a domain rich in complementary CO2 measurements. The objective of the experiment was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the system and its ability to distinguish contents between boundary layer and free troposphere. Therefore, the experiment was co-located with other CO2 measurement setups that aid the evaluation. These setups include NOAA WBI tower with in-situ CO2 sampling sensors at 31, 99 and 379 m altitudes; NOAA airborne CO2 profiling; and radiosondes for atmospheric temperature, pressure and relative humidity profiling at the site. The lidar operations included daytime CO2 measurements to sense the well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer and overlying troposphere; day-to-night and night-to-day transitions; and night observations to capture CO2 mixing ratio differences within the boundary layer. Measurements included atmospheric CO2 spatial and temporal profiles as well as column measurements using high altitude clouds. Examples of CO2 DIAL system capability and measurements from the field experiment will be presented.

  16. A Novel Satellite Mission Concept for Upper Air Water Vapour, Aerosol and Cloud Observations Using Integrated Path Differential Absorption LiDAR Limb Sounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Weitnauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new satellite mission to deliver high quality measurements of upper air water vapour. The concept centres around a LiDAR in limb sounding by occultation geometry, designed to operate as a very long path system for differential absorption measurements. We present a preliminary performance analysis with a system sized to send 75 mJ pulses at 25 Hz at four wavelengths close to 935 nm, to up to 5 microsatellites in a counter-rotating orbit, carrying retroreflectors characterized by a reflected beam divergence of roughly twice the emitted laser beam divergence of 15 µrad. This provides water vapour profiles with a vertical sampling of 110 m; preliminary calculations suggest that the system could detect concentrations of less than 5 ppm. A secondary payload of a fairly conventional medium resolution multispectral radiometer allows wide-swath cloud and aerosol imaging. The total weight and power of the system are estimated at 3 tons and 2,700 W respectively. This novel concept presents significant challenges, including the performance of the lasers in space, the tracking between the main spacecraft and the retroreflectors, the refractive effects of turbulence, and the design of the telescopes to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio for the high precision measurements. The mission concept was conceived at the Alpbach Summer School 2010.

  17. Development of lidar techniques for environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Mats

    1996-09-01

    The lidar group in Lund has performed many DIAL measurements with a mobile lidar system that was first described in 1987. The lidar system is based on a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. During the last few years the lidar group has focused on fluorescence imaging and mercury measurements in the troposphere. In 1994 we performed two campaigns: one fluorescence imaging measurement campaign outside Avignon, France and one unique lidar campaign at a mercury mine in Almaden, Spain. Both campaigns are described in this thesis. This thesis also describes how the mobile lidar system was updated with the graphical programming language LabVIEW to obtain a user friendly lidar system. The software controls the lidar system and analyses measured data. The measurement results are shown as maps of species concentration. All electronics and the major parts of the program are described. A new graphical technique to estimate wind speed from plumes is also discussed. First measurements have been performed with the new system. 31 refs, 19 figs, 1 tab

  18. New ground-based lidar enables volcanic CO2 flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Nuvoli, Marcello; Chiodini, Giovanni; Minopoli, Carmine; Tamburello, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    There have been substantial advances in the ability to monitor the activity of hazardous volcanoes in recent decades. However, obtaining early warning of eruptions remains challenging, because the patterns and consequences of volcanic unrests are both complex and nonlinear. Measuring volcanic gases has long been a key aspect of volcano monitoring since these mobile fluids should reach the surface long before the magma. There has been considerable progress in methods for remote and in-situ gas sensing, but measuring the flux of volcanic CO2-the most reliable gas precursor to an eruption-has remained a challenge. Here we report on the first direct quantitative measurements of the volcanic CO2 flux using a newly designed differential absorption lidar (DIAL), which were performed at the restless Campi Flegrei volcano. We show that DIAL makes it possible to remotely obtain volcanic CO2 flux time series with a high temporal resolution (tens of minutes) and accuracy (volcanic CO2 represents a major step forward in volcano monitoring, and will contribute improved volcanic CO2 flux inventories. Our results also demonstrate the unusually strong degassing behavior of Campi Flegrei fumaroles in the current ongoing state of unrest.

  19. Simultaneous NO and NO(2) DIAL measurement using BBO crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölsch, H J; Rairoux, P; Wolf, J P; Wöste, L

    1989-06-01

    We report a new differential absorption lidar technique for measuring simultaneously the concentrations of NO and NO(2) in the atmosphere. The technique is based on the correlation of the 450-nm absorption band of NO(2) and 227-nm absorption band of NO by frequency doubling. This performance has been allowed by the advent of a new and highly efficient frequency doubling crystal: the beta-BaB(2)O(4). A test experiment on a NO/NO(2) emitter has been performed, demonstrating the efficiency of the technique. The detection limit is estimated to be ~1 ppm .m for NO(2) and 100 ppb.m for NO. The range of measurement is limited to 1 km, due to the strong UV Rayleigh scattering and O(2) absorption.

  20. Tropospheric Ozone Source Attribution in Southern California during Summer 2014 Based on Lidar Measurements and Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Munoz, Maria Jose; Johnson, Matthew S.; Leblanc, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, significant efforts have been made to increase tropospheric ozone long-term monitoring. A large number of ground-based, airborne and space-borne instruments are currently providing valuable data to contribute to better understand tropospheric ozone budget and variability. Nonetheless, most of these instruments provide in-situ surface and column-integrated data, whereas vertically resolved measurements are still scarce. Besides ozonesondes and aircraft, lidar measurements have proven to be valuable tropospheric ozone profilers. Using the measurements from the tropospheric ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) located at the JPL Table Mountain Facility, California, and the GEOS-Chem and GEOS-5 model outputs, the impact of the North American monsoon on tropospheric ozone during summer 2014 is investigated. The influence of the Monsoon lightning-induced NOx will be evaluated against other sources (e.g. local anthropogenic emissions and the stratosphere) using also complementary data such as backward-trajectories analysis, coincident water vapor lidar measurements, and surface ozone in-situ measurements.

  1. Lidar detection of high concentrations of ozone and aerosol transported from northeastern Asia over Saga, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Osamu; Sakai, Tetsu; Izumi, Toshiharu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Morino, Isamu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Deushi, Makoto; Yumimoto, Keiya; Maki, Takashi; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Akaho, Taiga; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arai, Kohei; Nakatsuru, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2017-02-01

    To validate products of the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), we observed vertical profiles of aerosols, thin cirrus clouds, and tropospheric ozone with a mobile-lidar system that consisted of a two-wavelength (532 and 1064 nm) polarization lidar and a tropospheric ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We used these lidars to make continuous measurements over Saga (33.24° N, 130.29° E) during 20-31 March 2015. High ozone and high aerosol concentrations were observed almost simultaneously in the altitude range 0.5-1.5 km from 03:00 to 20:00 Japan Standard Time (JST) on 22 March 2015. The maximum ozone volume mixing ratio was ˜ 110 ppbv. The maxima of the aerosol extinction coefficient and optical depth at 532 nm were 1.2 km-1 and 2.1, respectively. Backward trajectory analysis and the simulations by the Model of Aerosol Species IN the Global AtmospheRe (MASINGAR) mk-2 and the Meteorological Research Institute Chemistry-Climate Model, version 2 (MRI-CCM2), indicated that mineral dust particles from the Gobi Desert and an air mass with high ozone and aerosol (mainly sulfate) concentrations that originated from the North China Plain could have been transported over the measurement site within about 2 days. These high ozone and aerosol concentrations impacted surface air quality substantially in the afternoon of 22 March 2015. After some modifications of its physical and chemical parameters, MRI-CCM2 approximately reproduced the high ozone volume mixing ratio. MASINGAR mk-2 successfully predicted high aerosol concentrations, but the predicted peak aerosol optical thickness was about one-third of the observed value.

  2. Methodology of dimensionless multiplicative decomposition for atmospheric lidar evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil; Gross, Barry; Comeron, Adolfo

    2006-09-01

    In the present paper, we show application examples of united generalized methodology for atmospheric lidar assessment, which uses the dimensionless-parameterization as a core component. It is based on a series of our previous works where the problem of universal parameterization over many lidar technologies were described and analyzed from different points of view. A methodology of spatial-angular filtering efficiency was used for comparison of different receiving system designs on the criterion of stability against background radiation. The dimensionless parameterization concept applied to photodetectors of remote sensing instruments allowed predicting the lidar receiver performance in presence of sky background. The approach can be widely used to evaluate a broad range of lidar system capabilities for a variety of lidar remote sensing applications, as well as to serve as a basis for selection of appropriate lidar system parameters for a specific application. Such a methodology provides generalized, uniform and objective approach for the evaluation of a broad range of lidar types and systems (aerosol, Raman, DIAL), operating on different targets (backscatter or topographic) and under intense sky background conditions, and can be used within the lidar community to compare different lidar instruments.

  3. Micropulse Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Micropulse Lidar (MPL) is a ground-based optical remote sensing system designed primarily to determine the altitude of clouds overhead. The physical principle is...

  4. Vision system for dial gage torque wrench calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Doiron, Theodore D.; Sanghera, Paramjeet S.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a fast and robust vision system which, in conjunction with the Dial Gage Calibration system developed by AKO Inc., will be used by the U.S. Army in calibrating dial gage torque wrenches. The vision system detects the change in the angular position of the dial pointer in a dial gage. The angular change is proportional to the applied torque. The input to the system is a sequence of images of the torque wrench dial gage taken at different dial pointer positions. The system then reports the angular difference between the different positions. The primary components of this vision system include modules for image acquisition, linear feature extraction and angle measurements. For each of these modules, several techniques were evaluated and the most applicable one was selected. This system has numerous other applications like vision systems to read and calibrate analog instruments.

  5. Lidar to lidar calibration phase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the results from phase 2 of a lidar to lidar (L2L) calibration procedure. Phase two of the project included two measurement campaigns conducted at given sites. The purpose was to find out if the lidar-to-lidar calibration procedure can be conducted with similar results...

  6. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  7. Lidar to lidar calibration phase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents a feasibility study of a lidar to lidar (L2L) calibration procedure. Phase one of the project was conducted at Høvsøre, Denmark. Two windcubes were placed next to the 116m met mast and different methods were applied to obtain the sensing height error of the lidars. The purpose...... is to find the most consistent method and use it in a potential lidar to lidar calibration procedure....

  8. High resolution and high precision absorption spectroscopy using high finesse cavities: application to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest; Cavites de haute finesse pour la spectroscopie d'absorption haute sensibilite et haute precision: application a l'etude de molecules d'interet atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V.

    2005-12-15

    High finesse cavities are used to measure very weak absorption features. Two different methodologies are investigated and applied to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest. First, Continuous Wave - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) is used to study the atmospheric spectra of water vapour in the near infrared range. These measurements are performed for temperature and pressure of atmospheric relevance for DIAL applications (Differential Absorption Lidar). This study, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA), goes with the WALES mission (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). The experimental setup was conceived in order to control pressure, temperature and relative humidity conditions. A particular attention is done to characterize and describe the spectrometer. Then, measurements of red Oxygen B band are performed to demonstrate the huge performance of Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). The desired optical feedback is obtained by light injection into the high finesse cavity through a glass plate placed inside the cavity and closed to the Brewster angle. We show a measurement dynamical range of 5 orders of magnitude (10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10} /cm) and a sensitivity of 10{sup -10} /cm/{radical} Hz. Also, sampling absorption spectra by the super linear cavity frequency comb allows very precise frequency measurements. This is demonstrated by the determination of Oxygen pressure shifts with an absolute accuracy of around 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -1}/atm. To our knowledge, we provide the highest accuracy ever reported for this parameter. (author)

  9. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  10. 可重部署钠激光雷达接收系统减震设计%Shock absorption design of the receiving system for re deployment of sodium lidar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程永强; 胡雄; 闫召爱; 郭商勇; 孙逸桥; 张旭

    2016-01-01

    为了防止中国科学院临近空间环境野外综合探测站(廊坊,39ºN,116ºE)的钠荧光多普勒激光雷达在可重新部署运输过程中震动对激光雷达系统的不良影响,保证系统测量的稳定性和精度,文中主要对钠激光雷达接收系统进行了减震设计。首先选用了空气悬挂车载底盘和对望远镜的主镜运输以及望远镜安装运输平台等进行了三级减震设计,通过仿真模拟表明通过减震设计的望远镜安装运输平台冲击位移小于望远镜的主镜运输减震设计要求;其次通过跑车实验表明通过减震设计主镜室的最大振动加速度满足望远镜运输条件设计输入要求;最后通过钠荧光多普勒激光雷达系统的观测实验进一步验证了在长途运输中减震设计的可靠性。%In the process of the re deployment, in order to prevent the adverse effects and assure the stability and accuracy of the sodium Doppler fluorescence lidar in the near space environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Langfang, 39oN, 116oE), the shock absorption design of the receiving system in sodium lidar was mainly carried out. Firstly, the three-level shock absorber design was carried out by selecting the air suspension chassis, the main mirror of the telescope, and the platform for the installation of the telescope. Through simulation, it was found that the impact displacement of the telescope platform is less than the design requirements of the primary mirror of the telescope. Secondly, by the sports truck experiment, the maximum vibration acceleration of the main mirror chamber was found to meet the requirements of the design input of the telescope. In the end, the reliability of shock absorption design of the long distance transportation is further verified by the observation experiment of the sodium doppler fluorescence lidar.

  11. Tropospheric ozone and aerosols measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic boundary layer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and aerosol distributions were measured from an aircraft using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system as part of the 1988 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment - Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE-3A) to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during the summer. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. Several cases of continental polar air masses were examined during the experiment. The aerosol scattering associated with these air masses was very low, and the atmospheric distribution of aerosols was quite homogeneous for those air masses that had been transported over the ice for greater than or = 3 days. The transition in O3 and aerosol distributions from tundra to marine conditions was examined several times. The aerosol data clearly show an abrupt change in aerosol scattering properties within the mixed layer from lower values over the tundra to generally higher values over the water. The distinct differences in the heights of the mixed layers in the two regions was also readily apparent. Several cases of enhanced O3 were observed during ABLE-3 in conjunction with enhanced aerosol scattering in layers in the free atmosphere. Examples are presented of the large scale variations of O3 and aerosols observed with the airborne lidar system from near the surface to above the tropopause over the Arctic during ABLE-3.

  12. Calculation of optimal parameters of an NH3-CO2 lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasil'ev, BI; Mannoun, OM

    2005-01-01

    The basic parameters (range, signal-to-noise ratio, and sensitivity) of a lidar using NH3 and CO2 lasers are calculated. The principle of lidar operation is based on the differential absorption recording. Absorption spectra of all known Freons are considered in the spectral range 9-13.5 mu m and opt

  13. La dialéctica en las investigaciones educativas

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio Alberto Ortiz Torres

    2011-01-01

    En las investigaciones educativas se refleja la dialéctica al manifestarse contradicciones en el objeto de estudio, que se presuponen y se niegan al unísono. Sin embargo, los principios y las categorías de la lógica dialéctica casi no son abordados, de manera explícita, en la formación de profesionales en investigación educativa, en los manuales elaborados, ni en la propia práctica inquisitoria. Por lo general, solo se resalta la importancia de las leyes y reglas de la lógica formal que consi...

  14. Liderazgo dialógico en Comunidades de Aprendizaje

    OpenAIRE

    Gisela Redondo-Sama

    2015-01-01

    Objeto: El objetivo de este artículo es presentar y discutir los resultados obtenidos en tres Comunidades de Aprendizaje en relación a los procesos de creación, promoción y consolidación del liderazgo dialógico. En el análisis, se incorpora el papel de los diferentes miembros de la comunidad en la organización escolar. Diseño/metodología: Se realiza una revisión de literatura científica sobre los conceptos de liderazgo, liderazgo educativo y liderazgo dialógico. Las contribuciones se han sele...

  15. LIDAR Research & Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The LIDAR Research and Development labs are used to investigate and improve LIDAR components such as laser sources, optical signal detectors and optical filters. The...

  16. Lidar calibration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.; Streicher, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of atmospheric aerosol diffusion experiments combined with lidar detection was conducted to evaluate and calibrate an existing retrieval algorithm for aerosol backscatter lidar systems. The calibration experiments made use of two (almost) identical mini-lidar systems for aerosol cloud...... detection to test the reproducibility and uncertainty of lidars. Lidar data were obtained from both single-ended and double-ended Lidar configurations. A backstop was introduced in one of the experiments and a new method was developed where information obtained from the backstop can be used in the inversion...... algorithm. Independent in-situ aerosol plume concentrations were obtained from a simultaneous tracer gas experiment with SF6, and comparisons with the two lidars were made. The study shows that the reproducibility of the lidars is within 15%, including measurements from both sides of a plume...

  17. Wind Measurement LIDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systems & Processes Engineering Corporation (SPEC) proposes a Wind Measurement LIDAR whose sensor assembly is composed of SPEC Gen IV LIDAR seeker, with 12.8...

  18. Dialética, Linguagem e Genealogia: sobre o programa da Dialética Negativa de Adorno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Calheiros de Lima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gostaria aqui de formular o programa mais geral, contido na Dialética Negativa de Adorno, a partir de algumas perspectivas histórico-filosóficas. Na primeira parte, procuro desenvolver a ideia de que a crítica de Adorno a Hegel, compreendida como um novo enlace entre dialética e ontologia, beneficia-se da interpretação proposta por Adorno de temas da filosofia kantiana (1. Em seguida, procuro mostrar como Adorno conecta sua reformulação da dialética a uma compreensão de linguagem fortemente devedora de estratégias genealógicas de argumentação (2.

  19. Solving the Dial-a-Ride Problem using Genetic Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rene Munk; Larsen, Jesper; Bergvinsdottir, Kristin Berg

    2007-01-01

    In the Dial-a-Ride problem (DARP), customers request transportation from an operator. A request consists of a specified pickup location and destination location along with a desired departure or arrival time and capacity demand. The aim of DARP is to minimize transportation cost while satisfying...

  20. Feasibility Checking for Dial-a-Ride Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugland, Dag; Ho, Sin C.

    Hunsaker and Savelsbergh have proposed an algorithm for testing feasibility of a route in the solution to the dial-a-ride problem. The constraints that are checked are load capacity constraints, time windows, ride time bounds and wait time bounds. The algorithm has linear running time. By virtue...

  1. Feasibility testing for dial-a-ride problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugland, Dag; Ho, Sin C.

    Hunsaker and Savelsbergh have proposed an algorithm for testing feasibility of a route in the solution to the dial-a-ride problem. The constraints that are checked are load capacity constraints, time windows, ride time bounds and wait time bounds. The algorithm has linear running time. By virtue...

  2. Feasibility Testing for Dial-a-Ride Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugland, Dag; Ho, Sin C.

    2010-01-01

    Hunsaker and Savelsbergh have proposed an algorithm for testing feasibility of a route in the solution to the dial-a-ride problem. The constraints that are checked are load capacity constraints, time windows, ride time bounds and wait time bounds. The algorithm has linear running time. By virtue...

  3. USAFETAC Online Climatology: Dial-In Service Users Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Chapter 2 GETTING STARTED AND LOGGING ON Fanllarzaton Dial-In was designed to operate both online and offline. Before you log on to the ETAC computer, we...o; -a:-] WV Local Time Conversion: [SS (- tar East. + tef Wesit ) "o Six-digit Block Station te. o. ,.r listing of 6W .,...,., Numbr conaltional *ow.n

  4. Lidar base specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Hans Karl.

    2012-01-01

    In late 2009, a $14.3 million allocation from the “American Recovery and Reinvestment Act” for new light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data prompted the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) to develop a common base specification for all lidar data acquired for The National Map. Released as a draft in 2010 and formally published in 2012, the USGS–NGP “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” (now Lidar Base Specification) was quickly embraced as the foundation for numerous state, county, and foreign country lidar specifications.

  5. Sobre o transcendental prático e a dialética da sociabilidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Lopes dos Santos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ao escrever Apresentação do mundo: considerações sobre o pensamento de Ludwig Wittgenstein, as intenções de José Arthur Giannotti não eram principalmente exegéticas. Ele pretendia trilhar alguns caminhos abertos por Ludwig Wittgenstein no intuito de lidar com suas próprias obsessões filosóficas. Neste artigo, mostro por que e como algumas das linhas de pensamento de Wittgenstein ajudaram Giannotti a clarear logicamente alguns de seus próprios temas filosóficos obsessivos: o transcendental prático e a dialética da sociabilidade.In writing Presentation of the World: considerations on the thought of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Giannotti's intentions were not primarily exegetical. He aimed to follow some of Wittgenstein's conceptual pathways in order to deal with his own philosophical obsessions. In this paper, I show why and how some of Wittgenstein's lines of thought helped Giannotti to logically clarify a couple of his own obsessive philosophical themes: the practical transcendental and the dialectic of sociability.

  6. Space-borne clear air lidar measurements in the presence of broken cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Astin

    Full Text Available A number of proposed lidar systems, such as ESA’s AEOLUS (formerly ADM and DIAL missions (e.g. WALES are to make use of lidar returns in clear air. However, on average, two-thirds of the globe is covered in cloud. Hence, there is a strong likelihood that data from these instruments may be contaminated by cloud. Similarly, optically thick cloud may not be penetrated by a lidar pulse, resulting in unobservable regions that are overshadowed by the cloud. To address this, it is suggested, for example, in AEOLUS, that a number of consecutive short sections of lidar data (between 1 and 3.5 km in length be tested for cloud contamination or for overshadowing and only those that are unaffected by cloud be used to derive atmospheric profiles. The prob-ability of obtaining profiles to near ground level using this technique is investigated both analytically and using UV air-borne lidar data recorded during the CLARE’98 campaign. These data were measured in the presence of broken cloud on a number of flights over southern England over a four-day period and were chosen because the lidar used has the same wavelength, footprint and could match the along-track spacing of the proposed AEOLUS lidar.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques; general circulation

  7. Advances in lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Piotr Andrzej

    Quantitative laser remote sensing (lidar) measurements have always posed a challenge for the research community. The complexity of the data inversion and the instrumentation itself makes lidar results difficult to interpret. This dissertation presents a suite of 3 elastic lidar experiments. The goal of these studies was to quantitatively approach atmospheric physical phenomena such as rainfall (chapter 3), a distribution of concentration of particulates in Mexico City (chapter 4) and emission rates and emission factors from an agricultural facility in Iowa (chapter 5). The studies demonstrate that elastic lidar measurements are possible not only in a qualitative sense but also in a quantitative sense. The lidar study of rainfall was intended to provide rainfall data in small spatial and temporal scales (1.5m and 1s resolution). The two levels of lidar inversion algorithms allowed the calculation of rainfall rates in small scales. The problem of the distribution of particles over Mexico City required mobile lidar measurements. The elastic lidar data were successfully inverted to extinction coefficients which were then combined with aerosol size distribution. As a result, a spatial distribution of particulate concentration was created to illustrate the transport processes and intensity of Mexico City pollution. The measurements of particulate emission fluxes from a livestock facility involved a stationary scanning elastic lidar, in-situ aerosol size distribution measurements and wind measurements. The data from the 3 independent measurement platforms combined together resulted in emission rates and emission factors. The results from this experiment demonstrated that the new lidar approach is an adequate tool for measurement of aerosol emissions from livestock production facilities. The studies presented in the dissertation show quantitative lidar measurements in combination with other instruments measurements. This approach significantly extends the applications of

  8. 2015 Lowndes County (GA) Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Lidar for Lowndes County, GA with the option to Collect Lidar in Cook and Tift Counties, GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task...

