WorldWideScience

Sample records for absolute single-molecule entropies

  1. A family of 'windmill'-like {Cu6Ln12} complexes exhibiting single-molecule magnetism behavior and large magnetic entropy changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandropoulos, Dimitris I; Poole, Katye M; Cunha-Silva, Luis; Ahmad Sheikh, Javeed; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Christou, George; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2017-03-31

    A family of nanosized {Cu6Ln12} clusters with a 'windmill'-like topology was prepared from the employment of 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime, in conjunction with bridging N3(-), in 3d/4f-metal chemistry; the octadecanuclear compounds exhibit single-molecule magnetism behavior and large magnetic entropy changes, depending on the 4f-metal ion present.

  2. Classic maximum entropy recovery of the average joint distribution of apparent FRET efficiency and fluorescence photons for single-molecule burst measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Matthew S; Gull, Stephen F; Johnson, Carey K

    2012-04-05

    We describe a method for analysis of single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) burst measurements using classic maximum entropy. Classic maximum entropy determines the Bayesian inference for the joint probability describing the total fluorescence photons and the apparent FRET efficiency. The method was tested with simulated data and then with DNA labeled with fluorescent dyes. The most probable joint distribution can be marginalized to obtain both the overall distribution of fluorescence photons and the apparent FRET efficiency distribution. This method proves to be ideal for determining the distance distribution of FRET-labeled biomolecules, and it successfully predicts the shape of the recovered distributions.

  3. Digital encoding of cellular mRNAs enabling precise and absolute gene expression measurement by single-molecule counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Glenn K; Wilhelmy, Julie; Stern, David; Fan, H Christina; Fodor, Stephen P A

    2014-03-18

    We present a new approach for the sensitive detection and accurate quantitation of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) gene transcripts in single cells. First, the entire population of mRNAs is encoded with molecular barcodes during reverse transcription. After amplification of the gene targets of interest, molecular barcodes are counted by sequencing or scored on a simple hybridization detector to reveal the number of molecules in the starting sample. Since absolute quantities are measured, calibration to standards is unnecessary, and many of the relative quantitation challenges such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias are avoided. We apply the method to gene expression analysis of minute sample quantities and demonstrate precise measurements with sensitivity down to sub single-cell levels. The method is an easy, single-tube, end point assay utilizing standard thermal cyclers and PCR reagents. Accurate and precise measurements are obtained without any need for cycle-to-cycle intensity-based real-time monitoring or physical partitioning into multiple reactions (e.g., digital PCR). Further, since all mRNA molecules are encoded with molecular barcodes, amplification can be used to generate more material for multiple measurements and technical replicates can be carried out on limited samples. The method is particularly useful for small sample quantities, such as single-cell experiments. Digital encoding of cellular content preserves true abundance levels and overcomes distortions introduced by amplification.

  4. On determining absolute entropy without quantum theory or the third law of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    We employ classical thermodynamics to gain information about absolute entropy, without recourse to statistical methods, quantum mechanics or the third law of thermodynamics. The Gibbs-Duhem equation yields various simple methods to determine the absolute entropy of a fluid. We also study the entropy of an ideal gas and the ionization of a plasma in thermal equilibrium. A single measurement of the degree of ionization can be used to determine an unknown constant in the entropy equation, and thus determine the absolute entropy of a gas. It follows from all these examples that the value of entropy at absolute zero temperature does not need to be assigned by postulate, but can be deduced empirically.

  5. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  6. A Proposed Absolute Entropy of Near Extremal Kerr-Newman Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, H

    2001-01-01

    Some problems have been found as to the definition of entropy of black hole being applied to the extremal Kerr-Newman case, which has conflicts with the third law of thermodynamics. We have proposed a new modification for the near extremal one, which not only obeys the third law, but also does not conflict with other results in black hole thermodynamics. Then we proved that the inner horizon has temperature and proposed that the inner horizon contributes to the entropy of the near extremal one so that the entropy of it has a modified form and vanishes at absolute zero temperature.

  7. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  8. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  9. Topological Research on Standard Absolute Entropies,S(○)298, for Binary Inorganic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    For predicting the standard entropy of a binary inorganic compound, two novel connectivity indexes mQ,mG and their converse indexes mQ',mG' based on adjacency matrix of molecular graphs and ionic parameters gi, qi were pro-posed. The qi and gi are defined as qi=(1.1+Zi1.1)/(1.7+ni), gi:(1.4d-Zi)/(0.9+ri+ri-1), where Zi, ni, ri are the charge numbers, the outer electronic shell primary quantum numbers, and the radii of ionic I respectively. The good Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) models for the standard entropies of binary inorganic com-pound can be constructed from 0Q,0Q',1G, and 1G', by using a multivariate linear regression (MLR) method and an artificial neural network (NN) method. The correlation coefficient r, the standard error s, and the average absolute deviation of the MLR model and the NN model are 0.9905, 8.29 J·K-1,mol-1 and 6.48 J·K-1·mol-1, and 0.9960,5.37 J·K-1·mol-1 and 3.90 J·K-1·mol-1, respectively, for 371 binary inorganic compounds (training set). The cross-validation by using the leave-one-out method demonstrates that the MLR model is highly reliable from the point of view of statistics. The correlation coefficients, standard deviations and average absolute deviations of pre-dicted values of the standard entropies of other 185 binary inorganic compounds (test set) are 0.9897, 8.64 J·K-1·mol-1 and 6.84 J·K-1·mol-1, and 0.9957, 5.63 J·K-1·mol-1 and 4.18 J·K-1·mol-1 for the MLR model and the Nnmodel, respectively. The results show that the current method is more effective than literature methods for estimat-ing the standard entropy of a binary inorganic compound. Both MLR and NN methods can provide acceptable mod-els for the prediction of the standard entropies of binary inorganic compounds. The NN model for the standard en-tropies appears to be more reliable than the MLR model.

  10. Special Issue: Single Molecule Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans H. Gorris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in the detection and manipulation of single molecules have enabled new insights into the function, structure and interactions of biomolecules. This Special Issue was launched to account for the rapid progress in the field of “Single Molecule Techniques”. Four original research articles and seven review articles provide an introduction, as well as an in-depth discussion, of technical developments that are indispensable for the characterization of individual biomolecules. Fluorescence microscopy takes center stage in this Special Issue because it is one of the most sensitive and flexible techniques, which has been adapted in many variations to the specific demands of single molecule analysis. Two additional articles are dedicated to single molecule detection based on atomic force microscopy.

  11. Optofluidic single molecule flow proteometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Nan; Chou, Chao-Kai; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2009-02-01

    A microfluidic single molecule fluorescence-based detection scheme is developed to identify target protein direct from cell lysate by using polyclonal antibody. Relative concentration of target protein in solution is determined by twodimensional (2D) photon burst analysis. Compared to conventional ensemble measurement assays, this microfluidic single molecule approach combines the advantages of higher sensitivity, fast processing time, small sample consumption and high resolution quantitative analysis.

  12. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makusu Tsutsui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule.

  13. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal...

  14. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  15. Single-molecule stochastic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Manosas, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F; 10.1103/PhysRevX.2.031012

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a well known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively folding/unfolding transitions under the action of an applied oscillating mechanical force with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigated the folding/unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measured several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins is a good quantifier of the SR. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance match...

  16. Making "Operations" inside a Single Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Free and delicate manipulation of single molecules has long been expected by scientists so as to realize specific functions. In the 1990s, the laboratory led by Prof. Wison Ho from the University of California was successful in inducing chemical reactions at the single molecule level with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), revealing the extensive potentials of "single molecule operation." However, until recently, researchers have failed to utilize the reaction to give rise to special physical properties.

  17. The Stumbling Block of the Gibbs Entropy: the Reality of the Negative Absolute Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghel Dragoş-Victor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The second Tisza-Callen postulate of equilibrium thermodynamics states that for any system there exists a function of the system extensive parameters, called entropy, defined for all equilibrium states and having the property that the values assumed by the extensive parameters in the absence of a constraint are those that maximize the entropy over the manifold of constrained equilibrium states. Based on the thermodynamic evolution of systems which (in the Boltzmann description have positive and negative temperatures, we show that this postulate is satisfied by the Boltzmann formula for the entropy and may be violated by the Gibbs formula, therefore invalidating the later. Vice versa, if we assume, by reductio ad absurdum, that for some thermodynamic systems the equilibrium state is determined by the Gibbs’ prescription and not by Boltzmann’s, this implies that such systems have macroscopic fluctuations and therefore do not reach the thermodynamic equilibrium.

  18. A Proposed Absolute Entropy of Near Extremal Kerr-Newman Black Hole

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hai

    2001-01-01

    Some problems have been found as to the definition of entropy of black hole being applied to the extremal Kerr-Newman case, which has conflicts with the third law of thermodynamics. We have proposed a new modification for the near extremal one, which not only obeys the third law, but also does not conflict with other results in black hole thermodynamics. Then we proved that the inner horizon has temperature and proposed that the inner horizon contributes to the entropy of the near extremal on...

  19. Single-molecule dynamics at variable temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Single-molecule optics has evolved from a specialized variety of optical spectroscopy at low temperatures into a versatile tool to address questions in physics, chemistry, biology, and materials science. In this thesis, the potential of single-molecule (and ensemble) optical microscopy at variable t

  20. SINGLE MOLECULE ENZYMOLOGY FINDS ITS STRIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    More techniques aimed at probing the nature of single molecules are being developed and advanced in biophysics labs. Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at the scientists leading the charge into the micro-world.

  1. Non-linear irreversible thermodynamics of single-molecule experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Santamaria-Holek, I; Hidalgo-Soria, M; Perez-Madrid, A

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible thermodynamics of single-molecule experiments subject to external constraining forces of a mechanical nature is presented. Extending Onsager's formalism to the non-linear case of systems under non-equilibrium external constraints, we are able to calculate the entropy production and the general non-linear kinetic equations for the variables involved. In particular, we analyze the case of RNA stretching protocols obtaining critical oscillations between di?erent con?gurational states when forced by external means to remain in the unstable region of its free-energy landscape, as observed in experiments. We also calculate the entropy produced during these hopping events, and show how resonant phenomena in stretching experiments of single RNA macromolecules may arise. We also calculate the hopping rates using Kramer's approach obtaining a good comparison with experiments.

  2. Theoretical study on single-molecule spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Guang-cun; HUANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The photon-by-photon approach for single molecule spectroscopy experiments utilizes the information carried by each detected photon and allows the measurements of conformational fluctuation with time resolution on a vast range of time scales,where each photon represents a data point.Here,we theoretically simulate the photon emission dynamics of a single molecule spectroscopy using the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to understand the underlying complex photon dynamic process of a single molecule.In addition,by following the molecular process in real time,the mechanism of complex biochemical reactions can be revealed.We hope that this theoretical study will serve as an introduction and a guideline into this exciting new field.

  3. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  4. Single Molecule Biophysics Experiments and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yang, Haw; Silbey, Robert J; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-01-01

    Discover the experimental and theoretical developments in optical single-molecule spectroscopy that are changing the ways we think about molecules and atoms The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This latest volume explores the advent of optical single-molecule spectroscopy, and how atomic force microscopy has empowered novel experiments on individual biomolecules, opening up new frontiers in molecular and cell biology and leading to new theoretical approaches

  5. Methods for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of biological systems based on ideas from polymer physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    2010-01-01

    The commonly used simulation techniques, Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) are of a dynamical type which enables one to sample system configurations i correctly with the Boltzmann probability, P(i)(B), while the value of P(i)(B) is not provided directly; therefore, it is difficult to obtain the absolute entropy, S approximately -ln P(i)(B), and the Helmholtz free energy, F. With a different simulation approach developed in polymer physics, a chain is grown step-by-step with transition probabilities (TPs), and thus their product is the value of the construction probability; therefore, the entropy is known. Because all exact simulation methods are equivalent, i.e. they lead to the same averages and fluctuations of physical properties, one can treat an MC or MD sample as if its members have rather been generated step-by-step. Thus, each configuration i of the sample can be reconstructed (from nothing) by calculating the TPs with which it could have been constructed. This idea applies also to bulk systems such as fluids or magnets. This approach has led earlier to the "local states" (LS) and the "hypothetical scanning" (HS) methods, which are approximate in nature. A recent development is the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo (HSMC) (or molecular dynamics, HSMD) method which is based on stochastic TPs where all interactions are taken into account. In this respect, HSMC(D) can be viewed as exact and the only approximation involved is due to insufficient MC(MD) sampling for calculating the TPs. The validity of HSMC has been established by applying it first to liquid argon, TIP3P water, self-avoiding walks (SAW), and polyglycine models, where the results for F were found to agree with those obtained by other methods. Subsequently, HSMD was applied to mobile loops of the enzymes porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase and acetylcholinesterase in explicit water, where the difference in F between the bound and free states of the loop was calculated. Currently

  6. Near-field single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, X.S.; Dunn, R.C.

    1995-02-01

    The high spatial resolution and sensitivity of near-field fluorescence microscopy allows one to study spectroscopic and dynamical properties of individual molecules at room temperature. Time-resolved experiments which probe the dynamical behavior of single molecules are discussed. Ground rules for applying near-field spectroscopy and the effect of the aluminum coated near-field probe on spectroscopic measurements are presented.

  7. Nanoscience: Single-molecule instant replay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camillone, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    A nanoscale imaging method that uses ultrashort light pulses to initiate and follow the motion of a single molecule adsorbed on a solid surface opens a window onto the physical and chemical dynamics of molecules on surfaces. See Letter p.263

  8. Single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, S C; Cherayil, Binny J; Min, Wei; English, Brian P; Xie, X Sunney

    2005-10-20

    This paper summarizes our present theoretical understanding of single-molecule kinetics associated with the Michaelis-Menten mechanism of enzymatic reactions. Single-molecule enzymatic turnover experiments typically measure the probability density f(t) of the stochastic waiting time t for individual turnovers. While f(t) can be reconciled with ensemble kinetics, it contains more information than the ensemble data; in particular, it provides crucial information on dynamic disorder, the apparent fluctuation of the catalytic rates due to the interconversion among the enzyme's conformers with different catalytic rate constants. In the presence of dynamic disorder, f(t) exhibits a highly stretched multiexponential decay at high substrate concentrations and a monoexponential decay at low substrate concentrations. We derive a single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equation for the reciprocal of the first moment of f(t), 1/, which shows a hyperbolic dependence on the substrate concentration [S], similar to the ensemble enzymatic velocity. We prove that this single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equation holds under many conditions, in particular when the intercoversion rates among different enzyme conformers are slower than the catalytic rate. However, unlike the conventional interpretation, the apparent catalytic rate constant and the apparent Michaelis constant in this single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equation are complicated functions of the catalytic rate constants of individual conformers. We also suggest that the randomness parameter r, defined as )2> / t2, can serve as an indicator for dynamic disorder in the catalytic step of the enzymatic reaction, as it becomes larger than unity at high substrate concentrations in the presence of dynamic disorder.

  9. Parametric scaling from species relative abundances to absolute abundances in the computation of biological diversity: a first proposal using Shannon's entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotta, Carlo

    2003-01-01

    Traditional diversity measures such as the Shannon entropy are generally computed from the species' relative abundance vector of a given community to the exclusion of species' absolute abundances. In this paper, I first mention some examples where the total information content associated with a given community may be more adequate than Shannon's average information content for a better understanding of ecosystem functioning. Next, I propose a parametric measure of statistical information that contains both Shannon's entropy and total information content as special cases of this more general function.

  10. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Jason [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mishra, Bud [Departments of Computer Science and Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Pittenger, Bede [Veeco Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Magonov, Sergei [Veeco Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Troke, Joshua [Department of Pathology and Center for Cell Control, an NIH Nanomedicine Development Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Teitell, Michael A [Department of Pathology and Center for Cell Control, an NIH Nanomedicine Development Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2007-01-31

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations.

  11. Diamond based single molecule magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, J -M; Plenio, M B; Retzker, A

    2011-01-01

    The detection of a nuclear spin in an individual molecule represents a key challenge in physics and biology whose solution has been pursued for many years. The small magnetic moment of a single nucleus and the unavoidable environmental noise present the key obstacles for its realization. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond can be used to construct a nano-scale single molecule spectrometer that is capable of detecting the position and spin state of a single nucleus and can determine the distance and alignment of a nuclear or electron spin pair. In combination with organic spin labels, this device will find applications in single molecule spectroscopy in chemistry and biology, such as in determining protein structure or monitoring macromolecular motions and can thus provide a tool to help unravelling the microscopic mechanisms underlying bio-molecular function.

  12. The symmetry of single-molecule conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-14

    We introduce the conductance point group which defines the symmetry of single-molecule conduction within the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown, either rigorously or to within a very good approximation, to correspond to a molecular-conductance point group defined purely in terms of the properties of the conducting molecule. This enables single-molecule conductivity to be described in terms of key qualitative chemical descriptors that are independent of the nature of the molecule-conductor interfaces. We apply this to demonstrate how symmetry controls the conduction through 1,4-benzenedithiol chemisorbed to gold electrodes as an example system, listing also the molecular-conductance point groups for a range of molecules commonly used in molecular electronics research.

  13. Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen the development of a number of novel biophysical methods that allow the manipulation and study of individual biomolecules. The ability to monitor biological processes at this fundamental level of sensitivity has given rise to an improved understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Through the removal of ensemble averaging, distributions and fluctuations of molecular properties can be characterized, transient intermediates identified, and catalytic mechanisms elucidated. By applying forces on biomolecules while monitoring their activity, important information can be obtained on how proteins couple function to structure. The Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics provides an introduction to these techniques and presents an extensive discussion of the new biological insights obtained from them. Coverage includes: Experimental techniques to monitor and manipulate individual biomolecules The use of single-molecule techniques in super-resolution and functional imaging Single-molec...

  14. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  15. Single Molecule Data Analysis: An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Meysam; Li, Chun-Biu; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Pressé, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We review methods of data analysis for biophysical data with a special emphasis on single molecule applications. Our review is intended for anyone, from student to established researcher. For someone just getting started, we focus on exposing the logic, strength and limitations of each method and cite, as appropriate, the relevant literature for implementation details. We review traditional frequentist and Bayesian parametric approaches to data analysis and subsequently extend our discussion to recent non-parametric and information theoretic methods.

  16. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  17. Absolute Free Energy of Binding and Entropy of the FKBP12-FK506 Complex: Effects of the Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General, Ignacio J; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2013-10-08

    The hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics (HSMD) method combined with thermodynamic integration (HSMD-TI) has been extended recently for calculating ΔA(0)-the absolute free energy of binding of a ligand to a protein. With HSMD-TI, ΔA(0) is obtained in a new way as a sum of several components, among them is ΔSligand-the change in the conformational entropy as the ligand is transferred from the bulk solvent to the active site-this entropy is obtained by a specific reconstruction procedure. This unique aspect of HSMD (which is useful in rational drug design) is in particular important for treating large ligands, where ΔSligand might be significant. Technically, one should verify that the results for ΔSligand converge-a property that might become more difficult for large ligands; therefore, studying ligands of increasing size would define the range of applicability of HSMD-TI for binding. In this paper, we check the performance of HSMD-TI by applying it to the relatively large ligand FK506 (126 atoms) complexed with the protein FKBP12, where ΔA(0) = -12.8 kcal/mol is known experimentally as well as the crystal structure of the complex. This structure was initially equilibrated by carrying out a 100 ns molecular dynamics trajectory, where the system is modeled by the AMBER force field, TIP3P water, and Particle Mesh Ewald. HSMD-TI calculations were carried out in three conformational regions defined by the intervals [0.2,2], [2,5], and [5,100] ns along the trajectory, where local equilibration of the total energy has been observed; we obtained ΔA(0) = -13.6 ± 1.1, -16.6 ± 1.4, and -16.7 ± 1.4 kcal/mol, respectively indicating the following: (1) The second and third regions belong to the same conformational subspace of the complex, which is different from the [0.2,2] ns subspace. (2) The unsatisfactory result for ΔA(0) obtained in the well equilibrated (hence theoretically preferred) latter regions reflects the nonperfect modeling used, which however (3

  18. Synthesis of single-molecule nanocars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Guillaume; Tour, James M

    2009-03-17

    The drive to miniaturize devices has led to a variety of molecular machines inspired by macroscopic counterparts such as molecular motors, switches, shuttles, turnstiles, barrows, elevators, and nanovehicles. Such nanomachines are designed for controlled mechanical motion and the transport of nanocargo. As researchers miniaturize devices, they can consider two complementary approaches: (1) the "top-down" approach, which reduces the size of macroscopic objects to reach an equivalent microscopic entity using photolithography and related techniques and (2) the "bottom-up" approach, which builds functional microscopic or nanoscopic entities from molecular building blocks. The top-down approach, extensively used by the semiconductor industry, is nearing its scaling limits. On the other hand, the bottom-up approach takes advantage of the self-assembly of smaller molecules into larger networks by exploiting typically weak molecular interactions. But self-assembly alone will not permit complex assembly. Using nanomachines, we hope to eventually consider complex, enzyme-like directed assembly. With that ultimate goal, we are currently exploring the control of nanomachines that would provide a basis for the future bottom-up construction of complex systems. This Account describes the synthesis of a class of molecular machines that resemble macroscopic vehicles. We designed these so-called nanocars for study at the single-molecule level by scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The vehicles have a chassis connected to wheel-terminated axles and convert energy inputs such as heat, electric fields, or light into controlled motion on a surface, ultimately leading to transport of nanocargo. At first, we used C(60) fullerenes as wheels, which allowed the demonstration of a directional rolling mechanism of a nanocar on a gold surface by STM. However, because of the low solubility of the fullerene nanocars and the incompatibility of fullerenes with photochemical processes, we developed new

  19. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction

  20. Single-molecule electronics: from chemical design to functional devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lanlan; Diaz-Fernandez, Yuri A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2014-11-07

    The use of single molecules in electronics represents the next limit of miniaturisation of electronic devices, which would enable us to continue the trend of aggressive downscaling of silicon-based electronic devices. More significantly, the fabrication, understanding and control of fully functional circuits at the single-molecule level could also open up the possibility of using molecules as devices with novel, not-foreseen functionalities beyond complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology (CMOS). This review aims at highlighting the chemical design and synthesis of single molecule devices as well as their electrical and structural characterization, including a historical overview and the developments during the last 5 years. We discuss experimental techniques for fabrication of single-molecule junctions, the potential application of single-molecule junctions as molecular switches, and general physical phenomena in single-molecule electronic devices.

  1. Rotation of a single molecule within a supramolecular bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimzewski, J.K.; Joachim, C.; Schlittler, R.R.;

    1998-01-01

    Experimental visualization and verification of a single-molecule rotor operating within a supramolecular bearing is reported. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, single molecules were observed to exist in one of two spatially defined states Laterally separated by 0.26 nanometers. One was ident......Experimental visualization and verification of a single-molecule rotor operating within a supramolecular bearing is reported. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, single molecules were observed to exist in one of two spatially defined states Laterally separated by 0.26 nanometers. One...

  2. Evidence of disorder in biological molecules from single molecule pulling experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity in biological molecules, resulting in molecule-to-molecule variations in their dynamics and function, is an emerging theme. To elucidate the consequences of heterogeneous behavior at the single molecule level, we propose an exactly solvable model in which the unfolding rate due to mechanical force depends parametrically on an auxiliary variable representing an entropy barrier arising from fluctuations in internal dynamics. When the rate of fluctuations, a measure of dynamical disorder, is comparable to or smaller than the rate of force-induced unbinding, we show that there are two experimentally observable consequences: non-exponential survival probability at constant force, and a heavy-tailed rupture force distribution at constant loading rate. By fitting our analytical expressions to data from single molecule pulling experiments on proteins and DNA, we quantify the extent of disorder. We show that only by analyzing data over a wide range of forces and loading rates can the role of disorder due...

  3. Single-Molecule FRET Study of DNA G-Quadruplex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The DNA G-quadruplex formed by the human telomeric sequence is a potential target for novel anticancer drugs. We have investigated an intramolecular DNA G-quadruplex using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer and shown that individual folded quadruplexes can be identified. The mean proximity ratio measured at the single-molecule level was consistent with ensemble measurement.

  4. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Henrry M.; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids....

  5. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  6. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  7. An optical nanofiber-based interface for single molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Skoff, Sarah M; Schauffert, Hardy; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Optical interfaces for quantum emitters are a prerequisite for implementing quantum networks. Here, we couple single molecules to the guided modes of an optical nanofiber. The molecules are embedded within a crystal that provides photostability and due to its inhomogeneous environment, a means to spectrally address single molecules. Single molecules are excited and detected solely via the nanofiber interface without the requirement of additional optical access. In this way, we realize a fully fiber-integrated system that is scalable and may become a versatile constituent for quantum hybrid systems.

  8. Single Molecule Scanning of DNA Radiation Oxidative Damage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal will develop an assay to map genomic DNA, at the single molecule level and in a nanodevice, for oxidative DNA damage arising from radiation exposure;...

  9. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Severin, Jessica

    2016-07-19

    There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

  10. Single-molecule emulsion PCR in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhang, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingxia; Guan, Zhichao; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-06-01

    The application of microfluidic droplet PCR for single-molecule amplification and analysis has recently been extensively studied. Microfluidic droplet technology has the advantages of compartmentalizing reactions into discrete volumes, performing highly parallel reactions in monodisperse droplets, reducing cross-contamination between droplets, eliminating PCR bias and nonspecific amplification, as well as enabling fast amplification with rapid thermocycling. Here, we have reviewed the important technical breakthroughs of microfluidic droplet PCR in the past five years and their applications to single-molecule amplification and analysis, such as high-throughput screening, next generation DNA sequencing, and quantitative detection of rare mutations. Although the utilization of microfluidic droplet single-molecule PCR is still in the early stages, its great potential has already been demonstrated and will provide novel solutions to today's biomedical engineering challenges in single-molecule amplification and analysis.

  11. Single Molecule Imaging in Living Cell with Optical Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Significance, difficult, international developing actuality and our completed works for single molecules imaging in living cell with optical method are described respectively. Additionally we give out some suggestions for the technology development further.

  12. Single Molecule Spectroscopy in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Nobel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Gräslund, Astrid; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Written by the leading experts in the field, this book describes the development and current state-of-the-art in single molecule spectroscopy. The application of this technique, which started 1989, in physics, chemistry and biosciences is displayed.

  13. Massively parallel single-molecule manipulation using centrifugal force

    CERN Document Server

    Halvorsen, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Precise manipulation of single molecules has already led to remarkable insights in physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. However, widespread adoption of single-molecule techniques has been impeded by equipment cost and the laborious nature of making measurements one molecule at a time. We have solved these issues with a new approach: massively parallel single-molecule force measurements using centrifugal force. This approach is realized in a novel instrument that we call the Centrifuge Force Microscope (CFM), in which objects in an orbiting sample are subjected to a calibration-free, macroscopically uniform force-field while their micro-to-nanoscopic motions are observed. We demonstrate high-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy with this technique by performing thousands of rupture experiments in parallel, characterizing force-dependent unbinding kinetics of an antibody-antigen pair in minutes rather than days. Additionally, we verify the force accuracy of the instrument by measuring the well-est...

  14. Probing molecular choreography through single-molecule biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oijen, Antoine M; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2015-12-01

    Single-molecule approaches are having a dramatic impact on views of how proteins work. The ability to observe molecular properties at the single-molecule level allows characterization of subpopulations and acquisition of detailed kinetic information that would otherwise be hidden in the averaging over an ensemble of molecules. In this Perspective, we discuss how such approaches have successfully been applied to in vitro-reconstituted systems of increasing complexity.

  15. Uncovering hierarchical data structure in single molecule transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ben H.; Ivie, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Tyler K.; Monti, Oliver L. A.

    2017-03-01

    Interpretation of single molecule transport data is complicated by the fact that all such data are inherently highly stochastic in nature. Features are often broad, seemingly unstructured and distributed over more than an order of magnitude. However, the distribution contains information necessary for capturing the full variety of processes relevant in nanoscale transport, and a better understanding of its hierarchical structure is needed to gain deeper insight into the physics and chemistry of single molecule electronics. Here, we describe a novel data analysis approach based on hierarchical clustering to aid in the interpretation of single molecule conductance-displacement histograms. The primary purpose of statistically partitioning transport data is to provide avenues for unbiased hypothesis generation in single molecule break junction experiments by revealing otherwise potentially hidden aspects in the conductance data. Our approach is generalizable to the analysis of a wide variety of other single molecule experiments in molecular electronics, as well as in single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, force microscopy, and ion-channel conductance measurements.

  16. PREFACE: Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics Nanoelectronics, sensors and single molecule biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    This special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM) is dedicated to Professor Stuart M Lindsay on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in recognition of his outstanding contributions to multiple research areas, including light scattering spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, biophysics, solid-liquid interfaces and molecular and nanoelectronics. It contains a collection of 14 papers in some of these areas, including a feature article by Lindsay. Each paper was subject to the normal rigorous review process of JPCM. In Lindsay's paper, he discusses the next generations of hybrid chemical-CMOS devices for low cost and personalized medical diagnosis. The discussion leads to several papers on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. Kawaguchi et al report on the detection of single pollen allergen particles using electrode embedded microchannels. Stern et al describe a structural study of three-dimensional DNA-nanoparticle assemblies. Hihath et al measure the conductance of methylated DNA, and discuss the possibility of electrical detection DNA methylation. Portillo et al study the electrostatic effects on the aggregation of prion proteins and peptides with atomic force microscopy. In an effort to understand the interactions between nanostructures and cells, Lamprecht et al report on the mapping of the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes with a confocal Raman imaging technique, and Wang et al focus on the intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles using fluorescence microscopy. Park and Kristic provide theoretical analysis of micro- and nano-traps and their biological applications. This section also features several papers on the fundamentals of electron transport in single atomic wires and molecular junctions. The papers by Xu et al and by Wandlowksi et al describe new methods to measure conductance and forces in single molecule junctions and metallic atomic wires. Scullion et al report on the conductance of molecules with similar

  17. Single-molecule manipulation experiments to explore friction and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, R.; Kawai, S.; Meier, T.; Glatzel, T.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    2017-03-01

    Friction forces, which arise when two bodies that are in contact are moved with respect to one another, are ubiquitous phenomena. Although various measurement tools have been developed to study these phenomena at all length scales, such investigations are highly challenging when tackling the scale of single molecules in motion on a surface. This work reviews the recent advances in single-molecule manipulation experiments performed at low temperature with the aim of understanding the fundamental frictional response of single molecules. Following the advent of ‘nanotribology’ in the field based on the atomic force microscopy technique, we will show the technical requirements to direct those studies at the single-molecule level. We will also discuss the experimental prerequisites needed to obtain and interpret the phenomena, such as the implementation of single-molecule manipulation techniques, the processing of the experimental data or their comparison with appropriate numerical models. Finally, we will report examples of the controlled vertical and lateral manipulation of long polymeric chains, graphene nanoribbons or single porphyrin molecules that systematically reveal friction-like characteristics while sliding over atomically clean surfaces.

  18. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malý, Pavel; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlo...

  19. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Probing the Conformations of Single Molecule via Photon Counting Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Yonggang; Yang, Chuanlu; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    We suggest an approach to detect the conformation of single molecule by using the photon counting statistics. The generalized Smoluchoswki equation is employed to describe the dynamical process of conformational change of single molecule. The resonant trajectories of the emission photon numbers $$ and the Mandel's $Q$ parameter, in the space of conformational coordinates $\\bm{\\mathcal{X}}$ and frequency $\\omega_L$ of external field ($\\bm{\\mathcal{X}}-\\omega_L$ space), can be used to rebuild the conformation of the single molecule. As an example, we consider Thioflavin T molecule. It demonstrates that the results of conformations extracted by employing the photon counting statistics is excellent agreement with the results of {\\it ab initio} computation.

  1. Single-molecule mechanochemical sensing using DNA origami nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Deepak; Shrestha, Prakash; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Mandal, Shankar; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Mao, Hanbin

    2014-07-28

    While single-molecule sensing offers the ultimate detection limit, its throughput is often restricted as sensing events are carried out one at a time in most cases. 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures are used as expanded single-molecule platforms in a new mechanochemical sensing strategy. As a proof of concept, six sensing probes are incorporated in a 7-tile DNA origami nanoassembly, wherein binding of a target molecule to any of these probes leads to mechanochemical rearrangement of the origami nanostructure, which is monitored in real time by optical tweezers. Using these platforms, 10 pM platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are detected within 10 minutes, while demonstrating multiplex sensing of the PDGF and a target DNA in the same solution. By tapping into the rapid development of versatile DNA origami nanostructures, this mechanochemical platform is anticipated to offer a long sought solution for single-molecule sensing with improved throughput.

  2. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  3. Extending single-molecule microscopy using optical Fourier processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Adam S; Moerner, W E

    2014-07-17

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules.

  4. Novel approaches for single molecule activation and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Benfenati, Fabio; Torre, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    How can we obtain tools able to process and exchange information at the molecular scale In order to do this, it is necessary to activate and detect single molecules under controlled conditions. This book focuses on the generation of biologically-inspired molecular devices. These devices are based on the developments of new photonic tools able to activate and stimulate single molecule machines. Additionally, new light sensitive molecules can be selectively activated by photonic tools. These technological innovations will provide a way to control activation of single light-sensitive molecules, a

  5. Photoemission of Mn6Cr single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzmann, U.; Merschjohann, F.; Helmstedt, A.; Gryzia, A.; Winter, A.; Steppeler, S.; Müller, N.; Brechling, A.; Sacher, M.; Richthofen, C.-G. Freiherr v.; Glaser, T.; Voss, S.; Fonin, M.; Rüdiger, U.

    2009-11-01

    We present the status of new experimental studies of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, magnetic circular dichroism in photoemission and spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of Mn6Cr single-molecule magnet systems by use of circularly-polarized synchrotron radiation of the electron storage rings in Maxlab Lund, Sweden und BESSY, Berlin, Germany.

  6. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  7. Large negative differential conductance in single-molecule break junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, Mickael L.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Koole, Max; Seldenthuis, Johannes S.; Gil, Jose A. Celis; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Thijssen, Joseph M.; Dulic, Diana; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular electronics aims at exploiting the internal structure and electronic orbitals of molecules to construct functional building blocks(1). To date, however, the overwhelming majority of experimentally realized single-molecule junctions can be described as single quantum dots, where transport i

  8. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  9. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The g

  10. VISUALIZING DNA REPLICATION AT THE SINGLE-MOLECULE LEVEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, NG

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule methodology have made it possible to study the dynamic behavior of individual enzymes and their interactions with other proteins in multiprotein complexes. Here, we describe newly developed methods to study the coordination of DNA unwinding, priming, and synthesis

  11. Visualizing DNA Replication at the Single-Molecule Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule methodology have made it possible to study the dynamic behavior of individual enzymes and their interactions with other proteins in multiprotein complexes. Here, we describe newly developed methods to study the coordination of DNA unwinding, priming, and synthesis

  12. Alternating-laser excitation : single-molecule FRET and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohlbein, Johannes; Craggs, Timothy D.; Cordes, Thorben

    2014-01-01

    The alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) scheme continues to expand the possibilities of fluorescence-based assays to study biological entities and interactions. Especially the combination of ALEX and single-molecule Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) has been very successful as ALEX enables

  13. Single-molecule choreography between telomere proteins and G quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-06-10

    Telomeric DNA binds proteins to protect chromosome ends, but it also adopts G quadruplex (GQ) structures. Two new studies by Hwang and colleagues (in this issue of Structure) and Ray and colleagues (published elsewhere) use single molecule imaging to reveal how GQs affect the binding of different telomere associated proteins. The data suggest that GQs play important roles in regulating accessibility of telomeres.

  14. Assembling a single-molecule view on nucleosome dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is a better understanding of the basic compaction mechanism of our DNA using multiple single-molecule techniques. The stretched-out length of our DNA is enormous compared with the dimensions of a cell. To make DNA fit within a cell it is systematically wrapped around pr

  15. Time-Varying Triplet State Lifetimes of Single Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Kuipers, L.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1999-01-01

    It is found that triplet state lifetimes and intersystem crossing yields of individual molecules embedded in a polymer host at room temperature are not constant in time. The range over which the triplet lifetime of a single molecule varies during long observation times shows a strong similarity with

  16. Single-molecule detection in electrochemical nanogap devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents results obtained during a research project aimed at realizing electrochemical single-molecule detection in water. By virtue of being inherently electrical in nature, electrochemical sensors are particularly well suited for integration with microelectronics compared to sensors ba

  17. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Kamping, W.; Van den Hout, M.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNAenzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct. Su

  18. The optics inside an automated single molecule array analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, William; Fournier, David R.; Watson, Gary W.; Walling, Les; Gigante, Bill; Duffy, David C.; Rissin, David M.; Kan, Cheuk W.; Meyer, Raymond E.; Piech, Tomasz; Fishburn, Matthew W.

    2014-02-01

    Quanterix and Stratec Biomedical have developed an instrument that enables the automated measurement of multiple proteins at concentration ~1000 times lower than existing immunoassays. The instrument is based on Quanterix's proprietary Single Molecule Array technology (Simoa™ ) that facilitates the detection and quantification of biomarkers previously difficult to measure, thus opening up new applications in life science research and in-vitro diagnostics. Simoa is based on trapping individual beads in arrays of femtoliter-sized wells that, when imaged with sufficient resolution, allows for counting of single molecules associated with each bead. When used to capture and detect proteins, this approach is known as digital ELISA (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The platform developed is a merger of many science and engineering disciplines. This paper concentrates on the optical technologies that have enabled the development of a fully-automated single molecule analyzer. At the core of the system is a custom, wide field-of-view, fluorescence microscope that images arrays of microwells containing single molecules bound to magnetic beads. A consumable disc containing 24 microstructure arrays was developed previously in collaboration with Sony DADC. The system cadence requirements, array dimensions, and requirement to detect single molecules presented significant optical challenges. Specifically, the wide field-of-view needed to image the entire array resulted in the need for a custom objective lens. Additionally, cost considerations for the system required a custom solution that leveraged the image processing capabilities. This paper will discuss the design considerations and resultant optical architecture that has enabled the development of an automated digital ELISA platform.

  19. Electronic transport in benzodifuran single-molecule transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, An; Li, Hui; Chen, Songjie; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Liao, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices.Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The fabrication procedure for BDF single-molecule

  20. Coherent spectroscopy in the single molecule limit (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potma, Eric O.; Crampton, Kevin; Fast, Alex; Alfonso García, Alba; Apkarian, Vartkess A.

    2016-10-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a popular technique for detecting and analyzing molecules at very low concentrations. The sensitivity of SERS is high enough to detect single molecules. It has proven difficult, however, to perform similar measurements in the so-called nonlinear optical regime, a regime in which the molecule is responding to multiple light pulses. Nonetheless, recent experiments indicate that after careful optimization, it is possible to generate signals derived from nonlinear analogs of SERS. Such measurements make it possible to view molecular vibrations in real time, which amounts to the femto- to pico-second range. In this contribution, we discuss in detail under which conditions detectable surface-enhanced coherent Raman signals can be expected, provide experimental evidence of coherent Raman scattering of single molecules, and highlight the unique information that can be attained from such measurements.

  1. STM CONTROL OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS: Single-Molecule Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hla, Saw-Wai; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2003-10-01

    The fascinating advances in single atom/molecule manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip allow scientists to fabricate atomic-scale structures or to probe chemical and physical properties of matters at an atomic level. Owing to these advances, it has become possible for the basic chemical reaction steps, such as dissociation, diffusion, adsorption, readsorption, and bond-formation processes, to be performed by using the STM tip. Complete sequences of chemical reactions are able to induce at a single-molecule level. New molecules can be constructed from the basic molecular building blocks on a one-molecule-at-a-time basis by using a variety of STM manipulation schemes in a systematic step-by-step manner. These achievements open up entirely new opportunities in nanochemistry and nanochemical technology. In this review, various STM manipulation techniques useful in the single-molecule reaction process are reviewed, and their impact on the future of nanoscience and technology are discussed.

  2. Single Molecule Detection in Solution: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Christoph; Enderlein, Jorg; Keller, Richard A.

    2002-07-01

    The detection of single molecules opens up new horizons in analytical chemistry, biology and medicine. This discipline, which belongs to the expanding field of nanoscience, has been rapidly emerging over the last ten years. This handbook provides a thorough overview of the field. It begins with basics of single molecule detection in solution, describes methods and devices (fluorescense correlation spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman scattering, sensors, especially dyes, screening techniques, especially confocal laser scanning microscopy). In the second part, various applications in life sciences and medicine provide the latest research results. This modern handbook is a highly accessible reference for a broad community from advanced researchers, specialists and company professionals in physics, spectroscopy, biotechnology, analytical chemistry, and medicine. Written by leading authorities in the field, it is timely and fills a gap - up to now there exists no handbook concerning this theme.

  3. Single molecule imaging with longer x-ray laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Andrew V; Caleman, Carl; Quiney, Harry M

    2015-01-01

    In serial femtosecond crystallography, x-ray laser pulses do not need to outrun all radiation damage processes because Bragg diffraction exceeds the damage-induced background scattering for longer pulses ($\\sim$ 50--100 fs). This is due to a "self-gating pulse" effect whereby damage terminates Bragg diffraction prior to the pulse completing its passage through the sample, as if that diffraction were produced by a shorter pulse of equal fluence. We show here that a similar gating effect applies to single molecule diffraction with respect to spatially uncorrelated damage processes like ionization and ion diffusion. The effect is clearly seen in calculations of the diffraction contrast, by calculating the diffraction of average structure separately to the diffraction from statistical fluctuations of the structure due to damage ("damage noise"). Our results suggest that sub-nanometer single molecule imaging with longer pulses, like those produced at currently operating facilities, should not yet be ruled out. The...

  4. Single Molecule Junctions: Probing Contact Chemistry and Fundamental Circuit Laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-04-11

    By exploiting selective link chemistry, formation of single molecule junctions with reproducible conductance has become established. Systematic studies reveal the structure-conductance relationships for diverse molecules. I will draw on experiments from my collaborators at Columbia University, atomic-scale calculations and theory to describe progress in two areas. First, I will describe a novel route to form single molecule junctions, based on SnMe3 terminated molecules, in which gold directly bonds to carbon in the molecule backbone resulting in near ideal contact resistance [1]. Second, comparison of the conductance of junctions formed with molecular species containing either one backbone or two backbones in parallel allows demonstration of the role of quantum interference in the conductance superposition law at the molecular scale [2].

  5. Incoherent x-ray scattering in single molecule imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Slowik, Jan Malte; Dixit, Gopal; Jurek, Zoltan; Santra, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the structure of single proteins or other biomolecules with atomic resolution would be enormously beneficial to structural biology. X-ray free-electron lasers generate highly intense and ultrashort x-ray pulses, providing a route towards imaging of single molecules with atomic resolution. The information on molecular structure is encoded in the coherent x-ray scattering signal. In contrast to crystallography there are no Bragg reflections in single molecule imaging, which means the coherent scattering is not enhanced. Consequently, a background signal from incoherent scattering deteriorates the quality of the coherent scattering signal. This background signal cannot be easily eliminated because the spectrum of incoherently scattered photons cannot be resolved by usual scattering detectors. We present an ab initio study of incoherent x-ray scattering from individual carbon atoms, including the electronic radiation damage caused by a highly intense x-ray pulse. We find that the coherent scattering pa...

  6. Semisynthetic Nanoreactor for Reversible Single-Molecule Covalent Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Protein engineering has been used to remodel pores for applications in biotechnology. For example, the heptameric α-hemolysin pore (αHL) has been engineered to form a nanoreactor to study covalent chemistry at the single-molecule level. Previous work has been confined largely to the chemistry of cysteine side chains or, in one instance, to an irreversible reaction of an unnatural amino acid side chain bearing a terminal alkyne. Here, we present four different αHL pores obtained by coupling either two or three fragments by native chemical ligation (NCL). The synthetic αHL monomers were folded and incorporated into heptameric pores. The functionality of the pores was validated by hemolysis assays and by single-channel current recording. By using NCL to introduce a ketone amino acid, the nanoreactor approach was extended to an investigation of reversible covalent chemistry on an unnatural side chain at the single-molecule level. PMID:27537396

  7. Electronic Single Molecule Identification of Carbohydrate Isomers by Recognition Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Im, JongOne; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2016-01-01

    Glycans play a central role as mediators in most biological processes, but their structures are complicated by isomerism. Epimers and anomers, regioisomers, and branched sequences contribute to a structural variability that dwarfs those of nucleic acids and proteins, challenging even the most sophisticated analytical tools, such as NMR and mass spectrometry. Here, we introduce an electron tunneling technique that is label-free and can identify carbohydrates at the single-molecule level, offering significant benefits over existing technology. It is capable of analyzing sub-picomole quantities of sample, counting the number of individual molecules in each subset in a population of coexisting isomers, and is quantitative over more than four orders of magnitude of concentration. It resolves epimers not well separated by ion-mobility and can be implemented on a silicon chip. It also provides a readout mechanism for direct single-molecule sequencing of linear oligosaccharides.

