WorldWideScience

Sample records for absolute thermal fission

  1. Absolute measurement of thermal neutron fluence and its application for fission track dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzawa, Yoshihiro; Honda, Teruyuki; Nozaki, Tetsuya.

    1988-01-01

    The absolute measurements of thermal neutron fluence for fission track dating have been developed after the proceeding results of Honda et al. (1987). The 2,200 m/sec activation cross section of 197 Au (98.8 barn) is corrected to 87.4 barn (σa) by the three factors of the neutron temperature, Maxwellian distribution of thermal neutrons and non 1/v correction factor for the above absolute measurement. The calibrated factor (B th ) of standard glasses (SRM613, SRM962a, CN-1 and CN-2) and zeta-a (ζa) values for fission track dating are determined on the basis of these experimental results. The values of B th , (7.47 ± 0.29) x 10 9 for SRM613, (7.43 ± 0.34) x 10 9 for SRM962a, (2.50 ± 0.06) x 10 9 for CN-1 and (2.74 ± 0.06) x 10 9 for CN-2 closely agree with those reported previously by Honda et al. (1987). Further, the ζa values of 392.3 ± 16.5 for SRM962a and SRM613, 131.4 ± 3.1 for CN-1 and 144.1 ± 3.3 for CN-2 calculated from B th , effective thermal neutron fission cross-section σf (497.4 barn), isotopic abundance ratio 235 U/ 239 U, I (7.2527 x 10 -3 ) and spontaneous fission decay constant of 238 U, λ f (6.85 x 10 -17 a -7 ) show close agreement with ζ b values (392.5 ± 10.0, 131.6 ± 3.3, 140.1 ± 3.5) derived from the absolute age of Fish Canyon Tuff (27.9 ± 0.7 Ma) respectively. The fission track dating of zircons separated from Oligocene-Miocene tuff distributed in Eastern Hokkaido have been carried out by the external detector method using ζ a . The obtained ages are 28.6 ± 0.7 Ma (1 - 2) and 23.3 ± 0.7 Ma (3 - 2). These results agree well with the geologic age supported from Ashoro Fossil Fauna, K-Ar ages of volcanic rocks and stratigraphy in this area. (author)

  2. Yields of fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 245Cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; McConnell, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute yields have been determined for 105 gamma rays emitted in the decay of 95 fission products representing 54 mass chains created during thermal-neutron fission of 245 Cm. These results include 17 mass chains for which no prior yield data exist. Using a Ge(Li) detector, spectra were obtained of gamma rays between 30 sec and 0.3 yr after very short irradiations of thermal neutrons on a 1 μg sample of 245 Cm. On the basis of measured gamma-ray yields and known nuclear data, total chain mass yields and relative uncertainties were obtained for 51 masses between 84 and 156. The absolute overall normalization uncertainty is 239 Pu and for 252 Cf(s.f.); the influences of the closed shells Z=50, N=82 are not as marked as for thermal-neutron fission of 239 Pu but much more apparent than for 252 Cf(s.f.). Information on the charge distribution along several isobaric mass chains was obtained by determining fractional yields for 12 fission products. The charge distribution width parameter, based upon data for the heavy masses, A=128 to 140, is independent of mass to within the uncertainties of the measurements. Gamma-ray assignments were made for decay of short-lived fission products for which absolute gamma-ray transition probabilities are either not known or in doubt. Absolute gamma-ray transition probabilities were determined as (51 +- 8)% for the 374-keV gamma ray from decay of 110 Rh, (35 +- 7)% for the 1096-keV gamma ray from decay of 133 Sb, and (21.2 +- 1.2)% for the 255-keV gamma ray from decay of 142 Ba

  3. Yields of fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 229Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; McConnell, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Absolute yields have been determined for 47 gamma rays emitted in the decay of 37 fission products representing 25 mass chains created during thermal-neutron fission of 229 Th. Using a Ge(Li) detector, spectra were obtained of gamma rays emitted between 15 min and 0.4 yr after very short irradiations by thermal neutrons of a 15-μg sample of 229 Th. On the basis of measured gamma-ray yields and known nuclear data, yields for cumulative production of 37 fission products were deduced. The absolute overall normalization uncertainty is 235 U, we postulate a simple functional dependence sigma = sigma(Z/sub p/), and using this dependence obtain values of Z/sub p/(A) for 15 mass chains created during fission of 229 Th. Values of Z/sub p/(A) were estimated for other mass chains based upon results of a recent study of Z/sub p/(A). Charge distributions determined using the deduced mass distribution and the deduced sets of Z/sub p/(A) and sigma(Z/sub p/) are in very good agreement with recent measurements, exhibiting a pronounced even-odd effect in elemental yields. These results may be used to predict unmeasured yields for 229 Th fission

  4. Yields of fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 249Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; McConnell, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute yields have been determined for 107 gamma rays emitted in the decay of 97 fission products representing 54 mass chains created during thermal-neutron fission of 249 Cf. These results include 14 mass chains for which no prior yield data exist. Using a Ge(Li) detector, spectra were obtained of gamma rays emanating from a 0.4 μg sample of 249 Cf between 45 s and 0.4 yr after very short irradiations of the 249 Cf by thermal neutrons. On the basis of measured gamma-ray yields and known nuclear data, total chain mass yields and relative uncertainties were obtained for 51 masses between 89 and 156. The absolute overall normalization uncertainty is approx.8%. The measured A-chain cumulative yields make up 77% of the total light mass (A 249 Cf

  5. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun; Wang Mei; Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei

    2003-01-01

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural of the fission chamber, etc

  6. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Karpf, E.

    1984-01-01

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  7. Comparison of Thermal Neutron Flux Measured by Uranium 235 Fission Chamber and Rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector in MTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lyoussi, A.; Geslot, B.; Malo, J.-Y.; Carcreff, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.

    2013-06-01

    Thermal neutron flux is one of the most important nuclear parameter to be measured on-line in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). In particular two types of sensors with different physical operating principles are commonly used: self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) and fission chambers with uranium 235 coating. This work aims to compare on one hand the thermal neutron flux evaluation given by these two types of sensors and on the other hand to compare these evaluations with activation dosimeter measurements, which are considered as the reference for absolute neutron flux assessment. This study was conducted in an irradiation experiment, called CARMEN-1, performed during 2012 in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France). The CARMEN-1 experiment aims to improve the neutron and photon flux and nuclear heating measurements in MTRs. In this paper we focus on the thermal neutron flux measurements performed in CARMEN-1 experiment. The use of fission chambers to measure the absolute thermal neutron flux in MTRs is not very usual. An innovative calibration method for fission chambers operated in Campbell mode has been developed at the CEA Cadarache (France) and tested for the first time in the CARMEN-1 experiment. The results of these measurements are discussed, with the objective to measure with the best accuracy the thermal neutron flux in the future Jules Horowitz Reactor. (authors)

  8. Fission-product yields for thermal-neutron fission of curium-243

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breederland, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Cumulative fission yields for 25 gamma rays emitted during the decay of 23 fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 243 Cm have been determined. Using Ge(Li) spectroscopy, 33 successive pulse-height spectra of gamma rays emitted from a 77-ng sample of 243 Cm over a period of approximately two and one-half months were analyzed. Reduction of these spectra resulted in the identification and matching of gamma-ray energies and half-lives to specific radionuclides. Using these results, 23 cumulative fission-product yields were calculated. Only those radionuclides having half-lives between 6 hours and 65 days were observed. Prior to this experiment, no fission-product yields had been recorded for 243 Cm

  9. Independent fission yields of Rb and Cs from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Forman, L.

    1975-01-01

    The relative independent fission yields of Rb and Cs from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu have been measured on line using a mass spectrograph and thermalized neutrons from a burst reactor. Independent yields were derived by normalizing the measurements to products of chain yields and fractional independent yields, estimating the latter from measured cumulative yields of Kr and Xe. Comparing the independent yields with those from 238 U fission, the 239 Pu results show shifts in isotopic yield distribution toward lower mass for both Rb and Cs and also toward the production of more Cs and less Rb when 239 Pu is fissioned

  10. Cumulative fission yield of Ce-148 produced by thermal-neutron fission of U-235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.A.

    1984-12-01

    Cumulative fission yield of 148 cesium isotopes and some other fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 235 uranium is determined by Germanium/Lithium spectroscopic methods. The measuremets were done at Tsing-Hua open pool reactor using 3 to 4 mg of 93.15% enriched 235 uranium samples. Gamma rays are assigned to the responsible fission products by matching gamma rays energies and half lives. Fission rate is calculated by fission track method. Cumulative fission yields of 148 cesium, 90 krypton, 130 iodine, 144 lanthanum, 89 krypton, 136 xenon, 137 xenon and 140 cesium are calculated. This values are compared with previously predicted values and showed good agreement. 21 Ref

  11. NEACRP thermal fission product benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.; Taubman, C.J.

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the thermal fission product benchmark was to compare the range of fission product data in use at the present time. A simple homogeneous problem was set with 200 atoms H/1 atom U235, to be burnt up to 1000 days and then decay for 1000 days. The problem was repeated with 200 atoms H/1 atom Pu239, 20 atoms H/1 atom U235 and 20 atoms H/1 atom Pu239. There were ten participants and the submissions received are detailed in this report. (author)

  12. Barium 139 as Fission Indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1943-07-01

    This report is based on a measurement performed at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) by E. Broda in December 1943 where a technique has been worked out for measuring the fission density in a uranium containing medium in relative units by determining the amount of a suitable fission product formed. Generally a given fission product will be formed in natural uranium by slow neutron fission of U235 or by fast neutron fission of either U235 or U238. It is intended to translate the relative units into absolute units by comparison of the Ba yield with the indication of UF6 fission chamber in the same medium. This has to be done separately for fast and slow neutron fission as the yields may be different. Another application of the technique developed is the measurement of thermal neutron density in an uraniferous medium without using a detector subject to variations of sensitivity according to the properties of the medium. (nowak)

  13. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Existing thermal reactors are energy production scale limited because of low portion of raw uranium usage. Fast reactors are limited by reprocessing need of huge mass of raw uranium at the initial stage of development. The possibility of development of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction, which solves the problem, is discussed here. Neutron losses are decreased, uranium-thorium fuel with artificial fission materials equilibrium regime is used, additional in-core and out-core neutron sources are used for supplying of high fission materials reproduction. Liquid salt reactors can use dynamic loading regime for this purpose. Preferable construction is channel type reactor with heavy water moderator. Good materials for fuel element shells and channel walls are zirconium alloys enriched by 90Zr. Water cooled reactors with usage 12% of raw uranium and liquid metal cooled reactors with usage 25% of raw uranium are discussed. Reactors with additional neutron sources obtain full usage of raw uranium with small additional energy expenses. On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  14. Multiscale development of a fission gas thermal conductivity model: Coupling atomic, meso and continuum level simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, Michael R.; Millett, Paul C.; Nerikar, Pankaj; Du, Shiyu; Andersson, David; Stanek, Christopher R.; Gaston, Derek; Andrs, David; Williamson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact the fuel performance, causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity and fission gas release. However, typical empirical models of fuel properties treat each of these effects separately and uncoupled. Here, we couple a fission gas release model to a model of the impact of fission gas on the fuel thermal conductivity. To quantify the specific impact of grain boundary (GB) bubbles on the thermal conductivity, we use atomistic and mesoscale simulations. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were employed to determine the GB thermal resistance. These values were then used in mesoscale heat conduction simulations to develop a mechanistic expression for the effective GB thermal resistance of a GB containing gas bubbles, as a function of the percentage of the GB covered by fission gas. The coupled fission gas release and thermal conductivity model was implemented in Idaho National Laboratory’s BISON fuel performance code to model the behavior of a 10-pellet LWR fuel rodlet, showing how the fission gas impacts the UO 2 thermal conductivity. Furthermore, additional BISON simulations were conducted to demonstrate the impact of average grain size on both the fuel thermal conductivity and the fission gas release

  15. An absolute measurement of 252Cf prompt fission neutron spectrum at low energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajtai, A.; Dyachenko, P.P.; Kutzaeva, L.S.; Kononov, V.N.; Androsenko, P.A.; Androsenko, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Prompt neutron energy spectrum at low energies (25 keV 252 Cf spontaneous fission has been measured with a time-of-flight technique on a 30 cm flight-path. Ionization chamber and lithium-glass were used as fission fragment and neutron detectors, respectively. Lithium glasses of NE-912 (containing 6 Li) and of NE-913 (containing 7 Li) 45 mm in diameter and 9.5 mm in thickness have been employed alternatively, for the registration of fission neutrons and gammas. For the correct determination of the multiscattering effects - the main difficulty of the low energy neutron spectrum measurements - a special geometry for the neutron detector was used. Special attention was paid also to the determination of the absolute efficiency of the neutron detector. The real response function of the spectrometer was determined by a Monte-Carlo calculation. The scattering material content of the ionization chamber containing a 252 Cf source was minimized. As a result of this measurement a prompt fission neutron spectrum of Maxwell type with a T=1.42 MeV parameter was obtained at this low energy range. We did not find any neutron excess or irregularities over the Maxwellian. (author)

  16. Fission track thermochronology : reconstructing the thermal and tectonic evolution of the crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleadow, A.J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The basis and current status of fission track analysis is reviewed showing the kinds of patterns of fission track parameters which result from a variety of thermal and tectonic histories. Fission track thermochronology is a well established method for reconstructing the thermal histories of rocks with particularly important applications in tectonic studies. Quantitative modelling of the thermal annealing of tracks in apatite shows that distinctive profiles of apparent fission track age can be related to a number of simple thermal history styles. The main types of profiles observed tend to be either an essentially linear decrease of apparent age with increasing depth, which relates to continuous uplift and denudation, or a concave-upwards profile produced by partial annealing in environments of tectonic stability or burial. More complex thermal histories produce compound profiles which are essentially just combinations of these two elements. Track length information allows the apparent age profiles to be interpreted in much greater detail. Examples of the major profile types have been identified in various geological environments and can be analysed to give information about, for example, uplift and denudation rates, the timing of uplift or low-grade thermal events and maximum palaeotemperatures experienced during burial. 25 refs., 8 figs

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99 Mo, 95 Zr, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 141,143 Ce, and 147 Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147 Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ∼5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except

  19. Energy dependence of fission product yields from 235U, 238U, and 239Pu with monoenergetic neutrons between thermal and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Matthew; Arnold, Charles; Bhike, Megha; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Krishichayan; Tonchev, Anton; Tornow, Werner; Stoyer, Mark; Vieira, David; Wilhelmy, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements has been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the total number of fissions in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of two months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 7.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV. Preliminary results from thermal irradiations at the MIT research reactor will also be presented and compared to present data and evaluations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory through NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance grant No. DE-FG52-09NA29465, DE-FG52-09NA29448 and Office of Nuclear Physics Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  20. Energy dependence of fission product yields from 235U, 238U, and 239Pu with monoenergetic neutrons between thermal and 14.8 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooden Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements has been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the total number of fissions in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of two months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 7.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV. Preliminary results from thermal irradiations at the MIT research reactor will also be presented and compared to present data and evaluations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory through NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance grant No. DE-FG52-09NA29465, DE-FG52-09NA29448 and Office of Nuclear Physics Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  1. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements in low power light water reactor pressure vessel mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of extensive SSTR measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been reported previously. Measurements were made at key locations in PCA which is an idealized mockup of the water gap, thermal shield, pressure vessel geometry of a light water reactor. Recently, additional SSTR fission rate measurements have been carried out for 237-Np, 238-U, and 235-U in key locations in the NESTOR Shielding and Dosimetry Improvement Program (NESDIP) mockup facility located at Winfrith, England. NESDIP is a replica of the PCA facility, and comparisons will be made between PCA and NESDIP measurements. The results of measurements made at the engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium will also be reported. Measurements were made at selected radial and azimuthal locations in VENUS, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor. Comparisons of absolute SSTR fission rates with absolute fission rates made with the Mol miniature fission chamber will be reported. Absolute fission rate comparisons have also been made between the NBS fission chamber, radiometric fission foils, and SSTRs, and these results will be summarized

  2. SFINX: Soviet-French integral experiment on measuring the capture and fission at Masurca and BFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doulin, V.A.; Mikhailov, J.M.; Mozhaev, V.K.

    1990-01-01

    The SFINX experiment was aimed at the comparison of experimental procedures used at the MASURCA and the BFS critical assemblies for measuring the ratio of the 238 U and 239 Pu average fission cross-sections to the 235 U average cross-section (F8/F5, F9/F5) and of the 238 U average capture cross-section to the 239 Pu average fission cross section (C8/F9). As part of the calibration of the measurements F8/F5 and F9/F5 were also measured in a thermal column. To obtain C8/F9, absolute measurements of capture rates in 238 U and fission rates in 239 Pu and 235 U were carried out. The measurements were made in September 1987 at the MASURCA facility (FRANCE) in the BALZAC 1 critical assembly and in the thermal column of the HARMONIE facility. In April 1989 these measurements were complemented by joint measurements of the 239 Pu absolute fission rate at the BFS 55-1 critical assembly (USSR)

  3. Fission-product yields for thermal-neutron fission of 243Cm determined from measurements with a high-resolution low-energy germanium gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, L.D.

    1984-04-01

    Cumulative fission-product yields have been determined for 13 gamma rays emitted during the decay of 12 fission products created by thermal-neutron fission of 243 Cm. A high-resolution low-energy germanium detector was used to measure the pulse-height spectra of gamma rays emitted from a 77-nanogram sample of 243 Cm after the sample had been irradiated by thermal neutrons. Analysis of the data resulted in the identification and matching of gamma-ray energies and half-lives to individual radioisotopes. From these results, 12 cumulative fission product yields were deduced for radionuclides with half-lives between 4.2 min and 84.2 min. 7 references

  4. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  5. An evaporation-based model of thermal neutron induced ternary fission of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lestone, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Ternary fission probabilities for thermal neutron induced fission of plutonium are analyzed within the framework of an evaporation-based model where the complexity of time-varying potentials, associated with the neck collapse, are included in a simplistic fashion. If the nuclear temperature at scission and the fission-neck-collapse time are assumed to be ~ 1.2 MeV and ~ 10 -22 s, respectively, then calculated relative probabilities of ternary-fission light-charged-particle emission follow the trends seen in the experimental data. The ability of this model to reproduce ternary fission probabilities spanning seven orders of magnitude for a wide range of light-particle charges and masses implies that ternary fission is caused by the coupling of an evaporation-like process with the rapid re-arrangement of the nuclear fluid following scission. (author)

  6. Measurement of fission yields far from the center of isotopic distributions in the thermal neutron fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmid, M.

    1979-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to measure independent yields, in the thermal neutron fission of 235 U, of fission products which lie far from the centers of the isotopic and isobaric yield distributions. These measurements were used to test the predictions of semi-empirical systematics of fission yields and theoretical fission models. Delay times were measured as a function of temperature in the range 1200-2000degC. The very low delay times achieved in the present work permitted expanding the measurable region to the isotopes 147 , 148 Cs and 99 Rb which are of special interest in the present work. The delay times of Sr and Ba isotopes achieved were more than two orders of magnitude lower than values reported in the literature and thus short-lived isotopes of these elements could be separated for the first time by mass spectrometry. The half-lives of 147 Ba, 148 Ba, 149 La and 149 Ce were measured for the first time. The isotopic distributions of fission yields were measured for the elements Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba in the thermal neutron fission of 235 U, those of 99 Rb, 147 Cs and 148 Cs having been measured for the first time. A comparison of the experimental yields with the predictions of the currently accepted semi-empirical systematics of fission yields, which is the odd-even effect systematics, shows that the systematics succeeds in accounting for the strong odd-even proton effect and the weaker odd-even neutron effect and also in predicting the shape of the distributions in the central region. It is shown that prompt neutron emission broadens the distribution only slightly in the wing of heavy isotopes and more significantly in the wing of light isotopes. But the effect of prompt neutron emission cannot explain the large discrepancies existing between the predictions of fission models and the experimentally measured fission yield in the wings of the isotopic distributions. (B.G.)

  7. Simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and prompt neutrons for thermal neutron-induced fission of U-235

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kimura, Itsuro; Nakagome, Yoshihiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and prompt neutrons following the thermal neutron induced fission of U-235 has been performed in order to obtain the neutron multiplicity (v) and its emission energy ({eta}) against the specified mass (m{sup *}) and the total kinetic energy (TKE). The obtained value of -dv/dTKE(m{sup *}) showed a saw-tooth distribution. The average neutron energy <{eta}>(m{sup *}) had a distribution with a reflection symmetry around the half mass division. The measurement also gave the level density parameters of the specified fragment, a(m{sup *}), and this parameters showed a saw-tooth trend too. The analysis by a phenomenological description of this parameters including the shell and collective effects suggested the existence of a collective motion of the fission fragments. (author)

  8. Accelerator-driven thermal fission systems may provide energy supply advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation discusses the energy supply advantages of using accelerator-driven thermal fission systems. Energy supply issues as related to cost, fuel supply stability, environmental impact, and safety are reviewed. It is concluded that the Los Alamos Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept, discussed here, has the following advantages: improved safety in the form of low inventory and subcriticality; reduced high-level radioactive waste management timescales for both fission products and actinides; and a very long-term fuel supply requiring no enrichment

  9. A numerical model for the thermal history of rocks based on confined horizontal fission tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Klint; Hansen, Kirsten; Kunzendorf, Helmar

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model for determination of the thermal history of rocks is presented. It is shown that the thermal history may be uniquely determined as a piece-by-piece linear function on the basis of etched confined, horizontal fission track length distributions, their surface densities, and the ur......A numerical model for determination of the thermal history of rocks is presented. It is shown that the thermal history may be uniquely determined as a piece-by-piece linear function on the basis of etched confined, horizontal fission track length distributions, their surface densities...

  10. Thermal significance of fission-track length distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The semi-analytical solution of an equation describing the production and shortening of fission tracks in apatite suggests that certain thermal histories have unique length-distribution 'signatures'. Isothermal-heating histories should be characterized by flattened, length-shortened distributions; step-heating histories should be characterized by bimodal track length distributions; and linear-cooling histories should be characterized by negatively skewed, length-shortened distributions. The model formulated here to investigate track length distributions can be used to constrain the thermal histories of natural samples for which unbiased track length data are available - provided that the geologic history of the system of interest can be used to partially constrain one of the unknowns in the model equations, time or temperature. (author)

  11. Beta and gamma decay heat evaluation for the thermal fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, G.K.; Schmittroth, F.

    1979-01-01

    Beta and gamma fission product decay heat curves are evaluated for the thermal fission of 235 U. Experimental data that include beta, gamma, and total measurements are combined with summation calculations based on ENDF/B in a consistent evaluation. Least-squares methods are used that take proper account of data uncertainties and correlations. 4 figures, 2 tables

  12. Radiochemical studies on fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on nuclear chemistry; topics considered include: recoil range and kinetic energy distribution in the thermal neutron ftssion of /sup 245/Cm; mass distribution and recoil range measurements in the reactor neutron-induced fission of /sup 232/U; fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of /sup 241/PU highly asymmetric binary fission of uranium induced by reactor neutrons; and nuclear charge distribution in low energy fission. ( DHM)

  13. Measurement of absolute neutron flux in LWSCR based on the nuclear track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghzadeh, J.; Nassiri Mofakham, N.; Khajehmiri, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Up to now the spectral parameters of thermal neutrons are measured with activation foils that are not always reliable in low flux systems. ► We applied a solid state nuclear track detector to measure the absolute neutron flux in the light water sub-critical reactor (LWSCR). ► Experiments concerning fission track detecting were performed and were investigated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. ► The neutron fluxes obtained in experiment are in fairly good agreement with the results obtained by MCNP. - Abstract: In the present paper, a solid state nuclear track detector is applied to measure the absolute neutron flux in the light water sub-critical reactor (LWSCR) in Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI). Up to now, the spectral parameters of thermal neutrons have been measured with activation foils that are not always reliable in low flux systems. The method investigated here is the irradiation method. Experiments concerning fission track detecting were performed. The experiment including neutron flux calculation method has also been investigated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The analysis shows that the values of neutron flux obtained by experiment are in fairly good agreement with the results obtained by MCNP. Thus, this method may be able to predict the absolute value of neutron flux at LWSCR and other similar reactors.

  14. Neutron and thermal dynamics of a gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dam, H.; Kuijper, J.C.; Stekelenburg, A.J.C.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Kistemaker, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper neutron kinetics and thermal dynamics of a Gaseous Core Fission Reactor with magnetical pumping are shown to have many unconventional aspects. Attention is focused on the properties of the fuel gas, the non-linear neutron kinetics and the energy balance in thermodynamical cycles

  15. Measurement of 237Np fission rate ratio relative to 235U fission rate in cores with various thermal neutron spectrum at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unesaki, Hironobu; Shiroya, Seiji; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Kitada, Takanori; Kuroda, Mitsuo; Kohashi, Akio; Kato, Takeshi; Ikeuchi, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Integral measurements of 237 Np fission rate ratio relative to 235 U fission rate have been performed at Kyoto University Citrical Assembly. The fission rates have been measured using the back-to back type double fission chamber at five thermal cores with different H/ 235 U ratio so that the neutron spectra of the cores were systematically varied. The measured fission rate ratio per atom was 0.00439 to 0.0298, with a typical uncertainty of 2 to 3%. The measured data were compared with the calculated results using SRAC/TWOTRAN and MVP based on JENDL-3.2, which gave the averaged C/E values of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. Obtained results of C/E using 237 Np cross sections from JENDL-3/2, ENDF/B-VI.5 and JEF2.2 show that the latter two gave smaller results than JENDL-3.2 by about 4%, which clearly reflects the discrepancy in the evaluated cross section among the libraries. This difference arises from both fast fission and resonance region. Although further improvement is recommended, 237 Np fission cross section in JENDL-3.2 is considered to be superior to those in the other libraries and can be adopted for use in design calculations for minor actinide transmutation system using thermal reactors with prediction precision of 237 Np fission rate with in 10%. (author)

  16. Fission gas behavior during fast thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The behavior of non-equilibrium fission in fuel elements undergoing fast thermal transients is analyzed. To facilitate the analysis, a new variable, the equilibrium variable (EV) is defined. This variable, together with bubble radius, completely specifies a bubble with respect to its size and equilibrium condition. The analysis is coded using a two-variable (radius and EV) multigroup numerical approximation that accepts as input the time-temperature history, the time-fission rate history, and the time-thermal gradient history of the fuel element. Studies were performed to test the code for convergence with respect to the time interval and the number of groups chosen. For a series of transient simulation studies, the measurements obtained at HEDL (microscopic examination of intragranular porosity in oxide fuel transient-tested in TREAT) are used. Two different transient histories were selected; the first, a high-temperature transient (HTT) with a peak at 2477 0 K and the second, a low-temperature transient (LTT) with a peak-temperature at 2000 0 K. The LTT was simulated for three different conditions: Bubbles were allowed to move via (a) only biased migration, (b) via random migration, and (c) via both mechanisms. The HTT was also run for both mechanisms. The agreement with HEDL microscopic observations was fair for bubbles smaller than 964 A in diameter, and poor for larger bubbles. Bubbles that grew during the heat-up part of the transient were frozen at a larger size during the cool down

  17. First-Principles Quantum Dynamics of Singlet Fission: Coherent versus Thermally Activated Mechanisms Governed by Molecular π Stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hiroyuki; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene; Olivier, Yoann; Beljonne, David

    2015-09-01

    Singlet excitons in π -stacked molecular crystals can split into two triplet excitons in a process called singlet fission that opens a route to carrier multiplication in photovoltaics. To resolve controversies about the mechanism of singlet fission, we have developed a first principles nonadiabatic quantum dynamical model that reveals the critical role of molecular stacking symmetry and provides a unified picture of coherent versus thermally activated singlet fission mechanisms in different acenes. The slip-stacked equilibrium packing structure of pentacene derivatives is found to enhance ultrafast singlet fission mediated by a coherent superexchange mechanism via higher-lying charge transfer states. By contrast, the electronic couplings for singlet fission strictly vanish at the C2 h symmetric equilibrium π stacking of rubrene. In this case, singlet fission is driven by excitations of symmetry-breaking intermolecular vibrations, rationalizing the experimentally observed temperature dependence. Design rules for optimal singlet fission materials therefore need to account for the interplay of molecular π -stacking symmetry and phonon-induced coherent or thermally activated mechanisms.

  18. Inverse modelling of thermal histories with apatite fission tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Lmrani, A.; Zine El Abidine, H.; Limouri, M.; Essaid, A.; POupeau, G.

    1998-01-01

    The problem of modelling thermal histories lies in the exploration of a time-temperature space, usually so broad, in order to identify the optimal paths. For overcoming this difficulty, many approaches were proposed, using linear and non-linear optimisation algorithms. Generally, these approaches do not take into account the experimental data (fission track age [FTA] and fission track length distribution [FTLD]) to better aim the search strategy. The present work shows that experimental data hold some precious information, for which it should be known how to extract it. In fact, it allows us to tighten the time-temperature space of search, supposed to contain the optimal solutions. A genetic algorithm is also used in this work to perform the search for these optimal solutions. (authors)

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Stochastic approaches to dynamics of heavy ion collisions, the case of thermal fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, D.; Abe, Y.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the influence of fluctuations on various phenomena linked to heavy ion collisions, a Langevin equation has been derived from a microscopic model. Parameters entering this equation are completely determined from microscopic quantities characterizing nuclear matter. This equation has been applied to various phenomena at intermediate energies. This paper focuses on large amplitude motions and especially thermal fission. Fission rate is calculated and compared to experimental results

  1. The Radiological and Thermal Characteristics of Fission Waste from a Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LIFE) and Implications for Repository Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, H.F.; Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Latkowski, J.; Kramer, K.

    2009-01-01

    We are studying the use of a Laser Inertial-confinement Fusion Engine (LIFE) to drive a hybrid fusion-fission system that can generate electrical power and/or burn nuclear waste. The system uses the neutrons from laser driven ICF to produce tritium and to drive nuclear reactions in a subcritical fission blanket. The fusion neutron source obviates the need for a self-sustaining chain reaction in the fission blanket. Either fissile or fertile could be used as fission fuel, thus eliminating the need for isotopic enrichment. The 'driven' system potentially allows very high levels of burnup to be reached, extracting a large fraction of the available energy in the fission fuel without the need for reprocessing. In this note, we discuss the radionuclide inventory of a depleted uranium (DU) fuel burned to greater than 95% FIMA (Fissions per Initial heavy Metal Atom), the implications for thermal management of the resulting waste, and the implications of this waste for meeting the dose standards for releases from a geological repository for high-level waste. The fission waste discussed here would be that produced by a LIFE hybrid with a 500-MW fusion source. The fusion neutrons are multiplied and moderated by a sequence of concentric shells of materials before encountering the fission fuel, and fission in this region is largely due to thermal neutrons. The fission blanket consists of 40 metric tons (MT) of DU, assumed to be in the form of TRISO-like UOC fuel particles embedded in 2-cm-diameter graphite pebbles. (It is recognized that TRISO-based fuel may not reach the high burnup of the fertile fuel considered here, and other fuel options are being investigated. We postulate the existence of a fuel that can reach >95% FIMA so that the waste disposal implications of high burnup can be assessed.) The engine and plant design considered here would receive one load of fission fuel and produce ∼2 GWt of power (fusion + fission) over its 50- to 70-year lifetime. Neutron and

  2. The thermal history of the Bowen Basin: a comparison of apatite fission track analysis and vitrinite reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshallsea, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) are two techiques widely used to assess paleotemperatures of the order of 20-120 deg.C. in sedimentary basins. Whereas vitrinite reflectance is essentially a qualitative technique that gives an integrated measure of the entire thermal history, AFTA can reveal information on the variation of paleotemperatures through time because fission-tracks in apatite are continually produced throughout geological time. An apatite fission track study of the Upper Permian units of the Bowen Basin has offered the opportunity to compare the two paleotemperature indicators and place constraints on the timing of maximum paleotemperatures. The regional pattern of apatite fission-track ages closely coincides with the vitrinite reflectance indicating that maximum paleotemperatures have varied across the Basin with the central region of the Bowen Basin experiencing highest paleotemperatures. The reduction in apatite reflectance fission-track age with increasing reflectance represents the progressive annealing at temperatures around 60-120 deg. C. of those fission-tracks formed prior to the time of maximum temperatures. In those samples giving the youngest apatite fission-track ages all tacks were totally annealed at this time, and the fission-track age in these samples, in the range 90-120 Myr, indicate the time of cooling from the thermal maximum in the Early Cretaceous. 1 ref

  3. distributions for the thermal neutron induced fission of 234U

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Adili A.

    2016-01-01

    In addition, the analysis of thermal neutron induced fission of 234U(n,f will be discussed. Currently analysis of data is ongoing, originally taken at the ILL reactor. The experiment is of particular interest since no measurement exist of the mass and energy distributions for this system at thermal energies. One main problem encountered during analysis was the huge background of 235U(nth,f. Despite the negligible isotopic traces in the sample, the cross section difference is enormous. Solution to this parasitic background will be highlighted.

  4. The study of prompt and delayed muon induced fission III. The ratios of prompt to delayed fission yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rösel, Ch.; Hänscheid, H.; Hartfiel, J.; Mutius, von R.; Achard van Enschut, d' J.F.M.; David, P; Janszen, H.; Johansson, T.; Konijn, J.; Krogulski, T.; Laat, de C.T.A.M.; Paganetti, H.; Petitjean, C.; Polikanov, S.M.; Reist, H.W.; Risse, F.; Schaller, L.A.; Schrieder, W.; Sinha, A.K.; Taal, A.; Theobald, J.P.; Tibell, G.; Trautmann, N.

    1993-01-01

    The ratios of prompt to delayed fission yields for the isotopes U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Np-237, Pu-242, and Pu-244 and the fission probabilities relative to each other have been investigated experimentally. Using the value of the total fission probability for Np-237 the absolute

  5. Fission-product energy release for times following thermal-neutron fission of 235U between 2 and 14000 seconds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Emery, J.F.; Love, T.A.; McConnell, J.W.; Northcutt, K.J.; Peelle, R.W.; Weaver, H.

    1977-10-01

    Fission-product decay energy-releases rates were measured for thermal-neutron fission of 235 U. Samples of mass 1 to 10 μg were irradiated for 1 to 100 sec by use of the fast pneumatic-tube facility at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The resulting beta- and gamma-ray emissions were counted for times-after-fission between 2 and 14,000 seconds. The data were obtained for beta and gamma rays separately as spectral distributions, N(E/sub γ/) vs E/sub γ/ and N(E/sub beta/) vs E/sub β/. For the gamma-ray data the spectra were obtained by using a NaI detector, while for the beta-ray data the spectra were obtained by using an NE-110 detector with an anticoincidence mantle. The raw data were unfolded to provide spectral distributions of modest resolution. These were integrated over E/sub γ/ and E/sub β/ to provide total yield and energy integrals as a function of time after fission. Results are low compared to the present 1973 ANS Decay-heat standard. A complete description of the experimental apparatus and data-reduction techniques is presented. The final integral data are given in tabular and graphical form and are compared with published data. 41 figures, 13 tables

  6. Fission Product Yields of 233U, 235U, 238U and 239Pu in Fields of Thermal Neutrons, Fission Neutrons and 14.7-MeV Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurec, J.; Adam, A.; de Bruyne, T.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T.; Aupiais, J.; Bersillon, O.; Le Petit, G.; Authier, N.; Casoli, P.

    2010-12-01

    The yields of more than fifteen fission products have been carefully measured using radiochemical techniques, for 235U(n,f), 239Pu(n,f) in a thermal spectrum, for 233U(n,f), 235U(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f) reactions in a fission neutron spectrum, and for 233U(n,f), 235U(n,f), 238U(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f) for 14.7 MeV monoenergetic neutrons. Irradiations were performed at the EL3 reactor, at the Caliban and Prospero critical assemblies, and at the Lancelot electrostatic accelerator in CEA-Valduc. Fissions were counted in thin deposits using fission ionization chambers. The number of fission products of each species were measured by gamma spectrometry of co-located thick deposits.

  7. Thermal history of rocks in southern San Joaquin Valley, California: evidence from fission-track analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, N.D.; Naeser, C.W.; McCulloh, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Fission-track analysis has been used to study the thermal and depositional history of the subsurface Tertiary sedimentary rocks on both sides of the active White Wolf reverse fault in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The distinctly different thermal histories of the rocks in the two structural blocks are clearly reflected in the apatite fission-track data, which suggest that rocks in the rapidly subsiding basin northwest of the fault have been near their present temperature for only about 1 m.y. compared with about 10 m.y. for rocks southeast of the fault. These estimates of heating time agree with previous estimates for these rocks. Zircon fission-track data indicate that the Tertiary sediments were derived from parent rocks of more than one age. However, from at least the Eocene to late Miocene or Pliocene, the major sediment source was rocks related to the youngest Sierra Nevada Mesozoic intrusive complexes, which are presently exposed east and south of the southern San Joaquin Valley. -from Authors

  8. Irradiation facilities on the TRIGA-SSR thermal column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, C; Aioanei, L; Preda, M; Gugiu, D [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania); Garlea, I; Kelerman, C; Garlea, C [SENDRA ' Nuclear Technologies' ltd. Bucharest (Romania)

    2004-07-01

    The development of thermal and intermediate energy neutron irradiation facilities at the steady state core of the Romanian TRIGA Reactor is described. The reference thermal neutron irradiation facility consists of a dry spherical cavity placed into the graphite thermal column of the SSR core and the intermediate energy neutron irradiation facility is a {sigma}{sigma} system located into the thermal flux cavity. The implementation of the irradiation facilities into the under-water thermal column represented an important challenge from the standpoint of instrumentation solutions. The neutron flux and spectrum measurements were performed using foil activation techniques and fission rate measurements by sealed fission chambers, followed by spectrum unfolding procedure. The absolute fission reaction measurements, using calibrated fission chambers, allow the neutron flux density unit transfer from international reference neutron fields. The MCNP-4C code package was used for neutron spectrum computations in the thermal flux cavity and in the {sigma}{sigma} system. The neutron characterization program demonstrates the accuracy of the spectrum characteristics and neutron flux densities reported to the local monitoring system count rates. Some discrepancies, as compared to other similar facilities, were identified and discussed. These are caused by thermal column particularities: the presence of a water layer between the graphite cells (thermal neutron absorption) and smaller geometrical dimensions (neutron escape phenomena). Based on these results the metrological certification process, according to Romanian metrological laws requirements, is now in progress. (nevyjel)

  9. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for production of fission molybdenum-99 at Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq, A. [Isotope Production Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: mushtaqa@pinstech.org.pk; Iqbal, Massod; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tariq; Mahmood, Tayyab; Ahmad, Zahoor; Zaman, Qamar [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-02-15

    Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for the fission molybdenum-99 production at PARR-1 has been performed. Low enriched uranium foil (<20% {sup 235}U) will be used as target material. Annular target designed by ANL (USA) will be irradiated in PARR-1 for the production of 100 Ci of molybdenum-99 at the end of irradiation, which will be sufficient to prepare required {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators at PINSTECH and its supply in the country. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis were performed using various codes. Data shows that annular targets can be safely irradiated in PARR-1 for production of required amount of fission molybdenum-99.

  10. Apatite fission track dating and thermal history of Qing-He region in Altay Mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Zengkuan; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Yuan Wanming; Dong Jinquan; Gao Shaokai

    2005-01-01

    Fission track ages (FTA) and track lengths of apatite from Qing-He diorite intrusion in Altay Mountains are measured. Apatite fission track ages of three diorite samples is range from (78±5) Ma to (95 ± 5) Ma, and the lengths of horizontal confined spontaneous fission tracks are (13.2 ± 1.2)-(13.5 ±1.3) μm. The distribution of the track length is narrow and symmetrical with a mean length of approximately 13.3 μm and a standard deviation of around 0.1 μm. The inverse modeling results show that thermal history of this region has four stages, two rapid uplift of this region still existed magmatic intrusion and tectonic movements in Yanshanian. (authors)

  11. Measurement of {sup 238}Np fission cross-section by neutrons near thermal point (preliminary results)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramo; vich, S.N.; Andreev, M.F.; Bol`shakov, Y.M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Arzamas (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Measurements have been carried out of {sup 238}Np fission cross-section by thermal neutrons. The isotope {sup 238}Np was built up through the reaction {sup 238}U(p,n) on an electrostatic accelerator. Extraction and cleaning of the sample were done by ion-exchange chromatography. Fast neutrons were generated on the electrostatic accelerator through the reaction {sup 9}Be(d,n); a polyethylene block was used to slow down neutrons. Registration of fission fragments was performed with dielectric track detectors. Suggesting that the behavior of {sup 238}Np and {sup 238}U. Westscott`s factors are indentical the fission cross-section of {sup 238}Np was obtained: {sigma}{sub fo}=2110 {plus_minus} 75 barn.

  12. Independent yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron induced fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Decker, R.; Wollnik, H.; Wuensch, K.D.; Jung, G.; Koglin, E.; Siegert, G.

    1979-01-01

    The relative yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron fission of 235 U have been redetermined using the mass separator OSTIS, on-line at a neutron guide of the High-Flux Beam Reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France. The separator ion source was a hot oven containing 235 U in a graphite matrix. The neutron beam was pulsed. Alkali fission products diffused out of the graphite and were ionized, thus producing a stepwise increase in the analyzed ion beam proportional to the independent fission yield. The ion beam and the fissions in the source were monitored simultaneously. The diffusion of Rb and Cs from the source was exponential in time with half-lives ranging from 2.8 to 18 sec, depending upon the element and source temperature. The independent fission yields of Rb and Cs are normalized by equating their element yields to each other and to a value computed from the charge distributions observed with the recoil separator LOHENGRIN and well established mass yields. Fractional independent yields are deduced from the independent fission yields, and these compare very well with the EOZ model described by Wahl

  13. Absolute measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulating materials at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liermann, J.

    1975-01-01

    A device was developed at the CEA for the absolute measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulators. It can operate in controlled atmospheres (air, CO 2 , Ar, He) and between 100 and 1050 deg C [fr

  14. Fission product yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenta, V.; Hep, J.

    1978-01-01

    Data are summed up necessary for determining the yields of individual fission products from different fissionable nuclides. Fractional independent yields, cumulative and isobaric yields are presented here for the thermal fission of 235 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu and for fast fission (approximately 1 MeV) of 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu; these values are included into the 5th version of the YIELDS library, supplementing the BIBFP library. A comparison is made of experimental data and possible improvements of calculational methods are suggested. (author)

  15. Independent yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron induced fission of /sup 235/U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Decker, R.; Wollnik, H.; Wuensch, K.D.; Jung, G.; Koglin, E.; Siegert, G.

    1979-12-01

    The relative yields of Rb and Cs isotopes from thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U have been redetermined using the mass separator OSTIS, on-line at a neutron guide of the High-Flux Beam Reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France. The separator ion source was a hot oven containing /sup 235/U in a graphite matrix. The neutron beam was pulsed. Alkali fission products diffused out of the graphite and were ionized, thus producing a stepwise increase in the analyzed ion beam proportional to the independent fission yield. The ion beam and the fissions in the source were monitored simultaneously. The diffusion of Rb and Cs from the source was exponential in time with half-lives ranging from 2.8 to 18 sec, depending upon the element and source temperature. The independent fission yields of Rb and Cs are normalized by equating their element yields to each other and to a value computed from the charge distributions observed with the recoil separator LOHENGRIN and well established mass yields. Fractional independent yields are deduced from the independent fission yields, and these compare very well with the EOZ model described by Wahl.

  16. Behavior of sorption and thermal desorption of fission products from loaded metal oxide exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerck, J.

    1986-08-01

    A new sublimation method for the concentration and purification of 99 Mo, produced by the fission of 235 U with thermal neutrons, has been developed to replace the present final decontamination steps in the various well established 99 Mo separation processes. A distinct simplification and shortening of the actual procedure is obtained by combining the chromatographic sorption on the SnO 2 -exchanger with the direct thermal desorption of the Mo product from the oxide. (orig./PW) [de

  17. Low-Cost Radiator for Fission Power Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Taylor; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William; Hartenstine, John; Stern, Theodore; Walmsley, Nicholas; Briggs, Maxwell

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future Lunar surface power applications. The systems are envisioned in the 10 to 100kW(sub e) range and have an anticipated design life of 8 to 15 years with no maintenance. NASA GRC is currently setting up a 55 kW(sub e) non-nuclear system ground test in thermal-vacuum to validate technologies required to transfer reactor heat, convert the heat into electricity, reject waste heat, process the electrical output, and demonstrate overall system performance. Reducing the radiator mass, size, and cost is essential to the success of the program. To meet these goals, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) and Vanguard Space Technologies, Inc. (VST) are developing a single facesheet radiator with heat pipes directly bonded to the facesheet. The facesheet material is a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) and the heat pipes are titanium/water. By directly bonding a single facesheet to the heat pipes, several heavy and expensive components can be eliminated from the traditional radiator design such as, POC(TradeMark) foam saddles, aluminum honeycomb, and a second facesheet. A two-heat pipe radiator prototype, based on the single facesheet direct-bond concept, was fabricated and tested to verify the ability of the direct-bond joint to withstand coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) induced stresses during thermal cycling. The thermal gradients along the bonds were measured before and after thermal cycle tests to determine if the performance degraded. Overall, the results indicated that the initial uniformity of the adhesive was poor along one of the heat pipes. However, both direct bond joints showed no measureable amount of degradation after being thermally cycled at both moderate and aggressive conditions.

  18. What do we learn on the dynamics of fission from α-accompanied fission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guet, C.; Asghar, M.; Nifenecker, H.; Perrin, P.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the angular distribution of α-particles emitted by thermal fission of 236 U are presented. Also the dependence of the angular distribution on the kinetic energy of the fission products is studied. (WL) [de

  19. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  20. Potentialities and practical limitations of absolute neutron dosimetry using thin films of uranium and thorium applied to the fission track dating

    CERN Document Server

    Bigazzi, G; Hadler-Neto, J C; Iunes, P J; Paulo, S R; Oddone, M; Osorio, A M A; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry using natural uranium and thorium thin films makes possible that mineral dating by the fission-track method can be accomplished, even when poor thermalized neutron facilities are employed. In this case, the contributions of the fissions of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th induced by thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons to the population of tracks produced during irradiation are quantified through the combined use of natural uranium and thorium films. If the Th/U ratio of the sample is known, only one irradiation (where the sample and the films of uranium and thorium are present) is necessary to perform the dating. However, if that ratio is unknown, it can be determined through another irradiation where the mineral to be dated and both films are placed inside a cadmium box. Problems related with film manufacturing and calibration are discussed. Special attention is given to the utilization of thin films having very low uranium content. The problems faced sugg...

  1. Fission track dating and thermal history of Habahe rock body in Altai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shunsheng; Tan Kaixuan

    2002-01-01

    The fission track ages (FTA) of several apatite and zircon samples from Habahe rock body in Altai were determined. The FTA of apatites were 51.1-76.9 Ma, and FTA of zircons were 141-149 Ma. Modelling of the palaeo-temperature evolution [T(t)-path] of rock body relies on confined track length measurements and the annealing equations of Laslett et al. (1987). The thermal and uplift history of this region was discussed

  2. Effects of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide (Nd) and metallic precipitate (Ru) on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hun; Rhee, Young-Woo; Kang, Ki-Won; Kim, Keon-Sik; Song, Kun-Woo

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solid fission products on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide nuclear fuel were experimentally investigated. Neodymium (Nd) and ruthenium (Ru) were added to represent the physical states of solid fission products such as 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. Thermal conductivity was determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The effects of the additives on the thermal conductivity were quantified in the form of the thermal resistivity equation - the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation - which was determined from the measured data. It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of the irradiated nuclear fuel is affected by both the 'dissolved oxide' and the 'metallic precipitate', however, the effects are in the opposite direction and the 'dissolved oxide' influences the thermal conductivity more significantly than that of the 'metallic precipitate'

  3. Determination of palaeotemperatures of apatite with the fission-track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, E.; Maerk, E.; Bertel, E.; Pahl, M.; Maerk, T.D.