  9. Liderazgo dialógico en Comunidades de Aprendizaje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Redondo-Sama

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objeto: El objetivo de este artículo es presentar y discutir los resultados obtenidos en tres Comunidades de Aprendizaje en relación a los procesos de creación, promoción y consolidación del liderazgo dialógico. En el análisis, se incorpora el papel de los diferentes miembros de la comunidad en la organización escolar. Diseño/metodología: Se realiza una revisión de literatura científica sobre los conceptos de liderazgo, liderazgo educativo y liderazgo dialógico. Las contribuciones se han seleccionado principalmente del Journal Citation Report, SCOUPS y ERIH, entre otras bases científicas. El trabajo empírico se ha desarrollado en base a la metodología comunicativa, que pone el énfasis en el diálogo igualitario entre investigadores e investigadoras y sujetos implicados en la realidad social objeto de estudio. Se han seleccionado tres centros que se transforman en Comunidad de Aprendizaje en muy diferentes momentos (1978, 2001 y 2013. Las personas entrevistadas se han seleccionado considerango la diversidad de perfiles de participación en los centros, concretamente profesorado, familiares y voluntariado. Aportaciones y resultados: Los resultados obtenidos contribuyen a la comprensión de las formas en que en estas tres Comunidades de Aprendizaje se desarrolla el liderazgo dialógico y cómo se consolida con la comunidad. En base a los resultados obtenidos en las entrevistas, se destacan aspectos vinculados a los procesos de aprendizaje a través de la implementación de las actuaciones educativas de éxito. Limitaciones: El liderazgo dialógico en Comunidades de Aprendizaje se desarrolla en contextos escolares muy diversos, estando este artículo centrado en tres centros. Implicaciones prácticas: La participación de toda la comunidad en el liderazgo dialógico en Comunidades de Aprendizaje tiene implicaciones que pueden ir más allá del centro escolar. Implicaciones sociales: Comunidades de Aprendizaje ha demostrado mejorar

  10. Horizontal Cooperation in Dial-a-Ride Services

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A dial-a-ride system is an application of demand-dependent, collective people transportation. Each user requests a trip between an origin and a destination of choice, to which a number of service level requirements are linked. The service provider attempts to develop efficient vehicle routes and time schedules, respecting these requirements and the technical constraints of a pickup and delivery problem. A frequent objective is to minimize operational costs subject to full demand satisfaction ...

  11. Dialética e Ontologia em Hegel e Marx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Bispo Santos Neto

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available

    O presente artigo tem seu ponto de partida na apresentação das categorias como determinações da existência e de que maneira a categoria da contradição desempenha um papel fundamental no processo de constituição da processualidade dialética. Feito isso, passamos a elucidação da relação de semelhança e diferenciação existente no movimento de constituição elementar da dialética marxiana em relação à dialética hegeliana mediante a descrição da relação estabelecida entre ontologia e gnosiologia, entre as determinações da realidade e as determinações escritas no âmbito da lógica.

  12. La dialéctica en las investigaciones educativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Alberto Ortiz Torres

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En las investigaciones educativas se refleja la dialéctica al manifestarse contradicciones en el objeto de estudio, que se presuponen y se niegan al unísono. Sin embargo, los principios y las categorías de la lógica dialéctica casi no son abordados, de manera explícita, en la formación de profesionales en investigación educativa, en los manuales elaborados, ni en la propia práctica inquisitoria. Por lo general, solo se resalta la importancia de las leyes y reglas de la lógica formal que considera a la contradicción como algo indeseable y que se debe eliminar en aras de conservar el rigor científico, cuando en realidad ambas no son excluyentes, por el contrario, su complementariedad deviene en una exigencia contemporánea para las investigaciones científicas. Por lo anterior, el objetivo de este ensayo es ofrecer varios argumentos y recomendaciones que contribuyen a la aplicación rigurosa, consecuente y sistemática de la lógica dialéctica en las investigaciones educativas. Además, puede servir de consulta para el diseño y el desarrollo de investigaciones en el campo educativo

  13. Efficient 1.6 Micron Laser Source for Methane DIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Timothy; Burnham, Ralph; Nehrir, Amin R.; Ismail, Syed; Hair, Johnathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and on a per molecule basis has a warming influence 72 times that of carbon dioxide over a 20 year horizon. Therefore, it is important to look at near term radiative effects due to methane to develop mitigation strategies to counteract global warming trends via ground and airborne based measurements systems. These systems require the development of a time-resolved DIAL capability using a narrow-line laser source allowing observation of atmospheric methane on local, regional and global scales. In this work, a demonstrated and efficient nonlinear conversion scheme meeting the performance requirements of a deployable methane DIAL system is presented. By combining a single frequency 1064 nm pump source and a seeded KTP OPO more than 5 mJ of 1.6 µm pulse energy is generated with conversion efficiencies in excess of 20%. Even without active cavity control instrument limited linewidths (50 pm) were achieved with an estimated spectral purity of 95%. Tunable operation over 400 pm (limited by the tuning range of the seed laser) was also demonstrated. This source demonstrated the critical needs for a methane DIAL system motivating additional development of the technology.

  14. Minimum Makespan Multi-vehicle Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li; Nagarajan, Viswanath; Ravi, R.

    2009-01-01

    -a-Ride problem, there are q vehicles each having capacity k and where each vehicle j ∈ [q] has its own depot-vertex rj ∈ V. A feasible schedule consists of a capacitated route for each vehicle (where vehicle j originates and ends at its depot rj) that together move all objects from their sources to destinations....... The objective is to find a feasible schedule that minimizes the maximum completion time (i.e. makespan) of vehicles, where the completion time of vehicle j is the time when it returns to its depot rj at the end of its route. We consider the preemptive version of multi-vehicle Dial-a-Ride, where an object may......Dial-a-Ride problems consist of a set V of n vertices in a metric space (denoting travel time between vertices) and a set of m objects represented as source-destination pairs {(si,ti)}mi=1, where each object requires to be moved from its source to destination vertex. In the multi-vehicle Dial...

  15. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  16. Dimensionless parameterization of lidar for laser remote sensing of the atmosphere and its application to systems with SiPM and PMT detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil; Comerón, Adolfo; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Sicard, Michaël

    2014-05-20

    In this paper, we show a renewed approach to the generalized methodology for atmospheric lidar assessment, which uses the dimensionless parameterization as a core component. It is based on a series of our previous works where the problem of universal parameterization over many lidar technologies were described and analyzed from different points of view. The modernized dimensionless parameterization concept applied to relatively new silicon photomultiplier detectors (SiPMs) and traditional photomultiplier (PMT) detectors for remote-sensing instruments allowed predicting the lidar receiver performance with sky background available. The renewed approach can be widely used to evaluate a broad range of lidar system capabilities for a variety of lidar remote-sensing applications as well as to serve as a basis for selection of appropriate lidar system parameters for a specific application. Such a modernized methodology provides a generalized, uniform, and objective approach for evaluation of a broad range of lidar types and systems (aerosol, Raman, DIAL) operating on different targets (backscatter or topographic) and under intense sky background conditions. It can be used within the lidar community to compare different lidar instruments.

  17. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  18. Hardness of Preemptive Finite Capacity Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2006-01-01

    In the Finite Capacity Dial-a-Ride problem the input is a metric space, a set of objects, each specifying a source and a destination, and an integer k---the capacity of the vehicle used for making the deliveries. The goal is to compute a shortest tour for the vehicle in which all objects can...... be delivered from their sources to their destinations while ensuring that the vehicle carries at most k objects at any point in time. In the preemptive version an object may be dropped at intermediate locations and picked up later and delivered. Let N be the number of nodes in the input graph. Charikar...... and Raghavachari [FOCS '98] gave a min{O(log N),O(k)}-approximation algorithm for the preemptive version of the problem. In this paper we show that the preemptive Finite Capacity Dial-a-Ride problem has no $min{O(log^{1/4-\\epsilon}N),k^{1-\\epsilon}}$-approximation algorithm for any $\\epsilon>0$ unless all problems...

  19. Dialéctica material Donald Judd y Philip Johnson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Muñoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen El objetivo de este escrito es examinar cómo se plantea una cierta dialéctica material en el conjunto llamado la Mansana de Chinati, construido por el escultor Donald Judd en la ciudad de Marfa, Texas, a partir del año 1974, comparándolo con las dos viviendas que realiza el arquitecto Philip Johnson en su propiedad de New Canaan, Connecticut, en torno al año 1950. Tanto en New Canaan como en la Mansana de Chinati existe una  oposición, una dialéctica, entre una arquitectura industrial y otra artesana, tanto Philip Johnson como Donald Judd consideran que existe una arquitectura principal, la realizada con materiales y técnicas industriales, y otra subalterna o de servicio, la construida con piezas de arcilla y técnicas artesanales. Esta segunda arquitectura encarnará las cualidades asociadas con la pobreza, la abundancia material y la clausura espacial. Sin  embargo, esta exhibición de pobreza no tiene como fin los propios edificios domésticos construidos artesanalmente, ya sea con adobe o con ladrillo, sino que estará al servicio de esa otra arquitectura, construida con técnicas industriales, a la que se exige renunciar a la comodidad y el confort o cuando menos ocultarlos bajo la forma de una radical austeridad.

  20. Minimum Makespan Multi-Vehicle Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li; Nagarajan, Viswanath; Ravi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Dial-a-Ride problem, there are q vehicles, each having capacity k and where each vehicle j epsilon [q] has its own depot-vertex r(j) epsilon V. A feasible schedule consists of a capacitated route for each vehicle (where vehicle j originates and ends at its depot r(j)) that together move all objects...... from their sources to destinations. The objective is to find a feasible schedule that minimizes the maximum completion time (i.e., makespan) of vehicles, where the completion time of vehicle j is the time when it returns to its depot r(j) at the end of its route. We study the preemptive version......Dial-a-Ride problems consist of a set V of n vertices in a metric space (denoting travel time between vertices) and a set of m objects represented as source-destination pairs {(s(i), t(i))}(i-1)(m), where each object requires to be moved from its source to destination vertex. In the multi-vehicle...

  1. Calculus, Radio Dials and the Straight-Line Frequency Variable Capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadzhiev, Khristo N.

    2010-01-01

    Most often radio dials of analogue radios are not uniformly graded; the frequencies are cramped on the left side or on the right side. This makes tuning more difficult. Why are dials made this way? We shall see here that simple calculus can help understand this problem and solve it. (Contains 7 figures.)

  2. LIDAR: Malheur NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project was funded through the Region 1 Inventory and Monitoring Initiative RFP in 2011. LiDAR has been identified by the Malheur Lake Work Group as critical...

  3. LIDAR: Malheur NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LiDAR has been identified by the Malheur Lake Work Group as critical tool for planning, management, and restoration across the Harney Basin. In particular, this...

  4. 2006 FEMA Hawaii Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The FEMA Task Order 26 LiDAR data set was collected by Airborne 1 Corporation of El Segundo, California in September - December of 2006 for URS Corp.

  5. 2004 Maine Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata document describes the collection and processing of Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data over an area along the coast of Maine. Data was collected...

  6. 2003 Oahu Coastline Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS positioning...

  7. Lidar 2009 - All Returns

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing classified points of all returns. We have 3 classifications Unclassified, Ground, Low points. The average Ground Sample...

  8. Phoenix Lidar Operation Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This is an animation of the Canadian-built meteorological station's lidar, which was successfully activated on Sol 2. The animation shows how the lidar is activated by first opening its dust cover, then emitting rapid pulses of light (resembling a brilliant green laser) into the Martian atmosphere. Some of the light then bounces off particles in the atmosphere, and is reflected back down to the lidar's telescope. This allows the lidar to detect dust, clouds and fog. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report...... presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated...... a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam...

  10. 2004 Connecticut Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS positioning...

  11. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail.The first of these is a line of sight...

  12. An Efficient Single Frequency Ho:YLF Laser for IPDA Lidar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Wong, T.; Reithmeier, K.; Petros, M.

    2016-01-01

    A highly efficient, versatile, single frequency 2-micron pulsed laser can be used in a pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) instrument to make precise, high-resolution measurements to investigate sources and sinks of CO2. For a direct detection IPDA lidar, the desired 2 ?m Ho:YLF laser should generate 30-40 mJ pulses at the repetition rate of 100 to 200 Hz, with short pulse length (lidar measurement. The seed beam is entered into the resonator through an output coupler. The laser is mounted on a water cooled optical bench for stable and reliable operation. The size of the optical bench is 22.16 x 9.20 x 1.25 inches. It is stiffened so that the laser can be operated in any orientation of the optical bench. This packaged Ho:YLF laser is designed for either mobile trailer or airborne platform operation. The engineering prototype Ho:YLF laser has been fully characterized to demonstrate laser performance. Figure 1 shows the laser output power as a function of pump power at different pulse repetition rates from 100 Hz to 333 Hz. The threshold of the laser is less than 14 W. The slope efficiencies are 28%, 40%, 41% and 43% for pulse repetition rates of 100, 200, 250 and 333 Hz, respectively. Maximum power increases with the pulse repetition rate. Output power of 4.2 W, 6 W, 6.7 W, and 7.7 W is achieved for pulse repetition rates of 100, 200, 250 and 333Hz, respectively. This represents the optical conversion efficiency of 16.7%, 22.4%, 23.7%, and 26.5% at these various pulse repletion rates. It is the most efficient and compact Ho:YLF laser demonstrated in the high pulse energy (>20mJ) and moderate pulse repetition rate (100's Hz) operation range. As shown in Figure 1, the maximum pulse energy at 100 Hz is 42 mJ. This is limited due to optical damage. The laser stability is characterized and found to be very stable. A relative pulse energy standard deviation of 2% was measured. The beam quality of the Ho:YLF was

  13. 2006 Volusia County, Florida Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the lidar data for Volusia County, Florida, approximately 1,432 square miles, acquired in early March of 2006. A total of 143 flight lines of Lidar...

  14. Sonoma County, CA, 2013 Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sonoma County Vegetation Mapping and LiDAR Consortium retained WSI to provide lidar and Orthophoto data and derived products in Sonoma County, CA. A classified LAS...

  15. Multi-wavelength injection seeded mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator for DIAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, M.S.; Stanion, K.B.; Deane, D.J. [and others

    1996-01-27

    We have constructed and fielded a multi-wavelength injection seeded mid-IR OPO source for DIAL. This OPO system was built for ground based remote sensing measurements of species with both broad (300 cm{sup -1}) and narrow absorption bandwidths (0.07 cm{sup -1} FWHM). The OPO utilizes a single frequency tunable diode laser for the injection seeded signal wavelength in the region from 6400 to 6700 cm{sup -1} and an angle phase-matched 5 cm LiNbO3 crystal to provide large tuning excursions on a slow time scale. The pump was a diode pumped Nd:YAG MOPA (9398 cm{sup -1}) running at 180 Hz. This pump source was repeatedly injection seeded with a different wavelength on each of film sequential shots forming a set of three pulses having wavelength separations on the order of 0.4 cm{sup -1} at a three color set repetition rate of 60 Hz. This combination of OPO signal and pump source produced a set of three time staggered idler wavelengths separated by 0.4 cm{sup -1} with the center wavelength tunable from 2700 to 3000 cm{sup -1}. This OPO system was used in field test experiments to detect the release of chemicals from a standoff distance of 3.3 Km. We present key OPO design criteria, performance data, and numerical simulations that agree with our observations of pump induced spectral impurities in the OPO output.

  16. Dial a feeling: Detecting moderation of affect decline during ostracism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselmann, Eric D; Wirth, James H; Mroczek, Daniel K; Williams, Kipling D

    2012-10-01

    Ostracism, being excluded and ignored, is a common and painful experience. Previous research has found ostracism's immediate effects robust to moderation by individual differences. However, this could be the result of using retrospective measures taken after the ostracism occurs, rather than assessing the effects of ostracism throughout the episode. Participants completed measures of loneliness and social avoidance and distress before either being ostracized or included in a virtual ball-toss game, Cyberball. During Cyberball, participants recorded second-by-second phenomenological affect using a dial device. Individual differences in loneliness and social avoidance and distress moderated affective reactions throughout ostracism and inclusion. Lonely individuals, compared to less-lonely individuals, had slower affect decrease when ostracized but quicker affective increase when included. Additionally, socially-avoidant individuals recovered more slowly from ostracism than less-avoidant individuals. Replicating previous research, moderation by individual differences was not detected with measures taken only at end of the interaction or with retrospective measures.

  17. A psicoterapia dialógica de Martin Buber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón, Saturnino Pesquero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A doutrina buberiana sobre os efeitos humanizadores do seu principio dialógico, que define o genuíno diálogo, estabelece a base para se alcançar tanto uma realização pessoal plena quanto uma sociedade construída sobre as relações interpessoais. Num primeiro momento, sua elaboração teórica e aplicação prática estiveram mais voltadas para o campo da sociologia e da educação. A partir da década dos anos 50, no entanto, privilegia seu viés psicológico e psicoterápico. O presente artigo objetiva expor os principais conceitos e postulados de seu modelo psicoterápico assim como a convergência do mesmo com o da Psicoterapia Centrada na Pessoa de C. Rogers

  18. Chaotic LIDAR for Naval Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    LIDAR for Naval Applications: FY12 Progress Report (7/1/2014- 9/30/2014) This document provides a progress report on the project "Chaotic LIDAR for...digital receiver to form a chaotic LIDAR (CLIDAR) ranging system. The design of the chaotic fiber ring laser and the fiber amplifiers are guided by...Wideband Amplifier Chain High Power Blue-Green Ranging Fig 1. The chaotic LIDAR (CLIDAR) transmitter approach. Several stages are used to

  19. Combined Dial Sounding of Ozone, Water Vapour and Aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Trickl Thomas; Vogelmann Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Routine high-quality lidar measurements of ozone, water vapour and aerosol at Garmisch-Partenkirchen since 2007 have made possible more comprehensive atmospheric studies and lead to a growing insight concerning the most frequently occurring long-range transport pathways. In this contribution we present as examples results on stratospheric layers travelling in the free troposphere for extended periods of time without eroding. In particular, we present a case of an intrusion layer that subsided...

  20. Tierno Galván, Bajtín y el pensamiento dialógico

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Cascante, Francisco; Universidad de Costa Rica

    2013-01-01

    Este artículo discute dos propuestas relativas al pensamiento dialógico: la de Enrique Tierno Galván y la de Mijaíl Bajtín. Del primero se examinan sus categorías de épocas dialogantes, razón mecánica e inteligencia dialéctica. De Bajtín se analizan los conceptos de enunciado, discurso, género, novela, texto, carnaval y dialogismo. El estudio hace una evaluación de la pertinencia y los aportes de cada autor al pensamiento dialógico

  1. Balloonborne Lidar Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-24

    system. 56 or 4~ I 4-, 570 It is required that the radiant output power be monitoreo at both wavelengths. Ihe monitor system is shown in the schematic of...cantilever bCdIII. The pointing mirrors will be co-aligneo, on the ground at ambient tern perature, at a position 45’ from the vertical nadir (lidar...ly thick and at the approximate temperature of the ambient at the given alti- tude, LI Q6 then their spectral radiance at 10 pn; would be as shown in

  2. Solid State Transmitters for Water Vapor and Ozone DIAL Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of this Select Phase II program is to build and deliver laser components both for airborne water vapor and ozone DIAL systems. Specifically, Fibertek...

  3. Combined Dial Sounding of Ozone, Water Vapour and Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickl, Thomas; Vogelmann, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Routine high-quality lidar measurements of ozone, water vapour and aerosol at Garmisch-Partenkirchen since 2007 have made possible more comprehensive atmospheric studies and lead to a growing insight concerning the most frequently occurring long-range transport pathways. In this contribution we present as examples results on stratospheric layers travelling in the free troposphere for extended periods of time without eroding. In particular, we present a case of an intrusion layer that subsided over as many as fifteen days and survived the interference by strong Canadian fires. These results impose a challenge on atmospheric modelling that grossly overestimates free-tropospheric mixing.

  4. Combined Dial Sounding of Ozone, Water Vapour and Aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trickl Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Routine high-quality lidar measurements of ozone, water vapour and aerosol at Garmisch-Partenkirchen since 2007 have made possible more comprehensive atmospheric studies and lead to a growing insight concerning the most frequently occurring long-range transport pathways. In this contribution we present as examples results on stratospheric layers travelling in the free troposphere for extended periods of time without eroding. In particular, we present a case of an intrusion layer that subsided over as many as fifteen days and survived the interference by strong Canadian fires. These results impose a challenge on atmospheric modelling that grossly overestimates free-tropospheric mixing.

  5. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, M.

    2013-01-15

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated by accurately aligning the beam to pass close to a reference wind speed sensor. A testing procedure is presented, reporting requirements outlined and the uncertainty of the method analysed. It is seen that the main limitation of the line of sight calibration method is the time required to obtain a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam inclination introduces extra uncertainties. A procedure for conducting such a calibration is presented and initial indications of the uncertainties given. A discussion of the merits and weaknesses of the two methods is given together with some proposals for the next important steps to be taken in this work. (Author)

  6. 2004 Alaska Lidar Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data sets are generated using the OPTECH ALTM 70 kHz LIDAR system mounted onboard AeroMap's twin-engine Cessna 320 aircraft. Classified data sets such as this...

  7. Nacelle lidar power curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report describes the power curve measurements performed with a nacelle LIDAR on a given wind turbine in a wind farm and during a chosen measurement period. The measurements and analysis are carried out in accordance to the guidelines in the procedure “DTU Wind Energy-E-0019” [1]. The reporting...

  8. Lidar 2009 - IMG

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — ESRI Grids 1 meter resolution are created from the ground classified lidar points. The tiles are delivered in 5,000m by 5,000m tiles. The ESRI grids are exported to...

  9. Survival times of pre-1950 US women radium dial workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehney, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    Survival times of US women radium dial workers to the end of 1989 were examined by life table methods. Included were 1301 women rust employed before 1930 and 1242 first employed in 1930-1949. Expected numbers of deaths were estimated from age- and time-specific death rates for US white females. In the early group, 85 deaths from the well-known radium-induced cancers - bone sarcomas and head carcinomas - were observed, but only 724 deaths from aH other causes were observed vs 755 expected. Life shortening ({plus_minus}S.E.) of 1.8 {plus_minus}0.5 y compared to the general population of US white females was calculated from the time distribution of all deaths in the pre-1930 group. In the 1930--1949 group, 350 deaths were observed vs 343 expected and no bone sarcomas or head carcinomas occurred. Among women who survived at least 2 y after rust measurement of body radium, a significant excess of observed vs expected deaths was found only for radium intakes greater than 1.85 MBq of {sup 226}Ra + {sup 228}Ra, and no trend of deaths or reduction of life expectancy was found with length of employment.

  10. 2-Micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2014-01-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations. This new 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of this year for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It is able to make measurements of the total amount of atmospheric CO2 from the aircraft to the ground or cloud. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  11. 2006 MDEQ Camp Shelby, MS Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the acquisition and processing of bare earth lidar data, raw point cloud lidar data, lidar intensity data, and floodmap breaklines...

  12. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  13. A semianalytic Monte Carlo code for modelling LIDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Elisa; Kostadinov, Ivan; Petritoli, Andrea; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Bortoli, Daniele; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margherita; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2007-10-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) is an optical active remote sensing technology with many applications in atmospheric physics. Modelling of LIDAR measurements appears useful approach for evaluating the effects of various environmental variables and scenarios as well as of different measurement geometries and instrumental characteristics. In this regard a Monte Carlo simulation model can provide a reliable answer to these important requirements. A semianalytic Monte Carlo code for modelling LIDAR measurements has been developed at ISAC-CNR. The backscattered laser signal detected by the LIDAR system is calculated in the code taking into account the contributions due to the main atmospheric molecular constituents and aerosol particles through processes of single and multiple scattering. The contributions by molecular absorption, ground and clouds reflection are evaluated too. The code can perform simulations of both monostatic and bistatic LIDAR systems. To enhance the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation, analytical estimates and expected value calculations are performed. Artificial devices (such as forced collision, local forced collision, splitting and russian roulette) are moreover foreseen by the code, which can enable the user to drastically reduce the variance of the calculation.