  8. Tetraanionic biphenyl lanthanide complexes as single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenliang; Le Roy, Jennifer J; Khan, Saeed I; Ungur, Liviu; Murugesu, Muralee; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-03-02

    Inverse sandwich biphenyl complexes [(NN(TBS))Ln]2(μ-biphenyl)[K(solvent)]2 [NN(TBS) = 1,1'-fc(NSi(t)BuMe2)2; Ln = Gd, Dy, Er; solvent = Et2O, toluene; 18-crown-6], containing a quadruply reduced biphenyl ligand, were synthesized and their magnetic properties measured. One of the dysprosium biphenyl complexes was found to exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling and single-molecule-magnet behavior with Ueff of 34 K under zero applied field. The solvent coordinated to potassium affected drastically the nature of the magnetic interaction, with the other dysprosium complex showing ferromagnetic coupling. Ab initio calculations were performed to understand the nature of magnetic coupling between the two lanthanide ions bridged by the anionic arene ligand and the origin of single-molecule-magnet behavior.

  9. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecular interactions regulate a plethora of vital cellular processes, including signal transduction, metabolism, catalysis and gene regulation. Regulation is encoded in the molecular properties of the constituent proteins; distinct conformations correspond to different functional outcomes...... of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance...... and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape, that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Here we survey new insights from single molecule studies that advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biomolecular recognition....

  10. Directly measuring single molecule heterogeneity using force spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intriguing results of single molecule experiments on proteins and nucleic acids is the discovery of functional heterogeneity: the observation that complex cellular machines exhibit multiple, biologically active conformations. The structural differences between these conformations may be subtle, but each distinct state can be remarkably long-lived, with random interconversions between states occurring only at macroscopic timescales, fractions of a second or longer. Though we now have proof of functional heterogeneity in a handful of systems---enzymes, motors, adhesion complexes---identifying and measuring it remains a formidable challenge. Here we show that evidence of this phenomenon is more widespread than previously known, encoded in data collected from some of the most well-established single molecule techniques: AFM or optical tweezer pulling experiments. We present a theoretical procedure for analyzing distributions of rupture/unfolding forces recorded at different pulling speeds. This re...

  11. Single Molecule DNA Detection with an Atomic Vapor Notch Filter

    CERN Document Server

    Uhland, Denis; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-sciences. Commonly, it founds on the fluorescence detection of single molecules, which are for example attached to the structures under study. For fluorescence microscopy and sensing the crucial parameters are the collection and detection efficiency, such that photons can be discriminated with low background from a labeled sample. Here we show a scheme for filtering the excitation light in the optical detection of single stranded labeled DNA molecules. We use the narrow-band filtering properties of a hot atomic vapor to filter the excitation light from the emitted fluorescence of a single emitter. The choice of atomic sodium allows for the use of fluorescent dyes, which are common in life-science. This scheme enables efficient photon detection, and a statistical analysis proves an enhancement of the optical signal of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration.

  12. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.;

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...... of the surface electrode. Nonequilibrium Green's function calculations reproduce the trend of the conductance and visualize the current flow through the junction, which is guided through molecule-electrode chemical bonds....

  13. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  14. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  15. Probing Nanoparticle Reactivity at the Single-Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-15

    spontaneous surface restructuring that is fundamentally important for heterogeneous catalysis . The significances of this achievement are that...Mater 7, 992-996 (2008). 20 W. Xu, J. S. Kong & P. Chen. Single-molecule kinetic theory of heterogeneous and enzyme catalysis . J Phys Chem C 113... heterogeneous catalysis . (VCH, 1997). 26 U. Heiz & U. Landman. Nanocatalysis. (Springer, 2007). 27 D. Astruc. Nanoparticles and catalysis . (Wiley-VCH, 2007

  16. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling le...

  17. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Laporte, Gregoire P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated ph...

  18. Quantum Chemical Characterization of Single Molecule Magnets Based on Uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Mariano; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Cramer, Christopher J; Graaf, Coen de; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-03-02

    Multiconfigurational electronic structure theory calculations including spin-orbit coupling effects were performed on four uranium-based single-molecule-magnets. Several quartet and doublet states were computed and the energy gaps between spin-orbit states were then used to determine magnetic susceptibility curves. Trends in experimental magnetic susceptibility curves were well reproduced by the calculations, and key factors affecting performance were identified.

  19. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy.

  20. Predicting single-molecule conductance through machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Breneman, Curt M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a robust machine learning model that is trained on the experimentally determined electrical conductance values of approximately 120 single-molecule junctions used in scanning tunnelling microscope molecular break junction (STM-MBJ) experiments. Quantum mechanical, chemical, and topological descriptors are used to correlate each molecular structure with a conductance value, and the resulting machine-learning model can predict the corresponding value of conductance with correlation coefficients of r 2 = 0.95 for the training set and r 2 = 0.78 for a blind testing set. While neglecting entirely the effects of the metal contacts, this work demonstrates that single molecule conductance can be qualitatively correlated with a number of molecular descriptors through a suitably trained machine learning model. The dominant features in the machine learning model include those based on the electronic wavefunction, the geometry/topology of the molecule as well as the surface chemistry of the molecule. This model can be used to identify promising molecular structures for use in single-molecule electronic circuits and can guide synthesis and experiments in the future.

  1. Single Molecule Electrochemical Detection in Aqueous Solutions and Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Joshua C; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Perry, David; McKelvey, Kim; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-10-20

    Single molecule electrochemical detection (SMED) is an extremely challenging aspect of electroanalytical chemistry, requiring unconventional electrochemical cells and measurements. Here, SMED is reported using a "quad-probe" (four-channel probe) pipet cell, fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barreled pipet and filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, and quasi-reference counter electrodes. A meniscus forms at the end of the probe covering the two working electrodes and is brought into contact with a substrate working electrode surface. In this way, a nanogap cell is produced whereby the two carbon electrodes in the pipet can be used to promote redox cycling of an individual molecule with the substrate. Anticorrelated currents generated at the substrate and tip electrodes, at particular distances (typically tens of nanometers), are consistent with the detection of single molecules. The low background noise realized in this droplet format opens up new opportunities in single molecule electrochemistry, including the use of ionic liquids, as well as aqueous solution, and the quantitative assessment and analysis of factors influencing redox cycling currents, due to a precisely known gap size.

  2. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  3. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  4. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Täuber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule (SM methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC. Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC.

  5. Electrochemical proton relay at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Medvedev, I. G.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    A scheme for the experimental study of single-proton transfer events, based on proton-coupled two-electron transfer between a proton donor and a proton acceptor molecule confined in the tunneling gap between two metal leads in electrolyte solution is suggested. Expressions for the electric current...... are derived and compared with formalism for electron tunneling through redox molecules. The scheme allows studying the kinetics of proton and hydrogen atom transfer as well as kinetic isotope effects at the single-molecule level under electrochemical potential control....

  6. Theoretical investigation on single-molecule chiroptical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakabayashi, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, School and Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Yokojima, S. [Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1423-1 Horinouchi, Hachiouji-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Fukaminato, T. [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20, W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Ogata, K.; Nakamura, S. [Research Cluster for Innovation, Nakamura Lab, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-10

    Some experimental results of chiroptical response of single molecule have already reported. In those experiments, dissymmetry parameter, g was used as an indicator of the relative circular dichroism intensity. The parameter for individual molecules was measured. For the purpose of giving an interpretation or explanation to the experimental result, the dissymmetry parameter is formulated on the basis of Fermi’s golden rule. Subsequently, the value of individual molecules is evaluated as a function of the direction of light propagation to the orientationary fixed molecules. The ground and excited wavefunction of electrons in the molecule and transition moments needed are culculated using the density functional theory.

  7. Electronic Single Molecule Measurements with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jong One

    Richard Feynman said "There's plenty of room at the bottom". This inspired the techniques to improve the single molecule measurements. Since the first single molecule study was in 1961, it has been developed in various field and evolved into powerful tools to understand chemical and biological property of molecules. This thesis demonstrates electronic single molecule measurement with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and two of applications of STM; Break Junction (BJ) and Recognition Tunneling (RT). First, the two series of carotenoid molecules with four different substituents were investigated to show how substituents relate to the conductance and molecular structure. The measured conductance by STM-BJ shows that Nitrogen induces molecular twist of phenyl distal substituents and conductivity increasing rather than Carbon. Also, the conductivity is adjustable by replacing the sort of residues at phenyl substituents. Next, amino acids and peptides were identified through STM-RT. The distribution of the intuitive features (such as amplitude or width) are mostly overlapped and gives only a little bit higher separation probability than random separation. By generating some features in frequency and cepstrum domain, the classification accuracy was dramatically increased. Because of large data size and many features, supporting vector machine (machine learning algorithm for big data) was used to identify the analyte from a data pool of all analytes RT data. The STM-RT opens a possibility of molecular sequencing in single molecule level. Similarly, carbohydrates were studied by STM-RT. Carbohydrates are difficult to read the sequence, due to their huge number of possible isomeric configurations. This study shows that STM-RT can identify not only isomers of mono-saccharides and disaccharides, but also various mono-saccharides from a data pool of eleven analytes. In addition, the binding affinity between recognition molecule and analyte was investigated by comparing with

  8. Single Molecule Study of Photoconversion and Spectral Heterogeneities of Fluorophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Zhiyu

    and mass spectrometry. Upon illumination, A3-TOTA+ degrades in a step-wise manner by de-ethylation on the periphery. The unusual red-shifted fluorescence from the photoproducts is not as intense as the original emission, but the photostability is improved. The acquired knowledge about photoconversion can...... stimulate new pathways in engineering and designing photoconvertible fluorophores, based on the reaction with oxygen or other chemicals. Besides, this results show that dyes that convert into other emissive species could give problems when interpreting single molecule FRET systems. The revealed mechanism...

  9. Single molecule studies of RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Abigail E; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is the first step in gene expression and a key determinant of cellular regulation. Elucidating the mechanism by which RNAP II synthesizes RNA is therefore vital to determining how genes are controlled under diverse biological conditions. Significant advances in understanding RNAP II transcription have been achieved using classical biochemical and structural techniques; however, aspects of the transcription mechanism cannot be assessed using these approaches. The application of single-molecule techniques to study RNAP II transcription has provided new insight only obtainable by studying molecules in this complex system one at a time.

  10. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  11. Probing Protein Channel Dynamics At The Single Molecule Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. Ann; Dunn, Robert C.

    1997-03-01

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance played by protein ion channels in cellular function. These macromolecular pores allow the passage of ions across the cellular membrane and play indispensable roles in all aspects of neurophysiology. While the patch-clamp technique continues to provide elegant descriptions of the kinetic processes involved in ion channel gating, the associated conformational changes remain a mystery. We are using the spectroscopic capabilities and single molecule fluorescence sensitivity of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe these dynamics at the single channel level. Using a newly developed cantilevered NSOM probe capable of probing soft biological samples with single molecule fluorescence sensitivity, we have begun mapping the location of single NMDA receptors in intact rat cortical neurons with <100 nm spatial resolution. We will also present recent results exploring the conformational changes accompanying activation of nuclear pore channels located in the nuclear membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Our recent NSOM and AFM measurements on single nuclear pore complexes reveal large conformational changes taking place upon activation, providing rich, new molecular level details of channel function.

  12. Single-molecule enzymology à la Michaelis-Menten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, Ramon; Walter, Nils G; Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 100 years, deterministic rate equations have been successfully used to infer enzyme-catalysed reaction mechanisms and to estimate rate constants from reaction kinetics experiments conducted in vitro. In recent years, sophisticated experimental techniques have been developed that begin to allow the measurement of enzyme-catalysed and other biopolymer-mediated reactions inside single cells at the single-molecule level. Time-course data obtained using these methods are considerably noisy because molecule numbers within cells are typically quite small. As a consequence, the interpretation and analysis of single-cell data requires stochastic methods, rather than deterministic rate equations. Here, we concisely review both experimental and theoretical techniques that enable single-molecule analysis, with particular emphasis on the major developments in the field of theoretical stochastic enzyme kinetics, from its inception in the mid-20th century to its modern-day status. We discuss the differences between stochastic and deterministic rate equation models, how these depend on enzyme molecule numbers and substrate inflow into the reaction compartment, and how estimation of rate constants from single-cell data is possible using recently developed stochastic approaches.

  13. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  14. High contrast single molecule tracking in the pericellular coat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; McLane, Louis T.; Curtis, Jennifer E.

    2014-03-01

    The pericellular coat is a robust, hydrated, polymer brush-like structure that can extend several micrometers into the extracellular space around living cells. By controlling access to the cell surface, acting as a filter and storage reservoir for proteins, and actively controlling tissue-immune system interactions, the cell coat performs many important functions at scales ranging from the single cell to whole tissues. The cell coat consists of a malleable backbone - the large polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) - with its structure, material properties, and ultimately its bio-functionality tuned by a diverse set of HA binding proteins. These proteins add charge, cross-links and growth factor-like ligands to the coat To probe the dynamic behavior of this soft biomaterial we have used high contrast single molecule imaging, based on highly inclined laser illumination, to observe individual fluorescently labeled HA binding proteins within the cell coat. Our work focuses on the cell coat of living chondrocyte (cartilage) cells, and in particular the effect of the large, highly charged, protein aggrecan on the properties of the coat. Through single molecule imaging we observe that aggrecan is tightly tethered to HA, and plays an important role in cell coat extension and stiffening.

  15. Surface passivation for single-molecule protein studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandradoss, Stanley D; Haagsma, Anna C; Lee, Young Kwang; Hwang, Jae-Ho; Nam, Jwa-Min; Joo, Chirlmin

    2014-04-24

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be instrumental in understanding a wide range of biological phenomena at the nanoscale. Important examples of what this technique can yield to biological sciences are the mechanistic insights on protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. When interactions of proteins are probed at the single-molecule level, the proteins or their substrates are often immobilized on a glass surface, which allows for a long-term observation. This immobilization scheme may introduce unwanted surface artifacts. Therefore, it is essential to passivate the glass surface to make it inert. Surface coating using polyethylene glycol (PEG) stands out for its high performance in preventing proteins from non-specifically interacting with a glass surface. However, the polymer coating procedure is difficult, due to the complication arising from a series of surface treatments and the stringent requirement that a surface needs to be free of any fluorescent molecules at the end of the procedure. Here, we provide a robust protocol with step-by-step instructions. It covers surface cleaning including piranha etching, surface functionalization with amine groups, and finally PEG coating. To obtain a high density of a PEG layer, we introduce a new strategy of treating the surface with PEG molecules over two rounds, which remarkably improves the quality of passivation. We provide representative results as well as practical advice for each critical step so that anyone can achieve the high quality surface passivation.

  16. Tunable magnetoresistance in an asymmetrically coupled single-molecule junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prüser, Henning; Sharp, John; Persson, Mats; Fisher, Andrew J.; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2015-03-01

    Phenomena that are highly sensitive to magnetic fields can be exploited in sensors and non-volatile memories. The scaling of such phenomena down to the single-molecule level may enable novel spintronic devices. Here, we report magnetoresistance in a single-molecule junction arising from negative differential resistance that shifts in a magnetic field at a rate two orders of magnitude larger than Zeeman shifts. This sensitivity to the magnetic field produces two voltage-tunable forms of magnetoresistance, which can be selected via the applied bias. The negative differential resistance is caused by transient charging of an iron phthalocyanine (FePc) molecule on a single layer of copper nitride (Cu2N) on a Cu(001) surface, and occurs at voltages corresponding to the alignment of sharp resonances in the filled and empty molecular states with the Cu(001) Fermi energy. An asymmetric voltage-divider effect enhances the apparent voltage shift of the negative differential resistance with magnetic field, which inherently is on the scale of the Zeeman energy. These results illustrate the impact that asymmetric coupling to metallic electrodes can have on transport through molecules, and highlight how this coupling can be used to develop molecular spintronic applications.

  17. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  18. Dual-Colored DNA Comb Polymers for Single Molecule Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Danielle; Marciel, Amanda; Schroeder, Charles

    2014-03-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of branched biopolymers for single molecule rheology. In our work, we utilize a hybrid enzymatic-synthetic approach to graft ``short'' DNA branches to ``long'' DNA backbones, thereby producing macromolecular DNA comb polymers. The branches and backbones are synthesized via polymerase chain reaction with chemically modified deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs): ``short'' branches consist of Cy5-labeled dNTPs and a terminal azide group, and ``long'' backbones contain dibenzylcyclooctyne-modified (DBCO) dNTPs. In this way, we utilize strain-promoted, copper-free cycloaddition ``click'' reactions for facile grafting of azide-terminated branches at DBCO sites along backbones. Copper-free click reactions are bio-orthogonal and nearly quantitative when carried out under mild conditions. Moreover, comb polymers can be labeled with an intercalating dye (e.g., YOYO) for dual-color fluorescence imaging. We characterized these materials using gel electrophoresis, HPLC, and optical microscopy, with atomic force microscopy in progress. Overall, DNA combs are suitable for single molecule dynamics, and in this way, our work holds the potential to improve our understanding of topologically complex polymer melts and solutions.

  19. From single molecules to life: microscopy at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkowyd, Bartosz; Virant, David; Endesfelder, Ulrike

    2016-10-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is the term commonly given to fluorescence microscopy techniques with resolutions that are not limited by the diffraction of light. Since their conception a little over a decade ago, these techniques have quickly become the method of choice for many biologists studying structures and processes of single cells at the nanoscale. In this review, we present the three main approaches used to tackle the diffraction barrier of ∼200 nm: stimulated-emission depletion (STED) microscopy, structured illumination microscopy (SIM), and single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). We first present a theoretical overview of the techniques and underlying physics, followed by a practical guide to all of the facets involved in designing a super-resolution experiment, including an approachable explanation of the photochemistry involved, labeling methods available, and sample preparation procedures. Finally, we highlight some of the most exciting recent applications of and developments in these techniques, and discuss the outlook for this field. Graphical Abstract Super-resolution microscopy techniques. Working principles of the common approaches stimulated-emission depletion (STED) microscopy, structured illumination microscopy (SIM), and single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM).

  20. Single Molecule Spectroscopy on Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Jelezko, F; Schuler, S; Thews, E; Tietz, C; Wechsler, A; Wrachtrup, J

    2001-01-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy was applied to unravel the energy transfer pathway in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes. Detailed analysis of excitation and fluorescence emission spectra has been made for peripheral plant antenna LHC II and Photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Optical transitions of individual pigments were resolved under nonselective excitation of antenna chlorophylls. High-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy of individual plant antenna LHC II indicates that at low temperatures, the excitation energy is localized on the red-most Chl a pool absorbing at 680 nm. More than one pigment molecule is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the LHC II trimer. The spectral lines of single Chl a molecules absorbing at 675 nm are broadened because of the Foerster energy transfer towards the red-most pigments. Low-temperature spectroscopy on single PS I trimers indicates that two subgroups of pigments, which are present in the red antenna pool, differ by the strength of t...

  1. Single-Molecule Electrochemical Gating in Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, Nicola J.; Higgins, Simon J.; Jeppesen, Jan O.

    2012-01-01

    The single-molecular conductance of a redox active molecular bridge has been studied in an electrochemical single-molecule transistor configuration in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). The redox active pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene (pTTF) moiety was attached to gold contacts at both ends through...... −(CH2)6S– groups, and gating of the redox state was achieved with the electrochemical potential. The water-free, room-temperature, ionic liquid environment enabled both the monocationic and the previously inaccessible dicationic redox states of the pTTF moiety to be studied in the in situ scanning...... and decreases again as the second redox process is passed. This is described as an “off–on–off–on–off” conductance switching behavior. This molecular conductance vs electrochemical potential relation could be modeled well as a sequential two-step charge transfer process with full or partial vibrational...

  2. A Single-Molecule Hershey-Chase Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Van Valen, David; Chen, Yi-Ju; Tuson, Hannah; Wiggins, Paul; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ever since Hershey and Chase used phages to establish DNA as the carrier of genetic information in 1952, the precise mechanisms of phage DNA translocation have been a mystery. While bulk measurements have set a time scale for in vivo DNA translocation during bacteriophage infection, measurements of DNA ejection by single bacteriophages have only been made in vitro. Here, we present direct visualization of single bacteriophages infecting individual Escherichia coli cells. For bacteriophage lambda, we establish a mean ejection time of roughly 5 minutes with significant cell-to-cell variability, including pausing events. In contrast, corresponding in vitro single-molecule ejections take only 10 seconds to reach completion and do not exhibit significant variability. Our data reveal that the velocity of ejection for two different genome lengths collapses onto a single curve. This suggests that in vivo ejections are controlled by the amount of DNA ejected, in contrast with in vitro DNA ejections, which are governed...

  3. Low-temperature phonoemissive tunneling rates in single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun, E-mail: yl2192@gmail.com [University of Illinois, Department of Physics, 1110 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Garg, Anupam, E-mail: agarg@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Tunneling between the two lowest energy levels of single molecule magnets with Ising type anisotropy, accompanied by the emission or absorption of phonons, is considered. Quantitatively accurate calculations of the rates for such tunneling are performed for a model Hamiltonian especially relevant to the best studied example, Fe{sub 8}. Two different methods are used: high-order perturbation theory in the spin–phonon interaction and the non-Ising-symmetric parts of the spin Hamiltonian, and a novel semiclassical approach based on spin-coherent-state-path-integral instantons. The methods are found to be in good quantitative agreement with other, and consistent with previous approaches to the problem. The implications of these results for magnetization of molecular solids of these molecules are discussed briefly.

  4. Synergizing superresolution optical fluctuation imaging with single molecule localization microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schidorsky, Shachar; Razvag, Yair; Golan, Yonatan; Weiss, Shimon; Sherman, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) techniques enable imaging biological samples well beyond the diffraction limit of light, but they vary significantly in their spatial and temporal resolutions. High-order statistical analysis of temporal fluctuations as in superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) also enable imaging beyond diffraction limit, but usually at a lower resolution as compared to SMLM. Since the same data format is acquired for both methods, their algorithms can be applied to the same data set, and thus may be combined synergistically to improve overall imaging performance. Here, we find that SOFI converges much faster than SMLM, provides additive information to SMLM, and can efficiently reject background. We then show how SOFI-assisted SMLM imaging can improve SMLM image reconstruction by rejecting common sources of background, especially under low signal-to-background conditions. The performance of our approach was evaluated using a realistic simulation of fluorescence imagi...

  5. Tracking Electrons in Biological Macromolecules: From Ensemble to Single Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro C. Tabares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nature utilizes oxido-reductases to cater to the energy demands of most biochemical processes in respiratory species. Oxido-reductases are capable of meeting this challenge by utilizing redox active sites, often containing transition metal ions, which facilitate movement and relocation of electrons/protons to create a potential gradient that is used to energize redox reactions. There has been a consistent struggle by researchers to estimate the electron transfer rate constants in physiologically relevant processes. This review provides a brief background on the measurements of electron transfer rates in biological molecules, in particular Cu-containing enzymes, and highlights the recent advances in monitoring these electron transfer events at the single molecule level or better to say, at the individual event level.

  6. Single-molecule optomechanics in “picocavities”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Felix; Schmidt, Mikolaj K.; Dreismann, Alexander; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Zhang, Yao; Demetriadou, Angela; Carnegie, Cloudy; Ohadi, Hamid; de Nijs, Bart; Esteban, Ruben; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2016-11-01

    Trapping light with noble metal nanostructures overcomes the diffraction limit and can confine light to volumes typically on the order of 30 cubic nanometers. We found that individual atomic features inside the gap of a plasmonic nanoassembly can localize light to volumes well below 1 cubic nanometer (“picocavities”), enabling optical experiments on the atomic scale. These atomic features are dynamically formed and disassembled by laser irradiation. Although unstable at room temperature, picocavities can be stabilized at cryogenic temperatures, allowing single atomic cavities to be probed for many minutes. Unlike traditional optomechanical resonators, such extreme optical confinement yields a factor of 106 enhancement of optomechanical coupling between the picocavity field and vibrations of individual molecular bonds. This work sets the basis for developing nanoscale nonlinear quantum optics on the single-molecule level.

  7. Few-photon coherent nonlinear optics with a single molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Maser, Andreas; Utikal, Tobias; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    The pioneering experiments of linear spectroscopy were performed using flames in the 1800s, but nonlinear optical measurements had to wait until lasers became available in the twentieth century. Because the nonlinear cross section of materials is very small, usually macroscopic bulk samples and pulsed lasers are used. Numerous efforts have explored coherent nonlinear signal generation from individual nanoparticles or small atomic ensembles with millions of atoms. Experiments on a single semiconductor quantum dot have also been reported, albeit with a very small yield. Here, we report on coherent nonlinear spectroscopy of a single molecule under continuous-wave single-pass illumination, where efficient photon-molecule coupling in a tight focus allows switching of a laser beam by less than a handful of pump photons nearly resonant with the sharp molecular transition. Aside from their fundamental importance, our results emphasize the potential of organic molecules for applications such as quantum information pro...

  8. Linear trinuclear cobalt(II) single molecule magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhu; Brown, Andrew J; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Gao, Song

    2015-02-14

    The introduction of NaBPh(4) into a methanolic solution of CoCl(2)·(6)H(2)O and 2-[(pyridine-2-ylimine)-methyl]phenol (Hpymp) afforded {[Co(II)(3)(pymp)(4)(MeOH)(2)][BPh(4)](2)}·(2)MeOH (1) with a centro-symmetrically linear trinuclear structure. Magnetic analysis of 1 exhibited significant intracluster ferromagnetic exchange (2.4 cm(-1)) and slow relaxation of magnetization in both zero and non-zero static fields below 5 K, giving the first [Co(II)(3)] single molecule magnet with an effective energy barrier of 17.2(3) cm(-1) under a 500 Oe dc field.

  9. Single-molecule chemical reactions on DNA origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    as templates for building materials with new functional properties. Relatively large nanocomponents such as nanoparticles and biomolecules can also be integrated into DNA nanostructures and imaged. Here, we show that chemical reactions with single molecules can be performed and imaged at a local position...... on a DNA origami scaffold by atomic force microscopy. The high yields and chemoselectivities of successive cleavage and bond-forming reactions observed in these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of post-assembly chemical modification of DNA nanostructures and their potential use as locally......DNA nanotechnology and particularly DNA origami, in which long, single-stranded DNA molecules are folded into predetermined shapes, can be used to form complex self-assembled nanostructures. Although DNA itself has limited chemical, optical or electronic functionality, DNA nanostructures can serve...

  10. Enhancing single molecule imaging in optofluidics and microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E; Laporte, Gregoire P J

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  11. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E. Vasdekis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  12. The Single-Molecule Approach to Membrane Protein Stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Michael G; Hallworth, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The advent of techniques for imaging solitary fluorescent molecules has made possible many new kinds of biological experiments. Here, we describe the application of single-molecule imaging to the problem of subunit stoichiometry in membrane proteins. A membrane protein of unknown stoichiometry, prestin, is coupled to the fluorescent enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and synthesized in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line. We prepare adherent membrane fragments containing prestin-eGFP by osmotic lysis. The molecules are then exposed to continuous low-level excitation until their fluorescence reaches background levels. Their fluorescence decreases in discrete equal-amplitude steps, consistent with the photobleaching of single fluorophores. We count the number of steps required to photobleach each molecule. The molecular stoichiometry is then deduced using a binomial model.

  13. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  14. Structure and mechanics of proteins from single molecules to cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andre E.

    2009-07-01

    Physical factors drive evolution and play important roles in motility and attachment as well as in differentiation. As animal cells adhere to survive, they generate force and "feel" various mechanical features of their surroundings and respond to externally applied forces. This mechanosensitivity requires a substrate for cells to adhere to and a mechanism for cells to apply force, followed by a cellular response to the mechanical properties of the substrate. We have taken an outside-in approach to characterize several aspects of cellular mechanosensitivity. First, we used single molecule force spectroscopy to measure how fibrinogen, an extracellular matrix protein that forms the scaffold of blood clots, responds to applied force and found that it rapidly unfolds in 23 nm steps at forces around 100 pN. Second, we used tensile testing to measure the force-extension behavior of fibrin gels and found that they behave almost linearly to strains of over 100%, have extensibilities of 170 +/- 15%, and undergo a large volume decrease that corresponds to a large and negative peak in compressibility at low strain, which indicates a structural transition. Using electron microscopy and X-ray scattering we concluded that these properties are likely due to coiled-coil unfolding, as observed at the single molecule level in fibrinogen. Moving inside cells, we used total internal reflection fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to image self-assembled myosin filaments. These filaments of motor proteins that are responsible for cell and muscle contractility were found to be asymmetric, with an average of 32% more force generating heads on one half than the other. This could imply a force imbalance, so that rather than being simply contractile, myosin filaments may also be motile in cells.

  15. Exploring single-molecule dynamics with fluorescence nanoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringemann, Christian; Harke, Ben; Von Middendorff, Claas; Medda, Rebecca; Leutenegger, Marcel; Schoenle, Andreas; W Hell, Stefan; Eggeling, Christian [Department of Nanobiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Honigmann, Alf; Wagner, Richard [Biophysik, University Osnabrueck, FB Biologie/Chemie, Osnabrueck (Germany)], E-mail: ceggeli@gwdg.de

    2009-10-15

    The study of molecular dynamics at the single-molecule level with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and far-field optics has contributed greatly to the functional understanding of complex systems. Unfortunately, such studies are restricted to length scales of >200 nm because diffraction does not allow further reduction of the measurement volume. This sets an upper limit on the applicable concentration of fluorescently labeled molecules and even more importantly, averages out details of nanoscale dynamics. By combining FCS and fluorescence intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) with sub-diffraction-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, we remove this restriction and obtain open measurement volumes of nanoscale dimensions which are tunable in size. As a consequence, single-molecule studies can now be extended to nanoscale dynamics and may be applied to much larger, often endogenous concentrations. In solution, low-brightness signal from axial out-of-focus volume shells was taken into account by using both FCS and FIDA in conjunction to analyze the data. In two-dimensional systems, such as lipid membranes, the background is greatly reduced and measurements feature excellent signal-to-noise ratios. Measurement foci of down to 30 nm in diameter directly reveal anomalous diffusion of lipids in the plasma membrane of living cells and allow for the determination of on/off rates of the binding of lipids to other membrane constituents. Such important insight into the prominent biological question of lipid membrane organization or 'lipid rafts' shows that combining fluctuation analysis with STED-engineered ultra-small measurement volumes is a viable and powerful new approach to probing molecular dynamics on the nanoscale.

  16. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F

    2006-08-16

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  17. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  18. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  19. Tunneling spectroscopy of organic monolayers and single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipps, K W

    2012-01-01

    Basic concepts in tunneling spectroscopy applied to molecular systems are presented. Junctions of the form M-A-M, M-I-A-M, and M-I-A-I'-M, where A is an active molecular layer, are considered. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is found to be readily applied to all the above device types. It can provide both vibrational and electron spectroscopic data about the molecules comprising the A layer. In IETS there are no strong selection rules (although there are preferences) so that transitions that are normally IR, Raman, or even photon-forbidden can be observed. In the electronic transition domain, spin and Laporte forbidden transitions may be observed. Both vibrational and electronic IETS can be acquired from single molecules. The negative aspect of this seemingly ideal spectroscopic method is the thermal line width of about 5 k(B)T. This limits the useful measurement of vibrational IETS to temperatures below about 10 K. In the case of most electronic transitions where the intrinsic linewidth is much broader, useful experiments above 100 K are possible. One further limitation of electronic IETS is that it is generally limited to transitions with energy less than about 20,000 cm(-1). IETS can be identified by peaks in d(2) I/dV (2) vs bias voltage plots that occur at the same position (but not necessarily same intensity) in either bias polarity.Elastic tunneling spectroscopy is discussed in the context of processes involving molecular ionization and electron affinity states, a technique we call orbital mediated tunneling spectroscopy, or OMTS. OMTS can be applied readily to M-I-A-M and M-I-A-I'-M systems, but application to M-A-M junctions is problematic. Spectra can be obtained from single molecules. Ionization state results correlate well with UPS spectra obtained from the same systems in the same environment. Both ionization and affinity levels measured by OMTS can usually be correlated with one electron oxidation and reduction potentials for the

  20. Developing DNA nanotechnology using single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: An important effort in the DNA nanotechnology field is focused on the rational design and manufacture of molecular structures and dynamic devices made of DNA. As is the case for other technologies that deal with manipulation of matter, rational development requires high quality and informative feedback on the building blocks and final products. For DNA nanotechnology such feedback is typically provided by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analytical tools provide excellent structural information; however, usually they do not provide high-resolution dynamic information. For the development of DNA-made dynamic devices such as machines, motors, robots, and computers this constitutes a major problem. Bulk-fluorescence techniques are capable of providing dynamic information, but because only ensemble averaged information is obtained, the technique may not adequately describe the dynamics in the context of complex DNA devices. The single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) technique offers a unique combination of capabilities that make it an excellent tool for guiding the development of DNA-made devices. The technique has been increasingly used in DNA nanotechnology, especially for the analysis of structure, dynamics, integrity, and operation of DNA-made devices; however, its capabilities are not yet sufficiently familiar to the community. The purpose of this Account is to demonstrate how different SMF tools can be utilized for the development of DNA devices and for structural dynamic investigation of biomolecules in general and DNA molecules in particular. Single-molecule diffusion-based Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET/ALEX) and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques are briefly described and demonstrated. To illustrate the many applications of SMF to DNA nanotechnology, examples of SMF studies of DNA hairpins and

  1. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jerry; Tomlinson, Ian; Warnement, Michael; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana; Piston, David; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, we implement a novel, single molecule approach to define the localization and mobility of the brain's major target of widely prescribed antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT labeled with single quantum dot (Qdot) revealed unsuspected features of transporter mobility with cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (often referred to as ``lipid rafts'') and cytoskeleton network linked to transporter activation. We document two pools of surface SERT proteins defined by their lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion in the plasma membrane and a second that displays significantly restricted mobility and localizes to cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Diffusion model prediction and instantaneous velocity analysis indicated that stimuli that act through p38 MAPK-dependent signaling pathways to activate SERT trigger rapid SERT movements within membrane microdomains. Cytoskeleton disruption showed that SERT lateral mobility behaves a membrane raft-constrained, cytoskeleton-associated manner. Our results identify an unsuspected aspect of neurotransmitter transporter regulation that we propose reflects the dissociation of inhibitory, SERT-associated cytoskeletal anchors.

  2. A theoretical justification for single molecule peptide sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Swaminathan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The proteomes of cells, tissues, and organisms reflect active cellular processes and change continuously in response to intracellular and extracellular cues. Deep, quantitative profiling of the proteome, especially if combined with mRNA and metabolite measurements, should provide an unprecedented view of cell state, better revealing functions and interactions of cell components. Molecular diagnostics and biomarker discovery should benefit particularly from the accurate quantification of proteomes, since complex diseases like cancer change protein abundances and modifications. Currently, shotgun mass spectrometry is the primary technology for high-throughput protein identification and quantification; while powerful, it lacks high sensitivity and coverage. We draw parallels with next-generation DNA sequencing and propose a strategy, termed fluorosequencing, for sequencing peptides in a complex protein sample at the level of single molecules. In the proposed approach, millions of individual fluorescently labeled peptides are visualized in parallel, monitoring changing patterns of fluorescence intensity as N-terminal amino acids are sequentially removed, and using the resulting fluorescence signatures (fluorosequences to uniquely identify individual peptides. We introduce a theoretical foundation for fluorosequencing and, by using Monte Carlo computer simulations, we explore its feasibility, anticipate the most likely experimental errors, quantify their potential impact, and discuss the broad potential utility offered by a high-throughput peptide sequencing technology.

  3. Ferromagnetic manganese "cubes": from PSII to single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Ross; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Prescimone, Alessandro; Siczek, Milosz; Lis, Tadeusz; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Brechin, Euan K; Milios, Constantinos J

    2010-05-28

    The reaction of Mn(O₂CMe)₂·2H₂O with Me-saoH₂ (Me-saoH₂ = 2-hydroxyphenylethanone oxime) in MeCN forms the complex [Mn(III)₄(Me-sao)₄(Me-saoH)₄] (1) in good yields. Replacing Me-saoH₂ with Naphth-saoH₂ (Naphth-saoH₂ = 2-hydroxy-1-napthaldoxime) in the presence of CH₃ONa forms the complex [Mn(III)₄(Naphth-sao)₄(Naphth-saoH)₄] (2) in low yields, while the reaction between Mn(ClO₄)₂·6H₂O, Et-saoH₂ (Et-saoH₂= 2-hydroxypropiophenone oxime) and NBu₄OH in MeCN gives the complex [Mn(III)₄(Et-sao)₄(Et-saoH)₄] (3) in moderate yields. All three tetrametallic cages exclusively contain Mn(III) centres arranged in a "cube"-like topology, in which the metal centres are connected by -N-O(oximate) groups. The magnetic properties of 1-3 are near identical, revealing the presence of only ferromagnetic interactions between the metal ions leading to high-spin ground states of S = 8. The complexes display frequency dependent out-of-phase signals in ac susceptibility studies and, in the case of 1 single-molecule magnetism has been observed by means of single-crystal hysteresis loop measurements.

  4. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications.

  5. Single molecule analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DNA replication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; Drosopoulos, William C; Quaresma, Marina Mônaco; Marques, Catarina A; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; McCulloch, Richard; Schildkraut, Carl L; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-03-11

    Eukaryotic genome duplication relies on origins of replication, distributed over multiple chromosomes, to initiate DNA replication. A recent genome-wide analysis of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of sleeping sickness, localized its replication origins to the boundaries of multigenic transcription units. To better understand genomic replication in this organism, we examined replication by single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. We determined the average speed of replication forks of procyclic and bloodstream form cells and we found that T. brucei DNA replication rate is similar to rates seen in other eukaryotes. We also analyzed the replication dynamics of a central region of chromosome 1 in procyclic forms. We present evidence for replication terminating within the central part of the chromosome and thus emanating from both sides, suggesting a previously unmapped origin toward the 5' extremity of chromosome 1. Also, termination is not at a fixed location in chromosome 1, but is rather variable. Importantly, we found a replication origin located near an ORC1/CDC6 binding site that is detected after replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment, suggesting it may be a dormant origin activated in response to replicative stress. Collectively, our findings support the existence of more replication origins in T. brucei than previously appreciated.

  6. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  7. DONOR-ACCEPTOR CONJUGATED COOLIGOMERS FOR SINGLE MOLECULE SOLAR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-fei Qu; Jian Liu; Si-da Li; Zhi-yuan Xie; Yan-hou Geng

    2013-01-01

    Five novel donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated cooligomers (F4B-hP,F5B-hP,F5B2[1,2]-hP,F5B2[1,3]-hP and F7B2[1,2]-hP) were synthesized.The absorption spectra of the cooligomers cover a wide range from 300 nm to 630 nm.The cooligomers could form films featured by alternating D-A lamellar nanostructures with the periods relative to the molecular lengths after thermal annealing or solvent vapor annealing.Single molecule solar cells were fabricated,and F5B-hP exhibited the best device performance.When the film of F5B-hP was thermally annealed,a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.56% was realized.With solvent vapor annealing,the PCE could be further improved to 1.72% with a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 5.76 mA/cm2,an open-circuit voltage (VoC) of 0.87 V and a fill factor (FF) of 0.34.

  8. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Su

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments, microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  9. Chapter 15: Live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Panorchan, Porntula; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method to measure the kinetics and micromechanical properties of individual receptor-ligand bonds formed between two living cells. Using living cells rather than recombinant proteins ensures that the orientation, surface density, and posttranslational modifications of the probed receptors are physiological and that their regulated attachment to the cytoskeleton can occur. A cell is tethered to a flexible cantilever and brought into contact with cells adherent to a substratum before being pulled at a controlled retraction velocity. Measurements of bond rupture forces and associated bond loading rates over an extended range of retraction velocities allow us to compute precisely the tensile strength, reactive compliance, lifetime, and dissociation rate of individual intercellular receptor-ligand bonds. We also describe tests of specificity and Monte Carlo simulations, which ensure that measurements obtained by this method correspond to a single type of intercellular adhesion bond. We illustrate this live-cell single molecule force spectroscopy assay by characterizing homotypic bonds composed of vascular endothelial -cadherin pairs formed between living endothelial cells. This versatile assay could be used to establish the molecular principles that drive a wide range of important physiological processes involving receptor-mediated intercellular adhesion, such as the immunological synapse between a lymphocyte and an antigen-presenting cell and synaptic interactions between neuron cells, and pathological processes resulting in altered intercellular adhesion.

  10. Computing magnetic anisotropy constants of single molecule magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramasesha; Shaon Sahoo; Rajamani Raghunathan; Diptiman Sen

    2009-09-01

    We present here a theoretical approach to compute the molecular magnetic anisotropy parameters, and for single molecule magnets in any given spin eigenstate of exchange spin Hamiltonian. We first describe a hybrid constant -valence bond (VB) technique of solving spin Hamiltonians employing full spatial and spin symmetry adaptation and we illustrate this technique by solving the exchange Hamiltonian of the Cu6Fe8 system. Treating the anisotropy Hamiltonian as perturbation, we compute the and values for various eigenstates of the exchange Hamiltonian. Since, the dipolar contribution to the magnetic anisotropy is negligibly small, we calculate the molecular anisotropy from the single-ion anisotropies of the metal centers. We have studied the variation of and by rotating the single-ion anisotropies in the case of Mn12Ac and Fe8 SMMs in ground and few low-lying excited states of the exchange Hamiltonian. In both the systems, we find that the molecular anisotropy changes drastically when the single-ion anisotropies are rotated. While in Mn12Ac SMM values depend strongly on the spin of the eigenstate, it is almost independent of the spin of the eigenstate in Fe8 SMM. We also find that the value is almost insensitive to the orientation of the anisotropy of the core Mn(IV) ions. The dependence of on the energy gap between the ground and the excited states in both the systems has also been studied by using different sets of exchange constants.

  11. Experimental demonstration of a single-molecule electric motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Heather L; Murphy, Colin J; Jewell, April D; Baber, Ashleigh E; Iski, Erin V; Khodaverdian, Harout Y; McGuire, Allister F; Klebanov, Nikolai; Sykes, E Charles H

    2011-09-04

    For molecules to be used as components in molecular machines, methods that couple individual molecules to external energy sources and that selectively excite motion in a given direction are required. Significant progress has been made in the construction of molecular motors powered by light and by chemical reactions, but electrically driven motors have not yet been built, despite several theoretical proposals for such motors. Here we report that a butyl methyl sulphide molecule adsorbed on a copper surface can be operated as a single-molecule electric motor. Electrons from a scanning tunnelling microscope are used to drive the directional motion of the molecule in a two-terminal setup. Moreover, the temperature and electron flux can be adjusted to allow each rotational event to be monitored at the molecular scale in real time. The direction and rate of the rotation are related to the chiralities of both the molecule and the tip of the microscope (which serves as the electrode), illustrating the importance of the symmetry of the metal contacts in atomic-scale electrical devices.

  12. A single-molecule view of gene regulation in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Single-cell analysis has revealed that transcription is dynamic and stochastic, but tools are lacking that can determine the mechanism operating at a single gene. Here we utilize single-molecule observations of RNA in fixed and living cells to develop a single-cell model of steroid-receptor mediated gene activation. Steroid receptors coordinate a diverse range of responses in higher eukaryotes and are involved in a wide range of human diseases, including cancer. Steroid receptor response elements are present throughout the human genome and modulate chromatin remodeling and transcription in both a local and long-range fashion. As such, steroid receptor-mediated transcription is a paradigm of genetic control in the metazoan nucleus. Moreover, the ligand-dependent nature of these transcription factors makes them appealing targets for therapeutic intervention, necessitating a quantitative understanding of how receptors control output from target genes. We determine that steroids drive mRNA synthesis by frequency modulation of transcription. This digital behavior in single cells gives rise to the well-known analog dose response across the population. To test this model, we developed a light-activation technology to turn on a single gene and follow dynamic synthesis of RNA from the activated locus. The response delay is a measure of time required for chromatin remodeling at a single gene.

  13. A single molecule investigation of the photostability of quantum dots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Christensen Arnspang

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are very attractive probes for multi-color fluorescence imaging in biological applications because of their immense brightness and reported extended photostability. We report here however that single QDs, suitable for biological applications, that are subject to continuous blue excitation from a conventional 100 W mercury arc lamp will undergo a continuous blue-switching of the emission wavelength eventually reaching a permanent dark, photobleached state. We further show that β-mercaptoethanol has a dual stabilizing effect on the fluorescence emission of QDs: 1 by increasing the frequency of time that a QD is in its fluorescent state, and 2 by decreasing the photobleaching rate. The observed QD color spectral switching is especially detrimental for multi-color single molecule applications, as we regularly observe spectral blue-shifts of 50 nm, or more even after only ten seconds of illumination. However, of significant importance for biological applications, we find that even small, biologically compatible, concentrations (25 µM of β-mercaptoethanol has a significant stabilizing effect on the emission color of QDs, but that greater amounts are required to completely abolish the spectral blue shifting or to minimize the emission intermittency of QDs.

