WorldWideScience

Sample records for absolute radiometric calibration

  1. Absolute radiometric calibration of the CCRS SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulander, Lars M. H.; Hawkins, Robert K.; Livingstone, Charles E.; Lukowski, Tom I.

    1991-11-01

    Determining the radar scattering coefficients from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) image data requires absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR system. The authors describe an internal calibration methodology for the airborne Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) SAR system, based on radar theory, a detailed model of the radar system, and measurements of system parameters. The methodology is verified by analyzing external calibration data acquired over a 6-month period in 1988 by the C-band radar using HH polarization. The results indicate that the overall error is +/- 0.8 dB (1-sigma) for incidence angles +/- 20 deg from antenna boresight. The dominant error contributions are due to the antenna radome and uncertainties in the elevation angle relative to the antenna boresight.

  2. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  3. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  4. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters.

  5. Absolute radiometric calibration of Landsat using a pseudo invariant calibration site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, D.; Thome, K.J.; Mishra, N.; Chander, G.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Choi, Tae-young

    2013-01-01

    Pseudo invariant calibration sites (PICS) have been used for on-orbit radiometric trending of optical satellite systems for more than 15 years. This approach to vicarious calibration has demonstrated a high degree of reliability and repeatability at the level of 1-3% depending on the site, spectral channel, and imaging geometries. A variety of sensors have used this approach for trending because it is broadly applicable and easy to implement. Models to describe the surface reflectance properties, as well as the intervening atmosphere have also been developed to improve the precision of the method. However, one limiting factor of using PICS is that an absolute calibration capability has not yet been fully developed. Because of this, PICS are primarily limited to providing only long term trending information for individual sensors or cross-calibration opportunities between two sensors. This paper builds an argument that PICS can be used more extensively for absolute calibration. To illustrate this, a simple empirical model is developed for the well-known Libya 4 PICS based on observations by Terra MODIS and EO-1 Hyperion. The model is validated by comparing model predicted top-of-atmosphere reflectance values to actual measurements made by the Landsat ETM+ sensor reflective bands. Following this, an outline is presented to develop a more comprehensive and accurate PICS absolute calibration model that can be Système international d'unités (SI) traceable. These initial concepts suggest that absolute calibration using PICS is possible on a broad scale and can lead to improved on-orbit calibration capabilities for optical satellite sensors.

  6. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV hyperspectral camera and its validation analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Zhi-yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Jing, Xin; Yin, Zhong-yi; Duan, Yi-ni

    2012-02-01

    With the data in Urad Front Banner, Inner Mongolia on November 14th, 2010, hyper-spectral camera on UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. During the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration, 6 hyper-spectral radiometric gray-scale targets were arranged in the validation field. These targets' reflectances are 4.5%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% separately. To validate the calibration result, four extra hyper-spectral targets with sharp-edge spectrum were arranged to simulate the reflection and absorption peaks in natural objectives. With these peaks, the apparent radiance calculated by radiation transfer model and that calculated through calibration coefficients are much different. The result shows that in the first 15 bands (blue bands), errors are somewhat huge due to the noises of equipment. In the rest bands with quite even spectrum, the errors are small, most of which are less than 10%. For those bands with sharp changes in spectral curves, the errors are quite considerable, varying from 10% to 25%.

  7. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV hyperspectral camera and its validation analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Zhi-yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Jing, Xin; Yin, Zhong-yi; Duan, Yi-ni

    2012-02-01

    With the data in Urad Front Banner, Inner Mongolia on November 14th, 2010, hyper-spectral camera on UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. During the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration, 6 hyper-spectral radiometric gray-scale targets were arranged in the validation field. These targets' reflectances are 4.5%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% separately. To validate the calibration result, four extra hyper-spectral targets with sharp-edge spectrum were arranged to simulate the reflection and absorption peaks in natural objectives. With these peaks, the apparent radiance calculated by radiation transfer model and that calculated through calibration coefficients are much different. The result shows that in the first 15 bands (blue bands), errors are somewhat huge due to the noises of equipment. In the rest bands with quite even spectrum, the errors are small, most of which are less than 10%. For those bands with sharp changes in spectral curves, the errors are quite considerable, varying from 10% to 25%. PMID:22512184

  8. Field Measurement of Sand Dune Bidirectional Reflectance Characteristics for Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Optical Remote Sensing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, C. A.; Logie, G.; Beaver, J.; Helder, D.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Pseudo Invariant Calibration Sites (PICS) for establishing the radiometric trending of optical remote sensing systems has a long history of successful implementation. Past studies have shown that the PICS method is useful for evaluating the trend of sensors over time or cross-calibration of sensors but was not considered until recently for deriving absolute calibration. Current interest in using this approach to establish absolute radiometric calibration stems from recent research that indicates that with empirically derived models of the surface properties and careful atmospheric characterisation Top of Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance values can be predicted and used for absolute sensor radiometric calibration. Critical to the continued development of this approach is the accurate characterization of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of PICS sites. This paper presents the field data collected by a high-performance portable goniometer system in order to develop a BRDF model for the Algodones Dunes in California. These BRDF data are part of a larger study that is seeking to evaluate and quantify all aspects of this dune system (from regional effects to the micro scale optical properties of the sand) in order to provide an absolute radiometric calibration PICS. This paper presents the results of a dense temporal measurement sequence (several measurements per hour with high angular resolution), to yield detailed information on the nature of the surface reflectance properties. The BRDF data were collected covering typical view geometry of space borne sensors and will be used to close the loop on the calibration to create an absolute calibration target for optical satellite absolute radiometric calibration.

  9. Landsat-7 ETM+ on-orbit reflective-band radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Thome, K.J.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Helder, Dennis L.; Barker, J. L.; Scaramuzza, Pat

    2004-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument is in its sixth year of operation. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments. To date, the best onboard calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, a solar-diffuser-based system, which has indicated changes of between 1% to 2% per year in the ETM+ gain for bands 1-4 and 8 and less than 0.5%/year for bands 5 and 7. However, most of this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on vicarious calibrations and observations of "invariant sites", hyperarid sites of the Sahara and Arabia. Weighted average slopes determined from these datasets suggest changes of 0.0% to 0.4% per year for bands 1-4 and 8 and 0.4% to 0.5% per year for bands 5 and 7. Absolute calibration of the reflective bands of the ETM+ is consistent with vicarious observations and other sensors generally at the 5% level, though there appear to be some systematic differences.

  10. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Narrow-Swath Imaging Sensors with Reference to Non-Coincident Wide-Swath Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Lockwood, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    An inter-calibration method is developed to provide absolute radiometric calibration of narrow-swath imaging sensors with reference to non-coincident wide-swath sensors. The method predicts at-sensor radiance using non-coincident imagery from the reference sensor and knowledge of spectral reflectance of the test site. The imagery of the reference sensor is restricted to acquisitions that provide similar view and solar illumination geometry to reduce uncertainties due to directional reflectance effects. Spectral reflectance of the test site is found with a simple iterative radiative transfer method using radiance values of a well-understood wide-swath sensor and spectral shape information based on historical ground-based measurements. At-sensor radiance is calculated for the narrow-swath sensor using this spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters that are also based on historical in situ measurements. Results of the inter-calibration method show agreement on the 2 5 percent level in most spectral regions with the vicarious calibration technique relying on coincident ground-based measurements referred to as the reflectance-based approach. While the variability of the inter-calibration method based on non-coincident image pairs is significantly larger, results are consistent with techniques relying on in situ measurements. The method is also insensitive to spectral differences between the sensors by transferring to surface spectral reflectance prior to prediction of at-sensor radiance. The utility of this inter-calibration method is made clear by its flexibility to utilize image pairings with acquisition dates differing in excess of 30 days allowing frequent absolute calibration comparisons between wide- and narrow-swath sensors.

  11. ABSOLUTE RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF THE GÖKTÜRK-2 SATELLITE SENSOR USING TUZ GÖLÜ (LANDNET SITE FROM NDVI PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Sakarya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available TÜBİTAK UZAY has conducted a research study on the use of space-based satellite resources for several aspects of agriculture. Especially, there are two precision agriculture related projects: HASSAS (Widespread application of sustainable precision agriculture practices in Southeastern Anatolia Project Region (GAP Project and AKTAR (Smart Agriculture Feasibility Project. The HASSAS project aims to study development of precision agriculture practice in GAP region. Multi-spectral satellite imagery and aerial hyperspectral data along with ground measurements was collected to analyze data in an information system. AKTAR aims to develop models for irrigation, fertilization and spectral signatures of crops in Inner Anatolia. By the end of the project precision agriculture practices to control irrigation, fertilization, pesticide and estimation of crop yield will be developed. Analyzing the phenology of crops using NDVI is critical for the projects. For this reason, absolute radiometric calibration of the Red and NIR bands in space-based satellite sensors is an important issue. The Göktürk-2 satellite is an earth observation satellite which was designed and built in Turkey and was launched in 2012. The Göktürk-2 satellite sensor has a resolution 2.5 meters in panchromatic and 5 meters in R/G/B/NIR bands. The absolute radiometric calibration of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor was performed via the ground-based measurements - spectra-radiometer, sun photometer, and meteorological station- in Tuz Gölü cal/val site in 2015. In this paper, the first ground-based absolute radiometric calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor using Tuz Gölü is demonstrated. The absolute radiometric calibration results of this paper are compared with the published cross-calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor utilizing Landsat 8 imagery. According to the experimental comparison results, the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor coefficients for

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of the GÖKTÜRK-2 Satellite Sensor Using Tuz GÖLÜ (landnet Site) from Ndvi Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarya, Ufuk; Hakkı Demirhan, İsmail; Seda Deveci, Hüsne; Teke, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Can; Küpçü, Ramazan; Feray Öztoprak, A.; Efendioğlu, Mehmet; Fehmi Şimşek, F.; Berke, Erdinç; Zübeyde Gürbüz, Sevgi

    2016-06-01

    TÜBİTAK UZAY has conducted a research study on the use of space-based satellite resources for several aspects of agriculture. Especially, there are two precision agriculture related projects: HASSAS (Widespread application of sustainable precision agriculture practices in Southeastern Anatolia Project Region (GAP) Project) and AKTAR (Smart Agriculture Feasibility Project). The HASSAS project aims to study development of precision agriculture practice in GAP region. Multi-spectral satellite imagery and aerial hyperspectral data along with ground measurements was collected to analyze data in an information system. AKTAR aims to develop models for irrigation, fertilization and spectral signatures of crops in Inner Anatolia. By the end of the project precision agriculture practices to control irrigation, fertilization, pesticide and estimation of crop yield will be developed. Analyzing the phenology of crops using NDVI is critical for the projects. For this reason, absolute radiometric calibration of the Red and NIR bands in space-based satellite sensors is an important issue. The Göktürk-2 satellite is an earth observation satellite which was designed and built in Turkey and was launched in 2012. The Göktürk-2 satellite sensor has a resolution 2.5 meters in panchromatic and 5 meters in R/G/B/NIR bands. The absolute radiometric calibration of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor was performed via the ground-based measurements - spectra-radiometer, sun photometer, and meteorological station- in Tuz Gölü cal/val site in 2015. In this paper, the first ground-based absolute radiometric calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor using Tuz Gölü is demonstrated. The absolute radiometric calibration results of this paper are compared with the published cross-calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor utilizing Landsat 8 imagery. According to the experimental comparison results, the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor coefficients for red and NIR bands

  13. Spectral and Radiometric Calibration using Tunable Lasers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —  SIRCUS-based calibration relies on a set of monitoring radiometers and tunable laser sources to provide an absolute radiometric calibration that can approach...