  14. Advanced Photodetectors for Space Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The detector in a space lidar plays a key role in the instrument characteristics and performance, especially in direct detection lidar. The sensitivity of the detector is usually the limiting factor when determining the laser power and the receiver aperture size, which in turn determines the instrument complexity and cost. The availability of a suitable detector is often a deciding factor in the choice of lidar wavelengths. A direct detection lidar can achieve the highest receiver performance, or the quantum limit, when its detector can detect signals at the single photon

  15. Improved CO [lidar detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, P.L.; Busch, G.E.; Thompson, D.C.; Remelius, D.K.; Wells, F.D.

    1999-07-18

    A high sensitivity, CO{sub 2} lidar detector, based on recent advances in ultra-low noise, readout integrated circuits (ROIC), is being developed. This detector will combine a high speed, low noise focal plane array (FPA) with a dispersive grating spectrometer. The spectrometer will filter the large background flux, thereby reducing the limiting background photon shot noise. In order to achieve the desired low noise levels, the HgCdTe FPA will be cooled to {approximately}50K. High speed, short pulse operation of the lidar system should enable the detector to operate with the order of a few noise electrons in the combined detector/ ROIC output. Current receiver design concepts will be presented, along with their expected noise performance.

  16. Flash Lidar Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkoetter, M. D.; Ruppert, L.; Weimer, C. S.; Ramond, T.; Lefsky, M. A.; Burke, I. C.; Hu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Late last year, a prototype Flash LIDAR instrument flew on a series of airborne tests to demonstrate its potential for improved vegetation measurements. The prototype is a precursor to the Electronically Steerable Flash LIDAR (ESFL) currently under development at Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp. with funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office. ESFL may soon significantly expand our ability to measure vegetation and forests and better understand the extent of their role in global climate change and the carbon cycle - all critical science questions relating to the upcoming NASA DESDynI and ESA BIOMASS missions. In order to more efficiently exploit data returned from the experimental Flash Lidar system and plan for data exploitation from future flights, Ball funded a graduate student project (through the Ball Summer Intern Program, summer 2009) to develop and implement algorithms for post-processing of the 3-Dimensional Flash Lidar data. This effort included developing autonomous algorithms to resample the data to a uniform rectangular grid, geolocation of the data, and visual display of large swaths of data. The resampling, geolocation, surface hit detection, and aggregation of frame data are implemented with new MATLAB code, and the efficient visual display is achieved with free commercial viewing software. These efforts directly support additional tests flights planned as early as October 2009, including possible flights over Niwot Ridge, CO, for which there is ICESat data, and a sea-level coastal area in California to test the effect of higher altitude (above ground level) on the divergence of the beams and the beam spot sizes.

  17. Tropospheric ozone climatology at two Southern Hemisphere tropical/subtropical sites, (Reunion Island and Irene, South Africa from ozonesondes, LIDAR, and in situ aircraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Clain

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a climatology and trends of tropospheric ozone in the Southwestern Indian Ocean (Reunion Island and South Africa (Irene and Johannesburg. This study is based on a multi-instrumental dataset: PTU-O3 ozonesondes, DIAL LIDAR and MOZAIC airborne instrumentation.

    The seasonal profiles of tropospheric ozone at Reunion Island have been calculated from two different data sets: ozonesondes and LIDAR. The two climatological profiles are similar, except in austral summer when the LIDAR profiles show greater values in the free troposphere, and in the upper troposphere when the LIDAR profiles show lower values during all seasons. These results show that the climatological value of LIDAR profiles must be discussed with care since LIDAR measurements can be performed only under clear sky conditions, and the upper limit of the profile depends on the signal strength.

    In addition, linear trends have been calculated from ozonesonde data at Reunion and Irene. Considering the whole tropospheric column, the trend is slightly positive for Reunion, and more clearly positive for Irene. Trend calculations have also been made separating the troposphere into three layers, and separating the dataset into seasons. Results show that the positive trend for Irene is governed by the lower layer that is affected by industrial pollution and biomass burning. On the contrary, for Reunion Island, the strongest trends are observed in the upper troposphere, and in winter when stratosphere-troposphere exchange is more frequently expected.

  18. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenkov, Ilya I.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter) allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm).

  19. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razenkov Ilya I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm.

  20. 2006 Fulton County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of Fulton County. The Fulton County LiDAR Survey project area consists of approximately 690.5 square...

  1. Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed...... in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar....... The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be noted as a limitation of the model. As the general conclusion of the study, it was stated that the lidars can be used in complex...

  2. Optimization of polarization lidar structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramochkin, Alexander I.; Kaul, Bruno V.; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.

    1999-11-01

    The problems of the polarization lidar transceiver optimization are considered. The basic features and the optimization criteria of lidar polarization units are presented and the comparative analysis of polarization units is fulfilled. We have analyzed optical arrangements of the transmitter to form the desired polarization state of sounding radiation. We have also considered various types of lidar receiving systems: (1) one-channel, providing measurement of Stocks parameters at a successive change of position of polarization analyzers in the lidar receiver, and (2) multichannel, where each channel has a lens, an analyzer, and a photodetector. In the latter case measurements of Stocks parameters are carried out simultaneously. The optimization criteria of the polarization lidar considering the atmospheric state are determined with the purpose to decrease the number of polarization devices needed.

  3. Calling for Help? Considering Function and Meaning when Patients Drunk-Dial Psychotherapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; LaPaglia, Donna; Steinfeld, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Drunk-dialing is a term documented in both popular culture and academic literatures to describe a behavior in which a person contacts another individual by phone while intoxicated. In our collective clinical experience we have found that clients drunk-dial their clinicians too, particularly while in substance use treatment, and yet there is a noticeable absence of research on the topic to guide clinical decision-making within a process-based understanding of these events. As the parameters within which psychotherapy takes place become increasingly technologized, a literature base to document clients’ idiosyncratic use of technology will become increasingly necessary and useful. We provide a brief review of the existing research on drunk-dialing and conclude with specific questions to guide future research and practice. PMID:24023519

  4. MyOcean Internal Information System (Dial-P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frederique; Jolibois, Tony; Loubrieu, Thomas; Manzella, Giuseppe; Mazzetti, Paolo; Nativi, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    , trajectory, station, grid, etc., which will be implemented in netCDF format. SeaDataNet is recommending ODV and NetCDF formats. Another problem related to data curation and interoperability is the possibility to use common vocabularies. Common vocabularies are developed in many international initiatives, such as GEMET (promoted by INSPIRE as a multilingual thesaurus), UNIDATA, SeaDataNet, Marine Metadata Initiative (MMI). MIS is considering the SeaDataNet vocabulary as a base for interoperability. Four layers of different abstraction levels of interoperability an be defined: - Technical/basic: this layer is implemented at each TAC or MFC through internet connection and basic services for data transfer and browsing (e.g FTP, HTTP, etc). - Syntactic: allowing the interchange of metadata and protocol elements. This layer corresponds to a definition Core Metadata Set, the format of exchange/delivery for the data and associated metadata and possible software. This layer is implemented by the DIAL-P logical interface (e.g. adoption of INSPIRE compliant metadata set and common data formats). - Functional/pragmatic: based on a common set of functional primitives or on a common set of service definitions. This layer refers to the definition of services based on Web services standards. This layer is implemented by the DIAL-P logical interface (e.g. adoption of INSPIRE compliant network services). - Semantic: allowing to access similar classes of objects and services across multiple sites, with multilinguality of content as one specific aspect. This layer corresponds to MIS interface, terminology and thesaurus. Given the above requirements, the proposed solution is a federation of systems, where the individual participants are self-contained autonomous systems, but together form a consistent wider picture. A mid-tier integration layer mediates between existing systems, adapting their data and service model schema to the MIS. The developed MIS is a read-only system, i.e. does not allow

  5. LIDAR COMBINED SCANNING UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Elizarov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The results of lidar combined scanning unit development for locating leaks of hydrocarbons are presented The unit enables to perform high-speed scanning of the investigated space in wide and narrow angle fields. Method. Scanning in a wide angular field is produced by one-line scanning path by means of the movable aluminum mirror with a frequency of 20Hz and amplitude of 20 degrees of swing. Narrowband scanning is performed along a spiral path by the deflector. The deflection of the beam is done by rotation of the optical wedges forming part of the deflector at an angle of ±50. The control function of the scanning node is performed by a specialized software product written in C# programming language. Main Results. This scanning unit allows scanning the investigated area at a distance of 50-100 m with spatial resolution at the level of 3 cm. The positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space is 15'. The developed scanning unit gives the possibility to browse the entire investigated area for the time not more than 1 ms at a rotation frequency of each wedge from 50 to 200 Hz. The problem of unambiguous definition of the beam geographical coordinates in space is solved at the software level according to the rotation angles of the mirrors and optical wedges. Lidar system coordinates are determined by means of GPS. Practical Relevance. Development results open the possibility for increasing the spatial resolution of scanning systems of a wide range of lidars and can provide high positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space.

  6. Hybrid search and the dial-a-ride problem with transfer scheduling constraints

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In a conventional dial-a-ride-system passengers are moved with the same vehicle between their pickup and their drop-off location. In a dial-a-ride-system with transfer, it is possible (or even standard) that passengers change the vehicle once or several times. Transfer Scheduling Constraints (TSC) are imposed in order to ensure that the comfort of the transfer remains on an acceptable level by avoiding too short or too long transfer times but also for limiting the total riding time between th...

  7. Internet lidar system (ILIS): new generation of lidar system using Internet technology for realizing unattended lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Hidenori; Asai, Kazuhiro; Aoki, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Kohei; Itabe, Toshikasu

    2001-02-01

    Most of lidar systems are being manually operated on site, therefore, a frequency of observations is limited due to a manpower etc if the lidar site is geographically far away from a laboratory. In such a case, an unattended automatic lidar system or a remote controllable one is expected as for increasing the frequencies. On the other hand, as well known, a computer is linked to the other through the Internet, and remotely operated each other. We have proposed the Internet LIdar System (named ILIS) as the unattended operational lidar. A concept of the ILIS is controllable through the Internet, anytime and anywhere. The ILIS proposed here has been successfully operating every night without any difficulty of the geographical distance of 1,000km.

  8. Generic methodology for calibrating profiling nacelle lidars

    OpenAIRE

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    2015-01-01

    Improving power performance assessment by measuring at different heights has been demonstrated using ground-based profiling LIDARs. More recently, nacelle-mounted lidars studies have shown promising capabilities to assess power performance. Using nacelle lidars avoids the erection of expensive meteorology masts, especially offshore. A new generation of commercially developed profiling nacelle lidars has sophisticated measurement capabilities.As for any other measuring system, lidars measureme...

  9. Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A.R.; Abshire, James B.; Spinhirne, James D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An autonomous, low-power atmospheric lidar instrument is being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This compact, portable lidar will operate continuously in a temperature controlled enclosure, charge its own batteries through a combination of a small rugged wind generator and solar panels, and transmit its data from remote locations to ground stations via satellite. A network of these instruments will be established by co-locating them at remote Automatic Weather Station (AWS) sites in Antarctica under the auspices of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF Office of Polar Programs provides support to place the weather stations in remote areas of Antarctica in support of meteorological research and operations. The AWS meteorological data will directly benefit the analysis of the lidar data while a network of ground based atmospheric lidar will provide knowledge regarding the temporal evolution and spatial extent of Type la polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). These clouds play a crucial role in the annual austral springtime destruction of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica, i.e. the ozone hole. In addition, the lidar will monitor and record the general atmospheric conditions (transmission and backscatter) of the overlying atmosphere which will benefit the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Prototype lidar instruments have been deployed to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station (1995-96, 2000) and to an Automated Geophysical Observatory site (AGO 1) in January 1999. We report on data acquired with these instruments, instrument performance, and anticipated performance of the AWS Lidar.

  10. Measurements of aerosol distribution by an elastic-backscatter lidar in summer 2008 in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenyi Chen; Wenqing Liu; Yujun Zhang; Nanjing Zhao; Junfeng He; Jun Ruan

    2009-01-01

    Elastic lidar observations of profiles of the aerosol extinction,backscattering coefficients,and the lidar ratio have been performed in Beijing.The elastic lidar transmitts wavelengths of 532 and 355 nm.The measurement altitude can reach up to 6 km.The similarity of the extinction and backscattering profiles suggests a close relation between the mean transmission and reflection properties.The lidar ratio on July 22,2008 varied from 10 to 30 sr with the mean value of 20 sr.The profiles of the aerosol properties indicate the cirrus at 6-km altitude and a well-mixed boundary layer from July 22 to 24,2008.The detected boundary layer also agrees well with the high and stable ozone concentration obtained from the differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS)system.

  11. Detailed signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuechao; Li, Sining; Lu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Lidar is short for light detection and ranging, which is a tool to help measuring some useful information of atmosphere. In the recent years, more and more attention was paid to the research of wind measurement by lidar. Because the accurate wind information can be used not only in weather report, but also the safety guarantee of the airplanes. In this paper, a more detailed signal model of wind measurement lidar is proposed. It includes the laser transmitting part which describes the broadening of the spectral, the laser attenuation in the atmosphere, the backscattering signal and the detected signal. A Voigt profile is used to describe the broadening of the transmitting laser spectral, which is the most common situation that is the convolution of different broadening line shapes. The laser attenuation includes scattering and absorption. We use a Rayleigh scattering model and partially-Correlated quadratic-Velocity-Dependent Hard-Collision (pCqSDHC) model to describe the molecule scattering and absorption. When calculate the particles scattering and absorption, the Gaussian particles model is used to describe the shape of particles. Because of the Doppler Effect occurred between the laser and atmosphere, the wind velocity can be calculated by the backscattering signal. Then, a two parameter Weibull distribution is used to describe the wind filed, so that we can use it to do the future work. After all the description, the signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar is decided. And some of the simulation is given by MATLAB. This signal model can describe the system more accurate and more detailed, so that the following work will be easier and more efficient.

  12. New mobile Raman lidar for measurement of tropospheric water vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chenbo; ZHOU Jun; YUE Guming; QI Fudi; FAN Aiyuan

    2007-01-01

    The content of water vapor in atmosphere is very little and the ratio of volume of moisture to air is about 0.1%-3%,but water vapor is the most active molecule in atmosphere.There are many absorption bands in infrared(IR)wavelength for water vapor,and water vapor is also an important factor in cloud formation and precipitation,therefore it takes a significant position in the global radiation budget and climatic changes.Because of the advantages of the high resolution,wide range,and highly automatic operation,the Raman lidar has become a new-style and useful tool to measure water vapor.In this paper,first,the new mobile Raman lidar's structure and specifications were introduced.Second,the process method of lidar data was described.Finally,the practical and comparative experiments were made over Hefei City in China.The results of measurement show that this lidar has the ability to gain profiles of ratio of water vapor mixing ratio from surface to a height of about 8 km at night.Mean-while,the measurement of water vapor in daytime has been taken,and the profiles of water vapor mixing ratio at ground level have been detected.

  13. The ARCADE Raman Lidar System for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Valore, Laura; Doro, Michele; Iarlori, Marco; Rizi, Vincenzo; Tonachini, Aurelio Siro; Vallania, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation of ground-based very high energy gamma-ray instruments; the facility will be organized in two arrays, one for each hemisphere. The atmospheric calibration of the CTA telescopes is a critical task. The atmosphere affects the measured Cherenkov yield in several ways: the air-shower development itself, the variation of the Cherenkov angle with altitude, the loss of photons due to scattering and absorption of Cherenkov light out of the camera field-of-view and the scattering of photons into the camera. In this scenario, aerosols are the most variable atmospheric component in time and space and therefore need a continuous monitoring. Lidars are among the most used instruments in atmospheric physics to measure the aerosol attenuation profiles of light. The ARCADE Lidar system is a very compact and portable Raman Lidar system that has been built within the FIRB 2010 grant and is currently taking data in Lamar, Colorado. The ARCADE Lidar is proposed to operat...

  14. Aprendizaje dialógico : base teórica de las comunidades de aprendizaje

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Sánchez, Elena; Mello, Roseli R. de; Gabassa, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    El aprendizaje dialógico y los siete principios que lo componen sientan las bases de las comunidades de aprendizaje como proyecto de transformación global y también las prácticas educativas concretas que se realizan en este marco

  15. Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is : DIAL, A Dialogical Model for Opinion Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dykstra, Piter; Elsenbroich, Corinna; Jager, Wander; de Lavalette, Gerard Renardel; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2013-01-01

    We present DIAL, a model of group dynamics and opinion dynamics. It features dialogues, in which agents gamble about reputation points. Intra-group radicalisation of opinions appears to be an emergent phenomenon. We position this model within the theoretical literature on opinion dynamics and social

  16. I 5683 you: dialing phone numbers on cell phones activates key-concordant concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolinski, Sascha

    2011-03-01

    When people perform actions, effects associated with the actions are activated mentally, even if those effects are not apparent. This study tested whether sequences of simulations of virtual action effects can be integrated into a meaning of their own. Cell phones were used to test this hypothesis because pressing a key on a phone is habitually associated with both digits (dialing numbers) and letters (typing text messages). In Experiment 1, dialing digit sequences induced the meaning of words that share the same key sequence (e.g., 5683, LOVE). This occurred even though the letters were not labeled on the keypad, and participants were not aware of the digit-letter correspondences. In Experiment 2, subjects preferred dialing numbers implying positive words (e.g., 37326, DREAM) over dialing numbers implying negative words (e.g., 75463, SLIME). In Experiment 3, subjects preferred companies with phone numbers implying a company-related word (e.g., LOVE for a dating agency, CORPSE for a mortician) compared with companies with phone numbers implying a company-unrelated word.

  17. Generic methodology for calibrating profiling nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    Improving power performance assessment by measuring at different heights has been demonstrated using ground-based profiling LIDARs. More recently, nacelle-mounted lidars studies have shown promising capabilities to assess power performance. Using nacelle lidars avoids the erection of expensive...... meteorology masts, especially offshore. A new generation of commercially developed profiling nacelle lidars has sophisticated measurement capabilities. As for any other measuring system, lidars measurements have uncertainties. Their estimation is the ultimate goal of a calibration. Field calibration...... procedures have been developed for non-profiling nacelle lidars. However, their specificity to one type of lidar or another highlights the need for developing generic calibration procedures. Such procedures should be applicable to any type of existing and upcoming lidar technology. Profiling nacelle lidars...

  18. Lidar Methods for Observing Mineral Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nobuo SUGIMOTO; HUANG Zhongwei

    2014-01-01

    Lidar methods for observing mineral dust aerosols are reviewed. These methods include Mie scattering lidars, polarization lidars, Raman scattering lidars, high-spectral-resolution lidars, and fluorescence lidars. Some of the lidar systems developed by the authors and the results of the observations and applications are introduced. The largest advantage of the lidar methods is that they can observe vertical distribution of aerosols continuously with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Networks of ground-based lidars provide useful data for understanding the distribution and movement of mineral dust and other aerosols. The lidar network data are actually used for validation and assimilation of dust transport models, which can evaluate emission, transport, and deposition of mineral dust. The lidar methods are also useful for measuring the optical characteristics of aerosols that are essential to assess the radiative effects of aerosols. Evolution of the lidar data analysis methods for aerosol characterization is also reviewed. Observations from space and ground-based networks are two important approaches with the lidar methods in the studies of the effects of mineral dust and other aerosols on climate and the environment. Directions of the researches with lidar methods in the near future are discussed.

  19. Computer Simulation of Global Profiles of Carbon Dioxide Using a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Column-Content DIAL System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results of computer simulations of the error in measuring carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles from earth orbit. The simulated sensor is a pulsed, 2-micron, coherent-detection lidar alternately operating on at least two wavelengths. The simulated geometry is a nadir viewing lidar measuring the column content signal. Atmospheric absorption is modeled using FASCODE3P software with the HITRAN 2004 absorption line data base. Lidar shot accumulation is employed up to the horizontal resolution limit. Horizontal resolutions of 50, 100, and 200 km are shown. Assuming a 400 km spacecraft orbit, the horizontal resolutions correspond to measurement times of about 7, 14, and 28 s. We simulate laser pulse-pair repetition frequencies from 1 Hz to 100 kHz. The range of shot accumulation is 7 to 2.8 million pulse-pairs. The resultant error is shown as a function of horizontal resolution, laser pulse-pair repetition frequency, and laser pulse energy. The effect of different on and off pulse energies is explored. The results are compared to simulation results of others and to demonstrated 2-micron operating points at NASA Langley.

  20. 2014 NJMC Lidar: Hackensack Meadowlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In February 2014, Quantum Spatial, Inc. (QSI) was contracted by the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission (NJMC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in...

  1. 2014 Mobile County, AL Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atlantic was contracted to acquire high resolution topographic LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data located in Mobile County, Alabama. The intent was to collect...

  2. 2009 SCDNR Horry County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sanborn Map Company completed the original classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Horry County, South Carolina in 2009. In 2013, Dewberry was tasked with...

  3. Alabama 2003 Lidar Coverage, USACE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in the summer of 2003. The data...

  4. 2009 SCDNR Berkeley County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sanborn Map Company completed the original classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Berkeley County, South Carolina in 2009. In 2013, Dewberry was tasked with...

  5. Can Wind Lidars Measure Turbulence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob; Gottschall, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Modeling of the systematic errors in the second-order moments of wind speeds measured by continuous-wave (ZephIR) and pulsed (WindCube) lidars is presented. These lidars use the conical scanning technique to measure the velocity field. The model captures the effect of volume illumination...... and conical scanning. The predictions are compared with the measurements from the ZephIR, WindCube, and sonic anemometers at a flat terrain test site under different atmospheric stability conditions. The sonic measurements are used at several heights on a meteorological mast in combination with lidars...... errors also vary with atmospheric stability and are low for unstable conditions. In general, for both lidars, the model agrees well with the measurements at all heights and under different atmospheric stability conditions. For the ZephIR, the model results are improved when an additional low-pass filter...

  6. 2009 Chatham County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR generated point cloud acquired in spring 2009 for Chatham County, Georgia for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. The data are classified as follows: Class...

  7. 2004 USACE Puerto Rico Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This record describes Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) data acquired for the island of Puerto Rico. The data were acquired for USACE, St. Louis District by 3001,...

  8. 2006 FEMA Lidar: Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The FEMA Task Order 26 LiDAR data set was collected by Airborne 1 Corporation of El Segundo, California in September - December of 2006 for URS Corp.

  9. 2013 USGS Lidar: Norfolk (VA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Laser Mapping Specialist, Inc (LMSI) and The Atlantic Group (Atlantic) provided high accuracy, calibrated multiple return LiDAR for roughly 1,130 square miles around...

  10. 2009 SCDNR Charleston County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photoscience completed the original collection and classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Charleston County, South Carolina in the winter of 2006-2007. In...

  11. 2005 Baltimore County Maryland Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the spring of 2005, Sanborn as part of the Dewberry team was contracted to execute a LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) survey campaign to collect the...

  12. 2008 City of Baltimore Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the spring of 2008, the City of Baltimore expressed an interest to upgrade the City GIS Database with mapping quality airborne LiDAR data. The City of Baltimore...

  13. 2009 SCDRN Lidar: Florence County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for Florence County, SC. Utilizing multi-return...

  14. 2009 Chatham County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR generated point cloud acquired in spring 2009 for Chatham County, Georgia for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. The data are classified as follows: Class 1...

  15. NASA_Airborne_Lidar_Flights

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon beginning in July 1982 and continuing to January 1984. Data in ASCII...

  16. Methane LIDAR Laser Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to develop laser technology intended to meet NASA's need for innovative lidar technologies for atmospheric measurements of methane. NASA and the...

  17. 2004 Harrison County, MS Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the topographic mapping of Harrison County, Mississippi during March of 2004. Products generated include lidar point clouds in .LAS...

  18. Recent results in imaging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulich, Bobby L.; Lacovara, Philip; Moran, Steven E.; DeWeert, Michael J.

    1997-07-01

    Imaging lidar, in which light detection and ranging is implemented with sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the size and shape of an object, has demonstrated impressive performance for detecting and classifying underwater targets. During 1996 the U.S. Navy deployed its first imaging lidar system with Naval Air Reserve Squadron HSL-94. This paper reviews the Magic LanternR system and discusses new technology and trends for future systems.