  14. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  15. Single-molecule magnet Mn12 on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Guo; Fry, James N.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2014-09-01

    We study energetics, electronic and magnetic structures, and magnetic anisotropy barriers of a monolayer of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), [Mn12O12(COOR)16](H2O)4 (abbreviated as Mn12, with R=H, CH3, C6H5, and CHCl2), on a graphene surface using spin-polarized density-functional theory with generalized gradient corrections and the inclusion of van der Waals interactions. We find that Mn12 molecules with ligands -H, -CH3, and -C6H5 are physically adsorbed on graphene through weak van der Waals interactions, and a much stronger ionic interaction occurs using a -CHCl2 ligand. The strength of bonding is closely related to the charge transfer between the molecule and the graphene sheet and can be manipulated by strain in the graphene; specifically, tension enhances n doping of graphene, and compression encourages p doping. The magnetic anisotropy barrier is computed by including the spin-orbit interaction within density-functional theory. The barriers for the Mn12 molecules with ligands -H, -CH3 and -C6H5 on graphene surfaces remain unchanged (within 1K) from those of isolated molecules because of their weak interaction, and a much larger reduction (10K) is observed when using the -CHCl2 ligand on graphene due to a substantial structural deformation as a consequence of the much stronger interaction. Neither strain in graphene nor charge transfer affects the magnetic anisotropy barrier significantly. Finally, we discuss the effect of strong correlation in the high-spin state of a Mn12 SMM and the consequence of SMM-surface adsorption.

  16. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for single-molecule studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Chen, Danqi; Yue, Hongjun; French, Jarrod B; Rufo, Joseph; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-06-21

    Recent developments on various lab-on-a-chip techniques allow miniaturized and integrated devices to perform on-chip single-molecule studies. Fluidic-based platforms that utilize unique microscale fluidic behavior are capable of conducting single-molecule experiments with high sensitivities and throughputs, while biomolecular systems can be studied on-chip using techniques such as DNA curtains, magnetic tweezers, and solid-state nanopores. The advances of these on-chip single-molecule techniques lead to next-generation lab-on-a-chip devices, such as DNA transistors, and single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology for rapid and low-cost whole genome DNA sequencing. In this Focus article, we will discuss some recent successes in the development of lab-on-a-chip techniques for single-molecule studies and expound our thoughts on the near future of on-chip single-molecule studies.

  17. DNA origami as biocompatible surface to match single-molecule and ensemble experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments on immobilized molecules allow unique insights into the dynamics of molecular machines and enzymes as well as their interactions. The immobilization, however, can invoke perturbation to the activity of biomolecules causing incongruities between single molecule and ensemble measurements. Here we introduce the recently developed DNA origami as a platform to transfer ensemble assays to the immobilized single molecule level without changing the nano-environment of the ...

  18. From nanofabrication to self-fabrication--tailored chemistry for control of single molecule electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    as alternatives to the dominant top-down nanofabrication techniques. One example is solution-based self-assembly of a molecule enclosed by two gold nanorod electrodes. This article will discuss recent attempts to control the self-assembly process by the use of supramolecular chemistry and how to tailor......Single molecule electronics is a field of research focused on the use of single molecules as electronics components. During the past 15 years the field has concentrated on development of test beds for measurements on single molecules. Bottom-up approaches to single molecule devices are emerging...

  19. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  20. Calix[4]arene Based Single-Molecule Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karotsis, Georgios; Teat, Simon J.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Piligkos, Stergios; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Brechin, Euan K.

    2009-06-04

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have been the subject of much interest in recent years because their molecular nature and inherent physical properties allow the crossover between classical and quantum physics to be observed. The macroscopic observation of quantum phenomena - tunneling between different spin states, quantum interference between tunnel paths - not only allows scientists to study quantum mechanical laws in great detail, but also provides model systems with which to investigate the possible implementation of spin-based solid state qubits and molecular spintronics. The isolation of small, simple SMMs is therefore an exciting prospect. To date almost all SMMs have been made via the self-assembly of 3d metal ions in the presence of bridging/chelating organic ligands. However, very recently an exciting new class of SMMs, based on 3d metal clusters (or single lanthanide ions) housed within polyoxometalates, has appeared. These types of molecule, in which the SMM is completely encapsulated within (or shrouded by) a 'protective' organic or inorganic sheath have much potential for design and manipulation: for example, for the removal of unwanted dipolar interactions, the introduction of redox activity, or to simply aid functionalization for surface grafting. Calix[4]arenes are cyclic (typically bowl-shaped) polyphenols that have been used extensively in the formation of versatile self-assembled supramolecular structures. Although many have been reported, p-{sup t}But-calix[4]arene and calix[4]arene (TBC4 and C4 respectively, Figure 1A) are frequently encountered due to (a) synthetic accessibility, and (b) vast potential for alteration at either the upper or lower rim of the macrocyclic framework. Within the field of supramolecular chemistry, TBC4 is well known for interesting polymorphic behavior and phase transformations within anti-parallel bi-layer arrays, while C4 often forms self-included trimers. The polyphenolic nature of calix[n]arenes (where

  1. Localization microscopy: mapping cellular dynamics with single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A J; Hess, S T

    2014-04-01

    Resolution describes the smallest details within a sample that can be recovered by a microscope lens system. For optical microscopes detecting visible light, diffraction limits the resolution to ∼200-250 nm. In contrast, localization measures the position of an isolated object using its image. Single fluorescent molecules can be localized with an uncertainty of a few tens of nanometres, and in some cases less than one nanometre. Superresolution fluorescence localization microscopy (SRFLM) images and localizes fluorescent molecules in a sample. By controlling the visibility of the fluorescent molecules with light, it is possible to cause a sparse subset of the tags to fluoresce and be spatially separated from each other. A movie is acquired with a camera, capturing images of many sets of visible fluorescent tags over a period of time. The movie is then analysed by a computer whereby all of the single molecules are independently measured, and their positions are recorded. When the coordinates of a sufficient number of molecules are collected, an image can be rendered by plotting the coordinates of the localized molecules. The spatial resolution of these rendered images can be better than 20 nm, roughly an order of magnitude better than the diffraction limited resolution. The invention of SRFLM has led to an explosion of related techniques. Through the use of specialized optics, the fluorescent signal can be split into multiple detection channels. These channels can capture additional information such as colour (emission wavelength), orientation and three-dimensional position of the detected molecules. Measurement of the colour of the detected fluorescence can allow researchers to distinguish multiple types of fluorescent tags and to study the interaction between multiple molecules of interest. Three-dimensional imaging and determination of molecular orientations offer insight into structural organization of the sample. SRFLM is compatible with living samples and

  2. Theoretical analysis of single molecule spectroscopy lineshapes of conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Murali

    Conjugated Polymers(CPs) exhibit a wide range of highly tunable optical properties. Quantitative and detailed understanding of the nature of excitons responsible for such a rich optical behavior has significant implications for better utilization of CPs for more efficient plastic solar cells and other novel optoelectronic devices. In general, samples of CPs are plagued with substantial inhomogeneous broadening due to various sources of disorder. Single molecule emission spectroscopy (SMES) offers a unique opportunity to investigate the energetics and dynamics of excitons and their interactions with phonon modes. The major subject of the present thesis is to analyze and understand room temperature SMES lineshapes for a particular CP, called poly(2,5-di-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (DEH-PPV). A minimal quantum mechanical model of a two-level system coupled to a Brownian oscillator bath is utilized. The main objective is to identify the set of model parameters best fitting a SMES lineshape for each of about 200 samples of DEH-PPV, from which new insight into the nature of exciton-bath coupling can be gained. This project also entails developing a reliable computational methodology for quantum mechanical modeling of spectral lineshapes in general. Well-known optimization techniques such as gradient descent, genetic algorithms, and heuristic searches have been tested, employing an L2 measure between theoretical and experimental lineshapes for guiding the optimization. However, all of these tend to result in theoretical lineshapes qualitatively different from experimental ones. This is attributed to the ruggedness of the parameter space and inadequateness of the L2 measure. On the other hand, when the dynamic reduction of the original parameter space to a 2-parameter space through feature searching and visualization of the search space paths using directed acyclic graphs(DAGs), the qualitative nature of the fitting improved significantly. For a more

  3. Injection molded nanofluidic chips: Fabrication method and functional tests using single-molecule DNA experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, Pawel; Persson, Karl Fredrik; Kristensen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels.......We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels....

  4. Direct Observation of Magnetic Anisotropy in an Individual Fe4 Single-Molecule Magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burzuri, E.; Zyazin, A.S.; Cornia, A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    We study three-terminal charge transport through individual Fe4 single-molecule magnets. Magnetic anisotropy of the single molecule is directly observed by introducing a spectroscopic technique based on measuring the position of the degeneracy point as a function of gate voltage and applied magnetic

  5. Single molecules in soft matter : a study of biomolecular conformation, heterogeneity and plasmon enhanced fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamics of single molecules and individual gold nanorods in glycerol at variable temperatures. We demonstrate temperature-cycle microscopy on FRET-labeled polyproline and double-stranded DNA molecules to access micro-second dynamics of single molecules, and reveal the influences of dye

  6. Single-molecule analysis of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.; Mechali, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    The recent advent in single-molecule imaging and manipulation methods has made a significant impact on the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying many essential cellular processes. Single-molecule techniques such as electron microscopy and DNA fiber assays have been employed to study the d

  7. Electrochemical detection of single molecules using abiotic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinena, Jose-Maria; Redondo, Antonio; Olazabal, Virginia; Hoffbauer, Mark A.; Akhadov, Elshan A.

    2009-12-29

    A barrier structure for use in an electrochemical stochastic membrane sensor for single molecule detection. The sensor is based upon inorganic nanopores having electrically tunable dimensions. The inorganic nanopores are formed from inorganic materials and an electrically conductive polymer. Methods of making the barrier structure and sensing single molecules using the barrier structure are also described.

  8. Resolving Single-Molecule Assembled Patterns with Superresolution Blink-Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Strackharn, Mathias; Stahl, Stefan W.; Summerer, Wolfram; Steinhauer, Christian; Forthmann, Carsten; Puchner, Elias M.; Vogelsang, Jan; Gaub, Hermann E.; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally combine a recently developed AFM-based molecule-by-molecule assembly (single-molecule cut-and-paste, SMCP) with subdiffraction resolution fluorescence imaging. Using “Blink-Microscopy”, which exploits the fluctuating emission of single molecules for the reconstruction

  9. An Organolanthanide Building Block Approach to Single-Molecule Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriman, Katie L M; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-21

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are highly sought after for their potential application in high-density information storage, spintronics, and quantum computing. SMMs exhibit slow relaxation of the magnetization of purely molecular origin, thus making them excellent candidates towards the aforementioned applications. In recent years, significant focus has been placed on the rare earth elements due to their large intrinsic magnetic anisotropy arising from the near degeneracy of the 4f orbitals. Traditionally, coordination chemistry has been utilized to fabricate lanthanide-based SMMs; however, heteroatomic donor atoms such as oxygen and nitrogen have limited orbital overlap with the shielded 4f orbitals. Thus, control over the anisotropic axis and induction of f-f interactions are limited, meaning that the performance of these systems can only extend so far. To this end, we have placed considerable attention on the development of novel SMMs whose donor atoms are conjugated hydrocarbons, thereby allowing us to perturb the crystal field of lanthanide ions through the use of an electronic π-cloud. This approach allows for fine tuning of the anisotropic axis of the molecule, allowing this method the potential to elicit SMMs capable of reaching much larger values for the two vital performance measurements of an SMM, the energy barrier to spin reversal (Ueff), and the blocking temperature of the magnetization (TB). In this Account, we describe our efforts to exploit the inherent anisotropy of the late 4f elements; namely, Dy(III) and Er(III), through the use of cyclooctatetraenyl (COT) metallocenes. With respect to the Er(III) derivatives, we have seen record breaking success, reaching blocking temperatures as high as 14 K with frozen solution magnetometry. These results represent the first example of such a high TB being observed for a system with only a single spin center, formally known as a single-ion magnet (SIM). Our continued interrelationship between theoretical

  10. Directional Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D; Camden, Jon P; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-05-08

    Controlling light from single emitters is an overarching theme of nano-optics. Antennas are routinely used to modify the angular emission patterns of radio wave sources. "Optical antennas" translate these principles to visible and infrared wavelengths and have been recently used to modify fluorescence from single quantum dots and single molecules. Understanding the properties of single molecules, however, would be advanced were one able to observe their vibrational spectra through Raman scattering in a very reproducible manner but it is a hugely challenging task, as Raman scattering cross sections are very weak. Here we measure for the first time the highly directional emission patterns of Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas fabricated on a chip. More than a thousand single molecule events are observed, revealing that an unprecedented near-unity fraction of optical antennas have single molecule sensitivity.

  11. Optical tweezers absolute calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Dutra, R S; Neto, P A Maia; Nussenzveig, H M

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past fifteen years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spo...

  12. A starting point for fluorescence-based single-molecule measurements in biomolecular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Alexander; Zander, Adrian; Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Schulz, Sarah; Lalkens, Birka; Tinnefeld, Philip; Grohmann, Dina

    2014-09-30

    Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  13. A Starting Point for Fluorescence-Based Single-Molecule Measurements in Biomolecular Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gust

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  14. Future challenges in single-molecule fluorescence and laser trap approaches to studies of molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elting, Mary Williard; Spudich, James A

    2012-12-11

    Single-molecule analysis is a powerful modern form of biochemistry, in which individual kinetic steps of a catalytic cycle of an enzyme can be explored in exquisite detail. Both single-molecule fluorescence and single-molecule force techniques have been widely used to characterize a number of protein systems. We focus here on molecular motors as a paradigm. We describe two areas where we expect to see exciting developments in the near future: first, characterizing the coupling of force production to chemical and mechanical changes in motors, and second, understanding how multiple motors work together in the environment of the cell.

  15. Hydrogel Droplet Microfluidics for High-Throughput Single Molecule/Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2017-01-17

    Heterogeneity among individual molecules and cells has posed significant challenges to traditional bulk assays, due to the assumption of average behavior, which would lose important biological information in heterogeneity and result in a misleading interpretation. Single molecule/cell analysis has become an important and emerging field in biological and biomedical research for insights into heterogeneity between large populations at high resolution. Compared with the ensemble bulk method, single molecule/cell analysis explores the information on time trajectories, conformational states, and interactions of individual molecules/cells, all key factors in the study of chemical and biological reaction pathways. Various powerful techniques have been developed for single molecule/cell analysis, including flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy, optical and magnetic tweezers, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and so forth. However, some of them have the low-throughput issue that has to analyze single molecules/cells one by one. Flow cytometry is a widely used high-throughput technique for single cell analysis but lacks the ability for intercellular interaction study and local environment control. Droplet microfluidics becomes attractive for single molecule/cell manipulation because single molecules/cells can be individually encased in monodisperse microdroplets, allowing high-throughput analysis and manipulation with precise control of the local environment. Moreover, hydrogels, cross-linked polymer networks that swell in the presence of water, have been introduced into droplet microfluidic systems as hydrogel droplet microfluidics. By replacing an aqueous phase with a monomer or polymer solution, hydrogel droplets can be generated on microfluidic chips for encapsulation of single molecules/cells according to the Poisson distribution. The sol-gel transition property endows the hydrogel droplets with new functionalities and diversified applications in single

  16. Monitoring early fusion dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 at single-molecule resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Sean X; Siliciano, Robert F; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-07-01

    The fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to host cells is a dynamic process governed by the interaction between glycoproteins on the viral envelope and the major receptor, CD4, and coreceptor on the surface of the cell. How these receptors organize at the virion-cell interface to promote a fusion-competent site is not well understood. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we map the tensile strengths, lifetimes, and energy barriers of individual intermolecular bonds between CCR5-tropic HIV-1 gp120 and its receptors CD4 and CCR5 or CXCR4 as a function of the interaction time with the cell. According to the Bell model, at short times of contact between cell and virion, the gp120-CD4 bond is able to withstand forces up to 35 pN and has an initial lifetime of 0.27 s and an intermolecular length of interaction of 0.34 nm. The initial bond also has an energy barrier of 6.7 k(B)T (where k(B) is Boltzmann's constant and T is absolute temperature). However, within 0.3 s, individual gp120-CD4 bonds undergo rapid destabilization accompanied by a shortened lifetime and a lowered tensile strength. This destabilization is significantly enhanced by the coreceptor CCR5, not by CXCR4 or fusion inhibitors, which suggests that it is directly related to a conformational change in the gp120-CD4 bond. These measurements highlight the instability and low tensile strength of gp120-receptor bonds, uncover a synergistic role for CCR5 in the progression of the gp120-CD4 bond, and suggest that the cell-virus adhesion complex is functionally arranged about a long-lived gp120-coreceptor bond.

  17. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes.

  18. Single vesicle biochips for ultra-miniaturized nanoscale fluidics and single molecule bioscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Andreas Lauge; Lohr, Christina; Christensen, Sune M.;

    2013-01-01

    , their fabrication via controlled self-assembly, and their characterization using fluorescence microscopy. We also highlight their applications in selected fields such as nanofluidics and single molecule bioscience. Despite their great potential for improved biocompatibility, extreme miniaturization and high...

  19. Single Molecule Photobleaching Probes the Exciton Wavefunction in a Multichromophoric System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernando, J.; Hoogenboom, J.P.; Dijk, van E.M.H.P.; Garcia-Lopez, J.J.; Crego Calama, M.; Reinhoudt, D.N.; Hulst, van N.F.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    The exciton wave function of a trichromophoric system is investigated by means of single molecule spectroscopy at room temperature. Individual trimers exhibit superradiance and loss of vibronic structure in emission spectrum, features proving exciton delocalization. We identify two distinct photodeg

  20. Shifting molecular localization by plasmonic coupling in a single-molecule mirage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Mario; Vietz, Carolin; Stefani, Fernando Daniel; Acuna, Guillermo Pedro; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, two fields have dominated the attention of sub-diffraction photonics research: plasmonics and fluorescence nanoscopy. Nanoscopy based on single-molecule localization offers a practical way to explore plasmonic interactions with nanometre resolution. However, this seemingly straightforward technique may retrieve false positional information. Here, we make use of the DNA origami technique to both control a nanometric separation between emitters and a gold nanoparticle, and as a platform for super-resolution imaging based on single-molecule localization. This enables a quantitative comparison between the position retrieved from single-molecule localization, the true position of the emitter and full-field simulations. We demonstrate that plasmonic coupling leads to shifted molecular localizations of up to 30 nm: a single-molecule mirage.

  1. Single-molecule detection at high concentrations with optical aperture nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Shah; Karim, Farzia; Zhao, Chenglong

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule detection has become an indispensable technology in life science, and medical research. In order to get meaningful information on many biological processes, single-molecule analysis is required in micro-molar concentrations. At such high concentrations, it is very challenging to isolate a single molecule with conventional diffraction-limited optics. Recently, optical aperture nanoantennas (OANs) have emerged as a powerful tool to enhance the single-molecule detection under a physiological environment. The OANs, which consist of nano-scale apertures on a metallic film, have the following unique properties: (1) nanoscale light confinement; (2) enhanced fluorescence emission; (3) tunable radiation pattern; (4) reduced background noise; and (5) massive parallel detection. This review presents the fundamentals, recent developments and future perspectives in this emerging field.

  2. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  3. Diversity of Chemical Mechanisms in Thioredoxin Catalysis Revealed by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are oxidoreductase enzymes, present in all organisms, that catalyze the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins. By applying a calibrated force to a substrate disulfide, the chemical mechanisms of Trx catalysis can be examined in detail at the single-molecule level. Here we use single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to explore the chemical evolution of Trx catalysis by probing the chemistry of eight different Trx enzymes. All Trxs show a characteristic Michaelis-Menten ...

  4. pyFRET: A Python Library for Single Molecule Fluorescence Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Rebecca R.; Jackson, Sophie E.; Klenerman, David

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule F\\"orster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is a powerful experimental technique for studying the properties of individual biological molecules in solution. However, as adoption of smFRET techniques becomes more widespread, the lack of available software, whether open source or commercial, for data analysis, is becoming a significant issue. Here, we present pyFRET, an open source Python package for the analysis of data from single-molecule fluorescence experiments from freely...

  5. Modulation of homochiral Dy(III) complexes: single-molecule magnets with ferroelectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi-Li; Chen, Chun-Lai; Gao, Yu-Liang; Liu, Cai-Ming; Feng, Xiang-Li; Gui, Yang-Hai; Fang, Shao-Ming

    2012-11-12

    Homochiral Dy(III) complexes: by changing the ligand-to-metal ratio, enantiomeric pairs of a Dy(III) complex of different nuclearity could be obtained. The mono- and dinuclear complexes exhibit characteristics of single-molecule magnets and different slow magnetic relaxation processes. In addition, the dinuclear complexes exhibit ferroelectric behavior, thus representing the first chiral polynuclear lanthanide-based single-molecule magnets with ferroelectric properties.

  6. Giant Suppression of Photobleaching for Single Molecule Detection via the Purcell Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    Giant Suppression of Photobleaching for Single Molecule Detection via the Purcell Effect Hu Cang,†,‡ Yongmin Liu,†,§,∥ Yuan Wang,† Xiaobo Yin,†,⊥ and...Information ABSTRACT: We report giant suppression of photobleaching and a prolonged lifespan of single fluorescent molecules via the Purcell effect in... Purcell effect to manipulate photochemical reactions at the subwavelength scale. KEYWORDS: Nano-optics, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

  7. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    OpenAIRE

    Hirvonen, Liisa Maija; Barber, Matthew; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, w...

  8. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in

  9. Deciphering the Structure and Function of Nuclear Pores Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Siegfried M; Grünwald, David

    2016-05-22

    Due to its central role in macromolecular trafficking and nucleocytoplasmic information transfer, the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has been studied in great detail using a wide spectrum of methods. Consequently, many aspects of its architecture, general function, and role in the life cycle of a cell are well understood. Over the last decade, fluorescence microscopy methods have enabled the real-time visualization of single molecules interacting with and transiting through the NPC, allowing novel questions to be examined with nanometer precision. While initial single-molecule studies focused primarily on import pathways using permeabilized cells, it has recently proven feasible to investigate the export of mRNAs in living cells. Single-molecule assays can address questions that are difficult or impossible to answer by other means, yet the complexity of nucleocytoplasmic transport requires that interpretation be based on a firm genetic, biochemical, and structural foundation. Moreover, conceptually simple single-molecule experiments remain technically challenging, particularly with regard to signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio, and the analysis of noise, stochasticity, and precision. We discuss nuclear transport issues recently addressed by single-molecule microscopy, evaluate the limits of existing assays and data, and identify open questions for future studies. We expect that single-molecule fluorescence approaches will continue to be applied to outstanding nucleocytoplasmic transport questions, and that the approaches developed for NPC studies are extendable to additional complex systems and pathways within cells.

  10. Absolute advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA country is said to have an absolute advantage over another country in the production of a good or service if it can produce that good or service using fewer real resources. Equivalently, using the same inputs, the country can produce more output. The concept of absolute advantage can a

  11. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  12. Multi-period Mean-absolute Deviation Fuzzy Portfolio Selection Model with Entropy Constraints%具有熵约束的多阶段均值-绝对偏差模糊投资组合决策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 张卫国; 曾玉婷

    2016-01-01

    文章运用可能性绝对偏差和比例熵分别度量风险和分散化程度,提出了具有风险控制和线性交易成本的终期财富最大化的多阶段模糊投资组合模型。运用可能理论,将该模型转化为显示的非线性动态优化问题。由于投资过程存在交易成本,上述模型为具有路径依赖性的动态优化问题。文章提出了前向动态规划方法求解。最后,通过实证研究比较了不同熵的取值投资组合最优投资比例和最终财富的变化。%This paper considers a multi-period fuzzy portfolio selection problem maximizing the terminal wealth imposed by risk control, in which risk of assets and the divergence measure of portfolio are, respectively, meas-ured by fuzzy absolute deviation and proportion entropy.Based on the theories of possibility theory, the proposed model is transformed into a crisp nonlinear programming problem.Because of the transaction costs, the multi-period portfolio selection is a dynamic optimization problem with path dependence.Furthermore, a forward dynamic programming method is designed to obtain the optimal portfolio strategy.Finally, an example is given to illustrate the behavior of the proposed model and the designed algorithm.

  13. SISGR: Room Temperature Single-Molecule Detection and Imaging by Stimulated Emission Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2017-03-13

    Single-molecule spectroscopy has made considerable impact on many disciplines including chemistry, physics, and biology. To date, most single-molecule spectroscopy work is accomplished by detecting fluorescence. On the other hand, many naturally occurring chromophores, such as retinal, hemoglobin and cytochromes, do not have detectable fluorescence. There is an emerging need for single-molecule spectroscopy techniques that do not require fluorescence. In the last proposal period, we have successfully demonstrated stimulated emission microscopy, single molecule absorption, and stimulated Raman microscopy based on a high-frequency modulation transfer technique. These first-of-a- kind new spectroscopy/microscopy methods tremendously improved our ability to observe molecules that fluorescence weakly, even to the limit of single molecule detection for absorption measurement. All of these methods employ two laser beams: one (pump beam) excites a single molecule to a real or virtual excited state, and the other (probe beam) monitors the absorption/emission property of the single. We extract the intensity change of the probe beam with high sensitivity by implementing a high-frequency phase-sensitive detection scheme, which offers orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity over direct absorption/emission measurement. However, single molecule detection based on fluorescence or absorption is fundamentally limited due to their broad spectral response. It is important to explore other avenues in single molecule detection and imaging which provides higher molecular specificity for studying a wide variety of heterogeneous chemical and biological systems. This proposal aimed to achieve single-molecule detection sensitivity with near resonance stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. SRS microscopy was developed in our lab as a powerful technique for imaging heterogeneous samples based on their intrinsic vibrational contrasts, which provides much higher molecular

  14. Single-molecule analysis of fluorescent carbon dots towards localization-based super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Navneet C.; Khan, Syamantak; Nandi, Chayan K.

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of high-resolution bioimaging has always been dependent on the discovery of bright and easily available fluorescent probes. Fluorescent carbon nanodots, an interesting class of relatively new nanomaterials, have emerged as a versatile alternative due to their superior optical properties, non-toxicity, cell penetrability and easy routes to synthesis. Although a plethora of reports is available on bioimaging using carbon dots, single-molecule-based super-resolution imaging is rare in the literature. In this study, we have systematically characterized the single-molecule fluorescence of three carbon dots and compared them with a standard fluorescent probe. Each of these carbon dots showed a long-lived dark state in the presence of an electron acceptor. The electron transfer mechanism was investigated in single-molecule as well as in ensemble experiments. The average on-off rate between the fluorescent bright and dark states, which is one of the important parameters for single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, was measured by changing the laser power. We report that the photon budget and on-off rate of these carbon dots were good enough to achieve single-molecule localization with a precision of ~35 nm.

  15. DNA origami as biocompatible surface to match single-molecule and ensemble experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments on immobilized molecules allow unique insights into the dynamics of molecular machines and enzymes as well as their interactions. The immobilization, however, can invoke perturbation to the activity of biomolecules causing incongruities between single molecule and ensemble measurements. Here we introduce the recently developed DNA origami as a platform to transfer ensemble assays to the immobilized single molecule level without changing the nano-environment of the biomolecules. The idea is a stepwise transfer of common functional assays first to the surface of a DNA origami, which can be checked at the ensemble level, and then to the microscope glass slide for single-molecule inquiry using the DNA origami as a transfer platform. We studied the structural flexibility of a DNA Holliday junction and the TATA-binding protein (TBP)-induced bending of DNA both on freely diffusing molecules and attached to the origami structure by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This resulted in highly congruent data sets demonstrating that the DNA origami does not influence the functionality of the biomolecule. Single-molecule data collected from surface-immobilized biomolecule-loaded DNA origami are in very good agreement with data from solution measurements supporting the fact that the DNA origami can be used as biocompatible surface in many fluorescence-based measurements. PMID:22523083

  16. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging, and Photocontrol: Foundations for Super-Resolution Microscopy (Nobel Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W E William E

    2015-07-06

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 90s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and current developments are summarized.

  17. Nobel Lecture: Single-molecule spectroscopy, imaging, and photocontrol: Foundations for super-resolution microscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E. William E.

    2015-10-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room-temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts as a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and selected current developments are summarized.

  18. Supramolecular Systems and Chemical Reactions in Single-Molecule Break Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Hu, Duan; Tan, Zhibing; Bai, Jie; Xiao, Zongyuan; Yang, Yang; Shi, Jia; Hong, Wenjing

    2017-04-01

    The major challenges of molecular electronics are the understanding and manipulation of the electron transport through the single-molecule junction. With the single-molecule break junction techniques, including scanning tunneling microscope break junction technique and mechanically controllable break junction technique, the charge transport through various single-molecule and supramolecular junctions has been studied during the dynamic fabrication and continuous characterization of molecular junctions. This review starts from the charge transport characterization of supramolecular junctions through a variety of noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bond, π-π interaction, and electrostatic force. We further review the recent progress in constructing highly conductive molecular junctions via chemical reactions, the response of molecular junctions to external stimuli, as well as the application of break junction techniques in controlling and monitoring chemical reactions in situ. We suggest that beyond the measurement of single molecular conductance, the single-molecule break junction techniques provide a promising access to study molecular assembly and chemical reactions at the single-molecule scale.

  19. Experimental and Computational Characterization of Biological Liquid Crystals: A Review of Single-Molecule Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungsoo Na

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative understanding of the mechanical behavior of biological liquid crystals such as proteins is essential for gaining insight into their biological functions, since some proteins perform notable mechanical functions. Recently, single-molecule experiments have allowed not only the quantitative characterization of the mechanical behavior of proteins such as protein unfolding mechanics, but also the exploration of the free energy landscape for protein folding. In this work, we have reviewed the current state-of-art in single-molecule bioassays that enable quantitative studies on protein unfolding mechanics and/or various molecular interactions. Specifically, single-molecule pulling experiments based on atomic force microscopy (AFM have been overviewed. In addition, the computational simulations on single-molecule pulling experiments have been reviewed. We have also reviewed the AFM cantilever-based bioassay that provides insight into various molecular interactions. Our review highlights the AFM-based single-molecule bioassay for quantitative characterization of biological liquid crystals such as proteins.

  20. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Domingo, M.P. [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Pardo, Julian [Grupo Apoptosis, Inmunidad y Cancer, Departamento Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular y Celular, Fac. Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Fundacion Aragon I-D (ARAID), Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain); Graeber, P. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Albertstrasse 23a, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Galvez, E.M., E-mail: eva@icb.csic.es [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Immune Effector Cells Group, Aragon Health Research Institute (IIS Aragon), Biomedical Research Centre of Aragon (CIBA) Fundacion Aragon I-D - ARAID, Gobierno de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the 'on'/'off' states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  1. DNA origami as biocompatible surface to match single-molecule and ensemble experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-08-01

    Single-molecule experiments on immobilized molecules allow unique insights into the dynamics of molecular machines and enzymes as well as their interactions. The immobilization, however, can invoke perturbation to the activity of biomolecules causing incongruities between single molecule and ensemble measurements. Here we introduce the recently developed DNA origami as a platform to transfer ensemble assays to the immobilized single molecule level without changing the nano-environment of the biomolecules. The idea is a stepwise transfer of common functional assays first to the surface of a DNA origami, which can be checked at the ensemble level, and then to the microscope glass slide for single-molecule inquiry using the DNA origami as a transfer platform. We studied the structural flexibility of a DNA Holliday junction and the TATA-binding protein (TBP)-induced bending of DNA both on freely diffusing molecules and attached to the origami structure by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This resulted in highly congruent data sets demonstrating that the DNA origami does not influence the functionality of the biomolecule. Single-molecule data collected from surface-immobilized biomolecule-loaded DNA origami are in very good agreement with data from solution measurements supporting the fact that the DNA origami can be used as biocompatible surface in many fluorescence-based measurements.

  2. Capabilities for measuring the diffusivity of a single molecule by recycling it in a nanochannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Davis, Lloyd

    2014-03-01

    Analysis of the fractions of fluorescently labeled molecules with different diffusivities within a microliter drop of solution is often used for high-throughput screening of molecular binding interactions in pharmaceutical drug discovery research. Assays frequently employ fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, an ensemble technique that is able to resolve fast diffusing small ligands from those bound to much larger biomolecules with considerably slower diffusion. Single-molecule measurements have the potential to resolve species with different diffusivities and to count the numbers of molecules of each species. Single-molecule recycling in a nanochannel, which entails detection of bursts of fluorescence photons from the repeated passage of a molecule through a focused laser beam as the flow along a nanochannel is periodically alternated, can be used to determine the diffusivity of a single molecule from the fluctuations in the intervals between successive detections. We discuss Monte Carlo studies to determine favorable experimental conditions for determining single-molecule diffusivities, together with a weighted-sliding-sum photon burst detection algorithm for flow-control and maximum-likelihood based analysis of recycle times. We also discuss incorporation of the algorithms into our experimental apparatus for single-molecule recycling, which uses a LabView real-time system for photon count analysis and flow control.

  3. Dissecting contact mechanics from quantum interference in single-molecule junctions of stilbene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Meisner, Jeffrey S; Krikorian, Markrete; Ahn, Seokhoon; Parameswaran, Radha; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2012-03-14

    Electronic factors in molecules such as quantum interference and cross-conjugation can lead to dramatic modulation and suppression of conductance in single-molecule junctions. Probing such effects at the single-molecule level requires simultaneous measurements of independent junction properties, as conductance alone cannot provide conclusive evidence of junction formation for molecules with low conductivity. Here, we compare the mechanics of the conducting para-terminated 4,4'-di(methylthio)stilbene and moderately conducting 1,2-bis(4-(methylthio)phenyl)ethane to that of insulating meta-terminated 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene single-molecule junctions. We simultaneously measure force and conductance across single-molecule junctions and use force signatures to obtain independent evidence of junction formation and rupture in the meta-linked cross-conjugated molecule even when no clear low-bias conductance is measured. By separately quantifying conductance and mechanics, we identify the formation of atypical 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene molecular junctions that are mechanically stable but electronically decoupled. While theoretical studies have envisaged many plausible systems where quantum interference might be observed, our experiments provide the first direct quantitative study of the interplay between contact mechanics and the distinctively quantum mechanical nature of electronic transport in single-molecule junctions.

  4. Bekenstein Entropy is String Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We argue that Bekenstein entropy can be interpreted as the entropy of an effective string with a rescaled tension. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we show that the Bekenstein entropy on the boundary CFT is given by the entropy of a string at the stretched horizon of the AdS black hole in the bulk. The gravitationally redshifted tension and energy of the string match those required to reproduce Bekenstein entropy.

  5. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Vibrationally dependent electron-electron interactions in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpenbeck, A.; Härtle, R.; Bockstedte, M.; Thoss, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of electronic-vibrational coupling in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions, taking into account that the corresponding coupling strengths may depend on the charge and excitation state of the molecular bridge. Within an effective-model Hamiltonian approach for a molecule with multiple electronic states, this requires to extend the commonly used model and include vibrationally dependent electron-electron interaction. We use Born-Markov master equation methods and consider selected models to exemplify the effect of the additional interaction on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule junction. In particular, we show that it has a significant influence on local cooling and heating mechanisms, it may result in negative differential resistance, and it may cause pronounced asymmetries in the conductance map of a single-molecule junction.

  7. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  8. Orbital-selective single molecule excitation and spectroscopy based on plasmon-exciton coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Imada, Hiroshi; Imai-Imada, Miyabi; Kawahara, Shota; Kimura, Kensuke; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic excitation of molecules triggers diverse phenomena such as luminescence and photovoltaic effects, which are the bases of various energy-converting devices. Understanding and control of the excitations at the single-molecule level are long standing targets, however, they have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution in optical probing techniques. Here we investigate the electronic excitation of a single molecule with sub-molecular precision using a localised plasmon at the tip apex of a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) as an excitation probe. Coherent energy transfer between the plasmon and molecular excitons is discovered when the plasmon is located in the proximity of isolated molecules, which is corroborated by a theoretical analysis. The polarised plasmonic field enables selective excitation of an electronic transition between anisotropic frontier molecular orbitals. Our findings have established the foundation of a novel single-molecule spectroscopy with STM, providing an integra...

  9. Single-Cell and Single-Molecule Analysis of Gene Expression Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Maria; Biswas, Jeetayu; Senecal, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in single-cell and single-molecule imaging technologies have resolved biological processes in time and space that are fundamental to understanding the regulation of gene expression. Observations of single-molecule events in their cellular context have revealed highly dynamic aspects of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control in eukaryotic cells. This approach can relate transcription with mRNA abundance and lifetimes. Another key aspect of single-cell analysis is the cell-to-cell variability among populations of cells. Definition of heterogeneity has revealed stochastic processes, determined characteristics of under-represented cell types or transitional states, and integrated cellular behaviors in the context of multicellular organisms. In this review, we discuss novel aspects of gene expression of eukaryotic cells and multicellular organisms revealed by the latest advances in single-cell and single-molecule imaging technology. PMID:27893965

  10. Single-molecule analysis of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B; van Oijen, Antoine M; Walter, Johannes C

    2012-06-01

    The recent advent in single-molecule imaging and manipulation methods has made a significant impact on the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying many essential cellular processes. Single-molecule techniques such as electron microscopy and DNA fiber assays have been employed to study the duplication of genome in eukaryotes. Here, we describe a single-molecule assay that allows replication of DNA attached to the functionalized surface of a microfluidic flow cell in a soluble Xenopus leavis egg extract replication system and subsequent visualization of replication products via fluorescence microscopy. We also explain a method for detection of replication proteins, through fluorescently labeled antibodies, on partially replicated DNA immobilized at both ends to the surface.

  11. Shedding light on protein folding, structural and functional dynamics by single molecule studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavishi, Krutika; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    The advent of advanced single molecule measurements unveiled a great wealth of dynamic information revolutionizing our understanding of protein dynamics and behavior in ways unattainable by conventional bulk assays. Equipped with the ability to record distribution of behaviors rather than the mean...... property of a population, single molecule measurements offer observation and quantification of the abundance, lifetime and function of multiple protein states. They also permit the direct observation of the transient and rarely populated intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out...... in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Single molecule studies have thus provided novel insights about how the dynamic sampling of the free energy landscape dictates all aspects of protein behavior; from its folding to function. Here we will survey some of the state of the art contributions...

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy for plastic electronics: materials analysis from the bottom-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, John M

    2010-04-18

    pi-conjugated polymers find a range of applications in electronic devices. These materials are generally highly disordered in terms of chain length and chain conformation, besides being influenced by a variety of chemical and physical defects. Although this characteristic can be of benefit in certain device applications, disorder severely complicates materials analysis. Accurate analytical techniques are, however, crucial to optimising synthetic procedures and assessing overall material purity. Fortunately, single-molecule spectroscopic techniques have emerged as an unlikely but uniquely powerful approach to unraveling intrinsic material properties from the bottom up. Building on the success of such techniques in the life sciences, single-molecule spectroscopy is finding increasing applicability in materials science, effectively enabling the dissection of the bulk down to the level of the individual molecular constituent. This article reviews recent progress in single molecule spectroscopy of conjugated polymers as used in organic electronics.

  13. Assembly and diploid architecture of an individual human genome via single-molecule technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Matthew; Sebra, Robert; Pang, Andy Wing Chun; Ummat, Ajay; Franzen, Oscar; Rausch, Tobias; Stütz, Adrian M; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Hastie, Alex; Dai, Heng; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Cao, Han; Cohain, Ariella; Deikus, Gintaras; Durrett, Russell E; Blanchard, Scott C; Altman, Roger; Chin, Chen-Shan; Guo, Yan; Paxinos, Ellen E; Korbel, Jan O; Darnell, Robert B; McCombie, W Richard; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Mason, Christopher E; Schadt, Eric E; Bashir, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We present the first comprehensive analysis of a diploid human genome that combines single-molecule sequencing with single-molecule genome maps. Our hybrid assembly markedly improves upon the contiguity observed from traditional shotgun sequencing approaches, with scaffold N50 values approaching 30 Mb, and we identified complex structural variants (SVs) missed by other high-throughput approaches. Furthermore, by combining Illumina short-read data with long reads, we phased both single-nucleotide variants and SVs, generating haplotypes with over 99% consistency with previous trio-based studies. Our work shows that it is now possible to integrate single-molecule and high-throughput sequence data to generate de novo assembled genomes that approach reference quality.

  14. From single-molecule spectroscopy to super-resolution imaging of the neuron: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Romain F.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; van de Linde, Sebastian; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2016-06-01

    For more than 20 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has been providing invaluable insights into nature at the molecular level. The field has received a powerful boost with the development of the technique into super-resolution imaging methods, ca. 10 years ago, which overcome the limitations imposed by optical diffraction. Today, single molecule super-resolution imaging is routinely used in the study of macromolecular function and structure in the cell. Concomitantly, computational methods have been developed that provide information on numbers and positions of molecules at the nanometer-scale. In this overview, we outline the technical developments that have led to the emergence of localization microscopy techniques from single-molecule spectroscopy. We then provide a comprehensive review on the application of the technique in the field of neuroscience research.

  15. Structure from Fleeting Illumination of Faint Spinning Objects in Flight with Application to Single Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Russell; Saldin, Dilano K; Ourmazd, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    There are many instances when the structure of a weakly-scattering spinning object in flight must be determined to high resolution. Examples range from comets to nanoparticles and single molecules. The latter two instances are the subject of intense current interest. Substantial progress has recently been made in illuminating spinning single particles in flight with powerful X-ray bursts to determine their structure with the ultimate goal of determining the structure of single molecules. However, proposals to reconstruct the molecular structure from diffraction "snapshots" of unknown orientation require ~1000x more signal than available from next-generation sources. Using a new approach, we demonstrate the recovery of the structure of a weakly scattering macromolecule at the anticipated next-generation X-ray source intensities. Our work closes a critical gap in determining the structure of single molecules and nanoparticles by X-ray methods, and opens the way to reconstructing the structure of spinning, or ra...

  16. Measurement and understanding of single-molecule break junction rectification caused by asymmetric contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Zhou, Jianfeng; Hamill, Joseph M; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-08-01

    The contact effects of single-molecule break junctions on rectification behaviors were experimentally explored by a systematic control of anchoring groups of 1,4-disubstituted benzene molecular junctions. Single-molecule conductance and I-V characteristic measurements reveal a strong correlation between rectifying effects and the asymmetry in contacts. Analysis using energy band models and I-V calculations suggested that the rectification behavior is mainly caused by asymmetric coupling strengths at the two contact interfaces. Fitting of the rectification ratio by a modified Simmons model we developed suggests asymmetry in potential drop across the asymmetric anchoring groups as the mechanism of rectifying I-V behavior. This study provides direct experimental evidence and sheds light on the mechanisms of rectification behavior induced simply by contact asymmetry, which serves as an aid to interpret future single-molecule electronic behavior involved with asymmetric contact conformation.

  17. Single-Molecule Investigations of Morphology and Mass Transport Dynamics in Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Daniel A.; Park, Seok Chan; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Ito, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials such as mesoporous metal oxides and phase-separated block copolymers form the basis for new monolith, membrane, and thin film technologies having applications in energy storage, chemical catalysis, and separations. Mass transport plays an integral role in governing the application-specific performance characteristics of many such materials. The majority of methods employed in their characterization provide only ensemble data, often masking the nanoscale, molecular-level details of materials morphology and mass transport. Single-molecule fluorescence methods offer direct routes to probing these characteristics on a single-molecule/single-nanostructure basis. This article provides a review of single-molecule studies focused on measurements of anisotropic diffusion, adsorption, partitioning, and confinement in nanostructured materials. Experimental methods covered include confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained promise to deepen our understanding of mass transport mechanisms in nanostructures, thus aiding in the realization of advanced materials systems.

  18. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-05-27

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  19. Single-molecule three-color FRET with both negligible spectral overlap and long observation time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghwa Lee

    Full Text Available Full understanding of complex biological interactions frequently requires multi-color detection capability in doing single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments. Existing single-molecule three-color FRET techniques, however, suffer from severe photobleaching of Alexa 488, or its alternative dyes, and have been limitedly used for kinetics studies. In this work, we developed a single-molecule three-color FRET technique based on the Cy3-Cy5-Cy7 dye trio, thus providing enhanced observation time and improved data quality. Because the absorption spectra of three fluorophores are well separated, real-time monitoring of three FRET efficiencies was possible by incorporating the alternating laser excitation (ALEX technique both in confocal microscopy and in total-internal-reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy.