  14. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  15. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, penalized regression using the L-1 norm on the estimated parameters is proposed for chemometric je calibration. The algorithm is of the lasso type, introduced by Tibshirani in 1996 as a linear regression method with bound on the absolute length of the parameters, but a modification...

  16. Outdoor relative radiometric calibration method using gray scale targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; YiNi; YAN; Lei; YANG; Bin; JING; Xin; CHEN; Wei

    2013-01-01

    The radiometric calibration of remote sensors is a basis and prerequisite of information quantification in remote sensing. This paper proposes a method for outdoor relative radiometric calibration using gray scale targets. In this method, the idea of two substitutions is adopted. Sunlight is used to replace the integrating sphere light source, and gray scale targets are used to re-place the diffuser. In this way, images at different radiance levels obtained outdoors can calculate the relative radiometric cali-bration coefficients using the least square method. The characteristics of this method are as follows. Firstly, compared with la-boratory calibration, it greatly reduces the complexity of the calibration method and the test cost. Secondly, compared with the existing outdoor relative radiometric calibration of a single radiance level, it uses test images of different radiance levels to re-duce errors. Thirdly, it is easy to operate with fewer environmental requirements, has obvious advantages in the rapid calibra-tion of airborne remote sensors before or after flight and is practical in engineering. This paper theoretically and experimental-ly proves the feasibility of this method. Calibration experiments were conducted on the wide-view multispectral imager (WVMI) using this method, and the precision of this method was evaluated by analyzing the corrected images of large uniform targets on ground. The experiment results have demonstrated that the new method is effective and its precision meets the re-quirement of the absolute radiometric calibration.

  17. Optical tweezers absolute calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Dutra, R S; Neto, P A Maia; Nussenzveig, H M

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past fifteen years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spo...

  18. Development of absolute radiometric response functions for HyPlant & G-LiHT using SIRCUS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to provide absolute radiometric and cross-calibrated spectral characterizations for G-LiHT and HyPlant.  The objectives are: (i) to...

  19. Revised landsat-5 thematic mapper radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective April 2, 2007, the radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) data that are processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) will be updated. The lifetime gain model that was implemented on May 5, 2003, for the reflective bands (1-5, 7) will be replaced by a new lifetime radiometric-calibration curve that is derived from the instrument's response to pseudoinvariant desert sites and from cross calibration with the Landsat-7 (L7) Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+). Although this calibration update applies to all archived and future L5 TM data, the principal improvements in the calibration are for the data acquired during the first eight years of the mission (1984-1991), where the changes in the instrument-gain values are as much as 15%. The radiometric scaling coefficients for bands 1 and 2 for approximately the first eight years of the mission have also been changed. Users will need to apply these new coefficients to convert the calibrated data product digital numbers to radiance. The scaling coefficients for the other bands have not changed. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  20. Site characterization for calibration of radiometric sensors using vicarious method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Shailesh; Rathore, L. S.; Mohapatra, M.; Sharma, A. K.; Mitra, A. K.; Bhatla, R.; Singh, R. S.; Desai, Yogdeep; Srivastava, Shailendra S.

    2016-05-01

    Radiometric performances of earth observation satellite/sensors vary from ground pre-launch calibration campaign to post launch period extended to lifetime of the satellite due to launching vibrations. Therefore calibration is carried out worldwide through various methods throughout satellite lifetime. In India Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) calibrates the sensor of Resourcesat-2 satellite by vicarious method. One of these vicarious calibration methods is the reflectance-based approach that is applied in this study for radiometric calibration of sensors on-board Resouresat-2 satellite. The results of ground-based measurement of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance are made at Bap, Rajasthan Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) site. Cal/Val observations at site were carried out with hyper-spectral Spectroradiometer covering spectral range of 350nm- 2500nm for radiometric characterization of the site. The Sunphotometer/Ozonometer for measuring the atmospheric parameters has also been used. The calibrated radiance is converted to absolute at-sensor spectral reflectance and Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) radiance. TOA radiance was computed using radiative transfer model `Second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum' (6S), which can accurately simulate the problems introduced by the presence of the atmosphere along the path from Sun to target (surface) to Sensor. The methodology for band averaged reflectance retrieval and spectral reflectance fitting process are described. Then the spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters are put into 6S code to predict TOA radiance which compare with Resourcesat-2 radiance. Spectral signature and its reflectance ratio indicate the uniformity of the site. Thus the study proves that the selected site is suitable for vicarious calibration of sensor of Resourcesat-2. Further the study demonstrates the procedure for similar exercise for site selection for Cal/Val analysis of other satellite over India

  1. Radiometric Calibration of Osmi Imagery Using Solar Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Han; Kim, Yong-Seung

    2000-12-01

    OSMI (Ocean Scanning Multi-Spectral Imager) raw image data (Level 0) were acquired and radiometrically corrected. We have applied two methods, using solar & dark calibration data from OSMI sensor and comparing with the SeaWiFS data, to the radiometric correction of OSMI raw image data. First, we could get the values of the gain and the offset for each pixel and each band from comparing the solar & dark calibration data with the solar input radiance values, calculated from the transmittance, BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) and the solar incidence angle (¥â,¥è) of OSMI sensor. Applying this calibration data to OSMI raw image data, we got the two odd results, the lower value of the radiometric corrected image data than the expected value, and the Venetian Blind Effect in the radiometric corrected image data. Second, we could get the reasonable results from comparing OSMI raw image data with the SeaWiFS data, and get a new problem of OSMI sensor.

  2. In-Flight Absolute Radiometric Calibration of UAV Hyperspectral Camera and Its Validation Analysis%无人机高光谱成像仪场地绝对辐射定标及验证分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    勾志阳; 晏磊; 陈伟; 景欣; 尹中义; 段依妮

    2012-01-01

    利用2010年11月14日于内蒙古乌拉特前旗开展的无人机遥感载荷综合验证场科学实验数据,对航飞中搭载的高光谱成像仪进行了场地绝对辐射定标.采用朗伯性较好、且光谱性能均一,反射率分别为4.5%,20%,30%,40%,50%和60%的6块高光谱辐射性能灰度靶标,利用反射率基法对高光谱成像仪进行绝对辐射定标.为了验证辐射定标结果,实验中另外铺设了四块高光谱性能辐射刃边靶标用以模拟在自然地物中出现反射峰或吸收峰时采用辐射定标系数计算表观辐亮度所产生的差异.结果表明因仪器噪声较大,在前15个波段(蓝光波段)误差较大.在靶标光谱较为均一的波段定标反演误差较小,一般小于10%,而在靶标光谱出现反射峰区段则误差较大,但一般在10%~25%之间.%With the data in Urad Front Banner, Inner Mongolia on November 14th, 2010, hyper-spectral camera on UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. During the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration, 6 hyper-spectral radiometric gray-scale targets were arranged in the validation field. These targets' reflectances are 4. 5%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% separately. To validate the calibration result, four extra hyper-spectral targets with sharp-edge spectrum were arranged to simulate the reflection and absorption peaks in natural objectives. With these peaks, the apparent radiance calculated by radiation transfer model and that calculated through calibration coefficients are much different. The result shows that in the first 15 bands (blue bands) , errors are somewhat huge due to the noises of equipment In the rest bands with quite even spectrum, the errors are small, most of which are less than 10%. For those bands with sharp changes in spectral curves, the errors are quite considerable, varying from 10% to 25%.

  3. Research radiometric calibration quantitative transfer methods between internal and external

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ju Guang; Ma, Yong hui; Zhang, Guang; Yang, Zhi hui

    2015-10-01

    This paper puts forward a method by realizing the internal and external radiation calibration transfer for infrared radiation characteristics quantitative measuring system. Through technological innovation and innovation application to establish a theoretical model of the corresponding radiated transfer method. This method can be well in engineering application for technology conversion process of radiometric calibration that with relatively simple and effective calibration in the half light path radiation instead of complex difficult whole optical path radiometric calibration. At the same time, it also will provide the basis of effective support to further carry out the target radiated characteristics quantitative measurement and application for ground type infrared radiated quantitative measuring system.

  4. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs

  5. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  6. Use of Radiometrically Calibrated Flat-Plate Calibrators in Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E.

    2015-08-01

    Most commonly used, low-temperature, infrared thermometers have large fields of view sizes that make them difficult to be calibrated with narrow aperture blackbodies. Flat-plate calibrators with large emitting surfaces have been proposed for calibrating these infrared thermometers. Because the emissivity of the flat plate is not unity, its radiance temperature is wavelength dependent. For calibration, the wavelength pass band of the device under test should match that of the reference infrared thermometer. If the device under test and reference radiometer have different pass bands, then it is possible to calculate the corresponding correction if the emissivity of the flat plate is known. For example, a correction of at is required when calibrating a infrared thermometer with a "" radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator. A method is described for using a radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator that covers both cases of match and mismatch working wavelength ranges of a reference infrared thermometer and infrared thermometers to be calibrated with the flat-plate calibrator. Also, an application example is included in this paper.

  7. Physical aspects to consider in radiometric calibration of satellite images

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo

    2012-01-01

    It does a revision about the physical principles involved in digital processing of satellite images, more specifically in radiometric calibration of them. It shows a conceptual description of the interaction between radiation and atmosphere and radiation and soil in order to help the reader understand in more detail which means the information contained in satellite images.

  8. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; /Buenos Aires, IAFE; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  9. Pleiades Absolute Calibration : Inflight Calibration Sites and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachérade, S.; Fourest, S.; Gamet, P.; Lebègue, L.

    2012-07-01

    In-flight calibration of space sensors once in orbit is a decisive step to be able to fulfil the mission objectives. This article presents the methods of the in-flight absolute calibration processed during the commissioning phase. Four In-flight calibration methods are used: absolute calibration, cross-calibration with reference sensors such as PARASOL or MERIS, multi-temporal monitoring and inter-bands calibration. These algorithms are based on acquisitions over natural targets such as African deserts, Antarctic sites, La Crau (Automatic calibration station) and Oceans (Calibration over molecular scattering) or also new extra-terrestrial sites such as the Moon and selected stars. After an overview of the instrument and a description of the calibration sites, it is pointed out how each method is able to address one or several aspects of the calibration. We focus on how these methods complete each other in their operational use, and how they help building a coherent set of information that addresses all aspects of in-orbit calibration. Finally, we present the perspectives that the high level of agility of PLEIADES offers for the improvement of its calibration and a better characterization of the calibration sites.