  19. Balloonborne lidar payloads for remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, O.; Aurilio, G.; Hurd, A. G.; Rappaport, S. A.; Reidy, W. P.; Rieder, R. J.; Bedo, D. E.; Swirbalus, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    A series of lidar experiments has been conducted using the Atmospheric Balloonborne Lidar Experiment payload (ABLE). These experiments included the measurement of atmospheric Rayleigh and Mie backscatter from near space (approximately 30 km) and Raman backscatter measurements of atmospheric constituents as a function of altitude. The ABLE payload consisted of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser transmitter, a 50 cm receiver telescope, and filtered photodetectors in various focal plane configurations. The payload for lidar pointing, thermal control, data handling, and remote control of the lidar system. Comparison of ABLE performance with that of a space lidar shows significant performance advantages and cost effectiveness for balloonborne lidar systems.

  20. Lidar Measurements of Methane and Applications for Aircraft and Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Abshire, James; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric methane levels have remained relatively constant over the last decade around 1.78 parts per million (ppm) but observations since 2007 show that levels may be increasing. This trend may be caused by increased fossil fuel production, rice farming, livestock and landfills, but the underlying causes are quite uncertain. One hypothesis is that reservoirs of carbon trapped in the permafrost regions of northern Canada, Europe, and Siberia thaw as global temperatures rise and are releasing increasing amounts of methane. Another hypothesis points to increased production of methane by microbes as the permafrost warms. Currently most observations of greenhouse gases are limited to in-situ (surface and tower sites) and limited airborne in-situ measurements. Space column density measurements are starting to become available from the GOSAT mission. Although methane survives for a shorter time in the atmosphere than CO2, its impact on climate change per molecule is about 23 times than that of CO2. Accurate global observations of several greenhouse gases, including methane, are urgently needed in order to better understand climate change processes and to reduce the uncertainty in the carbon budget. Differential absorption lidar is a well-established technique to measure atmospheric gases, and methane has optical absorption bands near 1.65,2.2,3.4 and 7.8 micron. The near infrared overtones lines of CH4 near 1650 nm are relatively free of interference from other species. There are absorption lines near 1651 nm which are both temperature insensitive and have line strengths well suited for lidar measurements. We have developed a laser and demonstrated lidar measurements of CH4 using lines in this band. Our laser uses a narrow linewidth 1064 nm laser pulse passing through a nonlinear crystal. We generate the tunable laser signals near 1651 nm by using the optical parametric amplification (OPA) process. Inside the crystal the 1064 nm beam overlaps with an injection seed

  1. Performance Simulations for a Spaceborne Methane Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, C.; Kawa, Stephan Randolph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Browell, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    Future spaceborne lidar measurements of key anthropogenic greenhouse gases are expected to close current observational gaps particularly over remote, polar, and aerosol-contaminated regions, where actual in situ and passive remote sensing observation techniques have difficulties. For methane, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" was proposed by Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt and Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. Simulations assess the performance of this mission with the help of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations of the earth's surface albedo and atmospheric optical depth. These are key environmental parameters for integrated path differential absorption lidar which uses the surface backscatter to measure the total atmospheric methane column. Results showthat a lidar with an average optical power of 0.45W at 1.6 µm wavelength and a telescope diameter of 0.55 m, installed on a low Earth orbit platform(506 km), will measure methane columns at precisions of 1.2%, 1.7%, and 2.1% over land, water, and snow or ice surfaces, respectively, for monthly aggregated measurement samples within areas of 50 × 50 km2. Globally, the mean precision for the simulated year 2007 is 1.6%, with a standard deviation of 0.7%. At high latitudes, a lower reflectance due to snow and ice is compensated by denser measurements, owing to the orbital pattern. Over key methane source regions such as densely populated areas, boreal and tropical wetlands, or permafrost, our simulations show that the measurement precision will be between 1 and 2%.

  2. Aerosol Properties From Combined Oxygen A Band Radiances and Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, Dave; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new aerosol retrieval technique based on combing high-resolution A band spectra with lidar profiles. Our goal is the development of a technique to retrieve aerosol absorption, one of the critical parameters affecting the global radiation budget and one which is currently poorly constrained by satellite measurements. Our approach relies on two key factors: 1) the use of high spectral resolution (17,000:1) measurements which resolve the A-band line structure, and 2) the use of co-located lidar profile measurements to constrain the vertical distribution of scatterers in the forward model. The algorithm has been developed to be applied to observations from the CALIPSO and OCO-2 satellites, flying in formation as part of the A-train constellation. We describe the approach and present simulated retrievals to illustrate performance potential.

  3. Retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining ground- and space-based elastic lidars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiyue, Mao; Wei, Gong; Yingying, Ma

    2012-02-15

    The aerosol lidar ratio is a key parameter for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties from elastic lidar, which changes largely for aerosols with different chemical and physical properties. We proposed a method for retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining simultaneous ground- and space-based elastic lidars. The method was tested by a simulated case and a real case at 532 nm wavelength. The results demonstrated that our method is robust and can obtain accurate lidar ratio and extinction coefficient profiles. Our method can be useful for determining the local and global lidar ratio and validating space-based lidar datasets.

  4. Eyesafe Direct Laser Source for Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate an eye-safe laser source for a DIAL CO2 sensor that meets or exceeds all topic requirements for a high-pulse-energy laser with good beam...

  5. 2014 PSLC Lidar: City of Redmond

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In February 2014, Quantum Spatial (QSI) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the City of...

  6. 3D Flash LIDAR Space Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc. (ASC) is a small business that has developed 3D Flash LIDAR systems for space and terrestrial applications. 3D Flash LIDAR is...

  7. 2006 Volusia County Florida LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the lidar data for Volusia County, Florida, approximately 1,432 square miles, acquired in early March of 2006. A total of 143 flight lines of Lidar...

  8. 2008 St. Johns County, FL Countywide Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne terrestrial LiDAR was collected for St. Johns County, FL. System Parameters/Flight Plan. The LiDAR system acquisition parameters were developed based on a...

  9. 2002 Willapa Bay LiDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA contracted with Spencer B. Gross, Inc. (SBG) to obtain airborne LiDAR of Willapa Bay, Washington during low tide conditions. The LiDAR data was processed to...

  10. Elevation - LIDAR Survey - Roseau County, Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — LIDAR Data for Roseau County Minnesota. This project consists of approximately 87 square miles of LIDAR mapping in Roseau County, Minnesota at two sites: area 1,...

  11. 2014 Horry County, South Carolina Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is comprised of lidar point cloud data. This project required lidar data to be acquired over Horry County, South Carolina. The total area of the Horry...

  12. 2004 SWFWMD Citrus County Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the ortho & LIDAR mapping of Citrus County, FL. The mapping consists of LIDAR data collection, contour generation, and production...

  13. 2011 South Carolina DNR Lidar: York County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towill Inc. collected LiDAR for over 3,500 square miles in York, Pickens, Anderson, and Oconee Counties in South Carolina. This metadata covers the LiDAR produced...

  14. Iowa LiDAR Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This is collection level metadata for LAS and ASCII data files from the statewide Iowa Lidar Project. The Iowa Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Project collects...

  15. 2007 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Anderson County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in 5 sessions, from March 7 to March 9, 2007. The airborne GPS (ABGPS) base stations supporting the LiDAR acquisition...

  16. 2009 Bayfield County Lake Superior Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The LIDAR survey presents digital elevation data sets of a bald earth surface model and 2ft interval contours covering Bayfield County, Wisconsin. The LIDAR data was...

  17. 2007 USGS Lidar: Canyon Fire (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Southern California Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is to provide high accuracy LIDAR data. These datasets will be the initial acquisition to support...

  18. Backscatter LIDAR signal simulation applied to spacecraft LIDAR instrument design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochesatto, J.; Ristori, P.; Flamant, P.; Machado, M. E.; Singh, U.; Quel, E.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the scientific cooperation between the CEILAP laboratory (Argentina) and IPSL Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (France), devoted to the development of LIDAR techniques for Atmospheric sciences, a new area of scientific research, involving LIDARs, is starting in Argentine space technology. This new research area is under consideration at CEILAP in a joint effort with CONAE, the Argentine space agency, responsible for the development of future space missions. The LIDAR technique is necessary to improve our knowledge of meteorological, dynamic, and radiative processes in the South American region, for the whole troposphere and the lower stratosphere. To study this future mission, a simple model for the prediction of backscatter LIDAR signal from a spacecraft platform has been used to determine dimensions and detection characteristics of the space borne LIDAR instrument. The backscatter signal was retrieved from a modeled atmosphere considering its molecular density profile and taking into account different aerosols and clouds conditions. Signal-to-noise consideration, within the interval of possible dimension of the instrument parameters, allows us to constrain the telescope receiving area and to derive maximum range achievable, integration time and the final spatial and temporal resolutions of backscatter profiles.

  19. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kiemle

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN on a small satellite in Polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1 % over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol

  20. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kiemle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN on a small satellite in polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1% over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol

  1. Computer simulation of the micropulse imaging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yongjiang; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Xiaoou

    2000-10-01

    In this paper a design method of the Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) is introduced, that is a computer simulation of the MPL. Some of the MPL parameters concerned air scattered and the effects on the performance of the lidar are discussed. The design software for the lidar with diode pumped solid laser is programmed by MATLAB. This software is consisted of six modules, that is transmitter, atmosphere, target, receiver, processor and display system. The method can be extended some kinds of lidar.

  2. Detection of Atmospheric Composition Based on Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinye; Tong Yala; Yang Xiaoling; Gong Jiaoli [School of science, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China); Gong Wei, E-mail: yezi.zh@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-02-01

    A summary overview about the types of lidar and their own applications on atmosphere detection is presented. Measurement of atmospheric aerosols by Mie lidar and Raman lidar is focused. The vertical profiles of aerosols in the atmosphere are retrieved. And at the same time, through analyzing aerosol vertical content distribution, the atmosphere boundary layer and the cloud are also observed. All the results show that the lidar has good performance on detecting the atmospheric composition.

  3. Calibration of Nacelle-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a two-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements....

  4. Calibration of Nacelle-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a four-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark.Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements...... with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements....

  5. Advanced Digital Signal Processing for Hybrid Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Technical 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advance Digital Signal Processing for Hybrid Lidar 6. AUTHOR(S) William D. Jemison 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...development of signed processing algorithms for hybrid lidar - radar designed to improve detection performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hybrid Lidar - Radar 16...Award Number N000141110371 Title of Research Advanced Digital Signal Processing for Hybrid Lidar Principal Investigator William D. Jemison

  6. Turbine-Mounted Lidar:The pulsed lidar as a reliable alternative.

    OpenAIRE

    Braña, Isaac

    2011-01-01

    Expectations for turbine-mounted lidar are increasing. The installation of lidars in wind turbine nacelles for measuring incoming winds, preventing wind gusts and increasing energy productions is after recently studies, technically and economically feasible. Among available lidar types, the most studied were continuous wave lidars because they were the most reliable apparatus when this initiative began. However, after studying technical considerations and checking commercial lidars, it was fo...

  7. Conhecimento, dialética, analogia e identidade na biologia de Aristóteles

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Nosso propósito principal neste trabalho é mostrar que o método utilizado por Aristóteles em sua biologia é o dialético. A demonstração não é o método da biologia por várias razões, entre elas porque os organismos e suas partes podem ser de outro modo do que são; além de o próprio Aristóteles ter afirmado que a precisão da matemática (demonstração) não deve ser exigida senão para as coisas não materiais. Sendo os animais investigados por meio da dialética, excetuados os princípios de cada áre...

  8. Hybrid column generation and large neighborhood search for the dial-a-ride problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parragh, Sophie N.; Schmid, Verena

    2013-01-01

    Demographic change towards an ever aging population entails an increasing demand for specialized transportation systems to complement the traditional public means of transportation. Typically, users place transportation requests, specifying a pickup and a drop off location and a fleet of minibuses or taxis is used to serve these requests. The underlying optimization problem can be modeled as a dial-a-ride problem. In the dial-a-ride problem considered in this paper, total routing costs are minimized while respecting time window, maximum user ride time, maximum route duration, and vehicle capacity restrictions. We propose a hybrid column generation and large neighborhood search algorithm and compare different hybridization strategies on a set of benchmark instances from the literature. PMID:23471127

  9. Hybrid column generation and large neighborhood search for the dial-a-ride problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parragh, Sophie N; Schmid, Verena

    2013-01-01

    Demographic change towards an ever aging population entails an increasing demand for specialized transportation systems to complement the traditional public means of transportation. Typically, users place transportation requests, specifying a pickup and a drop off location and a fleet of minibuses or taxis is used to serve these requests. The underlying optimization problem can be modeled as a dial-a-ride problem. In the dial-a-ride problem considered in this paper, total routing costs are minimized while respecting time window, maximum user ride time, maximum route duration, and vehicle capacity restrictions. We propose a hybrid column generation and large neighborhood search algorithm and compare different hybridization strategies on a set of benchmark instances from the literature.

  10. Solid State Transmitters for Water Vapor and Ozone DIAL Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed a common architecture for laser transmitters that address requirements for water vapor as well as ground and airborne ozone lidar systems. Our...

  11. A new frontier in CO2 flux measurements using a highly portable DIAL laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiβer, Manuel; Granieri, Domenico; Burton, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic CO2 emissions play a key role in the geological carbon cycle, and monitoring of volcanic CO2 fluxes helps to forecast eruptions. The quantification of CO2 fluxes is challenging due to rapid dilution of magmatic CO2 in CO2-rich ambient air and the diffuse nature of many emissions, leading to large uncertainties in the global magmatic CO2 flux inventory. Here, we report measurements using a new DIAL laser remote sensing system for volcanic CO2 (CO2DIAL). Two sites in the volcanic zone of Campi Flegrei (Italy) were scanned, yielding CO2 path-amount profiles used to compute fluxes. Our results reveal a relatively high CO2 flux from Campi Flegrei, consistent with an increasing trend. Unlike previous methods, the CO2DIAL is able to measure integrated CO2 path-amounts at distances up to 2000 m using virtually any solid surface as a reflector, whilst also being highly portable. This opens a new frontier in quantification of geological and anthropogenic CO2 fluxes. PMID:27652775

  12. Flight test results for the Digital Integrated Automatic Landing Systems (DIALS): A modern control full-state feedback design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueschen, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS) is discussed. The DIALS is a modern control theory design performing all the maneuver modes associated with current autoland systems: localizer capture and track, glideslope capture and track, decrab, and flare. The DIALS is an integrated full-state feedback system which was designed using direct-digital methods. The DIALS uses standard aircraft sensors and the digital Microwave Landing System (MLS) signals as measurements. It consists of separately designed longitudinal and lateral channels although some cross-coupling variables are fed between channels for improved state estimates and trajectory commands. The DIALS was implemented within the 16-bit fixed-point flight computers of the ATOPS research aircraft, a small twin jet commercial transport outfitted with a second research cockpit and a fly-by-wire system. The DIALS became the first modern control theory design to be successfully flight tested on a commercial-type aircraft. Flight tests were conducted in late 1981 using a wide coverage MLS on Runway 22 at Wallops Flight Center. All the modes were exercised including the capture and track of steep glidescopes up to 5 degrees.

  13. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  14. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  15. Study on characteristics of chirp about Doppler wind lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li-fang; Yang, Guo-tao; Wang, Ji-hong; Yue, Chuan; Chen, Lin-xiang

    2016-11-01

    In the doppler wind lidar, usually every 4MHz frequency error will produce wind error of 1m/s of 532nm laser. In the Doppler lidar system, frequency stabilization was achieved through absorption of iodine molecules. Commands that control the instrumental system were based on the PID algorithm and coded using VB language. The frequency of the seed laser was locked to iodine molecular absorption line 1109 which is close to the upper edge of the absorption range, with long-time (>4h) frequency-locking accuracy being≤0.5MHz and long-time frequency stability being 10-9 . The experimental result indicated that the seed frequency and the pulse laser frequency have a deviation, which effect is called the laser chirp characteristics. Finally chirp test system was constructed and tested the frequency offset in time. And such frequency deviation is known as Chirp of the laser pulse. The real-time measured frequency difference of the continuous and pulsed lights was about 10MHz, long-time stability deviation was around 5MHz. After experimental testing technology mature, which can monitoring the signal at long-term with corrected the wind speed.

  16. Lidar Observations of Atmospheric CO2 Column During 2014 Summer Flight Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Advanced knowledge in atmospheric CO2 is critical in reducing large uncertainties in predictions of the Earth' future climate. Thus, Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) from space was recommended by the U.S. National Research Council to NASA. As part of the preparation for the ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Exelis, Inc. have been collaborating in development and demonstration of the Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar approach for measuring atmospheric CO2 column from space. Airborne laser absorption lidars such as the Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) and ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) operating in the 1.57 micron CO2 absorption band have been developed and tested to obtain precise atmospheric CO2 column measurements using integrated path differential absorption technique and to evaluate the potential of the space ASCENDS mission. This presentation reports the results of our lidar atmospheric CO2 column measurements from 2014 summer flight campaign. Analysis shows that for the 27 Aug OCO-2 under flight over northern California forest regions, significant variations of CO2 column approximately 2 ppm) in the lower troposphere have been observed, which may be a challenge for space measurements owing to complicated topographic condition, heterogeneity of surface reflection and difference in vegetation evapotranspiration. Compared to the observed 2011 summer CO2 drawdown (about 8 ppm) over mid-west, 2014 summer drawdown in the same region measured was much weak (approximately 3 ppm). The observed drawdown difference could be the results of the changes in both meteorological states and the phases of growing seasons. Individual lidar CO2 column measurements of 0.1-s integration were within 1-2 ppm of the CO2 estimates obtained from on-board in-situ sensors. For weak surface reflection conditions such as ocean surfaces, the 1- s integrated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of

  17. Lidar configurations for wind turbine control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Mann, Jakob

    2016-09-01

    Lidar sensors have proved to be very beneficial in the wind energy industry. They can be used for yaw correction, feed-forward pitch control and load verification. However, the current lidars are expensive. One way to reduce the price is to use lidars with few measurement points. Finding the best configuration of an inexpensive lidar in terms of number of measurement points, the measurement distance and the opening angle is the subject of this study. In order to solve the problem, a lidar model is developed and used to measure wind speed in a turbulence box. The effective wind speed measured by the lidar is compared against the effective wind speed on a wind turbine rotor both theoretically and through simulations. The study provides some results to choose the best configuration of the lidar with few measurement points.

  18. Shear and Turbulence Effects on Lidar Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael; Sathe, Ameya; Gayle Nygaard, Nicolai

    Wind lidars are now used extensively for wind resource measurements. It is known that lidar wind speed measure-ments are affected by both turbulence and wind shear. This report explains the mechanisms behind these sensitivities. For turbulence, it is found that errors in the scalar mean speed...... are usually only small. However, particularly in re-spect of a lidar calibration procedure, turbulence induced errors in the cup anemometer speed are seen to be signifi-cantly larger. Wind shear is shown to induce measurement errors both due to possible imperfections in the lidar sensing height and due...... to the averaging of a non-linear speed profile. Both effects in combination have to be included when modelling the lidar error. Attempts to evaluate the lidar error from ex-perimental data have not been successful probably due to a lack of detailed knowledge of both the wind shear and the actual lidar sensing...

  19. Injection Seeded Laser for Formaldehyde Differential Fluorescence Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwemmer G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design and development of an injection seeded Nd:YVO4 laser for use in a differential fluorescence lidar for measuring atmospheric formaldehyde profiles. A high repetition rate Q-switched laser is modified to accept injection seed input to spectrally narrow and tune the output. The third harmonic output is used to excite formaldehyde (HCHO fluorescence when tuned to a HCHO absorption line. Spectral confirmation is made with the use of a photoacoustic cell and grating spectrometer.

  20. Mobile Lidar Operations at GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Since the last meeting, the GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar has participated in two campaigns at MLO - an ozone and temperature comparison and a water vapor comparison. The trailer has been returned to GSFC to begin transfer into a sea container, before deployment to Reunion Island in Spring, 2004.

  1. Lidar measurements of plume statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.

    1993-01-01

    the source, instantaneous crosswind plume profiles were detected repetitively at high spatial (1.5 m) and temporal (3 sec) intervals by use of a mini LIDAR system. The experiments were accompanied by measurement of the surface-layer mean wind and turbulence quantities by sonic anemometers. On the basis...

  2. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  3. Complex terrain and wind lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, F.

    2009-08-15

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar can be of the order of 3-4% in moderately-complex terrain and up to 10% in complex terrain. The findings were based on experiments involving collocated lidars and meteorological masts, together with flow calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to approx6h. At the forest edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17 deg.. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method. The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be

  4. Improving lidar turbulence estimates for wind energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. F.; Clifton, A.; Churchfield, M. J.; Klein, P.

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing devices (e.g., lidars) are quickly becoming a cost-effective and reliable alternative to meteorological towers for wind energy applications. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds accurately, these devices measure different values of turbulence intensity (TI) than an instrument on a tower. In response to these issues, a lidar TI error reduction model was recently developed for commercially available lidars. The TI error model first applies physics-based corrections to the lidar measurements, then uses machine-learning techniques to further reduce errors in lidar TI estimates. The model was tested at two sites in the Southern Plains where vertically profiling lidars were collocated with meteorological towers. Results indicate that the model works well under stable conditions but cannot fully mitigate the effects of variance contamination under unstable conditions. To understand how variance contamination affects lidar TI estimates, a new set of equations was derived in previous work to characterize the actual variance measured by a lidar. Terms in these equations were quantified using a lidar simulator and modeled wind field, and the new equations were then implemented into the TI error model.

  5. 2004 Southwest Florida Water Management District Lidar: Pasco District

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the ortho & lidar mapping of Pasco County, FL. The mapping consists of lidar data collected using a Leica ALS-40 Lidar Sensor,...

  6. 2006 MDEQ-FEMA Hinds County Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the acquisition and processing of bare earth lidar data, raw point cloud lidar data, lidar intensity data, and floodmap breaklines...

  7. 2004 Southwest Florida Water Management District Lidar: Sarasota District

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the ortho & lidar mapping of Sarasota County, FL. The mapping consists of lidar data collected using a Leica ALS-40 Lidar Sensor,...

  8. 2-μm Coherent DIAL for CO2, H2O and Wind Field Profiling in the Lower Atmosphere: Instrumentation and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibert Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 2-μm coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, water vapour (H2O absorption and wind field profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer. The CDIAL uses a Tm:fiber pumped, single longitudinal mode Q-switched seeded Ho:YLF laser and a fibercoupled coherent detection. The laser operates at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz and emits an output energy of 10 mJ with a pulse width of 40 ns (FWHM. Experimental horizontal and vertical range-resolved measurements were made in the atmospheric boundary layer and compared to colocated in-situ sensor data.

  9. 2006 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of Western Lewis County for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data set covers...

  10. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  11. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  12. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Tulalip Partnership

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC)to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  13. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  14. 2012 MEGIS Topographic Lidar: Statewide Lidar Project Areas 2 and 3 (Mid-Coastal Cleanup), Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is a remotely sensed high resolution elevation data collected by an airborne platform. The LiDAR sensor uses a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  15. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Saddle Mountain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  16. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data...

  17. 2011 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Quinault River Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Quinault River Basin survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium and...