  20. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  1. Single-molecule force-conductance spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonded complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; De Vico, Luca; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2017-03-01

    The emerging ability to study physical properties at the single-molecule limit highlights the disparity between what is observable in an ensemble of molecules and the heterogeneous contributions of its constituent parts. A particularly convenient platform for single-molecule studies are molecular junctions where forces and voltages can be applied to individual molecules, giving access to a series of electromechanical observables that can form the basis of highly discriminating multidimensional single-molecule spectroscopies. Here, we computationally examine the ability of force and conductance to inform about molecular recognition events at the single-molecule limit. For this, we consider the force-conductance characteristics of a prototypical class of hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes sandwiched between gold electrodes. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The simulations combine classical molecular dynamics of the mechanical deformation of the junction with non-equilibrium Green's function computations of the electronic transport. As shown, in these complexes hydrogen bonds mediate transport either by directly participating as a possible transport pathway or by stabilizing molecular conformations with enhanced conductance properties. Further, we observe that force-conductance correlations can be very sensitive to small changes in the chemical structure of the complexes and provide detailed information about the behavior of single molecules that cannot be gleaned from either measurement alone. In fact, there are regions during the elongation that are only mechanically active, others that are only conductance active, and regions where both force and conductance changes as the complex is mechanically manipulated. The implication is that force and conductance provide complementary information about the evolution of molecules in junctions that can be used to

  2. Single molecule experiments challenge the strict wave-particle dualism of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2010-01-21

    Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the "single photon limit" of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. "Single photon detectors" do not meet their promise-only "photon number resolving single photon detectors" do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  3. Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Kitaguchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices.

  4. Single Molecule Experiments Challenge the Strict Wave-Particle Dualism of Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Otto Greulich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the “single photon limit” of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. “Single photon detectors” do not meet their promise―only “photon number resolving single photon detectors” do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  5. Highlights from Faraday Discussion 184: Single-Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy, London, UK, September 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellings, E; Faez, S; Piatkowski, L

    2016-02-07

    The 2015 Faraday Discussion on single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy brought together leading scientists involved in various topics of single-molecule research. It attracted almost a hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - from experimentalists to theoreticians, from biologists to materials scientists, from masters students to Nobel Prize Laureates. The meeting was merely a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to detect individual molecules has had on science over the past quarter of a century. In the following we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation.

  6. Variable contact gap single-molecule conductance determination for a series of conjugated molecular bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haiss, W.; Wang, Christian; Jitchati, R.

    2008-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that the characteristics of the whole junction are important in determining the conductance of single molecules bound between two metal contacts. This paper shows through measurements on a series of seven conjugated molecular bridges that contact separation is an important...

  7. Ninth international conference on hole burning, single molecule and related spectroscopies: science and applications (HBSM 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This conference was organized around 9 sessions: -) single molecule, -) quantum optics, -) hole-burning materials and mechanisms, -) single nano-particle spectroscopy, -) dephasing and spectral diffusion, -) microwave photonics, -) biological systems, -) rare earth doped materials, -) novel laser sources. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  8. Single-molecule tools for enzymology, structural biology, systems biology and nanotechnology: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Julia R; Dhakal, Soma; Heinicke, Laurie A; Walter, Nils G

    2014-11-01

    Toxicology is the highly interdisciplinary field studying the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms. It requires sensitive tools to detect such effects. After their initial implementation during the 1990s, single-molecule fluorescence detection tools were quickly recognized for their potential to contribute greatly to many different areas of scientific inquiry. In the intervening time, technical advances in the field have generated ever-improving spatial and temporal resolution and have enabled the application of single-molecule fluorescence to increasingly complex systems, such as live cells. In this review, we give an overview of the optical components necessary to implement the most common versions of single-molecule fluorescence detection. We then discuss current applications to enzymology and structural studies, systems biology, and nanotechnology, presenting the technical considerations that are unique to each area of study, along with noteworthy recent results. We also highlight future directions that have the potential to revolutionize these areas of study by further exploiting the capabilities of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Spectral multitude and spectral dynamics reflect changing conjugation length in single molecules of oligophenylenevinylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule study of phenylenevinylene oligomers revealed distinct spectral forms due to different conjugation lengths which are determined by torsional defects. Large spectral jumps between different spectral forms were ascribed to torsional flips of a single phenylene ring. These spectral changes reflect the dynamic nature of electron delocalization in oligophenylenevinylenes and enable estimation of the phenylene torsional barriers. © 2012 The Owner Societies.

  10. Multiple states of the Tyr318Leu mutant of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase revealed by single molecule kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, J.; Palfey, B.A.; Dertouzos, J.

    2004-01-01

    of single enzyme molecules through the characteristic on-off fluorescence signal, which corresponds to flavin mononucleotide (FMN) interconverting between the oxidized and reduced states during turnover. Our single-molecule data provide evidence of a distinct static heterogeneity in the enzymatic activity...

  11. Real-time data acquisition incorporating high-speed software correlator for single-molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L-L; Lee, H-Y; Wang, M-K; Lin, X-Y; Hsu, K-H; Chang, Y-R; Fann, W; White, J D

    2009-06-01

    Single-molecule spectroscopy and detection are powerful techniques for the study of single fluorescent particles and their interaction with their environment. We present a low-cost system for simultaneous real-time acquisition, storage of inter-photon arrival times and the calculation and display of the fluorescence time trace, autocorrelation function and distribution of delays histogram for single-molecule experiments. From a hardware perspective, in addition to a multi-core computer, only a standard low-cost counting board is required as processing is software-based. Software is written in a parallel programming environment with time crucial operations coded in ANSI-C. Crucial to system performance is a simple and efficient real-time autocorrelation algorithm (acf) optimized for the count rates (approximately 10(4) cps) encountered in single-molecule experiments. The algorithm's time complexity is independent of temporal resolution, which is maintained at all time delays. The system and algorithm's performance was validated by duplicating the signal from the photon detector and sending it to both the ordinary counter board and a commercial correlator simultaneously. The data acquisition system's robustness under typical single-molecule experimental conditions was tested by observing the diffusion of Rhodamine 6G molecules in deionized water.

  12. A versatile low-temperature setup for the electrical characterization of single-molecule junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, C.A.; Smit, R.H.M.; Van Egmond, R.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Van Ruitenbeek, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a modular high-vacuum setup for the electrical characterization of single molecules down to liquid helium temperatures. The experimental design is based on microfabricated mechanically controllable break junctions, which offer control over the distance of two electrodes via the bending of

  13. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan; Domingo, M P; Pardo, Julian; Gräber, P; Galvez, E M

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the "on"/"off" states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  14. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arroyo, Carlos R.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper;

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3...

  15. Single-molecule enzymatic analysis in a droplet-based microfluidic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arayanarakool, R.; Shui, L.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Berg, van den A.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Fujii, T.; Hibara, A.; Takeuchi, S.; Fukuba, T.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetic activity of individual enzyme molecules was determined in aqueous droplets generated in a nano- and microfluidic device. To avoid high background noise, the enzyme and substrate solution was confined into femtolitre carriers to achieve single-molecule encapsulation. The tiny droplets (f~

  16. Potential of protoporphyrin IX and metal derivatives for single molecule fluorescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Yi; Geissinger, Peter [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3210 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Woehl, Joerg C., E-mail: woehl@uwm.ed [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3210 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Metalloporphyrins are cofactors of a variety of proteins, and are often used as spectroscopic probes of the active site. Many high resolution techniques, such as single molecule spectroscopy, are based on fluorescence contrast and require the replacement of the native metalloporphyrin by a fluorescent analog. We have investigated the potential of several fluorescent analogs of heme, namely free-base protoporphyrin IX and its metal derivatives containing Zn, Sn, and Mg, for single molecule fluorescence studies by determining their room-temperature molecular absorption cross sections and fluorescence quantum yields. According to these data, free-base protoporphyrin IX and its Zn derivative, which have the highest fluorescence quantum yields, are the most suitable heme analogs for single molecule fluorescence studies. - Research highlights: Protoporphyrin IX and fluorescent metal derivatives for single molecule detection. Measurement of room temperature absorption cross sections for Q bands. Measurement of room temperature fluorescence quantum yields for Q bands. PPIX and Zn derivative have highest quantum yields for lowest-energy transition.

  17. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein...

  18. Detailed analysis of complex single molecule FRET data with the software MASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzic, Mélodie C. A. S.; Kowerko, Danny; Börner, Richard; Zelger-Paulus, Susann; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-04-01

    The processing and analysis of surface-immobilized single molecule FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) data follows systematic steps (e.g. single molecule localization, clearance of different sources of noise, selection of the conformational and kinetic model, etc.) that require a solid knowledge in optics, photophysics, signal processing and statistics. The present proceeding aims at standardizing and facilitating procedures for single molecule detection by guiding the reader through an optimization protocol for a particular experimental data set. Relevant features were determined from single molecule movies (SMM) imaging Cy3- and Cy5-labeled Sc.ai5γ group II intron molecules synthetically recreated, to test the performances of four different detection algorithms. Up to 120 different parameterizations per method were routinely evaluated to finally establish an optimum detection procedure. The present protocol is adaptable to any movie displaying surface-immobilized molecules, and can be easily reproduced with our home-written software MASH (multifunctional analysis software for heterogeneous data) and script routines (both available in the download section of www.chem.uzh.ch/rna).

  19. Quantifying and optimizing single-molecule switching nanoscopy at high speeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lin

    Full Text Available Single-molecule switching nanoscopy overcomes the diffraction limit of light by stochastically switching single fluorescent molecules on and off, and then localizing their positions individually. Recent advances in this technique have greatly accelerated the data acquisition speed and improved the temporal resolution of super-resolution imaging. However, it has not been quantified whether this speed increase comes at the cost of compromised image quality. The spatial and temporal resolution depends on many factors, among which laser intensity and camera speed are the two most critical parameters. Here we quantitatively compare the image quality achieved when imaging Alexa Fluor 647-immunolabeled microtubules over an extended range of laser intensities and camera speeds using three criteria - localization precision, density of localized molecules, and resolution of reconstructed images based on Fourier Ring Correlation. We found that, with optimized parameters, single-molecule switching nanoscopy at high speeds can achieve the same image quality as imaging at conventional speeds in a 5-25 times shorter time period. Furthermore, we measured the photoswitching kinetics of Alexa Fluor 647 from single-molecule experiments, and, based on this kinetic data, we developed algorithms to simulate single-molecule switching nanoscopy images. We used this software tool to demonstrate how laser intensity and camera speed affect the density of active fluorophores and influence the achievable resolution. Our study provides guidelines for choosing appropriate laser intensities for imaging Alexa Fluor 647 at different speeds and a quantification protocol for future evaluations of other probes and imaging parameters.

  20. Single-molecule diodes with high rectification ratios through environmental control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Adak, Olgun; Dell, Emma J; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Taylor, Jeffrey C; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Campos, Luis M; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-06-01

    Molecular electronics aims to miniaturize electronic devices by using subnanometre-scale active components. A single-molecule diode, a circuit element that directs current flow, was first proposed more than 40 years ago and consisted of an asymmetric molecule comprising a donor-bridge-acceptor architecture to mimic a semiconductor p-n junction. Several single-molecule diodes have since been realized in junctions featuring asymmetric molecular backbones, molecule-electrode linkers or electrode materials. Despite these advances, molecular diodes have had limited potential for applications due to their low conductance, low rectification ratios, extreme sensitivity to the junction structure and high operating voltages. Here, we demonstrate a powerful approach to induce current rectification in symmetric single-molecule junctions using two electrodes of the same metal, but breaking symmetry by exposing considerably different electrode areas to an ionic solution. This allows us to control the junction's electrostatic environment in an asymmetric fashion by simply changing the bias polarity. With this method, we reliably and reproducibly achieve rectification ratios in excess of 200 at voltages as low as 370 mV using a symmetric oligomer of thiophene-1,1-dioxide. By taking advantage of the changes in the junction environment induced by the presence of an ionic solution, this method provides a general route for tuning nonlinear nanoscale device phenomena, which could potentially be applied in systems beyond single-molecule junctions.

  1. Frozen-solution magnetisation dynamics of hexanuclear oxime-based MnIII single-molecule magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inglis, R.; Bendix, J.; Brock-Nannestad, T.

    2010-01-01

    Frozen solution SQUID measurements of the hexanuclear Single-Molecule Magnets [Mn6O2(Et-sao)(6)(EtOH)(6)(Me(2)benz)(2)] (1) and [Mn6O2(Et-sao)(6)(EtOH)(4)(H2O)(2)(benz)(2)] (2) allow the molecular and solid state contributions to the magnetic properties to be quantified...

  2. Nonequilibrium Chemical Effects in Single-Molecule SERS Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sean A.; Aprà, Edoardo; Govind, Niranjan; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-02-03

    Recent developments in nanophotonics have paved the way for achieving significant advances in the realm of single molecule chemical detection, imaging, and dynamics. In particular, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful analytical technique that is now routinely used to identify the chemical identity of single molecules. Understanding how nanoscale physical and chemical processes affect single molecule SERS spectra and selection rules is a challenging task, and is still actively debated. Herein, we explore underappreciated chemical phenomena in ultrasensitive SERS. We observe a fluctuating excited electronic state manifold, governed by the conformational dynamics of a molecule (4,4’-dimercaptostilbene, DMS) interacting with a metallic cluster (Ag20). This affects our simulated single molecule SERS spectra; the time trajectories of a molecule interacting with its unique local environment dictates the relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states. Ab initio molecular dynamics of a model Ag20-DMS system are used to illustrate both concepts in light of recent experimental results.

  3. Photophysics of Fluorescent Probes for Single-Molecule Biophysics and Super-Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Taekjip; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy are important elements of the ongoing technical revolution to reveal biochemical and cellular processes in unprecedented clarity and precision. Demands placed on the photophysical properties of the fluorophores are stringent and drive the choice of appropriate probes. Such fluorophores are not simple light bulbs of a certain color and brightness but instead have their own “personalities” regarding spectroscopic parameters, redox properties, size, water solubility, photostability, and several other factors. Here, we review the photophysics of fluorescent probes, both organic fluorophores and fluorescent proteins, used in applications such as particle tracking, single-molecule FRET, stoichiometry determination, and super-resolution imaging. Of particular interest is the thiol-induced blinking of Cy5, a curse for single-molecule biophysical studies that was later overcome using Trolox through a reducing/oxidizing system but a boon for super-resolution imaging owing to the controllable photoswitching. Understanding photophysics is critical in the design and interpretation of single-molecule experiments.

  4. Probing the Conformational Landscape of DNA Polymerases Using Diffusion-Based Single-Molecule FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohlbein, J.; Kapanidis, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring conformational changes in DNA polymerases using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) has provided new tools for studying fidelity-related mechanisms that promote the rejection of incorrect nucleotides before DNA synthesis. In addition to the previously known open

  5. Theoretical Investigation of a Single Molecule Device:Geometrical Configurations and Electronic Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Zhe; SU Chang-Rong; ZHANG Shi-Zhong; LI Jia-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using the first-principle molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the molecular geometrical configurations as well as the corresponding electronic structures of a single molecule device assembled by the mechanically controllable break junction technique with variations of the electrode distance. There are some very interesting features varying with the electrode distance.

  6. Single-molecule FRET studies on alpha-synuclein oligomerization of Parkinson’s disease genetically related mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosatto, Laura; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Dear, Alexander J.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Cremades, Nunilo; Dobson, Christopher M.; Klenerman, David

    2015-11-01

    Oligomers of alpha-synuclein are toxic to cells and have been proposed to play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. As certain missense mutations in the gene encoding for alpha-synuclein induce early-onset forms of the disease, it has been suggested that these variants might have an inherent tendency to produce high concentrations of oligomers during aggregation, although a direct experimental evidence for this is still missing. We used single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer to visualize directly the protein self-assembly process by wild-type alpha-synuclein and A53T, A30P and E46K mutants and to compare the structural properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated. We found that the kinetics of oligomer formation correlates with the natural tendency of each variant to acquire beta-sheet structure. Moreover, A53T and A30P showed significant differences in the averaged FRET efficiency of one of the two types of oligomers formed compared to the wild-type oligomers, indicating possible structural variety among the ensemble of species generated. Importantly, we found similar concentrations of oligomers during the lag-phase of the aggregation of wild-type and mutated alpha-synuclein, suggesting that the properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated during self-assembly might be more relevant than their absolute concentration for triggering neurodegeneration.

  7. A single molecule magnet to single molecule magnet transformation via a solvothermal process: Fe4Dy2 → Fe6Dy3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sihuai; Mereacre, Valeriu; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-01-01

    Two series of heterometallic Fe(III)-Ln(III) compounds, [FeLn(μ3-OH)2(mdea)4(m-NO2C6H4COO)8]·3MeCN where Ln = Y (1) and Dy (2) and [FeLn(μ4-O)3(μ3-O)(mdea)5(m-NO2C6H4COO)9]·3MeCN where Ln = Y (3) and Dy (4), were synthesized. Compounds 1 and 2 were obtained under ambient conditions, whereas 3 and 4 were obtained via a solvothermal transformation process by heating 1 or 2 at 120 °C in MeCN. The magnetic properties of all four compounds have been measured and show that compounds 2 and 4 containing Dy(III) ions exhibit slow relaxation of magnetization characteristic of Single Molecule Magnetic (SMM) behaviour.

  8. Organization of DNA partners and strand exchange mechanisms during Flp site-specific recombination analyzed by difference topology, single molecule FRET and single molecule TPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chien-Hui; Liu, Yen-Ting; Savva, Christos G; Rowley, Paul A; Cannon, Brian; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Russell, Rick; Holzenburg, Andreas; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2014-02-20

    Flp site-specific recombination between two target sites (FRTs) harboring non-homology within the strand exchange region does not yield stable recombinant products. In negatively supercoiled plasmids containing head-to-tail sites, the reaction produces a series of knots with odd-numbered crossings. When the sites are in head-to-head orientation, the knot products contain even-numbered crossings. Both types of knots retain parental DNA configuration. By carrying out Flp recombination after first assembling the topologically well defined Tn3 resolvase synapse, it is possible to determine whether these knots arise by a processive or a dissociative mechanism. The nearly exclusive products from head-to-head and head-to-tail oriented "non-homologous" FRT partners are a 4-noded knot and a 5-noded knot, respectively. The corresponding products from a pair of native (homologous) FRT sites are a 3-noded knot and a 4-noded catenane, respectively. These results are consistent with non-homology-induced two rounds of dissociative recombination by Flp, the first to generate reciprocal recombinants containing non-complementary base pairs and the second to produce parental molecules with restored base pairing. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) analysis of geometrically restricted FRTs, together with single molecule tethered particle motion (smTPM) assays of unconstrained FRTs, suggests that the sites are preferentially synapsed in an anti-parallel fashion. This selectivity in synapse geometry occurs prior to the chemical steps of recombination, signifying early commitment to a productive reaction path. The cumulative topological, smFRET and smTPM results have implications for the relative orientation of DNA partners and the directionality of strand exchange during recombination mediated by tyrosine site-specific recombinases.

  9. Studies of G-quadruplex DNA structures at the single molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Sofie Louise

    2015-01-01

    Folding of G-quaduplex structures adopted by the human telomeric repeat is here studied by single molecule FRET microscopy. This method allows for the investigation of G-quadruplex structures and their conformational dynamic. Telomeres are located at the ends of our chromosomes and end in a single...... populations and thus providing more information than traditional ensemble experiments. Using single molecule FRET microscopy different aspects of G-quadruplex folding were investigated. We have obtained direct insight into G-quadruplex structural polymorphism both in K+ and Na+ solutions. Polymorphism have...... previously only been investigated in K+. Here, we observe significant polymorphism also in Na+. By investigating the dynamics of these conformational changes and comparing these findings with other experiments for G-quadruplexes with known topology we are able to identify different conformations and folding...

  10. Influence of quantum dot labels on single molecule movement in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking results are very dependent on the probe that is used. In this study we have investigated the influence that functionalized quantum dots (QDs) have on the recorded movement in single molecule tracking experiments of plasma membrane species in live cells. Potential issues...... in labeling single molecules with QDs (and other particles e.g. gold particles) are induction of cross-linking of the target molecules, which can cause activation of signaling pathways or reduced mobility, and steric hindrance as a result of the probe size. Cross-linking can be a result of the multivalent...... functionalization tag (e.g. streptavidin (sAv)) or the presence of multiple mono- or multivalent functionalization tags per QD. In this work, we have compared commercially available sAv-QDs of different sizes with custom prepared Co enzyme A (CoA)-QDs both targeting a GPI-anchored protein modified with either...

  11. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  12. Single-molecule diffusion and conformational dynamics by spatial integration of temporal fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2014-10-06

    Single-molecule localization and tracking has been used to translate spatiotemporal information of individual molecules to map their diffusion behaviours. However, accurate analysis of diffusion behaviours and including other parameters, such as the conformation and size of molecules, remain as limitations to the method. Here, we report a method that addresses the limitations of existing single-molecular localization methods. The method is based on temporal tracking of the cumulative area occupied by molecules. These temporal fluctuations are tied to molecular size, rates of diffusion and conformational changes. By analysing fluorescent nanospheres and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths and topological forms, we demonstrate that our cumulative-area method surpasses the conventional single-molecule localization method in terms of the accuracy of determined diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the cumulative-area method provides conformational relaxation times of structurally flexible chains along with diffusion coefficients, which together are relevant to work in a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

  13. Reconstructing multiple free energy pathways of DNA stretching from single molecule experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Eric W; Li, Jingqiang; Wijeratne, Sithara S; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2015-04-23

    Free energy landscapes provide information on the dynamics of proteins and nucleic acid folding. It has been demonstrated that such landscapes can be reconstructed from single molecule force measurement data using Jarzynski's equality, which requires only stretching data. However, when the process is reversible, the Crooks fluctuation theorem combines both stretch and relaxation force data for the analysis and can offer more rapid convergence of free energy estimates of different states. Here we demonstrate that, similar to Jarzynski's equality, the Crooks fluctuation theorem can be used to reconstruct the full free energy landscapes. In addition, when the free energy landscapes exhibit multiple folding pathways, one can use Jarzynski's equality to reconstruct individual free energy pathways if the experimental data show distinct work distributions. We applied the method to reconstruct the overstretching transition of poly(dA) to demonstrate that the nonequilibrium work theorem combined with single molecule force measurements provides a clear picture of the free energy landscapes.

  14. Diversity of Chemical Mechanisms in Thioredoxin Catalysis Revealed by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Li, Jingyuan; Kosuri, Pallav; Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Wiita, Arun P.; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Chueca, Ana; Holmgren, Arne; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Becker, Katja; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Beckwith, Jon; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean P.; Gaucher, Eric; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins are oxido-reductase enzymes present in all organisms, catalyzing the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins. By applying a calibrated force to a substrate disulfide, the chemical mechanisms of Trx catalysis can be examined in detail at the single molecule level. Here we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to explore the chemical evolution of Trx catalysis by probing the chemistry of eight different thioredoxin enzymes. While all Trxs show a characteristic Michaelis-Menten mechanism detected when the disulfide bond is stretched at low forces, two different chemical behaviors distinguish bacterial from eukaryotic-origin Trxs at high forces. Eukaryotic-origin Trxs reduce disulfide bonds through a single-electron transfer reaction (SET) whereas bacterial-origin Trxs exhibit both nucleophilic substitution (SN2) and SET reactions. A computational analysis of Trx structures identifies the evolution of the binding groove as an important factor controlling the chemistry of Trx catalysis. PMID:19597482

  15. pyFRET: A Python Library for Single Molecule Fluorescence Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Rebecca R; Klenerman, David

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule F\\"orster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is a powerful experimental technique for studying the properties of individual biological molecules in solution. However, as adoption of smFRET techniques becomes more widespread, the lack of available software, whether open source or commercial, for data analysis, is becoming a significant issue. Here, we present pyFRET, an open source Python package for the analysis of data from single-molecule fluorescence experiments from freely diffusing biomolecules. The package provides methods for the complete analysis of a smFRET dataset, from burst selection and denoising, through data visualisation and model fitting. We provide support for both continuous excitation and alternating laser excitation (ALEX) data analysis. pyFRET is available as a package downloadable from the Python Package Index (PyPI) under the open source three-clause BSD licence, together with links to extensive documentation and tutorials, including example usage and test data. Additio...

  16. Nanomechanical DNA origami 'single-molecule beacons' directly imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Sakai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Xu, Yan; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    DNA origami involves the folding of long single-stranded DNA into designed structures with the aid of short staple strands; such structures may enable the development of useful nanomechanical DNA devices. Here we develop versatile sensing systems for a variety of chemical and biological targets at molecular resolution. We have designed functional nanomechanical DNA origami devices that can be used as 'single-molecule beacons', and function as pinching devices. Using 'DNA origami pliers' and 'DNA origami forceps', which consist of two levers ~170 nm long connected at a fulcrum, various single-molecule inorganic and organic targets ranging from metal ions to proteins can be visually detected using atomic force microscopy by a shape transition of the origami devices. Any detection mechanism suitable for the target of interest, pinching, zipping or unzipping, can be chosen and used orthogonally with differently shaped origami devices in the same mixture using a single platform. PMID:21863016

  17. Aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of insulin receptors in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Minhyeok; Kwon, Mijin; Kim, Sooran; Yunn, Na-Oh; Kim, Daehyung; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-molecule imaging platform that quantitatively explores the spatiotemporal dynamics of individual insulin receptors in living cells. Modified DNA aptamers that specifically recognize insulin receptors (IRs) with a high affinity were selected through the SELEX process. Using quantum dot-labeled aptamers, we successfully imaged and analyzed the diffusive motions of individual IRs in the plasma membranes of a variety of cell lines (HIR, HEK293, HepG2). We further explored the cholesterol-dependent movement of IRs to address whether cholesterol depletion interferes with IRs and found that cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduces the mobility of IRs. The aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of IRs will provide better understanding of insulin signal transduction through the dynamics study of IRs in the plasma membrane.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectromechanical systems as magnetometers for single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzhorn, Marc; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2013-07-23

    Due to outstanding mechanical and electronic properties, carbon nanotube nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) were recently proposed as ultrasensitive magnetometers for single-molecule magnets (SMM). In this article, we describe a noninvasive grafting of a SMM on a carbon nanotube NEMS, which conserves both the mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube NEMS and the magnetic properties of the SMM. We will demonstrate that the nonlinearity of a carbon nanotube's mechanical motion can be used to probe the reversal of a molecular spin, associated with a bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium(III) single-molecule magnet, providing an experimental evidence for the detection of a single spin by a mechanical degree of freedom on a molecular level.

  19. Revealing −1 Programmed Ribosomal Frameshifting Mechanisms by Single-Molecule Techniques and Computational Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chun Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF serves as an intrinsic translational regulation mechanism employed by some viruses to control the ratio between structural and enzymatic proteins. Most viral mRNAs which use PRF adapt an H-type pseudoknot to stimulate −1 PRF. The relationship between the thermodynamic stability and the frameshifting efficiency of pseudoknots has not been fully understood. Recently, single-molecule force spectroscopy has revealed that the frequency of −1 PRF correlates with the unwinding forces required for disrupting pseudoknots, and that some of the unwinding work dissipates irreversibly due to the torsional restraint of pseudoknots. Complementary to single-molecule techniques, computational modeling provides insights into global motions of the ribosome, whose structural transitions during frameshifting have not yet been elucidated in atomic detail. Taken together, recent advances in biophysical tools may help to develop antiviral therapies that target the ubiquitous −1 PRF mechanism among viruses.

  20. Single molecule fluorescence fluctuations of the cyanine dyes linked covalently to DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AUMILER; Damir

    2009-01-01

    The intersystem crossing and isomerization dynamics of free-Cy3,Cy3-ssDNA,free-Cy5 and Cy5-ssDNA are obtained through simple analysis of rapid on/off blinking from single molecule fluorescence intensity time-traces and the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy(FCS).The on-and off-times observed in fluorescence time traces of single cyanine dyes are due to the formation of the triplet state and isomerization,where both the interaction with DNA and long central polymethine chain of cyanine dyes increase the barriers of isomerization,leading to long off-time.The results indicate that the single molecule fluorescence fluctuation together with the resulting second autocorrelation analysis are powerful methods for determining the triplet state and isomerization dynamics,which could be the simple techniques and complementary to other spectroscopic techniques,such as fluorescence decay measurement and laser flash photolysis to study the photophysical processes of complex molecules.

  1. Inelastic transport and low-bias rectification in a single-molecule diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihath, Joshua; Bruot, Christopher; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Lee, Youngu; Yu, Luping; Tao, Nongjian

    2011-10-25

    Designing, controlling, and understanding rectification behavior in molecular-scale devices has been a goal of the molecular electronics community for many years. Here we study the transport behavior of a single molecule diode, and its nonrectifying, symmetric counterpart at low temperatures, and at both low and high biases to help elucidate the electron-phonon interactions and transport mechanisms in the rectifying system. We find that the onset of current rectification occurs at low biases, indicating a significant change in the elastic transport pathway. However, the peaks in the inelastic electron tunneling (IET) spectrum are antisymmetric about zero bias and show no significant changes in energy or intensity in the forward or reverse bias directions, indicating that despite the change in the elastic transmission probability there is little impact on the inelastic pathway. These results agree with first principles calculations performed to evaluate the IETS, which also allow us to identify which modes are active in the single molecule junction.

  2. Super-resolution Analysis of TCR-Dependent Signaling: Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Valarie A; Yi, Jason; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) comprises methods that produce super-resolution images from molecular locations of single molecules. These techniques mathematically determine the center of a diffraction-limited spot produced by a fluorescent molecule, which represents the most likely location of the molecule. Only a small cohort of well-separated molecules is visualized in a single image, and then many images are obtained from a single sample. The localizations from all the images are combined to produce a super-resolution picture of the sample. Here we describe the application of two methods, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), to the study of signaling microclusters in T cells.

  3. Single molecule detection of 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Yin, Y. F.; Jiang, J. W.; Mo, Y. J.

    2009-02-01

    4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (DAB) is anticipated to be a human carcinogen based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. The trace detection of DAB is of great significance in environmental protection and safe life of the people. To test the availability of DAB trace detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), the SERS spectra of DAB single molecules adsorbed on the silver particle aggregates in colloid were investigated. The phenomena of blinking, spectral diffusion, and intensity fluctuations of the vibrational lines in the SERS spectra were observed. Statistical analysis of spectral intensity fluctuations indicates a multimodal distribution of some specific Raman bands, which are consistent with the identification of single molecule detection. Our results demonstrated that SERS can be applied to the trace detection of DAB molecules and other azo dyes.

  4. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  5. A Stochastic Single-Molecule Event Triggers Phenotype Switching of a Bacterial Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sunney; Choi, Paul; Cai, Long

    2009-03-01

    By monitoring fluorescently labeled lactose permease with single-molecule sensitivity, we investigated the molecular mechanism of how an Escherichia coli cell with the lac operon switches from one phenotype to another. At intermediate inducer concentrations, a population of genetically identical cells exhibits two phenotypes: induced cells with highly fluorescent membranes and uninduced cells with a small number of membrane-bound permeases. We found that this basal-level expression results from partial dissociation of the tetrameric lactose repressor from one of its operators on looped DNA. In contrast, infrequent events of complete dissociation of the repressor from DNA result in large bursts of permease expression that trigger induction of the lac operon. Hence, a stochastic single-molecule event determines a cell's phenotype.

  6. Electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry towards the single-molecule level: Theoretical notions and systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Albrecht, Tim;

    2005-01-01

    of metallic and semiconductor-based nanoparticles, nano-arrays, nanotubes, and nanopits. Others are based on self-assembled molecular monolayers. The latter extend to bioelectrochemical systems with redox metalloproteins and DNA-based molecules as targets. We overview here some recent achievements in areas...... of interfacial electrochemical ET systems, mapped to the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Focus is on both experimental and theoretical studies in our group. Systems addressed are organized monolayers of redox active transition metal complexes, and metalloproteins and metalloenzymes on single-crystal Au(111...... tunnelling spectroscopic (STS) features. Mapping of redox metalloproteins from the three major classes, i.e. blue copper proteins, heme proteins, and iron-sulfur proteins, at the monolayer and single-molecule levels have also been achieved. In situ STM and spectroscopy of redox molecules and biomolecules...

  7. Detection of Single Molecules Illuminated by a Light-Emitting Diode

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules has become an indispensable tool in biological imaging and sensing. Its success is based on fluorescence of organic dye molecules under carefully engineered laser illumination. In this paper we demonstrate optical detection of single molecules on a wide-field microscope with an illumination based on a commercially available, green light-emitting diode. The results are directly compared with laser illumination in the same experimental configuration. The setup and the limiting factors, such as light transfer to the sample, spectral filtering and the resulting signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. A theoretical and an experimental approach to estimate these parameters are presented. The results can be adapted to other single emitter and illumination schemes.

  8. Single-Molecule Diodes with High On/Off Ratios Through Environmental Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Dell, Emma; Adak, Olgun; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey; Campos, Luis; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-03-01

    Single-Molecule diodes were first proposed with an asymmetric molecule comprising a donor-bridge-acceptor architecture to mimic a semiconductor p-n junction. Progress in molecular electronics has led to the realization of several single-molecule diodes; these have relied on asymmetric molecular backbones, asymmetric molecule-electrode linkers, or asymmetric electrode materials. Despite these advances, molecular diodes have had limited potential for functional applications due to several pitfalls, including low rectification ratios (``on''/``off'' current ratios environment instead of an asymmetric molecule, we reproducibly achieve high rectification ratios at low operating voltages for molecular junctions based on a family of symmetric small-gap molecules. This technique serves as an unconventional approach for developing functional molecular-scale devices and probing their charge transport characteristics. Furthermore, this technique should be applicable to other nanoscale devices, providing a general route for tuning device properties.

  9. The origin of relative intensity fluctuations in single-molecule tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Matthew D; Chulhai, Dhabih; Seideman, Tamar; Jensen, Lasse; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2013-11-13

    An explanation of the relative intensity fluctuations observed in single-molecule Raman experiments is described utilizing both single-molecule tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. No correlation is observed in mode to mode intensity fluctuations indicating that the changes in mode intensities are completely independent. Theoretical calculations provide convincing evidence that the fluctuations are not the result of diffusion, orientation, or local electromagnetic field gradients but rather are the result of subtle variations of the excited-state lifetime, energy, and geometry of the molecule. These variations in the excited-state properties will provide information on adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions and may allow for inversion of experimental results to obtain these excited-state properties.

  10. Current rectification in a single molecule diode: the role of electrode coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Siya; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Coronado, Eugenio; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Agraït, Nicolás

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate large rectification ratios (> 100) in single-molecule junctions based on a metal-oxide cluster (polyoxometalate), using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) both at ambient conditions and at low temperature. These rectification ratios are the largest ever observed in a single-molecule junction, and in addition these junctions sustain current densities larger than 10(5) A cm(-2). By following the variation of the I-V characteristics with tip-molecule separation we demonstrate unambiguously that rectification is due to asymmetric coupling to the electrodes of a molecule with an asymmetric level structure. This mechanism can be implemented in other type of molecular junctions using both organic and inorganic molecules and provides a simple strategy for the rational design of molecular diodes.

  11. Roles of vacuum tunnelling and contact mechanics in single-molecule thermopower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Yokota, Kazumichi; Morikawa, Takanori; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-01-01

    Molecular junction is a chemically-defined nanostructure whose discrete electronic states are expected to render enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit suitable for energy-harvesting applications. Here, we report on geometrical dependence of thermoelectricity in metal-molecule-metal structures. We performed simultaneous measurements of the electrical conductance and thermovoltage of aromatic molecules having different anchoring groups at room temperature in vacuum. We elucidated the mutual contributions of vacuum tunnelling on thermoelectricity in the short molecular bridges. We also found stretching-induced thermoelectric voltage enhancement in thiol-linked single-molecule bridges along with absence of the pulling effects in diamine counterparts, thereby suggested that the electromechanical effect would be a rather universal phenomenon in Au-S anchored molecular junctions that undergo substantial metal-molecule contact elongation upon stretching. The present results provide a novel concept for molecular design to achieve high thermopower with single-molecule junctions. PMID:28281684

  12. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  13. An Undecanuclear Ferrimagnetic Cu9Dy2 Single Molecule Magnet Achieved through Ligand Fine-Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Irina A; Kostakis, George E; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-05-02

    We describe the concept of increasing the nuclearity of a previously reported high-spin Cu5Gd2 core using a "fine-tuning" ligand approach. Thus, two Cu9Ln2 coordination clusters, with Ln = Dy (1) and Gd (2), were synthesized with the Gd compound having a ground spin state of (17)/2 and the Dy analogue showing single-molecule-magnet behavior in zero field.

  14. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    OpenAIRE

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; PRAKASH, KIRTI; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA mino...

  15. A Heterotetranuclear [NiIIReIV3] single-molecule magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Faus, Juan

    2006-11-01

    The reaction of [ReIVCl4(ox)]2- and fully solvated Ni2+ ions in a MeCN/i-PrOH mixture affords the heterotetranuclear complex (NBu4)4[Ni{ReCl4(ox)}3] where the rhenium precursor acts as a bidentate ligand toward the nicke(II) ion through the oxalate group. The mixed 3d-5d species exhibits intramolecular ferromagnetic coupling and it behaves like a single-molecule magnet.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemi...

  17. Single-molecule magnet behavior with a single metal center enhanced through peripheral ligand modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurca, Titel; Farghal, Ahmed; Lin, Po-Heng; Korobkov, Ilia; Murugesu, Muralee; Richeson, Darrin S

    2011-10-12

    Bis(imino)pyridine pincer ligands in conjunction with two isothiocyanate ligands have been used to prepare two mononuclear Co(II) complexes. Both complexes have a distorted square-pyramidal geometry with the Co(II) centers lying above the basal plane. This leads to significant spin-orbit coupling for the d(7) Co(II) ions and consequently to slow relaxation of the magnetization that is characteristic of Single-Molecule Magnet (SMM) behavior.

  18. A Single-Molecule Study on the Structural Damage of Ultraviolet Radiated DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Chun Ke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The structural damage of double-stranded DNA under UV radiation was examined using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Compared to undamaged DNA, the diffusion coefficient of λ-DNA was significantly increased with 12 min or 20 min of radiation but remained unchanged for 40 min of exposure possibly due to strand crosslinking. The structural damage of DNA was further examined using transmission electron microscopy which revealed kinks and sharp bends along the DNA backbone.

  19. Real-Time analysis and visualization for single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kechkar, Adel; Nair, Deepak; Heilemann, Mike; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Accurate multidimensional localization of isolated fluorescent emitters is a time consuming process in single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy. We demonstrate a functional method for real-time reconstruction with automatic feedback control, without compromising the localization accuracy. Compatible with high frame rates of EM-CCD cameras, it relies on a wavelet segmentation algorithm, together with a mix of CPU/GPU implementation. A combination with Gaussian fitting allows direct ac...

  20. Real-Time Analysis and Visualization for Single-Molecule Based Super-Resolution Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kechkar, Adel; Nair, Deepak; Heilemann, Mike; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Accurate multidimensional localization of isolated fluorescent emitters is a time consuming process in single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy. We demonstrate a functional method for real-time reconstruction with automatic feedback control, without compromising the localization accuracy. Compatible with high frame rates of EM-CCD cameras, it relies on a wavelet segmentation algorithm, together with a mix of CPU/GPU implementation. A combination with Gaussian fitting allows direct ac...

  1. All-electric-controlled spin current switching in single-molecule magnet-tunnel junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zheng-Zhong; Shen Rui; Sheng Li; Wang Rui-Qiang; Wang Bai-Gen; Xing Ding-Yu

    2011-01-01

    A single-molecule magnet (SMM)coupled to two normal metallic electrodes can both switch spin-up and spindown electronic currents within two different windows of SMM gate voltage. Such spin current switching in the SMM tunnel junction arises from spin-selected single electron resonant tunneling via the lowest unoccupied molecular orbit of the SMM. Since it is not magnetically controlled but all-electrically controlled, the proposed spin current switching effect may have potential applications in future spintronics.

  2. Single-Molecule Enzymology Based On The Principle Of The Millikan Oil Drop Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Leiske, Danielle L; Chow, Andrea; Dettloff, Roger; Farinas, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The ability to monitor the progress of single molecule enzyme reactions is often limited by the need to use fluorogenic substrates. A method based on the principle of the Millikan Oil Drop Experiment was developed to monitor the change in charge of substrates bound to a nanoparticle and offers a means of detecting single enzyme reactions without fluorescence detection. As a proof of principle of the ability to monitor reactions which result in a change in substrate charge, polymerization on a...

  3. Retention of transcription initiation factor sigma(70) in transcription elongation: Single-molecule analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kapanidis, A. N.; Margeat, E; Laurence, T A; Doose, S.; Ho, S O; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Kortkhonjia, E; Mekler, V; Ebright, R H; S. Weiss

    2005-01-01

    We report a single-molecule assay that defines, simultaneously, the translocational position of a protein complex relative to DNA and the subunit stoichiometry of the complex. We applied the assay to define translocational positions and sigma(70) contents of bacterial transcription elongation complexes in vitro. The results confirm ensemble results indicating that a large fraction, similar to 70%-90%, of early elongation complexes retain sigma(70) and that a determinant for sigma(70) recognit...

  4. Single-Molecule Counting of Point Mutations by Transient DNA Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Li, Lidan; Wang, Shanshan; Hao, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Changyuan

    2017-03-01

    High-confidence detection of point mutations is important for disease diagnosis and clinical practice. Hybridization probes are extensively used, but are hindered by their poor single-nucleotide selectivity. Shortening the length of DNA hybridization probes weakens the stability of the probe-target duplex, leading to transient binding between complementary sequences. The kinetics of probe-target binding events are highly dependent on the number of complementary base pairs. Here, we present a single-molecule assay for point mutation detection based on transient DNA binding and use of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Statistical analysis of single-molecule kinetics enabled us to effectively discriminate between wild type DNA sequences and single-nucleotide variants at the single-molecule level. A higher single-nucleotide discrimination is achieved than in our previous work by optimizing the assay conditions, which is guided by statistical modeling of kinetics with a gamma distribution. The KRAS c.34 A mutation can be clearly differentiated from the wild type sequence (KRAS c.34 G) at a relative abundance as low as 0.01% mutant to WT. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analysis of clinically relevant biological samples, we used this technology to detect mutations in single-stranded DNA generated from asymmetric RT-PCR of mRNA from two cancer cell lines.

  5. Real-time single-molecule coimmunoprecipitation of weak protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Won; Ryu, Ji Young; Yoo, Janghyun; Choi, Byungsan; Kim, Kipom; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2013-10-01

    Coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) analysis is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. It currently involves electrophoresis and western blotting, which are not optimized for detecting weak and transient interactions. In this protocol we describe an advanced version of co-IP analysis that uses real-time, single-molecule fluorescence imaging as its detection scheme. Bait proteins are pulled down onto the imaging plane of a total internal reflection (TIR) microscope. With unpurified cells or tissue extracts kept in reaction chambers, we observe single protein-protein interactions between the surface-immobilized bait and the fluorescent protein-labeled prey proteins in real time. Such direct recording provides an improvement of five orders of magnitude in the time resolution of co-IP analysis. With the single-molecule sensitivity and millisecond time resolution, which distinguish our method from other methods for measuring weak protein-protein interactions, it is possible to quantify the interaction kinetics and active fraction of native, unlabeled bait proteins. Real-time single-molecule co-IP analysis, which takes ∼4 h to complete from lysate preparation to kinetic analysis, provides a general avenue for revealing the rich kinetic picture of target protein-protein interactions, and it can be used, for example, to investigate the molecular lesions that drive individual cancers at the level of protein-protein interactions.

  6. Nonlinear reconstruction of single-molecule free-energy surfaces from univariate time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    The stable conformations and dynamical fluctuations of polymers and macromolecules are governed by the underlying single-molecule free energy surface. By integrating ideas from dynamical systems theory with nonlinear manifold learning, we have recovered single-molecule free energy surfaces from univariate time series in a single coarse-grained system observable. Using Takens' Delay Embedding Theorem, we expand the univariate time series into a high dimensional space in which the dynamics are equivalent to those of the molecular motions in real space. We then apply the diffusion map nonlinear manifold learning algorithm to extract a low-dimensional representation of the free energy surface that is diffeomorphic to that computed from a complete knowledge of all system degrees of freedom. We validate our approach in molecular dynamics simulations of a C(24)H(50) n-alkane chain to demonstrate that the two-dimensional free energy surface extracted from the atomistic simulation trajectory is - subject to spatial and temporal symmetries - geometrically and topologically equivalent to that recovered from a knowledge of only the head-to-tail distance of the chain. Our approach lays the foundations to extract empirical single-molecule free energy surfaces directly from experimental measurements.

  7. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA-barcoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M

    2014-11-27

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing, high-throughput protein analyses are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule protein detection using optical methods is limited by the number of spectrally non-overlapping chromophores. Here we introduce a single-molecular-interaction sequencing (SMI-seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging single-molecule advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide thin film to construct a random single-molecule array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies) and analysed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimetre. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured on the basis of the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor and antibody-binding profiling, are demonstrated. SMI-seq enables 'library versus library' screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity.