  10. SLC-off Landsat-7 ETM+ reflective band radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Thome, K.J.; Barker, J.L.; Scaramuzza, P.L.; Helder, D.L.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Since May 31, 2003, when the scan line corrector (SLC) on the Landsat-7 ETM+ failed, the primary foci of Landsat-7 ETM+ analyses have been on understanding and attempting to fix the problem and later on developing composited products to mitigate the problem. In the meantime, the Image Assessment System personnel and vicarious calibration teams have continued to monitor the radiometric performance of the ETM+ reflective bands. The SLC failure produced no measurable change in the radiometric calibration of the ETM+ bands. No trends in the calibration are definitively present over the mission lifetime, and, if present, are less than 0.5% per year. Detector 12 in Band 7 dropped about 0.5% in response relative to the rest of the detectors in the band in May 2004 and recovered back to within 0.1% of its initial relative gain in October 2004.

  11. Radiometric Calibration for AgCam

    OpenAIRE

    Edward Hildum; Lianbo Hu; Hojin Kim; Xiaodong Zhang; Changyong Dou; Doug Olsen

    2010-01-01

    The student-built Agricultural Camera (AgCam) now onboard the International Space Station observes the Earth surface through two linescan cameras with Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) arrays sensitive to visible and near-infrared wavelengths, respectively. The electro-optical components of the AgCam were characterized using precision calibration equipment; a method for modeling and applying these measurements was derived. Correction coefficients to minimize effects of optical vignetting, CCD non-u...

  12. Operational Land Imager relative radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.

    2015-09-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI), on board the Landsat-8 satellite, is a pushbroom sensor with nearly 7000 detectors per band, divided between 14 separate modules. While rigorously characterized prior to launch, the shear number of individual detectors presents a challenge to maintaining the on-orbit relative calibration, such that stripes, bands and other artifacts are minimized in the final image products. On-orbit relative calibration of the OLI is primarily monitored and corrected by observing an on-board primary solar diffuser panel. The panel is the most uniform target available to the OLI, though as observed but the OLI, it has a slope across the field of view due to view angle effects. Just after launch, parameters were derived using the solar diffuser data, to correct for the angular effects across the 14 modules. The residual discontinuities between arrays and the detector-to-detector uniformity continue to be monitored on a weekly basis. The observed variations in the responses to the diffuser panel since launch are thought to be due to real instrument changes. Since launch, the Coastal/Aerosol (CA) and Blue bands have shown the most variation in relative calibration of the VNIR bands, with as much as 0.14% change (3-sigma) between consecutive relative gain estimates. The other VNIR bands (Green, Red and NIR) initially had detectors showing a slow drift of about 0.2% per year, though this stopped after an instrument power cycle about seven months after launch. The SWIR bands also exhibit variability between collects (0.11% 3-sigma) but the larger changes have been where individual detectors' responses change suddenly by as much as 1.5%. The mechanisms behind these changes are not well understood but in order to minimize impact to the users, the OLI relative calibration is updated on a quarterly basis in order to capture changes over time.

  13. Airborne radiometric: Data evaluation and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The airborne geophysical system of the BGR (German Geological Survey) consists of a helicopter equipped with an electromagnetic system with two transmittors and two receivers, a proton resonance magnetometer and a 16 L NaJ-crystal with four channel recording. All these data together with navigation data and flight altitude above ground are recorded each second on a nine track magnetic tape for further data evaluation. Different corrections have to be applied to the rough data such as: smoothing by means of a digital filter to reduce statistical noise, altitude correction, Compton-correction, and drift correction (cross-profile evaluation). Then the corrected measuring data are combined with the navigation data in order to be able to produce iso-line maps. The final results are presented as: line plots for U, Th, and K (and EM-data and magnetometer data); actual flight line plots; iso-line maps for U, Th, and K; iso-line maps for conductivity; depth of conducting layer; and magnetometry maps. The procedures of correction and evaluation of the above mentioned data as well as the calibration of the NaJ-detector in terms of ppm U, Th, and %K are dicussed in the paper. (author)

  14. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable, Wideband, Onboard Calibration Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, James B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.; Nolte, Scott H.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Knoll, Linley A.

    2013-01-01

    The Onboard Calibration (OBC) source incorporates a medical/scientific-grade halogen source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system, and a fiber-based intensity-monitoring feedback loop that results in radiometric and spectral stabilities to within less than 0.3 percent over a 15-hour period. The airborne imaging spectrometer systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory incorporate OBC sources to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The use of the OBC source will provide a significant increase in the quantitative accuracy, reliability, and resulting utility of the spectral data collected from current and future imaging spectrometer instruments.

  15. A pratical method of data elimination in radiometric calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absence of phosphorite standards to uranium radiometric analyses sugests the necessity of intercomparison samples to construct an uranium calibration curve. The intercomparison analysis was performed by delay neutrons, X-rays fluorescence and molecular absorption spectrophotometry in three diferents laboratories. This work intends to stablish rejection criteria for deviating data in order to achieve better precision. Through the comparison from results of the analysis methods, the data outside the confidence intervals, were eliminated. A more accurate calibration curve inside the interval +-1,1% to +-3.0% was obtained with this method. (author)

  16. Hierarchical Bayesian Data Analysis in Radiometric SAR System Calibration: A Case Study on Transponder Calibration with RADARSAT-2 Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn J. Döring

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic aperture radar (SAR system requires external absolute calibration so that radiometric measurements can be exploited in numerous scientific and commercial applications. Besides estimating a calibration factor, metrological standards also demand the derivation of a respective calibration uncertainty. This uncertainty is currently not systematically determined. Here for the first time it is proposed to use hierarchical modeling and Bayesian statistics as a consistent method for handling and analyzing the hierarchical data typically acquired during external calibration campaigns. Through the use of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations, a joint posterior probability can be conveniently derived from measurement data despite the necessary grouping of data samples. The applicability of the method is demonstrated through a case study: The radar reflectivity of DLR’s new C-band Kalibri transponder is derived through a series of RADARSAT-2 acquisitions and a comparison with reference point targets (corner reflectors. The systematic derivation of calibration uncertainties is seen as an important step toward traceable radiometric calibration of synthetic aperture radars.

  17. [In-Flight Radiometric Calibration for ZY-3 Satellite Multispectral Sensor by Modified Reflectance-Based Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Xie, Yong; Gu, Xing-fa; Yu, Tao; Liu, Qi-yue; Gao, Rong-jun

    2015-03-01

    Through integrating multi-spectral sensor characteristics of ZY-3 satellite, a modified reflectance-based method is proposed and used to achieve ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor in-flight radiometric calibration. This method chooses level 1A image as data source and establishes geometric model to get an accurate observation geometric parameters at calibration site according to the information provided in image auxiliary documentation, which can reduce the influences on the calibration accuracy from image resampling and observation geometry errors. We use two-point and multi-points methods to calculate the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of ZY-3 satellite multispectral sensor based on the large campaign at Dongying city, Shan Dong province. Compared with ZY-3 official calibration coefficients, multi-points method has higher accuracy than two-point method. Through analyzing the dispersion between each calibration point and the fitting line, we find that the residual error of water calibration site is larger than others, which of green band is approximately 67.39%. Treating water calibration site as an error, we filter it out using 95.4% confidence level as standard and recalculate the calibration coefficients with multi-points method. The final calibration coefficients show that the relative differences of the first three bands are less than 2% and the last band is less than 5%, which manifests that the proposed radiometric calibration method can obtain accurate and reliable calibration coefficients and is useful for other similar satellites in future.

  18. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager Radiometric Calibration and Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Markham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI was radiometrically calibrated prior to launch in terms of spectral radiance, using an integrating sphere source traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST standards of spectral irradiance. It was calibrated on-orbit in terms of reflectance using diffusers characterized prior to launch using NIST traceable standards. The radiance calibration was performed with an uncertainty of ~3%; the reflectance calibration to an uncertainty of ~2%. On-orbit, multiple calibration techniques indicate that the sensor has been stable to better than 0.3% to date, with the exception of the shortest wavelength band, which has degraded about 1.0%. A transfer to orbit experiment conducted using the OLI’s heliostat-illuminated diffuser suggests that some bands increased in sensitivity on transition to orbit by as much as 5%, with an uncertainty of ~2.5%. On-orbit comparisons to other instruments and vicarious calibration techniques show the radiance (without a transfer to orbit adjustment, and reflectance calibrations generally agree with other instruments and ground measurements to within the uncertainties. Calibration coefficients are provided with the data products to convert to either radiance or reflectance units.

  19. a Comparison of LIDAR Reflectance and Radiometrically Calibrated Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncat, A.; Briese, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    In order to retrieve results comparable under different flight parameters and among different flight campaigns, passive remote sensing data such as hyperspectral imagery need to undergo a radiometric calibration. While this calibration, aiming at the derivation of physically meaningful surface attributes such as a reflectance value, is quite cumbersome for passively sensed data and relies on a number of external parameters, the situation is by far less complicated for active remote sensing techniques such as lidar. This fact motivates the investigation of the suitability of full-waveform lidar as a "single-wavelength reflectometer" to support radiometric calibration of hyperspectral imagery. In this paper, this suitability was investigated by means of an airborne hyperspectral imagery campaign and an airborne lidar campaign recorded over the same area. Criteria are given to assess diffuse reflectance behaviour; the distribution of reflectance derived by the two techniques were found comparable in four test areas where these criteria were met. This is a promising result especially in the context of current developments of multi-spectral lidar systems.

  20. Galileo SSI/Gaspra Radiometrically Calibrated Images V1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    This data set includes Galileo Orbiter SSI radiometrically calibrated images of the asteroid 951 Gaspra, created using ISIS software and assuming nadir pointing. This is an original delivery of radiometrically calibrated files, not an update to existing files. All images archived include the the asteroid within the image frame. Calibration was performed in 2013-2014.