    1981-01-01

    As a consequence of thermal fading of fission tracks in minerals, the fission-track dating method can be used to obtain a sensitive geothermometer for unfolding thermal events in the history of rocks, especially if it is possible to determine the temperature associated with a measured fission-track age, i.e., yielding a temperature age. Based on the concept of a minimum fission-track length the differential annealing equation has been solved for apatite, taking into account the fact that the annealing coefficient depends also on the degree of fission-track reduction. This allows us to calculate an improved age-temperature relationship for apatite, which gives for a measured corrected fission-track age the corresponding temperature, assuming either linear or exponential time-dependence of the temperature. The present results for apatite are compared with previous calculations in apatite and sphene. As expected, a fission-track age of apatite dates a younger (lower temperature) point in the thermal-cooling history than a fission-track age of sphene. (author)

  4. The 235U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum in the BR1 Reactor at SCK•CEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, Jan; Malambu, Edouard; Borms, Luc; Fiorito, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The BR1 research reactor at SCK•CEN has a spherical cavity in the graphite above the reactor core. In this cavity an accurately characterised Maxwellian thermal neutron field is present. Different converters can be loaded in the cavity in order to obtain other types of neutron (and gamma) irradiation fields. Inside the so-called MARK III converter a fast 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron field can be obtained. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly related to the pure 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron spectrum. For this purpose MARK III spectrum averaged cross sections for the most relevant fluence dosimetry reactions have been determined. A calibration factor for absolute measurements has been determined applying activation dosimetry following ISO/IEC 17025 standards.

  5. The 235U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum in the BR1 Reactor at SCK•CEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagemans Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The BR1 research reactor at SCK•CEN has a spherical cavity in the graphite above the reactor core. In this cavity an accurately characterised Maxwellian thermal neutron field is present. Different converters can be loaded in the cavity in order to obtain other types of neutron (and gamma irradiation fields. Inside the so-called MARK III converter a fast 235U(n,f prompt fission neutron field can be obtained. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly related to the pure 235U(n,f prompt fission neutron spectrum. For this purpose MARK III spectrum averaged cross sections for the most relevant fluence dosimetry reactions have been determined. A calibration factor for absolute measurements has been determined applying activation dosimetry following ISO/IEC 17025 standards.

  6. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  7. Method of assaying uranium with prompt fission and thermal neutron borehole logging adjusted by borehole physical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, R.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium formations are assayed by prompt fission neutron logging techniques. The uranium in the formation is proportional to the ratio of epithermal counts to thermal or eqithermal dieaway. Various calibration factors enhance the accuracy of the measurement

  8. Thermal history, thermal state, and related tectonism of a moon of fission origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, A.B.; Lange, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal history of an initially totally molten moon of fission origin properly accounts for (1) the mare basalt epoch, in terms of its duration, the depth of the source region, and degrees of partial melting which produced the magmas; (2) the present-day heat flow of 17--18 ergs cm -2 s -1 ; and (3) the current high temperatures of the lower mantle as deduced from magnetic and seismic data. The model moon has a radius decrease of 5.4 km (3.1 x 10 -3 R) during lunar history. This value is within the rather poorly defined limits for the maximum change of the lunar radius of 10 -3 -10 -2 R. The majority of the thermoelastic stresses produced by the cooling of the moon have been dissipated via aseismic creep in the upper parts of the lunar mantle, not via faulting activity. A lower limit of 10 24 P for the viscosity of the mantle of the moon (at subsolidus temperatures) is suggested, based on the apparent absence of solid state convection in the moon at any time during its history. This is 10 3 times larger than that for the terrestrial mantle. The energy derived from the thermoelastic stresses in the type A moonquake zone is orders of magnitude smaller than the available tidal energy. Hence the thermoelastic stresses are not an important energy source for the tidal moon-quakes. The thermoelastic stresses can easily supply the energy for the high-frequency tele-seismic moonquakes. The relative rarity of HFT's is explained by the long times (10 8 -10 9 years) needed to accumulate the energy required to initiate faulting in the predicted source regions. These regions are in the uppermost mantle (depths between 80 and 200 km), where tensional quakes can occur, and at 10-km depths in the crust, where compressional quakes can occur. The consistency between our thermal history model results and the corresponding characteristics now known for the moon add further support for the fission model for the origin of the moon

  9. Uranium content of petroleum by Fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschaa, A.S.; Mafra, O.Y.; Oliveira, C.A.N.; Pinto, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of the fission track registration technique to investigate the natural uranium concentration in petroleum. The application is briefly described and the results obtained indicate the presence of uranium concentrations in samples of Brazilian petroleum which are over the detection limit of the fission track technique. The irradiations were performed by using fluxes with predominance of thermal neutrons, which have a fission cross-section for U 235 equal to 579 barns. Since the neutron fluxes were not comp sed exclusively of thermal neutrons, fissions from fast neutrons would also be taken into account for U 238 and Th 232

  10. Fission-track ages and their geological interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    In fission-track dating, experimental procedures such as etching and thermal pre-treatment may strongly affect the age values determined and their geological interpretation. This peculiarity is due to the common phenomenon of partial fading of fossil (spontaneous-) fission tracks during a sample's geological history. The proper geological interpretation of the age data must take into account the specific experimental conditions, the stability characteristics and size distribution of fission tracks in the sample, the ages of co-existing minerals, and the independent information about the thermal history of the geological region. (author)

  11. Thermal-Neutron-Induced Fission of U235, U233 and Pu239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, T.D.; Gibson, W.M.; Safford, G.J.

    1965-01-01

    We have used solid-state detectors to measure the kinetic energies of the coincident fission fragments in the thermal-neutron-induced fission of U 235 , U 233 and Pu 239 . Special care has been taken to eliminate spurious-events near symmetry to give an accurate measure of such quantities as the average total kinetic energy at symmetry. For each fissioning system over 10 6 events were recorded. As a result the statistics are good enough to see definite evidence for fine structure over a wide range of masses and energies. The data have been analysed to give mass yield curves, average kinetic energies as a function of mass, and other quantities of interest. For each fissioning system the average total kinetic energy goes through a maximum for a heavy fragment mass of about 132 and for the corresponding light fragment mass. There is a pronounced minimum at symmetry, although not as deep as that found in time-of-flight experiments. The difference between the maximum average kinetic energy and that at symmetry is about 32 MeV for U 235 , 18 MeV for U 233 and 20 MeV for Pu 239 . The dispersion of kinetic energies at symmetry is also smaller than that found in time-of-flight experiments. Fine structure is apparent in two different representations of the data. The energy spectrum of heavy fragments in coincidence with light fragment energies is greater than the most probable value. This structure becomes more pronounced as the light fragment energy increases. The mass yield curves for a given total kinetic energy show a structure suggesting a preference for fission fragments with masses ∼134, ∼140 and ∼145 (and their light fragment partners). Much of the structure observed can be understood by considering a semi-empirical mass surface and a simple model for the nuclear configuration at the saddle point. (author) [fr

  12. HTR fuel modelling with the ATLAS code. Thermal mechanical behaviour and fission product release assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillermier, Pierre; Daniel, Lucile; Gauthier, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    To support AREVA NP in its design on HTR reactor and its HTR fuel R and D program, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique developed the ATLAS code (Advanced Thermal mechanicaL Analysis Software) with the objectives: - to quantify, with a statistical approach, the failed particle fraction and fission product release of a HTR fuel core under normal and accidental conditions (compact or pebble design). - to simulate irradiation tests or benchmark in order to compare measurements or others code results with ATLAS evaluation. These two objectives aim at qualifying the code in order to predict fuel behaviour and to design fuel according to core performance and safety requirements. A statistical calculation uses numerous deterministic calculations. The finite element method is used for these deterministic calculations, in order to be able to choose among three types of meshes, depending on what must be simulated: - One-dimensional calculation of one single particle, for intact particles or particles with fully debonded layers. - Two-dimensional calculations of one single particle, in the case of particles which are cracked, partially debonded or shaped in various ways. - Three-dimensional calculations of a whole compact slice, in order to simulate the interactions between the particles, the thermal gradient and the transport of fission products up to the coolant. - Some calculations of a whole pebble, using homogenization methods are being studied. The temperatures, displacements, stresses, strains and fission product concentrations are calculated on each mesh of the model. Statistical calculations are done using these results, taking into account ceramic failure mode, but also fabrication tolerances and material property uncertainties, variations of the loads (fluence, temperature, burn-up) and core data parameters. The statistical method used in ATLAS is the importance sampling. The model of migration of long-lived fission products in the coated particle and more

  13. Transport properties of fission product vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1983-07-01

    Kinetic theory of gases is used to calculate the transport properties of fission product vapors in a steam and hydrogen environment. Provided in tabular form is diffusivity of steam and hydrogen, viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gaseous mixture, and diffusivity of cesium iodide, cesium hydroxide, diatomic tellurium and tellurium dioxide. These transport properties are required in determining the thermal-hydraulics of and fission product transport in light water reactors

  14. Fission energy of uranium isotopes and transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemirovskij, P.Eh.; Manevich, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made between the prompt fission energy, Esub(pr), calculated from the mass and binding energy spectrum and the Esub(pr) value obtained from the experimental data on the kinetic energy of fragments, the energy of prompt neutrons and prompt γ-quanta. Basing on the data on β-decay chains of fission fragments, the energies of neutrinos, γ-quanta and β-electrons are obtained, which permits to calculate the actual energy released during fission. The calculations are performed for thermal neutron-induced fission, fast-neutron induced fission and for fission after bombardment with 14 MeV neutrons. The available experimental data on the fission fragment kinetic energy, prompt γ-quanta energy and fission neutron energy are presented. The comparison of the Esub(pr) values obtained experimentally for the thermal-neutron-induced fission with the calculated Esub(pr) value shows that for 233 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu the agreement is rather favourable. For 235 U the agreement is within the error limits. As to the Esub(pr) values for the fast-neutron-induced fission, the agreement between the calculated and experimental data for all nuclides is quite good

  15. Least squares analysis of fission neutron standard fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.; Williams, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    A least squares analysis of fission neutron standard fields has been performed using the latest dosimetry cross sections. Discrepant nuclear data are identified and adjusted spectra for 252 Cf spontaneous fission and 235 U thermal fission fields are presented

  16. The effects of the physical states of a simulated fission product on the linear thermal expansion of (U0.924Ce0.076)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Si-Hyung; Lee, Young-Woo; Kim, Han-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The linear thermal expansions of an (U 0.924 Ce 0.076 )O 2 pellet, doped a simulated fission product (Nd 2 O 3 or Ru), were measured from room temperature to 1673 K in a flowing argon atmosphere using TMA. Nd 2 O 3 and Ru represent the physical states of a fission product, a dissolved oxide and a metallic precipitate, respectively. Using the measured data, the mean coefficients of a linear thermal expansion was obtained as a function of the temperature, and the effects of the physical states of a simulated fission product on the thermal expansion were investigated. In the case of the Nd 2 O 3 forming a dissolved oxide, the thermal expansion of the sample increased and the increment was proportional to the Nd contents, because the melting point of the Nd 2 O 3 was lower than that of UO 2 and although the metallic precipitate hardly affected the crystal structure, the linear thermal expansion also increased with an increasing Ru contents

  17. Behavior of solid fission products in irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ung Sup; Jung, Yang Hong; Kim, Hee Moon; Yoo, Byun Gok; Kim, Do Sik; Choo, Yong Sun; Hong, Kwon Pyo

    2004-01-01

    Many fission products are generated by fission events in UO 2 fuel under irradiation in nuclear reactor. Concentration of each fission product is changed by conditions of neutron energy spectrum, fissile material, critical thermal power, irradiation period and cooling time. Volatile materials such as Cs and I, the fission products, degrade nuclear fuel rod by the decrease of thermal conductivity in pellet and the stress corrosion cracking in cladding. Metal fission products (white inclusion) make pellet be swelled and decrease volume of pellet by densification. It seems that metal fission products are filled in the pore in pellet and placed between UO 2 lattices as interstitial. In addition, metal oxide state may change structural lattice volume. Considering behavior of fission products mentioned above, concentration of them is important. Fission products could be classified as bellows; solid solution in matrix : Sr, Zr, Nb, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm - metal precipitates : Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sb, Te - oxide precipitates : Ba, Zr, Nb, Mo, (Rb, Cs, Te) - volatile and gases : Kr, Xe, Br, I, (Rb, Cs, Te)

  18. Study of 235U very asymmetric thermal fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sida, J.L.

    1989-12-01

    The fission fragment separator Lohengrin of the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble was used to determine the yields of the very asymmetric light fission products (A=84-69) as a function of A, Z, and the kinetic energy E. The proton pairing effect causes fine structures in the mass distribution, in the mean nuclear charge anti Z and its variance σ z , and in the mean kinetic energies of the elements. The neutron pairing effect in the production yields is found for the first time of the same order of magnitude than the proton pairing effect. In the mass region investigated both are the largest observed in fission of 235 U. A decrease in the mean kinetic energy for the isotopes of Ni and Cu was observed. It points to a large deformation at scission. Our results support the view that very asymmetric low-energy fission is a weakly dissipative process. The highly deformed transient system breaks by a slow necking-in process [fr

  19. Innovation of fission gas release and thermal conductivity measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Meer, K.; Soboler, V.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation described two innovative measurement methods being currently developed at SCK-CEN in order to support the modeling of fuel performance. The first one is an acoustic method to measure the fission gas release in a fuel rod in a non destructive way. The total rod pressure is determined by generating a heat pulse causing a pressure wave that propagates through the gas to an ultrasound transducer. The final pulse width being proportional to the pressure, the latter can thus be determined. The measurement of the acoustic resonance frequency at fixed temperatures enables the distinction between different gas components. The second method is a non-stationary technique to investigate the thermal properties of the fuel rod, like thermal conductivity, diffusivity and heat capacity. These properties are derived from the amplitude and the phase shift of the fuel centre temperature response induced by a periodic temperature variation. These methods did not reveal any physical limitations for the practical applicability. Furthermore, they are rather simple. Preliminary investigations have proven both methods to be more accurate than techniques usually utilized. (author)

  20. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  1. Fission yield covariance generation and uncertainty propagation through fission pulse decay heat calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Diez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Labeau, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fission yield data and uncertainty comparison between major nuclear data libraries. • Fission yield covariance generation through Bayesian technique. • Study of the effect of fission yield correlations on decay heat calculations. • Covariance information contribute to reduce fission pulse decay heat uncertainty. - Abstract: Fission product yields are fundamental parameters in burnup/activation calculations and the impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past. Evaluations of these uncertainties were released, still without covariance data. Therefore, the nuclear community expressed the need of full fission yield covariance matrices to be able to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. State-of-the-art fission yield data and methodologies for fission yield covariance generation were researched in this work. Covariance matrices were generated and compared to the original data stored in the library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235 U. Calculations were carried out using different libraries and codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the libraries. The uncertainty quantification was performed first with Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the uncertainty of decay heat. Eventually, a sensitivity analysis of fission product yields to fission pulse decay heat was performed in order to provide a full set of the most sensitive nuclides for such a calculation

  2. Status of fission product yield data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuninghame, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The topics covered in this paper are: (a) cumulative yields in thermal neutron fission and in fast fission up to 14 MeV incident neutron energy, (b) dependence of the yields on incident neutron energy and spectrum, (c) independent yields, (d) charge dispersion and distribution, and (e) yields of light particles from ternary fission. The paper reviews information on these subjects for fission of actinides from 232 Th upwards with special emphasis on data published since the 1973 Bologna FPND Panel, compares data sets, and discusses the gaps still to be found in them. (author)

  3. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlheinz, Thom.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into non-equilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in nearly thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme-non-equilibrium. The accompanying variations of temperatures, pressure and radiative spectrum suggest wide ranges of applications. For example, in the gas-phase fission reactor concept enriched uranium hexafluoride or an uranium plasma replaces conventional fuel elements and permits operation above the melting point of solid materials. This potential has been motivation for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to conduct relevant research for high specific impulse propulsion in space. The need to separate the high temperature gaseous fuel from the surfaces of a containing vessel and to protect them against thermal radiation has led to the concept of an externally moderated reactor in which the fissioning gaseous material is suspended by fluid dynamic means and the flow of opaque buffer gas removes the power. The gaseous nuclear fuel can slowly be circulated through the reactor for continuous on-site reprocessing including the annihilation of transuranium actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides can thus be achieved. These characteristics and the unique radiative properties led to the expectation that the gas-phase fission reactor could feature improved safety, safeguarding and economy, in addition to new technologies such as processing, photochemistry and the transmission of power over large distances in space

  4. Thermal-neutron fission cross section of 26. 1-min /sup 235/U/sup m/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbert W.L. Jr.; Starner, J.W.; Estep, R.J.; Balestrini, S.J.; Attrep M. Jr.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R.

    1987-11-01

    The thermal-neutron fission cross section of /sup 235/U/sup m/ has been measured relative to the ground-state cross section. A rapid radiochemical separation procedure was developed to provide sizeable (10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 11/ atom) samples that were reasonably free of the parent /sup 239/Pu. From a series of eight measurements, the value of 1.42 +- 0.04 was obtained for the ratio sigma/sub m//sigma/sub g/.

  5. Thermal-neutron fission cross section of 26.1-min /sup 235/U/sup m/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Starner, J.W.; Estep, R.J.; Balestrini, S.J.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal-neutron fission cross section of /sup 235/U/sup m/ has been measured relative to the ground-state cross section. A rapid radiochemical separation procedure was developed to provide sizeable (10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 11/ atom) samples that were reasonably free of the parent /sup 239/Pu. From a series of eight measurements, the value of 1.42 +- 0.04 was obtained for the ratio σ/sub m//σ/sub g/

  6. Separation of the rare earths by high pressure liquid chromatography and the fission yield on sup(148m)Pm and sup(148g)Pm using thermal neutron induced fission of 233U and 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicky, H.U.

    1979-03-01

    This report is in two parts: in the first part, the method of high pressure liquid chromatography is described with particular reference to rare earth nuclei produced in nuclear reactions; in the second part, the results of a study of the fission yield of sup(148m)Pm and sup(148g)Pm from the thermal fission of 233 U and 239 Pu are presented. (G.T.H.)

  7. Absolute linear thermal-expansion measurements on copper and aluminum from 5 to 320 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, F.R.; Swenson, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A linear absolute dilatometer based on a three-terminal parallel-plate capacitor design has been used to obtain thermal expansion data for high-purity copper and aluminum from 5 to 320 K. These data have an absolute accuracy of +- 0.1% above 20 K for copper and above 30 K for aluminum, and agree well with published data at the higher temperatures. The disagreement which exists with other data below 5 K for copper and below 15 K for aluminum is believed to be sample dependent, but the mechanism is not known. The aluminum results in this region depend on the state of annealing of the sample

  8. Absolute Thermal SST Measurements over the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, W. S.; Warden, R.; Kaptchen, P. F.; Finch, T.; Emery, W. J.

    2010-12-01

    Climate monitoring and natural disaster rapid assessment require baseline measurements that can be tracked over time to distinguish anthropogenic versus natural changes to the Earth system. Disasters like the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill require constant monitoring to assess the potential environmental and economic impacts. Absolute calibration and validation of Earth-observing sensors is needed to allow for comparison of temporally separated data sets and provide accurate information to policy makers. The Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST) radiometer was designed and built by Ball Aerospace to provide a well calibrated measure of sea surface temperature (SST) from an unmanned aerial system (UAS). Currently, emissive skin SST observed by satellite infrared radiometers is validated by shipborne instruments that are expensive to deploy and can only take a few data samples along the ship track to overlap within a single satellite pixel. Implementation on a UAS will allow BESST to map the full footprint of a satellite pixel and perform averaging to remove any local variability due to the difference in footprint size of the instruments. It also enables the capability to study this sub-pixel variability to determine if smaller scale effects need to be accounted for in models to improve forecasting of ocean events. In addition to satellite sensor validation, BESST can distinguish meter scale variations in SST which could be used to remotely monitor and assess thermal pollution in rivers and coastal areas as well as study diurnal and seasonal changes to bodies of water that impact the ocean ecosystem. BESST was recently deployed on a conventional Twin Otter airplane for measurements over the Gulf of Mexico to access the thermal properties of the ocean surface being affected by the oil spill. Results of these measurements will be presented along with ancillary sensor data used to eliminate false signals including UV and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR

  9. Measurements of thermal fission and capture cross sections of minor actinides within the Mini-INCA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringer, O.; Chabod, S.; Dupont, E.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.; Veyssiere, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Oriol, L. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chartier, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Mutti, P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 38 - Grenoble, (France); AlMahamid, I. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of nuclear waste transmutation studies, the Mini-INCA project has been initiated at Cea/DSM to determine optimal conditions for transmutation and incineration of Minor Actinides in high intensity neutron fluxes in the thermal region. Our experimental tool is based on alpha- and gamma-spectroscopy of irradiated samples and microscopic fission-chambers. It can provide both microscopic information on nuclear reactions (total and partial cross sections for neutron capture and/or fission reactions) and macroscopic information on transmutation and incineration potentials. The {sup 232}Th, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 244}Cm transmutation chains have been explored in details, showing some discrepancies in comparison with evaluated data libraries but in overall good agreement with recent experimental data. (authors)

  10. Measurements of thermal fission and capture cross sections of minor actinides within the Mini-INCA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bringer, O.; Chabod, S.; Dupont, E.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.; Veyssiere, Ch.; Oriol, L.; Chartier, F.; Mutti, P.; AlMahamid, I.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of nuclear waste transmutation studies, the Mini-INCA project has been initiated at Cea/DSM to determine optimal conditions for transmutation and incineration of Minor Actinides in high intensity neutron fluxes in the thermal region. Our experimental tool is based on alpha- and gamma-spectroscopy of irradiated samples and microscopic fission-chambers. It can provide both microscopic information on nuclear reactions (total and partial cross sections for neutron capture and/or fission reactions) and macroscopic information on transmutation and incineration potentials. The 232 Th, 237 Np, 241 Am, and 244 Cm transmutation chains have been explored in details, showing some discrepancies in comparison with evaluated data libraries but in overall good agreement with recent experimental data. (authors)

  11. Monte-Carlo Generation of Time Evolving Fission Chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbeke, Jerome M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kim, Kenneth S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Prasad, Manoj K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Snyderman, Neal J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    About a decade ago, a computer code was written to model neutrons from their “birth” to their final “death” in thermal neutron detectors (3He tubes): SrcSim had enough physics to track the neutrons in multiplying systems, appropriately increasing and decreasing the neutron population as they interacted by absorption, fission and leakage. The theory behind the algorithms assumed that all neutrons produced in a fission chain were all produced simultaneously, and then diffused to the neutron detectors. For cases where the diffusion times are long compared to the fission chains, SrcSim is very successful. Indeed, it works extraordinarily well for thermal neutron detectors and bare objects, because it takes tens of microseconds for fission neutrons to slow down to thermal energies, where they can be detected. Microseconds are a very long time compared to the lengths of the fission chains. However, this inherent assumption in the theory prevents its use to cases where either the fission chains are long compared to the neutron diffusion times (water-cooled nuclear reactors, or heavily moderated object, where the theory starts failing), or the fission neutrons can be detected shortly after they were produced (fast neutron detectors). For these cases, a new code needs to be written, where the underlying assumption is not made. The purpose of this report is to develop an algorithm to generate the arrival times of neutrons in fast neutron detectors, starting from a neutron source such as a spontaneous fission source (252Cf) or a multiplying source (Pu). This code will be an extension of SrcSim to cases where correlations between neutrons in the detectors are on the same or shorter time scales as the fission chains themselves.

  12. Fission/milligram of 235U in BIG-10 Tests A, C, E, and B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, D.M.; Grundl, J.A.; Hansen, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The entire series of dosimetry foil tests at BIG-10 (including the preliminary Test A, five fission foil set irradiations--Tests C, five non-fission foil set irradiations--Tests E, and five track-etch detector irradiations--Tests B) were monitored continuously by the NBS double fission chamber PP5 in the central test cavity. The accuracy of the absolute fission counting data (fissions/milligram of 235 U) is estimated to be 1.4% for Tests A, C, and E and 1.5% for Test B. Deposit mass assay uncertainties remain the dominant error

  13. Fission products in glasses. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.K.; Luckscheiter, B.; Malow, G.; Schiewer, E.

    1977-09-01

    Glass ceramics of different composition with high leach and impact resistance can be produced for fission product solidification. In contrast to commercial glass products, they consist of a number of crystalline phases and a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase allows a classification into celsian, diopside, encryptite, and perovskite ceramics. They all are of special importance as host phases for long-lived fission products. The paper reports on relations between product composition and melting properties, viscosity, crystallization properties, and fixation capability for fission products. Further investigations deal with dimensional stability, impact resistance, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. The properties of the ceramics are compared with those of the basic products. The problems still to be solved with regard to further improvement and application of these products are discussed. (RB) [de

  14. Options for development of space fission propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, Mike; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana

    2001-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include high specific power continuous impulse propulsion systems and bimodal nuclear thermal rockets. Despite their tremendous potential for enhancing or enabling deep space and planetary missions, to date space fission systems have only been used in Earth orbit. The first step towards utilizing advanced fission propulsion systems is development of a safe, near-term, affordable fission system that can enhance or enable near-term missions of interest. An evolutionary approach for developing space fission propulsion systems is proposed

  15. Fission Product Yield Study of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Using Dual-Fission Ionization Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Tornow, W.; Gooden, M.; Kelley, J.; Arnold, C.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T.; Fowler, M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M.; Tonchev, A.

    2014-05-01

    To resolve long-standing differences between LANL and LLNL regarding the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data [M.B. Chadwick et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010); H. Selby et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010)], a collaboration between TUNL/LANL/LLNL has been established to perform high-precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields. The main goal is to make a definitive statement about the energy dependence of the fission yields to an accuracy better than 2-3% between 1 and 15 MeV, where experimental data are very scarce. At TUNL, we have completed the design, fabrication and testing of three dual-fission chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. The dual-fission chambers were used to make measurements of the fission product activity relative to the total fission rate, as well as for high-precision absolute fission yield measurements. The activation method was employed, utilizing the mono-energetic neutron beams available at TUNL. Neutrons of 4.6, 9.0, and 14.5 MeV were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, and for neutrons at 14.8 MeV, the 3H(d,n)4He reaction was used. After activation, the induced γ-ray activity of the fission products was measured for two months using high-resolution HPGe detectors in a low-background environment. Results for the yield of seven fission fragments of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and a comparison to available data at other energies are reported. For the first time results are available for neutron energies between 2 and 14 MeV.

  16. Nuclear fission with a Langevin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, D.; Suraud, E.; Abe, Yasuhisa

    1992-01-01

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out and discussed. A strong friction coefficient, estimated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. The calculations are performed with a collective mass depending on the collective variable and with a constant mass. Fission rates calculated at different temperatures are shown and compared with previous available results. (author) 23 refs.; 7 figs

  17. Thermal transport in UO2 with defects and fission products by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lashley, Jason Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Byler, Darrin David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-14

    The importance of the thermal transport in nuclear fuel has motivated a wide range of experimental and modelling studies. In this report, the reduction of thermal transport in UO2 due to defects and fission products has been investigated using non-equilibrium MD simulations, with two sets of empirical potentials for studying the degregation of UO2 thermal conductivity including a Buckingham type interatomic potential and a recently developed EAM type interatomic potential. Additional parameters for U5+ and Zr4+ in UO2 have been developed for the EAM potential. The thermal conductivity results from MD simulations are then corrected for the spin-phonon scattering through Callaway model formulations. To validate the modelling results, comparison was made with experimental measurements on single crystal hyper-stoichiometric UO2+x samples.

  18. Thermal Analysis of Fission Moly Target Solid Waste Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung Min; Park, Jonghark [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    There are various ways to produce Mo-99. Among them, nuclear transmutation of uranium target became the major one owing to its superior specific activity. After the fission molybdenum (FM) target is irradiated, it is transported to treatment facility to extract wanted isotope. During the process, various forms of wastes are produced including filter cake and other solid wastes. The filter cake is mostly consisted of decaying uranium compounds. The solid wastes are then packaged and moved to storage facility which will stay there for considerable amount of time. Being the continuous source of heat, the solid wastes are required to be cooled for the certain amount of time before transported to the storage area. In this study, temperature evaluation of the storage facility is carried out with pre-cooling time sensitivity to check its thermal integrity. In this study, thermal analysis on the FM target solid waste storage is performed. Finite volume method is utilized to numerically discretize and solve the geometry of interest. Analysis shows that the developed method can simulate temperature behavior during storage process, but needs to be checked against other code to see calculation accuracy. Highest temperature distribution is observed when every hole is filled with waste containers. Sensitivity results on pre-cooling time shows that at least 13 months of cooling is necessary to keep the structure integrity.

  19. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-01

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of 235 U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10 -10 sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass

  20. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-15

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10{sup -10} sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass.

  1. A numerical model for the thermal history of rocks based on confined horizontal fission tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, P.K.; Kunzendorf, Helmar; Hansen, Kirsten

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model for determination of the thermal history of rocks is presented. It is shown that the thermal history may be uniquely determined as a piece-by-piece linear function on the basis of etched confined, horizontal fission track length distributions, their surface densities, and the uranium content. The initial track length distribution is taken into account. A relation between the measured track length distribution and age is given which includes correction for partial annealing. The annealing model used is the fanning Arrhenius plot. It is shown that track length distributions measured in transmitted light are biased favouring short tracks compared with measurements in reflected light. Testing of the model is performed on apatites from a tuffaceous sandstone from Bornholm (Denmark) yielding an estimate of the thermal history for the period of about 280 Ma back in time. (author)

  2. Prompt Gamma Radiation from Fragments in the Thermal Fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albinsson, H.; Lindow, L.

    1970-06-01

    Measurements were made on the gamma radiation emitted from fission fragments in slow neutron induced fission of 235 U. The fragments were detected with solid state detectors of the surface barrier type and the gamma radiation with a Nal(Tl) scintillator. Mass selection was used so that the gamma radiation could be measured as a function of fragment mass. Time discrimination between the fission gammas and the prompt neutrons released in the fission process was employed to reduce the background. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fission fragments. In this way a decay curve was obtained from which the life-time of one of the gamma-emitting states could be estimated. The relative yield of the gamma-rays was determined as a function of mass for different gamma-ray energy portions and two specific time intervals after the fission events. Comparisons were made with data obtained from 252 Cf-fission. Attention is drawn to some features which seem to be the same in 235 U and 252 Cf-fission

  3. Delayed β ray spectrum of 235U fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascholati, P.R.

    1973-01-01

    The time-dependent electron spectra of fission fragments from the thermal-neutron-induced fission of 235 U are calculated. The Gross theory of nuclear beta decay is used to obtain the decay constant and individual electron spectra. The mean energy per fission carried by the electrons and the number of electrons per fission are also calculated. Comparison of these calculated spectra to experimental ones shows good agreements. (Author) [pt

  4. Investigation of the heavy nuclei fission with anomalously high values of the fission fragments total kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khryachkov, Vitaly; Goverdovskii, Andrei; Ketlerov, Vladimir; Mitrofanov, Vecheslav; Sergachev, Alexei

    2018-03-01

    Binary fission of 232Th and 238U induced by fast neutrons were under intent investigation in the IPPE during recent years. These measurements were performed with a twin ionization chamber with Frisch grids. Signals from the detector were digitized for further processing with a specially developed software. It results in information of kinetic energies, masses, directions and Bragg curves of registered fission fragments. Total statistics of a few million fission events were collected during each experiment. It was discovered that for several combinations of fission fragment masses their total kinetic energy was very close to total free energy of the fissioning system. The probability of such fission events for the fast neutron induced fission was found to be much higher than for spontaneous fission of 252Cf and thermal neutron induced fission of 235U. For experiments with 238U target the energy of incident neutrons were 5 MeV and 6.5 MeV. Close analysis of dependence of fission fragment distribution on compound nucleus excitation energy gave us some explanation of the phenomenon. It could be a process in highly excited compound nucleus which leads the fissioning system from the scission point into the fusion valley with high probability.

  5. Nuclear molecules in low energy fission of actinides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Tishchenko, V.G.; Unzhakova, A.V.; )

    2000-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the fine structure (FS) of the both energy-mass and energy-charge distributions of the fission fragments of thermal neutron induced fission of uranium in the data obtained at different spectrometers. Some peculiarities of the FS observed can be treated as a manifestation of two different types of collective vibrations of the fissioning system on its way to scission [ru

  6. A stochastic approach to fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, D.; Suraud, E.; Abe, Yasuhisa

    1992-01-01

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out. A strong friction coefficient, calculated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. Fission was described as a diffusion over a barrier of a collective variable, and a Langevin Equation (LE) was used to study the phenomenon. A study of the stationary flow over the saddle point with a Fokker-Planck Equation (FPE), equivalent to the LE was used to give formula for the stationary fission rate (or reaction rate for the chemistry applications). More recently, a complete study of the fission process was performed numerically with both FPE and LE. A long transient time, that could allow more pre-scission neutrons to evaporate, was pointed out. The derivation of this new LE is recalled, followed by the description of the memory dependence and by the effect of a large friction coefficient on the fission rate. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs

  7. Safe affordable fission engine (SAFE 30) module conductivity test thermal model correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Jose

    2001-01-01

    The SAFE 30 is a simple, robust space fission power system that is comprised of several independent modules. Each module contains 4 fuel tubes bonded to a central heatpipe. Fission energy is conducted from the fuel tubes to the heatpipe, which in turn transfers the energy to a power conversion system. This paper benchmarks a thermal model of the SAFE 30 with actual test data from simulated SAFE 30 module tests. Two 'dummy' SAFE 30 modules were fabricated - each consisted of 4 1-inch dia. tubes (simulating the fuel tubes) bonded to a central '1' dia. tube (simulating the heatpipe). In the first module the fuel tubes were simply brazed to the heatpipe along the line of contact (leaving void space in the interstices), and in the second module the tubes and heatpipe were brazed via tri-cusps that completely fill the interstices between the tubes. In these tests, fission energy is simulated by placing resistance heaters within each of the 4 fuel tubes. The tests were conducted in a vacuum chamber in 4 configurations: tri-cusps filled with and without an outer insulation wrap, and no tri-cusps with and without an outer insulation wrap. The baseline SAFE 30 configuration uses the brazed tri-cusps. During the tests, the power applied to the heaters was varied in a stepwise fashion, until a steady-state temperature profile was reached. These temperature levels varied between 773 K and 1073 K. To benchmark the thermal model, the input energy and chamber surface temperature were used as boundary conditions for the model. The analytical results from the nodes at the same location as the test thermocouples were plotted again test data to determinate the accuracy of the analysis. The unknown variables on the analysis are the radiation emissivity of the pipe and chamber and the radiation view factor between the module and the chamber. A correlation was determined using a parametric analysis by varying the surface emissivity and view factor until a good match was reached. This

  8. KUGEL: a thermal, hydraulic, fuel performance, and gaseous fission product release code for pebble bed reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Fehrenbach, M.E.

    1981-05-01

    The KUGEL computer code is designed to perform thermal/hydraulic analysis and coated-fuel particle performance calculations for axisymmetric pebble bed reactor (PBR) cores. This computer code was developed as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)-funded study designed to verify the published core performance data on PBRs. The KUGEL code is designed to interface directly with the 2DB code, a two-dimensional neutron diffusion code, to obtain distributions of thermal power, fission rate, fuel burnup, and fast neutron fluence, which are needed for thermal/hydraulic and fuel performance calculations. The code is variably dimensioned so that problem size can be easily varied. An interpolation routine allows variable mesh size to be used between the 2DB output and the two-dimensional thermal/hydraulic calculations

  9. Comparative measurements of independent yields of 239Pu fission fragments induced by thermal and resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundorin, N.A.; Kopach, Y.N.; Telezhnikov, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The independent yields of 239 Pu fission fragments by means of gamma-spectroscopy method were measured for light and heavy groups on the IBR-30 reactor in Dubna. Comparative analysis of experimental data for fission induced by thermal and resonance neutrons was performed. The possibilities to increase the measurement's precision consist of the employment of a HPGe detector with high efficiency and its open-quotes activeclose quotes shielding in the gamma spectrometer, as well as a high speed electronics system. In this way the number of identified fragments will be increased and independent yields will be measured to a precision of 1-3%. Measurements at the source with shorter neutron pulse duration to increase neutron energy resolution will be possible after the reconstruction of a modern neutron source in Dubna in accordance with the IREN project

  10. Experimental approach to fission process of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-07-01

    From experimental views, it seems likely that the mechanism of nuclear fission process remains unsolved even after the Bohr and Weeler`s study in 1939. Especially, it is marked in respect of mass distribution in unsymmetric nuclear fission. The energy dependency of mass distribution can be explained with an assumption of 2-mode nuclear fission. Further, it was demonstrated that the symmetrical fission components and the unsymmetrical ones have different saddle and fission points. Thus, the presence of the 2-mode fission mechanism was confirmed. Here, transition in the nuclear fission mechanism and its cause were investigated here. As the cause of such transition, plausible four causes; a contribution of multiple-chance fission, disappearance of shell effects, beginning of fission following collective excitation due to GDR and nuclear phase transition were examined in the condition of excitation energy of 14.0 MeV. And it was suggested that the transition in the nuclear fission concerned might be related to phase transition. In addition, the mechanism of nuclear fission at a low energy and multi-mode hypothesis were examined by determination of the energy for thermal neutron fission ({sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu) and spontaneous nuclear fission ({sup 252}Cf). (M.N.)

  11. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, M. U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S. A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-04-01

    The radionuclide 125Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  12. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, M.U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S.A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The radionuclide 125 Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125 Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125 Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125 Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125 Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  13. Yields of products from thermal-neutron induced fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.; Aagaard, P.; Zwicky, H.U.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for fission yield determinations at an ISOL-system connected to a nuclear reactor have been developed. The present report contains detailed descriptions both of the experimental techniques and of the method used to correct the experimental yields for the decay of short-lived nuclear species in the delay between production and measurement. The methods have been applied to the determination of the fission yields of 40 fission products including 2 isometric pairs in the light mass region and those of 99 fission products including 25 isometric pairs or triplets in the heavy mass region. For 64 cases this is the first determination published. (author)

  14. Modeling fission gas release in high burnup ThO2-UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Pilat, E.E.; Rim, C.S.; Kazimi, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary fission gas release model to predict the performance of thoria fuel using the FRAPCON-3 computer code package has been formulated. The following modeling changes have been made in the code: - Radial power/burnup distribution; - Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion; - Rim porosity and fuel density; - Diffusion coefficient of fission gas in ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel and low temperature fission gas release model. Due to its lower epithermal resonance absorption, thoria fuel experiences a much flatter distribution of radial fissile products and radial power distribution during operation as compared to uranian fuel. The rim effect and its consequences in thoria fuel, therefore, are expected to occur only at relatively high burnup levels. The enhanced conductivity is evident for ThO 2 , but for a mixture the thermal conductivity enhancement is small. The lower thermal fuel expansion tends to negate these small advantages. With the modifications above, the new version of FRAPCON-3 matched the measured fission gas release data reasonably well using the ANS 5.4 fission gas release model. (authors)

  15. Measurements of the prompt neutron spectra in 233U, 235U, 239Pu thermal neutron fission in the energy range of 0.01-5 MeV and in 252Cf spontaneous fission in the energy range of 0.01-10 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starostov, B.I.; Semenov, A.F.; Nefedov, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    The measurement results on the prompt neutron spectra in 233 U, 235 U, 239 Pu thermal neutron fission in the energy range of 0.01-5 MeV and in 252 Cf spontaneous fission in the energy range of 0.01-10 MeV are presented. The time-of-flight method was used. The exceeding of the spectra over the Maxwell distributions is observed at E 252 Cf neutron fission spectra. The spectra analysis was performed after normalization of the spectra and corresponding Maxwell distributions for one and the same area. In the range of 0.05-0.22 MeV the yield of 235 U + nsub(t) fission neutrons is approximately 8 and approximately 15 % greater than the yield of 252 Cf and 239 Pu + nsub(t) fission neutrons, respectively. In the range of 0.3-1.2 MeV the yield of 235 U + nsub(t) fission neutrons is 8 % greater than the fission neutron yield in case of 239 Pu + nsub(t) fission. The 235 U + nsub(t) and 233 U + nsub(t) fission neutron spectra do not differ from one another in the 0.05-0.6 MeV range

  16. A comparative analysis of the effect of gaseous fission products release on the thermal behaviour of oxide fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totev, T.L.; Kolev, I.G.

    1992-01-01

    Four different models of gaseous fission product release are compared in order to assess the relative effect of thermal characteristics of the fuel rods. The results show that the use of Weisman and EPRI models at a high burnup (over 50000 MW.d/tU) leads to almost the same figures of maximum fuel temperature and gas gap thermal conductivity. The use of Beyer-Hann (Betelle) and Pazdera-Valach (Rzez) models leads to under prediction of the fuel element thermal characteristics. A conclusion has been made that the Weisman model is the most suitable for the WWER-type fuel elements behaviour prediction. 10 refs., 7 figs

  17. Yields and isomeric ratio of xenon and krypton isotopes from thermal neutron fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.S.; Lin, J.T.; Yang, C.M.; Yu, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental cumulative yields of 85 Kr/sup m/, 87 Kr, 88 Kr, 133 Xe/sup g/, 135 Xe/sup m/, and 135 Xe/sup g/ and the independent isomeric yield of 133 Xe/sup m/ in the thermal neutron fission of 235 U have been measured by the gas chromatographic method. The independent yields of 133 Xe/sup g/, 135 Xe/sup m/, and 135 Xe/sup g/ were deduced with the aid of 133 I and 135 I data. The isomeric yield ratios of 133 Xe and 135 Xe have been computed and compared with theoretical values since they have the same high spin state J = 11/2 - and low spin ground state J = 3/2 + . The influence of the shell effect on the fission isomeric yield ratio is discussed. From the measured independent yield of Xe isotopes plus the reported data, the Xe-isotopic distribution curve has been constructed. The curve is compared with the isotopic distribution curves of Xe isotopes formed in 11.5 GeV proton interactions with 238 U and Cs isotopes formed in 24 GeV proton interactions with 238 U. Upon fitting the yield curves we find that only those products with N/Z> or =1.48 fit a curve typical of a binary fission process

  18. Prompt Gamma Radiation from Fragments in the Thermal Fission of {sup 235}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albinsson, H [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden); Lindow, L [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1970-06-15

    Measurements were made on the gamma radiation emitted from fission fragments in slow neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U. The fragments were detected with solid state detectors of the surface barrier type and the gamma radiation with a Nal(Tl) scintillator. Mass selection was used so that the gamma radiation could be measured as a function of fragment mass. Time discrimination between the fission gammas and the prompt neutrons released in the fission process was employed to reduce the background. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fission fragments. In this way a decay curve was obtained from which the life-time of one of the gamma-emitting states could be estimated. The relative yield of the gamma-rays was determined as a function of mass for different gamma-ray energy portions and two specific time intervals after the fission events. Comparisons were made with data obtained from {sup 252} Cf-fission. Attention is drawn to some features which seem to be the same in {sup 235}U and {sup 252} Cf-fission.

  19. Contribution to the study of the influences of the excitation energy on the characteristics of the fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron induced and spontaneous fission with neutron energies from 10 -2 to 2.10 5 eV have been studied. Thermal neutron induced fission measurements in Pa 231 , Th 232 , Np 237 , U 233 , U 235 , Pu 239 and Pu 241 are reported. Energy and mass distributions of heavy fission fragments due to the spontaneous fission of Pu 240 are compared to the results obtained by thermal neutron fission of Pu 239 ; the events observed with U 236 , Pu 240 , Pa 232 and Np 238 are explained by the Bohr theory of fission channels. Ternary fission phenomena of U 233 , U 235 , Pu 239 , Pa 231 and Np 237 induced by thermal neutrons are explained and compared to models of Carjan and Feather. (MDC)

  20. Online ICPMS detection of the thermal release of fission products from nuclear fuel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther-Leopold, I.; Svedkauskaite-Le Gore, J.; Kivel, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The release of volatile and semi-volatile fission products (like Cs, Tc, Mo etc.) from spent nuclear fuel by thermal and thermochemical treatment (oxidative or reductive conditions) as a head-end step for advanced reprocessing scenarios is studied in the Hot Laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institut. For this purpose, a heated sampling cell online connected to an ICPMS (Element 2, Thermo Fisher Scientific) was designed and tested on simulated fuel samples up to 650 o C. The results of this study as well as technical perspectives for heating experiments up to 2000 o C will be presented. (author)

  1. A standard fission neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahasrabudhe, S.G.; Chakraborty, P.P.; Iyer, M.R.; Kirthi, K.N.; Soman, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fission neutron irradiation facility (FISNIF) has been set up at the thermal column of the CIRUS reactor at BARC. The spectrum and the flux have been measured using threshold detectors. The paper describes the setting up of the facility, measurement and application. A concentric cylinder containing UO 2 powder sealed inside surrounds the irradiation point of a pneumatic sample transfer system located in the thermal column of the reactor. Samples are loaded in a standard aluminium capsule with cadmium lining and transported pneumatically. A sample transfer time of 1 s can be achieved in the facility. Typical applications of the facility for studying activation of iron and sodium in fission neutrons are also discussed. (Auth.)

  2. EURISOL-DS Multi-MW Target: Thermal Behaviour of the fission target disk arrangement inspired by the MAFF project

    CERN Document Server

    Cyril Kharoua, Yacine Kadi and the EURISOL-DS Task#2 collaboration

    This technical note summarises the design calculations performed within Task #2 of the European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Design Study (EURISOL-DS) [1] for the thermal behaviour of the fission target.A preliminary study was carried out in order to determine the heat deposition within the fissile material and estimate the temperature rise. This new solution takes into account the problems related to effusion/diffusion of radioactive isotopes inside a thick target. To enhance the extraction rates and the thermal behaviour it is proposed to study a solution where the fissile material is split into an arrangement of disks.

  3. Development of irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Bang Je-Geon; Kim Dae Ho; Jung Youn Ho

    2001-01-01

    Thermal conductivity model of the irradiated UO 2 pellet was developed, based upon the thermal diffusivity data of the irradiated UO 2 pellet measured during thermal cycling. The model predicts the thermal conductivity by multiplying such separate correction factors as solid fission products, gaseous fission products, radiation damage and porosity. The developed model was validated by comparison with the variation of the measured thermal diffusivity data during thermal cycling and prediction of other UO 2 thermal conductivity models. Since the developed model considers the effect of gaseous fission products as a separate factor, it can predict variation of thermal conductivity in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 pellet where the fission gases in the matrix are precipitated into bubbles, indicating that decrease of thermal conductivity by bubble precipitation in rim region would be significantly compensated by the enhancing effect of fission gas depletion in the UO 2 matrix. (author)

  4. Simulation of fission products behavior in severe accidents for advanced passive PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, L.L.; Huang, G.F.; Cao, X.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A fission product analysis model based on thermal hydraulic module is developed. • An assessment method for fission product release and transport is constructed. • Fission products behavior during three modes of containment response is investigated. • Source term results for the three modes of containment response are obtained. - Abstract: Fission product behavior for common Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been studied for many years, and some analytical tools have developed. However, studies specifically on the behavior of fission products related to advanced passive PWR is scarce. In the current study, design characteristics of advanced passive PWR influencing fission product behavior are investigated. An integrated fission products analysis model based on a thermal hydraulic module is developed, and the assessment method for fission products release and transport for advanced passive PWR is constructed. Three modes of containment response are simulated, including intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure. Fission products release from the core and corium, fission products transport and deposition in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), fission products transport and deposition in the containment considering fission products retention in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) and in the secondary side of steam generators (SGs) are simulated. Source term results of intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure are obtained, which can be utilized to evaluate the radiological consequences

  5. Review of areas that may require simultaneous coupled solution of the thermal hydraulic and fission product/aerosol behavior equations for source term determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, T.S.