  8. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  9. Single-molecule chemical reaction reveals molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuwei; Song, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Ruan, Mingbo; Xu, Weilin

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the microscopic elementary process of chemical reactions, especially in condensed phase, is highly desirable for improvement of efficiencies in industrial chemical processes. Here we show an approach to gaining new insights into elementary reactions in condensed phase by combining quantum chemical calculations with a single-molecule analysis. Elementary chemical reactions in liquid-phase, revealed from quantum chemical calculations, are studied by tracking the fluorescence of single dye molecules undergoing a reversible redox process. Statistical analyses of single-molecule trajectories reveal molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics of elementary reactions. The reactivity dynamic fluctuations of single molecules are evidenced and probably arise from either or both of the low-frequency approach of the molecule to the internal surface of the SiO2 nanosphere or the molecule diffusion-induced memory effect. This new approach could be applied to other chemical reactions in liquid phase to gain more insight into their molecular reaction kinetics and the dynamics of elementary steps.

  10. Rectifications in organic single-molecule diodes alkanethiolate-terminated heterocyclics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Yipeng, E-mail: ypan@htu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Zhang, Mengjun; Wang, Tianxing; Wang, Guangtao [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Fu, Zhaoming, E-mail: fuzhm1979@163.com [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-02-22

    Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with the ab initio density functional theory, we investigate the rectifying behaviors of the organic single-molecule S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with a variety of heterocyclics (i.e., BIPY, PHE, PHEPY, and PYR) coupled with two semi-infinite Au electrodes. Our quantum transport calculation results show that the BIPY and PHE nanojunctions show the high-efficiency rectifying effects. While, differently, the current–voltage (I–V) curves of PHEPY and PYR nanojunctions display the insulating and linear characters, respectively. The corresponding electronic transport mechanisms are analyzed in detail. Our calculation results demonstrate that these investigated organic single-molecule nanojunctions have the potential applications in rectifiers and molecular wires. - Highlights: • The organic single-molecule diodes S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with bipyridyl and phenanthroline groups present rectifying effects. • The S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with phenylpyridyl exhibit the insulating character. • The I–V curve of S(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-terminated with pyrazinyl group presents well linear character.

  11. Correlating anomalous diffusion with lipid bilayer membrane structure using single molecule tracking and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaug, Michael J.; Faller, Roland; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2011-06-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been observed abundantly in the plasma membrane of biological cells, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In general, it has not been possible to directly image the obstacles to diffusion in membranes, which are thought to be skeleton bound proteins, protein aggregates, and lipid domains, so the dynamics of diffusing particles is used to deduce the obstacle characteristics. We present a supported lipid bilayer system in which we characterized the anomalous diffusion of lipid molecules using single molecule tracking, while at the same time imaging the obstacles to diffusion with atomic force microscopy. To explain our experimental results, we performed lattice Monte Carlo simulations of tracer diffusion in the presence of the experimentally determined obstacle configurations. We correlate the observed anomalous diffusion with obstacle area fraction, fractal dimension, and correlation length. To accurately measure an anomalous diffusion exponent, we derived an expression to account for the time-averaging inherent to all single molecule tracking experiments. We show that the length of the single molecule trajectories is critical to the determination of the anomalous diffusion exponent. We further discuss our results in the context of confinement models and the generating stochastic process.

  12. Magnetic Relaxation Study on Single Crystals of Ni4 Single-Molecule Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-Rong; LIU Hai-Qing; LIU Ying; SU Shao-Kui; WANG Yun-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The ac susceptibility of single crystals of Nia single-molecule magnets is measured by a compensation measurement setup. The magnetic relaxation time calculated from the peak of the out-phase component of the susceptibility fits the Arrhenius law well and gives an effective spin-flipping energy barrier of Ueff = 7.2 K. This value is far below the classical activation energy barrier of U = 14 K, whereas it is close to the energy gap between the Sz = ±4 and Sz = ±3 doublets, which indicates that quantum tunneling between the Sz = 3 and Sz = -3 states plays a key role in the magnetic relaxation. Therefore the relaxation process combines thermal activation and quantum tunneling. Also we deduce that the blocking temperature of Ni4 single-molecule magnets is lower than 0.3 K by extrapolating the relaxation time plot, which ensures that this single-molecule magnet material enters a long-range magnetic ordered state instead of a spin glass state at 0.91 K.

  13. Single-molecule spectroscopy of the temperature-induced collapse of unfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettels, Daniel; Müller-Späth, Sonja; Küster, Frank; Hofmann, Hagen; Haenni, Dominik; Rüegger, Stefan; Reymond, Luc; Hoffmann, Armin; Kubelka, Jan; Heinz, Benjamin; Gast, Klaus; Best, Robert B; Schuler, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    We used single-molecule FRET in combination with other biophysical methods and molecular simulations to investigate the effect of temperature on the dimensions of unfolded proteins. With single-molecule FRET, this question can be addressed even under near-native conditions, where most molecules are folded, allowing us to probe a wide range of denaturant concentrations and temperatures. We find a compaction of the unfolded state of a small cold shock protein with increasing temperature in both the presence and the absence of denaturant, with good agreement between the results from single-molecule FRET and dynamic light scattering. Although dissociation of denaturant from the polypeptide chain with increasing temperature accounts for part of the compaction, the results indicate an important role for additional temperature-dependent interactions within the unfolded chain. The observation of a collapse of a similar extent in the extremely hydrophilic, intrinsically disordered protein prothymosin alpha suggests that the hydrophobic effect is not the sole source of the underlying interactions. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water show changes in secondary structure content with increasing temperature and suggest a contribution of intramolecular hydrogen bonding to unfolded state collapse.

  14. Synthesis and single-molecule imaging of highly mobile adamantane-wheeled nanocars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Pin-Lei E; Wang, Lin-Yung; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Link, Stephan; Tour, James M

    2013-01-22

    The synthesis and single-molecule imaging of two inherently fluorescent nanocars equipped with adamantane wheels is reported. The nanocars were imaged using 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) as the chromophore, which was rigidly incorporated into the nanocar chassis via Sonogashira cross-coupling chemistry that permitted the synthesis of nanocars having different geometries. In particular, studied here were four- and three-wheeled nanocars with adamantane wheels. It was found that, for the four-wheeled nanocar, the percentage of moving nanocars and the diffusion constant show a significant improvement over p-carborane-wheeled nanocars with the same chassis. The three-wheeled nanocar showed only limited mobility due to its geometry. These results are consistent with a requisite wheel-like rolling motion. We furthermore developed a model that relates the percentage of moving nanocars in single-molecule experiments with the diffusion constant. The excellent agreement between the model and the new results presented here as well as previous single-molecule studies of fluorescent nanocars yields an improved understanding of motion in these molecular machines.

  15. Wafer-scale metasurface for total power absorption, local field enhancement and single molecule Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D; Camden, Jon P; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-10-04

    The ability to detect molecules at low concentrations is highly desired for applications that range from basic science to healthcare. Considerable interest also exists for ultrathin materials with high optical absorption, e.g. for microbolometers and thermal emitters. Metal nanostructures present opportunities to achieve both purposes. Metal nanoparticles can generate gigantic field enhancements, sufficient for the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Thin layers containing metal nanostructures ("metasurfaces") can achieve near-total power absorption at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Thus far, however, both aims (i.e. single molecule Raman and total power absorption) have only been achieved using metal nanostructures produced by techniques (high resolution lithography or colloidal synthesis) that are complex and/or difficult to implement over large areas. Here, we demonstrate a metasurface that achieves the near-perfect absorption of visible-wavelength light and enables the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Our metasurface is fabricated using thin film depositions, and is of unprecedented (wafer-scale) extent.

  16. Ensemble and single-molecule studies on fluorescence quenching in transition metal bipyridine-complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Brox

    Full Text Available Beyond their use in analytical chemistry fluorescent probes continuously gain importance because of recent applications of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to monitor elementary reaction steps. In this context, we characterized quenching of a fluorescent probe by different metal ions with fluorescence spectroscopy in the bulk and at the single-molecule level. We apply a quantitative model to explain deviations from existing standard models for fluorescence quenching. The model is based on a reversible transition from a bright to a dim state upon binding of the metal ion. We use the model to estimate the stability constants of complexes with different metal ions and the change of the relative quantum yield of different reporter dye labels. We found ensemble data to agree widely with results from single-molecule experiments. Our data indicates a mechanism involving close molecular contact of dye and quenching moiety which we also found in molecular dynamics simulations. We close the manuscript with a discussion of possible mechanisms based on Förster distances and electrochemical potentials which renders photo-induced electron transfer to be more likely than Förster resonance energy transfer.

  17. Magnetic relaxations in a Tb-based single molecule magnet studied by quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofu, Maiko [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kajiwara, Takashi [Faculty of Science, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Gardner, Jason S. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Simeoni, Giovanna G. [Technische Universität München, Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz FRM II, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Tyagi, Madhusudan; Faraone, Antonio [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Department of Materials Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Nakajima, Kenji; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko [Neutron Science Section, J-PARC Center, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nakano, Motohiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamamuro, Osamu, E-mail: yamamuro@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • We examined a Tb based single molecule magnet by ac susceptibility and QENS. • We found two distinct magnetic relaxations in a wide time range from 0.1 ms to 1 ps. • The slower relaxation corresponds to the thermally activated tunneling process. • The faster one couples with the motion of H atoms around the magnetic ions. • The two relaxations exhibit a crossover around 100 ns. - Abstract: By using ac magnetic susceptibility and quasielatic neutron scattering (QENS) techniques, we have investigated a magnetization relaxation phenomenon of a rare-earth based single molecule magnet, TbCuC{sub 19}H{sub 20}N{sub 3}O{sub 16}. We clearly identified and characterized two magnetic relaxations. The slower relaxation observed in the ac susceptibility is at the ms timescale around T=2 K and its activation energy is 16 K. On the other hand, the faster relaxation in the QENS measurements occurs on the timescale between ns and ps with activation energy of 174 K. The slower relaxation may occur through thermally activated tunneling among magnetic substates. We discuss two possible origins for the faster relaxation; one is a thermally activated tunneling between the higher excited states, the other is the magnetic relaxation coupled with the motion of ligands around the magnetic ions. This is the first clear observation of magnetic relaxation on the single molecule magnet revealed by QENS.

  18. High-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence detection in theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, R.A.; Peck, K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Stryer, L. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology)

    1989-01-01

    The number of emitted photons that can be obtained from a fluorophore increases with the incident light intensity and the duration of illumination. However, saturation of the absorption transition and photodestruction place natural limits on the ultimate signal-to-noise ratio that can be obtained. Equations have been derived to describe the fluorescence-to-background-noise ratio in the presence of saturating light intensities and photodestruction. The fluorescence lifetime and the photodestruction quantum yield are the key parameters that determine the optimum light intensity and exposure time. To test this theory we have performed single molecule detection of phycoerythrin (PE). The laser power was selected to give a mean time between absorptions approximately equal to the fluorescence decay rate. The transit time was selected to be nearly equal to the photodestruction time of {approximately}600 {mu}s. Under these conditions the photocount distribution function, the photocount autocorrelation function, and the concentration dependence clearly show that we are detecting bursts of fluorescence from individual fluorophores. A hard-wired version of this single-molecule detection system was used to measure the concentration of PE down to 10{sup {minus}15} M. This single-molecule counter is three orders-of-magnitude more sensitive than conventional fluorescence detection systems. The approach presented here should be useful in the optimization of fluorescence detected DNA sequencing gels. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Amplification of single molecule translocation signal using β-strand peptide functionalized nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebes-Peer, Yael; Rapaport, Hanna; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2014-07-22

    Changes in ionic current flowing through nanopores due to binding or translocation of single biopolymer molecules enable their detection and characterization. It is, however, much more challenging to detect small molecules due to their rapid and small signal signature. Here we demonstrate the use of de novo designed peptides for functionalization of nanopores that enable the detection of a small analytes at the single molecule level. The detection relies on cooperative peptide conformational change that is induced by the binding of the small molecule to a receptor domain on the peptide. This change results in alteration of the nanopore effective diameter and hence induces current perturbation signal. On the basis of this approach, we demonstrate here the detection of diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (paraoxon), a poisonous organophosphate molecule. Paraoxon binding is induced by the incorporation of the catalytic triad of acetylcholine esterase in the hydrophilic domain of a short amphiphilic peptide and promotes β-sheet assembly of the peptide both in solution and for peptide molecules immobilized on solid surfaces. Nanopores coated with this peptide allowed the detection of paraoxon at the single molecule level revealing two binding arrangements. This unique approach, hence, provides the ability to study interactions of small molecules with the corresponding engineered receptors at the single molecule level. Furthermore, the suggested versatile platform may be used for the development of highly sensitive small analytes sensors.

  20. Absolute Summ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  1. Rational design of DNA-actuated enzyme nanoreactors guided by single molecule analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Soma; Adendorff, Matthew R.; Liu, Minghui; Yan, Hao; Bathe, Mark; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational heterogeneity. Upon rational redesign of the Holliday junctions located at their hinge and arms, we found that the DNA tweezers could be more completely and uniformly closed. A novel single molecule enzyme assay was developed to demonstrate that our design improvements yield significant, independent enhancements in the fraction of active enzyme nanoreactors and their individual substrate turnover frequencies. The sequence-level design strategies explored here may aid more broadly in improving the performance of DNA-based nanodevices including biological and chemical sensors.The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational

  2. Irving Langmuir Prize Talk: Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging: Nanoscale Emitters with Photoinduced Switching Enable Superresolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2009-03-01

    In the two decades since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in a solid (Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2535 (1989)), much has been learned about the ability of single molecules to probe local nanoenvironments and individual behavior in biological and nonbiological materials in the absence of ensemble averaging that can obscure heterogeneity. The early years concentrated on high-resolution spectroscopy in solids, which provided observations of lifetime-limited spectra, optical saturation, spectral diffusion, optical switching, vibrational spectra, and magnetic resonance of a single molecular spin. In the mid-1990's, much of the field moved to room temperature, where a wide variety of biophysical effects were subsequently explored, but it is worth noting that several features from the low-temperature studies have analogs at high temperature. For example, in our first studies of yellow-emitting variants of green fluorescent protein (EYFP) in the water-filled pores of a gel (Nature 388, 355 (1997)), optically induced switching of the emission was observed, a room-temperature analog of the earlier low-temperature behavior. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic imaging of individual fluorophores leads naturally to superlocalization, or determination of the position of the molecule with precision beyond the optical diffraction limit, simply by digitization of the point-spread function from the single emitter. Recent work has allowed measurement of the shape of single filaments in a living cell simply by allowing a single molecule to move through the filament (PNAS 103, 10929 (2006)). The additional use of photoinduced control of single-molecule emission allows imaging beyond the diffraction limit (superresolution) by several novel approaches proposed by different researchers. For example, using photoswitchable EYFP, a novel protein superstructure can now be directly imaged in a living bacterial cell at

  3. Single-molecule TPM studies on the conversion of human telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jen-Fei; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2010-04-21

    Human telomere contains guanine-rich (G-rich) tandem repeats of single-stranded DNA sequences at its 3' tail. The G-rich sequences can be folded into various secondary structures, termed G-quadruplexes (G4s), by Hoogsteen basepairing in the presence of monovalent cations (such as Na+ and K+). We developed a single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) method to investigate the unfolding process of G4s in the human telomeric sequence AGGG(TTAGGG)3 in real time. The TPM method monitors the DNA tether length change caused by formation of the G4, thus allowing the unfolding process and structural conversion to be monitored at the single-molecule level. In the presence of its antisense sequence, the folded G4 structure can be disrupted and converted to the unfolded conformation, with apparent unfolding time constants of 82 s and 3152 s. We also observed that the stability of the G4 is greatly affected by different monovalent cations. The folding equilibrium constant of G4 is strongly dependent on the salt concentration, ranging from 1.75 at 5 mM Na+ to 3.40 at 15 mM Na+. Earlier spectral studies of Na+- and K+-folded states suggested that the spectral conversion between these two different folded structures may go through a structurally unfolded intermediate state. However, our single-molecule TPM experiments did not detect any totally unfolded intermediate within our experimental resolution when sodium-folded G4 DNA molecules were titrated with high-concentration, excess potassium ions. This observation suggests that a totally unfolding pathway is likely not the major pathway for spectral conversion on the timescale of minutes, and that interconversion among folded states can be achieved by the loop rearrangement. This study also demonstrates that TPM experiments can be used to study conformational changes in single-stranded DNA molecules.

  4. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jingdong [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grubb, Mikala [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Allan G [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Kuznetsov, Alexander M [A N Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij Prospect 31, 117071 Moscow (Russian Federation); Boisen, Anja [Microelectronics Centre, Building 345, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wackerbarth, Hainer [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-05-14

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  5. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  6. Examining Sources of Error in PCR by Single-Molecule Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has enabled the detection of rare genetic or somatic mutations and contributed to our understanding of disease progression and evolution. However, many next-generation sequencing technologies first rely on DNA amplification, via the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), as part of sample preparation workflows. Mistakes made during PCR appear in sequencing data and contribute to false mutations that can ultimately confound genetic analysis. In this report, a single-molecule sequencing assay was used to comprehensively catalog the different types of errors introduced during PCR, including polymerase misincorporation, structure-induced template-switching, PCR-mediated recombination and DNA damage. In addition to well-characterized polymerase base substitution errors, other sources of error were found to be equally prevalent. PCR-mediated recombination by Taq polymerase was observed at the single-molecule level, and surprisingly found to occur as frequently as polymerase base substitution errors, suggesting it may be an underappreciated source of error for multiplex amplification reactions. Inverted repeat structural elements in lacZ caused polymerase template-switching between the top and bottom strands during replication and the frequency of these events were measured for different polymerases. For very accurate polymerases, DNA damage introduced during temperature cycling, and not polymerase base substitution errors, appeared to be the major contributor toward mutations occurring in amplification products. In total, we analyzed PCR products at the single-molecule level and present here a more complete picture of the types of mistakes that occur during DNA amplification. PMID:28060945

  7. Single-molecule chemistry of metal phthalocyanine on noble metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenyu; Li, Bin; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, Jian Guo

    2010-07-20

    To develop new functional materials and nanoscale electronics, researchers would like to accurately describe and precisely control the quantum state of a single molecule on a surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), combined with first-principles simulations, provides a powerful technique for acquiring this level of understanding. Traditionally, metal phthalocyanine (MPc) molecules, composed of a metal atom surrounded by a ligand ring, have been used as dyes and pigments. Recently, MPc molecules have shown great promise as components of light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells, and single-molecule devices. In this Account, we describe recent research on the characterization and control of adsorption and electronic states of a single MPc molecule on noble metal surfaces. In general, the electronic and magnetic properties of a MPc molecule largely depend on the type of metal ion within the phthalocyanine ligand and the type of surface on which the molecule is adsorbed. However, with the STM technique, we can use on-site molecular "surgery" to manipulate the structure and the properties of the molecule. For example, STM can induce a dehydrogenation reaction of the MPc, which allows us to control the Kondo effect, which describes the spin polarization of the molecule and its interaction with the complex environment. A specially designed STM tip can allow researchers to detect certain molecule-surface hybrid states that are not accessible by other techniques. By matching the local orbital symmetry of the STM tip and the molecule, we can generate the negative differential resistance effect in the formed molecular junction. This orbital symmetry based mechanism is extremely robust and does not critically depend on the geometry of the STM tip. In summary, this simple model system, a MPc molecule absorbed on a noble metal surface, demonstrates the power of STM for quantum characterization and manipulation of single molecules, highlighting the

  8. Single molecule studies of solvent-dependent diffusion and entrapment in poly(dimethylsiloxane) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey J; Culbertson, Christopher T; Higgins, Daniel A

    2008-12-15

    Single molecule microscopic and spectroscopic methods are employed to probe the mobility and physical entrapment of dye molecules in dry and solvent-loaded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) films. PDMS films of approximately 220 nm thickness are prepared by spin casting dilute solutions of Sylgard 184 onto glass coverslips, followed by low temperature curing. A perylene diimide dye (BPPDI) is used to probe diffusion and molecule-matrix interactions. Two classes of dye-loaded samples are investigated: (i) those incorporating dye dispersed throughout the films ("in film" samples) and (ii) those in which the dye is restricted primarily to the PDMS surface ("on film" samples). Experiments are performed under dry nitrogen and at various levels of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) loading from the vapor phase. A PDMS-coated quartz-crystal microbalance is employed to monitor solvent loading and drying of the PDMS and to ensure equilibrium conditions are achieved. Single molecules are shown to be predominantly immobile under dry conditions and mostly mobile under IPA-saturated conditions. Quantitative methods for counting the fluorescent spots produced by immobile single molecules in optical images of the samples demonstrate that the population of mobile molecules increases nonlinearly with IPA loading. Even under IPA saturated conditions, the population of fixed molecules is found to be greater than zero and is greatest for "in film" samples. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is used to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient for the mobile molecules, yielding a mean value of D = 1.4(+/-0.4) x 10(-8) cm(2)/s that is virtually independent of IPA loading and sample class. It is concluded that a nonzero population of dye molecules is physically entrapped within the PDMS matrix under all conditions. The increase in the population of mobile molecules under high IPA conditions is attributed to the filling of film micropores with solvent, rather than by incorporation of molecularly

  9. Conformational equilibria in monomeric alpha-synuclein at the single-molecule level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Sandal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human alpha-Synuclein (alphaSyn is a natively unfolded protein whose aggregation into amyloid fibrils is involved in the pathology of Parkinson disease. A full comprehension of the structure and dynamics of early intermediates leading to the aggregated states is an unsolved problem of essential importance to researchers attempting to decipher the molecular mechanisms of alphaSyn aggregation and formation of fibrils. Traditional bulk techniques used so far to solve this problem point to a direct correlation between alphaSyn's unique conformational properties and its propensity to aggregate, but these techniques can only provide ensemble-averaged information for monomers and oligomers alike. They therefore cannot characterize the full complexity of the conformational equilibria that trigger the aggregation process. We applied atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule mechanical unfolding methodology to study the conformational equilibrium of human wild-type and mutant alphaSyn. The conformational heterogeneity of monomeric alphaSyn was characterized at the single-molecule level. Three main classes of conformations, including disordered and "beta-like" structures, were directly observed and quantified without any interference from oligomeric soluble forms. The relative abundance of the "beta-like" structures significantly increased in different conditions promoting the aggregation of alphaSyn: the presence of Cu2+, the pathogenic A30P mutation, and high ionic strength. This methodology can explore the full conformational space of a protein at the single-molecule level, detecting even poorly populated conformers and measuring their distribution in a variety of biologically important conditions. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time evidence of a conformational equilibrium that controls the population of a specific class of monomeric alphaSyn conformers, positively correlated with conditions known to promote the formation of

  10. BOBA FRET: bootstrap-based analysis of single-molecule FRET data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian L B König

    Full Text Available Time-binned single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET experiments with surface-tethered nucleic acids or proteins permit to follow folding and catalysis of single molecules in real-time. Due to the intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in smFRET time traces, research over the past years has focused on the development of new methods to extract discrete states (conformations from noisy data. However, limited observation time typically leads to pronounced cross-sample variability, i.e., single molecules display differences in the relative population of states and the corresponding conversion rates. Quantification of cross-sample variability is necessary to perform statistical testing in order to assess whether changes observed in response to an experimental parameter (metal ion concentration, the presence of a ligand, etc. are significant. However, such hypothesis testing has been disregarded to date, precluding robust biological interpretation. Here, we address this problem by a bootstrap-based approach to estimate the experimental variability. Simulated time traces are presented to assess the robustness of the algorithm in conjunction with approaches commonly used in thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of time-binned smFRET data. Furthermore, a pair of functionally important sequences derived from the self-cleaving group II intron Sc.ai5γ (d3'EBS1/IBS1 is used as a model system. Through statistical hypothesis testing, divalent metal ions are shown to have a statistically significant effect on both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of their interaction. The Matlab source code used for analysis (bootstrap-based analysis of smFRET data, BOBA FRET, as well as a graphical user interface, is available via http://www.aci.uzh.ch/rna/.

  11. Plasmonic nano-protrusions: hierarchical nanostructures for single-molecule Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuray, Sagnik; Pathak, Avinash; Bok, Sangho; Chen, Biyan; Hamm, Steven C.; Mathai, Cherian J.; Guha, Suchismita; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2017-01-01

    Classical methods for enhancing the electromagnetic field from substrates for spectroscopic applications, such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), have involved the generation of hotspots through directed self-assembly of nanoparticles or by patterning nanoscale features using expensive nanolithography techniques. A novel large-area, cost-effective soft lithographic technique involving glancing angle deposition (GLAD) of silver on polymer gratings is reported here. This method produces hierarchical nanostructures with high enhancement factors capable of analyzing single-molecule SERS. The uniform ordered and patterned nanostructures provide extraordinary field enhancements that serve as excitatory hotspots and are herein interrogated by SERS. The high spatial homogeneity of the Raman signal and signal enhancement over a large area from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 2-naphthalenethiol demonstrated the uniformity of the hotspots. The enhancement was shown to have a critical dependence on the underlying nanostructure via the surface energy landscape and GLAD angles for a fixed deposition thickness, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy surface analysis of the substrate. The nanostructured surface leads to an extremely concentrated electromagnetic field at sharp nanoscale peaks, here referred to as ‘nano-protrusions’, due to the coupling of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with localized SPR. These nano-protrusions act as hotspots which provide Raman enhancement factors as high as 108 over a comparable SAM on silver. Comparison of our substrate with the commercial substrate Klarite™ shows higher signal enhancement and minimal signal variation with hotspot spatial distribution. By using the proper plasmon resonance angle corresponding to the laser source wavelength, further enhancement in signal intensity can be achieved. Single-molecule Raman spectra for rhodamine 6G are obtained from the best SERS substrate (a

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Taekjip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  13. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Tynan, Christopher J; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation). Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion.

  14. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation. Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion.

  15. Direct measurement and modulation of single-molecule coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhu, Nan; Gschneidtner, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Coordination chemistry has been a consistently active branch of chemistry since Werner's seminal theory of coordination compounds inaugurated in 1893, with the central focus on transition metal complexes. However, control and measurement of metal-ligand interactions at the single-molecule level...... remain a daunting challenge. Here we demonstrate an interdisciplinary and systematic approach that enables measurement and modulation of the coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex. Terpyridine is derived with a thiol linker, facilitating covalent attachment of this ligand on both gold...

  16. Single-Molecule Electrochemical Transistor Utilizing a Nickel-Pyridyl Spinterface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooke, Richard J.; Jin, Chengjun; Szumski, Doug S.

    2015-01-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscope break-junction technique, we produce 4,4′-bipyridine (44BP) single-molecule junctions with Ni and Au contacts. Electrochemical control is used to prevent Ni oxidation and to modulate the conductance of the devices via nonredox gating - the first time this has...... been shown using non-Au contacts. Remarkably the conductance and gain of the resulting Ni-44BP-Ni electrochemical transistors is significantly higher than analogous Au-based devices. Ab-initio calculations reveal that this behavior arises because charge transport is mediated by spin-polarized Ni d...

  17. Cationic Mn4 single-molecule magnet with a sterically isolated core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Katie J; Quddusi, Hajrah M; Liu, Junjie; O'Brien, James R; Nakano, Motohiro; del Barco, Enrique; Hill, Stephen; Hendrickson, David N

    2011-08-15

    The synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of a ligand-modified Mn(4) dicubane single-molecule magnet (SMM), [Mn(4)(Bet)(4)(mdea)(2)(mdeaH)(2)](BPh(4))(4), are presented, where the cationic SMM units are significantly separated from neighboring molecules in the crystal lattice. There are no cocrystallized solvate molecules, making it an ideal candidate for single-crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance studies. Increased control over intermolecular interactions in such materials is a crucial factor in the future application of SMMs.

  18. A Low-Symmetry Dysprosium Metallocene Single-Molecule Magnet with a High Anisotropy Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Thomas; Chilton, Nicholas F; Layfield, Richard A

    2016-09-05

    The single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of the isocarbonyl-ligated dysprosium metallocene [Cp*2 Dy{μ-(OC)2 FeCp}]2 (1Dy ), which contains a rhombus-shaped Dy2 Fe2 core, are described. Combining a strong axial [Cp*](-) ligand field with a weak equatorial field consisting of the isocarbonyl ligands leads to an anisotropy barrier of 662 cm(-1) in zero applied field. The dominant thermal relaxation pathways in 1Dy involves at least the fourth-excited Kramers doublet, thus demonstrating that prominent SMM behavior can be observed for dysprosium in low-symmetry environments.

  19. Label-free single molecule imaging with numerical aperture-shaped interferometric scattering microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Daniel; Weigel, Alexander; Kukura, P

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to optically interrogate nanoscopic objects is controlled by the difference between their extinction cross sections and the diffraction limited area to which light can be confined in the far field. We show that a partially transmissive spatial mask placed near the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture microscope objective enhances the extinction contrast of a scatterer near an interface by approximately $T^{-1/2}$, where T is the transmissivity of the mask. Numerical aperture based differentiation of background from scattered light represents a general approach to increasing extinction contrast and enables routine label free imaging down to the single molecule level.

  20. Preparation and single molecule structure of electroactive polysilane end-grafted on a crystalline silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kazuaki; Ebata, Keisuke

    2000-12-01

    Electrically active polysilanes of poly(methylphenylsilane) (PMPS) and poly[bis(p-n-butylphenyl)silane] (PBPS), which are, respectively, known as a good hole transporting material and a near-ultraviolet electroluminescent material, are end-grafted directly on a crystalline silicon surface. The single polysilane molecules are clearly distinguished one from the other on the surface by means of atomic force microscopy observations. End-grafted single molecules of PMPS are observed as dots while end-grafted PBPS appear as worms extending for more than 100 nm on the crystalline silicon surface.

  1. Nonlinear thermoelectric transport in single-molecule junctions: the effect of electron-phonon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze steady-state thermoelectric transport through a single-molecule junction with a vibrating bridge. The thermally induced charge current in the system is explored using a nonequilibrium Green function formalism. We study the combined effects of Coulomb interactions between charge carriers on the bridge and electron-phonon interactions on the thermocurrent beyond the linear response regime. It is shown that electron-vibron interactions may significantly affect both the magnitude and the direction of the thermocurrent, and vibrational signatures may appear.

  2. A simple DNA handle attachment method for single molecule mechanical manipulation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Duyoung; Arbing, Mark A; Jefferson, Robert E; Bowie, James U

    2016-08-01

    Manipulating single molecules and systems of molecules with mechanical force is a powerful technique to examine their physical properties. Applying force requires attachment of the target molecule to larger objects using some sort of molecular tether, such as a strand of DNA. DNA handle attachment often requires difficult manipulations of the target molecule, which can preclude attachment to unstable, hard to obtain, and/or large, complex targets. Here we describe a method for covalent DNA handle attachment to proteins that simply requires the addition of a preprepared reagent to the protein and a short incubation. The handle attachment method developed here provides a facile approach for studying the biomechanics of biological systems.

  3. Refractive index fluctuations in solids: nanoprobing by means of single-molecule spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Anikushina, T A; Gorshelev, A A; Naumov, A V

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a novel approach for probing of local fluctuations of the refractive index $n$ in solids by means of single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy. It is based on the dependence $T_1(n)$ of the effective radiative lifetime $T_1$ of dye centres in solids on $n$ due to the local field effects. Detection of SM zero-phonon lines at ultra-low temperatures gives the values of SM natural spectral linewidth (which is inverse proportional to $T_1$) and makes it possible to reveal the distribution of the local $n$ values in solids. Here we demonstrate this possibility on the example of amorphous polyethylene and polycrystalline naphthalene doped with terrylene.

  4. Theoretical and Experimental Exploration of the Structures and Electronic States of Single Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jianguo; YANG Jinlong; WANG Haiqian; WANG Bing; ZHU Qingshi

    2007-01-01

    @@ The scanning tunnel microscopy/spectroscopy(STM/STS) is a powerful technique in probing the surface structures and the electronic states on a single molecular scale. Although a scanning tunneling microscope has a high spatial resolution in a topographic image, the image just reflects the spatial distribution of the electronic states, instead of the geometric structure of single molecules. Moreover, some additional factors,like the influence of the substrate and the STM tip, may also affect an STM image. So, it is still a challenge to determine the molecular conformation, molecular orientation, and intramolecular structure and electronic states on a single molecular scale.

  5. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  6. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Russo

    2015-12-01

    We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  7. Comment on "A New Method for Determining Dipole Moment Orientation of Single Molecules"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Vacha; Masahiro Kotani

    2004-01-01

    @@ In a recent issue of Chinese Physics Letters, Wang et al.[1] proposed a method for determining orientation of transition dipole moments of single molecules. The suggested method is based on differences in electric field profile in fluorescence microscope produced by excitation light in epi-fluorescence illumination and total internal reflection illumination configurations, respectively. Here, we wish to draw attention to the fact that the same method based on identical physical principles has been already proposed and experimentally demonstrated by us in a publication which appeared more than one year before Wang's paper.

  8. A new multiplexing single molecule technique for measuring restriction enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbottle, Allison; Cavanaugh, Jillian; Gordon, Wendy; Loparo, Joseph; Price, Allen

    2012-02-01

    We present a new multiplexing single molecule method for observing the cleavage of DNAs by restriction enzymes. DNAs are attached to a surface at one end using a biotin-streptavidin link and to a micro bead at the other end via a digoxigenin-antidigoxigenin link. The DNAs are stretched by applying a flow. After introduction of the restriction enzyme, the exact time of cleavage of individual DNAs is recorded with video microscopy. We can image hundreds to thousands of DNAs in a single experiment. We are using our technique to search for the signature of facilitated diffusion in the measured rate dependence on ionic strength.

  9. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Hidden Complexity in a Protein Energy Landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M.; Rowling, Pamela J.E.; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured “safety pin” or “staple” from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unrav...

  10. Theory on single molecule_photon cryocooler—— Conception and quantum transition processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦伟平; 陈宝玖; 秦冠仕; 杜国同; 许武; 黄世华

    2001-01-01

    The micro mechanism of anti_Stokes fluorescent cooling was investigated on molecular or ionic scale. A new conception of single molecule_photon cryocooler (SMPC) was given, and the smallest cryocooler in the world was predicted. We described SMPC and its running principle in detail. The quantum transition processes of SMPC and the largest cooling coefficient that SMPC can get in an optical transition were given. Also we studied the random property of SMPC in cooling processes. The thermodynamic behavior of single Yb3+ ion as a photon cryocooler was imitated.

  11. Single molecule photon emission statistics of driven three-level systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yonggang; Zheng, Yujun; Brown, Frank L H

    2007-03-14

    We study the statistics of photon emission from three-level single molecule systems. The generating function method [Y. Zheng and F. L. H. Brown, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 238305 (2003)] is used to calculate steady state absorption line shapes and Mandel's Q parameter as a function of excitation frequency, as well as the time dependence associated with approach to the steady state. The line shape calculations confirm known results derived via other methods, while the Q parameter results display complex frequency dependences not amenable to simple interpretation. This study confirms the applicability of the generating function formalism to multilevel quantum systems, including the proper modeling of quantum coherence effects.

  12. Single cell and single molecule techniques for the analysis of the epigenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Christopher Benjamin

    Epigenetic regulation is a critical biological process for the health and development of a cell. Epigenetic regulation is facilitated by covalent modifications to the underlying DNA and chromatin proteins. A fundamental understanding of these epigenetic modifications and their associated interactions at the molecular scale is necessary to explain phenomena including cellular identity, stem cell plasticity, and neoplastic transformation. It is widely known that abnormal epigenetic profiles have been linked to many diseases, most notably cancer. While the field of epigenetics has progressed rapidly with conventional techniques, significant advances remain to be made with respect to combinatoric analysis of epigenetic marks and single cell epigenetics. Therefore, in this dissertation, I will discuss our development of devices and methodologies to address these pertinent issues. First, we designed a preparatory polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microdevice for the extraction, purification, and stretching of human chromosomal DNA and chromatin from small cell populations down to a single cell. The valveless device captures cells by size exclusion within the micropillars, entraps the DNA or chromatin in the micropillars after cell lysis, purifies away the cellular debris, and fluorescently labels the DNA and/or chromatin all within a single reaction chamber. With the device, we achieve nearly 100% extraction efficiency of the DNA. The device is also used for in-channel immunostaining of chromatin followed by downstream single molecule chromatin analysis in nanochannels (SCAN). Second, using multi-color, time-correlated single molecule measurements in nanochannels, simultaneous coincidence detection of 2 epigenetic marks is demonstrated. Coincidence detection of 3 epigenetic marks is also established using a pulsed interleaved excitation scheme. With these two promising results, genome-wide quantification of epigenetic marks was pursued. Unfortunately, quantitative SCAN never

  13. Theory of single-molecule experiments in the overstretching force regime

    CERN Document Server

    Manca, Fabio; Palla, Pier Luca; Cleri, Fabrizio; Colombo, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanics analysis of the finite-size elasticity of biopolymers, consisting of domains which can exhibit transitions between more than one stable state at large applied force. The constant-force (Gibbs) and constant-displacement (Helmholtz) formulations of single molecule stretching experiments are shown to converge in the thermodynamic limit. Monte Carlo simulations of continuous three dimensional polymers of variable length are carried out, based on this formulation. We demonstrate that the experimental force-extension curves for short and long chain polymers are described by a unique universal model, despite the differences in chemistry and rate-dependence of transition forces.

  14. Ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and spectrally resolved super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Kenny, Samuel J; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2015-10-01

    By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing photoswitching, we synchronously obtained the fluorescence spectra and positions of ∼10(6) single molecules in labeled cells in minutes, which consequently enabled spectrally resolved, 'true-color' super-resolution microscopy. The method, called spectrally resolved stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SR-STORM), achieved cross-talk-free three-dimensional (3D) imaging for four dyes 10 nm apart in emission spectrum. Excellent resolution was obtained for every channel, and 3D localizations of all molecules were automatically aligned within one imaging path.

  15. Salen-based [Zn2Ln3] complexes with fluorescence and single-molecule-magnet properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Carolyn E; Burchell, Tara J; Lin, Po-Heng; Habib, Fatemah; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Clérac, Rodolphe; Murugesu, Muralee

    2009-09-07

    A family of four isostructural complexes with a V-shaped pentanuclear [Zn(2)Ln(3)] core of general formula [Zn(2)Ln(3)(m-salen)(3)(N(3))(5)(OH)(2)] [Ln(III) = Tb(III) (1), Eu(III) (2), Ho(III) (3), Dy(III) (4); m-salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(3-methoxysalicylideneamine)] were isolated and structurally characterized. The fluorescence and magnetic measurements of the four compounds were investigated. Complex 1 exhibits strong fluorescence properties, while single-molecule-magnet behavior is seen in complex 4.

  16. An improved synthesis of a fluorescent gabapentin-choline conjugate for single molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haitao; Kaur, Gurpreet; Griffiths, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium ion channels are comprised of pore-forming α1 and auxiliary α2δ, β and γ subunits. They are important molecular devices involved in a variety of cell functions. Fluorescently labeled acylcholine analogues are important in studies such as ion channel regulation. Cy3-3-acetylcholine has recently been synthesized for single molecule detection studies; albeit in an extremely low overall yield (0.06 %). In this work, an alternative route to that used in the previous Cy3-3-acetylcholine synthesis was developed with a 90 % yield at a significantly lower material cost. PMID:20161233

  17. A single molecule switch based on two Pd nanocrystals linked by a conjugated dithiol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ved Varun Agrawal; Reji Thomas; G U Kulkarni; C N R Rao

    2005-11-01

    Tunneling spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on a single molecule device formed by two Pd nanocrystals (dia. ∼ 5 nm) electronically coupled by a conducting molecule, dimercaptodiphenylacetylene. The – data, obtained by positioning the tip over a nanocrystal electrode, exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) on a background M-I-M characteristics. The NDR feature occurs at ∼ 0.67 V at 300 K and shifts to a higher bias of 1.93 V at 90 K. When the tip is held in the middle region of the device, a Coulomb blockade region is observed (± ∼ 0.3 V).

  18. Real-time analysis and visualization for single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Kechkar

    Full Text Available Accurate multidimensional localization of isolated fluorescent emitters is a time consuming process in single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy. We demonstrate a functional method for real-time reconstruction with automatic feedback control, without compromising the localization accuracy. Compatible with high frame rates of EM-CCD cameras, it relies on a wavelet segmentation algorithm, together with a mix of CPU/GPU implementation. A combination with Gaussian fitting allows direct access to 3D localization. Automatic feedback control ensures optimal molecule density throughout the acquisition process. With this method, we significantly improve the efficiency and feasibility of localization-based super-resolution microscopy.

  19. Real-time analysis and visualization for single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechkar, Adel; Nair, Deepak; Heilemann, Mike; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Accurate multidimensional localization of isolated fluorescent emitters is a time consuming process in single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy. We demonstrate a functional method for real-time reconstruction with automatic feedback control, without compromising the localization accuracy. Compatible with high frame rates of EM-CCD cameras, it relies on a wavelet segmentation algorithm, together with a mix of CPU/GPU implementation. A combination with Gaussian fitting allows direct access to 3D localization. Automatic feedback control ensures optimal molecule density throughout the acquisition process. With this method, we significantly improve the efficiency and feasibility of localization-based super-resolution microscopy.

  20. Interaction of spin and vibrations in transport through single-molecule magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk May

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We study electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM and the interplay of its anisotropic spin with quantized vibrational distortions of the molecule. Based on numerical renormalization group calculations we show that, despite the longitudinal anisotropy barrier and small transverse anisotropy, vibrational fluctuations can induce quantum spin-tunneling (QST and a QST-Kondo effect. The interplay of spin scattering, QST and molecular vibrations can strongly enhance the Kondo effect and induce an anomalous magnetic field dependence of vibrational Kondo side-bands.

  1. Single molecule optical measurements of orientation and rotations of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, Deborah Y.; Lippert, Lisa G.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2016-12-01

    Subdomains of macromolecules often undergo large orientation changes during their catalytic cycles that are essential for their activity. Tracking these rearrangements in real time opens a powerful window into the link between protein structure and functional output. Site-specific labeling of individual molecules with polarized optical probes and measurement of their spatial orientation can give insight into the crucial conformational changes, dynamics, and fluctuations of macromolecules. Here we describe the range of single molecule optical technologies that can extract orientation information from these probes, review the relevant types of probes and labeling techniques, and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of these technologies for addressing specific inquiries.

  2. SLAP: Small Labeling Pair for Single-Molecule Super-Resolution Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieneke, Ralph; Raulf, Anika; Kollmannsperger, Alina; Heilemann, Mike; Tampé, Robert

    2015-08-24

    Protein labeling with synthetic fluorescent probes is a key technology in chemical biology and biomedical research. A sensitive and efficient modular labeling approach (SLAP) was developed on the basis of a synthetic small-molecule recognition unit (Ni-trisNTA) and the genetically encoded minimal protein His6-10 -tag. High-density protein tracing by SLAP was demonstrated. This technique allows super-resolution fluorescence imaging and fulfills the necessary sampling criteria for single-molecule localization-based imaging techniques. It avoids masking by large probes, for example, antibodies, and supplies sensitive, precise, and robust size analysis of protein clusters (nanodomains).

  3. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Macdonald, J. Emyr;

    2012-01-01

    a gold surface and a platinum–iridium STM tip. Two different orientations of the linkers were examined: a long-axis configuration (SH-LA) and a short-axis configuration (SH-SA). In each case, the molecular conductance could be ‘gated’ through electrochemical control of the heme redox state. Reproducible...... and remarkably high conductance was observed in this relatively complex electron transfer system, with single-molecule conductance values peaking around 18 nS and 12 nS for the SH-SA and SH-LA cytochrome b562 molecules near zero electrochemical overpotential. This strongly points to the important role...

  4. A single molecule assay for measuring site-specific DNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Stefano; Mousley, Briana; Cathcart, Lindsay; Winship, Janelle; Loparo, Joseph J; Price, Allen C

    2016-02-15

    Sequence-specific DNA cleavage is a key step in a number of genomic transactions. Here, we report a single-molecule technique that allows the simultaneous measurement of hundreds of DNAs, thereby collecting significant statistics in a single experiment. Microbeads are tethered with single DNA molecules in a microfluidic channel. After the DNA cleavage reaction is initiated, the time of cleavage of each DNA is recorded using video microscopy. We demonstrate the utility of our method by measuring the cleavage kinetics of NdeI, a type II restriction endonuclease.