  1. Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Barsi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Launched in February 2013, the Landsat-8 carries on-board the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS, a two-band thermal pushbroom imager, to maintain the thermal imaging capability of the Landsat program. The TIRS bands are centered at roughly 10.9 and 12 μm (Bands 10 and 11 respectively. They have 100 m spatial resolution and image coincidently with the Operational Land Imager (OLI, also on-board Landsat-8. The TIRS instrument has an internal calibration system consisting of a variable temperature blackbody and a special viewport with which it can see deep space; a two point calibration can be performed twice an orbit. Immediately after launch, a rigorous vicarious calibration program was started to validate the absolute calibration of the system. The two vicarious calibration teams, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL and the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT, both make use of buoys deployed on large water bodies as the primary monitoring technique. RIT took advantage of cross-calibration opportunity soon after launch when Landsat-8 and Landsat-7 were imaging the same targets within a few minutes of each other to perform a validation of the absolute calibration. Terra MODIS is also being used for regular monitoring of the TIRS absolute calibration. The buoy initial results showed a large error in both bands, 0.29 and 0.51 W/m2·sr·μm or −2.1 K and −4.4 K at 300 K in Band 10 and 11 respectively, where TIRS data was too hot. A calibration update was recommended for both bands to correct for a bias error and was implemented on 3 February 2014 in the USGS/EROS processing system, but the residual variability is still larger than desired for both bands (0.12 and 0.2 W/m2·sr·μm or 0.87 and 1.67 K at 300 K. Additional work has uncovered the source of the calibration error: out-of-field stray light. While analysis continues to characterize the stray light contribution, the vicarious calibration work proceeds. The additional data have not changed

  2. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission Operational Land Imager (OLI) Radiometric Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L.; Dabney, Philip W.; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.; Knight, Edward J.; Kvaran, Geir; Barsi, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) has a comprehensive radiometric characterization and calibration program beginning with the instrument design, and extending through integration and test, on-orbit operations and science data processing. Key instrument design features for radiometric calibration include dual solar diffusers and multi-lamped on-board calibrators. The radiometric calibration transfer procedure from NIST standards has multiple checks on the radiometric scale throughout the process and uses a heliostat as part of the transfer to orbit of the radiometric calibration. On-orbit lunar imaging will be used to track the instruments stability and side slither maneuvers will be used in addition to the solar diffuser to flat field across the thousands of detectors per band. A Calibration Validation Team is continuously involved in the process from design to operations. This team uses an Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the ground system to characterize and calibrate the on-orbit data.

  3. Design, manufacture, and calibration of infrared radiometric blackbody sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, D.A.; Michaud, F.D.; Bender, S.C. [and others

    1996-04-01

    A Radiometric Calibration Station (RCS) is being assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) which will allow for calibration of sensors with detector arrays having spectral capability from about 0.4-15 {mu}m. The configuration of the LANL RCS. Two blackbody sources have been designed to cover the spectral range from about 3-15 {mu}m, operating at temperatures ranging from about 180-350 K within a vacuum environment. The sources are designed to present a uniform spectral radiance over a large area to the sensor unit under test. The thermal uniformity requirement of the blackbody cavities has been one of the key factors of the design, requiring less than 50 mK variation over the entire blackbody surface to attain effective emissivity values of about 0.999. Once the two units are built and verified to the level of about 100 mK at LANL, they will be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where at least a factor of two improvement will be calibrated into the blackbody control system. The physical size of these assemblies will require modifications of the existing NIST Low Background Infrared (LBIR) Facility. LANL has constructed a bolt-on addition to the LBIR facility that will allow calibration of our large aperture sources. Methodology for attaining the two blackbody sources at calibrated levels of performance equivalent to present state of the art will be explained in the following.

  4. A definitive calibration record for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper anchored to the Landsat-7 radiometric scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, P.M.; Helder, D.L.; Ruggles, T.A.; Landry, R.; Ahern, F.J.; Higgs, N.J.; Barsi, J.; Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Thome, K.J.; Schott, J.R.; Palluconi, Frank Don

    2004-01-01

    A coordinated effort on the part of several agencies has led to the specification of a definitive radiometric calibration record for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper (TM) for its lifetime since launch in 1984. The time-dependent calibration record for Landsat-5 TM has been placed on the same radiometric scale as the Landsat-7 enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+). It has been implemented in the National Landsat Archive Production Systems (NLAPS) in use in North America. This paper documents the results of this collaborative effort and the specifications for the related calibration processing algorithms. The specifications include (i) anchoring of the Landsat-5 TM calibration record to the Landsat-7 ETM+ absolute radiometric calibration, (ii) new time-dependent calibration processing equations and procedures applicable to raw Landsat-5 TM data, and (iii) algorithms for recalibration computations applicable to some of the existing processed datasets in the North American context. The cross-calibration between Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ was achieved using image pairs from the tandem-orbit configuration period that was programmed early in the Laridsat-7 mission. The time-dependent calibration for Landsat-5 TM is based on a detailed trend analysis of data from the on-board internal calibrator. The new lifetime radiometric calibration record for Landsat-5 will overcome problems with earlier product generation owing to inadequate maintenance and documentation of the calibration over time and will facilitate the quantitative examination of a continuous, near-global dataset at 30-m scale that spans almost two decades.

  5. Characterization of the Sonoran desert as a radiometric calibration target for Earth observing sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Amit; Chander, Gyanesh; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Choi, Tae-young; Wu, Aisheng

    2011-01-01

    To provide highly accurate quantitative measurements of the Earth's surface, a comprehensive calibration and validation of the satellite sensors is required. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Characterization Support Team, in collaboration with United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, has previously demonstrated the use of African desert sites to monitor the long-term calibration stability of Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+). The current study focuses on evaluating the suitability of the Sonoran Desert test site for post-launch long-term radiometric calibration as well as cross-calibration purposes. Due to the lack of historical and on-going in situ ground measurements, the Sonoran Desert is not usually used for absolute calibration. An in-depth evaluation (spatial, temporal, and spectral stability) of this site using well calibrated L7 ETM+ measurements and local climatology data has been performed. The Sonoran Desert site produced spatial variability of about 3 to 5% in the reflective solar regions, and the temporal variations of the site after correction for view-geometry impacts were generally around 3%. The results demonstrate that, barring the impacts due to occasional precipitation, the Sonoran Desert site can be effectively used for cross-calibration and long-term stability monitoring of satellite sensors, thus, providing a good test site in the western hemisphere.

  6. Evaluation of Two Absolute Radiometric Normalization Algorithms for Pre-processing of Landsat Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hanqiu

    2006-01-01

    In order to evaluate radiometric normalization techniques, two image normalization algorithms for absolute radiometric correction of Landsat imagery were quantitatively compared in this paper, which are the Illumination Correction Model proposed by Markham and Irish and the Illumination and Atmospheric Correction Model developed by the Remote Sensing and GIS Laboratory of the Utah State University. Relative noise, correlation coefficient and slope value were used as the criteria for the evaluation and comparison, which were derived from pseudo-invariant features identified from multitemtween the normalized multitemporal images were significantly reduced when the seasons of multitemporal images were different. However, there was no significant difference between the normalized and unnormalized images with a similar seasonal condition. Furthermore, the correction results of two algorithms are similar when the images are relatively clear with a uniform atmospheric condition. Therefore, the radiometric normalization procedures should be carried out if the multitemporal images have a significant seasonal difference.

  7. On-orbit performance of the Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric calibrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L; Barker, J. L.; Kaita, E.; Seiferth, J.; Morfitt, Ron

    2003-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) incorporates two new devices to improve its absolute radiometric calibration: a Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC) and a Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC). The FASC is a diffuser panel, typically deployed once per month. Initial FASC absolute calibration results were within 5% of the pre-launch calibrations. Over time, the responses of the ETM+ to the FASC have varied with the location viewed on the panel, suggesting a localized degradation or contamination of the panel. On the best part of the panel, the trends in response range from m 1.4% y m 1 (band 4) to +0.6% y m 1 (band 7), with band 5 showing the least change at m 0.4% y m 1 . Changes in the panel reflectance due to UV exposure are believed to be the origin of these trends. The PASC is a set of auxiliary optics that allows the ETM+ to image the Sun through reduced apertures. PASC data have normally been acquired on a daily basis. Unlike the FASC, the PASC has exhibited significant anomalies. During the first six months of operation, responses to the PASC increased up to 60%, sending bands 2, 3 and 8 into saturation (band 1 was saturated at launch). The short-wave infrared (SWIR) band individual detectors have shown variations up to - 20% in response to the PASC. The variation is different for each detector. After the first six months, the responses to the PASC have become more stable, with much of the variation related to the within-scan position of the solar image. Overall results to date for all calibrators and comparisons with vicarious calibrations indicate that most of the response variations have been due to the calibrators themselves and suggest that the instrument has been stable with changes in response of less than 0.5% y m 1 .

  8. An Overview of MODIS Radiometric Calibration and Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the key instruments for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), currently operating on both the Terra and Aqua satellites. The MODIS is a major advance over the previous generation of sensors in terms of its spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions. It has 36 spectral bands: 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with center wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.1μm and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB) with center wavelengths from 3.7 to 14.4μm,making observations at three spatial resolutions: 250 m (bands 1-2), 500 m (bands 3-7), and 1km (bands 8-36). MODIS is a cross-track scanning radiometer with a wide field-of-view, providing a complete global coverage of the Earth in less than 2 days. Both Terra and Aqua MODIS went through extensive pre-launch calibration and characterization at various levels. In orbit, the calibration and characterization tasks are performed using its on-board calibrators (OBCs) that include a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), a v-grooved flat panel blackbody (BB), and a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). In this paper, we present an overview of MODIS calibration and characterization activities, methodologies, and lessons learned from pre-launch characterization and in-orbit operation. Key issues discussed in this paper include in-orbit efforts of monitoring the noise characteristics of the detectors,tracking the solar diffuser and optics degradations, and updating the sensor's response versus scan angle.The experiences and lessons learned through MODIS have played and will continue to play major roles in the design and characterization of future sensors.

  9. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Alireza G; Olsen, Michael J; Parrish, Christopher E; Wilson, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record "intensity", loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of "normalization", "correction", or "calibration" techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration. PMID:26561813

  10. Inflight Radiometric Calibration of New Horizons' Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Howett, C J A; Olkin, C B; Reuter, D C; Ennico, K; Grundy, W M; Graps, A L; Harrison, K P; Throop, H B; Buie, M W; Lovering, J R; Porter, S B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A; Stern, S A; Beyer, R A; Binzell, R P; Buratti, B J; Cheng, A F; Cook, J C; Cruikshank, D P; Ore, C M Dalle; Earle, A M; Jennings, D E; Linscott, I R; Lunsford, A W; Parker, J Wm; Phillippe, S; Protopapa, S; Quirico, E; Schenk, P M; Schmitt, B; Singer, K N; Spencer, J R; Stansberry, J A; Tsang, C C C; Weigle, G E; Verbiscer, A J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two semi-independent calibration techniques used to determine the in-flight radiometric calibration for the New Horizons' Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). The first calibration technique compares the observed stellar flux to modeled values. The difference between the two provides a calibration factor that allows the observed flux to be adjusted to the expected levels for all observations, for each detector. The second calibration technique is a channel-wise relative radiometric calibration for MVIC's blue, near-infrared and methane color channels using observations of Charon and scaling from the red channel stellar calibration. Both calibration techniques produce very similar results (better than 7% agreement), providing strong validation for the techniques used. Since the stellar calibration can be performed without a color target in the field of view and covers all of MVIC's detectors, this calibration was used to provide the radiometric keywords delivered by the New Horizons project...