    1984-01-01

    In the determination of the behavior of nuclear aerosols in the reactor coolant system and in the containment for the development of severe accident source terms, present practice generally is to first perform thermal hydraulic calculations for specific plant types and sequences and then to utilize the results as input for separate fission product/aerosol dynamic transport calculations. It is recognized that there are several areas in which the thermal-hydraulics and the fission product/aerosol behavior may be significantly coupled and that it is then basically incorrect to do the analyses in a separated manner. This review paper produces a speculative list of these potentially coupled areas and attempts to assess the importance of the coupling for as many of the specific items that time has allowed before this conference

  6. Recovery in stages I and II of thermal and fission neutron irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Redman, J.K.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of initial dose and irradiation doping upon the recovery of Mo was studied for the markedly different types of damage produced by thermal and fission neutrons. The features of the Stage I recovery commonly seen for several fcc metals can be identified, including a I/sub D/ peak at 40 0 K. The typical dose-dependent behavior of a I/sub E/ subpeak was observed at approximately 47 0 K, and evidence for free interstitial migration is further supported by irradiation doping results. Stage II shows a first-order peak at 120 0 K in which the population percentage increases with increasing initial dose in opposite fashion to fcc impurity detrapping peaks. (auth)

  7. Application of fission track analysis to hydrocarbon exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Gleadow, A.J.W.; Marshallsea, S.; Tingate, P.; Laslett, G.M.; Hegarty, K.A.; Lovering, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature range over which fission tracks in apatite show observable annealing effects coincides with that responsible for the maximum generation of liquid hydrocarbons. Work is currently in progress in a number of Australian and overseas sedimentary basins, applying Apatite Fission Track Analysis (AFTA) to investigate the thermal evolution of these hydrocarbon prospective regions

  8. Fission product data for thermal reactors. Final report. Part I. A data set for EPRI-CINDER using ENDF/B-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.; Stamatelatos, M.G.

    1976-12-01

    A four-group fission-product neutron absorption library, appropriate for use in thermal reactors, is described. All decay parameters are taken from ENDF/B-IV. The absorption cross sections are also processed from ENDF/B-IV files, first into a 154-group set and subsequently collapsed into the 4-group set described in this report. The decay and cross section data were used to form 84 linear chains in the CINDER code format. These chains contain all significant fission products having half-lives exceeding 4 hours--a total of 186 nuclides. A 12-chain set containing one pseudo-chain for use in spatial depletion calculations is described. This set accurately reproduces the aggregate absorption buildup of the 84 chains. This report describes the chains and processed data, results of comparison calculations for various fuels, and a comparison of calculated temporal fission-product absorption buildup with corresponding results from a long-term fuel irradiation and cooling integral experiment

  9. Thermal annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, chlorapatite, manganoanapatite, and Durango apatite: experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravenhurst, C.E.; Roden-Tice, M.K.; Miller, D.S.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the optically measured lengths of fission tracks in apatite crystals are a function of etching conditions, crystallographic orientation of the track, composition of the crystal, and the state of thermal annealing. In this study we standardize etching conditions and optimize track length measurability by etching until etch pits formed at the surface of each apatite crystal reached widths of about 0.74 μm. Etching times using 5M HNO 3 at 21 o C were 31 s for Otter Lake, Quebec, fluorapatite; 47 s for Durango, Mexico, apatite; 33 s for Portland, Connecticut, manganoanapatite; and 11 s for Bamle, Norway, chlorapatite. An etching experiment using two etchant strengths (5M and 1.6M HNO 3 ) revealed that, despite significant differences in etch pit shape, fission-track length anisotropy with respect to crystallographic orientation of the tracks is not a chemical etching effect. A series of 227 constant-temperature annealing experiments were carried out on nuclear reactor induced tracks in oriented slices of the apatites. After etching, crystallographic orientations of tracks were measured along with their lengths. The 200-300 track lengths measured for each slice were ellipse-fitted to give the major (c crystallographic direction) and minor (a crystallographic direction) semi-axes used to calculate equivalent isotropic lengths. The equivalent isotropic length is more useful than mean length for thermal history analysis because the variation caused by anisotropy has been removed. Using normalized etching procedures and equivalent isotropic length data, we found that the fluorapatite anneals most readily, followed by Durango apatite, manganoanapatite, and lastly chlorapatite. (author)

  10. A Novel Portable Absolute Transient Hot-Wire Instrument for the Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Marc J.; Antoniadis, Konstantinos D.; Metaxa, Ifigeneia N.; Mylona, Sofia K.; Assael, John-Alexander M.; Wu, Jiangtao; Hu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    A new portable absolute Transient Hot-Wire instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of solids over a range of 0.2 { W}{\\cdot }m^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} to 4 { W}{\\cdot }m^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} is presented. The new instrument is characterized by three novelties: (a) an innovative two-wires sensor which provides robustness and portability, while at the same time employs a soft silicone layer to eliminate the effect of the contact resistance between the wires and the sample, (b) a newly designed compact portable printed electronic board employing an FPGA architecture CPU to the control output voltage and data processing—the new board replaces the traditional, large in size Wheatstone-type bridge system required to perform the experimental measurements, and (c) a cutting-edge software suite, developed for the mesh describing the structure of the sensor, and utilizing the Finite Elements Method to model the heat flow. The estimation of thermal conductivity is modeled as a minimization problem and is solved using Bayesian Optimization. Our revolutionizing proposed methodology exhibits radical speedups of up to × 120, compared to previous approaches, and considerably reduces the number of simulations performed, achieving convergence only in a few minutes. The new instrument was successfully employed to measure, at room temperature, the thermal conductivity of two thermal conductivity reference materials, Pyroceram 9606 and Pyrex 7740, and two possible candidate glassy solids, PMMA and BK7, with an absolute low uncertainty of 2 %.

  11. Comparison of the ENIGMA code with experimental data on thermal performance, stable fission gas and iodine release at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killeen, J C [Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The predictions of the ENIGMA code have been compared with data from high burn-up fuel experiments from the Halden and RISO reactors. The experiments modelled were IFA-504 and IFA-558 from Halden and the test II-5 from the RISO power burnup test series. The code has well modelled the fuel thermal performance and has provided a good measure of iodine release from pre-interlinked fuel. After interlinkage the iodine predictions remain a good fit for one experiment, but there is significant overprediction for a second experiment (IFA-558). Stable fission gas release is also well modelled and the predictions are within the expected uncertainly band throughout the burn-up range. This report presents code predictions for stable fission gas release to 40GWd/tU, iodine release measurements to 50GWd/tU and thermal performance (fuel centre temperature) to 55GWd/tU. Fuel ratings of up to 38kW/m were modelled at the high burn-up levels. The code is shown to accurately or conservatively predict all these parameters. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs.

  12. Fission - track age of the Marjalahti Pallasite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, Yu.V.; Perelygin, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Investigation of fossil charged-particle tracks in various mineral phases of extraterrestrial samples is a powerful method for research the early stages of the solar system. Over geological time, meteorites crystals have accumulated a record of tracks produced by heavily charged energetic particles from both internal (spontaneous fission of 238U and some other extinct isotopes) and external sources (galactic cosmic rays with Z>20). The fortunate fact that meteorite grains can accumulate latent and very long-lived tracks since soon after the end of nucleosynthesis in the solar nebula enables one to decode their radiation history and to detect any thermal events in the meteorite cosmic history by revealing these tracks through suitable etching procedures. Only a few minerals in meteorites (mainly phosphates) contain small amount of uranium; the fact that 238 U undergoes fission with fission-decay constant λ f ∼ 8.2x10 -17 yr -1 allows one to use this isotope as a chronometer. By measuring the U concentration in the crystals (by reactor irradiation) and the density of the spontaneous-fission tracks it is relatively easy to calculate the 'fission-track age' if 238 U is the main source of fission tracks. However the fission-track dating of extraterrestrial samples compared with the terrestrial ones has some peculiar features due to presence of a number of other potential track sources except the spontaneous fission of 238 U, such as the spontaneous fission of presently extinct 244 Pu, heavy nuclei of cosmic rays and induced fission by cosmic ray primaries. Only tracks from the spontaneous fission of U and Pu are suitable for fission-track dating. The competing effects of these fissioning elements, whose half-lives differ by a factor of ∼50, form a basis for a fission-track chronology for samples older than ∼ 4.0 Gyr. Over small intervals in time (∼ few x10 8 yr ) the track density from spontaneous fission of 238 U is nearly constant. However, the

  13. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  14. The status of fission product yield data (FPND) in 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuninghame, J.G.

    1977-05-01

    The topics covered is this paper are:- (a) cumulative yields in thermal neutron fission and in fast fission up to 14 MeV incident neutron energy; (b) dependence of the yields on incident neutron energy and spectrum; (c) independent yields; (d) charge dispersion and distribution, and (e) yields of light particles from ternary fission. The paper reviews information on these subjects for fission of actinides from 232 Th upwards, with special emphasis on data published since the 1973 Bologna FPND Panel, compares data sets and discusses the gaps still to be found in them. (author)

  15. Separation of fission products by the use of recoil; Separation des produits de fission par utilisation du recul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, R; Beydon, J; Bardy, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    We have studied fission recoil in U{sub 3}O{sub 8} organic solvent mixtures. The organic phase chosen was first naphtalene then terphenyl. Graphite and activated carbon were also tried out as recoil media. We first verified that the fission fragments are ejected from the uranium oxide particles under our experimental conditions. The retention phenomenon observed is due to an adsorption occurring either during irradiation or during the chemical treatment. Using naphthalene or terphenyl, the individual separation of the fission products has made it possible to show the influence of the chemical nature of the recoil medium on the retention of each fission product. We put forward a hypothesis concerning this phenomenon: experiments carried out using 'scavengers', together with kinetic studies make it possible to explain the retention phenomenon and to choose the most favorable conditions for reducing this retention to a low value. The thermal recombination kinetics demonstrate the influence of the fission ion charge on the final value of the retention for a given temperature. The origins of this thermal recombination are discussed. (author) [French] On a etudie le recul de fission dans les melanges U{sub 3}0{sub 8}, phase organique. La phase organique choisie a ete le naphtalene puis le terphenyle. Le graphite et le charbon actif ont egalement ete essayes comme milieux de recul. On a d'abord determine que les fragments de fission sortent des particules d'oxyde d'uranium avec un rendement de 100 pour cent dans nos conditions experimentales. Le phenomene de retention observe est du a une adsorption ayant lieu pendant l'irradiation ou pendant le traitement chimique. Dans le naphtalene et le terphenyle, la separation individuelle des produits de fission a permis de mettre en evidence l'influence de la nature chimique du milieu de recul sur la retention de chaque produit de fission. On avance une hypothese sur ce phenomene: des experiences effectuees avec des 'scavengers

  16. Dispersion of the Neutron Emission in U{sup 235} Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feynman, R. P.; de Hoffmann, F.; Serber, R.

    1955-01-01

    Equations are developed which allow the calculation of the average number of neutrons per U{sup235} fission from experimental measurements. Experimental methods are described, the results of which give a value of (7.8 + 0.6){sup ½} neutrons per U{sup 235} thermal fission.

  17. Fission theory and actinide fission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A.

    1975-06-01

    The understanding of the fission process has made great progress recently, as a result of the calculation of fission barriers, using the Strutinsky prescription. Double-humped shapes were obtained for nuclei in the actinide region. Such shapes could explain, in a coherent manner, many different phenomena: fission isomers, structure in near-threshold fission cross sections, intermediate structure in subthreshold fission cross sections and anisotropy in the emission of the fission fragments. A brief review of fission barrier calculations and relevant experimental data is presented. Calculations of fission cross sections, using double-humped barrier shapes and fission channel properties, as obtained from the data discussed previously, are given for some U and Pu isotopes. The fission channel theory of A. Bohr has greatly influenced the study of low-energy fission. However, recent investigation of the yields of prompt neutrons and γ rays emitted in the resonances of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, together with the spin determination for many resonances of these two nuclei cannot be explained purely in terms of the Bohr theory. Variation in the prompt neutron and γ-ray yields from resonance to resonance does not seem to be due to such fission channels, as was thought previously, but to the effect of the (n,γf) reaction. The number of prompt fission neutrons and the kinetic energy of the fission fragments are affected by the energy balance and damping or viscosity effects in the last stage of the fission process, from saddle point to scission. These effects are discussed for some nuclei, especially for {sup 240}Pu.

  18. Measurement of p-odd asymmetry of fragment escape in ternary fission of plutonium 239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belozerov, A.V.; Vodennikov, B.D.; Danilyan, G.V.; Korobkina, E.I.; Pavlov, V.S.; Pevchev, Yu.F.; Sadchikov, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    Values of effects of parity nonconservation in binary and ternary fission of plutonium 239 by polarized thermal neutrons were measured simultaneously. The ratio of asymmetry coefficient (AC) of ternary fission to the AC of binary fission was equal to 0.67+-0.20. The obtained result testifies to insignificant disagreement of AC of fragment escape in studied fission types

  19. Thermal conductivity of hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucuta, P G; Verrall, R A [Chalk River Labs., AECL Research, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Matzke, H [CEC Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    At extended burnup, reduction in fuel thermal conductivity occurs as fission-gas bubble, solid fission-product (dissolved and precipitated) build-up, and the oxygen-to-uranium ratio (O/U) possible increases. The effects of solid fission products and the deviation from stoichiometry can be investigated using SIMFUEL (SIMulated high-burnup UO{sub 2} FUEL). The reduction in fuel conductivity due to solid fission products was assessed and reported previously. In this paper, thermal conductivity measurements on hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL and UO{sub 2+x} investigating the effect of the excess of oxygen on fuel thermal properties, are reported. The thermal diffusivity, specific heat and density of hyperstorichiometric SIMFUEL and UO{sub 2+x}, annealed at the same oxygen potential, were measured to obtain thermal conductivity. The excess of oxygen lowered to the thermal diffusivity, but did not significantly affect the specific heat. The thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2+x} (no fission products present) decreases with an increasing O/U ratio; a reduction of 15%, 37% and 56% at 600 deg. C, and 11%, 23% and 33% at 1500 deg. C, was found for O/U ratios of 2.007, 2.035 and 2.084, respectively. For the SIMFUEL annealed at {Delta}Go{sub 2} = -245 kJ/mol (corresponding to UO{sub 2,007}), the thermal conductivity was practically unchanged, although for the higher oxygen potentials ({Delta}Go{sub 2} {>=} -205 kJ/mol) a reduction in thermal conductivity of the same order as in UO{sub 2+x} W as measured. For SIMFUEL, annealed in reducing conditions, the fission products lowered thermal conductivity significantly. However, for high oxygen potentials ({Delta}Go{sub 2} {>=} -205 kJ/mol), the thermal conductivities of UO{sub 2+x} and SIMFUEL were found to be approximately equal in the temperature range of 600 to 1500 deg. C. Consequently, excess oxygen is the dominant factor contributing to thermal conductivity degradation at high oxygen potentials. (author). 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  20. Thermal conductivity of hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucuta, P.G.; Verrall, R.A.; Matzke, H.

    1997-01-01

    At extended burnup, reduction in fuel thermal conductivity occurs as fission-gas bubble, solid fission-product (dissolved and precipitated) build-up, and the oxygen-to-uranium ratio (O/U) possible increases. The effects of solid fission products and the deviation from stoichiometry can be investigated using SIMFUEL (SIMulated high-burnup UO 2 FUEL). The reduction in fuel conductivity due to solid fission products was assessed and reported previously. In this paper, thermal conductivity measurements on hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL and UO 2+x investigating the effect of the excess of oxygen on fuel thermal properties, are reported. The thermal diffusivity, specific heat and density of hyperstorichiometric SIMFUEL and UO 2+x , annealed at the same oxygen potential, were measured to obtain thermal conductivity. The excess of oxygen lowered to the thermal diffusivity, but did not significantly affect the specific heat. The thermal conductivity of UO 2+x (no fission products present) decreases with an increasing O/U ratio; a reduction of 15%, 37% and 56% at 600 deg. C, and 11%, 23% and 33% at 1500 deg. C, was found for O/U ratios of 2.007, 2.035 and 2.084, respectively. For the SIMFUEL annealed at ΔGo 2 = -245 kJ/mol (corresponding to UO 2,007 ), the thermal conductivity was practically unchanged, although for the higher oxygen potentials (ΔGo 2 ≥ -205 kJ/mol) a reduction in thermal conductivity of the same order as in UO 2+x W as measured. For SIMFUEL, annealed in reducing conditions, the fission products lowered thermal conductivity significantly. However, for high oxygen potentials (ΔGo 2 ≥ -205 kJ/mol), the thermal conductivities of UO 2+x and SIMFUEL were found to be approximately equal in the temperature range of 600 to 1500 deg. C. Consequently, excess oxygen is the dominant factor contributing to thermal conductivity degradation at high oxygen potentials. (author). 9 figs, 2 tabs

  1. PC based system for absolute neutron flux-spectrum measurements. Final report for the period 1 April 1994 - 15 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrea, D.

    1998-01-01

    When measuring absolute neutron flux-spectra, thin detector foils are irradiated in a neutron field. The absolute activity of isotopes generated by activation or fission reactions (fission products) is then measured, using an efficiency calibrated high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy system, and the absolute reaction rates for their production is determined. Finally the flux-spectrum is determined based upon the reaction rate values. A general method to obtain flux-spectra from the reaction rate is the unfolding method. The above process involves computations of photopeak area, reaction rate, flux perturbation corrections and flux-spectrum. The PC's are well suited for the data processing system outlined above. Using available interfaces, the PC's can be involved even in the data acquisition. Graphical facilities allow decision upon the data processing flow

  2. Fission track imaging of the Australian continent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleadow, A.; Kohn, B.; O'Sullivan, P.; Brown, R.; Gallagher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Techniques to reconstruct the thermal histories of rocks in the low-temperature environment of the upper crust have previously found important applications in such areas as sedimentary basin analysis, the evolution of convergent orogenic belts and studies of extensional tectonic environments. Increasingly large sets of thermochronology data are now becoming available on an even larger scale from the apatite fission-track system (for temperatures <∼110 deg C). Additional information is also now starting to emerge at even lower temperatures (<∼75 deg C) from the apatite (U-Th)/He system. The results from such systems can be used in novel ways to examine and visualise the evolution of the upper part of the continental crust. Quantitative modelling has brought a new dimension to this work and forward-modelling procedures are now well established which give 'best fit' thermal histories for temperatures less than about 110 deg C. In many cases the modelled thermal histories provide a proxy for rock transport towards the surface as overlying material is removed by denudation. Such information allows a reconstruction of the denudation history of the land surface. Applying these modelling procedures to large regional arrays of fission-track data means that the thermal history information can now be integrated with other regional data sets to provide an important new perspective on crustal and surface evolution. Apatite fission track analysis has now been completed on nearly 3000 surface outcrop samples across Australia under an AGCRC project to image the thermotectonic evolution of the exposed basement rocks of the continent. The samples analysed are mostly from rocks of broadly granitic composition and the apatites separated from these are overwhelmingly fluorapatites, which are consistent in their fission-track annealing properties with those on which the numerical annealing models are based. By interpolating the calculated thermal histories a series of

  3. Measurement of the 235U/238U fission cross section ratio in the 235U fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimi-Garakani, D.; Bagheri-Darbandi, M.

    1983-06-01

    Fission cross section ratio of 235 U to 238 U has been measured in the fast neutron field generated by the 235 U fission plate installed on the thermal column of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) with a Makrofol solid state nuclear track detector. The experiments were carried out with a set of total six enriched 235 U and depleted 238 U deposits with different masses and Makrofol films of 0.025mm and 0.060mm thicknesses. The chemically etched tracks were counted by an optical microscope. No significant differences were observed with the thin and the thick films. The results showed that the average fission cross section ratio is 3.83+-0.25. (author)

  4. Reference and standard benchmark field consensus fission yields for U.S. reactor dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, D.M.; Helmer, R.G.; Greenwood, R.C.; Rogers, J.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Popek, R.J.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; Hansen, G.E.; Zimmer, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Measured fission product yields are reported for three benchmark neutron fields--the BIG-10 fast critical assembly at Los Alamos, the CFRMF fast neutron cavity at INEL, and the thermal column of the NBS Research Reactor. These measurements were carried out by participants in the Interlaboratory LMFBR Reaction Rates (ILRR) program. Fission product generation rates were determined by post-irradiation analysis of gamma-ray emission from fission activation foils. The gamma counting was performed by Ge(Li) spectrometry at INEL, ANL, and HEDL; the sample sent to INEL was also analyzed by NaI(Tl) spectrometry for Ba-140 content. The fission rates were determined by means of the NBS Double Fission Ionization Chamber using thin deposits of each of the fissionable isotopes. Four fissionable isotopes were included in the fast neutron field measurements; these were U-235, U-238, Pu-239, and Np-237. Only U-235 was included in the thermal neutron yield measurements. For the fast neutron fields, consensus yields were determined for three fission product isotopes--Zr-95, Ru-103, and Ba-140. For these fission product isotopes, a separately activated foil was analyzed by each of the three gamma counting laboratories. The experimental standard deviation of the three independent results was typically +- 1.5%. For the thermal neutron field, a consensus value for the Cs-137 yield was also obtained. Subsidiary fission yields are also reported for other isotopes which were studied less intensively (usually by only one of the participating laboratories). Comparisons with EBR-II fast reactor yields from destructive analysis and with ENDF/B recommended values are given

  5. Prognostic value of preoperative absolute lymphocyte count in recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma following thermal ablation: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Xin Li, Zhiyu Han, Zhigang Cheng, Jie Yu, Xiaoling Yu, Ping Liang Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of preoperative absolute lymphocyte count (ALC in recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (RHCC following thermal ablation. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between preoperative ALC and the clinicopathologic factors and long-term prognosis in 423 RHCC patients who underwent curative thermal ablation. Correlation analysis, receiver operating characteristic (ROC calculation, Kaplan–Meier curves, and multivariate regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: The median time to recurrence was 12 months for RHCC patients after thermal ablation. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, preoperative ALC was an independent risk factor for cancer recurrence, along with tumor differentiation and α-fetoprotein level. ALC ≥1.64×109/L defined by ROC calculation was associated with prolonged survival (area under the curve 0.741, P<0.001. Patients with ALC ≥1.64×109/L showed a mean survival of 20.2 months versus 11.6 months for patients with ALC <1.64×109/L (P<0.001. Patients were stratified into high and low groups according to ALC status. After excluding the basic parameters between groups, the 1- and 3-year recurrence rates in the high group were 20.9% and 29.5%, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of the low group (58.4% and 71.9%, respectively; P<0.001. The recurrence-free survival rates in the two groups analyzed by Kaplan–Meier curves were significantly different (P<0.001. Conclusion: Preoperative ALC is a powerful prognostic factor for RHCC recurrence after thermal ablation, which suggests that maintaining a high ALC in RHCC patients might improve cancer outcomes. Keywords: absolute lymphocyte count, recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma, thermal ablation, recurrence  

  6. Modelisation of the fission cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morariu, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    The neutron cross sections of four nuclear systems (n+ 235 U, n+ 233 U, n+ 241 Am and n+ 237 Np) are studied in the present document. The target nuclei of the first case, like 235 U and 239 Pu, have a large fission cross section after the absorption of thermal neutrons. These nuclei are called 'fissile' nuclei. The other type of nuclei, like 237 Np and 241 Am, fission mostly with fast neutrons, which exceed the fission threshold energy. These types of nuclei are called 'fertile'. The compound nuclei of the fertile nuclei have a binding energy higher than the fission barrier, while for the fissile nuclei the binding energy is lower than the fission barrier. In this work, the neutron induced cross sections for both types of nuclei are evaluated in the fast energy range. The total, reaction and shape-elastic cross sections are calculated by the coupled channel method of the optical model code ECIS, while the compound nucleus mechanism are treated by the statistical models implemented in the codes STATIS, GNASH and TALYS. The STATIS code includes a refined model of the fission process. Results from the theoretical calculations are compared with data retrieved from the experimental data base EXFOR. (author) [fr

  7. Advantages of Production of New Fissionable Nuclides for the Nuclear Power Industry in Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibulskiy, V. F.; Andrianova, E. A.; Davidenko, V. D.; Rodionova, E. V.; Tsibulskiy, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    A concept of a large-scale nuclear power engineering system equipped with fusion and fission reactors is presented. The reactors have a joint fuel cycle, which imposes the lowest risk of the radiation impact on the environment. The formation of such a system is considered within the framework of the evolution of the current nuclear power industry with the dominance of thermal reactors, gradual transition to the thorium fuel cycle, and integration into the system of the hybrid fusion-fission reactors for breeding nuclear fuel for fission reactors. Such evolution of the nuclear power engineering system will allow preservation of the existing structure with the dominance of thermal reactors, enable the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with low burnup, and prevent the dangerous accumulation of minor actinides. The proposed structure of the nuclear power engineering system minimizes the risk of radioactive contamination of the environment and the SNF reprocessing facilities, decreasing it by more than one order of magnitude in comparison with the proposed scheme of closing the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle based on the reprocessing of SNF with high burnup from fast reactors.

  8. Systematics of neutron-induced fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachot, J.; Brissot, R.

    1983-10-01

    The main characteristics of the mass and charge distributions for thermal neutron induced fission of actinides are reviewed. We show that these distributions can be reasonably reproduced with only 24 data as input. We use a representation where the element yields together with the most probable mass Ap(Z) play the dominant role. The ability of this model to calculate mass yields for the fission of not yet measured actinides is also shown. The influence of the excitation energy of the fissile system on charge and mass distribution is also discussed

  9. Fission-track studies of uranium distribution in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynard, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The standard method of studying uranium distribution in geological material by registration of fission tracks from the thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U has been adapted for utilisation in the SAFARI-1 reactor at Pelindaba. The theory of fission-track registration as well as practical problems are discussed. The method has been applied to study uranium distribution in a variety of rock types and the results are discussed in this paper. The method is very sensitive and uranium present in quantities far below the detection limit of the microprobe have been detected

  10. Considerations in modeling fission gas release during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumble, E.T.; Lim, E.Y.; Stuart, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    The EPRI LWR fuel rod modeling code evaluation program analyzed seven fuel rods with experimental fission gas release data. In these cases, rod-averged burnups are less than 20,000 MWD/MTM, while the fission gas release fractions range roughly from 2 to 27%. Code results demonstrate the complexities in calculating fission gas release in certain operating regimes. Beyond this work, the behavior of a pre-pressurized PWR rod is simulated to average burnups of 40,000 MWD/MTM using GAPCON-THERMAL-2. Analysis of the sensitivity of fission gas release to power histories and release correlations indicate the strong impact that LMFBR type release correlations induce at high burnup. 15 refs

  11. Thermal and exhumation history of Sakhalin Island (Russia) constrained by apatite U-Pb and fission track thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorie, Stijn; Alexandrov, Igor; Nixon, Angus; Jepson, Gilby; Gillespie, Jack; Jahn, Bor-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Sakhalin Island represents a key locality to study the tectonic evolution of the western Pacific. The island is located at the Amur-Okhotsk plate margin and records a complex thermotectonic history. Apatite double dating (U-Pb and fission track) and thermal history modelling were applied to three late Eocene granitoid massifs within central and southern Sakhalin: the Aniva, Okhotsk and Langeri complexes. Apatite U-Pb results yield consistent late Eocene (∼40-37 Ma) ages, suggesting rapid post-magmatic cooling. Apatite fission track results reveal bimodal age distributions with late Eocene - early Oligocene (∼38-33 Ma) and early Miocene (∼20-17 Ma) age populations that can be correlated with variations in Uranium and Chlorine concentrations. Thermal history modelling translates the AFT age bimodality into two-phase cooling histories. The timing of the early cooling phase (∼38-33 Ma) corresponds with the apatite U-Pb ages, indicating rapid cooling to at least ∼100 °C during the late Oligocene. The second cooling phase at ∼20-17 Ma cooled the samples to near-surface temperatures. Both cooling phases correspond with regional unconformities and subsequent accelerations in sedimentation rate, suggesting that cooling was a response to rapid exhumation. In addition, our data suggests that the studied terranes record differential exhumation with respect to the structural architecture. The Miocene exhumation pulse is coeval with the timing of transpressional fault displacement and the subsequent opening of the Kuril Basin.

  12. Proposal to represent neutron absorption by fission products by a single pseudo-fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsibulya, A.M.; Kochetkov, A.L.; Kravchenko, I.V.; Nikolaev, M.N.

    1991-01-01

    The concentration of fission products during reactor operation is analyzed. The dependence of a composite fission product capture cross-section as a function of time and on the nature of the A of the fissile nuclide are investigated, and the neutron radiative capture in fission products of a thermal reactor is evaluated. It is concluded that neutron absorption by fission products can be described by pseudo-fragments. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Isotopic composition of fission gases in LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Many fuel rods from power reactors and test reactors have been punctured during past years for determination of fission gas release. In many cases the released gas was also analysed by mass spectrometry. The isotopic composition shows systematic variations between different rods, which are much larger than the uncertainties in the analysis. This paper discusses some possibilities and problems with use of the isotopic composition to decide from which part of the fuel the gas was released. In high burnup fuel from thermal reactors loaded with uranium fuel a significant part of the fissions occur in plutonium isotopes. The ratio Xe/Kr generated in the fuel is strongly dependent on the fissioning species. In addition, the isotopic composition of Kr and Xe shows a well detectable difference between fissions in different fissile nuclides. (author)

  14. The measurement of tripartition alpha particle low energy spectrum in 235U fission induced by thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hage Sleiman, F.

    1980-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the α particles emitted in the thermal neutron induced fission of 235 U was measured from 11.5 MeV down to 2 MeV using the parabola mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the ILL high flux reactor. A Monte Carlo program, that simulates the α particle motion to the spectrometer, has been developed. Numerical results of Monte Carlo calculations for differents values of parameter are reported. The overall energy spectrum is slightly asymmetric at low energy. The possible reasons for the existence of this asymmetry are discussed [fr

  15. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  16. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  17. Decay heat from products of 235U thermal fission by fast-response boil-off calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnell, J.L.; Bendt, P.J.

    1977-09-01

    A cryogenic boil-off calorimeter was used to measure the decay heat from the products of thermal-neutron-induced fission of 235 U. Data are presented for cooling times between 10 and 10 5 s following a 2 x 10 4 s irradiation at constant thermal-neutron flux. The experimental uncertainty (1 sigma) in these measurements was approximately 2 percent, except at the shortest cooling times where it rose to approximately 4 percent. The beta and gamma energy from an irradiated 235 U sample was absorbed in a thermally isolated 52-kg copper block that was held at 4 K by an internal liquid helium reservoir. The absorbed energy evaporated liquid helium from the reservoir and a hot-film anemometer flowmeter recorded the evolution rate of the boil-off gas. The decay heat was calculated from the gas-flow rate using the heat of vaporization of helium. The calorimeter had a thermal time constant of 0.85 s. The energy loss caused by gamma leakage from the absorber was less than or equal to 3 percent; a correction was made by Monte Carlo calculations based on experimentally determined gamma spectra. The data agree within the combined uncertainties with summation calculations using the ENDF/B-IV data base. The experimental data were combined with summation calculations to give the decay heat for infinite (10 13 s) irradiation

  18. The fission time scale measured with an atomic clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Hunyadi, M; Kopecky, S; Lohner, H; Rogachevskiy, A; Siemssen, RH; Krasznahorkay, A; Hamilton, JH; Ramayya, AV; Carter, HK

    2003-01-01

    We present a new direct method of measuring the fission absolute time scale using an atomic clock based on the lifetime of a vacancy in the atomic K-shell. We studied the reaction Ne-20 + Th-232 -> O-16 + U-236* at 30 MeV/u. The excitation energy of about 115 MeV in such a reaction is in the range

  19. Simultaneous measurement of neutrons and fission fragments of thermal neutron fission of U-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itsuro Kimura; Katsuhisa Nishio; Yoshihiro Nakagome

    2000-01-01

    The multiplicity and the energy of prompt neutrons from the fragments for 233 U(n th , f) were measured as functions of fragment mass and total kinetic energy. Average neutron energy against the fragment mass showed a nearly symmetric distribution about the half mass division with two valleys at 98 and 145 u. The slope of the neutron multiplicity with total kinetic energy depended on the fragment mass and showed the minimum at about 130 u. The obtained neutron data were applied to determine the total excitation energy of the system, and the resulting value in the typical asymmetric fission lied between 22 and 25 MeV. The excitation energy agreed with that determined by subtracting the total kinetic energy from the Q-value within 1 MeV, thus satisfied the energy conservation. In the symmetric fission, where the mass yield was drastically suppresses, the total excitation energy is significantly large and reaches to about 40 MeV, suggesting that fragment pairs are preferentially formed in a compact configuration at the scission point [ru

  20. Fission profits of thorium: Distribution in charge and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnieri, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is presented the improvement of a semi-empiric model to describe behavior fo the 235 U + thermal neutrons system. The model is applied to fission of the 232 Th case reproducing the distribution of mass profits of fission products from the behavior of independent profits of fragments related the mass and charge, and the emission of prompt neutrons per fragment. (M.C.K.) [pt

  1. Recent progress in fission at saddle point and scission point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blons, J.; Paya, D.; Signarbieux, C.

    High resolution measurements of 230 Th and 232 Th fission cross sections for neutrons exhibit a fine structure. Such a structure is interpreted as a superposition of two rotational bands in the third, asymmetric, well of the fission barrier. The fragment mass distribution in the thermal fission of 235 U and 233 U does not show any even-odd effect, even at the highest kinetic energies. This is the mark of a strong viscosity in the descent from saddle point to scission point [fr

  2. Methods to Collect, Compile, and Analyze Observed Short-lived Fission Product Gamma Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Ellis, Tere A.

    2011-09-29

    A unique set of fission product gamma spectra was collected at short times (4 minutes to 1 week) on various fissionable materials. Gamma spectra were collected from the neutron-induced fission of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes at thermal, epithermal, fission spectrum, and 14-MeV neutron energies. This report describes the experimental methods used to produce and collect the gamma data, defines the experimental parameters for each method, and demonstrates the consistency of the measurements.

  3. U and Th thin film neutron dosimetry for fission-track dating: application to the age standard Moldavite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iunes, P.J.; Bigazzi, G.; Hadler Neto, J.C.; Laurenzi, M.A.; Balestrieri, M.L.; Norelli, P.; Osorio Araya, A.M.; Guedes, S.; Tello S, C.A.; Paulo, S.R.; Moreira, P.A.F.P.; Palissari, R.; Curvo, E.A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry based on U and Th thin films was used for fission-track dating of the age standard Moldavite, the central European tektite, from the Middle Miocene deposit of Jankov (southern Bohemia, Czech Republic). Our fission-track age (13.98+/-0.58Ma) agrees with a recent 40 Ar/ 39 Ar age, 14.34+/-0.04Ma, based on several determinations on Moldavites from different sediments, including the Jankov deposit. This result indicates that the U and Th thin film neutron dosimetry represents a reliable alternative for an absolute approach in fission-track dating

  4. Continuous fission-product monitor system at Oyster Creek. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.L.; Chulick, E.T.

    1980-10-01

    A continuous on-line fission product monitor has been installed at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Forked River, New Jersey. The on-line monitor is a minicomputer-controlled high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer system. An intrinsic Ge detector scans a collimated sample line of coolant from one of the plant's recirculation loops. The minicomputer is a Nuclear Data 6620 system. Data were accumulated for the period from April 1979 through January 1980, the end of cycle 8 for the Oyster Creek plant. Accumulated spectra, an average of three a day, were stored on magnetic disk and subsequently analyzed for fisson products, Because of difficulties in measuring absolute detector efficiency, quantitative fission product concentrations in the coolant could not be determined. Data for iodine fission products are reported as a function of time. The data indicate the existence of fuel defects in the Oyster Creek core during cycle 8

  5. Angular distribution of oriented nucleus fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of anisotropy of angular distribution of oriented 235 U nuclei thermal fission neutrons have been carried out. the neutrons were assumed to evaporate isotropically by completely accelerated fragements in the fragment system with only its small part, i. e. fission-producing neutrons, emitted at the moment of neck break. It has been found out that at low energies of neutrons Esub(n)=1-2 MeV the sensitivity of the angular distribution anisotropy to variations of spectrum of neutron evaporation from fragments and the magnitude of a share of fission-producing neutrons reaches approximately 100%, which at high energies, Esub(n) > 5 MeV it does not exceed approximately 20%. Therefore the angular distribution of fast neutrons to a greater degree of confidence may be used for restoring the angular distribution anisotropy of fragments while the angular distribution of low energy neutrons may be used for deriving information on the fission process, but only in case 6f the experiment accuracy is better than approximately 3%

  6. User's manual for computer code RIBD-II, a fission product inventory code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    The computer code RIBD-II is used to calculate inventories, activities, decay powers, and energy releases for the fission products generated in a fuel irradiation. Changes from the earlier RIBD code are: the expansion to include up to 850 fission product isotopes, input in the user-oriented NAMELIST format, and run-time choice of fuels from an extensively enlarged library of nuclear data. The library that is included in the code package contains yield data for 818 fission product isotopes for each of fourteen different fissionable isotopes, together with fission product transmutation cross sections for fast and thermal systems. Calculational algorithms are little changed from those in RIBD. (U.S.)

  7. Contribution of the fission-track method to the study of the Alpine chains: relationship between tectonics and metamorphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpena, J.

    1984-01-01

    The fission-track method allows geologists to date rocks and to get information on the thermal history of rocks. Fission tracks in minerals are essentially due to the spontaneous fission of uranium 238. The knowledge of the density of tracks and the concentration of uranium 238 lead to the determination of the age of the rock. The irradiation in a neutron flux of a sample of the rock allows the determination of the concentration of uranium. The age obtained is in fact an apparent age that does not take into account possible geological annealing process that may erase fission tracks, some corrections are then necessary. The first part of this work details the fission-track method, its scope and limitations. It is shown that fission-track method on apatites can reveal the thermal evolution of the rock and that the same method used on zircons can give information of the setting of volcanic rocks. The second part is dedicated to the contribution of the fission-track method to a both dating and thermal evolution study of a french-italian part of the Alpine chain

  8. Thermal neutron converter for irradiations with fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, F.M.; Kampfer, S.; Kastenmuller, A.; Waschkowski, W.; Bucherl, Th.; Kampfer, S.

    2007-01-01

    The new research reactor FRM II at Garching started operation in March 2004. The compact core is cooled by light water, and moderated by heavy water. Two fuel plates mounted in the heavy water tank convert thermal to fast neutrons. The fast neutron flux in the connected beam tube is up to 7 centre dot 10 8 s -1 cm -2 (depending on filters and collimation); the mean neutron energy is about 1.6 MeV. There are two irradiation rooms along the beam. The first is mainly used for medical therapy (MEDAPP facility), the second for materials characterization (NECTAR facility). At the former therapy facility RENT at the old research reactor FRM, the same beam quality was available until July 2000. Therefore, only a small program is run for the determination of the biological effectiveness of the new beam. The neutron and gamma dose rates in the medical beam are 0.54 and 0.20 Gy/min, respectively. The therapy facility MEDAPP is still under examination according to European regulations for medical devices. Full medical operation will start in 2007. The radiography and tomography facility NECTAR is in operation and aims at non-destructive inspection of objects up to 400 kg mass and 80 centre dot 80 centre dot 80 cm 3 in size. As for fission neutrons the macroscopic cross section of hydrogen is much higher than for other materials (e. g. Fe and Pb), one special application is the detection of hydrogen-containing materials (e. g. oil) in dense materials

  9. Fission-product SiC reaction in HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, F.

    1981-01-01

    The primary barrier to release of fission product from any of the fuel types into the primary circuit of the HTGR are the coatings on the fuel particles. Both pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings are very effective in retaining fission gases under normal operating conditions. One of the possible performance limitations which has been observed in irradiation tests of TRISO fuel is chemical interaction of the SiC layer with fission products. This reaction reduces the thickness of the SiC layer in TRISO particles and can lead to release of fission products from the particles if the SiC layer is completely penetrated. The experimental section of this report describes the results of work at General Atomic concerning the reaction of fission products with silicon carbide. The discussion section describes data obtained by various laboratories and includes (1) a description of the fission products which have been found to react with SiC; (2) a description of the kinetics of silicon carbide thinning caused by fission product reaction during out-of-pile thermal gradient heating and the application of these kinetics to in-pile irradiation; and (3) a comparison of silicon carbide thinning in LEU and HEU fuels

  10. Absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heft, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Environmental Science Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has in use a system of absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Basically, absolute INAA is dependent upon the absolute measurement of the disintegration rates of the nuclides produced by neutron capture. From such disintegration rate data, the amount of the target element present in the irradiated sample is calculated by dividing the observed disintegration rate for each nuclide by the expected value for the disintegration rate per microgram of the target element that produced the nuclide. In absolute INAA, the expected value for disintegration rate per microgram is calculated from nuclear parameters and from measured values of both thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes which were present during irradiation. Absolute INAA does not depend on the concurrent irradiation of elemental standards but does depend on the values for thermal and epithermal neutron capture cross-sections for the target nuclides. A description of the analytical method is presented

  11. Fission product source term research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to describe some of the research being performed at ORNL in support of the effort to describe, as realistically as possible, fission product source terms for nuclear reactor accidents. In order to make this presentation manageable, only those studies directly concerned with fission product behavior, as opposed to thermal hydraulics, accident sequence progression, etc., will be discussed

  12. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  13. Chrono-thermométrie par traces de fission : une perspective nouvelle pour la prospection pétrolière Chronothermometry by Fission-Track Dating: New Means for Petroleum Prospection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storzer D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La propriété caractéristique des traces de fission d'enregistrer les paléotempératures offre la possibilité unique de caler des événements thermiques dans leur contexte géologique et donc de modéliser quantitativement les histoires thermiques des roches. Le thermomètre traces de fission-apatite enregistre les paléo-températures dans un intervalle compris entre 30 et 170°C, domaine qui inclut les températures généralement retenues pour la genèse optimale des hydrocarbures liquides. La formation, la maturation et la destruction des hydrocarbures, de la même façon que la guérison des traces latentes, sont fonction des deux paramètres temps et températures; en conséquence, l'étude détaillée de l'effacement progressif des traces latentes fossiles dans les apatites en fonction de leur profondeur dans un puits, conduit à des indications précises sur les variations de la température en fonction du temps à l'intérieur de la fenêtre à huile. Ces deux informations sont obtenues en combinant la datation traces de fission-isochrone et les analyses de longueurs des traces de fission. Le potentiel de la méthode des traces de fission dans son application à la reconstitution de l'histoire thermique des bassins sédimentaires est illustré à partir de l'analyse d'apatites détritiques provenant des bassins intérieur et côtier du Gabon d'une part et du bassin d'Otway en Australie du Sud d'autre part. The characteristic property of fission tracks to record paleotemperatures provides a unique possibility of setting thermal events in their geological context and hence of quantitatively modeling the thermal histories of rocks. The fission track apatite-thermometer records paleotemperatures in the interval between 30 and 170°C, a range that includes the temperatures generally considered to be required for the optimum formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The formation, maturation and destruction of hydrocarbons, as well as the

  14. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA

    2009-01-27

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  15. Yields of some fragments on 235U, 238U and 239Pu fission due to the neutrons of the SBR-1 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurova, L.N.; Bushuev, A.V.; Ozerkov, V.N.; Chachin, V.V.; Zvonarev, A.V.; Liforov, Yu.G.; Koleganov, Yu.V.; Miller, V.V.; Gorbatyuk, O.V.

    1979-01-01

    Determined are the values of the yields of fission fragments in spectrum close to that of the neutron fission using the data on yields at fission by thermal neutrons. The relation between the activities of fragments in samples irradiated in the BR-1 center and in the thermal colomn of the same reactor was measured with the help of the Ge(Li). The relative rate of fissions in uranium and plutonium samples in the center or in thermal colomn were measured by track detectors. The comparison of the yields obtained and the data of other authors is being made

  16. On the safety of conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.; Badham, V.; Caspi, S.; Chan, C.K.; Ferrell, W.J.; Frederking, T.H.K.; Grzesik, J.; Lee, J.Y.; McKone, T.E.; Pomraning, G.C.; Ullman, A.Z.; Ting, T.D.; Kim, Y.I.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary examination of some potential safety questions for conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors is presented in this paper. The study and subsequent analysis was largely based upon one design, a conceptual mirror fusion-fission reactor, operating on the deuterium-tritium plasma fusion fuel cycle and the uranium-plutonium fission fuel cycle. The major potential hazards were found to be: (a) fission products, (b) actinide elements, (c) induced radioactivity, and (d) tritium. As a result of these studies, it appears that highly reliable and even redundent decay heat removal must be provided. Loss of the ability to remove decay heat results in melting of fuel, with ultimate release of fission products and actinides to the containment. In addition, the studies indicate that blankets can be designed which will remain subcritical under extensive changes in both composition and geometry. Magnet safety and the effects of magnetic fields on thermal parameters were also considered. (Auth.)

  17. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [INL

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  18. Obsidian dating by fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, A.M.O.

    1990-12-01

    The fission track method was employed to obtain the age of twelve obsidian sample from Ecuador. By using the plateau-age correction method, we obtained the true age of each sample and were able to identify four groups of ages in the studied area. Thereafter we studied the fading of fission tracks in two obsidian samples with different origins: Yanaurcu, Ecuador and Monte Arci, Italy. We constructed Arrhenius plots and calculated activation energies for both samples. The results from thermal annealing experiments were compared with theoretical curves obtained by integrating an equation proposed by Shukolyukov et al (1965). (author). 43 refs, 20 figs, 10 tabs

  19. Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of {sup 239}Pu; Etude du nombre de neutrons produits par la fission de {sup 239}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of {sup 239}Pu. The counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by these fissions allows the study of the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by {nu} fission. In the first chapter, it studied the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by {sup 239}Pu fission with the energy of the incident neutron. A description of the experiment is given: a spectrometer with a crystal of sodium chloride or beryllium (mounted on a goniometer) is used, a fission chamber containing 10 mg of {sup 239}Pu and the neutron detection system constituted of BF{sub 3} counters which are enriched in {sup 10}B. In the second part, the counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by the same fission and received by two different groups of counters allow the determination of a relationship between the root mean square and the average of neutron number produced by fission. The variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of {sup 239}Pu is studied when we change from a thermal spectra of neutrons to a fission spectra of incident neutrons. Finally, when separating in two different part the fission chamber, it is possible to measure the mean number of neutrons emitted from fission of two different sources. It compared the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 233}U. (M.P.)

  20. Calculating the mass distribution of heavy nucleus fission product by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, A.N.; Koldobskij, A.B.; Kolobashkin, V.M.; Semenova, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of calculating the fission product mass yields by neutrons which are necessary for performing nucleus physical calculations in designing nuclear reactor cores is considered. The technique is based on the approximation of fission product mass distribution over the whole mass range by five Gauss functions. New analytical expressions for determining energy weights of used gaussians are proposed. The results of comparison of experimental data with calculated values for fission product mass obtained for reference processes in the capacity of which the fission reactions are chosen: 233 U, 235 U fission by thermal neutrons, 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U by fission spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons and for 232 Th fission reactions by 11 MeV neutrons and 238 U by 7.7 MeV neutrons. On the basis of the analysis of results obtained the conclusion is drawn on a good agreement of fission product mass yield calculation values obtained using recommended values of mass distribution parameters with experimental data [ru

  1. A new technique to measure fission-product diffusion coefficients in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Verrall, R.A.; Bushby, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new out-reactor technique for the measurement of fission-product diffusion rates in UO 2 . The technique accurately simulates in-reactor fission-fragment effects: a thermal diffusion that is due to localized mixing in the fission track, radiation-enhanced diffusion that is due to point-defect creation by fission fragments, and bubble resolution. The technique utilizes heavy-ion accelerators - low energy (40 keV to 1 MeV) for fission-product implantation, high energy (72 MeV) to create fission-fragment damage effects, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for measuring the depth profile of the implanted species. Preliminary results are presented from annealing tests (not in the 72 MeV ion flux) at 1465 deg. C and 1650 deg. C at low and high concentrations of fission products. (author)

  2. {sup 235}U(n,F) prompt fission neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, M.V.; Tetereva, N.A. [Joint Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research, Minsk-Sosny (Belarus); Pronyaev, V.P.; Kagalenko, A.B. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Granier, T.; Morillon, B. [CEA, Centre DAM-IIe de France, 91 - Arpajon (France); Hambsch, F.J. [EC-JRC Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Sublet, J.C. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    The longstanding problem of inconsistency of integral thermal data testing and differential prompt fission neutron spectra data (PFNS) is mostly due to rather poor fits of differential PFNS data in major data libraries. The measured database is updated by using modern standards including Manhart's evaluation of the spontaneous fission neutron spectra of {sup 252}Cf(sf). That largely removes the inconsistency of older thermal neutron-induced PFNS measurements with newest data of JRC IRMM by Hambsch et al. (2009). A phenomenological approach, developed by Kornilov et al. (1999), for the first-chance fission and extended for the emissive fission domain by Maslov et al. (2005) is calibrated at E{sub th} to predict both the PFNS average energy and PFNS shape up to 20 MeV. The latter is extremely important, since rather close values in fact correspond to quite discrepant spectra shapes, which influences reactor neutronics strongly. The proposed phenomenological representation of the PFNS reproduces both soft and hard energy tails of {sup 235}U(n{sub th},F) PFNS at thermal incident neutron energy E{sub th}. In the first-chance and emissive fission domain evaluated PFNS are consistent with the data by Ethvignot et al. (2005). A compiled MF=5 Endf/B-formatted file of the {sup 235}U(n,F) PFNS largely removes the inconsistencies of the evaluated differential PFNS with integral data benchmarks. Almost perfect fits are attained for available differential PFNS data from E{sub th} up to E{sub n}=14.7 MeV, with few exceptions at E{sub n}=2.9 and E{sub n}=5 MeV. Fast integral critical experiment like GODIVA or Flattop benchmarks might be reproduced almost with the same accuracy as with the PFNS of the major data libraries. That reveals a rather delicate compensation effect, since present and previous PFNS shapes are drastically different from each other. Thermal assemblies benchmarking reveals positive biases in k(eff), which might be attributed to the influence of

  3. Interaction of noble-metal fission products with pyrolytic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, R.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which act as a miniature pressure vessel and form the primary fission product barrier. Of the many fission products formed during irradiation, the noble metals are of particular interest because they interact significantly with the SiC layer and their concentrations are somewhat higher in the low-enriched uranium fuels currently under consideration. To study fission product-SiC interactions, particles of UO 2 or UC 2 are doped with fission product elements before coating and are then held in a thermal gradient up to several thousand hours. Examination of the SiC coatings by TEM-AEM after annealing shows that silver behaves differently from the palladium group

  4. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for fission product decay heat calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebah, J.; Lee, Y.K.; Nimal, J.C.; Nimal, B.; Luneville, L.; Duchemin, B.