  5. Monitoring Early Fusion Dynamics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 at Single-Molecule Resolution ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Sean X.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-01-01

    The fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to host cells is a dynamic process governed by the interaction between glycoproteins on the viral envelope and the major receptor, CD4, and coreceptor on the surface of the cell. How these receptors organize at the virion-cell interface to promote a fusion-competent site is not well understood. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we map the tensile strengths, lifetimes, and energy barriers of individual intermolecular bonds between CCR5-tropic HIV-1 gp120 and its receptors CD4 and CCR5 or CXCR4 as a function of the interaction time with the cell. According to the Bell model, at short times of contact between cell and virion, the gp120-CD4 bond is able to withstand forces up to 35 pN and has an initial lifetime of 0.27 s and an intermolecular length of interaction of 0.34 nm. The initial bond also has an energy barrier of 6.7 kBT (where kB is Boltzmann's constant and T is absolute temperature). However, within 0.3 s, individual gp120-CD4 bonds undergo rapid destabilization accompanied by a shortened lifetime and a lowered tensile strength. This destabilization is significantly enhanced by the coreceptor CCR5, not by CXCR4 or fusion inhibitors, which suggests that it is directly related to a conformational change in the gp120-CD4 bond. These measurements highlight the instability and low tensile strength of gp120-receptor bonds, uncover a synergistic role for CCR5 in the progression of the gp120-CD4 bond, and suggest that the cell-virus adhesion complex is functionally arranged about a long-lived gp120-coreceptor bond. PMID:18480458

  6. Chitosan-coated anisotropic silver nanoparticles as a SERS substrate for single-molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potara, Monica; Baia, Monica; Farcau, Cosmin; Astilean, Simion

    2012-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a technique that has become widely used for identifying and providing structural information about molecular species in low concentration. There is an ongoing interest in finding optimum particle size, shape and spatial distribution for optimizing the SERS substrates and pushing the sensitivity toward the single-molecule detection limit. This work reports the design of a novel, biocompatible SERS substrate based on small clusters of anisotropic silver nanoparticles embedded in a film of chitosan biopolymer. The SERS efficiency of the biocompatible film is assessed by employing Raman imaging and spectroscopy of adenine, a significant biological molecule. By combining atomic force microscopy with SERS imaging we find that the chitosan matrix enables the formation of small clusters of silver nanoparticles, with junctions and gaps that greatly enhance the Raman intensities of the adsorbed molecules. The study demonstrates that chitosan-coated anisotropic silver nanoparticle clusters are sensitive enough to be implemented as effective plasmonic substrates for SERS detection of nonresonant analytes at the single-molecule level.

  7. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin

    2012-10-25

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. A general approach to break the concentration barrier in single-molecule imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Loveland, Anna B.

    2012-09-09

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is often incompatible with physiological protein concentrations, as fluorescence background overwhelms an individual molecule\\'s signal. We solve this problem with a new imaging approach called PhADE (PhotoActivation, Diffusion and Excitation). A protein of interest is fused to a photoactivatable protein (mKikGR) and introduced to its surface-immobilized substrate. After photoactivation of mKikGR near the surface, rapid diffusion of the unbound mKikGR fusion out of the detection volume eliminates background fluorescence, whereupon the bound molecules are imaged. We labeled the eukaryotic DNA replication protein flap endonuclease 1 with mKikGR and added it to replication-competent Xenopus laevis egg extracts. PhADE imaging of high concentrations of the fusion construct revealed its dynamics and micrometer-scale movements on individual, replicating DNA molecules. Because PhADE imaging is in principle compatible with any photoactivatable fluorophore, it should have broad applicability in revealing single-molecule dynamics and stoichiometry of macromolecular protein complexes at previously inaccessible fluorophore concentrations. © 2012 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Single-molecule study on polymer diffusion in a melt state: Effect of chain topology

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2013-08-06

    We report a new methodology for studying diffusion of individual polymer chains in a melt state, with special emphasis on the effect of chain topology. A perylene diimide fluorophore was incorporated into the linear and cyclic poly(THF)s, and real-time diffusion behavior of individual chains in a melt of linear poly(THF) was measured by means of a single-molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The combination of mean squared displacement (MSD) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) analysis demonstrated the broad distribution of diffusion coefficient of both the linear and cyclic polymer chains in the melt state. This indicates the presence of spatiotemporal heterogeneity of the polymer diffusion which occurs at much larger time and length scales than those expected from the current polymer physics theory. We further demonstrated that the cyclic chains showed marginally slower diffusion in comparison with the linear counterparts, to suggest the effective suppression of the translocation through the threading-entanglement with the linear matrix chains. This coincides with the higher activation energy for the diffusion of the cyclic chains than of the linear chains. These results suggest that the single-molecule imaging technique provides a powerful tool to analyze complicated polymer dynamics and contributes to the molecular level understanding of the chain interaction. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Probing static disorder in Arrhenius kinetics by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Li, Jingyuan; Barel, Itay; Lu, Hui; Berne, Bruce J.; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph; Fernández, Julio M.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used Arrhenius equation describes the kinetics of simple two-state reactions, with the implicit assumption of a single transition state with a well-defined activation energy barrier ΔE, as the rate-limiting step. However, it has become increasingly clear that the saddle point of the free-energy surface in most reactions is populated by ensembles of conformations, leading to nonexponential kinetics. Here we present a theory that generalizes the Arrhenius equation to include static disorder of conformational degrees of freedom as a function of an external perturbation to fully account for a diverse set of transition states. The effect of a perturbation on static disorder is best examined at the single-molecule level. Here we use force-clamp spectroscopy to study the nonexponential kinetics of single ubiquitin proteins unfolding under force. We find that the measured variance in ΔE shows both force-dependent and independent components, where the force-dependent component scales with F2, in excellent agreement with our theory. Our study illustrates a novel adaptation of the classical Arrhenius equation that accounts for the microscopic origins of nonexponential kinetics, which are essential in understanding the rapidly growing body of single-molecule data. PMID:20534507

  11. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until “bleached”. This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes. PMID:25482122

  12. madSTORM: a superresolution technique for large-scale multiplexing at single-molecule accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jason; Manna, Asit; Barr, Valarie A.; Hong, Jennifer; Neuman, Keir C.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of heterogeneous cellular structures using single-molecule localization microscopy has been limited by poorly defined localization accuracy and inadequate multiplexing capacity. Using fluorescent nanodiamonds as fiducial markers, we define and achieve localization precision required for single-molecule accuracy in dSTORM images. Coupled with this advance, our new multiplexing strategy, madSTORM, allows accurate targeting of multiple molecules using sequential binding and elution of fluorescent antibodies. madSTORM is used on an activated T-cell to localize 25 epitopes, 14 of which are on components of the same multimolecular T-cell receptor complex. We obtain an average localization precision of 2.6 nm, alignment error of 2.0 nm, and <0.01% cross-talk. Combining these technical advances affords the ability to move beyond obtaining superresolved structures to defining spatial relationships among constituent molecules within structures. Probing the molecular topology of complex signaling cascades and other heterogeneous networks is feasible with madSTORM. PMID:27708141

  13. Feedback-controlled electro-kinetic traps for single-molecule spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Kumbakhar; Dirk Hähnel; Ingo Gregor; Jörg Enderlein

    2014-01-01

    A principal limitation of single-molecule spectroscopy in solution is the diffusionlimited residence time of a given molecule within the detection volume. A common solution to this problem is to immobilize molecules of interest on a passivated glass surface for extending the observation time to obtain reliable data statistics. However, surface tethering of molecules often introduces artifacts, particularly when studying the structural dynamics of biomolecules. To circumvent this limitation, we investigated alternative ways to extend single-molecule observation times in solution without surface immobilization. Among various possibilities, the so-called anti-Brownian electro-kinetic trap (or ABEL trap) seems best suited to achieve this goal. The essential part of this trap is a feedback-controlled electro-kinetic steering of a molecule’s position in reaction to its diffusive Brownian motion which is monitored by fluorescence, thus keeping the molecule within a sub-micron sized detection volume. Fluorescence trace recordings of over thousands of milliseconds duration on individual dye molecules within an ABEL trap have been reported. In this short review, we shall briefly discuss the principle and some results of ABEL trapping of individual molecules with possible extensions to future works.

  14. All-Dielectric Silicon Nanogap Antennas To Enhance the Fluorescence of Single Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Raju; Berthelot, Johann; Winkler, Pamina M; Mivelle, Mathieu; Proust, Julien; Bedu, Frédéric; Ozerov, Igor; Begou, Thomas; Lumeau, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; García-Parajó, María F; Bidault, Sébastien; Wenger, Jérôme; Bonod, Nicolas

    2016-08-10

    Plasmonic antennas have a profound impact on nanophotonics as they provide efficient means to manipulate light and enhance light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. However, the large absorption losses found in metals can severely limit the plasmonic applications in the visible spectral range. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of an alternative approach using all-dielectric nanoantennas based on silicon dimers to enhance the fluorescence detection of single molecules. The silicon antenna design is optimized to confine the near-field intensity in the 20 nm nanogap and reach a 270-fold fluorescence enhancement in a nanoscale volume of λ(3)/1800 with dielectric materials only. Our conclusions are assessed by combining polarization resolved optical spectroscopy of individual antennas, scanning electron microscopy, numerical simulations, fluorescence lifetime measurements, fluorescence burst analysis, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This work demonstrates that all-silicon nanoantennas are a valid alternative to plasmonic devices for enhanced single molecule fluorescence sensing, with the additional key advantages of reduced nonradiative quenching, negligible heat generation, cost-efficiency, and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility.

  15. Diffusion of oriented single molecules with switchable mobility in networks of long unidimensional nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christophe; Kirstein, Johanna; Platschek, Barbara; Bein, Thomas; Budde, Michael; Frank, Irmgard; Müllen, Klaus; Michaelis, Jens; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2008-02-06

    Single dye molecules incorporated into a mesoporous matrix can act as highly sensitive reporters of their environment. Here, we use single TDI molecules incorporated as guests into hexagonal mesoporous films containing highly structured domains. The dye molecules allow us to map the size of these domains which can extend to over 100 microm. Investigation of the translational and orientational dynamics via single molecule fluorescence techniques gives structural as well as dynamical information about the host material. In an air atmosphere, the guest molecules show no movement but perfect orientation along the pore direction. The diffusion of the TDI molecules can be induced by placing the mesoporous film in a saturated atmosphere of chloroform. In single molecule measurements with very high positioning accuracy (down to 2-3 nm) the movement of molecules could be observed even between neighboring channels. This reveals the presence of defects like dead ends closing the pores or small openings in the silica walls between neighboring channels, where molecules can change from one channel to the next. A statistical analysis demonstrates that the diffusion of TDI in the mesoporous film cannot be described with a 1D-random diffusion but is more complicated due to the presence of adsorption sites in which the TDI molecules can be occasionally trapped.

  16. Solution-based single molecule imaging of surface-immobilized conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, Paul A; Traina, Christopher A; Penedo, J Carlos; Bazan, Guillermo C; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2013-05-15

    The photophysical behavior of conjugated polymers used in modern optoelectronic devices is strongly influenced by their structural dynamics and conformational heterogeneity, both of which are dependent on solvent properties. Single molecule studies of these polymer systems embedded in a host matrix have proven to be very powerful to investigate the fundamental fluorescent properties. However, such studies lack the possibility of examining the relationship between conformational dynamics and photophysical response in solution, which is the phase from which films for devices are deposited. By developing a synthetic strategy to incorporate a biotin moiety as a surface attachment point at one end of a polyalkylthiophene, we immobilize it, enabling us to make the first single molecule fluorescence measurements of conjugated polymers for long periods of time in solution. We identify fluctuation patterns in the fluorescence signal that can be rationalized in terms of photobleaching and stochastic transitions to reversible dark states. Moreover, by using the advantages of solution-based imaging, we demonstrate that the addition of oxygen scavengers improves optical stability by significantly decreasing the photobleaching rates.

  17. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNAs with Sticky Ends at Water/Fused Silica Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Slavica [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to study intermolecular interactions of DNAs with unpaired (sticky) ends of different lengths at water/fused silica interface at the single-molecule level. Evanescent field residence time, linear velocity and adsorption/desorption frequency were measured in a microchannel for individual DNA molecules from T7, Lambda, and PSP3 phages at various pH values. The longest residence times and the highest adsorption/desorption frequencies at the constant flow at pH 5.5 were found for PSP3 DNA, followed by lower values for Lambda DNA, and the lowest values for T7 DNA. Since T7, Lambda, and PSP3 DNA molecules contain none, twelve and nineteen unpaired bases, respectively, it was concluded that the affinity of DNAs for the surface increases with the length of the sticky ends. This confirms that hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between sticky ends and fused-silica surface are driving forces for DNA adsorption at the fused-silica surface. Described single-molecule methodology and results therein can be valuable for investigation of interactions in liquid chromatography, as well as for design of DNA hybridization sensors and drug delivery systems.

  18. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  19. Force-activated reactivity switch in a bimolecular chemical reaction at the single molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Liang, Jian; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2010-03-01

    Mechanical force can deform the reacting molecules along a well-defined direction of the reaction coordinate. However, the effect of mechanical force on the free-energy surface that governs a chemical reaction is still largely unknown. The combination of protein engineering with single-molecule AFM force-clamp spectroscopy allows us to study the influence of mechanical force on the rate at which a protein disulfide bond is reduced by some reducing agents in a bimolecular substitution reaction (so-called SN2). We found that cleavage of a protein disulfide bond by hydroxide anions exhibits an abrupt reactivity ``switch'' at 500 pN, after which the accelerating effect of force on the rate of an SN2 chemical reaction greatly diminishes. We propose that an abrupt force-induced conformational change of the protein disulfide bond shifts its ground state, drastically changing its reactivity in SN2 chemical reactions. Our experiments directly demonstrate the action of a force-activated switch in the chemical reactivity of a single molecule. References: Sergi Garcia-Manyes, Jian Liang, Robert Szoszkiewicz, Tzu-Ling Kuo and Julio M. Fernandez, Nature Chemistry, 1, 236-242, 2009.

  20. The linear and non-linear magnetic response of a tri-uranium single molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaram, B. S.; Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.; Kumar, P.; Celli, V.

    2017-03-01

    We report here low temperature magnetization isotherms for the single molecule magnet, (UO2-L)3. By analyzing the low temperature magnetization in terms of M  =  χ 1 B  +  χ 3 B 3 we extract the linear susceptibility χ 1 and the leading order nonlinear susceptibility χ 3. We find that χ 1 exhibits a peak at a temperature of T 1  =  10.4 K with χ 3 also exhibiting a peak but at a reduced temperature T 3  =  5 K. At the lowest temperatures the isotherms exhibit a critical field B c  =  11.5 T marked by a clear point of inflection. A minimal Hamiltonian employing S  =  1 (pseudo) spins with only a single energy scale (successfully used to model the behavior of bulk f-electron metamagnets) is shown to provide a good description of the observed linear scaling between T 1, T 3 and B c. We further show that a Heisenberg Hamiltonian previously employed by Carretta et al (2013 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25 486001) to model this single molecule magnet gives formulas for the angle averaged susceptibilities (in the Ising limit) very similar to those of the minimal model.

  1. Single molecule fluorescence fluctuations of the cyanine dyes linked covalently to DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Wei; CHEN XuDong; AUMILER Damir; XIA AnDong

    2009-01-01

    The intersystem crossing and isomerization dynamics of free-Cy3,Cy3-ssDNA,free-Cy5 and Cy5-ssDNA are obtained through simple analysis of rapid on/off blinking from single molecule fluo rescence intensity time-traces and the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy(FCS).The on-and off-times observed in fluorescence time traces of single cyanine dyes are due to the formation of the triplet state and isomerization,where both the interaction with DNA and long central polymethine chain of cyanine dyes increase the barriers of isomerization,leading to long off-time.The results indicate that the single molecule fluorescence fluctuation together with the resulting second autocorrelation analysis are powerful methods for determining the triplet state and isomerization dynamics,which could be the simple techniques and complementary to other spectroscopic techniques,such as fluorescence decay measurement and laser flash photolysis to study the photophysical processes of complex molecules.

  2. The role of anharmonic phonons in under-barrier spin relaxation of single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, Alessandro; Totti, Federico; Sessoli, Roberta; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The use of single molecule magnets in mainstream electronics requires their magnetic moment to be stable over long times. One can achieve such a goal by designing compounds with spin-reversal barriers exceeding room temperature, namely with large uniaxial anisotropies. Such strategy, however, has been defeated by several recent experiments demonstrating under-barrier relaxation at high temperature, a behaviour today unexplained. Here we propose spin–phonon coupling to be responsible for such anomaly. With a combination of electronic structure theory and master equations we show that, in the presence of phonon dissipation, the relevant energy scale for the spin relaxation is given by the lower-lying phonon modes interacting with the local spins. These open a channel for spin reversal at energies lower than that set by the magnetic anisotropy, producing fast under-barrier spin relaxation. Our findings rationalize a significant body of experimental work and suggest a possible strategy for engineering room temperature single molecule magnets. PMID:28262663

  3. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Zurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until "bleached". This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes.

  4. Single molecule PCR reveals similar patterns of non-homologous DSB repair in tobacco and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Andrew H; Wang, Dong; Timmis, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) occur constantly in eukaryotes. These potentially lethal DNA lesions are repaired efficiently by two major DSB repair pathways: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). We investigated NHEJ in Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) by introducing DNA double-strand breaks through inducible expression of I-SceI, followed by amplification of individual repair junction sequences by single-molecule PCR. Using this process over 300 NHEJ repair junctions were analysed in each species. In contrast to previously published variation in DSB repair between Arabidopsis and tobacco, the two species displayed similar DSB repair profiles in our experiments. The majority of repair events resulted in no loss of sequence and small (1-20 bp) deletions occurred at a minority (25-45%) of repair junctions. Approximately ~1.5% of the observed repair events contained larger deletions (>20 bp) and a similar percentage contained insertions. Strikingly, insertion events in tobacco were associated with large genomic deletions at the site of the DSB that resulted in increased micro-homology at the sequence junctions suggesting the involvement of a non-classical NHEJ repair pathway. The generation of DSBs through inducible expression of I-SceI, in combination with single molecule PCR, provides an effective and efficient method for analysis of individual repair junctions and will prove a useful tool in the analysis of NHEJ.

  5. Single Molecule Bioelectronics and Their Application to Amplification-Free Measurement of DNA Lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, O Tolga; Pugliese, Kaitlin M; Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C; Pan, Deng; Rajapakse, Arith J; Weiss, Gregory A; Collins, Philip G

    2016-06-24

    As biosensing devices shrink smaller and smaller, they approach a scale in which single molecule electronic sensing becomes possible. Here, we review the operation of single-enzyme transistors made using single-walled carbon nanotubes. These novel hybrid devices transduce the motions and catalytic activity of a single protein into an electronic signal for real-time monitoring of the protein's activity. Analysis of these electronic signals reveals new insights into enzyme function and proves the electronic technique to be complementary to other single-molecule methods based on fluorescence. As one example of the nanocircuit technique, we have studied the Klenow Fragment (KF) of DNA polymerase I as it catalytically processes single-stranded DNA templates. The fidelity of DNA polymerases makes them a key component in many DNA sequencing techniques, and here we demonstrate that KF nanocircuits readily resolve DNA polymerization with single-base sensitivity. Consequently, template lengths can be directly counted from electronic recordings of KF's base-by-base activity. After measuring as few as 20 copies, the template length can be determined with <1 base pair resolution, and different template lengths can be identified and enumerated in solutions containing template mixtures.

  6. Max Delbruck Prize in Biological Physics Lecture: Single-molecule protein folding and transition paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William

    2012-02-01

    The transition path is the tiny fraction of an equilibrium molecular trajectory when a transition occurs by crossing the free energy barrier between two states. It is a uniquely single-molecule property, and has not yet been observed experimentally for any system in the condensed phase. The importance of the transition path in protein folding is that it contains all of the mechanistic information on how a protein folds. As a major step toward observing transition paths, we have determined the average transition-path time for a fast and a slow-folding protein from a photon-by-photon analysis of fluorescence trajectories in single-molecule FRET experiments. While the folding rate coefficients differ by 10,000-fold, surprisingly, the transition-path times differ by less than 5-fold, showing that a successful barrier crossing event takes almost the same time for a fast- and a slow-folding protein, i.e. almost the same time to fold when it actually happens.

  7. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals Topology Dependent Mutual Relaxation of Polymer Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Abadi, Maram

    2015-08-24

    The motion and relaxation of linear and cyclic polymers under entangled conditions are investigated by means of a newly developed single-molecule tracking technique, cumulative-area (CA) tracking. CA tracking enables simultaneous quantitative characterization of the diffusion mode, diffusion rate, and relaxation time that have been impossible with a widely used conventional single-molecule localization and tracking method, by analyzing cumulative areas occupied by the moving molecule. Using the novel approach, we investigate the motion and relaxation of entangled cyclic polymers, which have been an important but poorly understood question. Fluorescently labeled 42 kbp linear or cyclic tracer dsDNAs in concentrated solutions of unlabeled linear or cyclic DNAs are used as model systems. We show that CA tracking can explicitly distinguish topology-dependent diffusion mode, rate, and relaxation time, demonstrating that the method provides an invaluable tool for characterizing topological interaction between the entangled chains. We further demonstrate that the current models proposed for the entanglement between cyclic polymers which are based on cyclic chains moving through an array of fixed obstacles cannot correctly describe the motion of the cyclic chain under the entangled conditions. Our results rather suggest the mutual relaxation of the cyclic chains, which underscore the necessity of developing a new model to describe the motion of cyclic polymer under the entangled conditions based on the mutual interaction of the chains.

  8. Single-molecule measurements of synthesis by DNA polymerase with base-pair resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Thomas D; Romano, Louis J; Rueda, David

    2009-12-15

    The catalytic mechanism of DNA polymerases involves multiple steps that precede and follow the transfer of a nucleotide to the 3'-hydroxyl of the growing DNA chain. Here we report a single-molecule approach to monitor the movement of E. coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) on a DNA template during DNA synthesis with single base-pair resolution. As each nucleotide is incorporated, the single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer intensity drops in discrete steps to values consistent with single-nucleotide incorporations. Purines and pyrimidines are incorporated with comparable rates. A mismatched primer/template junction exhibits dynamics consistent with the primer moving into the exonuclease domain, which was used to determine the fraction of primer-termini bound to the exonuclease and polymerase sites. Most interestingly, we observe a structural change after the incorporation of a correctly paired nucleotide, consistent with transient movement of the polymerase past the preinsertion site or a conformational change in the polymerase. This may represent a previously unobserved step in the mechanism of DNA synthesis that could be part of the proofreading process.

  9. Nanophotonic approaches for nanoscale imaging and single-molecule detection at ultrahigh concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mivelle, Mathieu; Van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-07-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed an outburst of many different optical techniques aimed at breaking the diffraction limit of light, providing super-resolution imaging on intact fixed cells. In parallel, single-molecule detection by means of fluorescence has become a common tool to investigate biological interactions at the molecular level both in vitro and in living cells. Despite these advances, visualization of dynamic events at relevant physiological concentrations at the nanometer scale remains challenging. In this review, we focus on recent advancements in the field of nanophotonics toward nanoimaging and single-molecule detection at ultrahigh sample concentrations. These approaches rely on the use of metal nanostructures known as optical antennas to localize and manipulate optical fields at the nanometer scale. We highlight examples on how different optical antenna geometries are being implemented for nanoscale imaging of cell membrane components. We also discuss different implementations of self-standing and two-dimensional antenna arrays for studying nanoscale dynamics in living cell membranes as well as detection of individual biomolecular interactions in the µM range for sensing applications.

  10. Single-molecule enzymology based on the principle of the Millikan oil drop experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiske, Danielle L; Chow, Andrea; Dettloff, Roger; Farinas, Javier

    2014-03-01

    The ability to monitor the progress of single-molecule enzyme reactions is often limited by the need to use fluorogenic substrates. A method based on the principle of the Millikan oil drop experiment was developed to monitor the change in charge of substrates bound to a nanoparticle and offers a means of detecting single-enzyme reactions without fluorescence detection. As a proof of principle of the ability to monitor reactions that result in a change in substrate charge, polymerization on a single DNA template was detected. A custom oligonucleotide was synthesized that allowed for the attachment of single DNA templates to gold nanoparticles with a single polymer tether. The nanoparticles were then tethered to the surface of a microfluidic channel where the positions of the nanoparticles, subjected to an oscillating electric field, were monitored using dark field microscopy. With short averaging times, the signal-to-noise level was low enough to discriminate changes in charge of less than 1.2%. Polymerization of a long DNA template demonstrated the ability to use the system to monitor single-molecule enzymatic activity. Finally, nanoparticle surfaces were modified with thiolated moieties to reduce and/or shield the number of unproductive charges and allow for improved sensitivity.

  11. Single-molecule protein unfolding and translocation by an ATP-fueled proteolytic machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Olivares, Adrian O; Sauer, Robert T; Baker, Tania A; Lang, Matthew J

    2011-04-15

    All cells employ ATP-powered proteases for protein-quality control and regulation. In the ClpXP protease, ClpX is a AAA+ machine that recognizes specific protein substrates, unfolds these molecules, and then translocates the denatured polypeptide through a central pore and into ClpP for degradation. Here, we use optical-trapping nanometry to probe the mechanics of enzymatic unfolding and translocation of single molecules of a multidomain substrate. Our experiments demonstrate the capacity of ClpXP and ClpX to perform mechanical work under load, reveal very fast and highly cooperative unfolding of individual substrate domains, suggest a translocation step size of 5-8 amino acids, and support a power-stroke model of denaturation in which successful enzyme-mediated unfolding of stable domains requires coincidence between mechanical pulling by the enzyme and a transient stochastic reduction in protein stability. We anticipate that single-molecule studies of the mechanical properties of other AAA+ proteolytic machines will reveal many shared features with ClpXP.

  12. Identification of intensity ratio break points from photon arrival trajectories in ratiometric single molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingemann, Dieter; Allen, Rachel M

    2012-01-01

    We describe a statistical method to analyze dual-channel photon arrival trajectories from single molecule spectroscopy model-free to identify break points in the intensity ratio. Photons are binned with a short bin size to calculate the logarithm of the intensity ratio for each bin. Stochastic photon counting noise leads to a near-normal distribution of this logarithm and the standard student t-test is used to find statistically significant changes in this quantity. In stochastic simulations we determine the significance threshold for the t-test's p-value at a given level of confidence. We test the method's sensitivity and accuracy indicating that the analysis reliably locates break points with significant changes in the intensity ratio with little or no error in realistic trajectories with large numbers of small change points, while still identifying a large fraction of the frequent break points with small intensity changes. Based on these results we present an approach to estimate confidence intervals for the identified break point locations and recommend a bin size to choose for the analysis. The method proves powerful and reliable in the analysis of simulated and actual data of single molecule reorientation in a glassy matrix.

  13. Single molecule narrowfield microscopy of protein-DNA binding dynamics in glucose signal transduction of live yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrowfield microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain sub-cellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyse these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single molecule problem - a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behaviour at the whole cell and population level.

  14. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  15. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  16. Exploring novel techniques for the single molecule toolkit: Vesicle encapsulation and immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumus, Burak

    Tracking asynchronous time evolution of single biological molecules provides unique insights into detailed reaction kinetics and pathways. Such measurements are frequently made on macromolecules that are tethered on a glass surface. However, there have been reports of variability of surface environment, and suspicion that observed heterogeneity of dynamic properties in single molecules might be an artifact of the local surface. A striking example is the hairpin ribozyme which was shown---in our lab---to exhibit two orders of magnitude variation in folding/unfolding kinetics between molecules. Moreover, a DNA with a sequence of human telomeric repeat exhibited extreme conformational diversity among six interconverting conformations. In order to find out the true nature of the observed heterogeneities, we encapsulated the ribozyme and the human telomeric DNA inside liposomes (i.e. artificially formed phospholipid vesicles) which were then tethered on the surface. Our data revealed similar behavior for encapsulated and the conventionally attached nucleic acid molecules. Although vesicle encapsulation offers a biologically relevant environment for many soluble proteins and nucleic acids, impermeability towards ions and other small molecules such as ATP hinders more general applications. We therefore developed methods to induce pores into vesicles which open up the possibility of using them as ultra-small, bio-mimetic, porous containers. Porous vesicles were then utilized to perform unique measurements for observing RecA filament formation, hairpin ribozyme cleavage and Rep helicase translocation within confined volumes. Novel features were revealed by such experiments unveiling new biological findings. We also discuss ideas to introduce pores that can be opened up via ultraviolet radiation for future applications. Aside from the encapsulation studies, we developed a new assay to detect the SNARE mediated membrane fusion by using surface attached proteliposomes. Such an

  17. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Shanlin [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  18. Mechanism for Si–Si Bond Rupture in Single Molecule Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haixing; Kim, Nathaniel T.; Su, Timothy A.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Nuckolls, Colin; Darancet, Pierre; Leighton, James L.; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-12-14

    The stability of chemical bonds can be studied experimentally by rupturing single molecule junctions under applied voltage. Here, we compare voltage-induced bond rupture in two Si–Si backbones: one has no alternate conductive pathway whereas the other contains an additional naphthyl pathway in parallel to the Si–Si bond. We show that in contrast to the first system, the second can conduct through the naphthyl group when the Si–Si bond is ruptured using an applied voltage. We investigate this voltage induced Si–Si bond rupture by ab initio density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations that ultimately demonstrate that the excitation of molecular vibrational modes by tunneling electrons leads to homolytic Si–Si bond rupture.

  19. Conformational equilibria in monomeric alpha-synuclein at the single molecule level

    CERN Document Server

    Sandal, Massimo; Tessari, Isabella; Mammi, Stefano; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Musiani, Francesco; Brucale, Marco; Bubacco, Luigi; Samori', Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Natively unstructured proteins defy the classical "one sequence-one structure" paradigm of protein science. Monomers of these proteins in pathological conditions can aggregate in the cell, a process that underlies socially relevant neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. A full comprehension of the formation and structure of the so-called misfolded intermediates from which the aggregated states ensue is still lacking. We characterized the folding and the conformational diversity of alpha-synuclein (aSyn), a natively unstructured protein involved in Parkinson disease, by mechanically stretching single molecules of this protein and recording their mechanical properties. These experiments permitted us to directly observe directly and quantify three main classes of conformations that, under in vitro physiological conditions, exist simultaneously in the aSyn sample, including disordered and "beta-like" structures. We found that this class of "beta-like" structures is directly related to aSyn ag...

  20. Hierarchically-coupled hidden Markov models for learning kinetic rates from single-molecule data

    CERN Document Server

    van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Wood, Frank; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Wiggins, Chris H

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of analyzing sets of noisy time-varying signals that all report on the same process but confound straightforward analyses due to complex inter-signal heterogeneities and measurement artifacts. In particular we consider single-molecule experiments which indirectly measure the distinct steps in a biomolecular process via observations of noisy time-dependent signals such as a fluorescence intensity or bead position. Straightforward hidden Markov model (HMM) analyses attempt to characterize such processes in terms of a set of conformational states, the transitions that can occur between these states, and the associated rates at which those transitions occur; but require ad-hoc post-processing steps to combine multiple signals. Here we develop a hierarchically coupled HMM that allows experimentalists to deal with inter-signal variability in a principled and automatic way. Our approach is a generalized expectation maximization hyperparameter point estimation procedure with variational Bayes a...

  1. Kinetic Studies of Lysine Riboswitch Folding Using Single-Molecule FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegland, Larry; Garst, Andrew; Fiore, J.; Batey, Robert; Nesbitt, David

    2010-03-01

    Riboswitches regulate gene expression through conformational changes induced by metabolite binding. This regulation of gene expression depends on the kinetics of metabolite binding and structural changes. Therefore, an understanding of these dynamics is crucial to developing a compete knowledge of riboswitch functionality. To probe the binding of a metabolite and subsequent folding, a metabolite-binding domain of the Bacillus subtilis lysine riboswitch was transcribed and hybridized to a fluorescent-labeled RNA strand, which allows FRET monitoring of ligand-induced conformational changes. The RNA construct was studied using single-molecule FRET methods that allowed for characterization of the folding dynamics. In the presence of lysine, we observed two states, of which the relative populations are perturbed by lysine concentration. We measured the folding and unfolding rates of the inter-conversion between these states. We also observe that [Mg^2+] affects the lysine-free conformation and the lysine sensitivity of the riboswitch.

  2. Stable metal-organic frameworks containing single-molecule traps for enzyme encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Tian-Fu; Su, Jie; Bosch, Mathieu; Wei, Zhangwen; Wan, Wei; Yuan, Daqiang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Kecheng; Lian, Xizhen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Park, Jihye; Zou, Xiaodong; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic catalytic processes possess great potential in chemical manufacturing, including pharmaceuticals, fuel production and food processing. However, the engineering of enzymes is severely hampered due to their low operational stability and difficulty of reuse. Here, we develop a series of stable metal-organic frameworks with rationally designed ultra-large mesoporous cages as single-molecule traps (SMTs) for enzyme encapsulation. With a high concentration of mesoporous cages as SMTs, PCN-333(Al) encapsulates three enzymes with record-high loadings and recyclability. Immobilized enzymes that most likely undergo single-enzyme encapsulation (SEE) show smaller Km than free enzymes while maintaining comparable catalytic efficiency. Under harsh conditions, the enzyme in SEE exhibits better performance than free enzyme, showing the effectiveness of SEE in preventing enzyme aggregation or denaturation. With extraordinarily large pore size and excellent chemical stability, PCN-333 may be of interest not only for enzyme encapsulation, but also for entrapment of other nanoscaled functional moieties.

  3. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Chistiakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms.

  4. Photo-activation of Single Molecule Magnet Behavior in a Manganese-based Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetoh, Ahmed; Cosquer, Goulven; Morimoto, Masakazu; Irie, Masahiro; El-Gammal, Ola; El-Reash, Gaber Abu; Breedlove, Brian K.; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    A major roadblock to fully realizing molecular electronic devices is the ability to control the properties of each molecule in the device. Herein we report the control of the magnetic properties of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), which can be used in memory devices, by using a photo-isomerizable diarthylenthene ligand. Photo-isomerization of the diarylethene ligand bridging two manganese salen complexes with visible light caused a significant change in the SMM behavior due to opening of the six-membered ring of diarylethene ligand, accompanied by reorganization of the entire molecule. The ring-opening activated the frequency-dependent magnetization of the complex. Our results are a major step towards the realization of molecular memory devices composed of SMMs because the SMM behaviour can be turned on and off simply by irradiating the molecule.

  5. Discriminating single-molecule sensing by crown-ether-based molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Ali K.; Al-Jobory, Alaa; Grace, Iain; Lambert, Colin J.

    2017-02-01

    Crown-ether molecules are well known to selectively bind alkali atoms, so by incorporating these within wires, any change in electrical conductance of the wire upon binding leads to discriminating sensing. Using a density functional theory-based approach to quantum transport, we investigate the potential sensing capabilities of single-molecule junctions formed from crown ethers attached to anthraquinone units, which are in turn attached to gold electrodes via alkyl chains. We calculate the change in electrical conductance for binding of three different alkali ions (lithium, sodium, and potassium). Depending on the nature of the ionic analyte, the conductance is enhanced by different amounts. This change in electrical conductance is due to charge transfer from the ion to molecular wire causing the molecular resonances to shift closer to the electrode Fermi energy.

  6. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  7. Exchange biasing single molecule magnets: coupling of TbPc2 to antiferromagnetic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi Rizzini, A; Krull, C; Balashov, T; Mugarza, A; Nistor, C; Yakhou, F; Sessi, V; Klyatskaya, S; Ruben, M; Stepanow, S; Gambardella, P

    2012-11-14

    We investigate the possibility to induce exchange bias between single molecule magnets (SMM) and metallic or oxide antiferromagnetic substrates. Element-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements reveal, respectively, the presence and absence of unidirectional exchange anisotropy for TbPc(2) SMM deposited on antiferromagnetic Mn and CoO layers. TbPc(2) deposited on Mn thin films present magnetic hysteresis and a negative horizontal shift of the Tb magnetization loop after field cooling, consistent with the observation of pinned spins in the Mn layer coupled parallel to the Tb magnetic moment. Conversely, molecules deposited on CoO substrates present paramagnetic magnetization loops with no indication of exchange bias. These experiments demonstrate the ability of SMM to polarize the pinned uncompensated spins of an antiferromagnet during field-cooling and realize metal-organic exchange-biased heterostructures using antiferromagnetic pinning layers.

  8. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-06-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex had long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent modified Redfield theory and non-Markovian quantum jump method to simulate EET dynamics. This scheme provides a practical approach of detecting the realistic EET pathway in BChl complexes with currently available experimental technology. And it may assist optimizing design of artificial light-harvesting devices.

  9. A highly specific gold nanoprobe for live-cell single-molecule imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Leduc, Cecile; Gautier, Jérémie; Soto-Ribeiro, Martinho; Wehrle-Haller, B; Gautreau, Alexis; Giannone, Gregory; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule tracking in live cells is the ultimate tool to study subcellular protein dynamics, but it is often limited by the probe size and photostability. Due to these issues, long-term tracking of proteins in confined and crowded environments, such as intracellular spaces, remains challenging. We have developed a novel optical probe consisting of 5-nm gold nanoparticles functionalized with a small fragment of camelid antibodies that recognize widely used GFPs with a very high affinity, which we call GFP-nanobodies. These small gold nanoparticles can be detected and tracked using photothermal imaging for arbitrarily long periods of time. Surface and intracellular GFP-proteins were effectively labeled even in very crowded environments such as adhesion sites and cytoskeletal structures both in vitro and in live cell cultures. These nanobody-coated gold nanoparticles are probes with unparalleled capabilities; small size, perfect photostability, high specificity, and versatility afforded by combination with...

  10. Minimizing pulling geometry errors in atomic force microscope single molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Monica; Lee, Whasil; Ke, Changhong; Marszalek, Piotr E; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2008-10-01

    In atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), it is assumed that the pulling angle is negligible and that the force applied to the molecule is equivalent to the force measured by the instrument. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the pulling geometry errors can drastically alter the measured force-extension relationship of molecules. Here we describe a software-based alignment method that repositions the cantilever such that it is located directly above the molecule's substrate attachment site. By aligning the applied force with the measurement axis, the molecule is no longer undergoing combined loading, and the full force can be measured by the cantilever. Simulations and experimental results verify the ability of the alignment program to minimize pulling geometry errors in AFM-SMFS studies.

  11. Shot noise of the spin inelastic tunneling through a quantum dot with single molecule-magnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Bo; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the quantum fluctuations of inelastic spin-electron scattering in quantum dot with an embedded biaxial single molecule-magnet and particularly investigated the zero-frequency shot noise and Fano factor in different magnetic fields. It is found that the shot noise and Fano factor exhibit a stepwise behaviour as bias increases in the presence of interaction between the electron and molecule-magnet for a weak magnetic field. As magnetic field becomes strong, a dip is displayed in the shot-noise-bias curve due to the suppression of inelastic shot noise caused by the quantum tunneling of magnetisation. Because of the spontaneous inelastic tunneling at zero bias, a small shot noise occurs, which results in the case of Fano factor F > 1. Moreover, our results show that the sweeping speed can also influence the shot noise and Fano factor obviously.

  12. Insulator-protected mechanically controlled break junctions for measuring single-molecule conductance in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusubramanian, N.; Galan, E.; Maity, C.; Eelkema, R.; Grozema, F. C.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to fabricate insulated gold mechanically controlled break junctions (MCBJ) by coating the metal with a thin layer of aluminum oxide using plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 thickness deposited on the MCBJ devices was varied from 2 to 15 nm to test the suppression of leakage currents in deionized water and phosphate buffered saline. Junctions coated with a 15 nm thick oxide layer yielded atomically sharp electrodes and negligible conductance counts in the range of 1 to 10-4 G0 (1 G0 = 77 μS), where single-molecule conductances are commonly observed. The insulated devices were used to measure the conductance of an amphiphilic oligophenylene ethynylene derivative in deionized water.

  13. Quenching points of dimeric single-molecule magnets: Exchange interaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florez, J.M., E-mail: juanmanuel.florez@alumnos.usm.c [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, P.O. Box 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.c [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Vargas, P., E-mail: patricio.vargas@usm.c [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, P.O. Box 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-11-15

    We study the quenched energy-splitting ({Delta}{sub E}) of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) conformed by two exchange coupled giant-spins. An assessment of two nontrivial characteristics of this quenching is presented: (i) The quenching-points of a strongly exchange-coupled dimer differ from the ones of their respective giant-spin modeled SMM and such a difference can be well described by using the Solari-Kochetov extra phase; (ii) the dependence on the exchange coupling of the magnetic field values at the quenching-points when {Delta}{sub E} passes from monomeric to dimeric behavior. The physics behind these exchange-modified points, their relation with the {Delta}{sub E}-oscillations experimentally obtained by the Landau-Zener method and with the diabolical-plane of a SMM, is discussed.

  14. Correlating Anomalous Diffusion with Membrane Obstacle Structure Using Single Molecule Tracking and AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaug, Michael; Longo, Marjorie; Faller, Roland

    2011-03-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been observed abundantly in the plasma membrane, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In general, it has not been possible to directly image the obstacles to diffusion in membranes, so the dynamics of diffusing particles are used to deduce the obstacle characteristics. We present a supported lipid bilayer system in which we characterized the anomalous diffusion of lipid molecules using single molecule tracking, while at the same time imaging the obstacles to diffusion with atomic force microscopy. To explain our experimental results, we performed lattice Monte Carlo simulations of tracer diffusion in the presence of the experimentally determined obstacle configurations. We correlate the observed anomalous diffusion with obstacle area fraction, fractal dimension and correlation length. We further discuss our results in the context of confinement models and the generating stochastic process. Supported by NSF grant CBET 0506602.

  15. Novel double-decker phthalocyaninato terbium(III) single molecule magnets with stabilised redox states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonidec, Mathieu; Amabilino, David B; Veciana, Jaume

    2012-11-28

    Double-decker phthalocyanine lanthanide complexes are single molecule magnets (SMMs) presenting a thermally activated magnetic relaxation with relatively high effective barriers. For this reason they are potential candidates as components for data storage and spintronic devices. One of the disadvantages of these compounds is their redox instability: they are oxidized or reduced in the presence of mild oxidizing and reducing agents. To solve this issue, we designed, prepared and characterized new double-decker phthalocyanine based SMMs bearing electron withdrawing groups and therefore presenting an increased redox stability. In the present article, the synthesis and characterization of these novel compounds is presented and we demonstrate how the magnetic behavior of the complexes is virtually identical to that of the parent unsubstituted compounds.

  16. Highly reduced double-decker single-molecule magnets exhibiting slow magnetic relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonidec, Mathieu; Krivokapic, Itana; Vidal-Gancedo, Jose; Davies, E Stephen; McMaster, Jonathan; Gorun, Sergiu M; Veciana, Jaume

    2013-04-15

    F64Pc2Ln (1Ln, Ln = Tb or Lu) represent the first halogenated phthalocyanine double-decker lanthanide complexes, and 1Tb exhibits single-molecule magnet properties as revealed by solid-state magnetometry. The fluorine substituents of the phthalocyanine rings have a dramatic effect on the redox properties of the F64Pc2Ln complexes, namely, a stabilization of their reduced states. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements demonstrate that the 1Tb(-/2-) and 1Tb(2-/3-) couples exhibit redox reversibility and that the 1Tb(-), 1Tb(2-) and 1Tb(3-) species may be prepared by bulk electrolysis in acetone. Low-temperature MCD studies reveal for the first time magnetization hystereses for the super-reduced dianionic and trianionic states of Pc2Ln.

  17. Key components for nano-assembled plasmon-excited single molecule non-linear devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kewes, Günter; Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Neitzke, Oliver; Schönfeld, Rolf-Simon; Schell, Andreas W; Probst, Jürgen; Wolters, Janik; Löchel, Bernd; Toninelli, Costanza; Benson, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous enhancement of light-matter interaction in plasmon-excited molecular hybrid devices allows for non-linearities on the level of single emitters and few photons. This promises a plethora of novel applications like single photon transistors. Nevertheless, building the components of such devices is technologically extremely challenging. We tackle this task by lithographically fabricating on-chip plasmonic waveguides, efficiently connected to far-field in- and out-coupling ports via low-loss dielectric waveguides. Furthermore, a nano-assembling technology is developed, enabling the controlled coupling of single organic emitters to the plasmonic waveguides. Dibenzoterrylene fluorescent molecules hosted in anthracene crystals are investigated for this purpose. Here we present all key-components and technologies for a plasmon-excited single molecule non-linear device.

  18. Two-dimensional, phenanthroline-based, extended {pi}-conjugated molecules for single-molecule conduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlthat, Soeren; Reimers, Jeffrey R [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pauly, Fabian [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: reimers@chem.usyd.edu.au

    2008-07-23

    The conduction properties of phenanthroline-terminated, polycyclic extended {pi}-conjugated molecular wires are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in combination with Green's function techniques and group theory. While these molecules could possibly be thought of as accessible graphene-like fragments, they are calculated to conduct poorly. The decay constant for their exponential decrease of conductance with length is in excess of 0.6 A{sup -1} for the addition of internal fused quinoxaline groups and in excess of 0.9 A{sup -1} for the addition of internal pyrazine-fused pyrene groups. Furthermore, while the bidentate phenanthroline connectors adhere strongly to gold, they are sometimes predicted to be less conductive than related monodentate connectors. Careful design is thus required for any graphene-like extended {pi}-system intended for single-molecule conduction applications.