  11. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanner radiometric calibration results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Gibson, M. A.; Thomas, Susan; Meekins, Jeffrey L.; Mahan, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning radiometers are producing measurements of the incoming solar, earth/atmosphere-reflected solar, and earth/atmosphere-emitted radiation fields with measurement precisions and absolute accuracies, approaching 1 percent. ERBE uses thermistor bolometers as the detection elements in the narrow-field-of-view scanning radiometers. The scanning radiometers can sense radiation in the shortwave, longwave, and total broadband spectral regions of 0.2 to 5.0, 5.0 to 50.0, and 0.2 to 50.0 micrometers, respectively. Detailed models of the radiometers' response functions were developed in order to design the most suitable calibration techniques. These models guided the design of in-flight calibration procedures as well as the development and characterization of a vacuum-calibration chamber and the blackbody source which provided the absolute basis upon which the total and longwave radiometers were characterized. The flight calibration instrumentation for the narror-field-of-view scanning radiometers is presented and evaluated.

  12. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza G. Kashani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR systems also record “intensity”, loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of “normalization”, “correction”, or “calibration” techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration.

  13. Improved Radiometric Calibrations and Measurements for Evaluating Photovoltaic Devices; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Task has improved broadband and spectral measurement capabilities at NREL. These improved NREL's capabilities affect the Photovoltaic Module and Array Performance and Reliability and Photovoltaic Measurements and Characterization Projects. Recent improvements (during 2000) in broadband radiometer calibrations result in the removal of bias errors on the order of 20 watts per square meter (W/m(sup 2)) in the measurement of global-hemispherical solar radiation. The improvements described are partially due to technical interactions by members of the Measurements and Instrumentation Team with the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS) Validation Program, World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Baseline Surface Measurement Network (BSRN), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Solar Radiation Research Branch (SRRB). New equipment has been purchased and techniques have been developed to characterize pulsed solar simulator spectral distributions. New equipment has been purchased and will be installed in the redesigned Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Baseline Measurement System (BMS). Expanded measurement capability, including sky radiance mapping, extensive ultraviolet and infrared radiation measurements, and routine spectral sampling will provide a unique complement of data for investigating PV device, module, and system design and performance, model development and validation, and for evaluating new measurement systems

  14. A new methodology for in-flight radiometric calibration of the MIVIS imaging sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lechi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Sensor radiometric calibration is of great importance in computing physical values of radiance of the investigated targets, but often airborne scanners are not equipped with any in-flight radiometric calibration facility. Consequently, the radiometric calibration or airborne systems usually relies only on pre-flight and vicarious calibration or on indirect approaches. This paper introduces an experimental approach that makes use of on-board calibration techniques to perform the radiometric calibration of the CNR’s MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer airborne scanner. This approach relies on the use of an experimental optical test bench originally designed at Politecnico di Milano University (Italy, called MIVIS Flying Test Bench (MFTB, to perform the first On-The-Fly (OTF calibration of the MIVIS reflective spectral bands. The main task of this study is to estimate how large are the effects introduced by aircraft motion (e.g., e.m. noise or vibrations and by environment conditions (e.g., environment temperature on the radiance values measured by the MIVIS sensor during the fly. This paper describes the first attempt to perform an On-The-Fly (OTF calibration of the MIVIS reflective spectral bands (ranging from 430 nm to 2.500 nm. Analysis of results seems to point out limitations of traditional radiometric calibration methodology based only on pre-flight approaches, with important implications for data quality assessment.

  15. Pre-Launch Absolute Calibration of CCD/CBERS-2B Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, Flávio Jorge; Albuquerque, Bráulio Fonseca Carneiro

    2008-01-01

    Pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients for the CCD/CBERS-2B sensor have been calculated from radiometric measurements performed in a satellite integration and test hall in the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) headquarters, located in Beijing, China. An illuminated integrating sphere was positioned in the test hall facilities to allow the CCD/CBERS-2B imagery of the entire sphere aperture. Calibration images were recorded and a relative calibration procedure adopted exclusively in Brazil was applied to equalize the detectors responses. Averages of digital numbers (DN) from these images were determined and correlated to their respective radiance levels in order to calculate the absolute calibration coefficients. It has been the first time these pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients have been calculated considering the Brazilian image processing criteria. Now it will be possible to compare them to those that will be calculated from vicarious calibration campaigns. This comparison will permit the CCD/CBERS-2B monitoring and the frequently data updating to the user community.

  16. Transmittance measurement of a heliostat facility used in the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-08-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  17. Transmittance Measurement of a Heliostat Facility used in the Preflight Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  18. System and method for calibrating a rotary absolute position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes a rotary device, a rotary absolute position (RAP) sensor generating encoded pairs of voltage signals describing positional data of the rotary device, a host machine, and an algorithm. The algorithm calculates calibration parameters usable to determine an absolute position of the rotary device using the encoded pairs, and is adapted for linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters. A method of calibrating the RAP sensor includes measuring the rotary position as encoded pairs of voltage signals, linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters, and calculating an absolute position of the rotary device using the calibration parameters. The calibration parameters include a positive definite matrix (A) and a center point (q) of the ellipse. The voltage signals may include an encoded sine and cosine of a rotary angle of the rotary device.

  19. Absolute sensitivity calibration of extreme ultraviolet photoresists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Juanita; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Aquila, Andrew; George, Simi; Niakoula, Dimitra

    2008-05-16

    One of the major challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography remains simultaneously achieving resist sensitivity, line-edge roughness, and resolution requirement. Sensitivity is of particular concern owing to its direct impact on source power requirements. Most current EUV exposure tools have been calibrated against a resist standard with the actual calibration of the standard resist dating back to EUV exposures at Sandia National Laboratories in the mid 1990s. Here they report on an independent sensitivity calibration of two baseline resists from the SEMATECH Berkeley MET tool performed at the Advanced Light Source Calibrations and Standards beamline. The results show the baseline resists to be approximately 1.9 times faster than previously thought based on calibration against the long standing resist standard.

  20. Radiometric calibration stability and inter-calibration of solar-band instruments in orbit using the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on monitoring the Earth's climate from space, more stringent calibration requirements are being placed on the data products from remote sensing satellite instruments. Among these are stability over decade-length time scales and consistency across sensors and platforms. For radiometer instruments in the solar reflectance wavelength range (visible to shortwave infrared), maintaining calibration on orbit is difficult due to the lack of absolute radiometric standards suitable for flight use. The Moon presents a luminous source that can be viewed by all instruments in Earth orbit. Considered as a solar diffuser, the lunar surface is exceedingly stable. The chief difficulty with using the Moon is the strong variations in the Moon's brightness with illumination and viewing geometry. This mandates the use of a photometric model to compare lunar observations, either over time by the same instrument or between instruments. The U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona, under NASA sponsorship, has developed a model for the lunar spectral irradiance that explicitly accounts for the effects of phase, the lunar librations, and the lunar surface reflectance properties. The model predicts variations in the Moon's brightness with precision ???1% over a continuous phase range from eclipse to the quarter lunar phases. Given a time series of Moon observations taken by an instrument, the geometric prediction capability of the lunar irradiance model enables sensor calibration stability with sub-percent per year precision. Cross-calibration of instruments with similar passbands can be achieved with precision comparable to the model precision. Although the Moon observations used for intercomparison can be widely separated in phase angle and/or time, SeaWiFS and MODIS have acquired lunar views closely spaced in time. These data provide an example to assess inter-calibration biases between these two instruments.

  1. Absolute angular calibration of a submarine km3 neutrino telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A requirement for neutrino telescope is the ability to resolve point sources of neutrinos. In order to understand its resolving power a way to perform absolute angular calibration with muons is required. Muons produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere offer an abundant calibration source. By covering a surface vessel with 200 modules of 5 m2 plastic scintillator a surface air shower array can be set up. Running this array in coincidence with a deep-sea km3 size neutrino detector, where the coincidence is defined by the absolute clock timing stamp for each event, would allow absolute angular calibration to be performed. Monte Carlo results simulating the absolute angular calibration of the km3 size neutrino detector will be presented. Future work and direction will be discussed.

  2. HJ-1A HSI on-orbit radiometric calibration and validation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The calibration experiment data at Dunhuang radiometric calibration site in October, 2008 were used to achieve the on-orbit radiometric calibration for HJ-1A hyper spectral imager (HSI). Two other field experiments data were used to validate the Dunhuang calibration results. One field experiment took place in Inner-Mongolia, China in September, 2008, and the other field experiment took place in Lake Frome, Australia in February, 2009. Finally, the ‘confidence interval of calibration error’ concept was put forward for quantitatively computing the calibration coefficient error confidence interval. The results showed that the Dunhuang calibration results in 2008 had high reliability. The confidence intervals of calibration error for all HSI channels were between 2% to 12%, which could satisfy the requirement of the HSI quantitative applications.

  3. RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF MARS HiRISE HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY BASED ON FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large data amount of HiRISE imagery, traditional radiometric calibration method is not able to meet the fast processing requirements. To solve this problem, a radiometric calibration system of HiRISE imagery based on field program gate array (FPGA is designed. The montage gap between two channels caused by gray inconsistency is removed through histogram matching. The calibration system is composed of FPGA and DSP, which makes full use of the parallel processing ability of FPGA and fast computation as well as flexible control characteristic of DSP. Experimental results show that the designed system consumes less hardware resources and the real-time processing ability of radiometric calibration of HiRISE imagery is improved.

  4. Radiometric Calibration of Mars HiRISE High Resolution Imagery Based on Fpga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yifan; Geng, Xun; Xing, Shuai; Tang, Yonghe; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Due to the large data amount of HiRISE imagery, traditional radiometric calibration method is not able to meet the fast processing requirements. To solve this problem, a radiometric calibration system of HiRISE imagery based on field program gate array (FPGA) is designed. The montage gap between two channels caused by gray inconsistency is removed through histogram matching. The calibration system is composed of FPGA and DSP, which makes full use of the parallel processing ability of FPGA and fast computation as well as flexible control characteristic of DSP. Experimental results show that the designed system consumes less hardware resources and the real-time processing ability of radiometric calibration of HiRISE imagery is improved.