    1994-01-01

    The calculated uncertainty in decay heat due to the uncertainty in basic nuclear data given in the CEA86 Library, is presented. Uncertainties in summation calculation arise from several sources: fission product yields, half-lives and average decay energies. The correlation between basic data is taken into account. The uncertainty analysis were obtained for thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235 and Pu239 in the case of burst fission and irradiation time. The calculated decay heat in this study is compared with experimental results and with new calculation using the JEF2 Library. (from authors) 6 figs., 19 refs

  5. HAMCIND, Cell Burnup with Fission Products Poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo Y.; Dos Santos, Adimir

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HAMCIND is a cell burnup code based in a coupling between HAMMER-TECHNION and CINDER. The fission product poisoning is taken into account in an explicit fashion. 2 - Method of solution: The nonlinear coupled set of equations for the neutron transport and nuclide transmutation equations and nuclide transmutation equations in a unit cell is solved by HAMCIND in a quasi-static approach. The spectral transport equation is solved by HAMMER-TECHNION at the beginning of each time-step while the nuclide transmutation equations are solved by CINDER for every time-step. The HAMMER-TECHNION spectral calculations are performed taking into account the fission product contribution to the macroscopic cross sections (fast and thermal), in the inelastic scattering matrix and even in the thermal scattering matrices. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Restrictions and/or limitations for HAMCIND depend upon the local operating system

  6. Low Cost Radiator for Fission Power Thermal Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future space transportation and surface power applications. The early systems are...

  7. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  8. Investigation of delayed fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayet, Nicolas

    1996-05-01

    The study of the fission gas release process in the high burnup rig IFA-562 has revealed a particular fuel behaviour: a delay in the fission gas release process. It appeared that an important release of gas was measured by the pressure transducers once the power had decreased, whereas, during steady-state operation, the pressure did not increase very much. After examinations, the gap size has been concluded to be the main parameter involving this delay. However the burnup could have been a potential factor, its role is mainly to close the gap by swelling. The observations of low burnup rods have shown the same delayed fission gas release, the gap being small by design and closed essentially by thermal expansion. The study of the kinetics has demonstrated the time-independency of the phenomenon. Thus the proposed mechanism driving this delayed fission gas release would involve three consecutives stages. During steady-state, the gas is released into the interlinkage network of grain boundary bubbles and cracks. Due to the closed gap, the gas is trapped in some void volumes, unable to escape the pellet. During power reduction, the gap and some old/new cracks open, immediately providing a path for the gas to the pressure transducers and explaining this delay in the fission gas release. (author)

  9. Fission cross section measurements of actinides at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [INL

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications. By combining measurement at two LANSCE facilities, Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR), differential cross sections can be measured from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method, and parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections relative to the {sup 235}U standard. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239,242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. In this paper preliminary results for cross section data of {sup 243}Am and {sup 233}U will be presented.

  10. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, G.D.; Lynn, J.E.; Michaudon, A.; Rowlands, J.; de Saussure, G.

    1981-01-01

    A general presentation of current knowledge of the fission process is given with emphasis on the low energy fission of actinide nuclei and neutron induced fission. The need for and the required accuracy of fission cross section data in nuclear energy programs are discussed. A summary is given of the steps involved in fission cross section measurement and the range of available techniques. Methods of fission detection are described with emphasis on energy dependent changed and detector efficiency. Examples of cross section measurements are given and data reduction is discussed. The calculation of fission cross sections is discussed and relevant nuclear theory including the formation and decay of compound nuclei and energy level density is introduced. A description of a practical computation of fission cross sections is given.

  11. General Description of Fission Observables - JEFF Report 24. GEF Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz; Amouroux, Charlotte

    2014-06-01

    The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) Project is a collaborative effort among the member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank to develop a reference nuclear data library. The JEFF library contains sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications; it contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yield data and thermal scattering law data. The General fission (GEF) model is based on novel theoretical concepts and ideas developed to model low energy nuclear fission. The GEF code calculates fission-fragment yields and associated quantities (e.g. prompt neutron and gamma) for a large range of nuclei and excitation energy. This opens up the possibility of a qualitative step forward to improve further the JEFF fission yields sub-library. This report describes the GEF model which explains the complex appearance of fission observables by universal principles of theoretical models and considerations on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and mathematics. The approach reveals a high degree of regularity and provides a considerable insight into the physics of the fission process. Fission observables can be calculated with a precision that comply with the needs for applications in nuclear technology. The relevance of the approach for examining the consistency of experimental results and for evaluating nuclear data is demonstrated. (authors)

  12. Characteristics of prompt fission gamma-ray emission - Experimental results and predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberstedt, Andreas; Billnert, Robert; Oberstedt, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Systematics from 2001, describing prompt fission gamma-ray spectra (PFGS) characteristics as function of mass and atomic number of the fissioning system, has been revisited and parameters have been revised based on recent experimental results. Although originally expressed for spontaneous and thermal neutron-induced fission, validity for fast neutrons was assumed and applied to predict PFGS characteristics for the reaction n + 238 U up to incident neutron energies of E n = 20 MeV. The results from this work are in good agreement with corresponding results from both model calculations and experiments. (authors)

  13. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  14. The thermal history of the Karoo Moatize-Minjova Basin, Tete Province, Mozambique: An integrated vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission track thermochronology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Paulo; Cogné, Nathan; Chew, David M.; Rodrigues, Bruno; Jorge, Raul C. G. S.; Marques, João; Jamal, Daud; Vasconcelos, Lopo

    2015-12-01

    The Moatize-Minjova Basin is a Karoo-aged rift basin located in the Tete Province of central Mozambique along the present-day Zambezi River valley. In this basin the Permian Moatize and Matinde formations consist of interbedded carbonaceous mudstones and sandstones with coal seams. The thermal history has been determined using rock samples from two coal exploration boreholes (ca. 500 m depth) to constrain the burial and exhumation history of the basin. Organic maturation levels were determined using vitrinite reflectance and spore fluorescence/colour. Ages and rates of tectonic uplift and denudation have been assessed by apatite fission track analysis. The thermal history was modelled by inverse modelling of the fission track and vitrinite reflectance data. The Moatize Formation attained a coal rank of bituminous coals with low to medium volatiles (1.3-1.7%Rr). Organic maturation levels increase in a linear fashion downhole in the two boreholes, indicating that burial was the main process controlling peak temperature maturation. Calculated palaeogeothermal gradients range from 59 °C/km to 40 °C/km. According to the models, peak burial temperatures were attained shortly (3-10 Ma) after deposition. Apatite fission track ages [146 to 84 Ma (Cretaceous)] are younger than the stratigraphic age. Thermal modelling indicates two episodes of cooling and exhumation: a first period of rapid cooling between 240 and 230 Ma (Middle - Upper Triassic boundary) implying 2500-3000 m of denudation; and a second period, also of rapid cooling, from 6 Ma (late Miocene) onwards implying 1000-1500 m of denudation. The first episode is related to the main compressional deformation event within the Cape Fold Belt in South Africa, which transferred stress northwards on pre-existing transtensional fault systems within the Karoo rift basins, causing tectonic inversion and uplift. During the Mesozoic and most of the Cenozoic the basin is characterized by very slow cooling. The second period

  15. Evaluating the 239Pu Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum Induced by Thermal to 30 MeV Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neudecker D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new evaluation of the 239Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS induced by thermal to 30 MeV neutrons. Compared to the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, this one includes recently published experimental data as well as an improved and extended model description to predict PFNS. For instance, the pre-equilibrium neutron emission component to the PFNS is considered and the incident energy dependence of model parameters is parametrized more realistically. Experimental and model parameter uncertainties and covariances are estimated in detail. Also, evaluated covariances are provided between all PFNS at different incident neutron energies. Selected evaluation results and first benchmark calculations using this evaluation are briefly discussed.

  16. In-reactor measurements of thermo mechanical behaviour and fission gas release of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolstad, E.; Vitanza, C.

    1983-01-01

    the fuel performance during and after a power ramp can be investigated by direct in-pile measurements related to the thermal, mechanical and fission gas release behaviour. The thermal response is examined by thermocouples placed at the centre of the fuel. Such measurements allow the determination of thermal feedback effects induced by the simultaneous liberation of fission gases. The thermal feedback effect is also being separately studied out-of-pile in a specially designed rod where the fission gas release is simulated by injecting xenon in known quantities at different axial positions within the rod. Investigations on the mechanical behaviour are based on axial and diametral cladding deformation measurements. This enables the determination of the amount of local cladding strain and ridging during ramping, the extent of relaxation during the holding time and the amount of residual (plastic) deformation. Gap width measurements are also performed in operating fuel rods using a cladding deflection technique. Fission gas release data are obtained, besides from post-irradiation puncturing, by continuous measurements of the rod internal pressure. This type of measurement leads to the description of the kinetics of the fission gas release process at different powers. The data tend to indicate that the time-dependent release can be reasonably well described by simple diffusion. The paper describes measuring techniques developed and currently in use in Halden, and presents and discusses selected experimental results obtained during various power ramps and transients. (author)

  17. Fission gas release of MOX with heterogeneous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, N.; Akiyama, H.; Kamimura, K; Delville, R.; Jutier, F.; Verwerft, M.; Miura, H.; Baba, T.

    2015-01-01

    It is very useful for fuel integrity evaluation to accumulate knowledge base on fuel behavior of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel used in light water reactors (LWRs). Fission gas release is one of fuel behaviors which have an impact on fuel integrity evaluation. Fission gas release behavior of MOX fuels having heterogeneous structure is focused in this study. MOX fuel rods with a heterogeneous fuel microstructure were irradiated in Halden reactor (IFA-702) and the BR-3/BR-2 CALLISTO Loop (CHIPS program). The 85 Kr gamma spectrometry measurements were carried out in specific cycles in order to examine the concerned LHR (Linear Heat Rate) for fission gas release in the CHIPS program. The concerned LHR is defined in this paper to be the LHR at which a certain additional fission gas release thermally occurs. Post-irradiation examination was performed to understand the fission gas release behavior in connection with the pellet microstructure. The followings conclusions can be made from this study. First, the concerned LHR for fission gas release is estimated to be in the range of 20-23 kW/m with burnup over 37 GWd/tM. It is moreover guessed that the concerned LHR for fission gas release tends to decrease with increasing burnup. Secondly It is observed that FGR (fission gas release rate) is positively correlated with LHR when the LHR exceeds the concerned value. Thirdly, when burnup dependence of fission gas release is discussed, effective burnup should be taken into account. The effective burnup is defined as the burnup at which the LHR should be exceed the concerned value at the last time during all the irradiation period. And fourthly, it appears that FGR inside Pu spots is higher than outside and that retained (not released) fission gases mainly exist in the fission gas bubbles. Since fission gases in bubbles are considered to be easily released during fuel temperature increase, this information is very important to estimate fission gas release behavior

  18. Optical efficiency for fission fragment track counting in Muscovite solid state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Gold, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine absolute fission rates from thin actinide deposits placed in direct contact with Muscovite Solid State Track Recorders, it is necessary to know the efficiency with which fission fragment tracks are recorded. In this paper, a redetermination of the 'optical efficiency', i.e. the fraction of fission events recorded and observed in the Muscovite is reported. The value obtained from a well-calibrated thin deposit of 252 Cf and Muscovite etched about 90 min. in 49% HF at room temperature, is 0.9875 +- 0.0085. Manual counting was used. Preliminary results from a deposit of 242 Pu are also reported, along with preliminary comparisons of track counting with an automated system. Reasons for the discrepancy of the optical efficiency reported here with an earlier measurement are also reported. (author)

  19. Low Cost Radiator for Fission Power Thermal Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA GRC is developing fission power system technology for future space transportation and surface power applications. The early systems are envisioned in the 10 to...

  20. Thermal history of the Krishna-Godavari basin, India: Constraints from apatite fission track thermochronology and organic maturity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Himansu S.; Raab, Matthias J.; Kohn, Barry P.; Gleadow, Andrew J. W.; Bal, Kiron D.

    2013-09-01

    The Krishna-Godavari (KG) basin, a passive margin Late Carboniferous to Holocene basin along the rifted east coast of India, includes the deltaic and inter-deltaic regions of the Krishna and Godavari rivers onshore and extends into the offshore. It is one of India's premier hydrocarbon-bearing basins. In an attempt to better understand the thermal history of the basin, apatite fission track (AFT) data has been obtained from six exploration wells (five onshore and one offshore). AFT thermal history models as well as other thermal indicators e.g. vitrinite reflectance (VR), Rock-Eval Tmax data reveal that the host rocks are currently at their maximum post-depositional temperatures and that any possible heating related to small-scale tectonism or rifting episodes in the basin bears little significance on the maturation of the sediments. In the case of one borehole (M-1) however, the organic maturity data reveals a period of Oligocene cooling across an unconformity when ∼1000 m of section was eroded due to falling sea-level. This information offers the potential for improved basin modeling of the KG basin.

  1. Determination of the fission coefficients in thermal nuclear reactors for antineutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Lenilson M. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Cabral, Ronaldo G., E-mail: rgcabral@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Anjos, Joao C.C. dos, E-mail: janjos@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. GLN - G

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear reactors in operation periodically need to change their fuel. It is during this process that these reactors are more vulnerable to occurring of several situations of fuel diversion, thus the monitoring of the nuclear installations is indispensable to avoid events of this nature. Considering this fact, the most promissory technique to be used for the nuclear safeguard for the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, it is based on the detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino from fissions that occur in the nuclear reactors. The detection and spectroscopy of antineutrino, they both depend on the single contribution for the total number of fission of each actinide in the core reactor, these contributions receive the name of fission coefficients. The goal of this research is to show the computational and mathematical modeling used to determinate these coefficients for PWR reactors. (author)

  2. Nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy: 3. International workshop on nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Heloise; Fioni, Gabriele; Faust, Herbert; Goutte, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The present book contains the proceedings of the third workshop in a series of workshops previously held in Seyssins in 1994 and 1998. The meeting was jointly organized by different divisions of CEA and two major international laboratories. In the opening address, Prof. B. Bigot, the French High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, outlined France's energy policy for the next few decades. He emphasized the continuing progress of nuclear fission in both technical and economic terms, allowing it to contribute to the energy needs of the planet even more in the future than it does today. Such progress implies a very strong link between fundamental and applied research based on experimental and theoretical approaches. The workshop gathered the different nuclear communities studying the fission process, including topics as the following: - nuclear fission experiments, - spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei, - fission data evaluation, - theoretical aspects of nuclear fission, - and innovative nuclear systems and new facilities. The scientific program was suggested by an International Advisory Committee. About 100 scientists from 13 different countries attended the conference in the friendly working atmosphere of the Castle of Cadarache in the heart of the Provence. The proceedings of the workshop were divided into 11 sections addressing the following subject matters: 1. Cross sections and resonances (5 papers); 2. Fission at higher energies - I (5 papers); 3. Fission: mass and charge yields (4 papers); 4. Light particles and cluster emission (4 papers); 5. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei (5 papers); 6. Resonances, barriers, and fission times (5 papers); 7. Fragment excitation and neutron emission (4 papers); 8. Mass and energy distributions (4 papers); 9. Needs for nuclear data and new facilities - I (4 papers); 10. Angular momenta and fission at higher Energies - II (3 papers); 11. New facilities - II (2 papers). A poster session of 8 presentations completed the workshop

  3. Search for sp-interference effect in emission of prompt neutrons of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U fission by thermal polarized neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Danilyan, G V; Pavlov, V S; Fedorov, A V

    2001-01-01

    The results of the experiment for the search of the sp-interference effect in the distribution of the prompt neutrons of the sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U fission by thermal polarized neutrons are presented. The experiment is carried out on the polarized neutrons beam of the MIFI reactor. The scheme of the installation and the flight time spectrum are presented

  4. Actinide Capture and Fission Cross Section Measurements Within the Mini-Inca Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Mini-INCA project is devoted to precise description of the transmutation chain of Actinides within high thermal neutron fluxes. It uses the High Flux Reactor of ILL (Laue Langevin Institute) as an intense thermal neutron source to measure capture and fission cross sections. Two irradiation channels are dedicated for those measurements offering a diversity of fluxes ranging from pure thermal neutrons to 15% epithermal neutrons with intensities as high as 1*10 15 n/cm 2 /s. Standard nuclear techniques for measurements, such as α and γ-spectroscopy of irradiated samples, have been extended in order to stand all constraints due to the irradiation in high fluxes. In particular new types of fission micro-chambers have been developed to follow online the evolution of one actinide and to measure its fission cross section in reference to 235 U(n,F) standard reaction. This type of neutron detector will be used within the MEGAPIE target to on-line characterise the neutron flux and to study the potentiality of such target in terms of incineration. (author)

  5. Needs and accuracy requirements for fission product nuclear data in the physics design of power reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The fission product nuclear data accuracy requirements for fast and thermal reactor core performance predictions were reviewed by Tyror at the Bologna FPND Meeting. The status of the data was assessed at the Meeting and it was concluded that the requirements of thermal reactors were largely met, and the yield data requirements of fast reactors, but not the cross section requirements, were met. However, the World Request List for Nuclear Data (WRENDA) contains a number of requests for fission product capture cross sections in the energy range of interest for thermal reactors. Recent reports indicate that the fast reactor reactivity requirements might have been met by integral measurements made in zero power critical assemblies. However, there are requests for the differential cross sections of the individual isotopes to be determined in addition to the integral data requirements. The fast reactor requirements are reviewed, taking into account some more recent studies of the effects of fission products. The sodium void reactivity effect depends on the fission product cross sections in a different way to the fission product reactivity effect in a normal core. This requirement might call for different types of measurement. There is currently an interest in high burnup fuel cycles and alternative fuel cycles. These might require more accurate fission product data, data for individual isotopes and data for capture products. Recent calculations of the time dependence of fission product reactivity effects show that this is dependent upon the data set used and there are significant uncertainties. Some recent thermal reactor studies on approximations in the treatment of decay chains and the importance of xenon and samarium poisoning are also summarized. (author)

  6. Modelling of thermal mechanical behaviour of high burn-Up VVER fuel at power transients with special emphasis on the impact of fission gas induced swelling of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.; Medvedev, A.; Khvostov, G.; Bogatyr, S.; Kuzetsov, V.; Korystin, L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the modelling of unsteady state mechanical and thermo-physical behaviour of high burn-up VVER fuel at a power ramp. The contribution of the processes related to the kinetics of fission gas to the consequences of pellet-clad mechanical interaction is analysed by the example of integral VVER-440 rod 9 from the R7 experimental series, with a pellet burn-up in the active part at around 60 MWd/kgU. This fuel rod incurred ramp testing with a ramp value ΔW 1 ∼ 250 W/cm in the MIR research reactor. The experimentally revealed residual deformation of the clad by 30-40 microns in the 'hottest' portion of the rod, reaching a maximum linear power of up to 430 W/cm, is numerically justified on the basis of accounting for the unsteady state swelling and additional degradation of fuel thermal conductivity due to temperature-induced formation and development of gaseous porosity within the grains and on the grain boundaries. The good prediction capability of the START-3 code, coupled with the advanced model of fission gas related processes, with regard to the important mechanical (residual deformation of clad, pellet-clad gap size, central hole filling), thermal physical (fission gas release) and micro-structural (profiles of intra-granular concentration of the retained fission gas and fuel porosity across a pellet) consequences of the R7 test is shown. (authors)

  7. Some aspects of the nuclear fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netter, F.

    1961-01-01

    In the following report one can find first a short general view on the present situation of our knowledge concerning the nuclear fission process, namely on the nucleus going through the saddle-point. Then there are some aspects connected with the excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus. The measurements made at Saclay on the fast neutron fission cross-section of U 233 , U 235 , Pu 239 , U 238 are described at the beginning of this work. It appears that for U 233 there is some characteristic shape modulation of the cross-section curve, in relation with the collective excited state of the deformed nucleus at the saddle-point. Good evidence of this is also given by the study of the relative fission rate with emission of long-range particles; it appears also that this ternary fission rate does not change substantially for neutron between thermal energy and 2 MeV, but that is very lower for the compound nucleus U 239 than for even-even compound nuclei. At the end there are some experiments on the strong 4,5 MeV gamma-ray originated by slow neutron absorption in U 235 . Time-of-flight device is used to establish that this 4,5 MeV gamma-ray seems mostly connected with radiative capture. (author) [fr

  8. Some aspects of the nuclear fission process; Quelques aspects du processus de fission nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netter, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    In the following report one can find first a short general view on the present situation of our knowledge concerning the nuclear fission process, namely on the nucleus going through the saddle-point. Then there are some aspects connected with the excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus. The measurements made at Saclay on the fast neutron fission cross-section of U{sup 233}, U{sup 235}, Pu{sup 239}, U{sup 238} are described at the beginning of this work. It appears that for U{sup 233} there is some characteristic shape modulation of the cross-section curve, in relation with the collective excited state of the deformed nucleus at the saddle-point. Good evidence of this is also given by the study of the relative fission rate with emission of long-range particles; it appears also that this ternary fission rate does not change substantially for neutron between thermal energy and 2 MeV, but that is very lower for the compound nucleus U{sup 239} than for even-even compound nuclei. At the end there are some experiments on the strong 4,5 MeV gamma-ray originated by slow neutron absorption in U{sup 235}. Time-of-flight device is used to establish that this 4,5 MeV gamma-ray seems mostly connected with radiative capture. (author) [French] Le present travail debute par un apercu de l'etat actuel de nos connaissances sur le processus de fission nucleaire, notamment sur le passage par le point-seuil. Puis sont evoques des aspects lies au niveau d'energie d'excitation auquel est porte le noyau qui subit la fission. Les mesures de sections efficaces de fission induite dans {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu et {sup 238}U par des neutrons rapides effectuees a Saclay sont decrites en premier lieu; elles font apparaitre pour {sup 233}U une ondulation caracteristique du role des etats collectifs d'excitation du noyau deforme au point-seuil. Des experiences sur la fission avec emission de particules de long parcours confirment cet aspect tout en demontrant que la frequence

  9. The nonlinear dynamics of a coupled fission system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanovic, Z.; Harms, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic properties of a nonlinear and in situ vibrationally perturbed nuclear-to-thermal coupled neutron multiplying medium are examined. Some unique self-organizational temporal patterns appear in such fission systems and suggest a complex underlying dynamic. (Author)

  10. Contribution to the study of prompt gamma-rays from fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnier, D.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis has essentially been motivated by the nuclear heating problematic in reactors. The main goal of this work was the production of methods capable of simulating the prompt gamma emission from fission. First of all, several algorithms for the treatment of the nucleus deexcitation were implemented. They have been successfully tested through various calculations (isomeric branching ratio, total radiative width, etc). These methods were then incorporated in the frame of the fission code FIFRELIN. The tool which results from this work, enables the determination of numerous fission observables in the frame of a single consistent model. A sensitivity study of the results to several numerical and nuclear models has been realized. At last, calculation have been lead for the 252 Cf spontaneous fission and the thermal neutron induced fission of 235 U and 239 Pu. The prompt gamma spectra obtained for those three fissioning systems have been determined. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data, including recent measurements published in 2012 and 2013. (author) [fr

  11. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  12. Development of glass ceramics for the incorporation of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.K.; Luckscheiter, B.; Lutze, W.; Malow, G.; Schiewer, E.

    1976-01-01

    Spontaneous devitrification of fission-product-containing borosilicate glasses can be avoided by controlled crystallization after melting. Glass ceramics have been developed from a vitrified simulated waste and further improvement of product properties was achieved. In particular perovskite, h-celsian, diopside and eucryptite glass ceramics were prepared. These contained leach resistant host phases which exhibited considerable enrichment of long-lived fission products. All products showed increased impact resistance, but the thermal expansion was only slightly improved

  13. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  14. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to these seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought fro earth should be less than 1000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield

  15. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to those seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought from earth should be less than 1,000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield

  16. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs

  17. Optical efficiency for fission-fragment track counting in Muscovite Solid-State Track Recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Gold, R.

    1983-07-01

    In order to determine absolute fission rates from thin actinide deposits placed in direct contact with Muscovite Solid-State Track Recorders, it is necessary to know the efficiency with which fission-fragment tracks are recorded. In this paper, a redetermination of the optical efficiency, i.e., the fraction of fission events recorded and observed in the Muscovite, is reported. The value obtained from a well-calibrated thin deposit of 252 Cf and Muscovite etched about 90 min. in 49% HF at room temperature, is 0.9875 +- 0.0085. Manual counting was used. Preliminary results from a deposit of 242 Pu are also reported, along with preliminary comparisons of track counting with an automated system. Reasons for the discrepancy of the optical efficiency reported here with an earlier measurement are also reported. 5 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  18. Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.

    1958-01-01

    Study of the number of neutrons produced by fission of 239 Pu. The counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by these fissions allows the study of the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by ν fission. In the first chapter, it studied the variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by 239 Pu fission with the energy of the incident neutron. A description of the experiment is given: a spectrometer with a crystal of sodium chloride or beryllium (mounted on a goniometer) is used, a fission chamber containing 10 mg of 239 Pu and the neutron detection system constituted of BF 3 counters which are enriched in 10 B. In the second part, the counting by coincidence of fissions and neutrons produced by the same fission and received by two different groups of counters allow the determination of a relationship between the root mean square and the average of neutron number produced by fission. The variation of the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of 239 Pu is studied when we change from a thermal spectra of neutrons to a fission spectra of incident neutrons. Finally, when separating in two different part the fission chamber, it is possible to measure the mean number of neutrons emitted from fission of two different sources. It compared the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission of 239 Pu and 233 U. (M.P.)

  19. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239 Pu(n th ,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  20. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Köster, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-09-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239Pu(nth,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  1. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Klinov, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of 235 U nuclei

  2. Role of effective distance in the fission mechanism study by the double-energy measurement for uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadashi; Takahashi, Naruto [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    Fission product kinetic energies were measured by the double-energy method for thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235,233}U and proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U at the 15.8-MeV excitation. From the obtained energy-mass correlation data, the kinetic-energy distribution was constructed from each mass bin to evaluate the first moment of the kinetic energy for a given fragment mass. The resulting kinetic energy was then converted to the effective distance between the charge centers at the moment of scission. The effective distances deduced for the proton-induced fission was concluded to be classified into two constant values, one for asymmetric and the other for symmetric mode, irrespective of the mass though an additional component was further extracted in the asymmetric mass region. This indicates that the fission takes place via two well-defined saddles, followed by the random neck rupture. On the contrary, the effective distances obtained for thermal-neutron induced fission turned out to lie along the contour line at the same level as the equilibrium deformation in the two-dimensional potential map. This strongly suggests that it is essentially a barrier-penetrating type of fission rather than the over-barrier fission. (author). 73 refs.

  3. Role of effective distance in the fission mechanism study by the double-energy measurement for uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadashi; Takahashi, Naruto

    1997-01-01

    Fission product kinetic energies were measured by the double-energy method for thermal-neutron fission of 235,233 U and proton-induced fission of 238 U at the 15.8-MeV excitation. From the obtained energy-mass correlation data, the kinetic-energy distribution was constructed from each mass bin to evaluate the first moment of the kinetic energy for a given fragment mass. The resulting kinetic energy was then converted to the effective distance between the charge centers at the moment of scission. The effective distances deduced for the proton-induced fission was concluded to be classified into two constant values, one for asymmetric and the other for symmetric mode, irrespective of the mass though an additional component was further extracted in the asymmetric mass region. This indicates that the fission takes place via two well-defined saddles, followed by the random neck rupture. On the contrary, the effective distances obtained for thermal-neutron induced fission turned out to lie along the contour line at the same level as the equilibrium deformation in the two-dimensional potential map. This strongly suggests that it is essentially a barrier-penetrating type of fission rather than the over-barrier fission. (author). 73 refs

  4. Miniature fission chambers calibration in pulse mode: interlaboratory comparison at the. SCK·CEN BR1 and CEA CALIBAN reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamirand, V.; Geslot, B.; Gregoire, G.; Garnier, D.; Breaud, S.; Mellier, F.; Di-Salvo, J.; Destouches, C.; Blaise, P.; Wagemans, J.; Borms, L.; Malambu, E.; Casoli, P.; Jacquet, X.; Rousseau, G.; Sauvecane, P.

    2013-06-01

    Miniature fission chambers are suited tools for instrumenting experimental reactors, allowing online and in-core neutron measurements of quantities such as fission rates or reactor power. A new set of such detectors was produced by CEA to be used during the next experimental program at the EOLE facility starting in 2013. Some of these detectors will be employed in pulse mode for absolute measurements, thus requiring calibration. The calibration factor is expressed in mass units and thus called 'effective mass'. A calibration campaign was conducted in December 2012 at the SCK.CEN BR1 facility within the framework of the scientific cooperation VEP (VENUS-EOLE-PROTEUS) between SCK.CEN, CEA and PSI. Two actions were conducted in order to improve the calibration method. First a new characterisation of the thermal flux cavity and the MARK3 neutron flux conversion device performed by SCK.CEN allowed using calculated effective cross sections for determining detectors effective masses. Dosimetry irradiations were performed in situ in order to determine the neutron flux level and provide link to the metrological standard. Secondly two fission chambers were also calibrated at the CEA CALIBAN reactor (fast neutron spectrum), using the same method so that the results can be compared with the results obtained at the SCK.CEN. In this paper the calibration method and recent improvements on uncertainty reduction are presented. The results and uncertainties obtained in the two reactors CALIBAN and BR1 are compared and discussed. (authors)

  5. Evaluation of fission cross sections and covariances for 233U, 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Matsunobu, Hiroyuki; Murata, Toru

    2000-02-01

    A simultaneous evaluation code SOK (Simultaneous evaluation on KALMAN) has been developed, which is a least-squares fitting program to absolute and relative measurements. The SOK code was employed to evaluate the fission cross sections of 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, and 241 Pu for the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.3. Procedures of the simultaneous evaluation and the experimental database of the fission cross sections are described. The fission cross sections obtained were compared with evaluated values given in JENDL-3.2 and ENDF/B-VI. (author)

  6. FREVAP-6, Metal Fission Products Release from HTGR Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, V.H.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The FREVAP type of code for estimating the release of longer-lived metallic fission products from HTGR fuel elements has been developed to take into account the combined effects of the retention of metallic fission products by fuel particles and the rather strong absorption of these fission products by the graphite of the fuel elements. Release calculations are made on the basis that the loss of fission product nuclides such as strontium, cesium, and barium is determined by their evaporation from the graphite surfaces and their transpiration induced by the flowing helium coolant. The code is devised so that changes of fission rate (fuel element power), fuel temperature, and graphite temperature may be incorporated into the calculation. Temperature is quite important in determining release because, in general, both release from fuel particles and loss by evaporation (transpiration) vary exponentially with the reciprocal of the absolute temperature. NESC0301/02: This version differs from the previous one in the following points: The source and output files were converted from BCD to ASCII coding. 2 - Method of solution: A problem is defined as having a one-dimensional segment made up of three parts - (1) the fission product source (fuel particles) in series with, (2) a non-source and absorption part (element graphite) and (3) a surface for evaporation to the coolant (graphite-helium interface). More than one segment may be connected (possibly segments stacked axially) by way of the coolant. At any given segment, a continuity equation is solved assuming equilibrium between the source term, absorption term, evaporation at coolant interface and the partial pressure of the fission product isotope in the coolant. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 5 isotopes; 10 time intervals for time-dependent variable; 49 segments (times number of isotopes); 5 different output print time-steps

  7. Effect of fission fragment on thermal conductivity via electrons with an energy about 0.5 MeV in fuel rod gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Golian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer process from pellet to coolant is one of the important issues in nuclear reactor. In this regard, the fuel to clad gap and its physical and chemical properties are effective factors on heat transfer in nuclear fuel rod discussion. So, the energy distribution function of electrons with an energy about 0.5 MeV in fuel rod gap in Busherhr’s VVER-1000 nuclear reactor was investigated in this paper. Also, the effect of fission fragments such as Krypton, Bromine, Xenon, Rubidium and Cesium on the electron energy distribution function as well as the heat conduction via electrons in the fuel rod gap have been studied. For this purpose, the Fokker- Planck equation governing the stochastic behavior of electrons in absorbing gap element has been applied in order to obtain the energy distribution function of electrons. This equation was solved via Runge-Kutta numerical method. On the other hand, the electron energy distribution function was determined by using Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. It was concluded that these fission fragments have virtually insignificant effect on energy distribution of electrons and therefore, on thermal conductivity via electrons in the fuel to clad gap. It is worth noting that this result is consistent with the results of other experiments. Also, it is shown that electron relaxation in gap leads to decrease in thermal conductivity via electrons

  8. CINDER, Depletion and Decay Chain Calculation for Fission Products in Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Gorrell, T.C.; Hightower, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CINDER is a four-group, one- point depletion and fission product program based on the evaluation of a general analytical solution of nuclides coupled in any linear sequence of radioactive decays and neutron absorptions in a specified neutron flux spectrum. The desired depletion and fission product chains and all physical data are specified by the problem originator. The program computes individual nuclide number densities, activities, nine energy-group disintegration rates, and macroscopic and barns/fission poisons at each time-step as well as selected summaries of these data. 2 - Method of solution: Time-dependent variations in nuclide cross sections and neutron fluxes are approximated by a user-specified sequential set of values which are considered constant during the duration of the user-specified associated time-increments. When a nuclide concentration is independent of the concentration of any of its progeny, it is possible to resolve the couplings so as to obtain nuclides fed by a single parent. These chains are referred to as linear. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is limited to 500 total nuclides formed in up to 240 chains of 20 or fewer nuclides each. Up to 10 nuclides may act as fission product sources, contributing to power, and as many as 99 time-steps of arbitrary length are permitted. All stable nuclides must have a cross section if zero power time-increments are anticipated

  9. Coulomb fission and transfer fission at heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmele, G.

    1981-01-01

    In the present thesis the first direct evidence of nuclear fission after inelastic scattering of heavy ions (sup(183,184)W, 152 Sm → 238 U; 184 W → 232 Th; 184 W, 232 Th → 248 Cm) is reported. Experiments which were performed at the UNILAC of the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt show the observed heavy ion induced fission possesses significant properties of the Coulomb fission. The observed dependence of the fission probability for inelastic scattering on the projectile charge proves that the nuclear fission is mediated by the electromagnetic interaction between heavy ions. This result suggests moreover a multiple Coulomb-excitation preceding the fission. Model calculations give a first indication, that the Coulomb fission proceeds mainly from the higher β phonons. In the irradiation with 184 W the fission probability of 232 Th is for all incident energies about 40% smaller that at 238 U. The target dependence of the Coulomb fission however doesn't allow, to give quantitative statements about the position and B(E2)-values of higher lying β phonons. (orig./HSI) [de

  10. Probability of ternary fission of 93Nb andnat Ag nuclei induced by 0.8-1.8 GeV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.A. de; Milomen, W.C.C.; Tavares, O.A.P.

    1989-01-01

    The yields of ternary fission of 93 Nb and nat Ag nuclei induced by bremsstrahlung photons of 0.8, 1.0, 1.4 and 1.8 GeV end-point energies have been measured by using the 2 Π-forward geometry with thick target metal foils in contact with makrofol polycarbonate sheets as fission-track detectors. Absolute mean cross sections per photon in the range 0.8-1.8 GeV have been obtained as 0.3 ± 0.3 μb and 0.5 ± μb, respectively, for 93 Nb and nat Ag nuclei. These correspond to a probability of ternary fission of approx. 10 -5 for both nuclei. Results are discussed and compared with previous ternary fission data obtained for nuclei of A [pt

  11. Coulomb and even-odd effects in cold and super-asymmetric fragmentation for thermal neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, M. [Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, Av. Túpac Amaru 210, Rímac, Lima (Peru)

    2016-07-07

    Even-odd effects of the maximal total kinetic energy (K{sub max}) as a function of charge (Z) and mass (A) of fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of actinides are questioned by other authors. In this work, visiting old results on thermal neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U, those even-odd effects are reconfirmed. The cases seeming to contradict even-odd effects are interpreted with the Coulomb effect hypothesis. According to Coulomb effect hypothesis, K{sub max} is equal to the Coulomb interaction energy of the most compact scission configuration. As a consequence, between two isobaric charge splits with similar Q-values, the more asymmetrical one will get the more compact scission configuration and then it will reach the higher K{sub max}-value. In some cases, the more asymmetrical charge split corresponds, by coincidence, to an odd charge split; consequently its higher K{sub max}-value may be misinterpreted as anti-even-odd effect. Another experimental result reported in the literature is the increasing of even-odd effects on charge distribution on the more asymmetrical fragmentations region. In this region, the difference between K{sub max} and Q-values increases with asymmetry, which means that the corresponding scission configuration needs higher total deformation energy to occur. Higher deformation energy of the fragments implies lower free energy to break nucleon pairs. Consequently, in the asymmetric fragmentation region, the even-odd effects of the distribution of proton number and neutron number must increase with asymmetry.

  12. Fission cross section measurements at the LLL 100-MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The fission cross section for 235 U was measured from thermal energy to 20 MeV in several steps. First, the cross section was measured from 8 MeV to 20 MeV relative to the n,p scattering cross section and then from thermal to one MeV relative to 6 Li(n,α). In addition, a measurement of the ratio of the fission cross sections of 235 U and 238 U relative to 235 U has been completed in the range 1 keV to 30 MeV for 233 U and 100 keV to 30 MeV for 238 U. Statistical uncertainties are less than 4 percent. (U.S.)

  13. Inventories of radioactive fission products in the core of thermal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, N.

    1977-01-01

    As a part of the analysis concerning radiological consequences of a major LWR accident, inventories of the most significant radioactive nuclides and stable fission gases in the core of a PWR type reactor have been calculated. Calculations were performed by the DELFIN code using nuclide data and neutron flux data earlier obtained by the METHUSELAH code. Comparison with simplified calculation method show that it is quite rough for certain nuclides but the accuracy may be sufficient for safety analysis purposes recalling the inaccuracies in the later parts of fission product transport process (author)

  14. Unit mechanisms of fission gas release: Current understanding and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, Michael; Andersson, David; Devanathan, Ram; Dubourg, Roland; El-Azab, Anter; Freyss, Michel; Iglesias, Fernando; Kulacsy, Katalin; Pastore, Giovanni; Phillpot, Simon R.; Welland, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Gaseous fission product transport and release has a large impact on fuel performance, degrading fuel properties and, once the gas is released into the gap between the fuel and cladding, lowering gap thermal conductivity and increasing gap pressure. While gaseous fission product behavior has been investigated with bulk reactor experiments and simplified analytical models, recent improvements in experimental and modeling approaches at the atomistic and mesoscales are being applied to provide unprecedented understanding of the unit mechanisms that define the fission product behavior. In this article, existing research on the basic mechanisms behind the various stages of fission gas release during normal reactor operation are summarized and critical areas where experimental and simulation work is needed are identified. This basic understanding of the fission gas behavior mechanisms has the potential to revolutionize our ability to predict fission product behavior during reactor operation and to design fuels that have improved fission product retention. In addition, this work can serve as a model on how a coupled experimental and modeling approach can be applied to understand the unit mechanisms behind other critical behaviors in reactor materials.

  15. Interference analysis of fission cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshkov, S.A.; Yaneva, N.B.

    1976-01-01

    The formula for the reaction cross-section based on the R-matrix formalism considering the interference between the two neighbouring resonances, referred to the same value of total momentum was used for the analysis of the cross-section of resonance neutron induced fission of 230Pu. The experimental resolution and thermal motion of the target nuclei were accounted for numerical integration

  16. Simulation of pellet-cladding thermomechanical interaction and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, A.; Soba, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that describes some of the main phenomena occurring in a nuclear fuel element throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, swelling and densification are modelized. The code assumes an axi-symmetric rod and hence, cylindrical finite elements are employed for the discretization. Due to the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity, the heat conduction problem is non-linear. Thermal expansion gives origin to elastic or plastic strains, which adequately describe the bamboo effect. Plasticity renders the stress-strain problem non linear. The fission gas inventory is calculated by means of a diffusion model, which assumes spherical grains and uses a finite element scheme. In order to reduce the calculation time, the rod is divided into five cylindrical rings where the temperature is averaged. In each ring the gas diffusion problem is solved in one grain and the results are then extended to the whole ring. The pressure, increased by the released gas, interacts with the stress field. Densification and swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products are also considered. Experiments, particularly those of the FUMEX series, are simulated with this code. A good agreement is obtained for the fuel center line temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release. (author)

  17. Anomalies in the Charge Yields of Fission Fragments from the ^{238}U(n,f) Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J N; Lebois, M; Qi, L; Amador-Celdran, P; Bleuel, D; Briz, J A; Carroll, R; Catford, W; De Witte, H; Doherty, D T; Eloirdi, R; Georgiev, G; Gottardo, A; Goasduff, A; Hadyńska-Klęk, K; Hauschild, K; Hess, H; Ingeberg, V; Konstantinopoulos, T; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lorusso, G; Lozeva, R; Lutter, R; Marini, P; Matea, I; Materna, T; Mathieu, L; Oberstedt, A; Oberstedt, S; Panebianco, S; Podolyák, Zs; Porta, A; Regan, P H; Reiter, P; Rezynkina, K; Rose, S J; Sahin, E; Seidlitz, M; Serot, O; Shearman, R; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Smith, A G; Tveten, G M; Verney, D; Warr, N; Zeiser, F; Zielinska, M

    2017-06-02

    Fast-neutron-induced fission of ^{238}U at an energy just above the fission threshold is studied with a novel technique which involves the coupling of a high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer (MINIBALL) to an inverse-kinematics neutron source (LICORNE) to extract charge yields of fission fragments via γ-γ coincidence spectroscopy. Experimental data and fission models are compared and found to be in reasonable agreement for many nuclei; however, significant discrepancies of up to 600% are observed, particularly for isotopes of Sn and Mo. This indicates that these models significantly overestimate the standard 1 fission mode and suggests that spherical shell effects in the nascent fission fragments are less important for low-energy fast-neutron-induced fission than for thermal neutron-induced fission. This has consequences for understanding and modeling the fission process, for experimental nuclear structure studies of the most neutron-rich nuclei, for future energy applications (e.g., Generation IV reactors which use fast-neutron spectra), and for the reactor antineutrino anomaly.

  18. Status update on the NIFFTE high precision fission cross section measurement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laptev, Alexander B.; Tovesson, Fredrik; Burgett, Eric; Greife, Uwe; Grimes, Steven; Heffner, Michael D.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Hill, Tony; Isenhower, Donald; Klay, Jennifer L.; Kornilov, Nickolay; Kudo, Ryuho; Loveland, Walter; Massey, Thomas; McGrath, Chris; Pickle, Nathan; Qu, Hai; Sharma, Sarvagya; Snyder, Lucas; Thornton, Tyler; Towell, Rusty S.; Watson, Shon

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) program has been underway for nearly two years. The program's mission is to measure fission cross sections of the primary fissionable and fissile materials ( 235 U, 239 Pu, 238 U) as well as the minor actinides across energies from approximately 50 keV up to 20 MeV with an absolute uncertainty of less than one percent while investigating energy ranges from below an eV to 600 MeV. This basic nuclear physics data is being reinvestigated to support the next generation power plants and a fast burner reactor program. Uncertainties in the fast, resolved and unresolved resonance regions in plutonium and other transuranics are extremely large, dominating safety margins in the next generation nuclear power plants and power plants of today. This basic nuclear data can be used to support all aspects of the nuciear renaissance. The measurement campaign is utilizing a Time Projection Chamber or TPC as the tool to measure these cross sections to these unprecedented levels. Unlike traditional fission cross section measurements using time-of-flight and a multiple fission foil configurations in which fission cross sections in relation to that of 235 U are performed, the TPC project uses time-of-flight and hydrogen as the benchmark cross section. Using the switch to hydrogen, a simple, smooth cross section that can be used which removes the uncertainties associated with the resolved and unresolved resonances in 235 U.

  19. Prompt fissionγ-ray characteristics from neutron-induced fission on 239Pu and the time-dependence of prompt-γray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatera, Angélique; Göök, Alf; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Moens, André; Oberstedt, Andreas; Oberstedt, Stephan; Sibbens, Goedele; Vanleeuw, David; Vidali, Marzio

    2018-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increased interest in prompt fission γ-ray (PFG) measurements motivated by a high priority request of the OECD/NEA for high precision data, mainly for the nuclear fuel isotopes 235U and 239Pu. Our group has conducted a PFG measurement campaign using state-of-the-art lanthanum halide detectors for all the main actinides to a precision better than 3%. The experiments were performed in a coincidence setup between a fission trigger and γ-ray detectors. The time-of-flight technique was used to discriminate photons, traveling at the speed of light, and prompt fission neutrons. For a full rejection of all neutrons below 20 MeV, the PFG time window should not be wider than a few nanoseconds. This window includes most PFG, provided that no isomeric states were populated during the de-excitation process. When isomeric states are populated, PFGs can still be emitted up to 1 yus after the instant of fission or later. To study these γ-rays, the detector response to neutrons had to be determined and a correction had to be applied to the γ-ray spectra. The latest results for PFG characteristics from the reaction 239Pu(nth,f) will be presented, together with an analysis of PFGs emitted up to 200 ns after fission in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf as well as for thermal-neutron induced fission on 235U and 239Pu. The results are compared with calculations in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach Monte Carlo code CGMF and FIFRELIN.

  20. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206 Pb and 238 U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.0 +- 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 +- 5.7 and 92.4 +- 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 +- 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.9 +- 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 +- 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 +- 59.6 and 705.5 +- 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. (orig.)

  1. Absolute calibration of the neutron yield measurement on JT-60 Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Barnes, C.W.