  19. Analysis of photon count data from single-molecule fluorescence experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burzykowski, T.; Szubiakowski, J.; Ryden, T

    2003-03-15

    We consider single-molecule fluorescence experiments with data in the form of counts of photons registered over multiple time-intervals. Based on the observation schemes, linking back to works by Dehmelt [Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 20 (1975) 60] and Cook and Kimble [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54 (1985) 1023], we propose an analytical approach to the data based on the theory of Markov-modulated Poisson processes (MMPP). In particular, we consider maximum-likelihood estimation. The method is illustrated using a real-life dataset. Additionally, the properties of the proposed method are investigated through simulations and compared to two other approaches developed by Yip et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 102 (1998) 7564] and Molski [Chem. Phys. Lett. 324 (2000) 301].

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at single-molecule scale and its implications in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuling; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-02-05

    Single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy has been an exciting area of research offering significant promise and hope in the field of sensor development to detect targets at ultra-low levels down to SM resolution. To the experts and developers in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), this has often been a challenge and a significant opportunity for exploration. Needless to say, the opportunities and excitement of this multidisciplinary area impacts span the fields of physics, chemistry and engineering, along with a significant thrust in applications constituting areas in medicine, biology, environment and agriculture among others. In this review, we will attempt to provide a quick snapshot of the basics of SM-SERS, nanostructures and devices that can enable SM Raman measurement. We will conclude with a discussion on SERS implications in biomedical sciences.

  1. Molecular Water Lilies: Orienting Single Molecules in a Polymer Film by Solvent Vapor Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Wuersch, Dominik; Eder, Theresa; Aggarwal, A Vikas; Idelson, Alissa; Hoeger, Sigurd; Lupton, John M; Vogelsang, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic orientation and position of photoactive molecules is crucial to the operation of optoelectronic devices such as OLEDs and solar cells. Here, we introduce a shape-persistent macrocyclic molecule as an excellent fluorescent probe to simply measure (i) its orientation by rotating the excitation polarization and recording the strength of modulation in photoluminescence (PL), and (ii) its position in a film by analyzing the overall PL brightness at the molecular level. The unique shape, the absorption and the fluorescence properties of this probe yields information on molecular orientation and position. We control orientation and positioning of the probe in a polymer film by solvent vapor annealing (SVA). During the SVA process the molecules accumulate at the polymer/air interface, where they adopt a flat conformation, much like water lilies on the surface of a pond. The results are significant for OLED fabrication and single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) in general.

  2. Single-Molecule FRET Spectroscopy and the Polymer Physics of Unfolded and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Benjamin; Soranno, Andrea; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel

    2016-07-05

    The properties of unfolded proteins have long been of interest because of their importance to the protein folding process. Recently, the surprising prevalence of unstructured regions or entirely disordered proteins under physiological conditions has led to the realization that such intrinsically disordered proteins can be functional even in the absence of a folded structure. However, owing to their broad conformational distributions, many of the properties of unstructured proteins are difficult to describe with the established concepts of structural biology. We have thus seen a reemergence of polymer physics as a versatile framework for understanding their structure and dynamics. An important driving force for these developments has been single-molecule spectroscopy, as it allows structural heterogeneity, intramolecular distance distributions, and dynamics to be quantified over a wide range of timescales and solution conditions. Polymer concepts provide an important basis for relating the physical properties of unstructured proteins to folding and function.

  3. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  4. Single-molecule microscopy reveals heterogeneous dynamics of lipid raft components upon TCR engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drbal, Karel; Moertelmaier, Manuel; Holzhauser, Christa; Muhammad, Arshad; Fuertbauer, Elke; Howorka, Stefan; Hinterberger, Maria; Stockinger, Hannes; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2007-05-01

    The existence of lipid rafts and their importance for immunoreceptor signaling is highly debated. By non-invasive single molecule imaging, we analyzed the dynamics of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR), the lipid raft-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) proteins CD48 and CD59 and the major leukocyte phosphatase CD45 in living naive T lymphocytes. TCR triggering induced the immobilization of CD45 and CD48 at different positions within the T-cell interface. The second GPI protein, CD59, did not co-immobilize indicating lipid raft heterogeneity in living T lymphocytes. A novel biochemical approach confirmed that lipid raft components are not associated in the plasma membrane of resting cells, and variably associate with specific receptors to distinct lipid rafts upon activation.

  5. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    , which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......, the electrons can tunnel in- elastically from the left to the right electrode. This is the process behind inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS), which is a single-molecule spectroscopic method, where the vibrational ngerprint of a molecule is di- rectly observed by the tunnelling current......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  6. Solid-phase single molecule biosensing using dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies.The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to

  7. Time-, Frequency-, and Wavevector-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction from Single Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Kochise; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broad-band X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and ...

  8. Feasibility of Single Molecule DNA Sequencing using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, C E; Reboredo, F; Chan, J; Lane, S M

    2006-02-03

    We have used a combined theoretical and experimental approach in order to assess the feasibility of using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for DNA sequencing at the single molecule level. We have developed a numerical tool capable of calculating the E-field and resulting SERS enhancement factors for metallic structures of arbitrary size and shape. Measurements of the additional SERS enhancement by combining SERS with coherent antistokes Raman scattering (CARS) show that only modest increases in the signal are achievable due to thermal damage at higher laser powers. Finally, measurements of the SERS enhancement from nanoparticles coated with an insulating layer show that the SERS enhancement is decreased by as much as two orders of magnitude when the molecule is not in contact with the metal surface.

  9. Magnetic and optical bistability in tetrairon(III) single molecule magnets functionalized with azobenzene groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Thazhe Kootteri; Poneti, Giordano; Sorace, Lorenzo; Rodriguez-Douton, Maria Jesus; Barra, Anne-Laure; Neugebauer, Petr; Costantino, Luca; Sessoli, Roberta; Cornia, Andrea

    2012-07-21

    Tetrairon(III) complexes known as "ferric stars" have been functionalized with azobenzene groups to investigate the effect of light-induced trans-cis isomerization on single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour. According to DC magnetic data and EPR spectroscopy, clusters dispersed in polystyrene (4% w/w) exhibit the same spin (S = 5) and magnetic anisotropy as bulk samples. Ligand photoisomerization, achieved by irradiation at 365 nm, has no detectable influence on static magnetic properties. However, it induces a small but significant acceleration of magnetic relaxation as probed by AC susceptometry. The pristine behaviour can be almost quantitatively recovered by irradiation with white light. Our studies demonstrate that magnetic and optical bistability can be made to coexist in SMM materials, which are of current interest in molecular spintronics.

  10. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  11. Single-molecule observation of DNA compaction by meiotic protein SYCP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjänen, Johanna L; Heller, Iddo; Candelli, Andrea; Davies, Owen R; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L; Pellegrini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper (Syrjänen et al., 2014), we reported the first structural characterisation of a synaptonemal complex (SC) protein, SYCP3, which led us to propose a model for its role in chromosome compaction during meiosis. As a component of the SC lateral element, SYCP3 has a critical role in defining the specific chromosome architecture required for correct meiotic progression. In the model, the reported compaction of chromosomal DNA caused by SYCP3 would result from its ability to bridge distant sites on a DNA molecule with the DNA-binding domains located at each end of its strut-like structure. Here, we describe a single-molecule assay based on optical tweezers, fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics that, in combination with bulk biochemical data, provides direct visual evidence for our proposed mechanism of SYCP3-mediated chromosome organisation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22582.001 PMID:28287952

  12. Structural dynamics of potassium-channel gating revealed by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizhen; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Borschel, William F; Ha, Taekjip; Nichols, Colin G

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography has provided invaluable insights regarding ion-channel selectivity and gating, but to advance understanding to a new level, dynamic views of channel structures within membranes are essential. We labeled tetrameric KirBac1.1 potassium channels with single donor and acceptor fluorophores at different sites and then examined structural dynamics within lipid membranes by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We found that the extracellular region is structurally rigid in both closed and open states, whereas the N-terminal slide helix undergoes marked conformational fluctuations. The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain fluctuates between two major structural states, both of which become less dynamic and move away from the pore axis and away from the membrane in closed channels. Our results reveal mobile and rigid conformations of functionally relevant KirBac1.1 channel motifs, implying similar dynamics for similar motifs in eukaryotic Kir channels and in cation channels in general.

  13. Structural dynamics of potassium channel gating revealed by single molecule FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschel, William F.; Ha, Taekjip; Nichols, Colin G.

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography has provided invaluable insights to ion channel selectivity and gating, but to advance understanding to a new level, dynamic views of channel structures within membranes are essential. We labeled tetrameric KirBac1.1 potassium channels with single donor and acceptor fluorophores at different sites, and examined structural dynamics within lipid membranes by single molecule FRET. We found that the extracellular region is structurally rigid in both closed and open states, whereas the N-terminal slide helix undergoes marked conformational fluctuations. The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain fluctuates between two major structural states both of which become less dynamic and move away from the pore axis and away from the membrane in closed channels. Our results reveal mobile and rigid conformations of functionally relevant KirBac1.1 channel motifs, implying similar dynamics for similar motifs in eukaryotic Kir channels and for cation channels in general. PMID:26641713

  14. From single molecule fluctuations to muscle contraction: a Brownian model of A.F. Huxley's hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marcucci

    Full Text Available Muscular force generation in response to external stimuli is the result of thermally fluctuating, cyclical interactions between myosin and actin, which together form the actomyosin complex. Normally, these fluctuations are modelled using transition rate functions that are based on muscle fiber behaviour, in a phenomenological fashion. However, such a basis reduces the predictive power of these models. As an alternative, we propose a model which uses direct single molecule observations of actomyosin fluctuations reported in the literature. We precisely estimate the actomyosin potential bias and use diffusion theory to obtain a brownian ratchet model that reproduces the complete cross-bridge cycle. The model is validated by simulating several macroscopic experimental conditions, while its interpretation is compatible with two different force-generating scenarios.

  15. Single-molecule spectromicroscopy: a route towards sub-wavelength refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikushina, T A; Gladush, M G; Gorshelev, A A; Naumov, A V

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a novel approach for spatially resolved probing of local fluctuations of the refractive index n in solids by means of single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy. It is based on the dependence T1(n) of the effective radiative lifetime T1 of dye centres in solids on n due to the local-field effects. Detection of SM zero-phonon lines at low temperatures gives the values of the SM natural spectral linewidth (which is inversely proportional to T1) and makes it possible to reveal the distribution of the local n values in solids. Here we demonstrate this possibility on the example of amorphous polyethylene and polycrystalline naphthalene doped with terrylene. In particular, we show that the obtained distributions of lifetime limited spectral linewidths of terrylene molecules embedded into these matrices are due to the spatial fluctuations of the refractive index local values.

  16. Two-substrate association with the 20S proteasome at single-molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutschenreiter, Silke; Tinazli, Ali; Model, Kirstin; Tampé, Robert

    2004-07-01

    The bipartite structure of the proteasome raises the question of functional significance. A rational design for unraveling mechanistic details of the highly symmetrical degradation machinery from Thermoplasma acidophilum pursues orientated immobilization at metal-chelating interfaces via affinity tags fused either around the pore apertures or at the sides. End-on immobilization of the proteasome demonstrates that one pore is sufficient for substrate entry and product release. Remarkably, a 'dead-end' proteasome can process only one substrate at a time. In contrast, the side-on immobilized and free proteasome can bind two substrates, presumably one in each antechamber, with positive cooperativity as analyzed by surface plasmon resonance and single-molecule cross-correlation spectroscopy. Thus, the two-stroke engine offers the advantage of speeding up degradation without enhancing complexity.

  17. Bayesian Decision Tree for the Classification of the Mode of Motion in Single-Molecule Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Türkcan, Silvan

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins move in heterogeneous environments with spatially (sometimes temporally) varying friction and with biochemical interactions with various partners. It is important to reliably distinguish different modes of motion to improve our knowledge of the membrane architecture and to understand the nature of interactions between membrane proteins and their environments. Here, we present an analysis technique for single molecule tracking (SMT) trajectories that can determine the preferred model of motion that best matches observed trajectories. Information theory criteria, such as the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), the Akaike information criterion (AIC), and modified AIC (AICc), are used to select the preferred model. The considered group of models includes free Brownian motion, and confined motion in 2nd or 4th order potentials. We determine the best information criteria for classifying trajectories. We tested its limits through simulations matching large sets of experimental conditions and buil...

  18. MCD spectroscopy of hexanuclear Mn(III) salicylaldoxime single-molecule magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Justin M; Thomson, Andrew J; Inglis, Ross

    2010-01-01

    The hexanuclear cages [Mn(6)O(2)(R-sao)(6)L(2)(EtOH)(x)(H(2)O)(y)] "Mn(6)" behave as single-molecule magnets (SMMs) below a characteristic blocking temperature. As with [Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CR)(16)(H(2)O)(4)] "Mn(12)" the electronic absorption spectra are rather featureless, yielding little information......)(MeOH)(3)](ClO(4)) (4) cast into polymer film. SMM behaviour has previously been observed using magnetic susceptibility measurements on powder and single-crystal samples. The ligand field environment of the magnetic ions is assumed to be similar in (1) and (2) and their different blocking temperatures...

  19. Precision ESR measurements of transverse anisotropy in the single-molecule magnet Ni4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Charles A.; Allão Cassaro, Rafael A.; Friedman, Jonathan R.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for precisely measuring the tunnel splitting in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) using electron-spin resonance, and use these measurements to precisely and independently determine the underlying transverse anisotropy parameter, given a certain class of transitions. By diluting samples of the SMM Ni4 via cocrystallization in a diamagnetic isostructural analog we obtain markedly narrower resonance peaks than are observed in undiluted samples. Using custom loop-gap resonators we measure the transitions at several frequencies, allowing a precise determination of the tunnel splitting. Because the transition under investigation occurs at zero field, and arises due to a first-order perturbation from the transverse anisotropy, we can determine the magnitude of this anisotropy independent of any other Hamiltonian parameters. This method can be applied to other SMMs with tunnel splittings arising from first-order transverse anisotropy perturbations.

  20. Spin coherence in a Mn{sub 3} single-molecule magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeywardana, Chathuranga [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Mowson, Andrew M.; Christou, George [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Takahashi, Susumu, E-mail: susumu.takahashi@usc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    Spin coherence in single crystals of the spin S = 6 single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Mn{sub 3}O(O{sub 2}CEt){sub 3}(mpko){sub 3}]{sup +} (abbreviated Mn{sub 3}) has been investigated using 230 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Coherence in Mn{sub 3} was uncovered by significantly suppressing dipolar contribution to the decoherence with complete spin polarization of Mn{sub 3} SMMs. The temperature dependence of spin decoherence time (T{sub 2}) revealed that the dipolar decoherence is the dominant source of decoherence in Mn{sub 3} and T{sub 2} can be extended up to 267 ns by quenching the dipolar decoherence.

  1. Single-Molecule Electronic Measurements of the Dynamic Flexibility of Histone Deacetylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froberg, James; You, Seungyong; Yu, Junru; Haldar, Manas; Sedigh, Abbas; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D. K.; Choi, Yongki

    Due to their involvement in epigenetic regulation, histone deacetylases (HDACs) have gained considerable interest in designing drugs for treatment of a variety of human diseases including cancers. Recently, we applied a label-free, electronic single-molecule nano-circuit technique to gain insight into the contribution of the dynamic flexibility in HDACs structure during the course of substrates/ ligands binding and catalysis. We observed that HDAC8 has two major (dynamically interconvertible) conformational states, ``ground (catalytically unfavorable)'' and ``transition (catalytically favorable)''. In addition, we found that its cognate substrates/ligands reciprocally catalyze the transition of the ground to the transition state conformation of HDAC8. Thus, we propose that both enzymes and their substrates/ligands serve as ``catalysts'' in facilitating the structural changes of each other and promoting the overall chemical transformation reaction. Such new information provides the potential for designing a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors and activators of HDAC8 for treating human diseases.

  2. Energy transfer pathway probed by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex has long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent modified Redfield theory and non-Markovian quantum jump method to simulate EET dynamics. This scheme provides a practical approach of detecting the realistic EET pathway in BChl complexes with currently available experimental technology. And it may assist optimizing design of artificial light-harvesting devices.

  3. Single-molecule studies on individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-13

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress in single-molecule studies of individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces. The structures and the mechanism of peptide assembly are discussed in detail. The contents include the following topics: structural analysis of single peptide molecules, adsorption and assembly of peptides on surfaces, folding structures of the amyloid peptides, interaction between amyloid peptides and dye or drug molecules, and modulation of peptide assemblies by small molecules. The explorations of peptide adsorption and assembly will benefit the understanding of the mechanisms for protein-protein interactions, protein-drug interactions and the pathogenesis of amyloidoses. The investigations on peptide assembly and its modulations could also provide a potential approach towards the treatment of the amyloidoses.

  4. Single Molecule Localization Microscopy of Mammalian Cell Nuclei on the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander; Xing, Jun; Birk, Udo J.; Cremer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear texture analysis is a well-established method of cellular pathology. It is hampered, however, by the limits of conventional light microscopy (ca. 200 nm). These limits have been overcome by a variety of super-resolution approaches. An especially promising approach to chromatin texture analysis is single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) as it provides the highest resolution using fluorescent based methods. At the present state of the art, using fixed whole cell samples and standard DNA dyes, a structural resolution of chromatin in the 50–100 nm range is obtained using SMLM. We highlight how the combination of localization microscopy with standard fluorophores opens the avenue to a plethora of studies including the spatial distribution of DNA and associated proteins in eukaryotic cell nuclei with the potential to elucidate the functional organization of chromatin. These views are based on our experience as well as on recently published research in this field. PMID:27446198

  5. Bayesian field theoretic reconstruction of bond potential and bond mobility in single molecule force spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Joshua C; Chou, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the forces between and within macromolecules is a necessary first step in understanding the mechanics of molecular structure, protein folding, and enzyme function and performance. In such macromolecular settings, dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy (DFS) has been used to distort bonds. The resulting responses, in the form of rupture forces, work applied, and trajectories of displacements, have been used to reconstruct bond potentials. Such approaches often rely on simple parameterizations of one-dimensional bond potentials, assumptions on equilibrium starting states, and/or large amounts of trajectory data. Parametric approaches typically fail at inferring complex-shaped bond potentials with multiple minima, while piecewise estimation may not guarantee smooth results with the appropriate behavior at large distances. Existing techniques, particularly those based on work theorems, also do not address spatial variations in the diffusivity that may arise from spatially inhomogeneous coupling to...

  6. Single-molecule synthesis and characterization of metal-ligand complexes by low-temperature STM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeroth, Peter; Swart, Ingmar; Paavilainen, Sami; Repp, Jascha; Meyer, Gerhard

    2010-07-14

    We present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)-based single-molecule synthesis of linear metal-ligand complexes starting from individual metal atoms (iron or nickel) and organic molecules (9,10-dicyanoanthracene) deposited on an ultrathin insulating film. We directly visualize the frontier molecular orbitals by STM orbital imaging, from which, in conjunction with detailed density functional theory calculations, the electronic structure of the complexes is inferred. Our studies show how the order of the molecular orbitals and the spin-state of the complex can be engineered through the choice of the metal atom. The high-spin iron complex has a singly occupied delocalized orbital with a large spin-splitting that points to the use of these engineered complexes as modular building blocks in molecular spintronics.

  7. Quantum-interference-enhanced thermoelectricity in single molecules and molecular films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Colin J.; Sadeghi, Hatef; Al-Galiby, Qusiy H.

    2016-12-01

    We provide a brief overview of recent measurements and predictions of thermoelectric properties of single-molecules and porous nanoribbons and discuss some principles underpinning strategies for enhancing their thermoelectric performance. The latter include (a) taking advantage of steep slopes in the electron transmission coefficient T (E), (b) creating structures with delta-function-like transmission coefficients and (c) utilising step-like features in T (E). To achieve high performance, we suggest that the latter may be the most fruitful, since it is less susceptible to inhomogeneous broadening. For the purpose of extrapolating thermoelectric properties of single or few molecules to monolayer molecular films, we also discuss the relevance of the conductance-weighted average Seebeck coefficient. xml:lang="fr"

  8. Biophysics of DNA-Protein Interactions From Single Molecules to Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a concise overview of current research on the biophysics of DNA-protein interactions. A wide range of new and classical methods are presented by authors investigating physical mechanisms by which proteins interact with DNA. For example, several chapters address the mechanisms by which proteins search for and recognize specific binding sites on DNA, a process critical for cellular function. Single molecule methods such as force spectroscopy as well as fluorescence imaging and tracking are described in these chapters as well as other parts of the book that address the dynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Other important topics include the mechanisms by which proteins engage DNA sequences and/or alter DNA structure. These simple but important model interactions are then placed in the broader biological context with discussion of larger protein-DNA complexes . Topics include replication forks, recombination complexes, DNA repair interactions, and ultimately, methods to understand the chromatin...

  9. Diagnosing Heterogeneous Dynamics in Single Molecule/Particle Trajectories with Multiscale Wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kejia; Guan, Juan; Granick, Steve

    2013-01-01

    We describe a simple automated method to extract and quantify transient heterogeneous dynamical changes from large datasets generated in single molecule/particle tracking experiments. Based on wavelet transform, the method transforms raw data to locally match dynamics of interest. This is accomplished using statistically adaptive universal thresholding, whose advantage is to avoid a single arbitrary threshold that might conceal individual variability across populations. How to implement this multiscale method is described, focusing on local confined diffusion separated by transient transport periods or hopping events, with 3 specific examples: in cell biology, biotechnology, and glassy colloid dynamics. This computationally-efficient method can run routinely on hundreds of millions of data points analyzed within an hour on a desktop personal computer.

  10. Properties of Single Molecules: Manipulation, Dissociation and Synthesis with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Kai-Felix; Hla, Saw-Wai

    The fascinating advances in the manipulation of single atoms and molecules with the scanning tunneling microscope tip allow scientists to build atomic scale structures and to probe chemical and physical properties of matters at an atomic level. Due to these advances, the basic steps of a catalyzed chemical reaction such as dissociation, diffusion, adsorption, re-adsorption and bond formation processes can be performed by using the STM-tip. Here a short review of these steps and the techniques involved is presented. The lateral manipulation is used for the controlled positioning of atoms/molecules whereby only the tip- atom/molecule forces are employed. By measuring the tip-height signal during the manipulation, different modes of motion of the adparticle can be distinguished. Lower corrugated surfaces exhibit more complex motions than higher corrugated surfaces where the adparticle movement is confined to one dimension. Molecules have more degrees of freedom which allow a rotational motion or change in configuration. Even internal degrees of freedom can be detected and manipulated. The vertical manipulation not only allows the pick-up of adparticles and the subsequent transfer back to the surface, but also the manipulation of fragments of larger molecules. Effects due to the tunneling curent can be used for a controlled dissociation of chemical bonds as well as for the formation of new bonds. The combination of these manipulation techniques can induce chemical reactions at a single molecule level and construct new molecules. These achievements in STM manipulation of molecules open up new opportunities in nanochemistry and nanochemical technology. In this article, various STM manipulation techniques used for the single molecule reaction process are reviewed, and their impact on the future of nanoscience and nanotechnology is discussed.

  11. Single-molecule conformational dynamics of a biologically functional hydroxocobalamin riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Polaski, Jacob T; Batey, Robert T; Nesbitt, David J

    2014-12-03

    Riboswitches represent a family of highly structured regulatory elements found primarily in the leader sequences of bacterial mRNAs. They function as molecular switches capable of altering gene expression; commonly, this occurs via a conformational change in a regulatory element of a riboswitch that results from ligand binding in the aptamer domain. Numerous studies have investigated the ligand binding process, but little is known about the structural changes in the regulatory element. A mechanistic description of both processes is essential for deeply understanding how riboswitches modulate gene expression. This task is greatly facilitated by studying all aspects of riboswitch structure/dynamics/function in the same model system. To this end, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) techniques have been used to directly observe the conformational dynamics of a hydroxocobalamin (HyCbl) binding riboswitch (env8HyCbl) with a known crystallographic structure.1 The single-molecule RNA construct studied in this work is unique in that it contains all of the structural elements both necessary and sufficient for regulation of gene expression in a biological context. The results of this investigation reveal that the undocking rate constant associated with the disruption of a long-range kissing-loop (KL) interaction is substantially decreased when the ligand is bound to the RNA, resulting in a preferential stabilization of the docked conformation. Notably, the formation of this tertiary KL interaction directly sequesters the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (i.e., the ribosome binding site) via base-pairing, thus preventing translation initiation. These results reveal that the conformational dynamics of this regulatory switch are quantitatively described by a four-state kinetic model, whereby ligand binding promotes formation of the KL interaction. The results of complementary cell-based gene expression experiments conducted in Escherichia coli are highly

  12. Single-molecule imaging with longer X-ray laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V. Martin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last five years, serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray laser pulses has been developed into a powerful technique for determining the atomic structures of protein molecules from micrometre- and sub-micrometre-sized crystals. One of the key reasons for this success is the `self-gating' pulse effect, whereby the X-ray laser pulses do not need to outrun all radiation damage processes. Instead, X-ray-induced damage terminates the Bragg diffraction prior to the pulse completing its passage through the sample, as if the Bragg diffraction were generated by a shorter pulse of equal intensity. As a result, serial femtosecond crystallography does not need to be performed with pulses as short as 5–10 fs, but can succeed for pulses 50–100 fs in duration. It is shown here that a similar gating effect applies to single-molecule diffraction with respect to spatially uncorrelated damage processes like ionization and ion diffusion. The effect is clearly seen in calculations of the diffraction contrast, by calculating the diffraction of the average structure separately to the diffraction from statistical fluctuations of the structure due to damage (`damage noise'. The results suggest that sub-nanometre single-molecule imaging with 30–50 fs pulses, like those produced at currently operating facilities, should not yet be ruled out. The theory presented opens up new experimental avenues to measure the impact of damage on single-particle diffraction, which is needed to test damage models and to identify optimal imaging conditions.

  13. A heterotrimer model of the complete Microprocessor complex revealed by single-molecule subunit counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Kristina M; Sarkar, Susanta K; Mills, Maria; Delgado De la Herran, Hilda C; Neuman, Keir C; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-02-01

    During microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, the Microprocessor complex (MC), composed minimally of Drosha, an RNaseIII enzyme, and DGCR8, a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, cleaves the primary-miRNA (pri-miRNA) to release the pre-miRNA stem-loop structure. Size-exclusion chromatography of the MC, isolated from mammalian cells, suggested multiple copies of one or both proteins in the complex. However, the exact stoichiometry was unknown. Initial experiments suggested that DGCR8 bound pri-miRNA substrates specifically, and given that Drosha could not be bound or cross-linked to RNA, a sequential model for binding was established in which DGCR8 bound first and recruited Drosha. Therefore, many laboratories have studied DGCR8 binding to RNA in the absence of Drosha and have shown that deletion constructs of DGCR8 can multimerize in the presence of RNA. More recently, it was demonstrated that Drosha can bind pri-miRNA substrates in the absence of DGCR8, casting doubt on the sequential model of binding. In the same study, using a single-molecule photobleaching assay, fluorescent protein-tagged deletion constructs of DGCR8 and Drosha assembled into a heterotrimeric complex on RNA, comprising two DGCR8 molecules and one Drosha molecule. To determine the stoichiometry of Drosha and DGCR8 within the MC in the absence of added RNA, we also used a single-molecule photobleaching assay and confirmed the heterotrimeric model of the human MC. We demonstrate that a heterotrimeric complex is likely preformed in the absence of RNA and exists even when full-length proteins are expressed and purified from human cells, and when hAGT-derived tags are used rather than fluorescent proteins.

  14. Observing lysozyme's closing and opening motions by high-resolution single-molecule enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhterov, Maxim V; Choi, Yongki; Olsen, Tivoli J; Sims, Patrick C; Iftikhar, Mariam; Gul, O Tolga; Corso, Brad L; Weiss, Gregory A; Collins, Philip G

    2015-06-19

    Single-molecule techniques can monitor the kinetics of transitions between enzyme open and closed conformations, but such methods usually lack the resolution to observe the underlying transition pathway or intermediate conformational dynamics. We have used a 1 MHz bandwidth carbon nanotube transistor to electronically monitor single molecules of the enzyme T4 lysozyme as it processes substrate. An experimental resolution of 2 μs allowed the direct recording of lysozyme's opening and closing transitions. Unexpectedly, both motions required 37 μs, on average. The distribution of transition durations was also independent of the enzyme's state: either catalytic or nonproductive. The observation of smooth, continuous transitions suggests a concerted mechanism for glycoside hydrolysis with lysozyme's two domains closing upon the polysaccharide substrate in its active site. We distinguish these smooth motions from a nonconcerted mechanism, observed in approximately 10% of lysozyme openings and closings, in which the enzyme pauses for an additional 40-140 μs in an intermediate, partially closed conformation. During intermediate forming events, the number of rate-limiting steps observed increases to four, consistent with four steps required in the stepwise, arrow-pushing mechanism. The formation of such intermediate conformations was again independent of the enzyme's state. Taken together, the results suggest lysozyme operates as a Brownian motor. In this model, the enzyme traces a single pathway for closing and the reverse pathway for enzyme opening, regardless of its instantaneous catalytic productivity. The observed symmetry in enzyme opening and closing thus suggests that substrate translocation occurs while the enzyme is closed.

  15. Functional metalloproteins integrated with conductive substrates: detecting single molecules and sensing individual recognition events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, B; Andolfi, L; Bizzarri, A R; Cannistraro, S

    2007-05-17

    In the past decade, there has been significant interest in the integration of biomaterials with electronic elements: combining biological functions of biomolecules with nanotechnology offers new perspectives for implementation of ultrasensitive hybrid nanodevices. In particular, great attention has been devoted to redox metalloproteins, since they possess unique characteristics, such as electron-transfer capability, possibility of gating redox activity, and nanometric size, which make them appealing for bioelectronics applications at the nanoscale. The reliable connection of redox proteins to electrodes, aimed at ensuring good electrical contact with the conducting substrate besides preserving protein functionality, is a fundamental step for designing a hybrid nanodevice and calls for a full characterization of the immobilized proteins, possibly at the single-molecule level. Here, we describe how a multitechnique approach, based on several scanning probe microscopy techniques, may provide a comprehensive characterization of different metalloproteins on metal electrodes, disclosing unique information not only about morphological properties of the adsorbed molecules but also about the effectiveness of electrical coupling with the conductive substrate, or even concerning the preserved biorecognition capability upon adsorption. We also show how the success of an immobilization strategy, which is of primary importance for optimal integration of metalloproteins with a metal electrode, can be promptly assessed by means of the proposed approach. Besides the characterization aspect, the complementary employment of the proposed techniques deserves major potentialities for ultrasensitive detection of adsorbed biomolecules. In particular, it is shown how sensing of single metalloproteins may be optimized by monitoring the most appropriate observable. Additionally, we suggest how the combination of several experimental techniques might offer increased versatility, real

  16. High Throughput Random Mutagenesis and Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of the Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Ferrand, Sandrine; Kelley, Nicholas; Bill, Anke; Freuler, Felix; Imbert, Pierre-Eloi; Marelli, Anthony; Gerwin, Nicole; Sivilotti, Lucia G.; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P.; Oakeley, Edward J.; Schopfer, Ulrich; Siehler, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High throughput random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify which residues are important for the function of a protein, and gain insight into its structure-function relation. The human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was used to test whether this technique previously used for monomeric receptors can be applied to a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel. A mutant library for the α1 subunit of the channel was generated by error-prone PCR, and full length sequences of all 2816 mutants were retrieved using single molecule real time sequencing. Each α1 mutant was co-transfected with wildtype β1, δ, and ε subunits, and the channel function characterized by an ion flux assay. To test whether the strategy could map the structure-function relation of this receptor, we attempted to identify mutations that conferred resistance to competitive antagonists. Mutant hits were defined as receptors that responded to the nicotinic agonist epibatidine, but were not inhibited by either α-bungarotoxin or tubocurarine. Eight α1 subunit mutant hits were identified, six of which contained mutations at position Y233 or V275 in the transmembrane domain. Three single point mutations (Y233N, Y233H, and V275M) were studied further, and found to enhance the potencies of five channel agonists tested. This suggests that the mutations made the channel resistant to the antagonists, not by impairing antagonist binding, but rather by producing a gain-of-function phenotype, e.g. increased agonist sensitivity. Our data show that random high throughput mutagenesis is applicable to multimeric proteins to discover novel functional mutants, and outlines the benefits of using single molecule real time sequencing with regards to quality control of the mutant library as well as downstream mutant data interpretation. PMID:27649498

  17. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be

  18. Unraveling the physics of nanofluidic phenomena at the single-molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasiero, Francesco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Despite groundbreaking potential in a broad application space, several nanofluidic phenomena remain poorly understood. Toward advancing the understanding of fluid behavior under nanoscale confinement, we developed a novel, ideal platform for fundamental molecular transport studies, in which the fluidic channel is a single carbon nanotube (CNT). CNTs offer the advantage of simple chemistry and structure, which can be synthetically tuned with nanometer precision and accurately modeled. With combined experimental and computational approaches, we demonstrated that CNT pores with 1-5 nm diameters conduct giant ionic currents that follow an unusual sublinear electrolyte concentration dependence. The large magnitude of the ionic conductance appears to originate from a strong electro-osmotic flow in smooth CNT pores. First-principle simulations suggest that electro-osmotic flow arises from localized negative polarization charges on carbon atoms near a potassium (K+) ion and from the strong cation-graphitic wall interactions, which drive K+ ions much closer to the wall than chlorides (Cl-). Single-molecule translocation studies reveal that charged molecules may be distinguished from neutral species on the basis of the sign of the transient current change during their passage through the nanopore. Together with shedding light on a few controversial questions in the CNT nanofluidics area, these results may benefit LLNL’s Security Mission by providing the foundation for the development of advanced single-molecule detection system for bio/chem/explosive analytes. In addition, these experimental and computational platforms can be applied to advance fundamental knowledge in other fields, from energy storage and membrane separation to superfluid physics.

  19. Vectorial nanoscale mapping of optical antenna fields by single molecule dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anshuman; Calbris, Gaëtan; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-08-13

    Optical nanoantennas confine light on the nanoscale, enabling strong light-matter interactions and ultracompact optical devices. Such confined nanovolumes of light have nonzero field components in all directions (x, y, and z). Unfortunately mapping of the actual nanoscale field vectors has so far remained elusive, though antenna hotspots have been explored by several techniques. In this paper, we present a novel method to probe all three components of the local antenna field. To this end a resonant nanoantenna is fabricated at the vertex of a scanning tip. Next, the nanoantenna is deterministically scanned in close proximity to single fluorescent molecules, whose fixed excitation dipole moment reads out the local field vector. With nanometer molecular resolution, we distinctly map x-, y-, and z-field components of the dipole antenna, i.e. a full vectorial mode map, and show good agreement with full 3D FDTD simulations. Moreover, the fluorescence polarization maps the localized coupling, with emission through the longitudinal antenna mode. Finally, the resonant antenna probe is used for single molecule imaging with 40 nm fwhm response function. The total fluorescence enhancement is 7.6 times, while out-of-plane molecules, almost undetectable in far-field, are made visible by the strong antenna z-field with a fluorescence enhancement up to 100 times. Interestingly, the apparent position of molecules shifts up to 20 nm depending on their orientation. The capability to resolve orientational information on the single molecule level makes the scanning resonant antenna an ideal tool for extreme resolution bioimaging.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F.

    2006-08-01

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  1. Bayesian orientation estimate and structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray diffraction images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Michał; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    We developed a Bayesian method to extract macromolecular structure information from sparse single-molecule x-ray free-electron laser diffraction images. The method addresses two possible scenarios. First, using a "seed" structural model, the molecular orientation is determined for each of the provided diffraction images, which are then averaged in three-dimensional reciprocal space. Subsequently, the real space electron density is determined using a relaxed averaged alternating reflections algorithm. In the second approach, the probability that the "seed" model fits to the given set of diffraction images as a whole is determined and used to distinguish between proposed structures. We show that for a given x-ray intensity, unexpectedly, the achievable resolution increases with molecular mass such that structure determination should be more challenging for small molecules than for larger ones. For a sufficiently large number of recorded photons (>200) per diffraction image an M^{1/6} scaling is seen. Using synthetic diffraction data for a small glutathione molecule as a challenging test case, successful determination of electron density was demonstrated for 20000 diffraction patterns with random orientations and an average of 82 elastically scattered and recorded photons per image, also in the presence of up to 50% background noise. The second scenario is exemplified and assessed for three biomolecules of different sizes. In all cases, determining the probability of a structure given set of diffraction patterns allowed successful discrimination between different conformations of the test molecules. A structure model of the glutathione tripeptide was refined in a Monte Carlo simulation from a random starting conformation. Further, effective distinguishing between three differently arranged immunoglobulin domains of a titin molecule and also different states of a ribosome in a tRNA translocation process was demonstrated. These results show that the proposed method is

  2. Stoichiometry and assembly of mTOR complexes revealed by single-molecule pulldown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankur; Arauz, Edwin; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Ikon, Nikita; Chen, Jie; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-12-16

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of cellular, developmental, and metabolic processes. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is implicated in numerous human diseases including cancer and diabetes. mTOR functions as part of either of the two multisubunit complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, but molecular details about the assembly and oligomerization of mTORCs are currently lacking. We use the single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull) assay that combines principles of conventional pulldown assays with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to investigate the stoichiometry and assembly of mTORCs. After validating our approach with mTORC1, confirming a dimeric assembly as previously reported, we show that all major components of mTORC2 exist in two copies per complex, indicating that mTORC2 assembles as a homodimer. Interestingly, each mTORC component, when free from the complexes, is present as a monomer and no single subunit serves as the dimerizing component. Instead, our data suggest that dimerization of mTORCs is the result of multiple subunits forming a composite surface. SiMPull also allowed us to distinguish complex disassembly from stoichiometry changes. Physiological conditions that abrogate mTOR signaling such as nutrient deprivation or energy stress did not alter the stoichiometry of mTORCs. On the other hand, rapamycin treatment leads to transient appearance of monomeric mTORC1 before complete disruption of the mTOR-raptor interaction, whereas mTORC2 stoichiometry is unaffected. These insights into assembly of mTORCs may guide future mechanistic studies and exploration of therapeutic potential.

  3. Tracking the ultrafast motion of a single molecule by femtosecond orbital imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocker, Tyler L.; Peller, Dominik; Yu, Ping; Repp, Jascha; Huber, Rupert

    2016-11-01

    Watching a single molecule move on its intrinsic timescale has been one of the central goals of modern nanoscience, and calls for measurements that combine ultrafast temporal resolution with atomic spatial resolution. Steady-state experiments access the requisite spatial scales, as illustrated by direct imaging of individual molecular orbitals using scanning tunnelling microscopy or the acquisition of tip-enhanced Raman and luminescence spectra with sub-molecular resolution. But tracking the intrinsic dynamics of a single molecule directly in the time domain faces the challenge that interactions with the molecule must be confined to a femtosecond time window. For individual nanoparticles, such ultrafast temporal confinement has been demonstrated by combining scanning tunnelling microscopy with so-called lightwave electronics, which uses the oscillating carrier wave of tailored light pulses to directly manipulate electronic motion on timescales faster even than a single cycle of light. Here we build on ultrafast terahertz scanning tunnelling microscopy to access a state-selective tunnelling regime, where the peak of a terahertz electric-field waveform transiently opens an otherwise forbidden tunnelling channel through a single molecular state. It thereby removes a single electron from an individual pentacene molecule’s highest occupied molecular orbital within a time window shorter than one oscillation cycle of the terahertz wave. We exploit this effect to record approximately 100-femtosecond snapshot images of the orbital structure with sub-ångström spatial resolution, and to reveal, through pump/probe measurements, coherent molecular vibrations at terahertz frequencies directly in the time domain. We anticipate that the combination of lightwave electronics and the atomic resolution of our approach will open the door to visualizing ultrafast photochemistry and the operation of molecular electronics on the single-orbital scale.

  4. Peering into Cells One Molecule at a Time: Single-molecule and plasmon-enhanced fluorescence super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence brings the resolution of optical microscopy down to the nanometer scale, allowing us to unlock the mysteries of how biomolecules work together to achieve the complexity that is a cell. This high-resolution, non-destructive method for examining subcellular events has opened up an exciting new frontier: the study of macromolecular localization and dynamics in living cells. We have developed methods for single-molecule investigations of live bacterial cells, and have used these techniques to investigate thee important prokaryotic systems: membrane-bound transcription activation in Vibrio cholerae, carbohydrate catabolism in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and DNA mismatch repair in Bacillus subtilis. Each system presents unique challenges, and we will discuss the important methods developed for each system. Furthermore, we use the plasmon modes of bio-compatible metal nanoparticles to enhance the emissivity of single-molecule fluorophores. The resolution of single-molecule imaging in cells is generally limited to 20-40 nm, far worse than the 1.5-nm localization accuracies which have been attained in vitro. We use plasmonics to improve the brightness and stability of single-molecule probes, and in particular fluorescent proteins, which are widely used for bio-imaging. We find that gold-coupled fluorophores demonstrate brighter, longer-lived emission, yielding an overall enhancement in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracy for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, since fluorescence intensity is proportional to local electromagnetic field intensity, these changes in decay intensity and rate serve as a nm-scale read-out of the field intensity. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging, and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  5. Entropy Maximization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K B Athreya

    2009-09-01

    It is shown that (i) every probability density is the unique maximizer of relative entropy in an appropriate class and (ii) in the class of all pdf that satisfy $\\int fh_id_=_i$ for $i=1,2,\\ldots,\\ldots k$ the maximizer of entropy is an $f_0$ that is proportional to $\\exp(\\sum c_i h_i)$ for some choice of $c_i$. An extension of this to a continuum of constraints and many examples are presented.

  6. Single molecule dynamics in a virtual cell: a three-dimensional model that produces simulated fluorescence video-imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanov, Gregory I

    2014-09-06

    The analysis of single molecule imaging experiments is complicated by the stochastic nature of single molecule events, by instrument noise and by the limited information which can be gathered about any individual molecule observed. Consequently, it is important to cross check experimental results using a model simulating single molecule dynamics (e.g. movements and binding events) in a virtual cell-like environment. The output of such a model should match the real data format allowing researchers to compare simulated results with the real experiments. The proposed model exploits the advantages of 'object-oriented' computing. First of all, the ability to create and manipulate a number of classes, each containing an arbitrary number of single molecule objects. These classes may include objects moving within the 'cytoplasm'; objects moving at the 'plasma membrane'; and static objects located inside the 'body'. The objects of a given class can interact with each other and/or with the objects of other classes according to their physical and chemical properties. Each model run generates a sequence of images, each containing summed images of all fluorescent objects emitting light under given illumination conditions with realistic levels of noise and emission fluctuations. The model accurately reproduces reported single molecule experiments and predicts the outcome of future experiments.

  7. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L. Haas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane.

  8. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  9. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  10. Extracting physical chemistry from mechanics: a new approach to investigate DNA interactions with drugs and proteins in single molecule experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, M S

    2015-01-01

    In this review we focus on the idea of establishing connections between the mechanical properties of DNAligand complexes and the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions. This type of connection is interesting because it opens the possibility of performing a robust characterization of such interactions by using only one experimental technique: single molecule stretching. Furthermore, it also opens new possibilities in comparing results obtained by very different approaches, in special when comparing single molecule techniques to ensemble-averaging techniques. We start the manuscript reviewing important concepts of the DNA mechanics, from the basic mechanical properties to the Worm-Like Chain model. Next we review the basic concepts of the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions, revisiting the most important models used to analyze the binding data and discussing their binding isotherms. Then, we discuss the basic features of the single molecule techniques most used to stretch the DNA-ligand complex...

  11. Plasmonic antennas and zero mode waveguides to enhance single molecule fluorescence detection and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy towards physiological concentrations

    CERN Document Server

    Punj, Deep; Moparthi, Satish Babu; de Torres, Juan; Grigoriev, Victor; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule approaches to biology offer a powerful new vision to elucidate the mechanisms that underpin the functioning of living cells. However, conventional optical single molecule spectroscopy techniques such as F\\"orster fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are limited by diffraction to the nanomolar concentration range, far below the physiological micromolar concentration range where most biological reaction occur. To breach the diffraction limit, zero mode waveguides and plasmonic antennas exploit the surface plasmon resonances to confine and enhance light down to the nanometre scale. The ability of plasmonics to achieve extreme light concentration unlocks an enormous potential to enhance fluorescence detection, FRET and FCS. Single molecule spectroscopy techniques greatly benefit from zero mode waveguides and plasmonic antennas to enter a new dimension of molecular concentration reaching physiological conditions. The application of nano-optics...