  5. Research in absolute calibration of single photon detectors by means of correlated photons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Feng; Xiaobing Zheng; Jianjun Li; Wei Zhang

    2006-01-01

    There are two general methods in radiometric calibration of detectors, one is based on radiation sources and the other based on detectors. Because the two methods need to establish a primary standard of high precision and a transfer chain, precision of the standard will be reduced by extension of the chain. A new calibration method of detectors can be realized by using correlated photons generated in spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) effect of nonlinear crystal, without needing transfer chain. Using 351.1-nm output of a tunable laser to pump β-barium borate (BBO) crystal, an absolute calibration experimental system of single photon detectors based on correlated photons is performed. The quantum efficiency of photomultiplier (PMT) at 702.2 nm is measured by the setup. Advantages of this method over traditional methods are also pointed out by comparison.

  6. Calibration chain design based on integrating sphere transfer radiometer for SI-traceable on-orbit spectral radiometric calibration and its uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Ning; Fang, Wei; Sun, Li-Wei; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Yu-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In order to satisfy the requirement of SI-traceable on-orbit absolute radiation calibration transfer with high accuracy for satellite remote sensors, a transfer chain consisting of a fiber coupling monochromator (FBM) and an integrating sphere transfer radiometer (ISTR) was designed in this paper. Depending on the Sun, this chain based on detectors provides precise spectral radiometric calibration and measurement to spectrometers in the reflective solar band (RSB) covering 300-2500 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 0.5-6 nm. It shortens the traditional chain based on lamp source and reduces the calibration uncertainty from 5% to 0.5% by using the cryogenic radiometer in space as a radiometric benchmark and trap detectors as secondary standard. This paper also gives a detailed uncertainty budget with reasonable distribution of each impact factor, including the weak spectral signal measurement with uncertainty of 0.28%. According to the peculiar design and comprehensive uncertainty analysis, it illustrates that the spectral radiance measurement uncertainty of the ISTR system can reach to 0.48%. The result satisfies the requirements of SI-traceable on-orbit calibration and has wider significance for expanding the application of the remote sensing data with high-quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41474161) and the National High-Technology Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA123703).

  7. Radiometric calibration of frame transfer CCD camera with uniform source system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Shi, Rongbao; Chen, Yuheng; Zhou, Yuying; Shen, Weimin

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a radiometric calibration method based on visibility function and uniform source system. The uniform system is mainly comprised of an integrating sphere and a monitoring silicon detector. The current of the silicon detector with a visibility function filter corresponds to the luminance at the exit port of integrating sphere through standard luminance meter transfer. The radiance at the camera entrance pupil is calculated for different solar zenith angles and Earth surface albedos by the MODTRAN atmospheric code. To simplify the calibration process, the radiance at its entrance pupil is integrated by visibility function. The shift smear of the frame transfer CCD is removed by the radiometric calibration and the amending ratio factor is introduced in the retrieving methods. The imaging experiment verifies the reliability of the calibration method and retrieves good quality image.

  8. A new method for the absolute radiance calibration for UV-vis measurements of scattered sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Penning de Vries, M.; Remmers, J.; Rozanov, A.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2015-10-01

    Absolute radiometric calibrations are important for measurements of the atmospheric spectral radiance. Such measurements can be used to determine actinic fluxes, the properties of aerosols and clouds, and the shortwave energy budget. Conventional calibration methods in the laboratory are based on calibrated light sources and reflectors and are expensive, time consuming and subject to relatively large uncertainties. Also, the calibrated instruments might change during transport from the laboratory to the measurement sites. Here we present a new calibration method for UV-vis instruments that measure the spectrally resolved sky radiance, for example zenith sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments or multi-axis (MAX)-DOAS instruments. Our method is based on the comparison of the solar zenith angle dependence of the measured zenith sky radiance with radiative transfer simulations. For the application of our method, clear-sky measurements during periods with almost constant aerosol optical depth are needed. The radiative transfer simulations have to take polarisation into account. We show that the calibration results are almost independent from the knowledge of the aerosol optical properties and surface albedo, which causes a rather small uncertainty of about < 7 %. For wavelengths below about 330 nm it is essential that the ozone column density during the measurements be constant and known.

  9. Observations of the moon by the global ozone monitoring experiment: radiometric calibration and lunar albedo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobber, M.R.; Goede, A.P.H.; Burrows, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a new instrument, which was launched aboard the second European Remoting Sensing satellite ESA-ERS2 in 1995. For its long-term radiometric and spectral calibration the GOME observes the sun and less frequently the moon on a regular basis. These measur

  10. Legacy of NOAA, NASA and NIST Cooperation in Developing Radiometric Calibration Standards, Equipment and Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Cao, Changyong

    2012-01-01

    This report traces the historical development of radiometric standards and calibration methodologies over the past several decades for optical passive sensor calibration at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), formerly National Bureau of Standards NBS. From the beginning, a remarkable goal oriented interaction between scientists and engineers of the 3 agencies ...

  11. Absolute calibration of a multilayer-based XUV diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Stuik, R; Tümmler, J; Bijkerk, F

    2002-01-01

    A portable, universal narrowband XUV diagnostic suitable for calibration of various XUV light sources, was built, tested and fully calibrated. The diagnostic allows measurement of the absolute XUV energy and average power in two selected wavelength bands, at 11.4 and 13.4 nm. In addition, the pulse-to-pulse and long-term XUV stability of the source can be assessed, as well as the contamination of multilayer XUV optics exposed to the source. This paper describes the full calibration procedure: all optical elements were calibrated at the wavelength of operation by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the storage ring Bessy II, a full analysis of geometrical factors was done, and the influence of the spectral emissivity of the source on the calibration was analyzed in detail. The calibration was performed both for the centroid wavelength as for the full bandwidth of the diagnostic. The total uncertainty in the absolute calibration allowed measurement of source characteristics with an uncertainty of less than...

  12. Radiometric calibration status of Landsat-7 and Landsat-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, J.A.; Markham, B.L.; Helder, D.L.; Chander, G.

    2007-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, Landsat-7 ETM+ continues to acquire data globally. The Scan Line Corrector in failure in 2003 has affected ground coverage and the recent switch to Bumper Mode operations in April 2007 has degraded the internal geometric accuracy of the data, but the radiometry has been unaffected. The best of the three on-board calibrators for the reflective bands, the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, has indicated slow changes in the ETM+, but this is believed to be due to contamination on the panel rather then instrument degradation. The Internal Calibrator lamp 2, though it has not been used regularly throughout the whole mission, indicates smaller changes than the FASC since 2003. The changes indicated by lamp 2 are only statistically significant in band 1, circa 0.3% per year, and may be lamp as opposed to instrument degradations. Regular observations of desert targets in the Saharan and Arabian deserts indicate the no change in the ETM+ reflective band response, though the uncertainty is larger and does not preclude the small changes indicated by lamp 2. The thermal band continues to be stable and well-calibrated since an offset error was corrected in late-2000. Launched in 1984, Landsat-5 TM also continues to acquire global data; though without the benefit of an on-board recorder, data can only be acquired where a ground station is within range. Historically, the calibration of the TM reflective bands has used an onboard calibration system with multiple lamps. The calibration procedure for the TM reflective bands was updated in 2003 based on the best estimate at the time, using only one of the three lamps and a cross-calibration with Landsat-7 ETM+. Since then, the Saharan desert sites have been used to validate this calibration model. Problems were found with the lamp based model of up to 13% in band 1. Using the Saharan data, a new model was developed and implemented in the US processing system in April 2007. The TM thermal band was found to have a

  13. Radiometric cross-calibration of the Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ using an invariant desert site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, T.; Angal, A.; Chander, G.; Xiong, X.

    2008-01-01

    A methodology for long-term radiometric cross-calibration between the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensors was developed. The approach involves calibration of near-simultaneous surface observations between 2000 and 2007. Fifty-seven cloud-free image pairs were carefully selected over the Libyan desert for this study. The Libyan desert site (+28.55??, +23.39??), located in northern Africa, is a high reflectance site with high spatial, spectral, and temporal uniformity. Because the test site covers about 12 kmx13 km, accurate geometric preprocessing is required to match the footprint size between the two sensors to avoid uncertainties due to residual image misregistration. MODIS Level IB radiometrically corrected products were reprojected to the corresponding ETM+ image's Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) grid projection. The 30 m pixels from the ETM+ images were aggregated to match the MODIS spatial resolution (250 m in Bands 1 and 2, or 500 m in Bands 3 to 7). The image data from both sensors were converted to absolute units of at-sensor radiance and top-ofatmosphere (TOA) reflectance for the spectrally matching band pairs. For each band pair, a set of fitted coefficients (slope and offset) is provided to quantify the relationships between the testing sensors. This work focuses on long-term stability and correlation of the Terra MODIS and L7 ETM+ sensors using absolute calibration results over the entire mission of the two sensors. Possible uncertainties are also discussed such as spectral differences in matching band pairs, solar zenith angle change during a collection, and differences in solar irradiance models.

  14. Adjustments to the MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration and Polarization Sensitivity in the 2010 Reprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite Terra provides global coverage of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances that have been successfully used for terrestrial and atmospheric research. The MODIS Terra ocean color products, however, have been compromised by an inadequate radiometric calibration at the short wavelengths. The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) at NASA has derived radiometric corrections using ocean color products from the SeaWiFS sensor as truth fields. In the R2010.0 reprocessing, these corrections have been applied to the whole mission life span of 10 years. This paper presents the corrections to the radiometric gains and to the instrument polarization sensitivity, demonstrates the improvement to the Terra ocean color products, and discusses issues that need further investigation. Although the global averages of MODIS Terra ocean color products are now in excellent agreement with those of SeaWiFS and MODIS Aqua, and image quality has been significantly improved, the large corrections applied to the radiometric calibration and polarization sensitivity require additional caution when using the data.

  15. Calibration and Measurement Uncertainty Estimation of Radiometric Data: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.; Andreas, A.; Konings, J.

    2014-11-01

    Evaluating the performance of photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays that form large solar deployments relies on accurate measurements of the available solar resource. Therefore, determining the accuracy of these solar radiation measurements provides a better understanding of investment risks. This paper provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements by radiometers using methods that follow the International Bureau of Weights and Measures Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty (GUM). Standardized analysis based on these procedures ensures that the uncertainty quoted is well documented.

  16. The Future Spaceborne Hyperspectral Imager Enmap: its In-Flight Radiometric and Geometric Calibration Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Müller, R.; Krawzcyk, H.; Bachmann, M.; Storch, T.; Mogulsky, V.; Hofer, S.