  18. 2012 MEGIS Topographic Lidar: Statewide Lidar Project Area 1 (Aroostook), Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is a remotely sensed high resolution elevation data collected by an airborne platform. The LiDAR sensor uses a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  19. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Willapa Valley (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In January, 2014 WSI, a Quantum Spatial (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  20. 2-micron Double Pulsed IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke; Scola, Tory

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a high energy pulsed 2-micron IPDA lidar instrument to measure the atmospheric CO2 column density. The IPDA lidar is operated on the long wavelength wing of R(30) CO2 line at 2050.967 nm (4875.749 cm-1) in the side-line operation mode. The R(30) line is an excellent absorption line for the measurements of CO2 in 2µm wavelength region with regard to the strength of the absorption lines, low susceptibility to atmospheric temperature variability, and freedom from problematic interference with other absorption lines. The Ho:Tm:YLF laser transmitter is designed to be operated in a unique double pulse format that can produce two-pulse pair in 10 Hz operation. Typically, the output energies of the laser transmitter are 100mJ and 45mJ for the first pulse and the second pulse, respectively. We injection seed the first pulse with on-line frequency and the second pulse with off-line frequency. The IPDA lidar instrument size, weight and power consumption were restricted to small research aircraft payload requirements. The airborne IPDA lidar instrument measures the total integrated column content of CO2 from the instrument to the ground but with weighting that can be tuned by controlling the transmitted wavelengths. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. The 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne demonstration was conducted during March 20, 2014 through April 10, 2014. IPDA lidar airborne flights included various operating and environmental conditions. Environmental conditions included different flight altitude up to 8.3 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Besides, some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating the IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. The lidar instrument is robust during all of the flights. This paper describes

  1. LIDAR Products, LiDAR, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Dodge County, Wisconsin.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This LIDAR Products dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR information as of 2006. It is described as 'LiDAR'. Data...

  2. Aerosol optical depth under "clear" sky conditions derived from sea surface reflection of lidar signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Hu, Yongxiang; Huang, Jian Ping; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-12-26

    There are considerable demands for accurate atmospheric correction of satellite observations of the sea surface or subsurface signal. Surface and sub-surface reflection under "clear" atmospheric conditions can be used to study atmospheric correction for the simplest possible situation. Here "clear" sky means a cloud-free atmosphere with sufficiently small aerosol particles. The "clear" aerosol concept is defined according to the spectral dependence of the scattering cross section on particle size. A 5-year combined CALIPSO and AMSR-E data set was used to derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the lidar signal reflected from the sea surface. Compared with the traditional lidar-retrieved AOD, which relies on lidar backscattering measurements and an assumed lidar ratio, the AOD retrieved through the surface reflectance method depends on both scattering and absorption because it is based on two-way attenuation of the lidar signal transmitted to and then reflected from the surface. The results show that the clear sky AOD derived from the surface signal agrees with the clear sky AOD available in the CALIPSO level 2 database in the westerly wind belt located in the southern hemisphere, but yields significantly higher aerosol loadings in the tropics and in the northern hemisphere.

  3. Terapia dialéctico conductual para el trastorno de personalidad límite

    OpenAIRE

    Irene de la Vega; Sabrina Sánchez Quintero

    2013-01-01

    La terapia dialéctico conductual (TDC) es una terapia psicológica de tercera generación desarrollada por Marsha Linehan (1993a, 1993b) para tratar específicamente los síntomas característicos del trastorno límite de la personalidad: inestabilidad afectiva, trastorno de identidad, impulsividad y dificultades en las relaciones sociales. La TDC parte de un modelo biosocial del trastorno límite y combina técnicas cognitivo conductuales con aproximaciones zen y budistas basadas en la aceptación de...

  4. Local search heuristics for the probabilistic dial-a-ride problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Sin C.; Haugland, Dag

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the probabilistic dial-a-ride problem, and describes an efficient request-relocation neighborhood evaluation procedure for the problem. The running time of the procedure is O(n5), compared to O(n6) for a straightforward approach. For solving the problem we embed the suggested...... evaluation procedure in a pure local search heuristic and in a tabu search heuristic. The quality of the solutions obtained by the two heuristics have been compared experimentally. Computational results confirm that our neighborhood evaluation technique is much faster than the straightforward one...

  5. Central nervous system tumors and related intracranial pathologies in radium dial workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbings, J.H.; Semkiw, W.

    1988-01-01

    Among the female radiation workers in the radium dial industry there is no overall excess of brain or central nervous system tumors. A significant excess did appear, however, in one of three major cohorts; the excess was not due to an excess of gliomas and cannot be ascribed with certainty to radium or external radiation. A significant proportional excess of tumors outside the brain was observed, and is consistent with irradiation of nervous system tissue from adjacent bone. Early deaths from brain abscess or mastoiditis, which are coded as diseases of the nervous system and sense organs, were observed. 12 refs., 11 tabs.

  6. Cuerpos significantes : una etnografía dialéctica con los toba takshik

    OpenAIRE

    Citro, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Dos son los propósitos fundamentales que guían el presente trabajo: construir un enfoque teórico metodológico de análisis de la corporalidad en la vida social en torno al concepto de "cuerpos significantes" y su abordaje dialéctico y aplicar este enfoque al estudio delos usos y representaciones del cuerpo en las prácticas socioculturales de los toba o qom del este de la provincia de Formosa (Argentina), también denominados takshik. La metáfora de la tra...

  7. Towards dial-a-molecule by integrating continuous flow, analytics and self-optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, Victor; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-04-21

    The employment of continuous-flow platforms for synthetic chemistry is becoming increasingly popular in research and industrial environments. Integrating analytics in-line enables obtaining a large amount of information in real-time about the reaction progress, catalytic activity and stability, etc. Furthermore, it is possible to influence the reaction progress and selectivity via manual or automated feedback optimisation, thus constituting a dial-a-molecule approach employing digital synthesis. This contribution gives an overview of the most significant contributions in the field to date.

  8. Ozone Lidar Observations for Air Quality Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Huang, Guanyu; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Koshak, William; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John T.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvarez, Raul; Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone lidars are well suited to measuring the high spatio-temporal variability of this important trace gas. Furthermore, lidar measurements in conjunction with balloon soundings, aircraft, and satellite observations provide substantial information about a variety of atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Examples of processes elucidated by ozone-lidar measurements are presented, and modeling studies using WRF-Chem, RAQMS, and DALES/LES models illustrate our current understanding and shortcomings of these processes.

  9. Lidar data used in the COFIN project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Nielsen, Morten

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the Lidar data used in the COFIN project. The Lidar data have been obtained from several ground level dispersion experiments over flat and complex terrain. The method for treating the data and the conditons under which the data wereobtained are described in detail. Finally we...... describe the Tools to extract and visualize the Lidar data. Data, report, and visualisation tools are available on the Risø FTP server....

  10. Lidar configurations for wind turbine control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Mann, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    configuration of an inexpensive lidar in terms of number of measurement points, the measurement distance and the opening angle is the subject of this study. In order to solve the problem, a lidar model is developed and used to measure wind speed in a turbulence box. The effective wind speed measured...... by the lidar is compared against the effective wind speed on a wind turbine rotor both theoretically and through simulations. The study provides some results to choose the best configuration of the lidar with few measurement points....

  11. Scalable lidar technique for fire detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Piedade, Fernando; Beixiga, Vasco; Mota, Pedro; Lousã, Pedro

    2014-08-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging) presents better sensitivity than fire surveillance based on imaging. However, the price of conventional lidar equipment is often too high as compared to passive fire detection instruments. We describe possibilities to downscale the technology. First, a conventional lidar, capable of smoke-plume detection up to ~10 km, may be replaced by an industrially manufactured solid-state laser rangefinder. This reduces the detection range to about 5 km, but decreases the purchase price by one order of magnitude. Further downscaling is possible by constructing the lidar smoke sensor on the basis of a low-cost laser diode.

  12. Automating the Purple Crow Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Purple Crow LiDAR (PCL was built to measure short and long term coupling between the lower, middle, and upper atmosphere. The initial component of my MSc. project is to automate two key elements of the PCL: the rotating liquid mercury mirror and the Zaber alignment mirror. In addition to the automation of the Zaber alignment mirror, it is also necessary to describe the mirror’s movement and positioning errors. Its properties will then be added into the alignment software. Once the alignment software has been completed, we will compare the new alignment method with the previous manual procedure. This is the first among several projects that will culminate in a fully-automated lidar. Eventually, we will be able to work remotely, thereby increasing the amount of data we collect. This paper will describe the motivation for automation, the methods we propose, preliminary results for the Zaber alignment error analysis, and future work.

  13. LIDAR data compression using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, B.; Mansor, Shattri; Ramli, Abdul Rahman; Mohamed Sharif, Abdul Rashid B.; Sandeep, K.

    2005-10-01

    The lifting scheme has been found to be a flexible method for constructing scalar wavelets with desirable properties. In this paper, it is extended to the LIDAR data compression. A newly developed data compression approach to approximate the LIDAR surface with a series of non-overlapping triangles has been presented. Generally a Triangulated Irregular Networks (TIN) are the most common form of digital surface model that consists of elevation values with x, y coordinates that make up triangles. But over the years the TIN data representation has become a case in point for many researchers due its large data size. Compression of TIN is needed for efficient management of large data and good surface visualization. This approach covers following steps: First, by using a Delaunay triangulation, an efficient algorithm is developed to generate TIN, which forms the terrain from an arbitrary set of data. A new interpolation wavelet filter for TIN has been applied in two steps, namely splitting and elevation. In the splitting step, a triangle has been divided into several sub-triangles and the elevation step has been used to 'modify' the point values (point coordinates for geometry) after the splitting. Then, this data set is compressed at the desired locations by using second generation wavelets. The quality of geographical surface representation after using proposed technique is compared with the original LIDAR data. The results show that this method can be used for significant reduction of data set.

  14. The portable P300 dialing system based on tablet and Emotiv Epoc headset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong Jijun; Zhang Peng; Xiao Ran; Ding Lei

    2015-08-01

    A Brain-computer interface (BCI) is a novel communication system that translates brain signals into a control signal. Now with the appearance of the commercial EEG headsets and mobile smart platforms (tablet, smartphone), it is possible to develop the mobile BCI system, which can greatly improve the life quality of patients suffering from motor disease, such as amyotrophic lateral scleroses (ALS), multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy and head trauma. This study adopted a 14-channel Emotiv EPOC headset and Microsoft surface pro 3 to realize a dialing system, which was represented by 4×3 matrices of alphanumeric characters. The performance of the online portable dialing system based on P300 is satisfying. The average classification accuracy reaches 88.75±10.57% in lab and 73.75±16.94% in metro, while the information transfer rate (ITR) reaches 7.17±1.80 and 5.05±2.17 bits/min respectively. This means the commercial EEG headset and tablet has good prospect in developing real time BCI system in realistic environments.

  15. Introducing heterogeneous users and vehicles into models and algorithms for the dial-a-ride problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parragh, Sophie N

    2011-08-01

    Dial-a-ride problems deal with the transportation of people between pickup and delivery locations. Given the fact that people are subject to transportation, constraints related to quality of service are usually present, such as time windows and maximum user ride time limits. In many real world applications, different types of users exist. In the field of patient and disabled people transportation, up to four different transportation modes can be distinguished. In this article we consider staff seats, patient seats, stretchers and wheelchair places. Furthermore, most companies involved in the transportation of the disabled or ill dispose of different types of vehicles. We introduce both aspects into state-of-the-art formulations and branch-and-cut algorithms for the standard dial-a-ride problem. Also a recent metaheuristic method is adapted to this new problem. In addition, a further service quality related issue is analyzed: vehicle waiting time with passengers aboard. Instances with up to 40 requests are solved to optimality. High quality solutions are obtained with the heuristic method.

  16. A dialética expositiva de "O Capital" de Karl Marx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Prado

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artigo tem o objetivo de analisar a forma expositiva dialética de O Capital de Karl Marx. O modo de exposição utilizado por Marx segue a tradição dialética e ascende do abstrato ao concreto, da aparência para a essência. Começa no nível mais simples e vazio de conteúdo para aos poucos ir desenvolvendo as contradições, acrescentando as determinações políticas, econômicas e sociais, para assim desvelar a essência por trás das formas aparentes.

  17. A dialética das possibilidades: a face interventiva do Serviço Social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes, Idilia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A sociedade contemporânea tem sido marcada pelo movimento histórico que traz a possibilidade de expressão humana, transformando tudo ao seu redor; os costumes e os recursos para a vida de hoje não se igualam aos da última metade de século que passou. Da mesma forma, os números absurdos que pontuam a exclusão social denunciam uma sociedade de sujeitos excluídos e maltratados cotidianamente em um tempo de gloriosos avanços tecnológicos e comunicacionais. Em uma perspectiva dialética, é possível perceber com maior precisão as contradições de um tempo ainda marcado pela centralidade da categoria trabalho. Este artigo pretende colocar em evidência a explicitação das categorias de apreensão do real na perspectiva do método dialético na relação com a sociedade contemporânea e com a instrumentalidade do Serviço Social

  18. Notas sobre lógica e dialética na Enéada de Plotino

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Loraine

    2007-01-01

    Este trabalho objetiva caracterizar a lógica e a dialética, conforme a Enéada I, 3 [20] 4-5. Para Plotino, a lógica consiste em um conjunto de procedimentos que trata de proposições e silogismos. A dialética é um método que faz uso dos procedimentos lógicos. Mas é também uma disposição que permite compreender a estrutura do inteligível. Por conseguinte, é um caminho de ascensão rumo ao Uno. Neste sentido, tem um aspecto ético.

  19. Notas sobre lógica e dialética na Enéada de Plotino

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Loraine

    2011-01-01

    Este trabalho objetiva caracterizar a lógica e a dialética, conforme a Enéada I, 3 [20] 4-5. Para Plotino, a lógica consiste em um conjunto de procedimentos que trata de proposições e silogismos. A dialética é um método que faz uso dos procedimentos lógicos. Mas é também uma disposição que permite compreender a estrutura do inteligível. Por conseguinte, é um caminho de ascensão rumo ao Uno. Neste sentido, tem um aspecto ético.

  20. La Terapia Dialéctico Conductual para el tratamiento del Trastorno Límite de la Personalidad.

    OpenAIRE

    Matilde Elices; Soledad Cordero

    2011-01-01

    La Terapia Dialéctico Conductual (TDC) ha sido creada por la Dra. Marsha Linehan, para el tratamiento de pacientes con intentos suicidas recurrentes y diagnóstico de Trastorno Limite de la Personalidad (TLP). Es un modelo terapéutico perteneciente a la “tercera ola” en psicoterapias cognitivas, puesto que se basa en las ciencias del comportamiento e incluye elementos de Mindfulness y de la filosofía dialéctica. En la actualidad la TDC es el tratamiento con mayor evidencia empírica para el TLP...

  1. Improving Lidar Turbulence Estimates for Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Clifton, Andrew; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Klein, Petra

    2016-10-06

    Remote sensing devices (e.g., lidars) are quickly becoming a cost-effective and reliable alternative to meteorological towers for wind energy applications. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds accurately, these devices measure different values of turbulence intensity (TI) than an instrument on a tower. In response to these issues, a lidar TI error reduction model was recently developed for commercially available lidars. The TI error model first applies physics-based corrections to the lidar measurements, then uses machine-learning techniques to further reduce errors in lidar TI estimates. The model was tested at two sites in the Southern Plains where vertically profiling lidars were collocated with meteorological towers. This presentation primarily focuses on the physics-based corrections, which include corrections for instrument noise, volume averaging, and variance contamination. As different factors affect TI under different stability conditions, the combination of physical corrections applied in L-TERRA changes depending on the atmospheric stability during each 10-minute time period. This stability-dependent version of L-TERRA performed well at both sites, reducing TI error and bringing lidar TI estimates closer to estimates from instruments on towers. However, there is still scatter evident in the lidar TI estimates, indicating that there are physics that are not being captured in the current version of L-TERRA. Two options are discussed for modeling the remainder of the TI error physics in L-TERRA: machine learning and lidar simulations. Lidar simulations appear to be a better approach, as they can help improve understanding of atmospheric effects on TI error and do not require a large training data set.

  2. Test Review: C. Mardell & D. S. Goldenberg. "Speed Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-Fourth Edition" ("Speed DIAL-4")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskey, Elena M.; Lagunas, Brenda; SooHoo, Michelle; Lomax, Amanda; Bullick, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Speed DIAL-4 was developed from the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning, Fourth Edition (DIAL-4), a screening designed to identify children between the ages of 2 years, 6 months through 5 years, 11 months "who are in need of intervention or diagnostic assessment in the following areas: motor, concepts, language,…

  3. Requirements For Lidar Aerosol and Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S.; Woeste, L.

    Laser remote sensing is the preferable method, when spatial-temporal resolved data is required. Data from stationary laser remote sensing devices at the earth surface give a very good impression about daily, annual and in general time trends of a measurand and can be compared sometimes to airborne instruments to get a direct link between optical and other methods. Space borne measurements on the other hand are the only possibility for obtaining as much data, as modeller wish to have to initialise, compare or validate there computation. But in this case it is very difficult to get the input in- formation, which is necessary for good quantitative analysis as well as to find points for comparison. In outer space and other harsh field environments only the simplest and most robust equipment for the respective purpose should be applied, to ensure a long-term stable operation. The first question is: what do we have to know about the properties of the atmosphere to get reliable data from instruments, which are just simple enough?, and secondly: how to set-up the instruments? Even for the evaluation of backscatter coefficients a density profile and the so-called Lidar-ratio, the ratio of backscatter to total volume scatter intensity, is necessary. Raman Lidar is a possibility to handle this problem by measuring aerosol extinction profiles. But again a density profile and in addition a guess about the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinc- tion between the Raman and laser wavelength are required. Unfortunately the tech- nique for Raman measurements is much more sensible and less suited for space borne measurements, because of the much smaller back scatter cross sections and the result- ing weak signals. It becomes worth, when we will have to maintain special laser with colours at molecular absorption bands in outer space, to measure gas concentration. I want to present simulation of optical systems for laser remote sensing, experimental experiences and compare air

  4. Standards – An Important Step for the (Public) Use of Lidars

    OpenAIRE

    Althausen Dietrich; Emeis Stefan; Flentje Harald; Guttenberger Josef; Jäckel Simon; Lehmann Volker; Mattis Ina; Münkel Christoph; Peters Gerhard; Ritter Christoph; Wiegner Matthias; Wille Holger

    2016-01-01

    Lidar standards are needed to ensure quality and lidar product control at the interface between lidar manufacturers and lidar users. Meanwhile three lidar standards have been published by German and international standardization organizations. This paper describes the cooperation between the lidar technique inventors, lidar instrument constructors, and lidar product users to establish useful standards. Presently a backscatter lidar standard is elaborated in Germany. Key points of this standar...

  5. 2012 USGS Lidar: Elwha River (WA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Elwha River, WA LiDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G11PD01088 Woolpert Order No....

  6. 2013 NRCS-USGS Lidar: Lauderdale (MS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME:NRCS LAUDERDALE MS 0.7M NPS LIDAR. LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task. USGS Contract No. G10PC00057. Task Order No. G12PD000125 Woolpert...

  7. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  8. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement unce...

  9. Saginaw Bay, MI LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME:(NRCS) Saginaw Bay, MI LiDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G11PD01254 Woolpert Order...

  10. Inclined test of nacelle wind lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael

    A nacelle wind lidar, placed at ground level, is tested by inclining the laser beams to bisect a measurement mast at a known distance and height. The horizontal wind speed reported by the lidar is compared to a reference cup anemometer mounted on the mast at the comparison height....

  11. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  12. CALIPSO lidar ratio retrieval over the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Damien; Rogers, Raymond; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-09-12

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type.

  13. 2006 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Aiken County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in five sessions, on March 15, 16 & 17, 2006, using a Leica ALS50 LiDAR System. Specific details about the ALS50 system...

  14. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  15. Stratospheric temperature measurement with scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for wind retrieval from mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haiyun; Dou, Xiankang; Shangguan, Mingjia; Zhao, Ruocan; Sun, Dongsong; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Shu, Zhifeng; Xue, Xianghui; Han, Yuli; Han, Yan

    2014-09-08

    Temperature detection remains challenging in the low stratosphere, where the Rayleigh integration lidar is perturbed by aerosol contamination and ozone absorption while the rotational Raman lidar is suffered from its low scattering cross section. To correct the impacts of temperature on the Rayleigh Doppler lidar, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on cavity scanning Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) is developed. By considering the effect of the laser spectral width, Doppler broadening of the molecular backscatter, divergence of the light beam and mirror defects of the FPI, a well-behaved transmission function is proved to show the principle of HSRL in detail. Analysis of the statistical error of the HSRL is carried out in the data processing. A temperature lidar using both HSRL and Rayleigh integration techniques is incorporated into the Rayleigh Doppler wind lidar. Simultaneous wind and temperature detection is carried out based on the combined system at Delhi (37.371°N, 97.374°E; 2850 m above the sea level) in Qinghai province, China. Lower Stratosphere temperature has been measured using HSRL between 18 and 50 km with temporal resolution of 2000 seconds. The statistical error of the derived temperatures is between 0.2 and 9.2 K. The temperature profile retrieved from the HSRL and wind profile from the Rayleigh Doppler lidar show good agreement with the radiosonde data. Specifically, the max temperature deviation between the HSRL and radiosonde is 4.7 K from 18 km to 36 km, and it is 2.7 K between the HSRL and Rayleigh integration lidar from 27 km to 34 km.

  16. Pointing Verification Method for Spaceborne Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Amediek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High precision acquisition of atmospheric parameters from the air or space by means of lidar requires accurate knowledge of laser pointing. Discrepancies between the assumed and actual pointing can introduce large errors due to the Doppler effect or a wrongly assumed air pressure at ground level. In this paper, a method for precisely quantifying these discrepancies for airborne and spaceborne lidar systems is presented. The method is based on the comparison of ground elevations derived from the lidar ranging data with high-resolution topography data obtained from a digital elevation model and allows for the derivation of the lateral and longitudinal deviation of the laser beam propagation direction. The applicability of the technique is demonstrated by using experimental data from an airborne lidar system, confirming that geo-referencing of the lidar ground spot trace with an uncertainty of less than 10 m with respect to the used digital elevation model (DEM can be obtained.

  17. Vapor Measurements from the GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, T.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor measurements from the GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar were made for the first time during a campaign at NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory. Comparisons were made among the GSFC lidar, the NOAA Lidar and water vapor sondes which were flown from the observatory at times coincident with the lidar measurements.

  18. Calibration Methods for a Space Borne Backscatter Lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Lidar returns from cloud decks and from the Earth's surface are useful for calibrating single scatter lidar signals from space. To this end analytical methods (forward and backward) are presented for inverting lidar waveforms in terms of the path integrated lidar retum and the transmission losses ov

  19. Broadband spectroscopic lidar for SWIR/MWIR detection of gaseous pollutants in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert-Girard, Simon; Hô, Nicolas; Bourliaguet, Bruno; Lemieux, Dany; Piché, Michel; Babin, François

    2012-11-01

    A broadband SWIR/MWIR spectroscopic lidar for detection of gaseous pollutants in air is presented for doing differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). One of the distinctive parts of the lidar is the use of a picosecond PPMgO:LN OPG (optical parametric generator) capable of generating broadband (10 to plane array used in the output plane of the grating spectrograph of the lidar system. The whole of the returned spectra is measured, within a very short time gate, at every pulse and at a resolution of a few tenths to a few nm. Light is collected by a telescope with variable focus for maximum coupling of the return to the spectrograph. Since all wavelengths are emitted and received simultaneously, the atmosphere is "frozen" during the path integrated measurement and hopefully reduces the baseline drift problem encountered in many broadband scanning approaches. The resulting path integrated gas concentrations are retrieved by fitting the molecular absorption features present in the measured spectra. The use of broadband pulses of light and of DOAS fitting procedures make it also possible to measure more than one gas at a time, including interferents. The OPG approach enables the generation of moderate FWHM continua with high spectral energy density and tunable to absorption features of a great number of molecules. Proposed follow-on work and applications will also be presented.

  20. Frequency Stepped Pulse Train Modulated Wind Sensing Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a wind sensing lidar utilizing a Frequency Stepped Pulse Train (FSPT) is demonstrated. One of the advantages in the FSTP lidar is that it enables direct measurement of wind speed as a function of distance from the lidar. Theoretically the FSPT lidar continuously produces measurements...... of frequency shifts corresponding to a specific distance. The spatial resolution depends on the repetition rate of the pulses in the pulse train. Directional wind measurements are shown and compared to a CW lidar measurement. The carrier to noise ratio of the FSPT lidar compared to a CW lidar is discussed...