  12. The role of molecular dipole orientation in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and implications for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Mikael P; Lew, Matthew D; Backer, Adam S; Sahl, Steffen J; Moerner, W E

    2014-03-17

    Numerous methods for determining the orientation of single-molecule transition dipole moments from microscopic images of the molecular fluorescence have been developed in recent years. At the same time, techniques that rely on nanometer-level accuracy in the determination of molecular position, such as single-molecule super-resolution imaging, have proven immensely successful in their ability to access unprecedented levels of detail and resolution previously hidden by the optical diffraction limit. However, the level of accuracy in the determination of position is threatened by insufficient treatment of molecular orientation. Here we review a number of methods for measuring molecular orientation using fluorescence microscopy, focusing on approaches that are most compatible with position estimation and single-molecule super-resolution imaging. We highlight recent methods based on quadrated pupil imaging and on double-helix point spread function microscopy and apply them to the study of fluorophore mobility on immunolabeled microtubules.

  13. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  14. Modeling single molecule junction mechanics as a probe of interface bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-03-01

    Using the atomic force microscope based break junction approach, applicable to metal point contacts and single molecule junctions, measurements can be repeated thousands of times resulting in rich data sets characterizing the properties of an ensemble of nanoscale junction structures. This paper focuses on the relationship between the measured force extension characteristics including bond rupture and the properties of the interface bonds in the junction. A set of exemplary model junction structures has been analyzed using density functional theory based calculations to simulate the adiabatic potential surface that governs the junction elongation. The junction structures include representative molecules that bond to the electrodes through amine, methylsulfide, and pyridine links. The force extension characteristics are shown to be most effectively analyzed in a scaled form with maximum sustainable force and the distance between the force zero and force maximum as scale factors. Widely used, two parameter models for chemical bond potential energy versus bond length are found to be nearly identical in scaled form. Furthermore, they fit well to the present calculations of N-Au and S-Au donor-acceptor bonds, provided no other degrees of freedom are allowed to relax. Examination of the reduced problem of a single interface, but including relaxation of atoms proximal to the interface bond, shows that a single-bond potential form renormalized by an effective harmonic potential in series fits well to the calculated results. This allows relatively accurate extraction of the interface bond energy. Analysis of full junction models shows cooperative effects that go beyond the mechanical series inclusion of the second bond in the junction, the spectator bond that does not rupture. Calculations for a series of diaminoalkanes as a function of molecule length indicate that the most important cooperative effect is due to the interactions between the dipoles induced by the donor

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on cell-matrix interactions at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, Florian

    2015-04-20

    Single molecule microscopy is a technology that allows for accurate assessment of the location and motion of single fluorescent molecules, even in the context of observations on living biological samples. In the present thesis, a flexible analysis tool for single molecule data as obtained in biological experiments was established. The development of a tool to faithfully detect and localize diffraction-limited images of individual fluorescent probes was necessary since data acquired under cell cultivation conditions that account for a three-dimensional microenvironment as experienced physiologically by cells in native tissue poses a challenge not faced ordinarily. After design, implementation, quantitative tests using simulations for comparisons and verification, and evaluation of the different steps of the analysis procedure including local background estimation, local noise estimation, de-noising approaches, detection, localization, and post-processing, analysis capabilities were utilized to evaluate the impact of x-ray irradiation on the plasma membrane architecture of U2OS human osteosarcoma cells as assessed by tracking individual fluorescent lipid-mimetic dye molecules diffusing in the outer membrane leaflet. It was shown that lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane is well described as two-phase anomalous subdiffusion and presence of 3D extracellular matrix leads to lower anomalous exponents of the fast fraction in comparison to monolayer cell culture. Interestingly, even high single-dose (25 Gy) treatments known to induce membrane-mediated apoptosis in tumor microvessel endothelium via membrane viscosity enhancing ceramide generation were not observed to alter membrane architecture in U2OS cells which can be related to amplifying, feedback-driven redox-signaling in the endothelium absent in U2OS. In summary, the sensitive and accurate framework developed in this thesis to assess minute changes of plasma membrane located dynamic processes did not uncover a

  16. Electron Transport, Energy Transfer, and Optical Response in Single Molecule Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander James

    The last decade has seen incredible growth in the quality of experiments being done on single molecule junctions. Contemporary experimental measurements have expanded far beyond simple electron transport. Measurement of vibronic eects, quantum interference and decoherence eects, molecular optical response (Raman spectroscopy), and molecular spintronics are just some of the continuing areas of research in single molecule junctions. Experimental advancements demand advanced theoretical treatments, which can be used accurately within appropriate physical regimes, in order to understand measured phenomena and predict interesting directions for future study. In this dissertation we will study systems with strong intra-system interactions using a many-body states based approach. We will be focused on three related processes in molecular junctions: electron transport, electronic energy transfer, and molecular excitation. Inelastic electron transport in the regime of strong and nonlinear electron-vibration coupling within and outside of the Born-Oppenheimer regime will be investigated. To understand their appropriateness, we will compare simple semi-classical approximations in molecular redox junctions and electron-counting devices to fully quantum calculations based on many-body system states. The role of coherence and quantum interference in energy and electron transfer in molecular junctions is explored. Experiments that simultaneously measure surface enhanced Raman scattering and electron conduction have revealed a strong interaction between conducting electrons and molecular excitation. We investigate the role of the molecular response to a classical surface plasmon enhanced electric eld considering the back action of the oscillating molecular dipole. Raman scattering is quantum mechanical by nature and involves strong interaction between surface plasmons in the contacts and the molecular excitation. We develop a scheme for treating strong plasmon-molecular excitation

  17. FRETBursts: An Open Source Toolkit for Analysis of Freely-Diffusing Single-Molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Lerner, Eitan; Chung, SangYoon; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) allows probing intermolecular interactions and conformational changes in biomacromolecules, and represents an invaluable tool for studying cellular processes at the molecular scale. smFRET experiments can detect the distance between two fluorescent labels (donor and acceptor) in the 3-10 nm range. In the commonly employed confocal geometry, molecules are free to diffuse in solution. When a molecule traverses the excitation volume, it emits a burst of photons, which can be detected by single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors. The intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence can then be related to the distance between the two fluorophores. While recent years have seen a growing number of contributions proposing improvements or new techniques in smFRET data analysis, rarely have those publications been accompanied by software implementation. In particular, despite the widespread application of smFRET, no complete software package for smFRET burst analysis is freely available to date. In this paper, we introduce FRETBursts, an open source software for analysis of freely-diffusing smFRET data. FRETBursts allows executing all the fundamental steps of smFRET bursts analysis using state-of-the-art as well as novel techniques, while providing an open, robust and well-documented implementation. Therefore, FRETBursts represents an ideal platform for comparison and development of new methods in burst analysis. We employ modern software engineering principles in order to minimize bugs and facilitate long-term maintainability. Furthermore, we place a strong focus on reproducibility by relying on Jupyter notebooks for FRETBursts execution. Notebooks are executable documents capturing all the steps of the analysis (including data files, input parameters, and results) and can be easily shared to replicate complete smFRET analyzes. Notebooks allow beginners to execute complex workflows and advanced users to

  18. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted Alfred

    2002-07-30

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  19. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted Alfred [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  20. Time resolved single molecule spectroscopy of semiconductor quantum dot/conjugated organic hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoi, Michael Yemoh

    Single molecule studies on CdSe quantum dots functionalized with oligo-phenylene vinylene ligands (CdSe-OPV) provide evidence of strong electronic communication that facilitate charge and energy transport between the OPV ligands and the CdSe quantum dot core. This electronic interaction greatly modify, the photoluminescence properties of both bulk and single CdSe-OPV nanostructure thin film samples. Size-correlated wide-field fluorescence imaging show that blinking suppression in single CdSe-OPV is linked to the degree of OPV coverage (inferred from AFM height scans) on the quantum dot surface. The effect of the complex electronic environment presented by photoexcited OPV ligands on the excited state property of CdSe-OPV is measured with single photon counting and photon-pair correlation spectroscopy techniques. Time-tagged-time-resolved (TTTR) single photon counting measurements from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures, show excited state lifetimes an order of magnitude shorter relative to conventional ZnS/CdSe quantum dots. Second-order intensity correlation measurements g(2)(tau) from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures point to a weak multi-excitonic character with a strong wavelength dependent modulation depth. By tuning in and out of the absorption of the OPV ligands we observe changes in modulation depth from g(2) (0) ≈ 0.2 to 0.05 under 405 and 514 nm excitation respectively. Defocused images and polarization anisotropy measurements also reveal a well-defined linear dipole emission pattern in single CdSe-OPV nanostructures. These results provide new insights into to the mechanism behind the electronic interactions in composite quantum dot/conjugated organic composite systems at the single molecule level. The observed intensity flickering , blinking suppression and associated lifetime/count rate and antibunching behaviour is well explained by a Stark interaction model. Charge transfer from photo-excitation of the OPV ligands to the surface of the Cd

  1. DNA origami based Au-Ag-core-shell nanoparticle dimers with single-molecule SERS sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, J.; Heck, C.; Ellerik, L.; Merk, V.; Bald, I.

    2016-03-01

    DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled.DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about materials and methods, designs of DNA origami templates, height profiles, additional SERS spectra, assignment of DNA

  2. Single molecule FRET data analysis procedures for FRET efficiency determination: probing the conformations of nucleic acid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Asger Christian; Birkedal, Victoria

    2013-11-01

    Single molecule FRET microscopy is an attractive technique for studying structural dynamics and conformational diversity of nucleic acid structures. Some of its strengths are that it can follow structural changes on a fast time scale and identify conformation distributions arising from dynamic or static population heterogeneity. Here, we give a description of the experiment and data analysis procedures of this method and detail what parameters are needed for FRET efficiency calculation. Using single molecule FRET data obtained on G-quadruplex DNA structures that exhibit large conformation diversity, we illustrate that the shape of the FRET distribution changes depending on what parameters are included in the data analysis procedure.

  3. Proton Pumping and Slippage Dynamics of a Eukaryotic P-Type ATPase Studied at the Single-Molecule Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veshaguri, Salome

    In all eukaryotes the plasma membrane potential and secondary transport systems are energized by P-type ATPases whose regulation however remains poorly understood. Here we monitored at the single-molecule level the activity of the prototypic proton pumping P-type ATPase Arabidopsis thaliana isoform......-intuitively increased the time spent pumping. Allosteric regulation by pH gradients affected the time spent pumping and the leakage probability but surprisingly not the intrinsic pumping rate. Interestingly, ATP dilution decreased the ATP hydrolysis rates in bulk while single molecule data revealed that intrinsic...

  4. Go-and-Back method: Effective estimation of the hidden motion of proteins from single-molecule time series

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, Makito

    2010-01-01

    We present an effective method for estimating the motion of proteins from the motion of attached probe particles in single-molecule experiments. The framework naturally incorporates Langevin dynamics to compute the most probable trajectory of the protein. By using a perturbation expansion technique, we achieve computational costs more than four orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional gradient descent method without loss of simplicity in the computation algorithm. We present illustrative applications of the method using simple models of single-molecule experiments and confirm that the proposed method yields reasonable estimates of the hidden motion in a highly efficient manner.

  5. Optical mapping of a rice B AC clone using restriction endonuclease and imaging with fluorescent microscopy at single molecule level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A method of constructing restriction map by optical mapping and single molecule fluorescent microscopy is described. DNA molecules were aligned and adsorbed on a glass coverslip surface by a mbdified "molecular combing"technique, and then the surface-immobilized DNAs were cleaved in situ with a restriction endonuclease. Individual DNA molecules digested by the endonuclease EcoR I were observable with fluorescent microscopy. Using optical mapping, a physical map of a rice bacterial artificial chromosome clone was constructed. This method will facilitate genomic mapping and tracing the dynamic process in real time at a single molecule level with fluorescence microscopy.

  6. In situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes: linking basic nanotechniques to cell biology, immunology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Chen, Zheng W; Cai, Jiye

    2014-11-01

    The cell membrane, which consists of a viscous phospholipid bilayer, different kinds of proteins and various nano/micrometer-sized domains, plays a very important role in ensuring the stability of the intracellular environment and the order of cellular signal transductions. Exploring the precise cell membrane structure and detailed functions of the biomolecules in a cell membrane would be helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms involved in cell membrane signal transductions, which could further benefit research into cell biology, immunology and medicine. The detection of membrane biomolecules at the single molecule level can provide some subtle information about the molecular structure and the functions of the cell membrane. In particular, information obtained about the molecular mechanisms and other information at the single molecule level are significantly different from that detected from a large amount of biomolecules at the large-scale through traditional techniques, and can thus provide a novel perspective for the study of cell membrane structures and functions. However, the precise investigations of membrane biomolecules prompts researchers to explore cell membranes at the single molecule level by the use of in situ imaging methods, as the exact conformation and functions of biomolecules are highly controlled by the native cellular environment. Recently, the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes has attracted increasing attention from cell biologists and immunologists. The size of biomolecules and their clusters on the cell surface are set at the nanoscale, which makes it mandatory to use high- and super-resolution imaging techniques to realize the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In the past few decades, some amazing imaging techniques and instruments with super resolution have been widely developed for molecule imaging, which can also be further employed for the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In

  7. Protein nanopore-based, single-molecule exploration of copper binding to an antimicrobial-derived, histidine-containing chimera peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereuta, Loredana; Schiopu, Irina; Asandei, Alina; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Luchian, Tudor

    2012-12-11

    Metal ions binding exert a crucial influence upon the aggregation properties and stability of peptides, and the propensity of folding in various substates. Herein, we demonstrate the use of the α-HL protein as a powerful nanoscopic tool to probe Cu(2+)-triggered physicochemical changes of a 20 aminoacids long, antimicrobial-derived chimera peptide with a His residue as metal-binding site, and simultaneously dissect the kinetics of the free- and Cu(2+)-bound peptide interaction to the α-HL pore. Combining single-molecule electrophysiology on reconstituted lipid membranes and fluorescence spectroscopy, we show that the association rate constant between the α-HL pore and a Cu(2+)-free peptide is higher than that of a Cu(2+)-complexed peptide. We posit that mainly due to conformational changes induced by the bound Cu(2+) on the peptide, the resulting complex encounters a higher energy barrier toward its association with the protein pore, stemming most likely from an extra entropy cost needed to fit the Cu(2+)-complexed peptide within the α-HL lumen region. The lower dissociation rate constant of the Cu(2+)-complexed peptide from α-HL pore, as compared to that of Cu(2+)-free peptide, supports the existence of a deeper free energy well for the protein interaction with a Cu(2+)-complexed peptide, which may be indicative of specific Cu(2+)-mediated contributions to the binding of the Cu(2+)-complexed peptide within the pore lumen.

  8. Expectation-maximization of the potential of mean force and diffusion coefficient in Langevin dynamics from single molecule FRET data photon by photon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kevin R; Yang, Haw; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2013-12-12

    The dynamics of a protein along a well-defined coordinate can be formally projected onto the form of an overdamped Lagevin equation. Here, we present a comprehensive statistical-learning framework for simultaneously quantifying the deterministic force (the potential of mean force, PMF) and the stochastic force (characterized by the diffusion coefficient, D) from single-molecule Förster-type resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments. The likelihood functional of the Langevin parameters, PMF and D, is expressed by a path integral of the latent smFRET distance that follows Langevin dynamics and realized by the donor and the acceptor photon emissions. The solution is made possible by an eigen decomposition of the time-symmetrized form of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation coupled with photon statistics. To extract the Langevin parameters from photon arrival time data, we advance the expectation-maximization algorithm in statistical learning, originally developed for and mostly used in discrete-state systems, to a general form in the continuous space that allows for a variational calculus on the continuous PMF function. We also introduce the regularization of the solution space in this Bayesian inference based on a maximum trajectory-entropy principle. We use a highly nontrivial example with realistically simulated smFRET data to illustrate the application of this new method.

  9. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Fahad; Harris, Paul D; Zaher, Manal S; Sobhy, Mohamed A; Joudeh, Luay I; Yan, Chunli; Piwonski, Hubert; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tainer, John A; Habuchi, Satoshi; Hamdan, Samir M

    2017-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5’nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5’nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually ‘locks’ protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21884.001 PMID:28230529

  10. Nanomechanical Characterization of Amyloid Fibrils Using Single-Molecule Experiments and Computational Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumjoon Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils have recently received much attention due to not only their important role in disease pathogenesis but also their excellent mechanical properties, which are comparable to those of mechanically strong protein materials such as spider silk. This indicates the necessity of understanding fundamental principles providing insight into how amyloid fibrils exhibit the excellent mechanical properties, which may allow for developing biomimetic materials whose material (e.g., mechanical properties can be controlled. Here, we describe recent efforts to characterize the nanomechanical properties of amyloid fibrils using computational simulations (e.g., atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments (e.g., atomic force microscopy experiments. This paper summarizes theoretical models, which are useful in analyzing the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils based on simulations and experiments, such as continuum elastic (beam model, elastic network model, and polymer statistical model. In this paper, we suggest how the nanomechanical properties of amyloid fibrils can be characterized and determined using computational simulations and/or atomic force microscopy experiments coupled with the theoretical models.

  11. Resolving the complexity of the human genome using single-molecule sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Huddleston, John; Dennis, Megan Y; Sudmant, Peter H; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Antonacci, Francesca; Surti, Urvashi; Sandstrom, Richard; Boitano, Matthew; Landolin, Jane M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-01-29

    The human genome is arguably the most complete mammalian reference assembly, yet more than 160 euchromatic gaps remain and aspects of its structural variation remain poorly understood ten years after its completion. To identify missing sequence and genetic variation, here we sequence and analyse a haploid human genome (CHM1) using single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing. We close or extend 55% of the remaining interstitial gaps in the human GRCh37 reference genome--78% of which carried long runs of degenerate short tandem repeats, often several kilobases in length, embedded within (G+C)-rich genomic regions. We resolve the complete sequence of 26,079 euchromatic structural variants at the base-pair level, including inversions, complex insertions and long tracts of tandem repeats. Most have not been previously reported, with the greatest increases in sensitivity occurring for events less than 5 kilobases in size. Compared to the human reference, we find a significant insertional bias (3:1) in regions corresponding to complex insertions and long short tandem repeats. Our results suggest a greater complexity of the human genome in the form of variation of longer and more complex repetitive DNA that can now be largely resolved with the application of this longer-read sequencing technology.

  12. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction.

  13. A versatile low-temperature setup for the electrical characterization of single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Christian A. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Smit, Roel H. M.; Egmond, Ruud van; Ruitenbeek, Jan M. van [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Zant, Herre S. J. van der [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    We present a modular high-vacuum setup for the electrical characterization of single molecules down to liquid helium temperatures. The experimental design is based on microfabricated mechanically controllable break junctions, which offer control over the distance of two electrodes via the bending of a flexible substrate. The actuator part of the setup is divided into two stages. The slow stage is based on a differential screw drive with a large bending range. An amplified piezoceramic actuator forms the fast stage of the setup, which can operate at bending speeds of up to 800 {mu}m/s. In our microfabricated break junctions this is translated into breaking speeds of several 10 nm/s, sufficient for the fast acquisition of large statistical datasets. The bandwidth of the measurement electronics has been optimized to enable fast dI/dV spectroscopy on molecular junctions with resistances up to 100 M{Omega}. The performance of the setup is demonstrated for a {pi}-conjugated oligo(phenylene-ethynylene)-dithiol molecule.

  14. Single-Molecule Approaches for the Characterization of Riboswitch Folding Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, Julien; Perez-Gonzalez, D Cibran; Penedo, J Carlos; Lafontaine, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are highly structured RNA molecules that control genetic expression by altering their structure as a function of metabolite binding. Accumulating evidence suggests that riboswitch structures are highly dynamic and perform conformational exchange between structural states that are important for the outcome of genetic regulation. To understand how ligand binding influences the folding of riboswitches, it is important to monitor in real time the riboswitch folding pathway as a function of experimental conditions. Single-molecule FRET (sm-FRET) is unique among biophysical techniques to study riboswitch conformational changes as it allows to both monitor steady-state populations of riboswitch conformers and associated interconversion dynamics. Since FRET fluorophores can be attached to virtually any nucleotide position, FRET assays can be adapted to monitor specific conformational changes, thus enabling to deduce complex riboswitch folding pathways. Herein, we show how to employ sm-FRET to study the folding pathway of the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and how this can be used to understand very specific conformational changes that are at the heart of riboswitch regulation mechanism.

  15. Assaying the binding strength of G-quadruplex ligands using single-molecule TPM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Wei; Chu, Jen-Fei; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fang, Hung-Chih; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-15

    G-quadruplexes are stable secondary structures formed by Hoogsteen base pairing of guanine-rich single-stranded DNA sequences in the presence of monovalent cations (Na(+) or K(+)). Folded G-quadruplex (G4) structures in human telomeres have been proposed as a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we used single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments to assay the binding strength of possible G4 ligands. We found that individual single-stranded DNA molecules containing the human telomeric sequence d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] fluctuated between the folded and the unfolded states in a 10 mM Na(+) solution at 37 °C. The durations of folded and unfolded states were single-exponentially distributed, and in return the folding and unfolding rate constants were 1.68 ± 0.01 and 1.63 ± 0.03 (s(-1)), respectively. In the presence of G4 ligands, such as TMPyP4, DODCI, BMVC, and BMVPA, the unfolding rate constant decreased appreciably. In addition, combining the Cu(2+)-induced G4 unfolding and TPM assay, we showed that BMVC and TMPyP4 are better G4 stabilizers than DODCI. The capability of monitoring the fluctuation between the folded and the unfolded state of G4 DNA in real time allows the determination of both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in a single measurement and offers a simple way to assay binding strength under various conditions.

  16. Two-Coordinate Co(II) Imido Complexes as Outstanding Single-Molecule Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiao-Nan; Du, Jing-Zhen; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Leng, Xue-Bing; Yang, Mu-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Da; Wang, Zhen-Xing; Ouyang, Zhong-Wen; Deng, Liang; Wang, Bing-Wu; Gao, Song

    2017-01-11

    The pursuit of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with better performance urges new molecular design that can endow SMMs larger magnetic anisotropy. Here we report that two-coordinate cobalt imido complexes featuring highly covalent Co═N cores exhibit slow relaxation of magnetization under zero direct-current field with a high effective relaxation barrier up to 413 cm(-1), a new record for transition metal based SMMs. Two theoretical models were carried out to investigate the anisotropy of these complexes: single-ion model and Co-N coupling model. The former indicates that the pseudo linear ligand field helps to preserve the first-order orbital momentum, while the latter suggests that the strong ferromagnetic interaction between Co and N makes the [CoN](+) fragment a pseudo single paramagnetic ion, and that the excellent performance of these cobalt imido SMMs is attributed to the inherent large magnetic anisotropy of the [CoN](+) core with |MJ = ± 7/2⟩ ground Kramers doublet.

  17. Single-molecule spectroscopy on RC-LH1 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Paul S; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2013-03-21

    We have revisited the RC-LH1 complex from Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) acidophila for single-molecule spectroscopy. For the current study the pigment-protein complexes were stabilized in the detergent buffer solution using a relatively mild detergent (dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM) instead of lauryldimethylamine N-oxide (LDAO)). This leads to a significant reduction of the fraction of broken/dissociated RC-LH1 complexes with respect to previous studies and has allowed us to investigate a sufficiently large sample of individual RC-LH1 complexes. For most of the complexes the fluorescence-excitation spectra exhibit a narrow spectral feature at the red end of the spectrum. Analysis of the statistics of the spectral properties yields a close resemblance with the results obtained on RC-LH1 complexes from Rps. palustris for which a low-resolution X-ray structure is available. Based on this comparison we come to the conclusion that for both species the RC-LH1 complex can be described by the same structural model, that is, an overall elliptical assembly of pigments that features a gap.

  18. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals photosynthetic LH2 complexes switch between emissive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Wang, Quan; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Moerner, W E

    2013-07-01

    Photosynthetic organisms flourish under low light intensities by converting photoenergy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency and under high light intensities by safely dissipating excess photoenergy and deleterious photoproducts. The molecular mechanisms balancing these two functions remain incompletely described. One critical barrier to characterizing the mechanisms responsible for these processes is that they occur within proteins whose excited-state properties vary drastically among individual proteins and even within a single protein over time. In ensemble measurements, these excited-state properties appear only as the average value. To overcome this averaging, we investigate the purple bacterial antenna protein light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila at the single-protein level. We use a room-temperature, single-molecule technique, the anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap, to study LH2 in a solution-phase (nonperturbative) environment. By performing simultaneous measurements of fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and spectra of single LH2 complexes, we identify three distinct states and observe transitions occurring among them on a timescale of seconds. Our results reveal that LH2 complexes undergo photoactivated switching to a quenched state, likely by a conformational change, and thermally revert to the ground state. This is a previously unobserved, reversible quenching pathway, and is one mechanism through which photosynthetic organisms can adapt to changes in light intensities.

  19. Design principles of natural light-harvesting as revealed by single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krüger, T.P.J., E-mail: tjaart.kruger@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Grondelle, R. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Biology offers a boundless source of adaptation, innovation, and inspiration. A wide range of photosynthetic organisms exist that are capable of harvesting solar light in an exceptionally efficient way, using abundant and low-cost materials. These natural light-harvesting complexes consist of proteins that strongly bind a high density of chromophores to capture solar photons and rapidly transfer the excitation energy to the photochemical reaction centre. The amount of harvested light is also delicately tuned to the level of solar radiation to maintain a constant energy throughput at the reaction centre and avoid the accumulation of the products of charge separation. In this Review, recent developments in the understanding of light-harvesting by plants will be discussed, based on results obtained from single molecule spectroscopy studies. Three design principles of the main light-harvesting antenna of plants will be highlighted: (a) fine, photoactive control over the intrinsic protein disorder to efficiently use intrinsically available thermal energy dissipation mechanisms; (b) the design of the protein microenvironment of a low-energy chromophore dimer to control the amount of shade absorption; (c) the design of the exciton manifold to ensure efficient funneling of the harvested light to the terminal emitter cluster.

  20. Single-Molecule Analysis of Protein Large-Amplitude Conformational Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have evolved to harness thermal fluctuations, rather than frustrated by them, to carry out chemical transformations and mechanical work. What are, then, the operation and design principles of protein machines? To frame the problem in a tractable way, several basic questions have been formulated to guide the experimental design: (a) How many conformational states can a protein sample on the functionally important timescale? (b) What are the inter-conversion rates between states? (c) How do ligand binding or interactions with other proteins modulate the motions? (d) What are the structural basis of flexibility and its underlying molecular mechanics? Guided by this framework, we have studied protein tyrosine phosphatase B, PtpB, from M. tuberculosis (a virulence factor of tuberculosis and a potential drug target) and adenylate kinase, AK, from E. coli (a ubiquitous energy-balancing enzyme in cells). These domain movements have been followed in real time on their respective catalytic timescales using high-resolution single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. It is shown quantitatively that both PtpB and AK are capable of dynamically sampling two distinct states that correlate well with those observed by x-ray crystallography. Integrating these microscopic dynamics into macroscopic kinetics allows us to place the experimentally measured free-energy landscape in the context of enzymatic turnovers.

  1. A Multicolor Single-Molecule FRET Approach to Study Protein Dynamics and Interactions Simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, M; Wortmann, P; Schmid, S; Hugel, T

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is a versatile tool for studying biomolecules in a quantitative manner. Multiple conformations within and interactions between biomolecules can be detected and their kinetics can be determined. Thus, smFRET has become an essential tool in enzymology. Ordinary two-color smFRET experiments can provide only limited insight into the function of biological systems, which commonly consist of more than two components. A complete understanding of complex multicomponent biological systems requires correlated information on conformational rearrangements on the one hand and transient interactions with binding partners on the other. Multicolor smFRET experiments enable the direct observation of such correlated dynamics and interactions. Here we demonstrate the power and limitations of multicolor smFRET experiments including the description of a multicolor smFRET setup and data analysis. A general analytical procedure for multicolor smFRET data is presented and applied to the multicomponent heat shock protein 90 system. This allows us to identify microscopic states in transient complexes. Conformational dynamics and nucleotide binding are simultaneously detected, which is impossible using two-color smFRET. Additionally, their correlation is quantified using 3D ensemble hidden Markov analysis, in and out of equilibrium. This method is perfectly suited for protein systems that are much more sophisticated than previously studied DNA-based systems. By extending the application to biologically relevant systems, multicolor smFRET comes of age and provides a unique mechanistic insight into protein machines.

  2. Transport through artificial single-molecule magnets:Spin-pair state sequential tunneling and Kondo effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Peng-Bin; Wang Qiang; Nie Yi-Hang

    2013-01-01

    The transport properties of an artificial single-molecule magnet based on a CdTe quantum dot doped with a single Mn+2 ion (S =5/2) are investigated by the non-equilibrium Green function method.We consider a minimal model where the Mn-hole exchange coupling is strongly anisotropic so that spin-flip is suppressed and the impurity spin S and a hole spin s entering the quantum dot are coupled into spin pair states with (2S+ 1) sublevels.In the sequential tunneling regime,the differential conductance exhibits (2S + 1) possible peaks,corresponding to resonance tunneling via (2S + 1) sublevels.At low temperature,Kondo physics dominates transport and (2S + 1) Kondo peaks occur in the local density of states and conductance.These peaks originate from the spin-singlet state formed by the holes in the leads and on the dot via higher-order processes and are related to the parallel and antiparallel spin pair states.

  3. Understanding spin structure in metallacrown single-molecule magnets using magnetic compton scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Aniruddha; Boron, Thaddeus T; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Mallah, Talal; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Penner-Hahn, James E

    2014-04-02

    The 3d-4f mixed metallacrowns frequently show single-molecule magnetic behavior. We have used magnetic Compton scattering to characterize the spin structure and orbital interactions in three isostructural metallacrowns: Gd2Mn4, Dy2Mn4, and Y2Mn4. These data allow the direct determination of the spin only contribution to the overall magnetic moment. We find that the lanthanide 4f spin in Gd2Mn4 and Dy2Mn4 is aligned parallel to the Mn 3d spin. For Y2Mn4 (manganese-only spin) we find evidence for spin delocalization into the O 2p orbitals. Comparing the magnetic Compton scattering data with SQUID studies that measure the total magnetic moment suggests that Gd2Mn4 and Y2Mn4 have only a small orbital contribution to the moment. In contrast, the total magnetic moment for Dy2Mn4 MCs is much larger than the spin-only moment, demonstrating a significant orbital contribution to the overall magnetic moment. Overall, these data provide direct insight into the correlation of molecular design with molecular magnetic properties.

  4. Low-Temperature Magnetic Force Microscopy on Single Molecule Magnet-Based Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serri, Michele; Mannini, Matteo; Poggini, Lorenzo; Vélez-Fort, Emilio; Cortigiani, Brunetto; Sainctavit, Philippe; Rovai, Donella; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2017-03-08

    The magnetic properties of some single molecule magnets (SMM) on surfaces can be strongly modified by the molecular packing in nanometric films/aggregates or by interactions with the substrate, which affect the molecular orientation and geometry. Detailed investigations of the magnetism of thin SMM films and nanostructures are necessary for the development of spin-based molecular devices, however this task is challenged by the limited sensitivity of laboratory-based magnetometric techniques and often requires access to synchrotron light sources to perform surface sensitive X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) investigations. Here we show that low-temperature magnetic force microscopy is an alternative powerful laboratory tool able to extract the field dependence of the magnetization and to identify areas of in-plane and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in microarrays of the SMM terbium(III) bis-phthalocyaninato (TbPc2) neutral complex grown as nanosized films on SiO2 and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), and this is in agreement with data extracted from nonlocal XMCD measurements performed on homogeneous TbPc2/PTCDA films.

  5. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  6. A single molecule study of a fluorescently labeled telomestatin derivative and G-quadruplex interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Parastoo; Ma, Yue; Iida, Keisuke; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Balci, Hamza

    2017-01-01

    The potential use of G-quadruplex (GQ) stabilizing small molecules as anti-cancer drugs has created a flurry of activity on various aspects of these molecules. Telomestatin and oxazole telomestatin derivatives (OTD) are some of the most prominent of such molecules, yet the underlying dynamics of their interactions with GQ and the extent of heterogeneities in these interactions are not known. We performed single molecule measurements to study binding kinetics, rotational freedom, and dwell time distributions of a Cy5-labeled OTD (L1Cy5–7OTD) as it interacted with several different GQ structures. Our measurements show that L1Cy5–7OTD dwells on more stable GQ for longer times and binds to such GQ with higher frequency. The dwell times showed a broad distribution, but were longer than a minute for a significant fraction of molecules (characteristic dwell time τ = 192 ± 15 s and τ = 98 ± 15 s for the more and less stable GQ, respectively). In addition, L1Cy5–7OTD might be able to bind to GQ in at least two different primary orientations and occasionally transition between these orientations. The dwell time in one of these orientations was significantly longer than that in the other one, suggesting different stabilities for different binding orientations. PMID:27899628

  7. Complete architecture of the archaeal RNA polymerase open complex from single-molecule FRET and NPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Julia; Grohmann, Dina; Cheung, Alan C. M.; Schulz, Sarah; Smollett, Katherine; Werner, Finn; Michaelis, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The molecular architecture of RNAP II-like transcription initiation complexes remains opaque due to its conformational flexibility and size. Here we report the three-dimensional architecture of the complete open complex (OC) composed of the promoter DNA, TATA box-binding protein (TBP), transcription factor B (TFB), transcription factor E (TFE) and the 12-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. By combining single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer and the Bayesian parameter estimation-based Nano-Positioning System analysis, we model the entire archaeal OC, which elucidates the path of the non-template DNA (ntDNA) strand and interaction sites of the transcription factors with the RNAP. Compared with models of the eukaryotic OC, the TATA DNA region with TBP and TFB is positioned closer to the surface of the RNAP, likely providing the mechanism by which DNA melting can occur in a minimal factor configuration, without the dedicated translocase/helicase encoding factor TFIIH.

  8. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE3, while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc, methyl sulfide (SMe, pyridyl (Py and amine (NH2. The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current–voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green’s function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings.

  9. Chemical polyglycosylation and nanolitre detection enables single-molecule recapitulation of bacterial sugar export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbing; Almond, Andrew; Bayley, Hagan; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2016-05-01

    The outermost protective layer of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is composed of bacterial capsular polysaccharides. Insights into the interactions between the capsular polysaccharide and its transporter and the mechanism of sugar export would not only increase our understanding of this key process, but would also help in the design of novel therapeutics to block capsular polysaccharide export. Here, we report a nanolitre detection system that makes use of the bilayer interface between two droplets, and we use this system to study single-molecule recapitulation of sugar export. A synthetic strategy of polyglycosylation based on tetrasaccharide monomers enables ready synthetic access to extended fragments of K30 oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Examination of the interactions between the Escherichia coli sugar transporter Wza and very small amounts of fragments of the K30 capsular polysaccharide substrate reveal the translocation of smaller but not larger fragments. We also observe capture events that occur only on the intracellular side of Wza, which would complement coordinated feeding by adjunct biosynthetic machinery.

  10. Single molecule fluorescence imaging as a technique for barium tagging in neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. J. P.; McDonald, A. D.; Nygren, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Background rejection is key to success for future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. To achieve sensitivity to effective Majorana lifetimes of ~ 1028 years, backgrounds must be controlled to better than 0.1 count per ton per year, beyond the reach of any present technology. In this paper we propose a new method to identify the birth of the barium daughter ion in the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The method adapts Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging, a technique from biochemistry research with demonstrated single ion sensitivity. We explore possible SMFI dyes suitable for the problem of barium ion detection in high pressure xenon gas, and develop a fiber-coupled sensing system with which we can detect the presence of bulk Ba++ ions remotely. We show that our sensor produces signal-to-background ratios as high as 85 in response to Ba++ ions when operated in aqueous solution. We then describe the next stage of this R&D program, which will be to demonstrate chelation and fluorescence in xenon gas. If a successful barium ion tag can be developed using SMFI adapted for high pressure xenon gas detectors, the first essentially zero background, ton-scale neutrinoless double beta decay technology could be realized.

  11. Single-molecule FRET reveals hidden complexity in a protein energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M; Rowling, Pamela J E; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2015-01-06

    Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured "safety pin" or "staple" from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated.

  12. Single Molecule Investigation of Kinesin-1 Motility Using Engineered Microtubule Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramlich, Michael W.; Conway, Leslie; Liang, Winnie H.; Labastide, Joelle A.; King, Stephen J.; Xu, Jing; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the microtubule is tightly regulated in cells via a number of microtubule associated proteins and enzymes. Microtubules accumulate structural defects during polymerization, and defect size can further increase under mechanical stresses. Intriguingly, microtubule defects have been shown to be targeted for removal via severing enzymes or self-repair. The cell’s control in defect removal suggests that defects can impact microtubule-based processes, including molecular motor-based intracellular transport. We previously demonstrated that microtubule defects influence cargo transport by multiple kinesin motors. However, mechanistic investigations of the observed effects remained challenging, since defects occur randomly during polymerization and are not directly observable in current motility assays. To overcome this challenge, we used end-to-end annealing to generate defects that are directly observable using standard epi-fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that the annealed sites recapitulate the effects of polymerization-derived defects on multiple-motor transport, and thus represent a simple and appropriate model for naturally-occurring defects. We found that single kinesins undergo premature dissociation, but not preferential pausing, at the annealed sites. Our findings provide the first mechanistic insight to how defects impact kinesin-based transport. Preferential dissociation on the single-molecule level has the potential to impair cargo delivery at locations of microtubule defect sites in vivo. PMID:28287156

  13. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Fahad

    2017-02-23

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5\\'nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5\\'nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually \\'locks\\' protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability.

  14. A redox responsive, fluorescent supramolecular metallohydrogel consists of nanofibers with single-molecule width

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ye

    2013-04-03

    The integration of a tripeptide derivative, which is a versatile self-assembly motif, with a ruthenium(II)tris(bipyridine) complex affords the first supramolecular metallo-hydrogelator that not only self assembles in water to form a hydrogel but also exhibits gel-sol transition upon oxidation of the metal center. Surprisingly, the incorporation of the metal complex in the hydrogelator results in the nanofibers, formed by the self-assembly of the hydrogelator in water, to have the width of a single molecule of the hydrogelator. These results illustrate that metal complexes, besides being able to impart rich optical, electronic, redox, or magnetic properties to supramolecular hydrogels, also offer a unique geometrical control to prearrange the self-assembly motif prior to self-assembling. The use of metal complexes to modulate the dimensionality of intermolecular interactions may also help elucidate the interactions of the molecular nanofibers with other molecules, thus facilitating the development of supramolecular hydrogel materials for a wide range of applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Overcoming computational uncertainties to reveal chemical sensitivity in single molecule conduction calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gemma C; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2005-06-01

    In the calculation of conduction through single molecule's approximations about the geometry and electronic structure of the system are usually made in order to simplify the problem. Previously [G. C. Solomon, J. R. Reimers, and N. S. Hush, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6615 (2004)], we have shown that, in calculations employing cluster models for the electrodes, proper treatment of the open-shell nature of the clusters is the most important computational feature required to make the results sensitive to variations in the structural and chemical features of the system. Here, we expand this and establish a general hierarchy of requirements involving treatment of geometrical approximations. These approximations are categorized into two classes: those associated with finite-dimensional methods for representing the semi-infinite electrodes, and those associated with the chemisorption topology. We show that ca. 100 unique atoms are required in order to properly characterize each electrode: using fewer atoms leads to nonsystematic variations in conductivity that can overwhelm the subtler changes. The choice of binding site is shown to be the next most important feature, while some effects that are difficult to control experimentally concerning the orientations at each binding site are actually shown to be insignificant. Verification of this result provides a general test for the precision of computational procedures for molecular conductivity. Predictions concerning the dependence of conduction on substituent and other effects on the central molecule are found to be meaningful only when they exceed the uncertainties of the effects associated with binding-site variation.

  16. An organometallic building block approach to produce a multidecker 4f single-molecule magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Jennifer J; Jeletic, Matthew; Gorelsky, Serge I; Korobkov, Ilia; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murugesu, Muralee

    2013-03-06

    An organometallic building block strategy was employed to investigate the magnetic properties of a Ln(III) organometallic single-ion magnet (SIM) and subsequent single-molecule magnet (SMM) after coupling two of the monomeric units. New homoleptic Dy(III)COT″2 and Ln(III)2COT″3 (Ln = Gd, Dy) complexes have been synthesized. DFT calculations of the bimetallic Dy(III) complex indicate strong metal-ligand covalency and uneven donation to the Dy(III) ions by the terminal and internal COT″(2-) (cyclooctatetraenide) rings that correlate with the respective bond distances. Interestingly, the studies also point to a weak covalent interaction between the metal centers, despite a large separation. The ac susceptibility data indicates that both Dy(III)COT″2 and Dy(III)2COT″3 act as an SIM and an SMM, respectively, with complex multiple relaxation mechanisms. Ab initio calculations reveal the direction of the magnetic anisotropic axis is not perpendicular to the planar COT″ rings for both Dy(III)COT″2 and Dy(III)2COT″3 complexes due to the presence of trimethylsilyl groups on the COT″ rings. If these bulky groups are removed, the calculations predict reorientation of the anisotropic axis can be achieved.

  17. Coupling strategies to enhance single-molecule magnet properties of erbium-cyclooctatetraenyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Jennifer J; Ungur, Liviu; Korobkov, Ilia; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-06-04

    Two different coupling strategies were employed to create Er(III) single-molecule magnets (SMMs) using high blocking temperature mononuclear precursors. The magnetic properties of three lanthanide-COT complexes, [Er(III)2(COT'')3] (1) (COT'' = 1,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclooctatetraenyl dianion) and K2(THF)4[Ln(III)2(COT)4] (Ln = Gd (2), Er (3); THF = tetrahydrofuran, COT = cyclooctatetraenyl dianion), are reported. Both Er(III) complexes behave as SMMs and exhibit magnetic hysteresis at 12 K in solid state. In solution compound 1 exhibits hysteresis up to 14 K. Ac susceptibility data indicates a 100 s blocking temperature of 12.5 and 12.9 K for [Er(III)2(COT'')3] and K2(THF)4[Er(III)2(COT)4], respectively. Both Er(III) dimers display enhanced SMM properties over their mononuclear analogues due to their linear structure and strictly axial anisotropy. A 4 K increase in the magnetic blocking temperature of [Er(III)2(COT'')3] over the double-decker analogue is attributed to an additional mechanism of magnetization blocking arising from exchange coupling between Er(III) ions.

  18. Single-molecule magnet behavior for an antiferromagnetically superexchange-coupled dinuclear dysprosium(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jérôme; Habib, Fatemah; Lin, Po-Heng; Korobkov, Ilia; Enright, Gary; Ungur, Liviu; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murugesu, Muralee

    2011-04-13

    A family of five dinuclear lanthanide complexes has been synthesized with general formula [Ln(III)(2)(valdien)(2)(NO(3))(2)] where (H(2)valdien = N1,N3-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)diethylenetriamine) and Ln(III) = Eu(III)1, Gd(III)2, Tb(III)3, Dy(III)4, and Ho(III)5. The magnetic investigations reveal that 4 exhibits single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with an anisotropic barrier U(eff) = 76 K. The step-like features in the hysteresis loops observed for 4 reveal an antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the two dysprosium ions. Ab initio calculations confirm the weak antiferromagnetic interaction with an exchange constant J(Dy-Dy) = -0.21 cm(-1). The observed steps in the hysteresis loops correspond to a weakly coupled system similar to exchange-biased SMMs. The Dy(2) complex is an ideal candidate for the elucidation of slow relaxation of the magnetization mechanism seen in lanthanide systems.

  19. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels.

  20. Smart-aggregation imaging for single molecule localisation with SPAD cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyongy, Istvan; Davies, Amy; Dutton, Neale A W; Duncan, Rory R; Rickman, Colin; Henderson, Robert K; Dalgarno, Paul A

    2016-11-23

    Single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM) has become an essential part of the super-resolution toolbox for probing cellular structure and function. The rapid evolution of these techniques has outstripped detector development and faster, more sensitive cameras are required to further improve localisation certainty. Single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) array cameras offer single-photon sensitivity, very high frame rates and zero readout noise, making them a potentially ideal detector for ultra-fast imaging and SMLM experiments. However, performance traditionally falls behind that of emCCD and sCMOS devices due to lower photon detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate, both experimentally and through simulations, that the sensitivity of a binary SPAD camera in SMLM experiments can be improved significantly by aggregating only frames containing signal, and that this leads to smaller datasets and competitive performance with that of existing detectors. The simulations also indicate that with predicted future advances in SPAD camera technology, SPAD devices will outperform existing scientific cameras when capturing fast temporal dynamics.