    1991-10-01

    Absolutely calibrated measurements of the neutron yield are important for the evaluation of the plasma performance such as the fusion gain Q in DD operating tokamaks. Total neutron yield is measured with 235 U and 238 U fission chambers and 3 He proportional counters in JT-60 Upgrade. The in situ calibration was performed by moving the 252 Cf neutron source toroidally through the JT-60 vacuum vessel. Detection efficiencies of three 235 U and two 3 He detectors were measured for 92 locations of the neutron point source in toroidal scans at two different major radii. The total detection efficiency for the torus neutron source was obtained by averaging the point efficiencies over the whole toroidal angle. The uncertainty of the resulting absolute plasma neutron source calibration is estimated to be ± 10%. (author)

  2. Fission-track constraints on the thermal and tectonic evolution of the Apuseni Mountains (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounov, Alexandre; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2013-01-01

    New zircon and apatite fission-track (FT) data, including apatite thermal modelling, are combined with an extensive literature survey and reconnaissance-type structural fieldwork in the Eastern Apuseni Mountains. This leads to a better understanding of the complex structural and thermal history of a key area at the boundary between two megatectonic units in the Balkan peninsula, namely the Tisza and Dacia Mega-Units. Following Late Jurassic obduction of the Transylvanian ophiolites onto a part of the Dacia Mega-Unit, that is, the Biharia nappe system, both units were buried to a minimum of 8 km during late Early Cretaceous times when these units were underthrust below the Tisza Mega-Unit consisting of the present-day Codru and Bihor nappe systems. Tisza formed the upper plate during Early Cretaceous (`Austrian') east-facing orogeny. Turonian to Campanian zircon FT cooling ages (95-71 Ma) from the Bihor and Codru nappe systems and the Biharia and Baia de Arieş nappes (at present the structurally lowest part of the Dacia Mega-Unit) record exhumation that immediately followed a second Cretaceous-age (i.e. Turonian) orogenic event. Thrusting during this overprinting event was NW-facing and led to the overall geometry of the present-day nappe stack in the Apuseni Mountains. Zircon FT ages, combined with thermal modelling of the apatite FT data, show relatively rapid post-tectonic cooling induced by a third shortening pulse during the latest Cretaceous (`Laramian' phase), followed by slower cooling across the 120°-60 °C temperature interval during latest Cretaceous to earliest Paleogene times (75-60 Ma). Cenozoic-age slow cooling (60-40 Ma) was probably related to erosional denudation postdating `Laramian' large-scale updoming.

  3. Process for ultimate storage of radioactive fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baukal, W.; Gruenthaler, K.H.; Neumann, K.

    1980-01-01

    In order to exclude cracking in the cooling phase during sealing of radioactive oxidic fission products in glass melts, metallic filling elements - e.g. wires, tissues - are proposed to be incorporated in the mould before the glass melt is poured in. Especially nickel alloys with corrosion proof surface layers, e.g. titanium nitride, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminium oxide, suit best. These elements reduce thermal stresses and effect high thermal conductance towards the mould wall. (UWI) [de

  4. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  5. Finite element simulation of fission gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.

    1999-01-01

    A fission gas release model is presented, which solves the atomic diffusion problem with xenon and krypton elements tramps produced by uranium fission during UO 2 nuclear fuel irradiation. The model considers intra and intergranular precipitation bubbles, its re dissolution owing to highly energetic fission products impact, interconnection of intergranular bubbles and gas sweeping by grain border in movement because of grain growth. In the model, the existence of a thermal gradient in the fuel pellet is considered, as well as temporal variations of fission rate owing to changes in the operation lineal power. The diffusion equation is solved by the finite element method and results of gas release and swelling calculation owing to gas fission are compared with experimental data. (author)

  6. Experimental study of the thermal fission of uranium 235 in the region of symmetrical masses; Contribution a l'etude experimentale de la fission thermique de l'uranium 235 dans la region des masses symetriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribrag, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-15

    Energy correlation experiments with fission fragments are strongly perturbed, in the symmetric region, by the detection of spurious events caused by the apparatus. We show that the measurement of an additional parameter, namely the difference in time-of-flight between the fragments, enables us to eliminate these difficulties. In this work we show also an original method of calibration of the time-of-flight set-up. For thermal fission of {sup 235}U, values of mass yields in the symmetric region are found to agree quantitatively with radiochemical values. Moreover, the average total kinetic energy distribution as a function of the pre-neutron emission masses of the fragments has been calculated. This curve presents in the symmetric region a large dip, the value of which takes on the value 21.2 {+-} 0.8 MeV. This value is smaller than previously published results. (author) [French] Les mesures correlees des energies cinetiques des fragments de fission sont fortement perturbees, dans la region symetrique, par la detection d'evenements aberrants d'origine instrumentale. Nous montrons que la mesure d'un parametre supplementaire, a savoir, la difference des temps de vol des deux fragments, nous permet d'eliminer ces difficultes. Dans ce travail, nous indiquons egalement une methode originale de calibration du dispositif de mesure des temps de vol. Dans le cas de la fission thermique de {sup 235}U, nous avons trouve, dans la region symetrique, une courbe de rendement des masses, en accord quantitatif avec les donnees radiochimiques. De plus, nous avons calcule la distribution de l'energie cinetique totale moyenne en fonction de la masse des fragments, avant emission neutronique. Cette courbe presente, dans la region symetrique, un creux important, dont la valeur atteint 21,2 {+-} 0,8 MeV. Cette valeur est inferieure aux resultats precedemment publies. (auteur)

  7. [Fission product yields of 60 fissioning reactions]. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    In keeping with the statement of work, I have examined the fission product yields of 60 fissioning reactions. In co-authorship with the UTR (University Technical Representative) Talmadge R. England ''Evaluation and Compilation of Fission Product Yields 1993,'' LA-UR-94-3106(ENDF-349) October, (1994) was published. This is an evaluated set of fission product Yields for use in calculation of decay heat curves with improved accuracy has been prepared. These evaluated yields are based on all known experimental data through 1992. Unmeasured fission product yields are calculated from charge distribution, pairing effects, and isomeric state models developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The current evaluation has been distributed as the ENDF/B-VI fission product yield data set

  8. Thermal safety analysis for pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie

    1998-01-01

    Pebble bed blanket hybrid reactor may have more advantages than slab element blanket hybrid reactor in nuclear fuel production and nuclear safety. The thermo-hydraulic calculations of the blanket in the Tokamak helium cooling pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor developed in China are carried out using the Code THERMIX and auxiliary code. In the calculations different fuel pebble material and steady state, depressurization and total loss of flow accident conditions are included. The results demonstrate that the conceptual design of the Tokamak helium cooling pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor with dump tank is feasible and safe enough only if the suitable fuel pebble material is selected and the suitable control system and protection system are established. Some recommendations for due conceptual design are also presented

  9. Measurement of mass and isotopic fission yields for heavy fission products with the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, A.

    2009-05-01

    In spite of the huge amount of fission yield data available in different libraries, more accurate values are still needed for nuclear energy applications and to improve our understanding of the fission process. Thus measurements of fission yields were performed at the mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. The mass separator Lohengrin is situated at the research reactor of the institute and permits the placement of an actinide layer in a high thermal neutron flux. It separates fragments according to their atomic mass, kinetic energy and ionic charge state by the action of magnetic and electric fields. Coupled to a high resolution ionization chamber the experiment was used to investigate the mass and isotopic yields of the light mass region. Almost all fission yields of isotopes from Th to Cf have been measured at Lohengrin with this method. To complete and improve the nuclear data libraries, these measurements have been extended in this work to the heavy mass region for the reactions 235 U(n th ,f), 239 Pu(n th ,f) and 241 Pu(n th ,f). For these higher masses an isotopic separation is no longer possible. So, a new method was undertaken with the reaction 239 Pu(n th ,f) to determine the isotopic yields by spectrometry. These experiments have allowed to reduce considerably the uncertainties. Moreover the ionic charge state and kinetic energy distributions were specifically studied and have shown, among others, nanosecond isomers for some masses. (author)

  10. Experimental Verification of the Fission Chamber Gamma Signal Suppression by the Campbelling Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, L.; Weber, M.; Oriol, L.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Geslot, B.; Jammes, C.; Normand, S.; Lescop, B.

    2011-01-01

    For the on-line monitoring of high fast neutron fluxes in the presence of a strong thermal neutron component, SCK-CEN and CEA are jointly developing a Fast Neutron Detector System, based on 242 Pu fission chambers as sensors and including dedicated electronics and data processing systems. Irradiation tests in the BR2 reactor of 242 Pu fission chambers operating in current mode showed that in typical MTR conditions the fission chamber currents are dominated by the gamma contribution. In order to reduce the gamma contribution to the signal, it was proposed to use the fission chambers in Campbelling mode. An irradiation experiment in the BR2 reactor with a 242 Pu and a 235 U fission chamber, both equipped with a suitable cable for measurements in Campbelling mode, proved the effectiveness of the suppression of the gamma-induced signal component by the Campbelling mode: gamma contribution reduction factors of 26 for the 235 U fission chamber and more than 80 for the 242 Pu fission chamber were obtained. The experimental data also prove that photofission contributions are negligibly small. Consequently, in typical MTR conditions the gamma contribution to the fission chamber Campbelling signal can be neglected. (authors)

  11. Measurement of isotopic cross sections of the fission fragments produced in 500 AMeV {sup 208}Pb + p reaction; Etude de la production des fragments de fission issus de la reaction {sup 208}Pb + p a 500 AMeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Dominguez, B

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the fission fragments produced in the spallation reaction {sup 208}Pb + p at 500 AMeV. The fission fragments from Z=23 up to Z=59 have been detected and identified by using the inverse kinematics technique with the high-resolution spectrometer FRS. The production cross sections and the recoil velocities of 430 nuclei have been measured. The measured data have been compared with previous data. The isotopic distributions show a high precision. However, the absolute value of the fission cross section is higher than expected. From the experimental data the characteristics of the average fissioning system have been reconstructed (Z{sub fis}, A{sub fis}, E*{sub fis}). In addition, the number of post-fission neutrons emitted from the fission fragments, v{sub post}, has been determined by using a new method. The experimental data have been compared to the two-steps models describing the spallation reaction. The impact of the model parameters on the observables has been analysed and the reasons Leading to the observed differences between the codes are also presented. This analyse shows a good agreement with the INCL4+ABLA code. (author)

  12. Prompt neutron fission spectrum mean energies for the fissile nuclides and 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    The international standard for a neutron spectrum is that produced from the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf, while the thermal neutron induced fission neutron spectra for the four fissile nuclides, 233 U, 235 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu are of interest from the standpoint of nuclear reactors. The average neutron energies of these spectra are tabulated. The individual measurements are recorded with the neutron energy range measured, the method of detection as well as the average neutron energy for each author. Also tabulated are the measurements of the ratio of mean energies for pairs of fission neutron spectra. 75 refs., 9 tabs

  13. Ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1991-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1946, light (charged) particle accompanied fission (ternary fission) has been extensively studied, for spontaneous as well as for induced fission reactions. The reason for this interest was twofold: the ternary particles being emitted in space and time close to the scission point were expected to supply information on the scission point configuration and the ternary fission process was an important source of helium, tritium, and hydrogen production in nuclear reactors, for which data were requested by the nuclear industry. Significant experimental progress has been realized with the advent of high-resolution detectors, powerful multiparameter data acquisition systems, and intense neutron and photon beams. As far as theory is concerned, the trajectory calculations (in which scission point parameters are deduced from the experimental observations) have been very much improved. An attempt was made to explain ternary particle emission in terms of a Plateau-Rayleigh hydrodynamical instability of a relatively long cylindrical neck or cylindrical nucleus. New results have also been obtained on the so-called open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission (fission in three about-equal fragments). The spontaneous emission of charged particles has also clearly been demonstrated in recent years. This chapter discusses the main characteristics of ternary fission, theoretical models, light particle emission probabilities, the dependence of the emission probabilities on experimental variables, light particle energy distributions, light particle angular distributions, correlations between light particle accompanied fission observables, open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission, and spontaneous emission of heavy ions. 143 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Thermal flow in detectors of CNA-II with spontaneous fissions source of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascitti, J. A

    2012-01-01

    The thermal flux in the position of ex-core and in-core CNA-II Nuclear Power Plant (CNA-II) detectors is estimated considering neutron from the 238 U spontaneous fissions as the source, for the reactor cold state (isothermal state with both coolant and moderator at a temperature of 60 o C, a pressure of 35 ata and 15.46 ppm of natural Boron), and 24% inserted control rods (slightly sub-critical). Results are obtained for two different situations: with and without photo-neutrons due to the (γ,n) reaction in D 2 O. It is concluded that the thermal flux is under the detection limit of the boron trifluoride 104-SR or 282-IB detectors (≅10 -1 cm-2.s -1 ). These detectors are located in opposite positions in the inner concrete shielding, having the lowest detection limit among all ex-core detectors. A significant difference is verified in neutron fluxes between both cases, which suggest that photo-neutrons in large heavy water reactors such as CNA-II should not be ignored. The total neutron flux attenuation factor between the inner and outer region of the reactor pressure vessel was estimated to be 7.0 x 10 -7 . It should be mentioned that none of the results here presented has been affected by any correction factor. Each value has a percentage relative error representing the statistical uncertainty due to the probabilistic Monte Carlo method used to obtain it (author)

  15. Fission level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    Fission level densities (or fissioning nucleus level densities at fission saddle deformations) are required for statistical model calculations of actinide fission cross sections. Back-shifted Fermi-Gas Model, Constant Temperature Model and Generalized Superfluid Model (GSM) are widely used for the description of level densities at stable deformations. These models provide approximately identical level density description at excitations close to the neutron binding energy. It is at low excitation energies that they are discrepant, while this energy region is crucial for fission cross section calculations. A drawback of back-shifted Fermi gas model and traditional constant temperature model approaches is that it is difficult to include in a consistent way pair correlations, collective effects and shell effects. Pair, shell and collective properties of nucleus do not reduce just to the renormalization of level density parameter a, but influence the energy dependence of level densities. These effects turn out to be important because they seem to depend upon deformation of either equilibrium or saddle-point. These effects are easily introduced within GSM approach. Fission barriers are another key ingredients involved in the fission cross section calculations. Fission level density and barrier parameters are strongly interdependent. This is the reason for including fission barrier parameters along with the fission level densities in the Starter File. The recommended file is maslov.dat - fission barrier parameters. Recent version of actinide fission barrier data obtained in Obninsk (obninsk.dat) should only be considered as a guide for selection of initial parameters. These data are included in the Starter File, together with the fission barrier parameters recommended by CNDC (beijing.dat), for completeness. (author)

  16. Simulation of the effects of grain boundary fission gas during thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Beiersdorf, B.A.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents the results of an initial set of out-of-cell transient heating experiments performed on unirradiated UO 2 pellets fabricated to simulate the effect of grain boundary fission gas on fuel swelling and cladding failure. The fabrication involved trapping high-pressure argon on internal pores by sintering annular UO 2 pellets in a hot isostatic press (HIP). The pellet stack was subjected to two separate transients (DGF83-03A and -03B). Figures show photomicrographs of HIPped and non-HIPped UO 2 , respectively, and the adjacent cladding after DGF83-03B. Fuel melting occurred at the center of both the HIPped and non-HIPped pellets; however, a dark ring is present near the center in the HIPped fuel but not in the non-HIPped fuel. This dark band is a high-porosity region due to increased grain boundary/edge swelling in that pellet. In contrast, grain boundary/edge swelling did not occur in the non-HIPped pellets. Thus, the presence of the high-pressure argon trapped on internal pores during sintering in the HIP altered the microstructural behavior. Results of these preliminary tests indicate that the microstructural behavior of HIPped fuel during thermal transients is different from the behavior of conventionally fabricated fuel

  17. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.; Leonard, Keith J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  18. Fission decay properties of ultra neutron-rich uranium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in the chain of neutron-rich uranium isotopes is examined here. The neutron ... mean field theory, this nucleus is shown to undergo exotic decay mode of thermal neu- .... For 250U with a fission barrier of 4.3 MeV [5], we obtain the value of.

  19. Measurement of the uranium-235 fission cross section over the neutron energy range 1 to 6 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, D.M.; Diven, B.C.; Hansen, G.E.; Jarvis, G.A.; Koontz, P.G.; Smith, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The ratio of the fission cross section of 235 U to the scattering cross section of 1 H was measured in the 1- to 6-MeV range using monoenergetic neutrons from a pulsed 3 H(p,n) 3 He source. In this measurement, solid-state detectors determined fission fragment and recoil proton emissions from back-to-back U(99.7%) and polyethylene disks. Timing permitted discrimination against room-scattered neutron backgrounds. Absolute values for 235 U(n,f) are obtained using the Hopkins-Breit evaluation of the hydrogen-scattering cross section

  20. Irradiation tests in BR2 of miniature fission chambers in pulse, Campbelling and current mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeeren, L. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Geslot, B.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C. [CEA/DEN/SPEx/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Legrand, A. [CEA/DEN/DRSN/SIREN/LASPI Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Barbot, L. [CEA/DEN/SPEx/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    The FNDS system ('Fast Neutron Detection System') for the on-line in-pile detection of the fast neutron flux in the presence of a significant thermal neutron flux and a high gamma dose rate is being developed in the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Laboratoire Commun. The system has been patented in 2008. The system consists of a miniature Pu-242 fission chamber as main detector, complemented by a U-235 fission chamber or a rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) for thermal neutron flux monitoring and a dedicated acquisition system that also takes care of the processing of the signals from both detectors to extract fast neutron flux data. This paper describes a FNDS qualification experiment in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor, with experimental results on a large set of fission chambers in current and Campbelling mode. (authors)

  1. Irradiation tests in BR2 of miniature fission chambers in pulse, Campbelling and current mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, L.; Geslot, B.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Legrand, A.; Barbot, L.

    2011-01-01

    The FNDS system ('Fast Neutron Detection System') for the on-line in-pile detection of the fast neutron flux in the presence of a significant thermal neutron flux and a high gamma dose rate is being developed in the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Laboratoire Commun. The system has been patented in 2008. The system consists of a miniature Pu-242 fission chamber as main detector, complemented by a U-235 fission chamber or a rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) for thermal neutron flux monitoring and a dedicated acquisition system that also takes care of the processing of the signals from both detectors to extract fast neutron flux data. This paper describes a FNDS qualification experiment in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor, with experimental results on a large set of fission chambers in current and Campbelling mode. (authors)

  2. Effect of fission gas leakage on heat transfer within a helium filled spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Schimmel, W.P. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Leakage of Xe from spent fuel elements into a He-filled cask would reduce the thermal conductivity, but it would also increase the nondimensional Grashof and Rayleigh number convection parameters. The thermal performance for various quantities of leaked fission gases was evaluated for a cask containing 9 fuel assemblies, each producing approximately 2 kW, and a He partial pressure of 4 atm. If all pins leaked, the max pin temperature would increase from 761 to 839 0 K. It is concluded that the effect of fission gases is a second order effect

  3. Consultants' meeting on prompt fission neutron spectra of major actinides. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote Noy, R.; Maslov, V.; Bauge, E.; Ohsawa, T.; Vorobyev, A.; Chadwick, M.B.; Oberstedt, S.

    2009-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting on 'Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Major Actinides' was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, to discuss the adequacy and quality of the recommended prompt fission neutron spectra to be found in existing nuclear data applications libraries. These prompt fission neutron spectra were judged to be inadequate, and this problem has proved difficult to resolve by means of theoretical modelling. Major adjustments may be required to ensure the validity of such important data. There is a strong requirement for an international effort to explore and resolve these difficulties and recommend prompt fission neutron spectra and uncertainty covariance matrices for the actinides over the neutron energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Participants also stressed that there would be a strong need for validation of the resulting data against integral critical assembly and dosimetry data. (author)

  4. Prompt neutrons from {sup 236}U fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldeman, J W; Musgrove, A.R. de L.; Walsch, R L

    1971-03-01

    Measurements were made of prompt neutron emission in the thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U. The mean neutron emission per fragment was obtained for particular values of the fragment mass and total kinetic energy. A direct neutron counting method was employed and a comparison made with data from previous experiments of this type. (author)

  5. Measurement of isotopic cross sections of the fission fragments produced in 500 AMeV 208Pb + p reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Dominguez, B.

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the fission fragments produced in the spallation reaction 208 Pb + p at 500 AMeV. The fission fragments from Z=23 up to Z=59 have been detected and identified by using the inverse kinematics technique with the high-resolution spectrometer FRS. The production cross sections and the recoil velocities of 430 nuclei have been measured. The measured data have been compared with previous data. The isotopic distributions show a high precision. However, the absolute value of the fission cross section is higher than expected. From the experimental data the characteristics of the average fissioning system have been reconstructed (Z fis , A fis , E* fis ). In addition, the number of post-fission neutrons emitted from the fission fragments, v post , has been determined by using a new method. The experimental data have been compared to the two-steps models describing the spallation reaction. The impact of the model parameters on the observables has been analysed and the reasons Leading to the observed differences between the codes are also presented. This analyse shows a good agreement with the INCL4+ABLA code. (author)

  6. Measurement of 235U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections and neutron spectrum adjusted with the activation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Kobayashi, Tooru

    1992-01-01

    The 235 U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections for 13 threshold reactions were measured with the fission plate (27 cm in diameter and 1.1 cm thick) at the heavy water thermal neutron facility of the Kyoto University Reactor. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was applied to check the deviation from the 235 U fission neutron spectrum due to the room-scattered neutrons, and it was found that the resultant spectrum was close to that of 235 U fission neutrons. Supplementally, the relations to derive the absorbed dose rates with the fission plate were also given using the calculated neutron spectra and the neutron Kerma factors. Finally, the present values of the fission spectrum-averaged cross sections were employed to adjust the 235 U fission neutron spectrum with the NEUPAC code. The adjusted spectrum showed a good agreement with the Watt-type fission neutron spectrum. (author)

  7. Neutron kinetics in moderators and SNM detection through epithermal-neutron-induced fissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozani, Tsahi, E-mail: tgmaven@gmail.com [1050 Harriet St., Palo Alto, CA 94301 (United States); King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Extension of the well-established Differential Die Away Analysis (DDAA) into a faster time domain, where more penetrating epithermal neutrons induce fissions, is proposed and demonstrated via simulations and experiments. In the proposed method the fissions stimulated by thermal, epithermal and even higher-energy neutrons are measured after injection of a narrow pulse of high-energy 14 MeV (d,T) or 2.5 MeV (d,D) source neutrons, appropriately moderated. The ability to measure these fissions stems from the inherent correlation of neutron energy and time (“E–T” correlation) during the process of slowing down of high-energy source neutrons in common moderating materials such as hydrogenous compounds (e.g., polyethylene), heavy water, beryllium and graphite. The kinetic behavior following injection of a delta-function-shaped pulse (in time) of 14 MeV neutrons into such moderators is studied employing MCNPX simulations and, when applicable, some simple “one-group” models. These calculations served as a guide for the design of a source moderator which was used in experiments. Qualitative relationships between slowing-down time after the pulse and the prevailing neutron energy are discussed. A laboratory system consisting of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a polyethylene-reflected Be moderator, a liquid scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and a two-parameter E–T data acquisition system was set up to measure prompt neutron and delayed gamma-ray fission signatures in a 19.5% enriched LEU sample. The measured time behavior of thermal and epithermal neutron fission signals agreed well with the detailed simulations. The laboratory system can readily be redesigned and deployed as a mobile inspection system for SNM in, e.g., cars and vans. A strong pulsed neutron generator with narrow pulse (<75 ns) at a reasonably high pulse frequency could make the high-energy neutron induced fission modality a realizable SNM detection technique.

  8. Heavy cluster in cold nuclear rearrangements in fusion and fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the appearance of cluster aspects in the dynamics of large rearrangements processes, as fusion and fission, is presented. Clusters in the sense as used in the following are strongly bound, doubly magic neutron rich nuclei as 48 Ca 28 , 78 Ni 50 , 132 Sn 82 , and 208 Pb 126 , the spherical nuclei Z=114 - 126 and N=184, and nuclei with closed shells N=28, 50, 82, and 126, and Z=28, 50, and 82. As with increasing nucleon numbers, the absolute shell corrections to the binding energies increase, the strongest effects are to be observed for the higher shells. The 132 cluster manifests itself in low energy fission (Faissner, H. and Wildermuth, K. Nucl. Phys., 58 (1964) 177). The 208 Pb cluster gave the new radioactivity (Rose, M.J. and Jones G.A., Nature, 307 (1984) 245) and the first superheavy elements (SHE) (Armbruster P., Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 35 (1985) 135-94; Munzenberg, G. Rep. Progr. Phys., 51 (1988) 57). The paper discuss experiments concerning the stability of clusters to intrinsic excitation energy in fusion and fission (Armbruster, P. Lect. Notes Phys., 158 (1982) 1). and the manifestation of clusters in the fusion entrance channel (Armbruster, P., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn., 58 (1989) 232). The importance of compactness of the clustering system seems to be equally decisive in fission and fusion. Finally, it s covered the importance of clusters for the production of SHEs)

  9. Evaluation and compilation of fission product yields 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Rider, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    This document is the latest in a series of compilations of fission yield data. Fission yield measurements reported in the open literature and calculated charge distributions have been used to produce a recommended set of yields for the fission products. The original data with reference sources, and the recommended yields axe presented in tabular form. These include many nuclides which fission by neutrons at several energies. These energies include thermal energies (T), fission spectrum energies (F), 14 meV High Energy (H or HE), and spontaneous fission (S), in six sets of ten each. Set A includes U235T, U235F, U235HE, U238F, U238HE, Pu239T, Pu239F, Pu241T, U233T, Th232F. Set B includes U233F, U233HE, U236F, Pu239H, Pu240F, Pu241F, Pu242F, Th232H, Np237F, Cf252S. Set C includes U234F, U237F, Pu240H, U234HE, U236HE, Pu238F, Am241F, Am243F, Np238F, Cm242F. Set D includes Th227T, Th229T, Pa231F, Am241T, Am241H, Am242MT, Cm245T, Cf249T, Cf251T, Es254T. Set E includes Cf250S, Cm244S, Cm248S, Es253S, Fm254S, Fm255T, Fm256S, Np237H, U232T, U238S. Set F includes Cm243T, Cm246S, Cm243F, Cm244F, Cm246F, Cm248F, Pu242H, Np237T, Pu240T, and Pu242T to complete fission product yield evaluations for 60 fissioning systems in all. This report also serves as the primary documentation for the second evaluation of yields in ENDF/B-VI released in 1993

  10. Evaluation and compilation of fission product yields 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, T.R.; Rider, B.F.

    1995-12-31

    This document is the latest in a series of compilations of fission yield data. Fission yield measurements reported in the open literature and calculated charge distributions have been used to produce a recommended set of yields for the fission products. The original data with reference sources, and the recommended yields axe presented in tabular form. These include many nuclides which fission by neutrons at several energies. These energies include thermal energies (T), fission spectrum energies (F), 14 meV High Energy (H or HE), and spontaneous fission (S), in six sets of ten each. Set A includes U235T, U235F, U235HE, U238F, U238HE, Pu239T, Pu239F, Pu241T, U233T, Th232F. Set B includes U233F, U233HE, U236F, Pu239H, Pu240F, Pu241F, Pu242F, Th232H, Np237F, Cf252S. Set C includes U234F, U237F, Pu240H, U234HE, U236HE, Pu238F, Am241F, Am243F, Np238F, Cm242F. Set D includes Th227T, Th229T, Pa231F, Am241T, Am241H, Am242MT, Cm245T, Cf249T, Cf251T, Es254T. Set E includes Cf250S, Cm244S, Cm248S, Es253S, Fm254S, Fm255T, Fm256S, Np237H, U232T, U238S. Set F includes Cm243T, Cm246S, Cm243F, Cm244F, Cm246F, Cm248F, Pu242H, Np237T, Pu240T, and Pu242T to complete fission product yield evaluations for 60 fissioning systems in all. This report also serves as the primary documentation for the second evaluation of yields in ENDF/B-VI released in 1993.

  11. Experimental verification of the fission chamber gamma signal suppression by the Campbelling mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeeren, L.; Weber, M. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Oriol, L.; Breaud, S.; Filliatre, P.; Geslot, B.; Jammes, C. [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Normand, S.; Lescop, B. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    For the on-line monitoring of high fast neutron fluxes in the presence of a strong thermal neutron component, SCK-CEN and CEA are jointly developing a Fast Neutron Detector System, based on {sup 242}Pu fission chambers as sensors and including dedicated electronics and data processing systems. Irradiation tests in the BR2 reactor of {sup 242}Pu fission chambers operating in current mode showed that in typical MTR (Materials Test Reactors) conditions the fission chamber currents are dominated by the gamma contribution. In order to reduce the gamma contribution to the signal, it was proposed to use the fission chambers in Campbelling mode. An irradiation experiment in the BR2 reactor with a {sup 242}Pu and a {sup 235}U fission chamber, both equipped with a suitable cable for measurements in Campbelling mode, proved the effectiveness of the suppression of the gamma-induced signal component by the Campbelling mode: gamma contribution reduction factors of 26 for the {sup 235}U fission chamber and more than 80 for the {sup 242}Pu fission chamber were obtained. The experimental data also prove that photofission contributions are negligibly small. Consequently, in typical MTR conditions the gamma contribution to the fission chamber Campbelling signal can be neglected. (authors)

  12. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  13. Backtracing neutron analysis in the fusion-fission dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennand, E. de Goes; Hanappe, F.; Stuttge, L.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of multi parametric experimental data is used in the study of the dynamics of the fission process for the compound system 126 Ba. We apply this method to obtain the correlation between thermal energy related to the neutron total multiplicity and the correlation between pre-scission neutron and pos-scission neutron multiplicities. The results obtained are interpreted into the framework of a dynamical model. From this interpretation we have access to the following information: the friction intensity which drives the dynamical evolution of the system; the initial deformation of the compound system; the barrier evolution with temperature and angular momentum, and fission times. (author)

  14. A Covariance Generation Methodology for Fission Product Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terranova N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent safety and economical concerns for modern nuclear reactor applications have fed an outstanding interest in basic nuclear data evaluation improvement and completion. It has been immediately clear that the accuracy of our predictive simulation models was strongly affected by our knowledge on input data. Therefore strong efforts have been made to improve nuclear data and to generate complete and reliable uncertainty information able to yield proper uncertainty propagation on integral reactor parameters. Since in modern nuclear data banks (such as JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1 no correlations for fission yields are given, in the present work we propose a covariance generation methodology for fission product yields. The main goal is to reproduce the existing European library and to add covariance information to allow proper uncertainty propagation in depletion and decay heat calculations. To do so, we adopted the Generalized Least Square Method (GLSM implemented in CONRAD (COde for Nuclear Reaction Analysis and Data assimilation, developed at CEA-Cadarache. Theoretical values employed in the Bayesian parameter adjustment are delivered thanks to a convolution of different models, representing several quantities in fission yield calculations: the Brosa fission modes for pre-neutron mass distribution, a simplified Gaussian model for prompt neutron emission probability, theWahl systematics for charge distribution and the Madland-England model for the isomeric ratio. Some results will be presented for the thermal fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  15. Post-scission fission theory: Neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of theoretical representations of two of the observables in neutron emission in fission is given, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N (E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity bar ν p . Early representations of the two observables are presented and their deficiencies are discussed. This is followed by summaries and examples of recent theoretical models for the calculation of these quantities. Emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the recent models. In particular, the dependencies of N (E) and bar ν p upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are treated. Recent work in the calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum matrix N (E, E n ), where E n is the energy of the neutron inducing fission, is then discussed. Concluding remarks address the current status of our ability to calculate these observables with confidence, the direction of future theoretical efforts, and limitations to current (and future) approaches

  16. Fission products collecting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fission products trap with no contamination to coolants and cover gas by the provision of a fission products trap above the upper part of a nuclear power plant. Constitution: Upon fuel failures in a reactor core, nuclear fission products leak into coolants and move along the flow of the coolants to the coolants above the reactor core. The fission products are collected in a trap container and guided along a pipeline into fission products detector. The fission products detector monitors the concentration of the fission products and opens the downstream valve of the detector when a predetermined concentration of the fission products is detected to introduce the fission products into a waste gas processing device and release them through the exhaust pipe. (Seki, T.)

  17. Chain and independent fission product yields adjusted to conform with physical conservation laws. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, E.A.C.

    1976-01-01

    Previously reported adjustments to the chain yields and independent yields for the thermal neutron induced fission of 233 U, 235 U, 239 Pu and 241 Pu, the fast neutron induced fission of 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, 240 Pu and 241 Pu, and the 14 MeV neutron induced fission of 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U and 238 U, have been recalculated using the principle of least squares. The adjustments to the chain yields so found are much smaller than those previously reported. (author)

  18. Fission track dating and estimation of uranium in some garnets of Rajasthan (India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S; Virk, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1978-09-01

    The experimental procedure, involving the preparation, etching, thermal neutron irradiation and scanning of the garnet samples, is described. The calculated fission track ages and uranium concentration are tabulated.

  19. Experimental study of fission process by fragment-neutron correlation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kanno, Ikuo; Kimura, Itsuro; Nakagome, Yoshihiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-07-01

    Fragment-neutron correlation measurement of {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) was carried out. The obtained results showed more statistical accuracy than that of reported thermal neutron reaction. Experimental results and it`s analysis made clear the following facts. The minimum values of <{eta}> (m*) are shown at about 90 and 145 {mu} and <{eta}> (m*) showed the symmetrical form with an axis of symmetrical fission. This tendency is same as the distribution of {sup 252}Cf(s.f). -dV/dTKE(m*) indicates the saw-teethed distribution as same as <{nu}>(m*). The distribution seems depend on stiffness of fission fragment affected by the shell effect. The level density parameter a(m*) of fission fragment obtained from {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) expresses the saw-teethed distribution as same as that of {sup 252}Cf(s.f). This distribution can be explained by the empirical equation under consideration of the fission fragment depending on the shell effect and the collective motion. (S.Y.)

  20. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  1. Fission track dating method: I. Study of neutron flux uniformity in some irradiation positions of IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, A.M.; Hadler, J.C.; Iunes, P.J.; Paulo, S.R. de

    1993-06-01

    In order to use the fission track dating method the flux gradient was verified within the sample holder, in some irradiation positions of the IEA-R1 reactor at IPEN/CNEN, Sao Paulo. The fission track dating method considers only the thermal neutron fission tracks, to subtract the other contributions sample irradiations with a cadmium cover was performed. The neutron flux cadmium influence was studied. (author)

  2. Controlled isotropic fission fragment sources on the base of nuclear-physical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevast'yanov, V.D.; Maslov, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    Isotropic fission fragment sources (IFFS) are developed on the base of a neutron generator and pulse fast reactor. IFFS permit to calibrate fission fragment detectors. The IFFS consist of radiators with 235 U. The radiators are placed in a thermal neutron field of the neutron generator or in the reactor core center. The fragment activity is controlled by indications of an α-particle counter or by indications of a monitor of energy release in the core. 14 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  3. Systematic features of mass yield curves in low-energy fission of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagame, Yuichiro

    1999-01-01

    excitation energy and angular distribution. (9) Based on the systematic analysis of the heavy asymmetric mass yield curves in thermal neutron- and proton-induced fission of actinides, and spontaneous fission of medium and heavy actinides, the relation between the fragment shell structure and the shape of the mass yield curves which reflect the final mass division process is discussed. (author)

  4. Transmutation of fission products and actinide waste at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemen, L.L.; Pitcher, E.J.; Russell, G.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The authors studied the neutronics of an ATW system for the transmutation of the fission products ({sup 99}Tc in particular) and the type of actinide waste stored in several tanks at Hanford. The heart of the system is a highly-efficient neutron production target. It is surrounded by a blanket containing a moderator/reflector material, as well as the products to be transmuted. The fission products are injected into the blanket in the form of an aqueous solution in heavy water, whereas an aqueous actinides slurry is circulated in the outer part of the blanket. For the sake of definiteness, the authors focussed on {sup 99}Tc (the most difficult fission product to transmute), and {sup 239}Pu, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am. Because of the low thermal neutron absorption cross-section of {sup 99}Tc, considerable care and effort must be devoted to the design of a very efficient neutron source.

  5. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103(n,n')Rh-103m reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103(n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to approximately +-5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the IAEA. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  6. Neutron emission as a probe of fusion-fission and quasi-fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Pre- and post scission neutron yeilds have been measured as a function of projectile mass, compound nucleus fissility, and fission mass-split and total kinetic energy (TKE) for 27 fusion-fission and quasi-fission reactions induced by beams of 16,18 O, 40 Ar and 64 Ni. A new method of interpretation of experimental pre-scission neutron multiplicities ν-pre and mean kinetic energies ε ν allows the extraction of fission time scales with much less uncertainty than previously, all fusion-fission results being consistent with a dynamical time scale of (35±15) x 10 -21 s for symmetric fission. All reactions show that ν-pre falls quite rapidly with increasing mass-asymmetry; evidence is presented that for fusion-fission reactions this is partly due to a reduction of the dynamical fission time scale with mass-asymmetry. For quasi-fission, the data indicate that the pre-scission multiplicity and mean neutron kinetic energy are very sensitive to the final mass-asymmetry, but that the time scale is virtually independent of mass-asymmetry. It is concluded that for fusion-fission there is no dependence of ν-pre on TKE, whilst for 64 Ni-induced quasi-fission reactions, a strong increase of ν-pre with decreasing TKE is observed, probably largely caused by neutron emission during the acceleration time of the fission fragments in these fast reactions. Interpretation of post-scission multiplicities in terms of fragment excitation energies leads to deduced time scales consistent with those determined from the pre-scission data. 54 refs., 17 tabs., 25 figs

  7. Studies on fission tracks and distributions of uranium and rare earths in granite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1987-01-01

    Many materials contain fossil records of the slow spontaneous fission of uranium they contain as an impurity. Fission fragments, heavy charged particles released in each fission event, produce microscopic trails of radiation damage that may persist over geological times and may be developed to a size observable under an optical microscope by a suitable etching treatment. Such tracks are also produced by fissions induced by thermal neutron irradiation of the uranium. When the material is heated sufficiently, it anneals and the the microscopic trails become shorter and narrower. The track density decreases, because the chemical etchant will not reach some of the shortened tracks. Measurements of track densities before and after annealing can be used, along with laboratory studies of annealing rates, to determine the annealing temperature. Also, the track density of induced fissions is related to the concentration of uranium and the fluence of neutrons to which it was exposed. If the track density due to induced fissions can be distinguished from that due to fossil tracks, estimates of either the concentration or the fluence can be made if the other is known. Two such materials (one a fragment of a granite paving stone, the other a piece of stained glass from a cathedral window) that had been exposed to the atomic bomb at Nagasaki were used in the present work. The fossil record in zircons in the granite was used to estimate the temperature to which it had been exposed in the bombing. Induced fissions were used to estimate the concentration of uranium in the zircons. Nonuniform heating and cooling and nearly uniform exposure to the neutrons make the granite sample unsuitable for determining the neutron fluence from the bomb. Induced fissions in the stained glass were used to estimate the concentration of uranium and the thermal neutron fluence from the A-bomb. Annealing of tracks in glass was also studied

  8. The evaluation for reference fission yield of 238U fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Qichang; Liu Tingjin

    1998-01-01

    In the fission yield data evaluation and measurement, the reference yield is very important, good or poor recommended or measurement values depend upon the reference data to a great extent. According to the CRP's requirement, the evaluation of reference fission yields have been and will be carried out in CNDC, as a part of the whole work (contract No.9504/R 0 /Regular Budget Fund), the evaluation for 29 reference fission yields of 15 product nuclides from 238 U fission have been completed

  9. High precision mass measurements of thermalized relativistic uranium projectile and fission fragments with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayet San Andres, Samuel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Justus Liebig Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Collaboration: FRS Ion Catcher-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    At the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI, a relativistic beam of {sup 238}U at 1GeV/u was used to produce fission and projectile fragments on a beryllium target. The ions were separated in-flight at the FRS, thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell and transferred to a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) where high precision mass measurements were performed. The masses of several fission and projectile fragments were measured (including short-lived nuclei with half-lives down to 18 ms) and the possibility of tailoring an isomerically clean beam for other experiments was demonstrated. With the demonstrated performance of the MR-TOF-MS and the expected production rates of exotic nuclei far from stability at the next-generation facilities such as FAIR, novel mass measurements of nuclei close to the neutron drip line will be possible and key information for understanding the r-process will be available. The results from the last experiment and an outlook of possible future mass measurements close to the neutron drip line at FAIR with the MR-TOF-MS are presented.

  10. Study on the technical feasibility of Fission-Track dating at two irradiation positions of the RA-6 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The method of Fission-Track dating is based upon the detection of the damage caused by fission fragments from the Uranium contained in geological samples.In order to determine the age of a sample, both the amount of spontaneous fissions occurred and the Uranium concentration must be known.The latter requires the irradiation of the samples inside a reactor with a well-thermalized flux, so that fissions are induced over 235 U targets only. Therefore, the Uranium concentration may be determined.The main inconvenient presented by the irradiation sites at the RA-6 MTR-type reactor is that neutron flux is not completely thermal there, which means that fissions due to epithermal and fast neutrons will not be negligible.In the same way, tracks due to fissions of 238 U and 232 Th will be detected. In order to know the corrections that must be applied to those measurements performed in this reactor, it is necessary to characterize fast flux.Because of it, this laboratory's gamma spectrometry equipment had to be calibrated. After that, several activation detectors were irradiated and results were analyzed. Finally, it was determined that it is feasible to Fission-Track date at the I6 position. However, limitations associated to this method were analyzed for the values of flux measured in the different sites

  11. Curves and tables of neutron cross sections of fission product nuclei in JENDL-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo [ed.

    1992-06-15

    Neutron cross sections of 172 nuclei in the fission product region stored in JENDL-3 are shown in graphs and tables. The evaluation work of these nuclei was made by the Fission Product Nuclear Data Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, in the neutron energy region from 10{sup {minus}5} eV to 20 MeV. Almost of the cross section data reproduced in graphs in this report. The cross section averaged over 38 energy intervals are listed in a table. Shown in order tables are thermal cross sections, resonance integrals, Maxwellian neutron flux average cross sections, fission spectrum average cross sections, 14-MeV cross sections, one group average cross sections in neutron flux of typical types of fission reactors and average cross sections in the 30-keV Maxwellian spectrum.

  12. Curves and tables of neutron cross sections of fission product nuclei in JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1992-06-01

    Neutron cross sections of 172 nuclei in the fission product region stored in JENDL-3 are shown in graphs and tables. The evaluation work of these nuclei was made by the Fission Product Nuclear Data Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, in the neutron energy region from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV. Almost all the cross section data are reproduced in graphs in this report. The cross section averaged over 38 energy intervals are listed in a table. Shown in other tables are thermal cross sections, resonance integrals, Maxwellian neutron flux average cross sections, fission spectrum average cross sections, 14-MeV cross sections, one group average cross sections in neutron flux of typical types of fission reactors and average cross sections in the 30-keV Maxwellian spectrum. (author)

  13. Computer program FPIP-REV calculates fission product inventory for U-235 fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. S.; Call, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates fission product inventories and source strengths associated with the operation of U-235 fueled nuclear power reactor. It utilizes a fission-product nuclide library of 254 nuclides, and calculates the time dependent behavior of the fission product nuclides formed by fissioning of U-235.

  14. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E., E-mail: Douglas.Burkes@pnnl.gov; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed. - Highlights: •Complementary fission gas release events are reported for U-Mo fuel with and without cladding. •Exothermic reaction between Zr diffusion layer and cladding influences fission gas release. •Mechanisms responsible for fission gas release are similar, but with varying timing and magnitude. •Behavior of samples is similar after 800 °C signaling the onset of superlattice destabilization.

  15. Yields of products from thermal-neutron induced fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagaard, P.; Rudstam, G.; Zwicky, H.U.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for fission yield determinations at an ISOL-system connected nuclear reactor have been developed. The present report contains detailed descriptions both of the experimental techniques and of the method used to correct the experimental yields for the decay of short-lived nuclear species in the delay between production and measurement. (Authors)

  16. Irradiation positions for fission-track dating in the University of Pavia TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, Massimo; Meloni, Sandro; Balestrieri, Maria Laura; Bigazzi, Giulio

    2002-01-01

    An irradiation position arranged is described in the present paper for fission-track dating in the Triga Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia. Fluence values determined using the NIST glass standard SRM 962a for fission-track dating and the traditional metal foils are compared. Relatively good neutron thermalization (φ th /φ f = 0.956) and lack of significant fluence spatial gradients are good factors for fission-track dating. Finally, international age standards (or putative age standards) irradiated in this new position yielded results consistent with independent reference ages. (author)

  17. Neutron multiplicity for neutron induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu as a function of neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Holden, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent development in the theory and practice of neutron correlation (''coincidence'') counting require knowledge of the higher factorial moments of the P/sub ν/ distribution (the probability that (ν) neutrons are emitted in a fission) for the case where the fission is induced by bombarding neutrons of more than thermal energies. In contrast to the situation with spontaneous and thermal neutron induced fission, where with a few exceptions the P/sub ν/ is reasonably well known, in the fast neutron energy region, almost no information is available concerning the multiplicity beyond the average value, [ν], even for the most important nuclides. The reason for this is the difficulty of such experiments, with consequent statistically poor and physically inconsistent results

  18. FITPULS: a code for obtaining analytic fits to aggregate fission-product decay-energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBauve, R.J.; George, D.C.; England, T.R.

    1980-03-01

    The operation and input to the FITPULS code, recently updated to utilize interactive graphics, are described. The code is designed to retrieve data from a library containing aggregate fine-group spectra (150 energy groups) from fission products, collapse the data to few groups (up to 25), and fit the resulting spectra along the cooling time axis with a linear combination of exponential functions. Also given in this report are useful results for aggregate gamma and beta spectra from the decay of fission products released from 235 U irradiated with a pulse (10 -4 s irradiation time) of thermal neutrons. These fits are given in 22 energy groups that are the first 22 groups of the LASL 25-group decay-energy group structure, and the data are expressed both as MeV per fission second and particles per fission second; these pulse functions are readily folded into finite fission histories. 65 figures, 11 tables

  19. Technical measurement of small fission gas inventory in fuel rod with laser puncturing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Moon; Kim, Sung Ryul; Lee, Byoung Oon; Yang, Yong Sik; Baek, Sang Ryul; Song, Ung Sup

    2012-01-01

    The fission gas release cause degradation of fuel rod. It influences fuel temperature and internal pressure due to low thermal conductivity. Therefore, fission gas released to internal void of fuel rod must be measured with burnup. To measure amount of fission gas, fuel rod must be punctured by a steel needle in a closed chamber. Ideal gas law(PV=nRT) is applied to obtain atomic concentration(mole). Steel needle type is good for large amount of fission gas such as commercial spent fuel rod. But, some cases with small fuel rig in research reactor for R/D program are not available to use needle type because of large chamber volume. The laser puncturing technique was developed to solve measurement of small amount of fission gas. This system was very rare equipment in other countries. Fine pressure gage and strong vacuum system were installed, and the chamber volume was reduced at least. Fiber laser was used for easy operation

  20. Mica fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.; Lehn, A.V.; Williamson, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The present development status of the mica fission detectors is summarized. It is concluded that the techniques have been refined and developed to a state such that the mica fission counters are a reliable and reproducible detector for fission events

  1. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

    2012-01-02

    Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in

  2. Ranges of the fragments from thermal (slow) neutron fission of /sup 235/U in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, H; Chao, Z; Sheng, Z; Wang, L; Feng, X

    1980-05-01

    According to the principle of thick target, we used the aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride of various concentrations as thick targets and platinum plates of known surface area as absorbers immersed in the target solutions. The ranges of the U(n, f) fission fragments /sup 89/Sr, /sup 91/Y, /sup 140/Ba, /sup 141/Ce and /sup 144/Ce in the aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride of various concentrations were determined. In the concentration region of 0.16 U% - 6.2 U%, the uranium concentration had no significant effect on the measurement of the range. Therefore, the ranges of the fission fragments in diluted UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ solutions are very close to those in pure water, and the mean value of the ranges in UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ solutions of various concentrations was taken as the range in water. The experimental results of the ranges of these five fission fragments in water were: R/sub Sr-90/ = 2.39 +- 0.04 mgcm/sup -2/, R/sub Y-91/ = 2.35 +- 0.09 mgcm/sup -2/, R/sub Ba-140/ = 1.92 +- 0.07 mgcm/sup -2/, R/sub Ce-141/ = 1.91 +- 0.12 mgcm/sup -2/, R/sub Ce-144/ = 1.84 +- 0.10 mgcm/sup -2/. In order to estimate the effect of back scattering of fission fragments in platinum plate, we did the experiments using stainless steel plate as absorber (the aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride as thick targets). The results were similar. Thus, the effect of back scattering was not significant. This work provides a convenient means for determining the ranges of the fission fragments in a liquid.