  1. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-05-18

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m(-1) to 1.6e-4 m(-1)) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m(-1)sr(-1) and 1.7e-06 m(-1)sr(-1)) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind.

  2. Dial meettechniek voor detectie van NO2: Bepaling van de systeemkwaliteit d.m.v. experimenten en simulatie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge CN; Swart DPJ; Bergwerff JB

    1991-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to ascertain the performance and to establish the performance parameters of the NO2 Dial system (configuration January 1991). The system specifications are established by basic system measurements as well as by some field experiments. For the latter are undependent referen

  3. 76 FR 53691 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Section 8 Random Digit Dialing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Section 8 Random Digit Dialing Fair Marketing Rent Surveys AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice... Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW.,...

  4. A Survey to Determine the Reliability of Dynamometer and Pinch Gauge Dial Readings Among Certified Hand Therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore I. King II, Ph.D, L.Ac.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Using a cross-sectional descriptive study design, surveys were mailed to 200 randomly selected certified hand therapists of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT to determine how they document analog dynamometer and pinch gauge dial readings. Three different needle settings for the dynamometer and pinch gauge were presented in picture format. For each instrument, one needle setting was just above a gauge marker, one was just below a gauge marker, and one was set exactly between two gauge markers. A total of 126out of 200 surveys were returned for a participation rate of 63%. For the dynamometer readings, therapists estimated the exact strength reading between the two gauge markers 78.3% of the time. For the pinch gauge readings, therapists rounded to the nearest dial marker 76.5% of the time when the needle was just above or just below a dial marker and 61.9% of the time they estimated the reading when the needle was placed exactly between two dial markers.

  5. Soroprevalência do Citomegalovirus Humano em amostras de pacientes dialíticos e transplantados renais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Okubo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue investigar la seroprevalencia de Citomegalovirus Humano en dialíticos y trasplantados renales y la asociación con la transfusión de sangre y el sexo. Estudio transversal, llevado a cabo de 2011 a 2012, en Maringá, PR, Brasil. La población fue compuesta de 203 pacientes dialíticos y 53 trasplantados renales y la identificación viral se realizó mediante la técnica serológica. Se encontró 96% (195 de seropositividad para anti-HCMV-IgG en dialíticos y 100% en los trasplantados; 5% (10 de seropositividad para anti-HCMV-IgM en dialíticos y 37,7% (20 en trasplantados. Realizándose la prueba exacta de Fisher, no hubo asociación significativa entre la seropositividad del anti-HCMV con la transfusión de sangre y género. A la gran parte de los infectados se señala la importancia de la atención de enfermería para prevenir la infección cruzada durante los procedimientos de rutina.

  6. Towards Enhanced Underwater Lidar Detection via Source Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, David W.

    Interest in underwater optical sensors has grown as technologies enabling autonomous underwater vehicles have been developed. Propagation of light through water is complicated by the dual challenges of absorption and scattering. While absorption can be reduced by operating in the blue-green region of the visible spectrum, reducing scattering is a more significant challenge. Collection of scattered light negatively impacts underwater optical ranging, imaging, and communications applications. This thesis concentrates on the ranging application, where scattering reduces operating range as well as range accuracy. The focus of this thesis is on the problem of backscatter, which can create a "clutter" return that may obscure submerged target(s) of interest. The main contributions of this thesis are explorations of signal processing approaches to increase the separation between the target and backscatter returns. Increasing this separation allows detection of weak targets in the presence of strong scatter, increasing both operating range and range accuracy. Simulation and experimental results will be presented for a variety of approaches as functions of water clarity and target position. This work provides several novel contributions to the underwater lidar field: 1. Quantification of temporal separation approaches: While temporal separation has been studied extensively, this work provides a quantitative assessment of the extent to which both high frequency modulation and spatial filter approaches improve the separation between target and backscatter. 2. Development and assessment of frequency separation: This work includes the first frequency-based separation approach for underwater lidar, in which the channel frequency response is measured with a wideband waveform. Transforming to the time-domain gives a channel impulse response, in which target and backscatter returns may appear in unique range bins and thus be separated. 3. Development and assessment of statistical

  7. Paciente lúpica em programa dialítico com serosite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Regina Gonçalves Ribeiro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available O lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES é uma doença do tecido conectivo, de origem autoimune, caracterizada por reação inflamatória em diversos órgãos e sistemas e que evolui intercalando períodos de atividade e remissão. Este relato de caso trata de uma paciente que apresentava lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, nefrite lúpica dialítica e foi admitida no serviço de saúde com volumoso derrame pleural à direita e derrame pericárdico. Mesmo na vigência de colagenose, importante causa de serosites, foi priorizado a exclusão de outros diagnósticos para avaliar a indicação do uso de imunossupressores.

  8. Dialéctica de la enfermedad en "Cama 11", de José Revueltas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Humberto Florencia-Saldivar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Se propone desentrañar la manera en que la narrativa de José Revueltas provee de significación al ‘cuerpo enfermo’ de los personajes que crea este escritor nacido hace 100 años en Durango, México. Con la ayuda de categorías literarias generadas por el propio Revueltas, y observando la ‘pluriperspectiva’ de algunos personajes revueltianos, se construye una fenomenología de la enfermedad que altera la normalidad de los cuerpos y las conciencias de los actores en relatos como “El Dios vivo”, “Dormir en tierra” y, particularmente, en “Cama 11”, al igual que en las novelas Los días terrenales y El apando. Se encuentra, entonces, un proceso dialéctico que trasciende la dicotomía ‘salud-enfermedad’.

  9. Frigidez feminina e a dialética do amor, desejo e gozo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkiria Helena Grant

    Full Text Available A frigidez feminina, diferentemente da impotência masculina, necessariamente não se faz sintoma. É no decorrer do trabalho analítico que ela pode assumir o estatuto de sofrimento para um sujeito. O que pode nos oferecer a psicanálise como parâmetros para pensarmos a(s causa(s da frigidez? Com Freud, retomaremos aspectos da célebre análise conduzida na princesa Marie-Bonaparte, que sofreu com sua frigidez. Com Lacan, destacaremos o manejo da relação transferencial para que a dialética do amor, desejo e gozo possa ter lugar no mundo psíquico daquela que ocupava a posição defensiva denominada frigidez.

  10. Hacia una conceptualización dialógica de la neuroeducación

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Este texto se plantea como un análisis del estado de la cuestión sobre la neuroeducación. Pretende ser una revisión crítica sobre los supuestos básicos sobre los que se asienta la neuroeducación como ciencia interdisciplinar. Para ello, a través de una metodología argumentativa y crítica, se propondrá una dirección en su quehacer que sea dialógica con otras ciencias afines para evitar reduccionismos neurocientíficos. La hipótesis principal es que el cerebro es el principal ó...

  11. La dialéctica del amor-odio en Empédocles y Schopenhauer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Troncoso, David Emilio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dialectical thinking can be described as a way of understand an idea which involves the necessary coexistence of the contrary. In the philosophy of Empedocles and Schopenhauer we can find a similar sense of dialectic thought, that is recognized by the last and points to the reevaluation of the moral experience as the ground of representation of the motion of the world of the life.

    El pensamiento dialéctico se puede describir como un modo de concebir una idea que involucra la necesaria coexistencia de su contrario o complementario. En las filosofías de Empédocles y en Schopenhauer se da una semejanza en este sentido, que es advertida por este último y que apunta a la reivindicación de la experiencia moral como soporte de una representación del devenir del mundo de la vida.

  12. Metaheuristics for the dynamic stochastic dial-a-ride problem with expected return transports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilde, M; Doerner, K F; Hartl, R F

    2011-12-01

    The problem of transporting patients or elderly people has been widely studied in literature and is usually modeled as a dial-a-ride problem (DARP). In this paper we analyze the corresponding problem arising in the daily operation of the Austrian Red Cross. This nongovernmental organization is the largest organization performing patient transportation in Austria. The aim is to design vehicle routes to serve partially dynamic transportation requests using a fixed vehicle fleet. Each request requires transportation from a patient's home location to a hospital (outbound request) or back home from the hospital (inbound request). Some of these requests are known in advance. Some requests are dynamic in the sense that they appear during the day without any prior information. Finally, some inbound requests are stochastic. More precisely, with a certain probability each outbound request causes a corresponding inbound request on the same day. Some stochastic information about these return transports is available from historical data. The purpose of this study is to investigate, whether using this information in designing the routes has a significant positive effect on the solution quality. The problem is modeled as a dynamic stochastic dial-a-ride problem with expected return transports. We propose four different modifications of metaheuristic solution approaches for this problem. In detail, we test dynamic versions of variable neighborhood search (VNS) and stochastic VNS (S-VNS) as well as modified versions of the multiple plan approach (MPA) and the multiple scenario approach (MSA). Tests are performed using 12 sets of test instances based on a real road network. Various demand scenarios are generated based on the available real data. Results show that using the stochastic information on return transports leads to average improvements of around 15%. Moreover, improvements of up to 41% can be achieved for some test instances.

  13. Assessing spaceborne lidar detection and characterization of aerosols near clouds using coincident airborne lidar and other measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Omar, A. H.; Burton, S. P.; Rogers, R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    The objectives are to 1) evaluate potential shortcomings in the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol height detection concerning specific biomass burning smoke events informed by airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in different cloud environments and 2) study the lidar-derived atmospheric parameters in the vicinity of clouds for the cases where smoke is within or above clouds. In the case of light absorbing aerosols like biomass burning smoke, studies show that the greater the cloud cover below the aerosols, the more likely the aerosols are to heat the planet. An accurate aerosol height assumption is also crucial to a correct retrieval of aerosol chemical composition from passive space-based measurements (through the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and aerosol absorption coefficient, as exemplified by aerosol retrievals using the passive Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)). Strong smoke events are recognized as very difficult to quantify from space using passive (MODIS, OMI etc...) or active (CALIOP) satellite sensors for different reasons. This study is performed through (i) the selection of smoke events with coincident CALIOP and airborne HSRL aerosol observations, with smoke presence determined according to the HSRL aerosol classification data, (ii) the order of such events by range of HSRL aerosol optical depth, total color ratio and depolarization ratio (the latter two informing on the size and shape of the particles) and the evaluation of CALIOP's detection, classification and retrieval performance for each event, (iii) the study of the HSRL (or CALIOP when available) atmospheric parameters (total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, mean attenuated backscatter) in the vicinity of clouds for each smoke event.

  14. Advances in High Energy Solid-State Pulsed 2-Micron Lidar Development for Ground and Airborne Wind, Water Vapor and CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Kavaya, Michael J.; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron lasers. From fundamental spectroscopy research, theoretical prediction of new materials, laser demonstration and engineering of lidar systems, it has been a very successful program spanning around two decades. Successful development of 2-micron lasers has led to development of a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement with an unprecedented laser pulse energy of 250 millijoules in a rugged package. This high pulse energy is produced by a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser with an optical amplifier. While the lidar is meant for use as an airborne instrument, ground-based tests were carried out to characterize performance of the lidar. Atmospheric measurements will be presented, showing the lidar's capability for wind measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer and free troposphere. Lidar wind measurements are compared to a balloon sonde, showing good agreement between the two sensors. Similar architecture has been used to develop a high energy, Ho:Tm:YLF double-pulsed 2-micron Integrated Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) instrument based on direct detection technique that provides atmospheric column CO2 measurements. This instrument has been successfully used to measure atmospheric CO2 column density initially from a ground mobile lidar trailer, and then it was integrated on B-200 plane and 20 hours of flight measurement were made from an altitude ranging 1500 meters to 8000 meters. These measurements were compared to in-situ measurements and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) airborne flask measurement to derive the dry mixing ratio of the column CO2 by reflecting the signal by various reflecting surfaces such as land, vegetation, ocean surface, snow and sand. The lidar measurements when compared showed a very agreement with in-situ and airborne flask measurement. NASA Langley Research Center is currently developing a

  15. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  16. The long term stability of lidar calibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael; Gayle Nygaard, Nicolai

    Wind lidars are now used extensively for wind resource measurements. One of the requirements for the data to be accepted in support of project financing (so-called ‘banka-bility’) is to demonstrate the long-term stability of lidar cali-brations. Calibration results for six Leosphere WindCube li-dars......-ters pertaining in the different calibration periods. This is supported by sliding-window analyses of one lidar at one location where the same order of variation is observed as between pre-service and post-service calibrations....

  17. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of a test of a ground-based lidar of other type. The test was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The result as an establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided...... by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the wind vanes is also given....

  18. Lidar Turbulence Measurements for Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Jakob; Sathe, Ameya; Gottschall, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of the systematic errors in the second-order moments of wind speeds measured by continuous-wave (ZephIR) and pulsed (WindCube) lidars is presented. These lidars use the velocity azimuth display technique to measure the velocity vector. The model is developed for the line-of-sight averaging......, whereas they are up to 70% for the horizontal velocity variances. The systematic errors also vary with atmospheric stability, being lowest for the very unstable conditions. It is concluded that with the current measurement configuration, these lidars cannot be used to measure turbulence precisely....

  19. Building Extraction from LIDAR Based Semantic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jie; YANG Haiquan; TAN Ming; ZHANG Guoning

    2006-01-01

    Extraction of buildings from LIDAR data has been an active research field in recent years. A scheme for building detection and reconstruction from LIDAR data is presented with an object-oriented method which is based on the buildings' semantic rules. Two key steps are discussed: how to group the discrete LIDAR points into single objects and how to establish the buildings' semantic rules. In the end, the buildings are reconstructed in 3D form and three common parametric building models (flat, gabled, hipped) are implemented.

  20. Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David; Clayton, Marian; Schmid, Beat; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Orgren, John; Andrews, Elisabeth; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jonsson, Hafidi

    2006-01-01

    Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol

  1. 2010 NOAA American Samoa Mobile Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains three-dimensional mobile lidar elevation data for seven villages in American Samoa on the island of Tutuila. The seven villages are: Fagaalu,...

  2. Biscayne National Park LIDAR GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Lidar is a remote sensing technique that uses laser light to detect, range, or identify remote objects based on light reflected by the object or emitted through it...

  3. Semiconductor Laser Wind Lidar for Turbine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi

    instead of the conventional fiber-lasers. Besides its advantage of lower cost, the relative intensity noise, which peaks around 1 MHz for fiber lasers, is inherently avoided by using a semiconductor light source. The impact of the line width increment on the SNR in the application of wind measurement has...... and demonstrated in this work. The challenge, aside from cost and compactness, is to ensure a long lifetime without regular maintenance, since the wind turbines are designed to last for 20 years. Finally, field test results of various measurement campaigns, designed to evaluate our lidar design, are presented here...... historical overview within the topic of wind lidar systems. Both the potential and the challenges of an industrialized wind lidar has been addressed here. Furthermore, the basic concept behind the heterodyne detection and a brief overview of the lidar signal processing is explained; and a simple...

  4. 2010 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Sumter County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Provide high density LiDAR elevation data map of Sumter County, SC. Provide Bare Earth DEM (vegetation removal) of Sumter County, SC.

  5. 2015 Cook & Tift County (GA) Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Tift and Cook Counties GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task NOAA Contract No. EA133C-11-CQ-0010 Woolpert Order No. 75271...

  6. Nonlinear filtering for LIDAR signal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Lainiotis

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available LIDAR (Laser Integrated Radar is an engineering problem of great practical importance in environmental monitoring sciences. Signal processing for LIDAR applications involves highly nonlinear models and consequently nonlinear filtering. Optimal nonlinear filters, however, are practically unrealizable. In this paper, the Lainiotis's multi-model partitioning methodology and the related approximate but effective nonlinear filtering algorithms are reviewed and applied to LIDAR signal processing. Extensive simulation and performance evaluation of the multi-model partitioning approach and its application to LIDAR signal processing shows that the nonlinear partitioning methods are very effective and significantly superior to the nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF, which has been the standard nonlinear filter in past engineering applications.

  7. 2010 ARC Carroll County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the DTM comprised of classified aerial lidar elevation points, photogrammetrically compiled breaklines and the derived TIN for Carroll...

  8. 2005 Oahu/Maui Lidar Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS positioning...

  9. 2010 FEMA Lidar: Ozaukee County (WI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ozaukee AOI consists of one area encompassing the entire county. Ground Control is collected throughout the AOI for use in the processing of LiDAR data to ensure...

  10. 2011 USGS Lidar: Orange County (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  11. 2012 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Aiken County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towill Inc. collected LiDAR for over 3,300 square miles in Calhoun, Aiken, Barnwell, Edgefield, McCormick, and Abbeville counties in South Carolina. This metadata...

  12. 2012 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Edgefield County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towill Inc. collected LiDAR for over 3,300 square miles in Calhoun, Aiken, Barnwell, Edgefield, McCormick, and Abbeville counties in South Carolina. This metadata...

  13. 2012 FEMA Lidar: Middle Counties (VA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dewberry collected LiDAR for ~3,341 square miles in various Virginia Counties, a part of Worcester County, and Hoopers Island. The acquisition was performed by...

  14. 2004 FEMA Lidar: Blackstone (MA & RI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The LIDAR-derived data was collected in the Blackstone River area. This data supports the Federal Emergency Management Agency's specifications for mapping...

  15. 2012 FEMA Lidar: Southern Virginia Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dewberry collected LiDAR for ~3,341 square miles in various Virginia Counties, a part of Worcester County, and Hoopers Island. The acquisition was performed by...

  16. 2012 USGS Lidar: Brooks Camp (AK)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) had a requirement for high resolution Lidar needed for mapping the Brooks Camp region of Katmai National Park in Alaska....

  17. 2005 Delaware Coastal Program Lidar: Sussex County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data were acquired in March 2005 using the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) platform in Sussex County, Delaware. Once acquired, the...

  18. 2010 ARRA Lidar: Eleven County Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint and LMSI collected LiDAR for over 2,572 square miles in Northumberland, Lancaster, Middlesex, King and Queen, Matthews, Gloucester, James City,...

  19. 2011 FEMA Lidar: Southern Virginia Cities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dewberry collected LiDAR for ~3,341 square miles in various Virginia Counties, a part of Worcester County, and Hooper's Island. The acquisition was performed by...

  20. 2004 Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, Michigan Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata document describes the collection and processing of Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data over an area along the coast of Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron,...

  1. 2006 FEMA Lidar: Rhode Island Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. By positioning laser range finding with the use of 1...

  2. High Throughput Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lite Cycles, Inc. (LCI) proposes to develop a direct-detection Doppler lidar (D3L) technology called ELITE that improves the system optical throughput by more than...

  3. NIR LIDAR for Hazard Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have investigated the feasibility of employing a hazard detection and mitigation system based upon a polarization discriminating range-gated Lidar system. This...

  4. 2005 NCFMP Lidar: NC Statewide Phase 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne LIDAR terrain mapping data acquired March through April 2005. These data sets may represent a single geographic tile of a larger, county/sub-county data...

  5. 2010 USGS Lidar: Salton Sea (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The USGS Salton Sea project encompasses a 5-kilometer buffer around the Salton Sea, California. Dewberry classified LiDAR for a project boundary that touches 623...

  6. 2010 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lidar - Lisianki Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted with Hawaii-based Aerial Surveying, Inc. to collect lidar-derived elevation data over the low-lying areas within the...

  7. 2010 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lidar - Laysan Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted with Hawaii-based Aerial Surveying, Inc. to collect lidar-derived elevation data over the low-lying areas within the...

  8. 2010 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lidar - Kure Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted with Hawaii-based Aerial Surveying, Inc. to collect lidar-derived elevation data over the low-lying areas within the...

  9. 2004 USGS Lidar: San Francisco Bay (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Lidar (Light detection and ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  10. 2006 NOAA Bathymetric Lidar: Puerto Rico (Southwest)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set (Project Number OPR-I305-KRL-06) depicts depth values (mean 5 meter gridded) collected using LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) from the shoreline...

  11. 2008 USGS New Jersey Lidar: Somerset County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data support the general geospatial needs of the USGS and other federal agencies. LiDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an...

  12. 2003 NCFMP Lidar: NC Statewide Phase 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne LIDAR terrain mapping data acquired January through March 2003. Point data (XYZ) in ASCII format. Horizontal datum NAD83(1995) North Carolina State Plane...

  13. 2007 JALBTCX Topographic Lidar: Saipan, CNMI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These files contain topographic lidar data collected by the CHARTS system in Saipan, CNMI. This file contains both first and last returns. The data points...

  14. 2010 ARRA Lidar: Golden Gate (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Golden Gate LiDAR Project is a cooperative project sponsored by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and San Francisco State University (SFSU) that has resulted in...

  15. 2012 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Calhoun County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towill Inc. collected LiDAR for over 3,300 square miles in Calhoun, Aiken, Barnwell, Edgefield, McCormick, and Abbeville counties in South Carolina. This metadata...

  16. 2012 South Carolina DNR Lidar: Abbeville County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towill Inc. collected LiDAR for over 3,300 square miles in Calhoun, Aiken, Barnwell, Edgefield, McCormick, and Abbeville counties in South Carolina. This metadata...

  17. 2010 ARC Dekalb County Georgia Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the DTM comprised of classified aerial lidar elevation points, photogrammetrically compiled breaklines and the derived TIN for Dekalb...

  18. 2010 ARRA Lidar: Hampton County (SC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Provide high density LiDAR elevation data map of Hampton County, SC. Provide Bare Earth DEM (vegetation removal) of Hampton County, SC.

  19. USGS Atchafalaya 2 LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Atchafalaya Basin project area. The entire survey area for Atchafalaya encompasses approximately...

  20. 2010 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lidar - Midway Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted with Hawaii-based Aerial Surveying, Inc. to collect lidar-derived elevation data over the low-lying areas within the...

  1. 2010 Coastal Georgia Elevation Project Lidar Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between January and March 2010, lidar data was collected in southeast/coastal Georgia under a multi-agency partnership between the Coastal Georgia Regional...

  2. 2004 St. Johns County, Florida Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the bare earth lidar data for St. Johns County, Florida, acquired in early January and February of 2004. This data was collected to develop...

  3. UV fluorescence lidar detection of bioaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christesen, Steven D.; Merrow, Clifton N.; Desha, Michael S.; Wong, Anna; Wilson, Mark W.; Butler, John C.

    1994-06-01

    A UV fluorescence lidar system for the remote detection of bioaerosols has been built and tested. At the heart of the UV- LIDAR Fluorosensor system are a 200 mJ quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm and a 16-inch Cassagrain telescope. Operating on three data collection channels, the UV lidar is capable of real time monitoring of 266 nm elastic backscatter, the total fluorescence between 300 and 400 nm, and the dispersed fluorescence spectrum (using a small spectrograph and gated intensified CCD array). Our goal in this effort was to assess the capabilities of biofluorescence for quantitative detection and discrimination of bioaerosols. To this end, the UV-LIDAR Fluorosensor system was tested against the aerosolized bacterial spore Bacillus subtilus var. niger sp. globiggi (BG) and several likely interferences at several ranges from approximately 600 to 3000 m. Our tests with BG indicate a detection limit of approximately 500 mg/cubic meter at a range of 3000 m.

  4. Ultrawideband coherent noise lidar range-Doppler imaging and signal processing by use of spatial-spectral holography in inhomogeneously broadened absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youzhi; Hoskins, Alan; Schlottau, Friso; Wagner, Kelvin H; Embry, Carl; Babbitt, William Randall

    2006-09-01

    We introduce a new approach to coherent lidar range-Doppler sensing by utilizing random-noise illuminating waveforms and a quantum-optical, parallel sensor based on spatial-spectral holography (SSH) in a cryogenically cooled inhomogeneously broadened absorber (IBA) crystal. Interference between a reference signal and the lidar return in the spectrally selective absorption band of the IBA is used to sense the lidar returns and perform the front-end range-correlation signal processing. Modulating the reference by an array of Doppler compensating frequency shifts enables multichannel Doppler filtering. This SSH sensor performs much of the postdetection signal processing, increases the lidar system sensitivity through range-correlation gain before detection, and is capable of not only Doppler processing but also parallel multibeam reception using the high-spatial resolution of the IBA crystals. This approach permits the use of ultrawideband, high-power, random-noise, cw lasers as ranging waveforms in lidar systems instead of highly stabilized, injection-seeded, and amplified pulsed or modulated laser sources as required by most conventional coherent lidar systems. The capabilities of the IBA media for many tens of gigahertz bandwidth and resolution in the 30-300 kHz regime, while using either a pseudo-noise-coded waveform or just a high-power, noisy laser with a broad linewidth (e.g., a truly random noise lidar) may enable a new generation of improved lidar sensors and processors. Preliminary experimental demonstrations of lidar ranging and simulation on range-Doppler processing are presented.