    2012-07-01

    The German Aerospace Center DLR - namely the Earth Observation Center EOC and the German Space Operations Center GSOC - is responsible for the establishment of the ground segment of the future German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program). The Earth Observation Center has long lasting experiences with air- and spaceborne acquisition, processing, and analysis of hyperspectral image data. In the first part of this paper, an overview of the radiometric in-flight calibration concept including dark value measurements, deep space measurements, internal lamps measurements and sun measurements is presented. Complemented by pre-launch calibration and characterization these analyses will deliver a detailed and quantitative assessment of possible changes of spectral and radiometric characteristics of the hyperspectral instrument, e.g. due to degradation of single elements. A geometric accuracy of 100 m, which will be improved to 30 m with respect to a used reference image, if it exists, will be achieved by ground processing. Therfore, and for the required co-registration accuracy between SWIR and VNIR channels, additional to the radiometric calibration, also a geometric calibration is necessary. In the second part of this paper, the concept of the geometric calibration is presented in detail. The geometric processing of EnMAP scenes will be based on laboratory calibration results. During repeated passes over selected calibration areas images will be acquired. The update of geometric camera model parameters will be done by an adjustment using ground control points, which will be extracted by automatic image matching. In the adjustment, the improvements of the attitude angles (boresight angles), the improvements of the interior orientation (view vector) and the improvements of the position data are estimated. In this paper, the improvement of the boresight angles is presented in detail as an example. The other values and combinations

  17. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A.; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J.; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρapp), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρapp are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρapp error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρapp from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars. PMID:26950126

  18. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L B; Strahler, Alan H; Schaaf, Crystal B; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna(®) Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρ(app)), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρ(app) are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρ(app) error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρ(app) from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars. PMID:26950126

  19. L5 TM radiometric recalibration procedure using the internal calibration trends from the NLAPS trending database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Haque, Md. O.; Micijevic, E.; Barsi, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the earth science user community has benefited from a historical record of remotely sensed data. The multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone for this extensive archive. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for this imagery used the instrument's response to the Internal Calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset for each detector. The IC system degraded with time causing radiometric calibration errors up to 20 percent. In May 2003 the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) was updated to use a gain model rather than the scene acquisition specific IC gains to calibrate TM data processed in the United States. Further modification of the gain model was performed in 2007. L5 TM data that were processed using IC prior to the calibration update do not benefit from the recent calibration revisions. A procedure has been developed to give users the ability to recalibrate their existing Level-1 products. The best recalibration results are obtained if the work order report that was originally included in the standard data product delivery is available. However, many users may not have the original work order report. In such cases, the IC gain look-up table that was generated using the radiometric gain trends recorded in the NLAPS database can be used for recalibration. This paper discusses the procedure to recalibrate L5 TM data when the work order report originally used in processing is not available. A companion paper discusses the generation of the NLAPS IC gain and bias look-up tables required to perform the recalibration.

  20. Radiometric Cross-calibration of KOMPSAT-3A with Landsat-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. Y.; Ahn, H. Y.; Lee, S. G.; Choi, C. U.; Kim, J. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, Cross calibration was conducted at the Libya 4 PICS site on 2015 using Landsat-8 and KOMPSAT-3A. Ideally a cross calibration should be calculated for each individual scene pair because on any given date the TOA spectral profile is influenced by sun and satellite view geometry and the atmospheric conditions. However, using the near-simultaneous images minimizes this effect because the sensors are viewing the same atmosphere. For the cross calibration, the calibration coefficient was calculated by comparing the at sensor spectral radiance for the same location calculated using the Landsat-8 calibration parameters in metadata and the DN of KOMPSAT-3A for the regions of interest (ROI). Cross calibration can be conducted because the satellite sensors used for overpass have a similar bandwidth. However, not all satellites have the same color filter transmittance and sensor reactivity, even though the purpose is to observe the visible bands. Therefore, the differences in the RSR should be corrected. For the cross-calibration, a calibration coefficient was calculated using the TOA radiance and KOMPSAT-3 DN of the Landsat-8 OLI overpassed at the Libya 4 Site, As a result, the accuracy of the calibration coefficient at the site was assumed to be ± 1.0%. In terms of the results, the radiometric calibration coefficients suggested here are thought to be useful for maintaining the optical quality of the KOMPSAT-3A.

  1. Vicarious Radiometric Calibration of a Multispectral Camera on Board an Unmanned Aerial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Del Pozo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Combinations of unmanned aerial platforms and multispectral sensors are considered low-cost tools for detailed spatial and temporal studies addressing spectral signatures, opening a broad range of applications in remote sensing. Thus, a key step in this process is knowledge of multi-spectral sensor calibration parameters in order to identify the physical variables collected by the sensor. This paper discusses the radiometric calibration process by means of a vicarious method applied to a high-spatial resolution unmanned flight using low-cost artificial and natural covers as control and check surfaces, respectively.

  2. Analysis of aerosol properties derived from sun photometer and lidar over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Xiuqing

    2016-05-01

    Duhuang site has been selected as China Radiation Calibration Site (CRCS) for Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors since 1996. With the economic development of Dunhuang city, the ambient of the radiation calibration field has changed in recent years. Taking into account the key role of aerosol in radiometric calibration, it is essential to investigate the aerosol optical properties over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site. In this paper, the CIMEL sun photometer (CE-318) and Mie-scattering Lidar are simultaneously used to measure aerosol optical properties in Dunhuang site. Data from aerosol-bands of sun photometer are used in a Langley method to determine spectral optical depths of aerosol. And Lidar is utilized to obtain information of vertical profile and integrated aerosol optical depths at different heights. The results showed that the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm wavelength during the in-situ measurement campaigns varied from 0.1 to 0.3 in Dunhuang site. And the observation results also indicated that high aerosol concentration layer mostly located at the height of about 2~4 km. These results implies that the aerosol concentration of atmosphere in Dunhuang was relatively small and suitable for in-flight calibration for remote sensing satellite sensors.

  3. Flow rate calibration for absolute cell counting rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Clare; Barnett, David

    2006-05-01

    There is a need for absolute leukocyte enumeration in the clinical setting, and accurate, reliable (and affordable) technology to determine absolute leukocyte counts has been developed. Such technology includes single platform and dual platform approaches. Derivations of these counts commonly incorporate the addition of a known number of latex microsphere beads to a blood sample, although it has been suggested that the addition of beads to a sample may only be required to act as an internal quality control procedure for assessing the pipetting error. This unit provides the technical details for undertaking flow rate calibration that obviates the need to add reference beads to each sample. It is envisaged that this report will provide the basis for subsequent clinical evaluations of this novel approach. PMID:18770842

  4. Surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. [for radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Quinn J.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute reflectance-based radiometric calibrations of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) are improved with the inclusion of a method to invert optical-depth measurements to obtain aerosol-particle size distributions, and a non-Lambertian surface reflectance model. The inverted size distributions can predict radiances varying from the previously assumed jungian distributions by as much as 5 percent, though the reduction in the estimated error is less than one percent. Comparison with measured diffuse-to-global ratios show that neither distribution consistently predicts the ratio accurately, and this is shown to be a large contributor to calibration uncertainties. An empirical model for the surface reflectance of White Sands, using a two-degree polynomial fit as a function of scattering angle, was employed. The model reduced estimated errors in radiance predictions by up to one percent. Satellite calibrations dating from October, 1984 were reprocessed using the improved methods and linear estimations of satellite counts per unit radiance versus time since launch were determined which showed a decrease over time for the first four bands.

  5. Stability of array spectroradiometers and their suitability for absolute calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevas, Saulius; Teuber, Annette; Sperling, Armin; Lindemann, Matthias

    2012-04-01

    An investigation of the short- and long-term stability of various low-end and high-end array spectroradiometers is presented. Potentially weak points of array spectroradiometers with respect to their suitability for absolute calibrations are pointed out. The influence of ambient conditions on relevant instrumental characteristics and their temporal stability is discussed. It is shown that the temporal stability of some instruments can be significantly affected by high ambient humidity. Most important ambient temperature effects on instrument properties are also discussed.

  6. Revised absolute amplitude calibration of the LOPES experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Link, K; Apel, W D; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hiller, R; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Isar, P G; Kampert, K-H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Łuczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schoo, S; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2015-01-01

    One of the main aims of the LOPES experiment was the evaluation of the absolute amplitude of the radio signal of air showers. This is of special interest since the radio technique offers the possibility for an independent and highly precise determination of the energy scale of cosmic rays on the basis of signal predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. For the calibration of the amplitude measured by LOPES we used an external source. Previous comparisons of LOPES measurements and simulations of the radio signal amplitude predicted by CoREAS revealed a discrepancy of the order of a factor of two. A re-measurement of the reference calibration source, now performed for the free field, was recently performed by the manufacturer. The updated calibration values lead to a lowering of the reconstructed electric field measured by LOPES by a factor of $2.6 \\pm 0.2$ and therefore to a significantly better agreement with CoREAS simulations. We discuss the updated calibration and its impact on the LOPES analysis results.

  7. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of a Standard Radiation Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, J. M.; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, J.; Martín, M. J.; Pons, A.; del Campo, D.

    2014-04-01

    Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) is disseminating the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90), at high temperatures, by using the fixed points of Ag and Cu and a standard radiation thermometer. However, the future mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin ( MeP-K) will include the dissemination of the kelvin by primary methods and by indirect approximations capable of exceptionally low uncertainties or increased reliability. Primary radiometry is, at present, able to achieve uncertainties competitive with the ITS-90 above the silver point with one of the possible techniques the calibration for radiance responsivity of an imaging radiometer (radiance method). In order to carry out this calibration, IO-CSIC (Spanish Designated Institute for luminous intensity and luminous flux) has collaborated with CEM, allowing traceability to its cryogenic radiometer. A monochromator integrating sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been used to calibrate one of the CEM standard radiation thermometers. The absolute calibrated standard radiation thermometer has been used to determine the temperatures of the fixed points of Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. The results obtained are 1357.80 K, 1597.10 K, 2011.66 K, and 2747.64 K, respectively, with uncertainties ranging from 0.4 K to 1.1 K.

  8. Pre-flight radiometric and spectral calibration of Resourcesat-2A-LISS3* payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Harish; Detroja, M. P.; Padmanabhan, Deepa; Raj, Vedant; Kumar, Anil; Sarkar, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Resourcesat-2A is a follow-on mission of Resourcesat-2, belongs to Indian Remote Sensing Program. It is expected to be launched in 2016 and is dedicated mainly to agricultural applications. One of the payloads, LISS3* is a medium resolution (23.5 m) sensor having four multispectral bands from 450 to 1650 nm. These spectral bands are named as B2 (550 nm), B3 (650 nm), B4 (815 nm) and B5 (1625 nm) respectively covering Visible, Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) regions. In order to provide quality data to the user community for long term scientific applications pre-flight ground calibration is carried out. This paper describes pre-flight spectral and radiometric calibration of LISS3* payload and its performance evaluation. Since it is a continuity mission to Resourcesat-2, which was launched in April 2011 so for generating long-term data record and correlation with previous observations, its parameters are compared with Resourcesat-2 LISS3* payload. The main spectral parameters like central wavelength, and pass band is determined using system level spectral response and compared for both the mission and differences are outlined. The next important exercise is pre-flight radiometric calibration, which was carried out in laboratory using a standard integrating sphere traceable to NIST standards. This paper highlights the technique adopted during pre-flight calibration of the radiometric response and performance assessment of all 4 bands of LISS3* in terms of major electro-optical parameters like Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), Saturation Radiance (SR) etc. The observed SR shows that the sensor can measure spectral radiance from Earth up to 100% albedo.