  3. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Lou Sai

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge of angular distributions of neutron-induced fission is limited to a maximal energy of 15 MeV, with large discrepancies around 14 MeV. Only 238 U and 232 Th have been investigated up to 100 MeV in a single experiment. The n-TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides ( 232 Th, 235 U, 238 U, 234 U, 237 Np) at the n-TOF facility using an experimental set-up made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC), extending the energy domain of the incident neutron above hundreds of MeV. The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. I will show the methods we used to reconstruct the full angular resolution by the tracking of fission fragments. Below 10 MeV our results are consistent with existing data. For example in the case of 232 Th, below 10 MeV the results show clearly the variation occurring at the first (1 MeV) and second (7 MeV) chance fission, corresponding to transition states of given J and K (total spin and its projection on the fission axis), and a much more accurate energy dependence at the 3. chance threshold (14 MeV) has been obtained. In the spallation domain, above 30 MeV we confirm the high anisotropy revealed in 232 Th by the single existing data set. I'll discuss the implications of this finding, related to the low anisotropy exhibited in proton-induced fission. I also explore the critical experiments which is valuable checks of nuclear data. The 237 Np neutron-induced fission cross section has recently been measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n-TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements, the n-TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7 % beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of n-TOF data, we simulate a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of 237 Np. This

  4. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector. Final Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rempe, Joy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McGregor, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ugorowski, Philip [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reichenberger, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ito, Takashi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Villard, J. -F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to

  5. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to ∼±5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the I.A.E.A. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  6. The quantitative determination of uranium in human hair by fission track measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.J.; Bentley, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    Human hairs containing a uranium burden were placed in contact with a mica sheet as the recording matrix and irradiated in a thermal neutron flux. The fission fragment tracks penetrating the mica were etched and counted. Calculations have been made to show the losses due to the fission fragment range being less than the diameter of the hair and for the variation of track density with distance from the line of contact between the hair and the mica. Experimental data from 50 μm diameter hair and those derived by calculation were compared. (author)

  7. Measurements of fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    2000-01-01

    After some historical introductory remarks on the discovery of nuclear fission and early fission yield determinations, the present status of knowledge on fission yields is briefly reviewed. Practical and fundamental reasons motivating the pursuit of fission yield measurements in the coming century are pointed out. Recent results and novel techniques are described that promise to provide new interesting insights into the fission process during the next century. (author)

  8. Studying fission neutrons with 2E-2v and 2E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Adili Ali

    2018-01-01

    The 2E technique utilizes an ionization chamber together with two liquid scintillator detectors. Two measurements have been performed, one of 252Cf(sf and another one of thermal-neutron induced fission in 235U(n,f. Results from 252Cf(sf are reported here.

  9. Comparison through fission-track analysis of portions of Australia and Antarctica adjacent prior to continental drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stump, E.; Fitzgerald, P.G.

    1990-01-01

    Australia and Antarctica have been reconstructed by the matching of three terranes in western Victoria with three terranes in northern Victoria Land. Apparent fission-track ages from granitic rocks of these matched regions are compared. In western Victoria, Australia, data reflect a history of slow cooling following intrusion in early to middle Paleozoic time. In northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, a complex history of cooling and uplift is indicated, with uplift of the present-day mountains commencing approximately 50 Ma. Fission tracks in apatites from most samples from northern Victoria Land were completely re-set to zero by the thermal effects of Jurassic tholeiitic magmatism. Apatite in three samples however, predate the Jurassic and were only partially re-set by this event. Apparent sphene fission-track ages indicate that the three terranes in northern Victoria Land have shared a common thermal history since the Devonian. With the exception of one small area in western Victoria, neither western Victoria nor northern Victoria Land data show a clear influence of rifting and breakup in the late Cretaceous. Overall, the data indicate that once the breakup of Australia and Antarctica had occurred, their thermal and tectonic histories evolved independently along differing paths. (author)

  10. Measurement of prompt fission gamma-ray spectra in fast neutron-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laborie, J.M.; Belier, G.; Taieb, J.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of prompt fission gamma-ray emission has been of major interest in reactor physics for a few years. Since very few experimental spectra were ever published until now, new measurements would be also valuable to improve our understanding of the fission process. An experimental method is currently being developed to measure the prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum from some tens keV up to 10 MeV at least. The mean multiplicity and total energy could be deduced. In this method, the gamma-rays are measured with a bismuth germanate (BGO) detector which has the advantage to present a high P/T ratio and a high efficiency compared to other gamma-ray detectors. The prompt fission neutrons are rejected by the time of flight technique between the BGO detector and a fission trigger given by a fission chamber or a scintillating active target. Energy and efficiency calibration of the BGO detector were carried out up to 10.76 MeV by means of the Al-27(p, gamma) reaction. First prompt fission gamma-ray spectrum measurements performed for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252 and for 1.7 and 15.6 MeV neutron-induced fission of U-238 at the CEA, DAM, DIF Van de Graaff accelerator, will be presented. (authors)

  11. A semi-empirical formula on the pre-neutron-emission fragment mass distribution in nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fucheng; Hu Jimin

    1988-03-01

    A 5-Gauss semi-empirical formula on the pre-neutron-emission fragment mass distribution is given. The absolute standard deviation and maximum departure between calculated values and experimental data for (n,f) and (n,n'f) fission reactions from 232 Th to 245 Cm are approximately 0.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The error will get bigger if the formula is used at higher excitation energies

  12. Absolute calibration of TFTR neutron detectors for D-T plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1995-03-01

    The two most sensitive TFTR fission-chamber detectors were absolutely calibrated in situ by a D-T neutron generator (∼5 x 10 7 n/s) rotated once around the torus in each direction, with data taken at about 45 positions. The combined uncertainty for determining fusion neutron rates, including the uncertainty in the total neutron generator output (±9%), counting statistics, the effect of coil coolant, detector stability, cross-calibration to the current mode or log Campbell mode and to other fission chambers, and plasma position variation, is about ±13%. The NE-451 (ZnS) scintillators and 4 He proportional counters that view the plasma in up to 10 collimated sightlines were calibrated by scanning. the neutron generator radially and toroidally in the horizontal midplane across the flight tubes of 7 cm diameter. Spatial integration of the detector responses using the calibrated signal per unit chord-integrated neutron emission gives the global neutron source strength with an overall uncertainty of ±14% for the scintillators and ±15% for the 4 He counters

  13. Future research program on prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Lebois, M.; Oberstedt, A.; Wilson, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the measurement of prompt fission γ-ray spectra (PFGS) has gained renewed interest, after about forty years since the first comprehensive studies of the reactions 235U(n th , f), 239Pu(n th ,f) and 252Cf(sf). The renaissance was initiated by requests for new values especially for γ-ray multiplicity and average total energy release per fission in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu. Both isotopes are considered the most important ones with respect to the modeling of innovative cores required for the Generation-IV reactors, the majority working with fast neutrons. During the last 5 years we have conducted a systematic study of spectral data for thermal-neutron-induced fission on 235U and 241Pu as well as for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with unprecedented accuracy. From the new data we conclude that those reactions do not considerably contribute to the observed heat excess and suspect other reactions playing a significant role. Possible contributions may originate from fast-neutron-induced reactions on 238U, which is largely present in the fuel, or from γ-induced fission from neutron capture in the construction material. A first experiment campaign on prompt γ-ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission on 235,238U was successfully performed in order to test our assumptions. In the following we attempt to summarize, what has been done in the field to date, and to motivate future measurement campaigns exploiting dedicated neutron and photon beams as well as upcoming highly efficient detector assemblies.

  14. Fast fission phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, Christian.

    1982-03-01

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted [fr

  15. JEFF 3.1.2 - Joint evaluated nuclear data library for fission and fusion applications - February 2012 (DVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-02-01

    The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File (JEFF) project is a collaboration between NEA Data Bank member countries. The JEFF library combines the efforts of the JEFF and EFF/EAF Working Groups to produce a common sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications. The JEFF-3.1.2 version, released in February 2012, contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yields, and thermal scattering law data. Currently, JEFF-3.1.2 data are available in ENDF-6 format (neutron library) from the Web. This new release is an update from JEFF-3.1.1 which concerns 115 material files from the general purpose incident neutron library which have been modified since JEFF-3.1.1. Modifications include: Hf isotopes: 6 new Hf evaluations have replaced previous ones; Gamma production data from neutron capture (MF=6 MT=102) has been added to 89 fission products (FP) evaluations; 47 of these FP have been replaced by ENDF-B/VII.0 evaluations, with gamma data added in this release. Corrections from JEFF-Beta feedback have been incorporated for 15 materials. Corrections that solve NJOY covariance processing problems and JANIS warnings have been made to 6 files. This DVD contains: - General purpose incident neutron data in ENDF-6 and ACE formats; - Activation data; - Thermal scattering data; - Incident proton data; - Radioactive decay data; - Neutron-induced fission yields data; - Spontaneous fission yields data

  16. Ejection of Uranium Atoms from UO{sub 2} by Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Goesta

    1964-02-15

    The numbers of uranium atoms ejected from the surface of sintered plates of UO{sub 2} by fission fragments have been measured over the fission density range 5x10{sup 15} to 7x10{sup 16} fissions/cm{sup 3}. The number of uranium atoms ejected per escaping fragment was about 9. The measurements were performed by irradiating the plates in vacuum and collecting a fraction of the uranium atoms ejected on catcher foils. The amount collected was determined by fission counting. Saturation of the amount collected, as reported by Rogers and Adam, was not observed. The numbers of uranium atoms ejected as knock-ons under the same experimental conditions have been calculated. The reasonably close agreement between the experimental and theoretical values indicates that, under the prevailing experimental conditions, mainly knock-ons are ejected. Other ejection mechanisms, e. g. evaporation of material in thermal spikes, are probably insignificant; this is in contrast to the usual interpretation of the ejection process. The mean range in UO{sub 2}, of fission products of mass number 140 was found to be 7.37 {+-} 0. 05 mg/cm{sup 2} by direct gamma spectrometric, determination of the fraction of {sup 140}La escaping from the surface of the plates.

  17. Contained fissionly vaporized imploded fission explosive breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwick, E.F.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor system which produces useful thermal power and breeds fissile isotopes wherein large spherical complex slugs containing fissile and fertile isotopes as well as vaporizing and tamping materials are exploded seriatim in a large containing chamber having walls protected from the effects of the explosion by about two thousand tons of slurry of fissile and fertile isotopes in molten alkali metal. The slug which is slightly sub-critical prior to its entry into the centroid portion of the chamber, then becomes slightly more than prompt-critical because of the near proximity of neutron-reflecting atoms and of fissioning atoms within the slurry. The slurry is heated by explosion of the slugs and serves as a working fluid for extraction of heat energy from the reactor. Explosive debris is precipitated from the slurry and used for the fabrication of new slugs

  18. Nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, T.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.) [pt

  19. Prompt fission neutron spectra of n + 235U above the (n, nf) fission threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Nengchuan; Chen Yongjing; Liu Tingjin; Jia Min

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from the 235 U(n, f) reaction were performed with a semi-empirical method for En = 7.0 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The total PFNS were obtained as a superposition of (n, xnf) pre-fission neutron spectra and post-fission spectra of neutrons which were evaporated from fission fragments, and these two kinds of spectra were taken as an expression of the evaporation spectrum. The contributions of (n, xnf) fission neutron spectra on the calculated PFNS were discussed. The results show that emission of one or two neutrons in the (n, nf) or (n, 2nf) reactions influences the PFNS shape, and the neutron spectra of the (n, xnf) fission-channel are soft compared with the neutron spectra of the (n, f) fission channel. In addition, analysis of the multiple-chance fission component showed that second-chance fission dominates the PFNS with an incident neutron energy of 14.7 MeV whereas first-chance fission dominates the 7 MeV case. (authors)

  20. Fission cross section measurement of Am-242m using lead slowing-down spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Yamamoto, Shuji; Fujita, Yoshiaki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Kimura, Itsuro; Ohkawachi, Yasushi; Wakabayashi, Toshio

    1998-03-01

    By making use of double fission chamber and lead slowing-down spectrometer coupled to an electron linear accelerator, fission cross section for the {sup 242m}Am(n,f) reaction has been measured relative to that for the {sup 235}U(n,f) reaction in the energy range from 0.1 eV to 10 keV. The measured result was compared with the evaluated nuclear data appeared in ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.2, of which evaluated data were broadened by the energy resolution function of the spectrometer. Although the JENDL-3.2 data seem to be a little smaller than the present measurement, good agreement can be seen in the general shape and the absolute values. The ENDF/B-VI data are larger more than 50 % than the present values above 3 eV. (author)

  1. Evaluation of fission cross sections and covariances for {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Matsunobu, Hiroyuki [Data Engineering, Inc. (Japan); Murata, Toru [AITEL Corporation, Tokyo (JP)] [and others

    2000-02-01

    A simultaneous evaluation code SOK (Simultaneous evaluation on KALMAN) has been developed, which is a least-squares fitting program to absolute and relative measurements. The SOK code was employed to evaluate the fission cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu for the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.3. Procedures of the simultaneous evaluation and the experimental database of the fission cross sections are described. The fission cross sections obtained were compared with evaluated values given in JENDL-3.2 and ENDF/B-VI. (author)

  2. On-line mass spectrometry measurement of fission gas release from nuclear fuel submitted to thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Pontillon, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The work presented in this paper has been performed in the framework of a joint research program between Aix-Marseille University and CEA Cadarache. The aim is to develop a mass spectrometer (MS) device for the MERARG facility. MERARG is devoted to the study of fission gas release measurement, from nuclear fuels submitted to annealing tests in high activity laboratory such as LECA-STAR, thanks to gamma spectrometry. The mass spectrometer will then extend the measurement capability from the γ-emitters gases to all the gases involved in the release in order to have a better understanding of the fission gas release dynamics from fuel during thermal transients. Furthermore, the mass spectrometer instrument combines the capabilities and performances of both on-line (for release kinetic) and off-line implementations (for delayed accurate analysis of capacities containing total release gas). The paper deals with two main axes: (1) the modelling of gas sampling inlet device and its performance and (2) the first MS qualification/calibration results. The inlet device samples the gas and also adapts the pressure between MERARG sweeping line at 1.2 bar and mass spectrometer chamber at high vacuum. It is a two-stage device comprising a capillary at inlet, an intermediate vacuum chamber, a molecular leak inlet and a two-stage pumping device. Pressure drops, conductance and throughputs are estimated both for mass spectrometer operation and for exhaust gas recovery. Possible gas segregation is also estimated and device modification is proposed to attain a more accurate calibration. First experimental results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm level can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  3. Fission gas release behaviour in MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Anantharaman, S.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    As a part of plutonium recycling programme MOX (U,Pu)O 2 fuels will be used in Indian boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR). Based on successful test irradiation of MOX fuel in CIRUS reactor, 10 MOX fuel assemblies have been loaded in the BWR of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). Some of these MOX fuel assemblies have successfully completed the initial target average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T. Enhancing the burnup target of the MOX fuels and increasing loading of MOX fuels in TAPS core will depend on the feedback information generated from the measurement of released fission gases. Fission gas release behaviour has been studied in the experimental MOX fuel elements (UO 2 - 4% PuO 2 ) irradiated in pressurised water loop (PWL) of CIRUS. Eight (8) MOX fuel elements irradiated to an average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T have been examined. Some of these fuel elements contained controlled porosity pellets and chamfered pellets. This paper presents the design details of the experimental set up for studying fission gas release behaviour including measurement of gas pressure, void volume and gas composition. The experimental data generated is compared with the prediction of fuel performance modeling codes of PROFESS and GAPCON THERMAL-3. (author)

  4. HAC and fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Moriyama, H.; Tachikawa, E.

    1984-01-01

    In the fission process, newly formed fission products undergo hot atom reactions due to their energetic recoil and abnormal positive charge. The hot atom reactions of the fission products are usually accompanied by secondary effects such as radiation damage, especially in condensed phase. For reactor safety it is valuable to know the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of these radioactive fission products. Here, the authors study the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of the fission products from the viewpoint of hot atom chemistry (HAC). They analyze the experimental results concerning fission product behaviour with the help of the theories in HAC and other neighboring fields such as radiation chemistry. (Auth.)

  5. Fission product range effects on HEU fissile gas monitoring for UF6 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, J.K. Jr.; Valentine, T.E.; Perez, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    The amount of 235 U in UF 6 flowing in a pipe can be monitored by counting gamma rays emitted from fission fragments carried along by the flowing gas. Neutron sources are mounted in an annular sleeve that is filled with moderator material and surrounds the pipe. This provides a source of thermal neutrons to produce the fission fragments. Those fragments that remain in the gas stream following fission are carried past a gamma detector. A typical fragment will be quite unstable, giving up energy as it decays to a more stable isotope with a significant amount of this energy being emitted in the form of gamma rays. A given fragment can emit several gamma rays over its lifetime. The gamma ray emission activity level of a distribution of fission fragments decreases with time. The monitoring system software uses models of these processes to interpret the gamma radiation counting data measured by the gamma detectors

  6. Active-interrogation measurements of fast neutrons from induced fission in low-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, J.L.; Marcath, M.J.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S.A.; Chichester, D.L.; Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P.

    2014-01-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutrons to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials. -- Highlights: • We studied low-enriched uranium using active-interrogation experiments including a deuterium–tritium neutron generator and an americium–lithium isotopic neutron source. • Liquid scintillators measured induced-fission neutrons from the active-interrogation methods. • Fast-neutron (DT) and thermal-neutron (Am–Li) interrogation resulted in the measurement of trends in uranium mass and 235 U enrichment respectively. • MCNPX-PoliMi, the Monte Carlo transport code, simulated the measured induced-fission neutron trends in the liquid scintillators

  7. Active-interrogation measurements of fast neutrons from induced fission in low-enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, J.L., E-mail: jldolan@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Marcath, M.J.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chichester, D.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Ispra (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutrons to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials. -- Highlights: • We studied low-enriched uranium using active-interrogation experiments including a deuterium–tritium neutron generator and an americium–lithium isotopic neutron source. • Liquid scintillators measured induced-fission neutrons from the active-interrogation methods. • Fast-neutron (DT) and thermal-neutron (Am–Li) interrogation resulted in the measurement of trends in uranium mass and {sup 235}U enrichment respectively. • MCNPX-PoliMi, the Monte Carlo transport code, simulated the measured induced-fission neutron trends in the liquid scintillators.

  8. Investigation of the fission yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U; Mesure de la distribution en masse et en charge des produits de la fission rapide de l'{sup 233}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galy, J

    1999-09-01

    As a stars, a survey of the different methods of investigations of the fission product yields and the experimental data status have been studied, showing advantages and shortcomings for the different approaches. An overview of the existing models for the fission product distributions has been as well intended. The main part of this thesis was the measurement of the independent yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of{sup 233}U, never investigated before this work. The experiment has been carried out using the mass separator OSIRIS (Isotope Separator On-Line). Its integrated ion-source and its specific properties required an analysis of the delay-parameter and ionisation efficiency for each chemical species. On the other hand, this technique allows measurement of independent yields and cumulative yields for elements from Cu to Ba, covering most of the fission yield distribution. Thus, we measured about 180 independent yields from Zn (Z=30) to Sr (Z=38) in the mass range A=74-99 and from Pd (Z=46) to Ba (Z=56) in the mass range A=113-147, including many isomeric states. An additional experiment using direct {gamma}-spectroscopy of aggregates of fission products was used to determine more than 50 cumulative yields of element with half-life from 15 min to a several days. All experimental data have been compared to estimates from a semi-empirical model, to calculated values and to evaluated values from the European library JEF 2.2. Furthermore, a study of both thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U measured at Studsvik, the comparison of the OSIRIS and LOHENGRIN facilities and the trends in new data for the Reactors Physics have been discussed. (author)

  9. On the frequency distributions per unit area of the projected and etchable lengths of surface-intersecting fission tracks: influences of track revelation, observation and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonckheere, R.; Haute, P. van den

    1999-01-01

    In addition to the statistical bounds discussed, thermal history analysis based on the projected and etchable length distributions of surface intersecting fission tracks is limited by systematic factors related to track revelation, observation and measurement. The effects of track revelation, in particular, distort these distributions in the length intervals of interest. An observation threshold poses a problem if it is described by a critical angle θ c , but not if it is described by other criteria proposed in the literature. Measurement imprecisions, predictably, blur the thermal history information contained in these distributions. Measurements of semi-confined tracks, added as a result of surface etching, are a more promising alternative to confined track length measurements for accessing the thermal history record in the fission track length distribution. On the other hand, measurements of the projected lengths of surface intersecting tracks offer the theoretical possibility of determining the true volumetric density N and true mean length m of an arbitrary population of fission tracks, thus allowing direct determination of the corrected age of samples with complex thermal histories. On a methodical level, knowledge of N and m allows to determine the efficiency with which fission tracks are counted under the optical microscope under exactly the same conditions as those under which fission track counts for routine dating purposes are performed

  10. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanier, P.E.; Forman, L.; Norman, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of excitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  11. Fission cross-section calculations and the multi-modal fission model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambsch, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    New, self consistent, neutron-induced reaction cross section calculations for 235,238 U, 237 Np have been performed. The statistical model code STATIS was improved to take into account the multimodality of the fission process. The three most dominant fission modes, the two asymmetric standards I (S1) and standard II (S2) modes and the symmetric superlong (SL) mode have been taken into account. De-convoluted fission cross sections for those modes for 235,238 U(n,f) and 237 Np(n,f) based on experimental branching ratios, were calculated for the first time up to the second chance fission threshold. For 235 U(n,f), the calculations being made up to 28 MeV incident neutron energy, higher fission chances have been considered. This implied the need for additional calculations for the neighbouring isotopes. As a side product also mass yield distributions could be calculated at energies hitherto not accessible by experiment. Experimental validation of the predictions is being envisaged

  12. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  13. Neutron-induced fission fragment angular distribution at CERN n TOF: The Th-232 case

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrio, Diego; Paradela, Carlos

    This thesis work was done in the frame of the study of the neutron-induced fission of actinides and subactinides at the CERN n TOF facility using a fast Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs) setup. This experimental setup provide us with an intense neutron beam with a white spectrum from thermal to 1 GeV and with an outstanding high resolution provided by its flight path of 185 m. In our experiment, fission events were identified by detection of both fission fragments in time coincidence in the two PPAC detectors flanking the corresponding target. This technique allowed us to discriminate the fission events from the background produced by α disintegration of radioactive samples and by particles produced in spallation reactions. Because PPAC detectors are insensitive to the γ flash, it is possible to reach energies as high as 1 GeV. The stripped cathodes provide the spatial position of the hits in the detectors, so that the emission angle of the fission fragments can be measured. Inside the reaction cham...

  14. Fission Research at IRMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Adili A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f, 234 U(n,f, prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f and is presenting the most important results.

  15. Absolute calibration of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, W.H.; Murphy, M.F.; March, M.R. [Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1979-05-15

    The uncertainties in determining the absolute values of the Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m reaction rate (which is widely used as a neutron damage flux monitor) have been reduced to {approx}{+-}5%. This has been achieved with the use of a calibrated source of Pd-103-Rh-103m activity supplied by the I.A.E.A. Agreement to within 3% between measured and calculated values of the reaction rate (normalised to the U-238 fission rate) has been achieved. (author)

  16. Non Nuclear Testing of Reactor Systems In The Early Flight Fission Test Facilities (EFF-TF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyke, Melissa; Martin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facility (EFF-TF) can assist in the design and development of systems through highly effective non-nuclear testing of nuclear systems when technical issues associated with near-term space fission systems are 'non-nuclear' in nature (e.g. system's nuclear operations are understood). For many systems, thermal simulators can be used to closely mimic fission heat deposition. Axial power profile, radial power profile, and fuel pin thermal conductivity can be matched. In addition to component and subsystem testing, operational and lifetime issues associated with the steady state and transient performance of the integrated reactor module can be investigated. Instrumentation at the EFF-TF allows accurate measurement of temperature, pressure, strain, and bulk core deformation (useful for accurately simulating nuclear behavior). Ongoing research at the EFF-TF is geared towards facilitating research, development, system integration, and system utilization via cooperative efforts with DOE laboratories, industry, universities, and other Nasa centers. This paper describes the current efforts for the latter portion of 2003 and beginning of 2004. (authors)

  17. Review of the neutron capture process in fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The importance of the neutron capture process and the status of the more important cross section data are reviewed. The capture in fertile and fissile nuclei is considered. For thermal reactors the thermal to epithermal capture ratio for 238 U and 232 Th remains a problem though some improvements were made with more recent measurements. The capture cross section of 238 U in the fast energy range remains quite uncertain and a long standing discrepancy for the calculated versus experimental central reaction rate ratio C28/F49 persists. Capture in structural materials, fission product nuclei and the higher actinides is also considered

  18. Prediction of the UO/sub 2/ fission gas release data of Bellamy and Rich using a model recently developed by Combustion Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeburn, H.R.; Pati, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    The trend in the light water reactor industry to higher discharge burnups of UO/sub 2/ fuel rods has initiated the modification of existing fuel rod models to better account for high burnup effects. The degree to which fission gas release from UO/sub 2/ fuel is enhanced at higher burnup is being addressed in the process. Fission gas release modeling should include the separation of the individual effects of thermal diffusion and any burnup enhancement on the release. Although some modelers have interpreted the Bellamy and Rich data on fission gas release from UO/sub 2/ fuel in this fashion, they have assumed that below about 1250 0 C the gas release is not temperature-dependent, and this has led them to predict a very strong burnup enhancement of gas release above 20 MWd/kgU. More recent data, however, suggest that an appreciable amount of fission gas is released by a thermal diffusion mechanism at even lower temperatures and will add to the fission gas released due to the temperature-independent mechanisms of knockout and recoil

  19. Future research program on prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberstedt, S.; Hambsch, F.J. [Joint Research Centre IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Billnert, R. [Joint Research Centre IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Lebois, M.; Wilson, J.N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire Orsay, Orsay (France); Oberstedt, A. [Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Ossolution Consulting, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    In recent years the measurement of prompt fission γ-ray spectra (PFGS) has gained renewed interest, after about forty years since the first comprehensive studies of the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f), {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) and {sup 252}Cf(sf). The renaissance was initiated by requests for new values especially for γ-ray multiplicity and average total energy release per fission in neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. Both isotopes are considered the most important ones with respect to the modeling of innovative cores required for the Generation-IV reactors, the majority working with fast neutrons. During the last 5 years we have conducted a systematic study of spectral data for thermal-neutron-induced fission on {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu as well as for the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with unprecedented accuracy. From the new data we conclude that those reactions do not considerably contribute to the observed heat excess and suspect other reactions playing a significant role. Possible contributions may originate from fast-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 238}U, which is largely present in the fuel, or from γ-induced fission from neutron capture in the construction material. A first experiment campaign on prompt γ-ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission on {sup 235,238}U was successfully performed in order to test our assumptions. In the following we attempt to summarize, what has been done in the field to date, and to motivate future measurement campaigns exploiting dedicated neutron and photon beams as well as upcoming highly efficient detector assemblies. (orig.)

  20. Alkaline glass as induced fission fragment detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, A.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The slide glass, registered trade marks INLAB, INVICT and PERFECTA were compared. For the three kinds of glasses the following studies were done: chemical composition; general dissolution rate for hydrofluoric acid solutions of concentrations between 1 and 10M, at 30 0 C and ultrasound shaking; relative efficiency for recording fission fragment tracks from 252 Cf. The INLAB glass was selected due to the better quality of its surface after chemical etching. The HF concentration 2.5M was determined for chemical etching of INLAB glass, and the optimum etching time was chosen between 8 and 10 minutes. The thermal attenuation of latent tracks in the environmental temperature was observed for intervals uo to 31 days between the detector exposure to the fission fragment source and etching of tracks. Several methods were used for determining the detector parameters, such as: critical angle, angle of the cone and efficiency of etching. The effects of gamma irradiation from 60 Co and reactor neutrons in material properties as track detector were studied. Attenuation of latent tracks and saturation of color centers were observed for doses over 100M Rad. Since this kind of material contains uranium as impurity, uniformely distributed, slide glass were calibrated to be applied as a monitor of thermal neutron flux in nuclear reactor. (Author) [pt

  1. Conceptual design of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor for transmutation of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, L.J.; Wu, Y.C.; Yang, Y.W.; Wu, Y.; Luan, G.S.; Xu, Q.; Guo, Z.J.; Xiao, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of the transmutation of long-lived radioactive waste using fusion-fission hybrid reactors, we are studying all the possible types of blanket, including a comparison of the thermal and fast neutron spectrum blankets. Conceptual designs of a small tokamak hybrid blanket with small inventory of actinides and fission products are presented. The small inventory of wastes makes the system safer. The small hybrid reactor system based on a fusion core with experimental parameters to be realized in the near future can effectively transmute actinides and fission products at a neutron wall loading of 1MWm -2 . An innovative energy system is also presented, including a fusion driver, fuel breeder, high level waste transmuter, fission reactor and so on. An optimal combination of all types of reactor is proposed in the system. ((orig.))

  2. An optimized symbiotic fusion and molten-salt fission reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkin, V.L.; Novikov, V.M.

    A symbiotic fusion-fission reactor system which breeds nuclear fuel is discussed. In the blanket of the controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR) uranium-233 is generated from thorium, which circulates in the form of ThF 4 mixed with molten sodium and beryllium fluorides. The molten-salt fission reactor (MSR) burns up the uranium-233 and generates tritium for the fusion reactor from lithium, which circulates in the form of LiF mixed with BeF 2 and 233 UF 4 through the MSR core. With a CTR-MSR thermal power ratio of 1:11 the system can produce electrical energy and breed fuel with a doubling time of 4-5 years. The system has the following special features: (1) Fuel reprocessing is much simpler and cheaper than for contemporary fission reactors; reprocessing consists simply in continuous removal of 233 U from the salt circulating in the CTR blanket by the fluorination method and removal of xenon from the MSR fuel salt by gas scavenging; the MSR fuel salt is periodically exchanged for fresh salt and the 233 U is then removed from it; (2) Tritium is produced in the fission reactor, which is a much simpler system than the fusion reactor; (3) The CTR blanket is almost ''clean''; no tritium is produced in it and fission fragment activity does not exceed the activity induced in the structural materials; (4) Almost all the thorium introduced into the CTR blanket can be used for producing 233 U

  3. Fission gas retention and axial expansion of irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.; Johanson, E.W.

    1986-05-01

    Out-of-reactor experiments utilizing direct electrical heating and infrared heating techniques were performed on irradiated metallic fuel. The results indicate accelerated expansion can occur during thermal transients and that the accelerated expansion is driven by retained fission gases. The results also demonstrate gas retention and, hence, expansion behavior is a function of axial position within the pin

  4. Towards a mechanistic understanding of transient fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.R.; Small, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experimental results on transient fission gas release from oxide fuels are briefly reviewed. These together with associated microstructural observations are compared with the main models for fission gas behaviour. Single gas atom diffusion, bubble migration, heterogeneous percolation and grain boundary sweeping are examined as possible release mechanisms. The role of gas trapping in bubbles and re-solution by irradiation and thermal processes are included in the comparison. As much of the data, and the main range of interest for light water reactor fuels, is for release during mild transients in fuel with a burn-up below 4%, the role of gas retention on grain boundaries is very important and in some cases dominant. The grain boundaries are found to respond very differently to various gas arrival rates and to local temperature conditions. This can lead to early interlinkage and release in some cases, but retention with accompanying large swelling in others. The role of fission products and the local oxygen content of the fuel are found to be important. The effective fuel stoichiometry is likely to change significantly during transients with substantial effects on the transport processes controlling fission gas behaviour. The results of the evaluation of the models are summarized in mechanism maps for intragranular and grain boundary behaviour. (author). 36 refs, 8 figs

  5. Investigation of short-living fission products from the spontaneous fission of Cf-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klonk, H.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper, a method of separating and measuring fission products of Cf-252 is presented. The measurement was achieved by means of γ-spectrometry and thus provides a quantitative analysis with a good separation of the fission products with respect to both atomic number Z and mass number A. The separation of the fission products from the fission source was achieved by means of solid traps. An automatic changing apparatus made it possible to keep irradiation and measuring times short, so even very short-lived fission products could be registered. The quantitative evaluation of primary fission products was made possible by correction according to Bateman equations. With that, the yields of single nuclides and the dispersion of charge can be determined. (orig./WL) [de

  6. Review of ENDF/B-VI Fission-Product Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.Q.

    1999-01-01

    In response to concerns raised in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-2, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed a comprehensive program to help assure that the DOE maintain and enhance its capability to predict the criticality of systems throughout the complex. Tasks developed to implement the response to DNFSB recommendation 93-2 included Critical Experiments, Criticality Benchmarks, Training, Analytical Methods, and Nuclear Data. The Nuclear Data Task consists of a program of differential measurements at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA), precise fitting of the differential data with the generalized least-squares fitting code SAMMY to represent the data with resonance parameters using the Reich-Moore formalism along with covariance (uncertainty) information, and the development of complete evaluations for selected nuclides for inclusion in the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDFB). The current ENDF/B library was developed for fast and thermal fission reactors and fusion reactors. Criticality safety practitioners recognize that many situations around the DOE complex are characterized by neutron spectra in the intermediate-energy region, as opposed to the high-energy region for fast reactors and fusion systems and the low-energy region for thermal reactors. Consequently, the Nuclear Data Task focuses primarily on the intermediate-energy region so that upgrades to existing evaluated data will remove deficiencies in the current ENDF/B evaluations. The ORELA allows high-resolution measurements in the intermediate-energy region and the SAMMY fitting code provides high quality resonance parameters in the resolved and unresolved energy range using the sophisticated Reich-Moore (RM) formalism for superior representation of the data in the intermediate energy region. In addition, the SAMMY fitting procedure provides covariance information for the resonance parameters that can be used in subsequent analyses to assess

  7. Heat and fission product transport in molten core material pool with crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J.I.; Suh, K.Y.; Kang, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow in a molten pool are influenced by internal volumetric heat generated from the radioactive decay of fission product species retained in the reactor vessel during a severe accident. The pool superheat is determined based on the overall energy balance that equates the heat production rate to the heat loss rate. Decay heat of fission products in the pool is estimated by product of the mass concentration and energy conversion factor of each fission product. Twenty-nine elements are chosen and classified by their chemical properties to calculate heat generation rate in the pool. The mass concentration of a fission product is obtained from released fraction and the tabular output of the ORIGEN 2 code. The initial core and pool inventories at each time can also be estimated using ORIGEN 2. The released fraction of each fission product is calculated based on the bubble dynamics and mass transport. Numerical analysis is performed for heat and fission product transport in a molten core material pool during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The pool is assumed to be a partially filled hemisphere, whose change in geometry is neglected during the numerical calculation. Calculated results indicate that the peak temperature in the molten pool is significantly lowered, since a substantial amount of the volatile fission products is released from the molten pool during progression of the accident. The results may directly be applied to the existing severe accident analysis codes to more mechanistically determine the thermal load to the reactor vessel lower head during the in-vessel retention

  8. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  9. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurements for the determination of the initial angular momentum ranges in normal and fast fission processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Masri, Y.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Martin, V.; Bizard, G.; Brou, R.; Laville, J.L.; Regimbart, R.; Tamain, B.; Peter, J.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities (first and second moments) have been measured, in the 220 MeV 20 Ne+ nat Re and 315 meV 40 Ar+ 165 Ho reactions, as a function of fission fragment masses and centre-of-mass total kinetic energies. The two reactions lead to the same fusion nucleus, 205 At, at the same excitation energy (167 MeV). The experimental critical angular momentum for the fission process in the Ne+Re system (91±3) ℎ is close to I Bf=0 (∝80 ℎ) while in the Ar+Ho reaction this critical angular momentum (136±4) ℎ is much larger than I Bf=0 value, favoring the occurrence of the fast fission process. The observed widths of the fission fragment mass distribution: (42±2) u in the Ne+Re system and (56±4) u in the Ar+Ho reaction strengthen this hypothesis. For both compound nucleus fission and fast fission components in Ar+Ho, the total spin values obtained in absolute magnitude and in their dependence on the mass asymmetry are well described by assuming rigid rotation of the fissioning complex and statistical excitation of some collective rotational modes such as 'Bending' and 'Wriggling' according to the Schmitt-Pacheco model. These modes, however, are not all fully excited, their degrees of excitation are approximately the same for both fission components. From theoretical estimates of equilibration times, one anticipates the 'Tilting' mode to be by far the last to be excited, and from its non-excitation in the present data together with the excitation of bending and wriggling, a time interval of about 10 -21 s to 2x10 -20 s can be derived for the reaction time of both normal fission and fast fission. (orig./HSI)

  10. The nuclear fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty years after its discovery, the nuclear fission phenomenon is of recurring interest. When its fundamental physics aspects are considered, fission is viewed in a very positive way, which is reflected in the great interest generated by the meetings and large conferences organized for the 50th anniversary of its discovery. From a purely scientific and practical point of view, a new book devoted to the (low energy) nuclear fission phenomenon was highly desirable considering the tremendous amount of new results obtained since the publication of the book Nuclear Fission by Vandenbosch and Huizenga in 1973 (Academic Press). These new results could be obtained thanks to the growth of technology, which enabled the construction of powerful new neutron sources, particle and heavy ion accelerators, and very performant data-acquisition and computer systems. The re-invention of the ionization chamber, the development of large fission fragment spectrometers and sophisticated multiparameter devices, and the production of exotic isotopes also contributed significantly to an improved understanding of nuclear fission. This book is written at a level to introduce graduate students to the exciting subject of nuclear fission. The very complete list of references following each chapter also makes the book very useful for scientists, especially nuclear physicists. The book has 12 chapters covering the fission barrier and the various processes leading to fission as well as the characteristics of the various fission reaction products. In order to guarantee adequate treatment of the very specialized research fields covered, several distinguished scientists actively involved in some of these fields were invited to contribute their expertise as authors or co-authors of the different chapters

  11. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylten, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  12. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Matthew; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Vieira, David; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Tonchev, Anton; Stoyer, Mark; Bhike, Megha; Finch, Sean; Krishichayan, Fnu; Tornow, Werner

    2017-09-01

    The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi- monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combi- nation of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and -ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ioniza- tion chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin de- posits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the total number of fissions in the activa- tion target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of 2 months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6 and 14.8 MeV. New data in the second chance fission region of 5.5 - 9 MeV are included. Work performed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  13. Variational RRKM calculation of thermal rate constant for C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Taghva Manesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides quantitative results for the rate constants of unimolecular C–H bond fission reactions in the nitro methane at elevated temperatures up to 2000 K. In fact, there are three different hydrogen atoms in the nitro methane. The potential energy surface for each C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane was investigated by ab initio calculations. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of the species involved in this process were optimized at the MP2 level of theory, using the cc-pvdz basis set. Since C–H bond fission channel is a barrierless reaction, we have used variational RRKM theory to predict rate coefficients. By means of calculated rate coefficients at different temperatures, the Arrhenius expression of the channel over the temperature range of 100–2000 K is k(T = 5.9E19∗exp(−56274.6/T.

  14. Effects of Neutron Emission on Fragment Mass and Kinetic Energy Distribution from Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Saetone, E.

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U(n th ,f) have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening in the standard deviation of the kinetic energy at the final fragment mass number around m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. and other results on yield of mass. We conclude that the obtained results are a consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the sharp variation in the primary fragment kinetic energy and mass yield curves. We show that because neutron emission is hazardous to make any conclusion on primary quantities distribution of fragments from experimental results on final quantities distributions

  15. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1984-09-01

    This is the tenth issue of a report series on Fission Product Data, which informs us about all the activities in this field, which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products, lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). There is also a section with recent references relative to fission product nuclear data

  16. Technique of neutron-induced (fission-track) autoradiography with histological detail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.M.; Taylor, G.N.; Jee, W.S.S.

    1980-01-01

    The primary advantage of neutron-induced or fission-track autoradiography compared with conventional autoradiography is that for low concentrations of fissile nuclides prohibitively long exposure times may be avoided. However, it is difficult to produce imaging of biological structures on the neutron-induced autoradiograph which would allow localization of the nuclide histologically. The technique presented circumvents this difficulty using a thin polycarbonate film applied to the histologically stained tissue section mounted on a quartz substrate. After irradiation of the tissue section with an appropriate thermal neutron flux, the fission fragment tracks are revealed by etching the film with KOH. The tracks, superimposed on the stained tissue, may be observed under the light microscope in the same manner as for conventional nuclear emulsion autoradiography

  17. Effects of fissioning nuclei distributions on fragment mass distributions for high energy fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi P C R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of fissioning nuclei mass- and energy-distributions on the formation of fragments for fission induced by high energy probes. A Monte Carlo code called CRISP was used for obtaining mass distributions and spectra of the fissioning nuclei for reactions induced by 660 MeV protons on 241Am and on 239Np, by 500 MeV protons on 208Pb, and by Bremsstrahlung photons with end-point energies at 50 MeV and 3500 MeV on 238U. The results show that even at high excitation energies, asymmetric fission may still contribute significantly to the fission cross section of actinide nuclei, while it is the dominante mode in the case of lead. However, more precise data for high energy fission on actinide are necessary in order to allow definite conclusions.

  18. Evaluation of the neutron cross sections of 235U in the thermal energy region. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Thompson, J.K.

    1976-02-01

    The objective of this work has been to improve the knowledge of the thermal cross sections of the fissile nuclei as a step toward providing a standard data base for the nuclear industry. The methodology uses a form of the Adler-Adler multilevel-fission theory and Breit-Wigner multilevel-scattering theory. It incorporates these theories in a general nonlinear least-squares (LSQ) fitting program SIGLEARNThe analysis methodology in this work was applied to the thermal data on 235 U. A reference data file has been developed which includes most of the known data of interest. The first important result of this work is the assessment of the shape uncertainties of the partial cross sections. The results of our studies lead to the following values and error estimates for 235 U g factors in a thermal (20.44 0 C) energy spectrum: g/sub f/ = 0.97751 (+-0.11%); g/sub γ/ = 0.98230 (+-0.14%). A second important result of this study is the development of a recommended set of 2200 m/s (0.0253 eV) values of the parameters and the probable range of further adjustment which might be made. The analysis also provides the result of a common interpretation of energy-dependent absolute cross-section data of different measurements to yield a consistent set of experimental 0.0253 eV values with rigorous error estimates. It also provides normalization factors for relative fission and capture cross sections on a common basis with rigorous error estimates. The results of these analyses provide a basis for deciding what new measurements would be most beneficial. The most important of these would be improved direct capture data in the thermal region

  19. A Review of Previous Research in Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUONG, HENRY; POLANSKY, GARY F.; SANDERS, THOMAS L.; SIEGEL, MALCOLM D.

    1999-01-01

    From the earliest days of power reactor development, direct energy conversion was an obvious choice to produce high efficiency electric power generation. Directly capturing the energy of the fission fragments produced during nuclear fission avoids the intermediate conversion to thermal energy and the efficiency limitations of classical thermodynamics. Efficiencies of more than 80% are possible, independent of operational temperature. Direct energy conversion fission reactors would possess a number of unique characteristics that would make them very attractive for commercial power generation. These reactors would be modular in design with integral power conversion and operate at low pressures and temperatures. They would operate at high efficiency and produce power well suited for long distance transmission. They would feature large safety margins and passively safe design. Ideally suited to production by advanced manufacturing techniques, direct energy conversion fission reactors could be produced more economically than conventional reactor designs. The history of direct energy conversion can be considered as dating back to 1913 when Moseleyl demonstrated that charged particle emission could be used to buildup a voltage. Soon after the successful operation of a nuclear reactor, E.P. Wigner suggested the use of fission fragments for direct energy conversion. Over a decade after Wigner's suggestion, the first theoretical treatment of the conversion of fission fragment kinetic energy into electrical potential appeared in the literature. Over the ten years that followed, a number of researchers investigated various aspects of fission fragment direct energy conversion. Experiments were performed that validated the basic physics of the concept, but a variety of technical challenges limited the efficiencies that were achieved. Most research in direct energy conversion ceased in the US by the late 1960s. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this

  20. Electron spin resonance of gamma, electron, neutron and fission fragments irradiated K2SO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, J.; Walton, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) of K 2 SO 4 irradiated by γ, electron, neutron and fission fragments has been investigated. The ESR spectra are attributed mainly to the formation of SO 3 - , SO 4 - , SO 2 - , and O 3 - radical ions. The most intense radical ion observed was due to the SO 3 - , and the other radicals were relatively much lower in intensity. Thermal annealing showed a significant decrease in the concentration of radical ions. The concentration of SO 3 - was measured in γ-irradiated K 2 SO 4 and K 2 SO 4 containing fission fragments. In fission fragments irradiated K 2 SO 4 , the G-value observed for SO 3 - radical formation was about eight times higher than that of γ-irradiated K 2 SO 4 . This was attributed to the high LET (Linear Energy Transfer) of the fission fragments. (author)

  1. Angular momenta of fission fragments in the {alpha}-accompanied fission of {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.; Morhac, M. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Nuclear Physics, Bratislava (Slovakia); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions, Dubna (Russian Federation); Hamilton, J.H.; Kormicki, J.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hwang, J.K.; Luo, Y.X.; Fong, D.; Gore, P. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics, Nashville, TN (United States); Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Rodin, A.M.; Fomichev, A.S.; Popeko, G.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions, Dubna (Russian Federation); Daniel, A.V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rasmussen, J.O.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Donangelo, R.; Cole, J.D.

    2005-06-01

    For the first time, average angular momenta of the ternary fission fragments {sup 100,102}Zr, {sup 106}Mo, {sup 144,146}Ba and {sup 138,140,142}Xe from the {alpha}-accompanied fission of {sup 252}Cf were obtained from relative intensities of prompt {gamma}-ray transitions with the use of the statistical model calculation. Average values of the angular momenta were compared with the corresponding values for the same fission fragments from the binary fission of {sup 252}Cf. Results indicate the presence of a decreasing trend in the average values of angular momenta induced in ternary fission fragments compared to the same binary fission fragments. On the average, the total angular momentum extracted for ternary fission fragments is {proportional_to}1.4{Dirac_h} lower than in binary fission. Consequently, results indicate that the mechanism of the ternary {alpha}-particles emission may directly effect an induction of angular momenta of fission fragments, and possible scenarios of such mechanisms are discussed. Further, the dependence of the angular momenta of {sup 106}Mo and {sup 140}Xe on the number of emitted neutrons from correlated pairs of primary fragments was obtained also showing a decreasing dependence of average angular momenta with increasing number of emitted neutrons. Consequences are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  2. Fission product chemistry and aerosol behaviour in the primary circuit of a pressurised water reactor under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.

    1985-09-01

    Three key accident sequences are considered covering a representative range of different environments of pressure, flow, temperature history and degree of zircaloy oxidation, and their principle thermal hydraulic and physical characteristics affecting chemistry behaviour are identified. Inventories, chemical forms and timing of fission product release are summarized together with the major sources of structural materials and their release characteristics. Chemistry of each main fission product species is reviewed from available experimental and/or theoretical data. Studies modelling primary circuit fission product behaviour are reviewed. Requirements for further study are assessed. (UK)

  3. International Union of Geological Sciences Subcommission on Geochronology recommendation for the standardization of fission track dating calibration and data reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurford, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the difficulties of calibration in fission track (FT) dating over the last 20 yr, including uncertainty of the absolute λ f value, complexities of neutron dosimetry, complexities of neutron irradiation, correction factors necessary in some methodological procedures, and personal factors in track counting, the Working Group elected at the Cambridge ICOG meeting in 1986 recommended to FT workers meeting at the 6th International Fission Track Dating Workshop in Besancon on 9 September 1988, a uniform approach to system calibration, sample irradiation, calculation of FT age, and presentation of data. After discussion and modification, the recommendation was accepted. This modified recommendation is presented. (author)

  4. Specific fission J-window and angular momentum dependence of the fission barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadashi; Takahashi, Naruto; Yokoyama, Akihiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Shinohara, Atsushi

    1997-04-01

    A method to determine a unique J-window in the fission process was devised and the fissioning nuclide associated with thus extracted J-window was identified for each of the heavy-ion reaction systems. Obtained fission barriers at the resulting J-window were compared with the calculated values by the rotating finite range model (RFRM). The deduced barriers for individual nuclides were compared with the RFRM barriers to reproduce more or less the angular momentum dependence the RFRM prediction. The deduced systematic behavior of the fission barrier indicates no even-odd and shell corrections are necessary. The nuclear dissipation effect based on Kramer`s model revealed substantial reduction of the statistically deduced barrier heights and brought a fairly large scattering from the RFRM J-dependence. However, introduction of the temperature-dependent friction coefficient ({gamma} = 2 for T {>=} 1.0 MeV and 0.5 for T < 1.0 MeV) was found to bring about satisfactory agreement with both RFRM fission barriers and the pre-fission neutron multiplicity systematics. (author). 81 refs.