  5. A New Framework for Quantifying Lidar Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer, F.; Clifton, Andrew; Bonin, Timothy A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2017-03-24

    As wind turbine sizes increase and wind energy expands to more complex and remote sites, remote sensing devices such as lidars are expected to play a key role in wind resource assessment and power performance testing. The switch to remote sensing devices represents a paradigm shift in the way the wind industry typically obtains and interprets measurement data for wind energy. For example, the measurement techniques and sources of uncertainty for a remote sensing device are vastly different from those associated with a cup anemometer on a meteorological tower. Current IEC standards discuss uncertainty due to mounting, calibration, and classification of the remote sensing device, among other parameters. Values of the uncertainty are typically given as a function of the mean wind speed measured by a reference device. However, real-world experience has shown that lidar performance is highly dependent on atmospheric conditions, such as wind shear, turbulence, and aerosol content. At present, these conditions are not directly incorporated into the estimated uncertainty of a lidar device. In this presentation, we propose the development of a new lidar uncertainty framework that adapts to current flow conditions and more accurately represents the actual uncertainty inherent in lidar measurements under different conditions. In this new framework, sources of uncertainty are identified for estimation of the line-of-sight wind speed and reconstruction of the three-dimensional wind field. These sources are then related to physical processes caused by the atmosphere and lidar operating conditions. The framework is applied to lidar data from an operational wind farm to assess the ability of the framework to predict errors in lidar-measured wind speed.

  6. Filter algorithm for airborne LIDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Ma, Hongchao; Wu, Jianwei; Tian, Liqiao; Qiu, Feng

    2007-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning data has become an accepted data source for highly automated acquisition of digital surface models(DSM) as well as for the generation of digital terrain models(DTM). To generate a high quality DTM using LIDAR data, 3D off-terrain points have to be separated from terrain points. Even though most LIDAR system can measure "last-return" data points, these "last-return" point often measure ground clutter like shrubbery, cars, buildings, and the canopy of dense foliage. Consequently, raw LIDAR points must be post-processed to remove these undesirable returns. The degree to which this post processing is successful is critical in determining whether LIDAR is cost effective for large-scale mapping application. Various techniques have been proposed to extract the ground surface from airborne LIDAR data. The basic problem is the separation of terrain points from off-terrain points which are both recorded by the LIDAR sensor. In this paper a new method, combination of morphological filtering and TIN densification, is proposed to separate 3D off-terrain points.

  7. Novel system for modulated lidar parameter optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhou; Yong Ma; Kun Liang; Zhiqiang Tu; Hongyuan Wang

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel system for parameter design and optimization of modulated lidar. The system is realized by combining software simulation with hardware circuit. This method is more reliable and flexible for lidar parameter optimization compared with theoretical computation or fiber-simulated system. Experiments confirm that the system is capable of optimizing parameters for modulated lidar. Key parameters are analyzed as well. The optimal filter bandwidth is 200 MHz and the optimal modulation depth is 0.5 under typical application environment.%@@ We present a novel system for parameter design and optimization of modulated lidar.The system is realized by combining software simulation with hardware circuit.This method is more reliable and flexible for lidar parameter optimization compared with theoretical computation or fiber-simulated system.Experiments confirm that the system is capable of optimizing parameters for modulated lidar.Key parameters are analyzed as well.The optimal filter bandwidth is 200 MHz and the optimal modulation depth is 0.5 under typical application environment.

  8. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  9. Airborne Lidar for Simultaneous Measurement of Column CO2 and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    The 2-micron wavelength region is suitable for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements due to the existence of distinct absorption feathers for the gas at this particular wavelength. For more than 20 years, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several high-energy and high repetition rate 2-micron pulsed lasers. This paper will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both CO2 and water vapor (H2O) in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver telescope, detection system and data acquisition. Future plans for the IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  10. O método dialético de Hegel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utz, Konrad

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A questão do método na Ciência da Lógica (CL é uma das mais controvertidas na discussão da filosofia de Hegel. O artigo defende a opinião de que o "método absoluto" de fato apresenta uma estrutura formal definida e distinta que seja o princípio geral de todo o desenvolvimento do sistema hegeliano (maduro. Defende essa interpretação contra mal-entendimentos, sobretudo contra aquele que um tal método geral tornaria a CL num formalismo vazio. O método hegeliano é apresentado como método do determinar, sendo que a CL, fundamentalmente e originalmente, não é outra coisa que não uma teoria de determinações aprióricas do pensar, i. é, de categorias, regras e formas lógicas. O artigo argumenta em favor da pretensão à universalidade e incondicionalidade que Hegel atribui a seu método. Quer mostrar que é exatamente essa incondicionalidade do método, e nada mas, que sustenta a necessidade e a imanência do proceder do pensar puro e, com isso, sustenta toda a pretensão à "ciência absoluta" e ao "idealismo absoluto" hegeliano. No final, porém, o texto oferece uma crítica interna a este método, que modifica decisivamente a pretensão de Hegel, embora não a destrua fundamentalmente. É que o próprio contém um momento de indeterminação ou contingência. Essa crítica conduz ao conceito do "acaso" como princípio originário e intransponível de toda dialética e, com isso, de todo determinar-se. Determinação se realiza no acaso da dialética. O acaso dialético e o princípio de toda realidade. The question of the Method in the Science of Logic (SL is among the most controversially debated in the discussions on Hegel. This article defends the view that there actually is a definite and distinct formal structure underlying the whole development of Hegel’s (mature system which he himself presents as the “Absolute Method”. This interpretation is defended against misunderstandings, especially against the opinion that

  11. Optical properties of different aerosol types: seven years of combined Raman-elastic backscatter lidar measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Giannakaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present our combined Raman/elastic backscatter lidar observations which were carried out at the EARLINET station of Thessaloniki, Greece, during the period 2001–2007. The largest optical depths are observed for Saharan dust and smoke aerosol particles. For local and continental polluted aerosols the measurements indicate high aerosol loads. However, measurements associated with the local path indicate enhanced aerosol load within the Planetary Boundary Layer. The lowest value of aerosol optical depth is observed for continental aerosols, from West directions with less free tropospheric contribution. The largest lidar ratios, of the order of 70 sr, are found for biomass burning aerosols. A significant and distinct correlation between lidar ratio and backscatter related Ångström exponent values were estimated for different aerosol categories. Scatter plot between lidar ratio values and Ångström exponent values for local and continental polluted aerosols does not show a significant correlation, with a large variation in both parameters possibly due to variable absorption characteristics of these aerosols. Finally for continental aerosols with west and northwest directions that follow downward movement when arriving at our site constantly low lidar ratios almost independent of size are found.

  12. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  13. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O'Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-15

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  14. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val. PMID:28198389

  15. Optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds over oceans from CALIPSO infrared radiometer and lidar measurements, and an evaluation of the lidar multiple scattering factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garnier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed evaluation of cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm and comparisons to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP flying on-board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations satellite. The blackbody radiance taken in the IIR Version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are then compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent 2-way transmittance through the cloud. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40% as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. This behavior is explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT to be applied to correct the measured transmittance, which is taken equal to 0.6 in the CALIOP Version 3 algorithm, and which is found here to vary with temperature (and hence cloud particle size from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP depolarization ratios and particle habits derived from IIR measurements.

  16. Para uma Dialéctica Constelar: Theodor W. Adorno à entrada do Século XXI1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro Cachopo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Interrogando-se sobre o lugar da filosofia de Theodor W. Adorno no âmbito do pensamento crítico contemporâneo, o presente artigo procura dar conta dos revezes da recepção político-filosófica da dialéctica negativa (das posturas críticas de Habermas, Lyotard ou Agamben às mais favoráveis de Jameson e Holloway e discutir a sua relevância actual. Defender-se-á que a politização do pensamento adorniano é possível, muito embora as suas valências críticas não se restrinjam a essa possibilidade. Hoje, a dialéctica negativa funcionaria também como antídoto contra os atalhos tomados pelas correntes "voluntarista" (Peter Hallward, "messiânica" (Agamben e "ontológica" (realismo especulativo da filosofia, à entrada do século XXI. Contudo, atendendo a que a relação entre teoria e prática é complexa em Adorno, a sua relevância actual ressaltaria em relação com as reacções críticas que o movimento do "realismo especulativo" tem suscitado. Em diálogo com alguns dos seus interlocutores (Markus Gabriel e Adrian Johnston, sugere-se que o desenvolvimento de uma "dialéctica constelar" depende da introdução de um elemento destotalizador no seio do diagnóstico radical - a um só tempo materialista e transcendental - da dialéctica negativa.

  17. Sobre a crítica dialética da Utopia de Thomas More: um livro proibido?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Egidio Leal e Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto tem por objetivo discutir a dialética da Utopia. Sabe-se que esta obra foi inspirada na República de Platão, e foi citada no O capital de Marx. No entanto, um estranho silêncio se faz sobre seus 500 anos, além de sua leitura pouco ser incentivada. Qual é o perigo da Utopia? Esta é a discussão que pretendemos realizar.

  18. Design Of A Low Cost Diode-Laser-Based High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Matthew; Spuler, Scott; Morley, Bruce; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    A concept for an eye-safe, semiconductor-based high spectral resolution lidar has been developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The lidar operates at a wavelength of 780 nm near several rubidium absorption peaks. A rubidium vapor cell is used to block aerosol backscatter in one channel to provide a molecular backscatter measurement for calculating extinction and backscatter ratio (calibrated backscatter). Laser and optical components around 780 nm are widely developed due to the large growth in atomic cooling and trapping of rubidium. Thus this instrument can be built largely using mature commercial-off-the-shelf parts. The simulation of the conceptual design shown here uses known commercial products and suggests that such an instrument could be used for quantitative profiling of the lower troposphere.

  19. Time and range averaging of lidar echoes using APD-based receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jose M. B.; Fonseca, Elsa S. R.; Resendes, David P.

    1999-10-01

    Lidar receivers perform time and/or space averaging to decrease the variance of the optical power estimates. In this paper we study an Avalanche PhotoDiode based receiver. The number samples to reach a given minimum variance depends on the receiver transfer function. Herein, we review the linear receiver and derive the number of samples for the logarithmic pre-amplifier. Comparing the two receivers, we show that the signal variance for the logarithmic case is degraded by a factor that vanishes as the receiver aperture increases. These results can be readily applied to the problem of estimating log-power returns in the context of Differential Absorption lidar systems. As an application example, we study two different log-power estimators and compare their performance.

  20. Assessing the feasibility and sample quality of a national random-digit dialing cellular phone survey of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Daniel A; ZuWallack, Randal S; Dayton, James; Echeverría, Sandra E; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2014-01-01

    The majority of adults aged 18-34 years have only cellular phones, making random-digit dialing of landline telephones an obsolete methodology for surveillance of this population. However, 95% of this group has cellular phones. This article reports on the 2011 National Young Adult Health Survey (NYAHS), a pilot study conducted in the 50 US states and Washington, DC, that used random-digit dialing of cellular phones and benchmarked this methodology against that of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Comparisons of the demographic distributions of subjects in the NYAHS and BRFSS (aged 18-34 years) with US Census data revealed adequate reach for all demographic subgroups. After adjustment for design factors, the mean absolute deviations across demographic groups were 3 percentage points for the NYAHS and 2.8 percentage points for the BRFSS, nationally, and were comparable for each census region. Two-sided z tests comparing cigarette smoking prevalence revealed no significant differences between NYAHS and BRFSS participants overall or by subgroups. The design effects of the sampling weight were 2.09 for the NYAHS and 3.26 for the BRFSS. Response rates for the NYAHS and BRFSS cellular phone sampling frames were comparable. Our assessment of the NYAHS methodology found that random-digit dialing of cellular phones is a feasible methodology for surveillance of young adults.

  1. Fragmentos do pensamento dialético na história da construção das ciências da natureza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Fernandes Nascimento Júnior

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem por objetivo identificar uma possível inclinação das ciências naturais em direção ao materialismo dialético. Para tanto, procura-se apresentar a história da dialética a partir da discussão racionalismo/empirismo moderno e seus desdobramentos até as tendências dialéticos contemporâneas. Os autores discutidos são Kant, Hegel, Marx, Engels, Lenin, Horkheimer, Marcuse, Habermas, Bachelard e suas escolas epistemológicas, completadas por Althusser, Lefebvre e Kedrov. Ao lado desses autores discutem-se outros, das duas últimas décadas, procurando extrair-lhes o olhar dialético, oculto em seus discursos acerca da ciência do fim do século. Também se procura encontrar na mecânica quântica, nos fractais, na lógica para-consistente, nos modelos matemáticos e na biologia antideterminista, argumentos para existência de uma forma de abordagem dialética da natureza. Por último, procura-se refletir acerca dos motivos da resistência ao método dialético apresentado pela maioria dos cientistas ocidentais e, sua possível superação.

  2. Terapia dialéctico conductual para el trastorno de personalidad límite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene de la Vega

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La terapia dialéctico conductual (TDC es una terapia psicológica de tercera generación desarrollada por Marsha Linehan (1993a, 1993b para tratar específicamente los síntomas característicos del trastorno límite de la personalidad: inestabilidad afectiva, trastorno de identidad, impulsividad y dificultades en las relaciones sociales. La TDC parte de un modelo biosocial del trastorno límite y combina técnicas cognitivo conductuales con aproximaciones zen y budistas basadas en la aceptación de la realidad tal como se presenta. El tratamiento consiste en un entrenamiento en habilidades, psicoterapia individual y atención en crisis y es llevado a cabo por un equipo coordinado de profesionales que ejercen distintas funciones. La TDC cuenta con estudios de eficacia y se está aplicando con éxito a otras poblaciones de pacientes con elevada impulsividad.

  3. Dora, uma experiência dialética Dora, a dialectical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Flávio S. Couto

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomando-se por base o texto Intervenção sobre a transferência (LACAN, 1951/1998, apresentamos aqui as considerações de Lacan sobre a direção do tratamento psicanalítico de Dora enquanto uma experiência dialética. Mesmo que a ênfase nas concepções hegelianas tenha sido posteriormente superada, não deixa de ser interessante refletir sobre a concepção da direção do tratamento impressa por ele em sua primeira clínica, à luz das escanções da verdade em seus diversos níveis.Based on the work Intervention on transference (LACAN, 1951/1998, this essay discusses a Lacanian approach to Dora's treatment as a dialectical experience. Although Hegel's conceptions have been surpassed, it is still worth reflecting on the treatment approach that he used in his first practice, in the light of several levels of truth scansions.

  4. Dialética da diferença = Dialectics of difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno, Sinésio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo tem por objetivo problematizar dialeticamente o tema da diferença de acordo com os conceitos da teoria crítica. Em um primeiro momento, o tema da diferença será pensado em sua recepção negativa referida à produção de estereótipos e preconceitos de natureza étnica, racial e de gênero. Em um segundo momento, o tema será tratado em sua recepção positiva, muito comum entre movimentos sociais de esquerda e meios acadêmicos. Em um terceiro momento, ambos os tipos de recepção da diferença serão problematizados a partir do pensamento de Theodor Adorno, em sua Dialética negativa, como possível via de mediação entre a particularidade empírica e a universalidade conceitual

  5. A literatura de massa na perspectiva dialógica/ The mass literature on dialogic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Cortina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Tomando por base alguns conceitos centrais da análise dialógica do discurso, este artigo propõe discutir, por meio do exame das listas dos livros mais vendidos no Brasil durante os anos de 2000 a 2010, as características centrais da literatura de massa contemporânea. A partir da constatação do predomínio dos livros de autoajuda, examina-se em que consiste esse fenômeno. O que se verifica é que a autoajuda pode ser observada tanto como gênero de discurso quanto como estilo. ABSTRACT: Building on some core concepts of dialogic discourse analysis, this article aims to discuss, through an examination of the bestseller lists in Brazil during the years 2000 to 2010, the central features of contemporary mass literature. By the evidence of the prevalence of self-help books, we examine how the phenomenon is consisting. The conclusion that we get is that self-help can be seen both as a discourse genre and as style.

  6. Elevation - LiDAR Survey - Roseau County, Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — LIDAR Data for Roseau County Minnesota. This project consists of approximately 87 square miles of LIDAR mapping in Roseau County, Minnesota at two sites: area 1,...

  7. 2002 NOAA Lidar: Willapa Bay, WA Mudflat (WA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA contracted with Spencer B. Gross, Inc. (SBG) to obtain airborne Lidar of Willapa Bay, Washington during low tide conditions. The Lidar data was processed to...

  8. 2012 NOAA Fisheries Topographic Lidar: Bridge Creek, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is an LAZ (compressed LAS) format file containing LIDAR point cloud data. This data set is an LAZ (compressed LAS) format file containing LIDAR point...

  9. 2013-2014 USGS Lidar: Olympic Peninsula (WA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: USGS Olympic Peninsula Washington LIDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G13PD00849...

  10. 2008 USGS South New Jersey County Project Lidar: Cumberland County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South New Jersey County Lidar Project is to provide LiDAR data for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJ-DEP) for Cape May, Cumberland, and...

  11. 2009 - 2011 CA Coastal Conservancy Coastal Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. This LiDAR dataset is a...

  12. 2006 FEMA New Jersey Flood Mitigation Lidar: Hunterdon County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the lidar topographic elevation mapping of Hunterdon County, NJ that occurred in July 2006. Products generated include lidar point...

  13. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Post Sandy (Long Island, NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Long Island New York Sandy LIDAR lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G14PD00296 Woolpert...

  14. 2006 FEMA New Jersey Flood Mitigation Lidar: Highlands Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. LiDAR was flown for...

  15. 2010-2011 ARRA Lidar: Nueces County (TX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This task order is for planning, acquisition, processing, and derivative products of LiDAR data to be collected for Nueces County, Texas. LiDAR data, and derivative...

  16. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  17. 3D Flash LIDAR EDL Resolution Improvement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc. (ASC) is a small business that has developed 3D Flash LIDAR systems for space and terrestrial applications. 3D Flash LIDAR is...

  18. 2008 Florida Division of Emergency Management Lidar: Middle Suwannee River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR Survey for the Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD), Florida. The LiDAR aerial acquisition was conducted in January of 2008, and the breaklines and...

  19. Combined HSRL and Optical Autocovarience Wind Lidar (HOAWL) Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate 2β + 2α + 2δ High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and Doppler wind lidar measurements simultaneously at 355nm and 532nm using a single...

  20. 2004 SWFWMD Citrus County Bare-Earth Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the ortho & LIDAR mapping of Citrus County, FL. The mapping consists of LIDAR data collection, contour generation, and production...

  1. 2012 NRCS-USGS Tupelo, MS Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is a remotely sensed high resolution elevation data collected by an airborne platform. The LiDAR sensor uses a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  2. Semiconductor Laser Lidar Wind Velocity Sensor for Turbine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A dual line-of-sight CW lidar that measures both wind speed and direction is presented . The wind lidar employs a semiconductor laser, which allows for inexpensive remote sensors geared towards enhanced control of wind turbines .......A dual line-of-sight CW lidar that measures both wind speed and direction is presented . The wind lidar employs a semiconductor laser, which allows for inexpensive remote sensors geared towards enhanced control of wind turbines ....

  3. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure made Using an IPDA Lidar Operating in the Oxygen A-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Abshire, James B.; Stephen, Mark; Rodriquez, Michael; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Mao, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of atmospheric pressure made using an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar that operates in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are needed for NASA s Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission to measure atmospheric CO2. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve our predictions of climate change. The goal of ASCENDS is to determine the CO2 dry mixing ratio with lidar measurements from space at a level of 1 ppm. Analysis to date shows that with current weather models, measurements of both the CO2 column density and the column density of dry air are needed. Since O2 is a stable molecule that uniformly mixed in the atmosphere, measuring O2 absorption in the atmosphere can be used to infer the dry air density. We have developed an airborne (IPDA) lidar for Oxygen, with support from the NASA ESTO IIP program. Our lidar uses DFB-based seed laser diodes, a pulsed modulator, a fiber laser amplifier, and a non-linear crystal to generate wavelength tunable 765 nm laser pulses with a few uJ/pulse energy. The laser pulse rate is 10 KHz, and average transmitted laser power is 20 mW. Our lidar steps laser pulses across a selected line O2 doublet near 764.7 nm in the Oxygen A-band. The direct detection lidar receiver uses a 20 cm diameter telescope, a Si APD detector in Geiger mode, and a multi-channel scalar to detect and record the time resolved laser backscatter in 40 separate wavelength channels. Subsequent analysis is used to estimate the transmission line shape of the doublet for the laser pulses reflected from the ground. Ground based data analysis allows averaging from 1 to 60 seconds to increase SNR in the transmission line shape of the doublet. Our retrieval algorithm fits the expected O2 lineshapes against the measurements and

  4. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Cedar River Watershed (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In September 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  5. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Quinault River Watershed, Washington (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Quinault watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This...

  6. Applications of KHZ-CW Lidar in Ecological Entomology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmqvist, Elin; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of kHz lidar in ecological entomology are explained. Results from kHz-measurements on insects, carried out with a CW-lidar system, employing the Scheimpflug principle to obtain range resolution, are presented. A method to extract insect events and analyze the large amount of lidar data is also described.

  7. Automating Identification of Roads and Trails Under Canopy Using LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    5 1. Brief History of LiDAR Development ................................................5 2. Laser Fundamentals ............................................................................6...Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), IMU, and laser scanner (From Diaz, 2011) 2. Laser Fundamentals Within the context of LiDAR, any point on the...section as well as a discussion of the different terrestrial, airborne, and spaceborne applications of LiDAR. A short explanation of laser

  8. Fractal properties and denoising of lidar signals from cirrus clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Driesenaar, M.L.; Lerou, R.J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar signals of cirrus clouds are analyzed to determine the cloud structure. Climate modeling and numerical weather prediction benefit from accurate modeling of cirrus clouds. Airborne lidar measurements of the European Lidar in Space Technology Experiment (ELITE) campaign were analyzed by

  9. Advanced Digital Signal Processing for Hybrid Lidar FY 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (Frorr) - To) 6/2011 to 9/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advance Digital Signal Processing for Hybrid Lidar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report describes the technical progress towards the development of signed processing algorithms for hybrid lidar - radar designed to improve...detection performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hybrid Lidar

  10. Lightweight Inexpensive Ozone Lidar Telescope Using a Plastic Fresnel Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Notari, Anthony; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive lightweight ozone lidar telescope was designed, constructed and operated during an ozone lidar field campaign. This report summarizes the design parameters and performance of the plastic Fresnel lens telescope and shows the ozone lidar performance compared to Zemax calculations.

  11. Technique to separate lidar signal and sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; MacDonnell, David G; Weimer, Carl; Baize, Rosemary R

    2016-06-13

    Sunlight contamination dominates the backscatter noise in space-based lidar measurements during daytime. The background scattered sunlight is highly variable and dependent upon the surface and atmospheric albedo. The scattered sunlight contribution to noise increases over land and snow surfaces where surface albedos are high and thus overwhelm lidar backscatter from optically thin atmospheric constituents like aerosols and thin clouds. In this work, we developed a novel lidar remote sensing concept that potentially can eliminate sunlight induced noise. The new lidar concept requires: (1) a transmitted laser light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM); and (2) a photon sieve (PS) diffractive filter that separates scattered sunlight from laser light backscattered from the atmosphere, ocean and solid surfaces. The method is based on numerical modeling of the focusing of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) laser beam and plane-wave light by a PS. The model results show that after passing through a PS, laser light that carries the OAM is focused on a ring (called "focal ring" here) on the focal plane of the PS filter, very little energy arrives at the center of the focal plane. However, scattered sunlight, as a plane wave without the OAM, focuses at the center of the focal plane and thus can be effectively blocked or ducted out. We also find that the radius of the "focal ring" increases with the increase of azimuthal mode (L) of LG laser light, thus increasing L can more effectively separate the lidar signal away from the sunlight noise.

  12. Rapid 2-axis scanning lidar prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsell, Daryl; LaRocque, Paul E.; Tripp, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    The rapid 2-axis scanning lidar prototype was developed to demonstrate high-precision single-pixel linear-mode lidar performance. The lidar system is a combined integration of components from various commercial products allowing for future customization and performance enhancements. The intent of the prototype scanner is to demonstrate current stateof- the-art high-speed linear scanning technologies. The system consists of two pieces: the sensor head and control unit. The senor head can be installed up to 4 m from the control box and houses the lidar scanning components and a small RGB camera. The control unit houses the power supplies and ranging electronics necessary for operating the electronics housed inside the sensor head. This paper will discuss the benefits of a 2-axis scanning linear-mode lidar system, such as range performance and a userselectable FOV. Other features include real-time processing of 3D image frames consisting of up to 200,000 points per frame.

  13. Linear LIDAR versus Geiger-mode LIDAR: impact on data properties and data quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, A.; Pfennigbauer, M.

    2016-05-01

    LIDAR has become the inevitable technology to provide accurate 3D data fast and reliably even in adverse measurement situations and harsh environments. It provides highly accurate point clouds with a significant number of additional valuable attributes per point. LIDAR systems based on Geiger-mode avalanche photo diode arrays, also called single photon avalanche photo diode arrays, earlier employed for military applications, now seek to enter the commercial market of 3D data acquisition, advertising higher point acquisition speeds from longer ranges compared to conventional techniques. Publications pointing out the advantages of these new systems refer to the other category of LIDAR as "linear LIDAR", as the prime receiver element for detecting the laser echo pulses - avalanche photo diodes - are used in a linear mode of operation. We analyze the differences between the two LIDAR technologies and the fundamental differences in the data they provide. The limitations imposed by physics on both approaches to LIDAR are also addressed and advantages of linear LIDAR over the photon counting approach are discussed.

  14. LIDAR Products, LiDAR bare earth point text files from NC Floodplain Program, Published in 2007, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This LIDAR Products dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR information as of 2007. It is described as 'LiDAR bare...

  15. Chaotic LIDAR for Naval Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-31

    are derived. MFD: Mode field diameter; ZBLAN : Heavy metal fluoride glass . [1] Cross-section Gaussian model follows Marciante and Zuegel, High-Gain...34^ Pump Power Pp" 280 mW Dopant Host - ZBLAN Pump Wavelength h 976 nm Upper State Lifetime T 0.84 ms ASE Wavelengths X 800 nm to 1200 nm Absorption

  16. Enhancements to INO's broadband SWIR/MWIR spectroscopic lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert-Girard, Simon; Babin, François; Allard, Martin; Piché, Michel

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the INO broadband SWIR/MWIR spectroscopic lidar will be presented. The system is designed for the detection of gaseous pollutants via active infrared differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Two distinctive features are a sub-nanosecond PPMgO:LN OPG capable of generating broadband (10 to plane array used in the output plane of a grating spectrograph. The operation consists in closely gating the returns from back-scattering off topographic features, and is thus, for now, a path integrated measurement. All wavelengths are emitted and received simultaneously, for low concentration measurements and DOAS fitting methods are then applied. The OPG approach enables the generation of moderate FWHM continua with high spectral energy density and tunable to absorption features of many molecules. Recent measurements demonstrating a minimum sensitivity of 10 ppm-m for methane around 3.3 μm with ˜ 2 mW average power in less than 10 seconds will be described. Results of enhancements to the laser source using small or large bandwidth seeds constructed from telecom off-the-shelf components indicate that the OPG output spectral energy density can have controllable spectral widths and shapes. It also has a slightly more stable spectral shape from pulse to pulse than without the seed (25 % enhancement). Most importantly, the stabilized output spectra will allow more sensitive measurements.

  17. Turbulence measurements using six lidar beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    The use of wind lidars for measuring wind has increased significantly for wind energy purposes. The mean wind speed measurement using the velocity azimuth display (VAD) technique can now be carried out as reliably as the traditional instruments like the cup and sonic anemometers. Using the VAD...... technique the turbulence measurements are far from being reliable. Two mechanisms contribute to systematic errors in the measurement of turbulence. One is the averaging of small scales of turbulence due to the volume within which lidars measure wind speed. The other is the contamination by the cross...... components of the Reynolds stress tensor, which arises because, in a VAD scan the lidar beams are combined to obtain different components of the wind field. In this work we demonstrate theoretically, how the contamination by the cross components can be avoided by using the measured variances of the line...

  18. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bingöl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured by collocating a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2.0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model.

  19. Genética molecular de caracteres cuantitativos en cruzamientos dialélicos de tomate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Raúl Pratta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar marcadores moleculares y caracteres cuantitativos en un cruzamiento dialélico completo sin recíprocos, entre cinco líneas recombinantes de tomate y sus híbridos. Se obtuvieron perfiles de AFLP ("amplified fragment length polymorphism" y de polipéptidos del pericarpio en cuatro estados de madurez del fruto de 15 genotipos. Se evaluaron, entre otros: peso, acidez titulable, pH, vida poscosecha y firmeza. Se calculó el porcentaje de polimorfismo para los marcadores moleculares y el porcentaje de variabilidad genética para los caracteres cuantitativos en el grupo de líneas recombinantes, el de híbridos y el conjunto de genotipos. Se realizaron análisis de agrupamiento con cada nivel de variación genética. Para AFLP, el porcentaje de polimorfismo varió entre 34 y 54% y, para los perfiles polipeptídicos, entre 40 y 78%. Mayor polimorfismo fue observado en el grupo de híbridos. La variabilidad genética fue de 100% para acidez y 34% para firmeza, con los mayores valores en los parentales. La similitud genética varió entre los genotipos según el nivel de variación genética; pero la consistencia en el agrupamiento de algunas líneas recombinantes y sus híbridos fue conservada, lo que evidenció asociaciones entre los datos moleculares y fenotípicos.

  20. Jean-Paul Sartre: La dialéctica ágil y paciente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arribas, Sonia

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay reconstructs the Sartrean conception of a dialectics of history and politics, as it is advanced in «In Search of a Method». The principles of Sartre's articulation of Marxism and existentialism are put forward, as well as his reflections on the existential project as the mediation between the economic base of capitalist society and its ideological superstructure, or as the subjective and practical mediation between objective contradictions. The essay argues that this idea of the project is based on an untenable dualism between Knowledge and the real, and that its concomitant notion of the imaginary is problematically formulated as a form of representation. A Marxist approach, without existentialism, can thematize subjectivity and the contingency of history and politics, without dualisms or representationist models of the imaginary.

    Este ensayo reconstruye la concepción sartreana de una dialéctica de la historia y la política, tal y como está esbozada en «Cuestiones de método». Se exponen los principios de su articulación del marxismo y el existencialismo, así como sus reflexiones sobre el proyecto existencial como la mediación entre la base económica de la sociedad capitalista y su superestructura ideológica, o en tanto que la mediación subjetiva y práctica entre contradicciones objetivas. Se argumenta que esta idea del proyecto se basa en un dualismo insostenible entre el Saber y lo real, que el concomitante concepto del imaginario se formula problemáticamente en términos de representación y que una perspectiva marxista, sin existencialismo, permitiría tematizar la subjetividad y la contingencia de la historia y la política sin dualismos ni modelos representacionalistas del imaginario.

  1. Avaliação de cultivares de mamona em cruzamentos dialélicos parciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Barreto de Medeiros Nóbrega

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A mamona (Ricinus communis L. é uma cultura de grande importância no Nordeste brasileiro, mas nos últimos anos expandiu-se também para outras regiões do Brasil, incentivada pelo Programa Nacional de Biodiesel. O trabalho teve por objetivo estimar as capacidades gerais e específicas de combinação para a produção de sementes e caracteres agronômicos de mamona, visando ao entendimento do controle genético de tais caracteres, para fins de melhoramento. Para isso, utilizaram-se 10 cultivares de mamona, divididos em dois grupos: Grupo 1, composto de cinco cultivares de porte baixo, e Grupo 2, composto de cinco cultivares de porte alto, que foram cruzadas segundo um arranjo dialélico parcial, originando 25 cruzamentos. Os cruzamentos foram avaliados no delineamento em látice 5 x 5 com quatro repetições e parcelas constituídas de uma fileira de 9 m de comprimento espaçada de 3 m (27 m², contendo 10 plantas. Os caracteres avaliados foram: produtividade de sementes (PR, dias para florescimento (DF, altura da planta (AP, altura do caule (AC, e tamanho útil do cacho (TU. A capacidade geral de combinação (CGC foi significativa para todos os caracteres dos dois grupos, enquanto a capacidade específica de combinação (CEC foi significativa somente para DF e TU. Além disso, a soma de quadrados devido à CGC foi maior que a soma de quadrados devido à CEC para todos os caracteres, indicando que os locos de efeito aditivo têm maior importância que os locos de efeito dominante. Nos dois grupos detectaram-se cultivares com alelos favoráveis para a produção de sementes e caracteres agronômicos.

  2. Generic calibration procedures for nacelle-based profiling lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    In power performance testing, it has been demonstrated that the effects of wind speed and direction variations over the rotor disk can no longer be neglected for large wind turbines [1]. A new generation of commercial nacelle-based lidars is now available, offering wind profiling capabilities...... to calibrate profiling nacelle lidars........ Developing standard procedures for power curves using lidars requires assessing lidars measurement uncertainty that is provided by a calibration. Based on the calibration results from two lidars, the Avent 5-beam Demonstrator and the Zephir Dual Mode (ZDM), we present in this paper a generic methodology...

  3. LIDAR, Point Clouds, and their Archaeological Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Devin A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    It is common in contemporary archaeological literature, in papers at archaeological conferences, and in grant proposals to see heritage professionals use the term LIDAR to refer to high spatial resolution digital elevation models and the technology used to produce them. The goal of this chapter is to break that association and introduce archaeologists to the world of point clouds, in which LIDAR is only one member of a larger family of techniques to obtain, visualize, and analyze three-dimensional measurements of archaeological features. After describing how point clouds are constructed, there is a brief discussion on the currently available software and analytical techniques designed to make sense of them.

  4. Ghost imaging lidar via sparsity constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Chengqiang; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Enrong; Wang, Hui; Xu, Wendong; Han, Shensheng

    2012-01-01

    For remote sensing, high-resolution imaging techniques are helpful to catch more characteristic information of the target. We extend pseudo-thermal light ghost imaging to the area of remote imaging and propose a ghost imaging lidar system. For the first time, we demonstrate experimentally that the real-space image of a target at about 1.0 km range with 20 mm resolution is achieved by ghost imaging via sparsity constraints (GISC) technique. The characters of GISC technique compared to the existing lidar systems are also discussed.

  5. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protat, A [Australian Bureau of Meterology; Young, S

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to evaluate the performance of the new Leosphere R-MAN 510 lidar, procured by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, by testing it against the MicroPulse Lidar (MPL) and Raman lidars, at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. This lidar is an eye-safe (355 nm), turn-key mini Raman lidar, which allows for the detection of aerosols and cloud properties, and the retrieval of particulate extinction profiles. To accomplish this evaluation, the R-MAN 510 lidar has been operated at the Darwin ARM site, next to the MPL, Raman lidar, and Vaisala ceilometer (VCEIL) for three months (from 20 January 2013 to 20 April 2013) in order to collect a sufficient sample size for statistical comparisons.

  6. MATLAB tools for lidar data conversion, visualization, and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Kaijing; Yang, Jie; Lu, Yilong

    2011-10-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) [1] is an optical remote sensing technology that has gained increasing acceptance for topographic mapping. LIDAR technology has higher accuracy than RADAR and has wide applications. The relevant commercial market for LIDAR has developed greatly in the last few years. LAS format is approved to be the standard data format for interchanging LIDAR data among different software developers, manufacturers and end users. LAS data format reduces the data size compared to ASCII data format. However, LAS data file can only be visualized by some expensive commercial software. There are some free tools available, but they are not user-friendly and have less or poor visualization functionality. This makes it difficult for researchers to investigate and use LIDAR data. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient and low cost LIDAR data toolbox. For this purpose we have developed a free and efficient Matlab tool for LIDAR data conversion, visualization and processing.

  7. Lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio of the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, James H; Sullivan, James M; Twardowski, Michael S

    2014-07-28

    Bio-optical models are used to develop a model of the lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio applicable to oceanographic lidar. The model is based on chlorophyll concentration, and is expected to be valid for Case 1 waters. The limiting cases of narrow- and wide-beam lidars are presented and compared with estimates based on in situ optical measurements. Lidar measurements are also compared with the model using in situ or satellite estimates of chlorophyll concentration. A modified lidar ratio is defined, in which the properties of pure sea water are removed. This modified ratio is shown to be nearly constant for wide-beam lidar operating in low-chlorophyll waters, so accurate inversion to derive extinction and backscattering is possible under these conditions. This ratio can also be used for lidar calibration.

  8. Liderança dialógica nas instituições hospitalares Liderazgo dialógico en las instituciones hospitalárias Dialogical leadership in hospitals institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Coelho Amestoy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma reflexão-teórica com o objetivo de discutir sobre a importância da inserção da liderança dialógica nas instituições hospitalares. O referencial teórico para fundamentar esta reflexão é de Paulo Freire complementado com outros autores. O modelo de liderança dialógica consiste em um instrumento gerencial que se difere dos métodos coercitivos e autocráticos, por ser fundamentado no estabelecimento de um processo comunicacional eficiente, capaz de estimular a autonomia, a co-responsabilização e a valorização de cada membro da equipe de enfermagem, bem como dos usuários dos serviços de saúde.Se trata de una reflexión-teórica con el objetivo de discutir sobre la importancia de la inserción del liderazgo dialógico en las instituciones hospitalarias. El referencial teórico para fundamentar esta reflexión es de Paulo Freire complementado con otros autores. El modelo de liderazgo dialógico consiste en un instrumento gerencial que se diferencia de los métodos coercitivos y autocráticos, por ser fundamentado en el establecimiento de un proceso comunicacional eficiente, capaz de estimular la autonomía, la co-responsabilidad y la valorización de cada miembro del equipo de enfermería, así como de los usuarios de los servicios de salud.The aim of this study is make a theorical-reflection about the importance of using dialogical leadership in hospital institutions through Freirean referencial. The dialogical leadership pattern differs from the coercive and autocratic methods, for being reasoned on the establishment of an efficient communicational process, able to stimulate autonomy, co-responsibility and appreciation of each member from nurse team. The dialogical leadership, unlike the directive one, is a management instrument, that pursuits to minimize the conflicts and stimulate the formation of healthy interpersonal relationships, which can contribute to the improvement of organizational atmosphere and

  9. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Entiat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDARConsortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the...

  10. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDARConsortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  11. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 77 square miles and covers a...

  12. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to complete the 2005 project for Yakima County. This project has partial coverage of Yakima County,...

  13. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 167 square miles and covers a...

  14. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: North Puget Sound Lowlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data contributing to the Puget Sound Lowlands project of 2005. Arlington, City of Snohomish, Snohomish...

  15. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lower Columbia River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint, on behalf of multiple agencies, collected topographic lidar of the Lower Columbia River area. Field data collection took place between the dates of...

  16. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Upper Naches River, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Upper Naches River Valley and Nile Slide area of interest on September 30th,...

  17. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Bare-Earth Topographic LiDAR: Lynnwood

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data contributing to the Puget Sound Lowlands project of 2005. Lynnwood, Snohomish County, Washington. This...

  18. 2007 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Sumpter, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the USDA Forest Service on September 17, 2007. The project covers an 8-mile...

  19. 2011 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Rattlesnake

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on six days between September 15th and November 5th, and from November 6th ? 13th,...

  20. 2000 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 1,146 square miles and covers part...

  1. Model of the Correlation between Lidar Systems and Wind Turbines for Lidar-Assisted Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlipf, David; Cheng, Po Wen; Mann, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    , if correlated frequencies are filtered out. To avoid these miscalculations, this work presents a method to model the correlation between lidar systems and wind turbines using Kaimal wind spectra. The derived model accounts for different measurement configurations and spatial averaging of the lidar system......Investigations of lidar-assisted control to optimize the energy yield and to reduce loads of wind turbines have increased significantly in recent years. For this kind of control, it is crucial to know the correlation between the rotor effective wind speed and the wind preview provided by a nacelle......, different rotor sizes, and wind evolution. The method is compared to real measurement data with promising results. In addition, examples depict how this model can be used to design an optimal controller and how the configuration of a lidar system is optimized for a given turbine to improve the correlation....

  2. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Olympic Peninsula

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Olympic Peninsula project of 2005, totaling approximately 114.59 sq mi: 24.5 for Clallam...

  3. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County project of 2005. The project site covered approximately 223 square miles, divided...

  4. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish River Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) co-acquired Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data and Truecolor Orthophotographs of the Snohomish River Estuary, WA on July 20 &...

  5. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Douglas Co.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Douglas County PUD area of interest (AOI) east of Wenatchee, WA on May 2nd ?...

  6. 2009 Puget Sound Lidar Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Nooksack River in Washington on February 20th - 22nd, 2009. The total area of...

  7. 2009 Puget Sound Lidar Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Nooksack River in Washington on February 20th - 22nd, 2009. The total area...

  8. Double-Pulse Two-Micron IPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    An advanced double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-micron laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation from up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  9. The efficiency of lidar measurements of wind velocity by a correlation lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astafurov, V.G.; Ignatova, E.Yu.; Matvienko, G.G. (Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation))

    1992-05-01

    A suboptimal estimate of the wind velocity based on the spectral processing of lidar signals is constructed. The error of this estimate is calculated and its calculations are performed for different atmospheric conditions and instrumental parameters for the experimentally confirmed models of the correlation functions of lidar signals. Some recommendations are given on the choice of parameters of a two-path method of sounding with an account of evolution time of the aerosol inhomogeneities. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Development of a high-spectral-resolution lidar for continuous observation of aerosols in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Ristori, Pablo; Papandrea, Sebastian; Otero, Lidia; Quel, Eduardo; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of aerosol profiles using lidar is helpful for a quasi-real-time indication of aerosol concentration. For instance, volcanic ash concentration and its height distribution are essential information for plane flights. Depolarization ratio and multi-wavelength measurements are useful for characterizing aerosol types such as volcanic ash, smoke, dust, sea-salt, and air pollution aerosols. High spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and Raman scattering lidar can contribute to such aerosol characterization significantly since extinction coefficients can be measured independently from backscattering coefficients. In particular, HSRL can measure aerosol extinction during daytime and nighttime with a high sensitivity. We developed an HSRL with the iodine filter method for continuous observation of aerosols at 532nm in the northern region of Argentina in the framework of the South American Environmental Atmospheric Risk Management Network (SAVER.Net)/SATREPS project. The laser wavelength of the HSRL was controlled by a feedback system to tune the laser wavelength to the center of an iodine absorption line. The stability of the laser wavelength with the system satisfied the requirement showing very small systematic errors in the retrieval of extinction and backscatter.

  11. El discurso dialógico en el castellano del Siglo XVI: Las Traducciones de los Coloquios de Erasmo.

    OpenAIRE

    Rey Quesada, Santiago del

    2013-01-01

    Hace cuatro años, cuando emprendí el inicio de mi carrera investigadora, entre los muy diversos temas a los que podría haber dedicado el proyecto de tesis doctoral, mi director y yo convinimos en que se hacía necesario abordar el estudio lingüístico de los diálogos literarios del Renacimiento, con el fin de calibrar su peso efectivo en la conformación del discurso dialógico en el castellano del siglo XVI. A principios de 2009 empe...

  12. Materialismo Histórico-Dialético e a Pesquisa em Educação Ambiental

    OpenAIRE

    B. Loureiro, Carlos Frederico

    2014-01-01

    Neste artigo trago algumas das reflexões expostas na palestra proferida no VII Encontro de Pesquisa em Educação Ambiental, realizado na UNESP de Rio Claro em 2013. Para fins de delimitação, apresento aspectos polêmicos do materialismo histórico-dialético e, principalmente, conceitos que ajudam a entender a ontologia do ser social aí contida, por sua relevância na compreensão do metabolismo sociedade-natureza e do debate ambiental. Ao destacar categorias fundamentais da tradição i...

  13. Diálisis peritoneal no convencional en pacientes con insuficiencia renal que requieren soporte dialítico.

    OpenAIRE

    MENESES LIENDO, Víctor; CIEZA ZEVALLOS, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Revisar las variaciones del medio interno y morbimortalidad en DP aguda no convencional en pacientes con insuficiencia renal que requieren soporte dialítico. Material y Métodos: Se trata de un estudio de serie de casos prospectivo y analítico realizado en el Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia (HNCH) sobre diálisis peritoneal (DP)aguda no convencional. Se incluyeron pacientes con insuficiencia renal con criterios de diálisis de urgencia o emergencia enrolados en el HNCH, a quienes se...

  14. Performances of a HGCDTE APD Based Detector with Electric Cooling for 2-μm DIAL/IPDA Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, A.; Rothman, J.; Gibert, F.; Lasfargues, G.; Zanatta, J.-P.; Edouart, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report on design and testing of an HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detector assembly for lidar applications in the Short Wavelength Infrared Region (SWIR : 1,5 - 2 μm). This detector consists in a set of diodes set in parallel -making a 200 μm large sensitive area- and connected to a custom high gain TransImpedance Amplifier (TIA). A commercial four stages Peltier cooler is used to reach an operating temperature of 185K. Crucial performances for lidar use are investigated : linearity, dynamic range, spatial homogeneity, noise and resistance to intense illumination.

  15. Two-wavelength lidar inversion algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Potter [Appl. Opt. 26, 1250 (1987)] has presented a method to determine profiles of the atmospheric aerosol extinction coefficients by use of a two-wavelength lidar with the assumptions of a constant value for the extinction-to-backscatter ratio for each wavelength and a constant value for the ratio

  16. Lidar Architecture for Harsh Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Church Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is provided of the obscurantpenetrating OPAL lidar sensor developed for harsh environments, including poor visibility conditions. The underlying technology, hardware and software architecture of the sensor are presented along with some examples of its software modules’ applications. The paper also discusses the performance of the OPAL in the presence of various types of obscurants.

  17. Coaxial direct-detection lidar-system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a coaxial direct-detection LIDAR system for measuring velocity, temperature and/or particulate density. The system comprises a laser source for emitting a laser light beam having a lasing center frequency along an emission path. The system further comprises an optical...

  18. Field test of a lidar wind profiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wind speeds and wind directions are measured remotely using an incoherent backscatter lidar system operating at a wavelength of 1.06 mm with a maximum repetition rate of 13 Hz. The principle of the measurements is based on following detectable atmospheric structures, which are transported by the win

  19. The LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic on JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salzmann, H.; Bundgaard, J.; Gadd, A.

    1988-01-01

    By combining the time‐of‐flight or LIDAR principle with a Thomson backscatter diagnostic, spatial profiles of the electron temperature and density are measured in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. This technique was realized for the first time on the JET tokamak. A ruby laser (3‐J pulse energy...

  20. Lidar Architecture for Harsh Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Philip

    2016-06-01

    An overview is provided of the obscurantpenetrating OPAL lidar sensor developed for harsh environments, including poor visibility conditions. The underlying technology, hardware and software architecture of the sensor are presented along with some examples of its software modules' applications. The paper also discusses the performance of the OPAL in the presence of various types of obscurants.