  5. Application of a Bayesian/generalised least-squares method to generate correlations between independent neutron fission yield data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Diez, C.; Cabellos, O.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Labeau, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Fission product yields are fundamental parameters for several nuclear engineering calculations and in particular for burn-up/activation problems. The impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past and evaluations were released, although still incomplete. Recently, the nuclear community expressed the need for full fission yield covariance matrices to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. In this work, we studied and applied a Bayesian/generalised least-squares method for covariance generation, and compared the generated uncertainties to the original data stored in the JEFF-3.1.2 library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235 U. Calculations were carried out using different codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the library. The uncertainty quantification was performed with the Monte Carlo sampling technique. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the statistics of decay heat. (authors)

  6. Neutron-induced fission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigmann, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the history of fission research, neutron-induced fission has always played the most important role. The practical importance of neutron-induced fission rests upon the fact that additional neutrons are produced in the fission process, and thus a chain reaction becomes possible. The practical applications of neutron-induced fission will not be discussed in this chapter, but only the physical properties of one of its characteristics, namely (n,f) cross sections. The most important early summaries on the subject are the monograph edited by Michaudon which also deals with the practical applications, the earlier review article on fission by Michaudon, and the review by Bjornholm and Lynn, in which neutron-induced fission receives major attention. This chapter will attempt to go an intermediate way between the very detailed theoretical treatment in the latter review and the cited monograph which emphasizes the applied aspects and the techniques of fission cross-section measurements. The more recent investigations in the field will be included. Section II will survey the properties of cross sections for neutron-induced fission and also address some special aspects of the experimental methods applied in their measurement. Section Ill will deal with the formal theory of neutron-induced nuclear reactions for the resolved resonance region and the region of statistical nuclear reactions. In Section IV, the fission width, or fission transmission coefficient, will be discussed in detail. Section V will deal with the broader structures due to incompletely damped vibrational resonances, and in particular will address the special case of thorium and neighboring isotopes. Finally, Section VI will briefly discuss parity violation effects in neutron-induced fission. 74 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Fission product nuclear data obtained by use of an on-line mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, P.L.; Wright, J.F.; Anderl, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A Spectrometer for On-Line Analysis of Radionuclides (SOLAR) has been installed at a 1 MW TRIGA reactor at Washington State University. Fission product ions from a combination target/ion source located within the thermal column are brought out to a 60 0 magnetic sector mass spectrometer. Surface ionization provides copious beams of Rb + and Cs + ions and less intense beams of Br - and I - ions with negligible contamination by other elements. About 40 fission product nuclides can thus be chemically and physically separated in times of less than 1 second. Past results on independent and cumulative fission yields along with measurements of half-lives of some very neutron-rich nuclides are presented. Current work on delayed-neutron emission probabilities and energy spectra of delayed neutrons from individual nuclides is described. (7 tables, 2 figures) (U.S.)

  8. Recent Results from Lohengrin on Fission Yields and Related Decay Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serot, O.; Amouroux, C.; Bidaud, A.; Capellan, N.; Chabod, S.; Ebran, A.; Faust, H.; Kessedjian, G.; Köester, U.; Letourneau, A.; Litaize, O.; Martin, F.; Materna, T.; Mathieu, L.; Panebianco, S.; Regis, J.-M.; Rudigier, M.; Sage, C.; Urban, W.

    2014-05-01

    The Lohengrin mass spectrometer is one of the 40 instruments built around the reactor of the Institute Laue-Langevin (France) which delivers a very intense thermal neutron flux. Usually, Lohengrin was combined with a high-resolution ionization chamber in order to obtain good nuclear charge discrimination within a mass line, yielding an accurate isotopic yield determination. Unfortunately, this experimental procedure can only be applied for fission products with a nuclear charge less than about 42, i.e. in the light fission fragment region. Since 2008, a large collaboration has started with the aim of studying various fission aspects, mainly in the heavy fragment region. For that, a new experimental setup which allows isotopic identification by γ-ray spectrometry has been developed and validated. This technique was applied on the 239Pu(nth,f) reaction where about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared with what was that previously available in nuclear data libraries. The same γ-ray spectrometric technique is currently being applied to the study of the 233U(nth,f) reaction. Our aim is to deduce charge and mass distributions of the fission products and to complete the experimental data that exist mainly for light fission fragments. The measurement of 41 mass yields from the 241Am(2nth,f) reaction has been also performed. In addition to these activities on fission yield measurements, various new nanosecond isomers were discovered. Their presence can be revealed from a strong deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a 'normal' Gaussian shape. Finally, a new neutron long-counter detector designed to have a detection efficiency independent of the detected neutron energy has been built. Combining this neutron device with a Germanium detector and a beta-ray detector array allowed us to measure the beta-delayed neutron emission probability Pn of some important fission products for reactor

  9. Measurement of uranium in human teeth and kidney stones with the fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    The measurement of uranium in human teeth and in kidney stones was carried out using the fission track activation technique. In this determination 2759 and 2205 absolute counts of tracks for teeth samples and 1689 tracks for kidney stone samples were performed, respectively. The results are as follows: xsub(tooth) (1)=(0.227+-0.006) ppm, xsub(tooth) (2)=(0.143+-0.007) ppm and xsub(kidney)=(0.568+-0.020) ppm. The experimental method is described and the results are discussed. (author)

  10. Correlation of errors in the Monte Carlo fission source and the fission matrix fundamental-mode eigenvector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufek, Jan; Holst, Gustaf

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Errors in the fission matrix eigenvector and fission source are correlated. • The error correlations depend on coarseness of the spatial mesh. • The error correlations are negligible when the mesh is very fine. - Abstract: Previous studies raised a question about the level of a possible correlation of errors in the cumulative Monte Carlo fission source and the fundamental-mode eigenvector of the fission matrix. A number of new methods tally the fission matrix during the actual Monte Carlo criticality calculation, and use its fundamental-mode eigenvector for various tasks. The methods assume the fission matrix eigenvector is a better representation of the fission source distribution than the actual Monte Carlo fission source, although the fission matrix and its eigenvectors do contain statistical and other errors. A recent study showed that the eigenvector could be used for an unbiased estimation of errors in the cumulative fission source if the errors in the eigenvector and the cumulative fission source were not correlated. Here we present new numerical study results that answer the question about the level of the possible error correlation. The results may be of importance to all methods that use the fission matrix. New numerical tests show that the error correlation is present at a level which strongly depends on properties of the spatial mesh used for tallying the fission matrix. The error correlation is relatively strong when the mesh is coarse, while the correlation weakens as the mesh gets finer. We suggest that the coarseness of the mesh is measured in terms of the value of the largest element in the tallied fission matrix as that way accounts for the mesh as well as system properties. In our test simulations, we observe only negligible error correlations when the value of the largest element in the fission matrix is about 0.1. Relatively strong error correlations appear when the value of the largest element in the fission matrix raises

  11. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, A.; Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C.; Chabod, S.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.

    2009-01-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  12. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A. [Irfu, Service de Physique Nucleaire, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C. [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chabod, S. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Breaud, S.; Oriol, L. [DEN/DER/SPEX, CEA-Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France)

    2009-07-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  13. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered: In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.

  14. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundberg, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered: In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.

  15. Beta decay heat following U-235, U-238 and Pu-239 neutron fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie

    1997-09-01

    This is an experimental study of beta-particle decay heat from 235U, 239Pu and 238U aggregate fission products over delay times 0.4-40,000 seconds. The experimental results below 2s for 235U and 239Pu, and below 20s for 238U, are the first such results reported. The experiments were conducted at the UMASS Lowell 5.5-MV Van de Graaff accelerator and 1-MW swimming-pool research reactor. Thermalized neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction induced fission in 238U and 239Pu, and fast neutrons produced in the reactor initiated fission in 238U. A helium-jet/tape-transport system rapidly transferred fission fragments from a fission chamber to a low background counting area. Delay times after fission were selected by varying the tape speed or the position of the spray point relative to the beta spectrometer that employed a thin-scintillator-disk gating technique to separate beta-particles from accompanying gamma-rays. Beta and gamma sources were both used in energy calibration. Based on low-energy(energies 0-10 MeV. Measured beta spectra were unfolded for their energy distributions by the program FERD, and then compared to other measurements and summation calculations based on ENDF/B-VI fission-product data performed on the LANL Cray computer. Measurements of the beta activity as a function of decay time furnished a relative normalization. Results for the beta decay heat are presented and compared with other experimental data and the summation calculations.

  16. The Growth of Sea cucumber Stichopus herrmanni After Transverse Induced Fission in Two and Three Fission Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Hartati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transverse induced fission proven could be done in Teripang Tril, Stichopus herrmanni. This present works aimed to analyze wound recovery, regeneration period and growth of Teripang Trill  after asexual reproduction by fission using two and three fission plane. Observations were made every day until the sea cucumber body separated into two or more (depending on treatment and reared for 16 weeks.  The results showed that there are differences in wound recovery, regeneration period and growth of S. herrmanni depend on their different fission plane. The wound recovery and regeneration period (days of anterior, middle and posterior individu S. herrmanni resulted from two and three fission plane were varied but the two fission plane the anterior individu recover for longer period than posterior part and  the wound recover process in both end for thee fission plane was same. Average growth of anterior and posterior fragment were longer for two fission plane than three fission plane.  The middle fragment (M1 and M2 both fission plane was able to grow but very low.  It showed that three fission plane gave very slow growth in every fragment of the body. Keywords: growth, post-fission, fission plane, Stichopus herrmanni

  17. Dynamin's helical geometry does not destabilize membranes during fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDargh, Zachary A; Deserno, Markus

    2018-05-01

    It is now widely accepted that dynamin-mediated fission is a fundamentally mechanical process: dynamin undergoes a GTP-dependent conformational change, constricting the neck between two compartments, somehow inducing their fission. However, the exact connection between dynamin's conformational change and the scission of the neck is still unclear. In this paper, we re-evaluate the suggestion that a change in the pitch or radius of dynamin's helical geometry drives the lipid bilayer through a mechanical instability, similar to a well-known phenomenon occurring in soap films. We find that, contrary to previous claims, there is no such instability. This lends credence to an alternative model, in which dynamin drives the membrane up an energy barrier, allowing thermal fluctuations to take it into the hemifission state. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of fission dynamics on the spectra and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Madland, D.G.; Sierk, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    With the goal of examining their effect on the spectra and multiplicities of the prompt neutrons emitted in fission, we discuss recent advances in a unified macroscopic-microscopic description of large-amplitude collective nuclear dynamics. The conversion of collective energy into single-particle excitation energy is calculated for a new surface-plus-window dissipation mechanism. By solving the Hamilton equations of motion for initial conditions appropriate to fission, we obtain the average fission-fragment translational kinetic energy and excitation energy. The spectra and multiplicities of the emitted neutrons, which depend critically upon the average excitation energy, are then calculated on the basis of standard nuclear evaporation theory, taking into account the average motion of the fission fragments, the distribution of fission-fragment residual nuclear temperature, the energy dependence of the cross section for the inverse process of compound-nucleus formation, and the possibility of multiple-chance fission. Some illustrative comparisons of our calculations with experimental data are shown

  19. Equilibrium fission model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.; Blann, M.

    1976-01-01

    In order to aid in understanding the systematics of heavy ion fission and fission-like reactions in terms of the target-projectile system, bombarding energy and angular momentum, fission widths are calculated using an angular momentum dependent extension of the Bohr-Wheeler theory and particle emission widths using angular momentum coupling

  20. Simulation of pellet-cladding thermomechanical interaction and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia; Soba, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that describes some of the main phenomena occurring in a nuclear fuel rod throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, gas mixing, swelling, and densification are modeled. The modular structure of the code allows for the incorporation of models to simulate different phenomena and material properties. Collapsible rods can be also simulated. The code is bidimensional, assumes cylindrical symmetry for the rod and uses the finite element method to integrate the differential equations. The stress-strain and heat conduction problems are nonlinear due to plasticity and to the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The fission gas inventory is calculated with a diffusion model, assuming spherical grains and using a one-dimensional finite element scheme. Pressure increase, swelling and densification are coupled with the stress field. Good results are obtained for the simulation of the irradiation tests of the first argentine prototypes of MOX fuels, where the bamboo effect is clearly observed, and of the FUMEX series for the fuel centerline temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release.

  1. Freedom: a transient fission-product release model for radioactive and stable species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, L.D.; Lewis, B.J.; Iglesias, F.C.

    1989-05-01

    A microstructure-dependent fission-gas release and swelling model (FREEDOM) has been developed for UO 2 fuel. The model describes the transient release behaviour for both the radioactive and stable fission-product species. The model can be applied over the full range of operating conditions, as well as for accident conditions that result in high fuel temperatures. The model accounts for lattice diffusion and grain-boundary sweeping of fusion products to the grain boundaries, where the fission gases accumulate in grain-face bubbles as a result of vacancy diffusion. Release of fission-gas to the free void of the fuel element occurs through the interlinkage of bubbles and cracks on the grain boundaries. This treatment also accounts for radioactive chain decay and neutron-induced transmutation effects. These phenomena are described by mass balance equations which are numerically solved using a moving-boundary, finite-element method with mesh refinement. The effects of grain-face bubbles on fuel swelling and fuel thermal conductivity are included in the ELESIM fuel performance code. FREEDOM has an accuracy of better than 1% when assessed against an analytic solution for diffusional release. The code is being evaluated against a fuel performance database for stable gas release, and against sweep-gas and in-cell fission-product release experiments at Chalk River for active species

  2. Induced fission track distribution from highly radioactive particles in fallout materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Okada, Tatemichi

    1987-01-01

    Some highly radioactive fallout particles (GPs) from the 19th Chinese nuclear detonation were followed to the neutron irradiation in a reactor after sandwiched with mica detectors. The interesting star-like fission track patterns were revealed on the etched surface of the mica detectors. The simple chemical separation procedure for the GPs was applied for the separation of U and Pu as fissile elements and the both resultant fractions were examined with the similar high sensitive fission tracking detection. Subsequently, a representative track pattern from a black spherical particle was subjected to the determination of fissile nuclide content; comparing the total fission events evaluated on the basis of the numerical calculation of track densities with the total thermal neutron fluence. The results implied that the uranium is responsible for the main fissile nuclide remaining within a particle as unfissioned fractions and should be certainly enriched with respect to U-235 within such small fallout particles. This sophisticated method was also applied to determine the dead GPs, which have been highly radioactive particles just after the detonations, in the rain and snow-residual materials. Many induced star-like fission tracks verified certainly that there remains a lot of dead particles in the atmosheric environment till nowadays. (author)

  3. Fusion-fission type collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeschler, H.

    1980-01-01

    Three examples of fusion-fission type collisions on medium-mass nuclei are investigated whether the fragment properties are consistent with fission from equilibrated compound nuclei. Only in a very narrow band of angular momenta the data fulfill the necessary criteria for this process. Continuous evolutions of this mechnism into fusion fission and into a deep-inelastic process and particle emission prior to fusion have been observed. Based on the widths of the fragment-mass distributions of a great variety of data, a further criterion for the compound-nucleus-fission process is tentatively proposed. (orig.)

  4. Fission neutron multiplicity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.; Ruben, A.; Seeliger, D.

    1991-01-01

    A model for calculating neutron multiplicities in nuclear fission is presented. It is based on the solution of the energy partition problem as function of mass asymmetry within a phenomenological approach including temperature-dependent microscopic energies. Nuclear structure effects on fragment de-excitation, which influence neutron multiplicities, are discussed. Temperature effects on microscopic energy play an important role in induced fission reactions. Calculated results are presented for various fission reactions induced by neutrons. Data cover the incident energy range 0-20 MeV, i.e. multiple chance fission is considered. (author). 28 refs, 13 figs

  5. Fission of Al, Ti, Co, Zr, Nb, Ag, In, Nd, Sm, and Ta nuclei induced by 0.8-1.8 GeV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.A. de; Martins, J.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Al, Ti, Co, Zr, Nb, Ag, In, Nd, Sm, and Ta elements in contact with solid state nuclear track detectors were exposed to 0.8-1.8 GeV bremsstrahlung beams at the 2.5-GeV Electron Synchrotron of the Bonn University. The detectors were processed to produce visible fission tracks for track analysis with optical microscopes. Absolute mean cross section per photon and fissility were evaluated. Results are discussed and compared with other photofission data as well as with estimates from the current fission models. A broad minimum found for nuclear fissility of 10 -4 -10 -3 covering the range 15 approx Z 2 /A approx 25 seems to confirm the predictions from the models. For Al and Ti nuclei the probability of fission amounts to approx 10 -1 . (author) [pt

  6. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  7. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  8. Study of hypernuclei fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, F.

    1990-01-01

    This work is about PS177 experience made on LEAR machine at CERN in 1988. The annihilation reaction of anti protons on a target of Bismuth or Uranium is studied. Lambda particles are produced by this reaction, in the nucleus in 2% of cases 7.1 10 -3 hypernuclei by stopped antiproton in the target are produced. The prompt hypernucleus fission probability of uranium is 75% and that of Bismuth 10%. The mass distribution of fission fragments is symmetrical ((≡ the excitation energy of the nucleus is very high). If the nucleus hasn't fissioned, the non-mesonic lambda decay, gives it an energy of 100 MeV, what allows to fission later. This fission is delayed because the hypernucleus lifetime is 1.3 +0.25 -0.21 10 -10 sec for Bismuth [fr

  9. On determining absolute entropy without quantum theory or the third law of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    We employ classical thermodynamics to gain information about absolute entropy, without recourse to statistical methods, quantum mechanics or the third law of thermodynamics. The Gibbs-Duhem equation yields various simple methods to determine the absolute entropy of a fluid. We also study the entropy of an ideal gas and the ionization of a plasma in thermal equilibrium. A single measurement of the degree of ionization can be used to determine an unknown constant in the entropy equation, and thus determine the absolute entropy of a gas. It follows from all these examples that the value of entropy at absolute zero temperature does not need to be assigned by postulate, but can be deduced empirically.

  10. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinhua; Guo Haiping; Mou Yunfeng; Zheng Pu; Liu Rong; Yang Xiaofei; Yang Jian

    2013-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established. It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium. The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D + beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode. The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α, β) thermal scattering model, so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors. (authors)

  11. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  12. Safety analysis on tokamak helium cooling slab fuel fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Jian Hongbing

    1992-01-01

    The thermal analyses for steady state, depressurization and total loss of flow in the tokamak helium cooling slab fuel element fusion-fission hybrid reactor are presented. The design parameters, computed results of HYBRID program and safety evaluation for conception design are given. After all, it gives some recommendations for developing the design

  13. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  14. Determination of the fission products yields, lanthanide and yttrium, in the fission of 238U with neutrons of fission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoli, I.G.

    1981-06-01

    A radiochemical investigation is performed to measure the cumulative fission product yields of several lantanides and yttrium nuclides in the 238 U by fission neutron spectra. Natural and depleted uranium are irradiated under the same experimental conditions in order to find a way to subtract the contribution of the 235 U fission. 235 U percentage in the natural uranium was 3.5 times higher than in the depleted uranium. Uranium oxides samples are irradiated inside the core of the Argonaut Reactor, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, and the lantanides and yttrium are chemically separated. The fission products gamma activities were detected, counted and analysed in a system constituted by a high resolution Ge(Li) detector, 4096 multichannel analyser and a PDP-11 computer. Cumulative yields for fission products with half-lives between 1 to 33 hours are measured: 93 Y, 141 La, 142 La, 143 Ce and 149 Nd. The chain total yields are calculated. The cumulative fission yields measured for 93 Y, 141 La, 142 La, 143 Ce and 149 Nd are 4,49%, 4,54%, 4,95%, 4,16% and 1,37% respectively and they are in good agreement with the values found in the literature. (Author) [pt

  15. Assessment of the ''thermal normalization technique'' for measurement of neutron cross sections vs energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, R.W.; de Sassure, G.

    1977-01-01

    Refined knowledge of the thermal neutron cross sections of the fissile nuclides and of the (n,α) reaction standards, together with the reasonably well known energy dependence of the latter, have permitted resonance-region and low-keV fissile nuclide cross sections to be based on these standards together with count-rate ratios observed as a function of energy using a pulsed ''white'' source. As one evaluates cross sections for energies above 20 keV, optimum results require combination of cross section shape measurements with all available absolute measurements. The assumptions of the ''thermal normalization method'' are reviewed, and an opinion is given of the status of some of the standards required for its use. The complications which may limit the accuracy of results using the method are listed and examples are given. For the 235 U(n,f) cross section, the option is discussed of defining resonance-region fission integrals as standards. The area of the approximately 9 eV resonances in this nuclide may be known to one percent accuracy, but at present the fission integral from 0.1 to 1.0 keV is known to no better than about two percent. This uncertainty is based on the scatter among independent results, and has not been reduced by the most recent measurements. This uncertainty now limits the accuracy attainable for the 235 U(n,f) cross section below about 50 keV. Suggestions are given to indicate how future detailed work might overcome past sources of error

  16. Determination of the fission barrier height in fission of heavy radioactive beams induced by the (d,p)-transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    A theoretical framework is described, allowing to determine the fission barrier height using the observed cross sections of fission induced by the (d,p)-transfer with accuracy, which is not achievable in another type of low-energy fission of neutron-deficient nuclei, the $\\beta$-delayed fission. The primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission of...

  17. Fission fragment distributions within dynamical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, K. [Institute of Nuclear, Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Nadtochy, P.N. [Omsk State Technical University, Omsk (Russian Federation); Ryabov, E.G.; Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Physics Department, Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The review covers recent developments and achievements in the dynamical description of fission process at high excitation energy. It is shown that the dynamical approach based on multidimensional Langevin equations combined with the statistical description of nuclear decay by particles evaporation is capable of fairly well describing the formation of fission fragment mass-energy, charge, and angular distributions of fission fragments in coincidence with the pre- and post-scission particle emission. The final yields of fission and evaporation residues channels products could be obtained. The detailed description of fission dynamics allows studying different stages of fission process, indicating the most important ingredients governing fission process and studying in detail such fundamental nuclear properties as nuclear viscosity and fission timescale. The tasks and perspectives of multidimensional dynamical approach are also discussed. (orig.)

  18. Thermal neutron calibration of a tritium extraction facility using the 6Li(n,t)4He/197Au(n,γ)198Au cross section ratio for standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    Absolute tritium activities in a neutron-activated metallic lithium samples have been measured by liquid scintillation methods to provide data needed for the determination of capture-to-fission ratios in fast breeder reactor spectra and for recent measurements of the 7 Li(n,n't) 4 He cross section. The tritium extraction facility used for all these experiments has now been calibrated by measuring the 6 Li(n,t) 4 He/ 197 Au/n,γ) 198 Au activity ratio for thermal neutrons and comparing the result with the well-known cross sections. The calculated-to-measured activity ratio was found to be 1.033 +- 0.018. 2 figures, 20 tables

  19. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  20. A threshold for dissipative fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and γ-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T thresh to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E Bar (T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T thresh /E Bar (T) thresh /E Bar (T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems

  1. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Fissioning uranium plasmas are the nuclear fuel in conceptual high-temperature gaseous-core reactors for advanced rocket propulsion in space. A gaseous-core nuclear rocket would be a thermal reactor in which an enriched uranium plasma at about 10,000 K is confined in a reflector-moderator cavity where it is nuclear critical and transfers its fission power to a confining propellant flow for the production of thrust at a specific impulse up to 5000 sec. With a thrust-to-engine weight ratio approaching unity, the gaseous-core nuclear rocket could provide for propulsion capabilities needed for manned missions to the nearby planets and for economical cislunar ferry services. Fueled with enriched uranium hexafluoride and operated at temperatures lower than needed for propulsion, the gaseous-core reactor scheme also offers significant benefits in applications for space and terrestrial power. They include high-efficiency power generation at low specific mass, the burnup of certain fission products and actinides, the breeding of U-233 from thorium with short doubling times, and improved convenience of fuel handling and processing in the gaseous phase.

  2. A fission ionization detector for neutron flux measurements at a spallation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Balestrini, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Brown, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Haight, R.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Laymon, C.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Lee, T.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Lisowski, P.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); McCorkle, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Nelson, R.O. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Parker, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Hill, N.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1993-11-15

    The construction of a neutron flux monitor that can measure absolute neutron intensities in the neutron energy range from below 1 MeV to over 500 MeV is described. The detector consists of an ionization chamber with several thin deposits of fissionable material. The ionization chamber is thin enough that it does not significantly affect the neutron beam and may be left in the neutron flight path during experimental measurements to continuously monitor the beam flux. The use of this monitor at the continuous-energy spallation neutron source at the WNR target area at LAMPF is described. (orig.)

  3. A fission ionization detector for neutron flux measurements at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, S.A.; Balestrini, S.; Brown, A.; Haight, R.C.; Laymon, C.M.; Lee, T.M.; Lisowski, P.W.; McCorkle, W.; Nelson, R.O.; Parker, W.; Hill, N.W.

    1993-01-01

    The construction of a neutron flux monitor that can measure absolute neutron intensities in the neutron energy range from below 1 MeV to over 500 MeV is described. The detector consists of an ionization chamber with several thin deposits of fissionable material. The ionization chamber is thin enough that it does not significantly affect the neutron beam and may be left in the neutron flight path during experimental measurements to continuously monitor the beam flux. The use of this monitor at the continuous-energy spallation neutron source at the WNR target area at LAMPF is described. (orig.)

  4. Simulation of the thermomechanical interaction between pellet and cladding and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.; Soba, Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that simulates some of the main phenomena occurring in a fuel element of a nuclear power reactor throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, swelling and densification are modeled. Thermal expansion gives origin to elastic or plastic strains, which adequately describe the bamboo effect. The code assumes an axial symmetric rod and hence, cylindrical finite elements are employed for the discretization. The fission gas inventory is calculated by means of a diffusion model, which assumes spherical grains and uses also a finite element scheme. Once the temperature distribution in the pellet and the cladding is obtained and in order to reduce the calculation time, the rod is divided into five cylindrical rings where the temperature is averaged. In each ring the gas diffusion problem is solved in one representative grain and the results are then extended to the whole ring. The pressure, increased by the released gas, interacts with the stress field. Densification and swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products are also considered. Experiments, particularly those of the FUMEX series, are simulated with this code. A good agreement is obtained for the fuel center line temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release. (author)

  5. Insights into nuclear structure and the fission process from spontaneous fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.H.; Butler-Moore, K.; Ramayya, A.V. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The {gamma}-rays emitted following spontaneous and induced fission are rich sources of information about the structure of neutron-rich nuclei and about the fission process itself. The study of spontaneous fissioning isotopes with large Ge detector arrays are providing a wealth of such information as seen, for example, in recent reports. In this paper we present some of our most recent results on nuclear structure studies and conclusions on the fission process itself. In our work, we have employed in spontaneous fission, a triple gamma coincidence study for the first time and a high resolution, X-ray detector-{gamma}-coincidence study. These data provide powerful ways of separating the gamma rays which belong to a particular nucleus. The triple coincidence technique was used to uniquely identify the levels in {sup 136}Te and higher spin states in its N=84 isotones, {sup 138}Xe and {sup 140}Ba{sup 171}. Some other examples of the level structures observed in the low and high mass partners are presented, including a detailed analysis of the backbending of the moment of inertia in {sup 112,114,116}Pd. Finally, we present the first examples of how our analysis allows one to extract a detailed picture of the dependence of the angular momentum on the mass and atomic numbers of the fission fragments and of the long-sought neutron multiplicity distribution from zero-n to ten-n as a function of the charge and mass asymmetry.

  6. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  7. Reexamination of fission fragment angular distributions and the fission process: Formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of fission fragment angular distributions is examined and the universally used expression is found to be valid only under restrictive assumptions. A more general angular distribution formula is derived and applied to recent data of high spin systems. At the same time it is shown that the strong anisotropies observed from such systems can be understood without changing the essential basis of standard fission theory. The effects of reaction mechanisms other than complete fusion on fission fragment angular distributions are discussed and possible angular distribution signatures of noncompound nucleus formation are mentioned

  8. Process for treating fission waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Wick, O.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste

  9. An economic parametric analysis of the synthetic fuel produced by a fusion-fission complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A simple analytic model is used to examine economic constraints of a fusion-fission complex in which a portion of a thermal energy is used for producing synthetic fuel (synfuel). Since the values of many quantities are not well-known, a parametric analysis has been carried out for testing the sensitivity of the synfuel production cost in relation to crucial economic and technological quantities (investment costs of hybrid and synfuel plants, energy multiplication of the fission blanket, recirculating power fraction of the fusion driver, etc.). In addition, a minimum synfuel selling price has been evaluated, from which the fission-fusion-synfuel complex brings about a higher economic benefit than does the fusion-fission hybrid entirely devoted to fissile-fuel and electricity generation. This paper describes the energy flow diagram of fusion-fission synfuel concept, express the revenue-to-cost formulation and the breakeven synfuel selling price. The synfuel production cost given by the model is evaluated within a range of values of crucial parameters. Assuming an electric cost of 2.7 cents/kWh, an annual investment cost per energy unit of 4.2 to 6 $/FJ for the fusion-fission complex and 1.5 to 3 $/GJ for the synfuel plant, the synfuel production cost lies between 6.5 and 8.5 $/GJ. These production costs can compete with those evaluated for other processes. The study points out a potential use of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor for other than fissile-fuel and electricity generation. (orig.) [de

  10. Yield of Prompt Gamma Radiation in Slow-Neutron Induced Fission of 235U as a Function of the Total Fragment Kinetic Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albinsson, H [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (SE)

    1971-07-01

    Fission gamma radiation yields as functions of the total fragment kinetic energy were obtained for 235U thermal-neutron induced fission. The fragments were detected with silicon surface-barrier detectors and the gamma radiation with a Nal(Tl) scintillator. In some of the measurements mass selection was used so that the gamma radiation could also be measured as a function of fragment mass. Time discrimination between the fission gammas and the prompt neutrons released in the fission process was employed to reduce the background. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fission fragments. Fission-neutron and gamma-ray data of previous experiments were used for comparisons of the yields, and estimates were made of the variation of the prompt gamma-ray energy with the total fragment kinetic energy

  11. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  12. Muon-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikanov, S.

    1980-01-01

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238 U and 232 Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238 U. (author)

  13. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239Pu induced by thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2010-01-01

    The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons (ν(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation σ E *(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass (σ E (A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence σ E *(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

  15. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... across the fission barrier is very small or in other words, the fission barrier is much ... of this shape evolution, the gross features of the fissioning nucleus can be described ..... [7] Y Abe, C Gregoire and H Delagrange, J. Phys.

  16. Burn-up physics in a coupled Hammer-Technion/Cinder-2 system and ENDF/B-V aggregate fission product thermal cross section validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A. dos.

    1990-01-01

    The new methodology developed in this work has the following purposes: a) to implement a burnup capability into the HAMMER-TECHNION/9/computer code by using the CINDER-2/10/computer code to perform the transmutation analysis for the actinides and fission products; b) to implement a reduced version of the CINDER-2 fission product chain structure to treat explicity nearly 99% of all original CINDER-2 fission product absorption in a typical PWR unit cell; c) to treat the effect of the fission product neutron absorption in an unit cell in a multigroup basis; d) to develop a tentative validation procedure for the ENOF/C-V stable and long-lived fission product nuclear data based on the available experimental data/11-14/. The analysis will be performed by using the reduce chain in the coupled system CINDER-2 to generate the time dependent effective four group cross sections for actinides and fission products and CINDER-2 to perform the complete transmutation analysis with its built-in chain structure. (author)

  17. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  18. Physics and chemistry of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: In the pleasant and hospitable atmosphere of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich in the Federal Republic of Germany, the IAEA symposium on the Physics and Chemistry of Fission took place. Almost 200 scientists attended, 154 abstracts were submitted, and 57 papers presented, but more important than the numbers was the quality of the contributions and the progress reported at the symposium. The neutron was discovered almost 50 years ago; 40 years ago the idea of nuclear fission was born. Since then, a number of laboratories have worked hard to explain the phenomenon of fission One would expect that by now scientists would know exactly what happens in a nucleus before and during the process of fission, particularly as there are hundreds of power and research reactors in operation, and fission of uranium isotopes is the basis of their functioning. At first glance, fission seems a simple process: a neutron hits and penetrates the uranium nucleus which becomes excited, i.e. has a surplus of energy. One way to get rid of this energy is for the nucleus to split into two parts; additional products of this process are energy and more neutrons. Nature, however, seems to dislike such straightforward explanations. In the case of fission, scientists have observed a number of phenomena which disagree with a simple model. Sometimes, a nucleus will split into two parts without being 'attacked' by a neutron; this spontaneous fission opens up a new line of fission research and several contributions at the symposium reported on sophisticated experiments designed to unravel some of its specific details. Sometimes, a fissioning nucleus will emit another particle: ternary fission has become a powerful tool for studying the properties of nuclei during the fission process. For the scientist, it is fascinating to observe how the nucleus behaves during fission. They invent models which are supposed to reproduce the most probable course of events leading to fission. In one of these

  19. Theoretical Description of the Fission Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2009-01-01

    Advanced theoretical methods and high-performance computers may finally unlock the secrets of nuclear fission, a fundamental nuclear decay that is of great relevance to society. In this work, we studied the phenomenon of spontaneous fission using the symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that many observed properties of fissioning nuclei can be explained in terms of pathways in multidimensional collective space corresponding to different geometries of fission products. From the calculated collective potential and collective mass, we estimated spontaneous fission half-lives, and good agreement with experimental data was found. We also predicted a new phenomenon of trimodal spontaneous fission for some transfermium isotopes. Our calculations demonstrate that fission barriers of excited superheavy nuclei vary rapidly with particle number, pointing to the importance of shell effects even at large excitation energies. The results are consistent with recent experiments where superheavy elements were created by bombarding an actinide target with 48-calcium; yet even at high excitation energies, sizable fission barriers remained. Not only does this reveal clues about the conditions for creating new elements, it also provides a wider context for understanding other types of fission. Understanding of the fission process is crucial for many areas of science and technology. Fission governs existence of many transuranium elements, including the predicted long-lived superheavy species. In nuclear astrophysics, fission influences the formation of heavy elements on the final stages of the r-process in a very high neutron density environment. Fission applications are numerous. Improved understanding of the fission process will enable scientists to enhance the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile and nuclear reactors. The deployment of a fleet of safe and efficient advanced reactors, which will also minimize radiotoxic

  20. Dynamic of fission and quasi-fission revealed by pre-scission neutron evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.

    1991-06-01

    The dependence of pre-scission neutron multiplicities (ν-pre) on the mass-split and total kinetic energy (TKE) in fusion-fission and quasi-fission has been measured for a wide range of projectile-target combinations. the data indicate that the fusion-fission time scale is shorter for asymmetric splits than for symmetric splits, whilst there is no dependence on TKE. For quasi-fission reactions induced using 64 Ni projectiles, ν-pre falls rapidly with increasing TKE, indicating that these neutrons are emitted near to or after scission. A new interpretation of both neutron multiplicities and mean energies (the neutron clock-thermometer) allows the extraction of time scales with much less uncertainty than previously, and also gives information about the deformation from which the neutrons are emitted. 15 refs., 13 figs

  1. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates; Mesures de sections efficaces de fission et du nombre de neutrons prompts emis par fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billaud, P; Clair, C; Gaudin, M; Genin, R; Joly, R; Leroy, J L; Michaudon, A; Ouvry, J; Signarbieux, C; Vendryes, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin {sup 10}B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of {sup 235}U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of {sup 235}U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF{sub 3} proportional counters. c) Mean number {nu} of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of {nu} for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) {alpha} reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author)Fren. [French] a) Mesures de sectionficaces de fission a basse energie. Nous avons mesure et analyse la variation de la section efficace de fission de divers isotopes fissiles pour des neutrons d'energie inferieure a 0,025 eV. Le monochromateur est constitue par un spectrometre a cristal auquel est associe un selecteur mecanique destine a eliminer les diffractions de Bragg d'ordre superieur au premier. Le materiau fissile est contenu dans une chambre a fission sous forme de depots realises par peinture; une chambre d'ionisation a depots minces de B{sub 10

  2. ENDF/B-5 fission product cross section evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, R.E.; England, T.R.

    1979-12-01

    Cross section evaluations were made for the 196 fission product nuclides on the ENDF/B-5 data files. Most of the evaluations involve updating the capture cross sections of the important absorbers for fast and thermal reactor systems. This included updating thermal values, resonance integrals, resonance parameter sets, and fast capture cross sections. For the fast capture results generalized least-squares calculations were made with the computer code FERRET. Input for these cross section adjustments included nuclear models calculations and both integral and differential experimental data results. The differential cross sections and their uncertainties were obtained from the CSIRS library. Integral measurement results came from CFRMF and STEK Assemblies 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000. Comparisons of these evaluations with recent capture measurements are shown. 15 figures, 10 tables

  3. Fission fragment assisted reactor concept for space propulsion: Foil reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept is to fabricate a reactor using thin films or foils of uranium, uranium oxide and then to coat them on substrates. These coatings would be made so thin as to allow the escaping fission fragments to directly heat a hydrogen propellant. The idea was studied of direct gas heating and direct gas pumping in a nuclear pumped laser program. Fission fragments were used to pump lasers. In this concept two substrates are placed opposite each other. The internal faces are coated with thin foil of uranium oxide. A few of the advantages of this technology are listed. In general, however, it is felt that if one look at all solid core nuclear thermal rockets or nuclear thermal propulsion methods, one is going to find that they all pretty much look the same. It is felt that this reactor has higher potential reliability. It has low structural operating temperatures, very short burn times, with graceful failure modes, and it has reduced potential for energetic accidents. Going to a design like this would take the NTP community part way to some of the very advanced engine designs, such as the gas core reactor, but with reduced risk because of the much lower temperatures

  4. Theory of nuclear fission: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosel, U.

    1976-01-01

    General properties of nuclear fission are reviewed and related to our present knowledge of fission theory. For this purpose the basic reasons for the shape of the fission barriers are discussed and their consequences compared with experimental results on barrier shapes and structures. Special emphasis is put on the asymmetry of the fission barriers and mass-distributions and its relation to the shells of the nascent fragment shells. Finally the problem of calculating fission cross sections is discussed

  5. Application of fission track method in the development study of coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoming; Peng Gelin

    2002-01-01

    In order to explore potential resource of coalbed methane in Xinji coal deposit of Huainan coalfield, its tectonic-thermal evolution history was studied by using fission track technique. The results showed that there had been 3 or more times of significant thermal events occurred in this area since the late Paleozoic Era. The paleo-geothermal gradient was higher than that of the present. It was estimated that the denudation thickness in this area should be over 2000 m. Mainly formed between 240-140 Ma, no abundant methane could be generated in such condition. Furthermore, the tectonic-thermal events would release the most of methane gases. So, the potential resource of the coalbed methane in this are might be limited

  6. Studies on short-lived fission products at the Mainz TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, N.

    1974-01-01

    Neutron-rich nuclei of medium mass number are produced by thermal-neutron-induced fission of heavy elements, e.g., 235 U, 239 Pu, and 249 Cf. Pulse irradiations lead to an enhancement of the ratio of short-lived activities to the accompanying longer-lived components. One approach for investigating the properties of short-lived nuclei consists in a combination of rapid chemical separations with higher-resolution gamma spectroscopy. This is demonstrated by the isolation of neutron-rich isotopes of niobium by sorption on glass and of ruthenium by solvent extraction. Other rapid separation procedures from aqueous solutions are briefly summarized and a few examples for their application in nuclear fission- and delayed neutron studies are given. Some experiments with an on-line mass separator of the ISOLDE-type, using chemical targets, are described. (U.S.)

  7. Determination of fission products in irradiated fuel by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogensen, M.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Hessel Andersen, N.

    1986-08-01

    X-ray fluorescence is a well established analytical tool for measuring elemental composition of fairly large (approximately 5 cm 2 ) ''cold'' samples. A version of this technique has been developed for analysis of radial distribution of fission products Xe, Cs and Ba in irradiated UO 2 fuel samples. About 0.1 mm thin slices of fuel pellets (full cross sections) are irradiated by 50 keV X-rays. The intensity of the Xe (Cs, Ba) K α fluorescence radiation generated is measured by means of a Ge detector fitted with a collimator. The slit is 0.5 mm wide in the scanning direction and 2 mm long. The measured Xe K α X-ray intensities are converted to absolute concentrations by comparing to the intensity from a Xe gas standard. In the case of Cs and Ba solid standards may be used. The X-ray fluorescence analysis is compared to other techniques used to obtain radial fission product profiles. It is shown how a combination of X-ray fluorescence and electron probe micro analysis is able to reveal the amount of Xe in the grain boundary porosities. (author)

  8. Progress report on the 14-MeV fission cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of a recoil proton monitor was completed. It will be used to measure the neutron flux in the 14-MeV fisson cross section measurements. Extensive calculations of the efficiency of this monitor were made and compared with the calculations of other authors. It is clear that a major source of uncertainty in the efficiency is the lack of precise knowledge of the angular distribution of the n-p elastic scattering cross section. This leads to a change in efficiency of 3% depending on the form of the angular distribution that is used. A 4πβ-γ coincidence system was assembled to investigate the K-correction in determining the absolute activity of foil sources. Iron foils will be used as secondary flux standards in comparing the 14-MeV neutron flux with the fluxes in other laboratories, so this is an important correction to measure. The target and target holders that will be used in the 14-MeV measurements were designed and constructed. Preparations were completed to measure the angular distribution of the fission fragments produced in neutron-induced fission at 14 MeV. 2 figures

  9. A microstructure-dependent model for fission product gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Hastings, I.J.

    1979-06-01

    A model for the release of fission gas from irradiated UO2 fuel is presented. It incorporates fission gas diffusion bubble and grain boundary movement,intergranular bubble formation and interlinkage. In addition, the model allows estimates of the extent of structural change and fuel swelling. In the latter, contributions of thermal expansion, densification, solid fission products, and gas bubbles are considered. When included in the ELESIM fuel performance code, the model yields predictions which are in good agreement with data from UO2 fuel elements irradiated over a range of water-cooled reactor conditions: linear power outputs between 40 and 120 kW/m, burnups between 10 and 300 MW.h/kg U and power histories including constant, high-to-low and low-to-high power periods. The predictions of the model are shown to be most sensitive to fuel power (temperature), the selection of diffusion coefficient for fission gas in UO2 and burnup. The predictions are less sensitive to variables such as fuel restraint, initial grain size and the rate of grain growth. (author)

  10. Delayed Fission Gamma-ray Characteristics of Th-232 U-233 U-235 U-238 and Pu-239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Taylor [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Delayed fission gamma-rays play an important role in determining the time dependent ioniz- ing dose for experiments in the central irradiation cavity of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Delayed gamma-rays are produced from both fission product decay and from acti- vation of materials in the core, such as cladding and support structures. Knowing both the delayed gamma-ray emission rate and the time-dependent gamma-ray energy spectrum is nec- essary in order to properly determine the dose contributions from delayed fission gamma-rays. This information is especially important when attempting to deconvolute the time-dependent neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray contribution to the response of a diamond photo-conducting diode (PCD) or fission chamber in time frames of milliseconds to seconds following a reactor pulse. This work focused on investigating delayed gamma-ray character- istics produced from fission products from thermal, fast, and high energy fission of Th-232, U-233, U-235, U-238, and Pu-239. This work uses a modified version of CINDER2008, a transmutation code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, to model time and energy dependent photon characteristics due to fission. This modified code adds the capability to track photon-induced transmutations, photo-fission, and the subsequent radiation caused by fission products due to photo-fission. The data is compared against previous work done with SNL- modified CINDER2008 [ 1 ] and experimental data [ 2 , 3 ] and other published literature, includ- ing ENDF/B-VII.1 [ 4 ]. The ability to produce a high-fidelity (7,428 group) energy-dependent photon fluence at various times post-fission can improve the delayed photon characterization for radiation effects tests at research reactors, as well as other applications.

  11. LENMODEL: A forward model for calculating length distributions and fission-track ages in apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Kevin D.

    1993-05-01

    The program LENMODEL is a forward model for annealing of fission tracks in apatite. It provides estimates of the track-length distribution, fission-track age, and areal track density for any user-supplied thermal history. The program approximates the thermal history, in which temperature is represented as a continuous function of time, by a series of isothermal steps of various durations. Equations describing the production of tracks as a function of time and annealing of tracks as a function of time and temperature are solved for each step. The step calculations are summed to obtain estimates for the entire thermal history. Computational efficiency is maximized by performing the step calculations backwards in model time. The program incorporates an intuitive and easy-to-use graphical interface. Thermal history is input to the program using a mouse. Model options are specified by selecting context-sensitive commands from a bar menu. The program allows for considerable selection of equations and parameters used in the calculations. The program was written for PC-compatible computers running DOS TM 3.0 and above (and Windows TM 3.0 or above) with VGA or SVGA graphics and a Microsoft TM-compatible mouse. Single copies of a runtime version of the program are available from the author by written request as explained in the last section of this paper.

  12. Micro plate fission chamber development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Wen Zhongwei; Lin Jufang; Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun

    2014-01-01

    To conduct the measurement of neutron flux and the fission rate distribution at several position in assemblies, the micro plate fission chamber was designed and fabricated. Since the requirement of smaller volume and less structure material was taken into consideration, it is convinient, commercial and practical to use fission chamber to measure neutron flux in specific condition. In this paper, the structure of fission chamber and process of fabrication were introduced and performance test result was presented. The detection efficiency is 91.7%. (authors)

  13. Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry: Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since it’ discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution.

  14. Mechanisms of fission neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.

    1991-01-01

    The time evolution in fission is the starting point for discussing not only the main mechanism of fission neutron emission, the evaporation from fully accelerated fragments, but also possible secondary ones connected with dynamical features of nuclear fission. ''Asymptotic'' conditions as relevant for describing the particle release from highly excited, rapidly moving fragments are defined. Corresponding statistical model approaches to fission neutron emission, based on the adequate consideration of the intricate fragment occurrence probability, reproduce most of the experimental data. The remarkable influence of fission modes on neutron observables is analyzed in the framework of a macroscopic-microscopic scission point model consistent with energy conservation. Finally, chances and deficiencies for solving the mechanism puzzle are summarized. (author). 87 refs, 21 figs

  15. Fission in a Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-26

    A three-year theory project was undertaken to study the fission process in extreme astrophysical environments, such as the crust of neutron stars. In the first part of the project, the effect of electron screening on the fission process was explored using a microscopic approach. For the first time, these calculations were carried out to the breaking point of the nucleus. In the second part of the project, the population of the fissioning nucleus was calculated within the same microscopic framework. These types of calculations are extremely computer-intensive and have seldom been applied to heavy deformed nuclei, such as fissioning actinides. The results, tools and methodologies produced in this work will be of interest to both the basic-science and nuclear-data communities.

  16. Calculation of fission gases internal pressure in nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos Santana, M. de.

    1981-12-01

    Models concerning the principal phenomena, particularly thermal expansion, fuel swelling, densification, reestructuring, relocation, mechanical strain, fission gas production and release, direct or indirectly important to calculate the internal pressure in nuclear fuel rods were analysed and selected. Through these analyses a computer code was developed to calculate fuel pin internal pressure evolution. Three different models were utilized to calculate the internal pressure in order to select the best and the most conservative estimate. (Author) [pt

  17. Development of a “Fission-proxy” Method for the Measurement of 14-MeV Neutron Fission Yields at CAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, Narek [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Relative fission yield measurements were made for 50 fission products from 25.6±0.5 MeV alpha-induced fission of Th-232. Quantitative comparison of these experimentally measured fission yields with the evaluated fission yields from 14-MeV neutron-induced fission of U-235 demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed fission-proxy method. This new technique, based on the Bohr-independence hypothesis, permits the measurement of fission yields from an alternate reaction pathway (Th-232 + 25.6 MeV α → U-236* vs. U-235 + 14-MeV n → U-236*) given that the fission process associated with the same compound nucleus is independent of its formation. Other suitable systems that can potentially be investigated in this manner include (but are not limited to) Pu-239 and U-237.

  18. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1981-06-01

    This is the seventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The sixth issue of this series has been published in June 1980 as INDC(NDS)-113/G+P. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1980 and 25 May 1981

  19. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  20. Fission product behaviour in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokiniemi, J.; Auvinen, A.; Maekynen, J.; Valmari, T.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of fission product (FP) behaviour in severe accidents is important for source term assessment and accident mitigation measures. For example in accident management the operator needs to know the effect of different actions on the behaviour and release of fission products. At VTT fission product behaviour have been studied in different national and international projects. In this presentation the results of projects in EU funded 4th framework programme Nuclear Fission Safety 1994-1998 are reported. The projects are: fission product vapour/aerosol chemistry in the primary circuit (FI4SCT960020), aerosol physics in containment (FI4SCT950016), revaporisation of test samples from Phebus fission products (FI4SCT960019) and assessment of models for fission product revaporisation (FI4SCT960044). Also results from the national project 'aerosol experiments in the Victoria facility' funded by IVO PE and VTT Energy are reported

  1. The nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentino, J.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear fission process considering initially the formation of compound nucleus and finishing with radioactive decay of fission products is studied. The process is divided in three parts which consist of the events associated to the nucleus of intermediate transitional state, the scission configuration, and the phenomenum of post scission. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. Irradiation effects and behaviour of fission products in zirconia and spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentils, A.

    2003-10-01

    Crystalline oxides, such as zirconia (ZrO 2 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ), are promising inert matrices for the transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides. This work deals with the study of the physico-chemical properties of these matrices, more specifically their behaviour under irradiation and their capacity to retain fission products. Irradiations at low energy and incorporation of stable analogs of fission products (Cs, I, Xe) into yttria-stabilized zirconia and magnesium-aluminate spinel single crystals were performed by using the ion implanter IRMA (CSNSM-Orsay). Irradiations at high energy were made on several heavy ion accelerators (GANIL-Caen, ISL-Berlin, HIL-Warsaw). The damage induced by irradiation and the release of fission products were monitored by in situ Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry experiments. Transmission electron microscopy was also used in order to determine the nature of the damage induced by irradiation. The results show that irradiation of ZrO 2 and MgAl 2 O 4 with heavy ions (about hundred keV and about hundred MeV) induces a huge structural damage in crystalline matrices. Total disorder (amorphization) is however never reached in zirconia, contrary to what is observed in the case of spinel. The results also emphasize the essential role played by the concentration of implanted species on their retention capacity. A dramatic release of fission products was observed when the concentration exceeds a threshold of a few atomic percent. Irradiation of implanted samples with medium-energy noble-gas ions leads to an enhancement of the fission product release. The exfoliation of spinel crystals implanted at high concentration of Cs ions is observed after a thermal treatment at high temperature. (author)

  3. Fission product yield data for the transmutation of minor actinide nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-04-01

    A report issued by an international study group for the transmutation of nuclear waste using accelerator driven systems has highlighted the need for specific sets of nuclear data. These authoritative requirements include fission product yields at an intermediate incident neutron energy of up to 150 MeV. Before the start of the present CRP on fission product yield data for the transmutation of nuclear waste, only four types of evaluated fission yield data sets existed, namely for spontaneous fission, and for fission induced by thermal, fast (or fission) spectrum, and by 'high energy' (14-15 MeV) neutrons. A new type of evaluation for energy dependent neutron induced fission yields was required for this project. In view of the scarcity of experimental data, such an evaluation has to be based on systematics and theoretical model calculations. Unlike fission cross-sections, where nuclear models are being used successfully for the calculation of unmeasured cross-section ranges, such models or theories existed only for low energy fission yields. Hence the CRP participants entered a completely new field of research for which the progress and outcome were unpredictable. Clearly the ultimate goal of such an effort, namely an evaluation of energy dependent fission yields, could not be realized within the perceived lifetime of a CRP. The main emphasis of the CRP was on the development of adequate systematics and models for the calculation of energy dependent fission yields up to 150 MeV incident neutron energy. Several problems had to be solved, such as the correct choice of model parameters and multiplicity distributions of emitted neutrons, and the effect of multi-chance fission. Models and systematics have been tested for lower energy yields, but they failed to reproduce recent experimental data, particularly at higher energies, and the parameters had to be modified. Other models have been developed from the analysis of experimental data in order to derive systematic

  4. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.

    1976-05-01

    The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on Fission Product Nuclear Data, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. This report consists of reproductions of essentially unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields; neutron cross-section data of fission products; data related to β-, γ-decay of fission products; delayed neutron data; and fission product decay-heat

  5. Relationship between thermotectonic evolution of Serra do Mar mountain range and Santos Basin, SP, Brazil, accessed through fission track analysis in apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadler, J.C; Tello, S.C.A; Iunes, P.J.; Guedes, S; Hackspacher, P; Paulo, S.R; Ribeiro, L.F.B

    2001-01-01

    Thermal evolution of tectonic units and its reflection on neighbouring basins adds importance to the study of some geological regions because this kind of process can be related to the origin of petroleum fields. During the last decade, thermochronology using the fission track method (FTM) in apatite was set up as an useful tool to obtain information from thermal histories (for instance, Rhorman et al., 1996; Amaral et al., 1997; Guedes et al., 2000). Thermal instability of fission tracks in some minerals is the basis of thermochronology by the FTM. In the case of apatite, there is a concordance in the temperature-time interval (∼70-110 o C for several tens of Ma) in which prehistoric forests were transformed in underground petroleum and a measurable shortening of fossil tracks. When spontaneous fission of a 238 U nucleus take place inside a mineral, a disarranged zone is created in the neighboring crystalline lattice (the latent track). This phenomenon is reversible since the atoms that were dislocated due to fission can come back to their original positions as consequence of thermal episodes of geological origin. This process can lead to partial or total reconstruction of the crystalline lattice around a latent track; it is named annealing in the literature. Fission tracks are continuously produced in apatite. Then, those prior to a thermal episode should present shorter lengths than those produced after it. In this way, by measuring the track length distribution at the optical microscope, after a suitable etching, one can obtain information about the thermal history of the region where an apatite sample was collected (Amaral et al., 1997). In spite of the effort carried out to understand track annealing kinetics (for instance, Carlson, 1990; Hadler et al., 2001), this phenomenon is not well known yet. To avoid this difficulty, annealing has been described using empirical models based on the best fitting of experimental data obtained in times compatible with

  6. Thermal and Mechanical Design Aspects of the LIFE Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, R P; Gerhard, M A; Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Morris, K R; Peterson, P F; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-25

    The Laser Inertial confinement fusion - Fission Energy (LIFE) engine encompasses the components of a LIFE power plant responsible for converting the thermal energy of fusion and fission reactions into electricity. The design and integration of these components must satisfy a challenging set of requirements driven by nuclear, thermal, geometric, structural, and materials considerations. This paper details a self-consistent configuration for the LIFE engine along with the methods and technologies selected to meet these stringent requirements. Included is discussion of plant layout, coolant flow dynamics, fuel temperatures, expected structural stresses, power cycle efficiencies, and first wall survival threats. Further research and to understand and resolve outstanding issues is also outlined.

  7. An on-line mass-separator for thermically ionisable fission products: OSTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuensch, K.-D.

    1978-01-01

    A mass separator has been designed and built for the installed at an external neutron guide tube (flux approximately 10 9 nsub(th)/s cm 2 ) of the High Flux Reactor of the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. The ion source consists of a high temperature oven containing fissile target material (approximately 2 g 235 U) embedded in porous carbon. Fission products formed in the target are thermalised in the carbon where only the alkali fission products diffuse quickly to the extraction hole. There only Rb and Cs are thermally ionized. Accelerated to 20 kV, these ions pass through a deflecting magnetic field (rhosub(m) approximately 215 mm, rho=77.5 0 ) for mass analysis and an electrostatic quadrupole to form a 5 mm diameter spot about 1 m outside the concrete shielding. Intensities of some 10 6 atoms per second were reached. The system allows all types of nuclear spectroscopy of Rb, Cs and their β-decay chain daughters as well as the measurement of yields and fission neutrons. It has been in nearly continuous operation for more than two years in Grenoble and first results are reported. (Auth.)

  8. Status of fission yield measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeck, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Fission yield measurement and yield compilation activities in the major laboratories of the world are reviewed. In addition to a general review of the effort of each laboratory, a brief summary of yield measurement activities by fissioning nuclide is presented. A new fast reactor fission yield measurement program being conducted in the US is described

  9. The use of averages and other summation quantities in the testing of evaluated fission product yield and decay data. Applications to ENDF/B(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Averages of some fission product properties can be obtained by multiplying the fission product yield for each fission product by the value of the property (e.g. mass, atomic number, mass defect) for that fission product and summing all significant contributions. These averages can be used to test the reliability of the yield set or provide useful data for reactor calculations. The report gives the derivation of these averages and discusses their application using the ENDF/B(IV) fission product library. The following quantities are treated here: the number of fission products per fission ΣYsub(i); the average mass number and the average number of neutrons per fission; the average atomic number of the stable fission products and the average number of β-decays per fission; the average mass defect of the stable fission products and the total energy release per fission; the average decay energy per fission (beta, gamma and anti-neutrino); the average β-decay energy per fission; individual and group-averaged delayed neutron emission; the total yield for each fission product element. Wherever it is meaningful to do so, a sum is subdivided into its light and heavy mass components. The most significant differences between calculated values based on ENDF/B(IV) and measurements are the β and γ decay energies for 235 U thermal fission and delayed neutron yields for other fissile nuclides, most notably 238 U. (author)

  10. Absolute risk, absolute risk reduction and relative risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Andres Calvache

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article illustrates the epidemiological concepts of absolute risk, absolute risk reduction and relative risk through a clinical example. In addition, it emphasizes the usefulness of these concepts in clinical practice, clinical research and health decision-making process.

  11. Influence of the cosmic-ray induced fission tracks on the fission track of extraterrestric minerals via the 238U spontaneous fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, G.; Thiel, K.

    1977-01-01

    The age determined by counting fission tracks of lunar and meteorite materials is obviously falsified by additional fission track parts not to be accounted for by the spontaneous fission of uranium 238. For this p and n induced fissions of U, Th and other hreavy elements through the cosmic radiation come into consideration. In order to determine the possible part of such interference factors, a simulation experiment at the proton synchrocycloton (CERN, Geneva) has been carried out and independently of this, the production rates for the p and n induced U, Th, Bi, Pb and Au in the surface-near regolith layers of the moon were calculated. It could be seen that the irradiation age as well as the spacial distribution of the heavy metals in the samples to be dated must be considered. (RB) [de

  12. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1983-08-01

    This is the ninth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The eighth issue of this series has been published in July 1982 as INDC(NDS)-130. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1982 and 25 June 1983

  13. Neutron dosimetry for radiation damage in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of materials subjected to the intense neutron radiation fields characteristic of fission power reactors or proposed fusion energy devices is a field of extensive current research. These investigations seek important information relevant to the safety and economics of nuclear energy. In high-level radiation environments, neutron metrology is accomplished predominantly with passive techniques which require detailed knowledge about many nuclear reactions. The quality of neutron dosimetry has increased noticeably during the past decade owing to the availability of new data and evaluations for both integral and differential cross sections, better quantitative understanding of radioactive decay processes, improvements in radiation detection technology, and the development of reliable spectrum unfolding procedures. However, there are problems caused by the persistence of serious integral-differential discrepancies for several important reactions. There is a need to further develop the data base for exothermic and low-threshold reactions needed in thermal and fast-fission dosimetry, and for high-threshold reactions needed in fusion-energy dosimetry. The unsatisfied data requirements for fission reactor dosimetry appear to be relatively modest and well defined, while the needs for fusion are extensive and less well defined because of the immature state of fusion technology. These various data requirements are examined with the goal of providing suggestions for continued dosimetry-related nuclear data research

  14. Properties of Fission-Product decay heat from Minor-Actinide fissioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hideki

    2000-01-01

    The aggregate Fission-Product (FP) decay heat after a pulse fission is examined for Minor Actinide (MA) fissiles 237 Np, 241 Am, 243 Am, 242 Cm and 244 Cm. We find that the MA decay heat is comparable but smaller than that of 235 U except for cooling times at about 10 8 s (approx. = 3 y). At these cooling times, either the β or γ component of the FP decay heat for these MA's is substantially larger than the one for 235 U. This difference is found to originate from the cumulative fission yield of 106 Ru (T 1/2 = 3.2x10 7 s). This nuclide is the parent of 106 Rh (T 1/2 = 29.8 s) which is the dominant source of the decay heat at 10 8 s (approx. = 3 y). The fission yield is nearly an increasing function of the fissile mass number so that the FP decay heat is the largest for 244 Cm among the MA's at the cooling time. (author)

  15. Mirror fusion--fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The fusion-fission concept and the mirror fusion-fission hybrid program are outlined. Magnetic mirror fusion drivers and blankets for hybrid reactors are discussed. Results of system analyses are presented and a reference design is described

  16. Comparison of fission probabilities with emission of long range particles under the action of slow and fast neutrons on various materials; Probabilites comparees de fission avec emission de particules de long parcours pour divers materiaux sous l'action des neutrons lents et rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netter, F; Faraggi, H; Garin-Bonnet, A; Julien, J; Corge, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Turkiewicz, J [Institut de Recherches Nucleaire de Varsovie (Poland)

    1958-07-01

    The authors describe relative cross-section measurements of fission of the isotopes of uranium and plutonium (more particularly {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu), with emission of long range particles, under the action of neutrons of various energies: thermal neutrons, pile neutrons, neutrons produced with the Van de Graaff accelerator by reaction of protons on tritium. The measurements are carried out: 1) with the aid of photographic plates, by submitting to the action of the neutrons a layer of fissile material coupled with an Ilford nuclear emulsion of 200 microns; a tin sheet laying between the plate and the layer stops the {alpha} particles and the fission fragments. By an appropriate development the tracks of the long range particles can be distinguished in the emulsion, from the tracks of the recoil protons resulting of fission neutrons, or of the last primary neutrons. For neutrons of energy under 1 MeV, the compared frequency of the tracks of long range particles and of the recoils caused by the fission neutrons gives a measurement of the fission cross-section with emission of long range particles relative to the product of the fission cross-section by the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission. For neutrons of higher energy, one measures only the frequency of the tracks of long range particles, comparatively with the flux of primary neutrons. Some precautions are taken to eliminate the action of thermal neutrons in the measurements with fast neutrons. 2) with the aid of a system of ionization chamber and proportional counter, the rate of coincidence between the impulsions caused by the long range particles and the impulsions provided by one of the fission fragments is measured comparatively with the counting rate of fission fragme (author) [French] Les auteurs decrivent des mesures relatives a la section efficace de fission des isotopes de l'uranium et du plutonium (notamment {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu) avec emission de particules de long

  17. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission; Detection des fragments de fission par emission secondaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audias, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author) [French] Le detecteur de fragments de fission que nous avons realise est base sur le principe de l'emission secondaire produite par les fragments de fission traversant une feuille mince: les electrons secondaires emis sont acceleres a des tensions telles (de l'ordre de 10 kV), qu'ils soient directement detectables par un scintillateur plastique associe a un photomultiplicateur. L'interet d'un tel detecteur reside: dans sa rapidite, sa tres bonne discrimination alpha, fission, la possibilite de detecter les fragments de fission avec une perte d'energie pouvant rester relativement faible, et la possibilite d'introduire des quantites de matiere fissile plus importantes que dans les autres types de detecteurs. Ce travail comporte: -) un apercu bibliographique de la theorie du phenomene, -) realisation et mise au point du detecteur avec etude experimentale de quelques parametres intervenant dans l'emission secondaire, -) etude de l'emission secondaire (sur la face d'emergence des fragments de fission) en fonction de l'energie du fragment et en fonction de l'epaisseur de matiere traversee avant emission secondaire, et -) une etude comparative de l'emission secondaire sur la face d'incidence et sur la face d'emergence des fragments de

  18. Monte carlo sampling of fission multiplicity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, J. S. (John S.)

    2004-01-01

    Two new methods have been developed for fission multiplicity modeling in Monte Carlo calculations. The traditional method of sampling neutron multiplicity from fission is to sample the number of neutrons above or below the average. For example, if there are 2.7 neutrons per fission, three would be chosen 70% of the time and two would be chosen 30% of the time. For many applications, particularly {sup 3}He coincidence counting, a better estimate of the true number of neutrons per fission is required. Generally, this number is estimated by sampling a Gaussian distribution about the average. However, because the tail of the Gaussian distribution is negative and negative neutrons cannot be produced, a slight positive bias can be found in the average value. For criticality calculations, the result of rejecting the negative neutrons is an increase in k{sub eff} of 0.1% in some cases. For spontaneous fission, where the average number of neutrons emitted from fission is low, the error also can be unacceptably large. If the Gaussian width approaches the average number of fissions, 10% too many fission neutrons are produced by not treating the negative Gaussian tail adequately. The first method to treat the Gaussian tail is to determine a correction offset, which then is subtracted from all sampled values of the number of neutrons produced. This offset depends on the average value for any given fission at any energy and must be computed efficiently at each fission from the non-integrable error function. The second method is to determine a corrected zero point so that all neutrons sampled between zero and the corrected zero point are killed to compensate for the negative Gaussian tail bias. Again, the zero point must be computed efficiently at each fission. Both methods give excellent results with a negligible computing time penalty. It is now possible to include the full effects of fission multiplicity without the negative Gaussian tail bias.

  19. Innovative nuclear thermal propulsion technology evaluation: Results of the NASA/DOE Task Team study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.; Borowski, S.; Helms, I.; Diaz, N.; Anghaie, S.; Latham, T.

    1991-01-01

    In response to findings from two NASA/DOE nuclear propulsion workshops held in the summer of 1990, six task teams were formed to continue evaluation of various nuclear propulsion concepts. The Task Team on Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) created the Innovative Concepts Subpanel to evaluate thermal propulsion concepts which did not utilize solid fuel. The Subpanel endeavored to evaluate each of the concepts on a ''level technological playing field,'' and to identify critical technologies, issues, and early proof-of-concept experiments. The concepts included the liquid core fission, the gas core fission, the fission foil reactors, explosively driven systems, fusion, and antimatter. The results of the studies by the panel will be provided. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Systematics of Fission-Product Yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Empirical equations representing systematics of fission-product yields have been derived from experimental data. The systematics give some insight into nuclear-structure effects on yields, and the equations allow estimation of yields from fission of any nuclide with atomic number Z F = 90 thru 98, mass number A F = 230 thru 252, and precursor excitation energy (projectile kinetic plus binding energies) PE = 0 thru ∼200 MeV--the ranges of these quantities for the fissioning nuclei investigated. Calculations can be made with the computer program CYFP. Estimates of uncertainties in the yield estimates are given by equations, also in CYFP, and range from ∼ 15% for the highest yield values to several orders of magnitude for very small yield values. A summation method is used to calculate weighted average parameter values for fast-neutron (∼ fission spectrum) induced fission reactions

  1. Systematics of Fission-Product Yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.C. Wahl

    2002-05-01

    Empirical equations representing systematics of fission-product yields have been derived from experimental data. The systematics give some insight into nuclear-structure effects on yields, and the equations allow estimation of yields from fission of any nuclide with atomic number Z{sub F} = 90 thru 98, mass number A{sub F} = 230 thru 252, and precursor excitation energy (projectile kinetic plus binding energies) PE = 0 thru {approx}200 MeV--the ranges of these quantities for the fissioning nuclei investigated. Calculations can be made with the computer program CYFP. Estimates of uncertainties in the yield estimates are given by equations, also in CYFP, and range from {approx} 15% for the highest yield values to several orders of magnitude for very small yield values. A summation method is used to calculate weighted average parameter values for fast-neutron ({approx} fission spectrum) induced fission reactions.

  2. Thermal Conductivity Measurement and Analysis of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Lee, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix in comparison with the current commercial UO2 fuel system of LWR. In addition to a safety enhancement of FCM fuel, thermal conductivity of SiC ceramic matrix is better than that of UO2 fuel. Because the centerline temperature of FCM fuel is lower than that of the current UO2 fuel due to the difference of thermal conductivity of fuel, an operational release of fission products from the fuel can be reduced. SiC ceramic has attracted for nuclear fuel application due to its high thermal conductivity properties with good radiation tolerant properties, a low neutron absorption cross-section and a high corrosion resistance. Thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composite depends on the thermal conductivity of each component and the morphology of reinforcement materials such as fibers and particles. There are many results about thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composite like as SiCf/SiC composite. Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with the volume fraction of TRISO particles were measured and analyzed by analytical models. Polycrystalline SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with TRISO particles were fabricated by hot press sintering with sintering additives. Thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets with TRISO particles of 0 vol.%, 10 vol.%, 20 vol.%, 30 vol.% and 40 vol.% show 68.4, 52.3, 46.8, 43.0 and 34.5 W/mK, respectively. As the volume fraction of TRISO particles increased, the measured thermal conductivity values closely followed the prediction of Maxwell's equation

  3. Distribution of nuclear charge in the proton-induced fission of Th-232

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, B D [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Foster, J S; Yaffe, L [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1958-09-15

    A great deal of work has been done on the distribution of nuclear mass in the fission process. About the nuclear charge distribution less is known. Data exist on the distribution from the fission of U-235 with thermal neutrons and with 14 Mev neutrons. Data also exist for the fission of uranium by 170 Mev protons, of bismuth by 190 Mev deuterons, and of uranium, thorium and bismuth by 480 Mev protons, and there is fragmentary information from other systems. The present work was undertaken to investigate the changes that occur in the charge distribution from proton-induced fission of Th-232 as the bombarding energy is raised from 8 to 90 Mev, the maximum proton energy of the McGill synchrocyclotron. This energy range is of interest in view of the substantial changes observed in the mass distribution. Also in this interval a change presumably begins in the nature of the initial step in nuclear reactions, from simple compound-nucleus formation, to a mechanism of direct interaction with individual nucleons. Thus at the lower energies studied, excitation of the nuclei at the end of the first step of the reaction will be essentially monochromatic whereas at the higher end of the bombarding-energy range, a broad spectrum of excitation energies will be produced, with corresponding complexity of the reaction products observed. (author)

  4. Asymmetry in ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons and fission mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunakov, V.E.; Gennenvajn, F.; Dzhessinger, P.; Mutterer, M.; Petrov, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    The results of measuring the P-odd, P-even (right-left) and T-odd asymmetries of the charged particles emission in the double and ternary fission, induced by the polarized neutrons, are considered. It is shown, what kind of information on the mechanism of the ternary nuclear fission may be obtained from the theoretical analysis of these data [ru

  5. Detection of fission signatures induced by a low-energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocherashvili, A.; Becka, A.; Mayorovb, V.; Roesgen, E.; Crochemoreb, J.-M.; Mosconi, M.; Pedersen, B.; Heger, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for the detection of special nuclear materials (SNM) in shielded containers which is both sensitive and applicable under field conditions. The method uses an external pulsed neutron source to induce fission in SNM and subsequent detection of the fast prompt fission neutrons. The detectors surrounding the container under investigation are liquid scintillation detectors able to distinguish gamma rays from fast neutrons by means of the pulse shape discrimination method (PSD). One advantage of these detectors, besides the ability for PSD analysis, is that the analogue signal from a detection event is of very short duration (typically few tens of nanoseconds). This allows the use of very short coincidence gates for the detection of the prompt fission neutrons in multiple detectors while benefiting from a low accidental (background) coincidence rate yielding a low detection limit. Another principle advantage of this method derives from the fact that the external neutron source is pulsed. By proper time gating the interrogation can be conducted by epithermal and thermal source neutrons only. These source neutrons do not appear in the fast neutron signal following the PSD analysis thus providing a fundamental method for separating the interrogating source neutrons from the sample response in form of fast fission neutrons. The paper describes laboratory tests with a configuration of eight detectors in the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA). The sensitivity of the coincidence signal to fissile mass is investigated for different sample configurations and interrogation regimes.

  6. Fission track dating: methodology and thermo-chronological applications in alpine and continental margin contexts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabil, N.

    1995-06-01

    The fission track dating method has proved to be unique in thermo-chronology by its capability to describe the final phases of the cooling history and denudation of metamorphic massifs, like the thermal history of sedimentary formations or the dating of some volcanic materials. In this work we describe this method and present a series of new analytic techniques and calibrations which we realised in the aim of further use in geology. We discuss a few examples of such applications. In the french Occidental Alps, the analysis of fission track on apatite samples from the granites of the Sept Laux (Belledonne massif), in the Eau d' Olle valley, suggests that this method could bring a contribution to the actual discussion about the origin of some alpine valleys. The fission track method suggests that the opening of this valley could be the consequence of an active faulting from the middle Miocene until the present. The characterization of fluvial deposits through their detrital apatites fission tracks record could eventually be used to study river captures related to changes tectonic regimes. Therefore we studied the apatites of a paleo-delta located in the Isere middle valley at the sub-alpine 'sillon' level, and of two valleys, those of the Arc and of the Breda, located up the delta. The distribution of the fission track ages of those mineraIs has not confirmed a previously suggested model, which proposed that the studied paleo-delta could be associated with a paleo-Arc rather than a paleo-Breda. In the Moroccan Occidental Meseta, three granitic massifs located in the Rehamna have been selected for a thermo-chronological study. The analysis of the fission track in zircons and apatites of these granites recorded the thermo-tectonic events which have affected the Meseta ever since the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean some 200 Ma ago. We show how a numerical simulation model recently (1994) proposed for the analysis of fission track in apatites allows us to specify

  7. Relativistic Coulomb Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear fission reactions induced by the electromagnetic field of relativistic nuclei are studied for energies relevant to present and future relativistic heavy ion accelerators. Cross sections are calculated for U-238 and Pu-239 fission induced by C-12, Si-28, Au-197, and U-238 projectiles. It is found that some of the cross sections can exceed 10 b.

  8. Decay Curves and Half-Lives of Gamma-Emitting States from a Study of Prompt Fission Gamma Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albinsson, H [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (SE)

    1971-04-15

    Measurements were made on the time distributions of the prompt gamma radiation emitted from fragments in the thermal-neutron induced fission of 235U. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fragments. In this way decay curves were obtained from which half-lives could be estimated. Time components with half-lives of 7.5, 18 and 60 ps were found and their relative intensities were calculated. Half-lives and associated intensities are in good agreement with earlier data from uranium and californium fission. Problems involved in this type of study are discussed. The collimator technique has proved to be effective for determination of half lives down to less than 10 ps

  9. Fission-product source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    This presentation consists of a review of fission-product source terms for light water reactor (LWR) fuel. A source term is the quantity of fission products released under specified conditions that can be used to calculate the consequences of the release. The source term usually defines release from breached fuel-rod cladding but could also describe release from the primary coolant system, the reactor containment shell, or the site boundary. The source term would be different for each locality, and the chemical and physical forms of the fission products could also differ

  10. Burn-up determination of irradiated thoria samples by isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jaison, P.G.; Telmore, V.M.; Shah, R.V.; Sant, V.L.; Sasibhushan, K.; Parab, A.R.; Alamelu, D.

    2010-03-01

    Burn-up was determined experimentally using thermal ionization mass spectrometry for two samples from ThO 2 bundles irradiated in KAPS-2. This involved quantitative dissolution of the irradiated fuel samples followed by separation and determination of Th, U and a stable fission product burn-up monitor in the dissolved fuel solution. Stable fission product 148 Nd was used as a burn-up monitor for determining the number of fissions. Isotope Dilution-Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ID-TIMS) using natural U, 229 Th and enriched 142 Nd as spikes was employed for the determination of U, Th and Nd, respectively. Atom % fission values of 1.25 ± 0.03 were obtained for both the samples. 232 U content in 233 U determined by alpha spectrometry was about 500 ppm and this was higher by a factor of 5 compared to the theoretically predicted value by ORIGEN-2 code. (author)

  11. Monitoring the fast neutrons in a high flux: The case for 242Pu fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Oriol, L.; Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.

    2009-01-01

    Fission chambers are widely used for on-line monitoring of neutron fluxes in irradiation reactors. A selective measurement of a component of interest of the neutron flux is possible in principle thanks to a careful choice of the deposit material. However, measuring the fast component is challenging when the flux is high (up to 10 15 n/cm 2 /s) with a significant thermal component. The main problem is that the isotopic content of a material selected for its good response to fast neutrons evolves with irradiation, so that the material is more and more sensitive to thermal neutrons. Within the framework of the FNDS (Fast Neutron Detector System) project, we design tools that simulate the evolution of the isotopic composition and fission rate for several deposits under any given flux. In the case of a high flux with a significant thermal component, 242 Pu is shown after a comprehensive study of all possibilities to be the best choice for measuring the fast component, as long as its purity is sufficient. If an estimate of the thermal flux is independently available, one can correct the signal for that component. This suggests a system of two detectors, one of which being used for such a correction. It is of very high interest when the detectors must be operated up to a high neutron fluence. (authors)

  12. Nuclear fission studies: from LOHENGRIN to FIPPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chebboubi, Abdelaziz

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fission consists in splitting a nucleus, in general an actinide, into smaller nuclei. Despite nuclear fission was discovered in 1939 by Hahn and Strassman, fission models cannot predict the fission observables with an acceptable accuracy for nuclear fuel cycle studies for instance. Improvement of fission models is an important issue for the knowledge of the process itself and for the applications. To reduce uncertainties of the nuclear data used in a nuclear reactor simulation, a validation of the models hypothesis is mandatory. In this work, two features of the nuclear fission were investigated in order to test the resistance of the theories. One aspect is the study of the symmetric fission fragments through the measurement of their yield and kinetic energy distribution. The other aspect is the study of the fission fragment angular momentum.Two techniques are available to assess the angular momentum of a fission fragment. The first one is to look at the properties of the prompt gamma. The new spectrometer FIPPS (Fission Product Prompt gamma-ray Spectrometer), is currently under development at the ILL and will combine a fission filter with a large array of gamma and neutron detectors in order to respond to these issues. The first part of this work is dedicated to the study of the properties of a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM) which is the type of fission filter considered for the FIPPS project.The second part of this work deals with the measurement of isomeric yields and evaluations of the angular momentum distribution of fission fragments. The study of the spherical nucleus 132 Sn shed the light on the current limits of fission models. Finally, the last part of this work is about the measurement of the yields and kinetic energy distributions of symmetric fission fragments. Since models predict the existence of fission modes, the symmetry region is a suitable choice to investigate this kind of prediction. In parallel with all these studies, an emphasis on the

  13. Generalized Energy-Dependent Q Values for Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R

    2010-03-31

    We extend Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q value for major and minor actinides on the incident neutron energies in the range 0 {le} E{sub n} {le} 20 MeV. Our parameterization is based on the actinide evaluations recommended for the ENDF/B-VII.1 release. This paper describes the calculation of energydependent fission Q values based on the calculation of the prompt energy release in fission by Madland. This calculation was adopted for use in the LLNL ENDL database and then generalized to obtain the prompt fission energy release for all actinides. Here the calculation is further generalized to the total energy release in fission. There are several stages in a fission event, depending on the time scale. Neutrons and gammas may be emitted at any time during the fission event.While our discussion here is focussed on compound nucleus creation by an incident neutron, similar parameterizations could be obtained for incident gammas or spontaneous fission.

  14. New fission-neutron-spectrum representation for ENDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1982-04-01

    A new representation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum is proposed for use in the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The proposal is made because a new theory exists by which the spectrum can be accurately predicted as a function of the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy. Thus, prompt fission neutron spectra can be calculated for cases where no measurements exist or where measurements are not possible. The mathematical formalism necessary for application of the new theory within ENDF is presented and discussed for neutron-induced fission and spontaneous fission. In the case of neutron-induced fission, expressions are given for the first-chance, second-chance, third-chance, and fourth-chance fission components of the spectrum together with that for the total spectrum. An ENDF format is proposed for the new fission spectrum representation, and an example of the use of the format is given

  15. IFPE/IFA-432, Fission Gas Release, Mechanical Interaction BWR Fuel Rods, Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Description: It contains data from experiments that have been performed at the IFE/OECD Halden Reactor Project, available for use in fuel performance studies. It covers experiments on thermal performance, fission product release, clad properties and pellet clad mechanical interaction. It includes also experimental data relevant to high burn-up behaviour. IFA-432: Measurements of fuel temperature response, fission gas release and mechanical interaction on BWR-type fuel rods up to high burn-ups. The assembly featured several variations in rod design parameters, including fuel type, fuel/cladding gap size, fill gas composition (He and Xe) and fuel stability. It contained 6 BWR-type fuel rods with fuel centre thermocouples at two horizontal planes, rods were also equipped with pressure transducers and cladding extensometers. Only data from 6 rods are compiled here

  16. Thermo chronology by the fission track method of a passive marge (Ponta Grossa dome in south-eastern Brazil) and within a collision chain (external zone of the alpine arch in France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros Vignol Lelarge, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The dating method by counting fission tracks on apatite (this rock is a geo-thermometer sensitive to weak temperature changes below 150 Celsius degrees) is an efficient tool for the thermal history of rocks. We have used this method in 2 different geological contexts: the Ponta Grossa dome in south-eastern Brazil and the alpine mountain in France. This dating method is based on the fact that some rocks like mica keep fossil remains of the passage of the fission products emitted during the simultaneous fission of uranium 238 present in the rock. This method requires the irradiation in a slow neutron flux of the sample because the initial quantity of uranium is unknown. The age t of the sample is given by the formula: t=(1/l 1 )*ln[1+(r s /r i )*(l 2 /l 1 )*F*σ*I] where: l 1 is the alpha decay constant of U 238 ; l 2 is the simultaneous fission decay constant of U 238 , r s is the number of fission tracks in the sample before the irradiation; r i is the number of fission tracks induced by the irradiation; F is the thermal neutron flux; σ is the thermal fission cross-section of U 235 ; and I is the isotopic rate U 235 /U 238 . This document is divided into 4 chapters. The first chapter presents the general principle of the method, the mechanisms capable of producing fission tracks and the techniques used to make these tracks visible with an optical microscope. The second chapter deals with the conditions of the irradiation and the calibration of the method. The 2 last chapters are dedicated to the applications to the 2 geological contexts. (A.C.)

  17. Device for measuring fission product density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Mitsunori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the fission product density of xenon or the like and enable measurement of real time of fission product density in a reactor by calculating the disintegration and annihilation of the fission product on the basis of neutron detected output. Constitution: The neutron flux in a reactor is detected by a detector, and applied to first and second density calculators. Second fission product density signal of xenon or the like outputted from first device is again inputted to the device to form an annihilation signal due to disintegration to determine the present density of the second fission product of xenon or the like corresponding to the decrease of the neutron due to the poison of xeron or the like. Similarly, second device determines the first fission product density of iodine or the like. (Sekiya, K.)

  18. Natural fission reactors from Gabon. Contribution to the study of the conditions of stability of a natural radioactive wastes storage site (2 Ga)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourcelot, L.

    1997-01-01

    The natural fission reactors of Oklo consists of a core of uraninite (60%) with fission products, embedded in a pure clay matrix. Thus, the aim of geological, mineral, and geochemical studies of the Oklo Reactors is to assess the behaviour of fission products in an artificial waste depository. Previous studies have shown that Reactor Zone 10, located in the Oklo mine, represents an example for an exceptional confinement of fission products since 2 Ga. In reactor Zone 9, located in Oklo open pit, migrations are more important. Reactor ZOne 13 was influenced by a thermal event due to a doleritic intrusion, located some twenty meters far away, one Ga years after fission reaction operations. In this study,we characterized temperature and redox conditions of fluids by using stable isotopes of uraninites and clays. Moreover mineralogical and chemical characteristics were defined. (author)

  19. Fission cross section and fission fragment angular distribution for oriented nucleus fission by intermediate energy neutrons (epsilon < or approximately 1 Mev)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    General analysis is conducted, and formulae for fission cross section and angular distribution of fission fragments of oriented nuclei by fast neutrons are presented. Geometrical coefficients making up the formulae permitting to carry out calculations for target nuclei with spins I=3/2, 5/2, 7/2 at interaction energies epsilon < or approximately 1 MeV are tabulated. Results of demonstrative calculation of fission fragment angular distribution of oriented sup(235)U nuclei by 0.1 <= epsilon <= 1.0 MeV neutrons reveal that angular distribution weakly depends on the set of permeability factors of neutron waves applied in the calculations

  20. High-power proton linac for transmuting the long-lived fission products in nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    High power proton linacs are being considered at Los Alamos as drivers for high-flux spallation neutron sources that can be used to transmute the troublesome long-lived fission products in defense nuclear waste. The transmutation scheme being studied provides a high flux (> 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}{minus}s) of thermal neutrons, which efficiently converts fission products to stable or short-lived isotopes. A medium-energy proton linac with an average beam power of about 110 MW can burn the accumulated Tc99 and I129 inventory at the DOE's Hanford Site within 30 years. Preliminary concepts for this machine are described. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Contribution to the study of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serot, O.

    2009-09-01

    The author proposes an overview of his research activity during the past fifteen years and more particularly that dealing with nuclear fission. The first part reports works on nucleus physics at the scission via the investigation of ternary fission (experimental procedure, influence of fission modes, influence of resonance spin, influence of excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus, emission probabilities, energy spectra of ternary alphas and tritons, emission mechanism). The second part reports measurements and assessments of neutron-induced fission cross sections. The third part reports the investigation of some properties of fission products (efficiencies, branching ratios of the main delayed neutron precursors)

  2. Fission cross sections of plutonium-239 and plutonium-242 relative to uranium-285 from 0. 1 to 10 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.W.

    1978-12-01

    Measurement of the ratio of the fission cross sections of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 242/Pu to that of /sup 235/U is reported. The sources of neutrons were the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be and D(d,n)/sup 3/He reactions. The ratio of the masses of the samples was determined by low geometry alpha counting and from relative thermal fission rates. The results are compared with other measurements. 19 references.

  3. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-05-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approximately 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium-thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breder-converter reactor scenario

  4. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-01-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approx. 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium--thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breeder-converter reactor scenario

  5. A small flat fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yijun; Wang Dalun; Chen Suhe

    1999-01-01

    With fission materials of depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, 239 Pu, and 237 Np, the authors have designed and made a series of small flat fission chamber. The authors narrated the construction of the fission chamber and its technological process of manufacture, and furthermore, the authors have measured and discussed the follow correct factor, self-absorption, boundary effect, threshold loss factor, bottom scatter and or so

  6. 50 years of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilscher, D.

    1989-01-01

    The article tells the story of the discovery of nuclear fission in Berlin 50 years ago by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in cooperation with Lise Meitner. 50 years later nuclear fission is still a subject of research. Some question remain unanswered. Selected new research results are used to discuss the dynamics of the collective movement of the elementary nuclear fission process. (orig.) [de

  7. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e - ). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  8. Fission gas detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colburn, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by failed fuel rods which device uses a filter adapted to pass coolant but to block passage of fission gas bubbles due to the surface tension of the bubbles. The coolant may be liquid metal. (author)

  9. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  10. Absolute and convective instability of a liquid sheet with transverse temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Qing-Fei; Yang, Li-Jun; Tong, Ming-Xi; Wang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The spatial–temporal instability of a liquid sheet with thermal effects was studied. • The flow can transit to absolutely unstable with certain flow parameters. • The effects of non-dimensional parameters on the transition were studied. -- Abstract: The spatial–temporal instability behavior of a viscous liquid sheet with temperature difference between the two surfaces was investigated theoretically. The practical situation motivating this investigation is liquid sheet heated by ambient gas, usually encountered in industrial heat transfer and liquid propellant rocket engines. The existing dispersion relation was used, to explore the spatial–temporal instability of viscous liquid sheets with a nonuniform temperature profile, by setting both the wave number and frequency complex. A parametric study was performed in both sinuous and varicose modes to test the influence of dimensionless numbers on the transition between absolute and convective instability of the flow. For a small value of liquid Weber number, or a great value of gas-to-liquid density ratio, the flow was found to be absolutely unstable. The absolute instability was enhanced by increasing the liquid viscosity. It was found that variation of the Marangoni number hardly influenced the absolute instability of the sinuous mode of oscillations; however it slightly affected the absolute instability in the varicose mode

  11. Shell effects in fission and quasi-fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itkis, M.G. E-mail: itkis@flnr.jinr.ru; Aeystoe, J.; Beghini, S.; Bogachev, A.A.; Corradi, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Gadea, A.; Giardina, G.; Hanappe, F.; Itkis, I.M.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Khlebnikov, S.V.; Kniajeva, G.N.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Kozulin, E.M.; Krupa, L.; Latina, A.; Materna, T.; Montagnoli, G.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Pokrovsky, I.V.; Prokhorova, E.V.; Rowley, N.; Rubchenya, V.A.; Rusanov, A.Ya.; Sagaidak, R.N.; Scarlassara, F.; Stefanini, A.M.; Stuttge, L.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Trzaska, W.H.; Vakhtin, D.N.; Vinodkumar, A.M.; Voskressenski, V.M.; Zagrebaev, V.I

    2004-04-05

    Results of the experiments aimed at the study of fission and quasi-fission processes in the reactions {sup 12}C+{sup 204}Pb, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144,154}Sm, {sup 168}Er, {sup 208}Pb, {sup 244}Pu, {sup 248}Cm; {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb, {sup 244}Pu, {sup 248}Cm, and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 186}W, {sup 242}Pu are presented in the work. The choice of the above-mentioned reactions was inspired by recent experiments on the production of the isotopes {sup 283}112, {sup 289}114 and {sup 283}116 at Dubna [1],[2] using the same reactions. The {sup 58}Fe and {sup 64}Ni projectiles were chosen since the corresponding projectile-target combinations lead to the synthesis of even heavier elements. The experiments were carried out at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Russia), the XTU Tandem accelerator of the National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL, Italy) and the Accelerator of the Laboratory of University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL, Finland) using the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET[3] and the neutron multi-detector DEMON[4],[5]. The role of shell effects and the influence of the entrance channel on the mechanism of the compound nucleus fusion-fission and the competitive process of quasi-fission are discussed.

  12. The FRS Ion Catcher : A facility for high-precision experiments with stopped projectile and fission fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass, W. R.; Dickel, T.; Purushothaman, S.; Dendooven, P.; Geissel, H.; Ebert, J.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Ranjan, M.; Reiter, M. P.; Weick, H.; Amjad, F.; Ayet, S.; Diwisch, M.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Greiner, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lang, J.; Moore, I.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Petrick, M.; Pfuetzner, M.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rink, A. -K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Schaefer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Winfield, J. S.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    At the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI, projectile and fission fragments are produced at relativistic energies, separated in-flight, range-focused, slowed down and thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell. A multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) is used to perform direct mass

  13. Inverted Apatite (U-Th)/He and Fission-track Dates from the Rae craton, Baffin Island, Canada and Implications for Apatite Radiation Damage-He Diffusivity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. K.; Reiners, P. W.; Thomson, S. N.; Miller, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track (AFT) thermochronology data from the same sample can be used to decipher complex low temperature thermal histories and evaluate compatibility between these two methods. Existing apatite He damage-diffusivity models parameterize radiation damage annealing as fission-track annealing and yield inverted apatite He and AFT dates for samples with prolonged residence in the He partial retention zone. Apatite chemistry also impacts radiation damage and fission-track annealing, temperature sensitivity, and dates in both systems. We present inverted apatite He and AFT dates from the Rae craton, Baffin Island, Canada, that cannot be explained by apatite chemistry or existing damage-diffusivity and fission track models. Apatite He dates from 34 individual analyses from 6 samples range from 237 ± 44 Ma to 511 ± 25 Ma and collectively define a positive date-eU relationship. AFT dates from these same samples are 238 ± 15 Ma to 350 ± 20 Ma. These dates and associated track length data are inversely correlated and define the left segment of a boomerang diagram. Three of the six samples with 20-90 ppm eU apatite grains yield apatite He and AFT dates inverted by 300 million years. These samples have average apatite Cl chemistry of ≤0.02 wt.%, with no correlation between Cl content and Dpar. Thermal history simulations using geologic constraints, an apatite He radiation damage accumulation and annealing model, apatite He dates with the range of eU values, and AFT date and track length data, do not yield any viable time-temperature paths. Apatite He and AFT data modeled separately predict thermal histories with Paleozoic-Mesozoic peaks reheating temperatures differing by ≥15 °C. By modifying the parameter controlling damage annealing (Rmr0) from the canonical 0.83 to 0.5-0.6, forward models reproduce the apatite He date-eU correlation and AFT dates with a common thermal history. Results imply apatite radiation damage anneals at

  14. A position sensitive parallel plate avalanche fission detector for use in particle induced fission coincidence measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plicht, J. van der

    1980-01-01

    A parallel plate avalanche detector developed for the detection of fission fragments in particle induced fission reactions is described. The active area is 6 × 10 cm2; it is position sensitive in one dimension with a resolution of 2.5 mm. The detector can withstand a count rate of 25000 fission

  15. Physics of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1989-06-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the Physics of Neutron Emission in Fission, Mito City (Japan), 24-27 May 1988. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers cover the following topics: Energy dependence of the number of fission neutrons ν-bar (3 papers), multiplicity distribution of fission neutrons (3 papers), competition between neutron and γ-ray emission (4 papers), the fission neutron yield in resonances (2 papers) and the energy spectrum of fission neutrons in experiment (9 papers), theory (4 papers) and evaluation (1 paper). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.

    1975-01-01

    This is the first issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND), published every six months by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Its purpose is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields; neutron cross-section data of fission products; data related to β-, γ-decay of fission products; delayed neutron data; and fission product decay-heat. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS before 1 November 1975

  17. In-Pile Sub-Miniature Fission Chambers Testing in BR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeeren, L.; Wéber, M.; Blandin, Ch.; Breaud, S.

    2003-06-01

    Three innovative sub-miniature fission chambers (SMFC), designed and manufactured at the Nuclear Measurement Systems Laboratory (LSMN) of CEA/Cadarache, were extensively tested in the BR2 research reactor at SCK•CEN, Mol. We present the experimental results for the (thermal) neutron sensitivity, the gamma-induced signal, the signal due to activation, the current picked up by the signal cable, the global current/voltage characteristics and the long term behaviour up to a thermal neutron fluence of 2.7·1021 n/cm2. We also compare the data with results from calculations with our FCD computer code. The onset of the saturation domain is well predicted by FCD; the neutron sensitivities can be accounted for perfectly after a refinement of the FCD model.

  18. Irradiation effects and behaviour of fission products in zirconia and spinel; Effets d'irradiation et comportement des produits de fission dans la zircone et le spinelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentils, A

    2003-10-01

    Crystalline oxides, such as zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) and spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}), are promising inert matrices for the transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides. This work deals with the study of the physico-chemical properties of these matrices, more specifically their behaviour under irradiation and their capacity to retain fission products. Irradiations at low energy and incorporation of stable analogs of fission products (Cs, I, Xe) into yttria-stabilized zirconia and magnesium-aluminate spinel single crystals were performed by using the ion implanter IRMA (CSNSM-Orsay). Irradiations at high energy were made on several heavy ion accelerators (GANIL-Caen, ISL-Berlin, HIL-Warsaw). The damage induced by irradiation and the release of fission products were monitored by in situ Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry experiments. Transmission electron microscopy was also used in order to determine the nature of the damage induced by irradiation. The results show that irradiation of ZrO{sub 2} and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} with heavy ions (about hundred keV and about hundred MeV) induces a huge structural damage in crystalline matrices. Total disorder (amorphization) is however never reached in zirconia, contrary to what is observed in the case of spinel. The results also emphasize the essential role played by the concentration of implanted species on their retention capacity. A dramatic release of fission products was observed when the concentration exceeds a threshold of a few atomic percent. Irradiation of implanted samples with medium-energy noble-gas ions leads to an enhancement of the fission product release. The exfoliation of spinel crystals implanted at high concentration of Cs ions is observed after a thermal treatment at high temperature. (author)

  19. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular ... alent to the assumption that fission is delayed, namely, that the fission probability is not .... parameters to be adjusted on the experimental data. ..... (b) Time distribution of all fission events for the 132Ce nucleus.

  20. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1982-07-01

    This is the eighth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. Therefore, the IAEA cannot be held responsible for the information contained nor for any consequences resulting from the use of this information. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The seventh issue of this series has been published in July 1981 as INDC(NDS)-116. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1981 and 15 June 1982