  9. The Absolute Calibration of the HiRes Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. N.; Thomas, S. B.; HiRes Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    The HiRes experiment studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using the air fluorescence technique. The experiment uses large mirrors that collect the fluorescence light and fo cus it onto arrays of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs measure the intensity and time of arrival of the collected light. Our primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs uses a high stability (portable light source. This source is transferred from the lab to the field where it is employed as a standard candle to calibrate the 64 detectors (>16,000 PMTs). To determine the absolute response it is necessary to understand the absolute light output of this source. We have measured the source irradiance using a hybrid photo dio de system, two NIST calibrated photo-dio des, and by observing the photo electron statistics of the PMTs. 2. Introduction The goal of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) project is to study cosmic rays at the highest energies. An ultra high energy cosmic ray entering the earth's atmosphere collides with atmospheric nuclei triggering the development of an Extensive Air Shower (EAS). The EAS emits fluorescence light as it develops. HiRes uses the air fluorescence signal to measure properties of the primary cosmic ray particle. The fundamental detector elements in HiRes are photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The light from an EAS is collected by large mirrors and fo cused into cameras each consisting of 256 PMTs [1]. Routine monitoring and calibration of the PMTs and associated electronics are crucial to the proper interpretation of the data. The primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs involves the use of a high stability portable xenon flash lamp. The Roving Xenon Flasher (RXF) offers several advantages. The pulse-to-pulse variation in intensity is very small ˜0.3% and the stability over a night is better than 2%. The emission spectrum of the RXF is sufficiently broad to allow calibration over a wide range of wavelengths. It is also readily transported from

  10. Updated radiometric calibration for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper reflective bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, D.L.; Markham, B.L.; Thome, K.J.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Malla, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) has been the workhorse of the Landsat system. Launched in 1984, it continues collecting data through the time frame of this paper. Thus, it provides an invaluable link to the past history of the land features of the Earth's surface, and it becomes imperative to provide an accurate radiometric calibration of the reflective bands to the user community. Previous calibration has been based on information obtained from prelaunch, the onboard calibrator, vicarious calibration attempts, and cross-calibration with Landsat-7. Currently, additional data sources are available to improve this calibration. Specifically, improvements in vicarious calibration methods and development of the use of pseudoinvariant sites for trending provide two additional independent calibration sources. The use of these additional estimates has resulted in a consistent calibration approach that ties together all of the available calibration data sources. Results from this analysis indicate a simple exponential, or a constant model may be used for all bands throughout the lifetime of Landsat-5 TM. Where previously time constants for the exponential models were approximately one year, the updated model has significantly longer time constants in bands 1-3. In contrast, bands 4, 5, and 7 are shown to be best modeled by a constant. The models proposed in this paper indicate calibration knowledge of 5% or better early in life, decreasing to nearly 2% later in life. These models have been implemented at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) and are the default calibration used for all Landsat TM data now distributed through EROS. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  11. Design and use of concrete pads for the calibration of radiometric survey instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gamma-ray spectrometer for use in geological exploration possesses four stripping ratios and three window sensitivities which must be determined to make the instrumentation applicable for field assay or airborne measurement of potassium, uranium, and thorium contents in the ground. Survey organizations in many parts of the world perform the instrument calibration using large pads of concrete which simulate a plane ground of known radioelement concentration. Calibration and monitoring trials with twelve facilities in ten countries prove that moisture absorption, radon exhalation, and particle-size effects can offset a radiometric grade assigned to concrete whose aggregate contains an embedded radioactive mineral. These and other calibration problems are discussed from a combined theoretical and practical viewpoint

  12. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zielcke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur dioxide emission flux measurements are an important tool for volcanic monitoring and eruption risk assessment. The SO2 camera technique remotely measures volcanic emissions by analysing the ultraviolet absorption of SO2 in a narrow spectral window between 305 nm and 320 nm using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere. The SO2 absorption is selectively detected by mounting band-pass interference filters in front of a two-dimensional, UV-sensitive CCD detector. While this approach is simple and delivers valuable insights into the two-dimensional SO2 distribution, absolute calibration has proven to be difficult. An accurate calibration of the SO2 camera (i.e., conversion from optical density to SO2 column density, CD is crucial to obtain correct SO2 CDs and flux measurements that are comparable to other measurement techniques and can be used for volcanological applications. The most common approach for calibrating SO2 camera measurements is based on inserting quartz cells (cuvettes containing known amounts of SO2 into the light path. It has been found, however, that reflections from the windows of the calibration cell can considerably affect the signal measured by the camera. Another possibility for calibration relies on performing simultaneous measurements in a small area of the camera's field-of-view (FOV by a narrow-field-of-view Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (NFOV-DOAS system. This procedure combines the very good spatial and temporal resolution of the SO2 camera technique with the more accurate column densities obtainable from DOAS measurements. This work investigates the uncertainty of results gained through the two commonly used, but quite different calibration methods (DOAS and calibration cells. Measurements with three different instruments, an SO2 camera, a NFOV-DOAS system and an Imaging DOAS (IDOAS, are presented. We compare the calibration-cell approach with the calibration from the NFOV-DOAS system. The

  13. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, R. A.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Woods, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. ( Solar Phys., 2010, doi:10.1007/s11207-009-9485-8). In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  14. Calibrating Late Quaternary terrestrial climate signals: radiometrically dated pollen evidence from the southern Sierra Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Durika, Nancy J.; Smith, George I.

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a radiometrically calibrated proxy record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change exceeding 230,000 yr duration, using pollen profiles from two cores taken through age-equivalent dry lakes - one core having greater age control (via 230Th alpha mass-spectrometry) and the other having greater stratigraphic completeness. The better dated of these two serial pollen records (Searles Lake) served as a reference section for improving the effective radiometric age control in a nearby and more complete pollen record (Owens Lake) because they: (1) are situated ~90 km apart in the same drainage system (on, and immediately leeward of, the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada), and (2) preserved strikingly similar pollen profiles and concordant sequences of sedimentological changes. Pollen assemblages from both lakes are well preserved and diverse, and document serial changes in Late Pleistocene and Holocene plant zone distribution and composition in the westernmost Great Basin; they consist of taxa now inhabiting montane forest, woodland, steppe, and desert-scrub environments. The studied core intervals are interpreted here to be the terrestrial equivalent of marine δ18O stages 1 through 9; these pollen profiles now appear to be among the best radiometrically dated Late Pleistocene records of terrestrial climate change known.

  15. An Empirical Approach to Ocean Color Data: Reducing Bias and the Need for Post-Launch Radiometric Re-Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Casey, Nancy W.; O'Reilly, John E.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2009-01-01

    A new empirical approach is developed for ocean color remote sensing. Called the Empirical Satellite Radiance-In situ Data (ESRID) algorithm, the approach uses relationships between satellite water-leaving radiances and in situ data after full processing, i.e., at Level-3, to improve estimates of surface variables while relaxing requirements on post-launch radiometric re-calibration. The approach is evaluated using SeaWiFS chlorophyll, which is the longest time series of the most widely used ocean color geophysical product. The results suggest that ESRID 1) drastically reduces the bias of ocean chlorophyll, most impressively in coastal regions, 2) modestly improves the uncertainty, and 3) reduces the sensitivity of global annual median chlorophyll to changes in radiometric re-calibration. Simulated calibration errors of 1% or less produce small changes in global median chlorophyll (less than 2.7%). In contrast, the standard NASA algorithm set is highly sensitive to radiometric calibration: similar 1% calibration errors produce changes in global median chlorophyll up to nearly 25%. We show that 0.1% radiometric calibration error (about 1% in water-leaving radiance) is needed to prevent radiometric calibration errors from changing global annual median chlorophyll more than the maximum interannual variability observed in the SeaWiFS 9-year record (+/- 3%), using the standard method. This is much more stringent than the goal for SeaWiFS of 5% uncertainty for water leaving radiance. The results suggest ocean color programs might consider less emphasis of expensive efforts to improve post-launch radiometric re-calibration in favor of increased efforts to characterize in situ observations of ocean surface geophysical products. Although the results here are focused on chlorophyll, in principle the approach described by ESRID can be applied to any surface variable potentially observable by visible remote sensing.

  16. A Traceable Ground to On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration System for the Solar Reflective Wavelength Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Donald F.; Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the combination of a Mie scattering spectral BSDF and BTDF albedo standard whose calibration is traceable to the NIST SIRCUS Facility or the NIST STARR II Facility. The Space-based Calibration Transfer Spectroradiometer (SCATS) sensor uses a simple, invariant optical configuration and dedicated narrow band spectral channel modules to provide very accurate, polarization-insensitive, stable measurements of earth albedo and lunar disk albedo. Optical degradation effects on calibration stability are eliminated through use of a common optical system for observations of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. The measurements from space would be traceable to SI units through preflight calibrations of radiance and irradiance at NIST's SIRCUS facility and the invariant optical system used in the sensor. Simultaneous measurements are made in multiple spectral channels covering the solar reflective wavelength range of 300 nm to 2.4 microns. The large dynamic range of signals is handled by use of single-element, highly-linear detectors, stable discrete electronic components, and a non imaging optical configuration. Up to 19 spectral modules can be mounted on a single-axis drive to give direct pointing at the Earth and at least once per orbit view of the Sun and Moon. By observing the Sun on every orbit, the most stringent stability requirements of the system are limited to short time periods. The invariant optical system for both radiance and irradiance measurements also give excellent transfer to-orbit SI traceability. Emerging instrumental requirements for remotely sensing tropospheric trace species have led to a rethinking by some of the paradigm for Systeme International d'Unites (SI) traceability of the spectral irradiance and radiance radiometric calibrations to spectral albedo (sr(exp -1)) which is not a SI unit. In the solar reflective wavelength region the spectral albedo calibrations are tied often to either the spectral albedo of a solar diffuser or the Moon

  17. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  18. Radiometric Cross-Calibration of the Chilean Satellite FASat-C Using RapidEye and EO-1 Hyperion Data and a Simultaneous Nadir Overpass Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Barrientos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The absolute radiometric calibration of a satellite sensor is the critical factor that ensures the usefulness of the acquired data for quantitative applications on remote sensing. This work presents the results of the first cross-calibration of the sensor on board the Sistema Satelital de Observación de la Tierra (SSOT Chilean satellite or Air Force Satellite FASat-C. RapidEye-MSI was chosen as the reference sensor, and a simultaneous Nadir Overpass Approach (SNO was applied. The biases caused by differences in the spectral responses of both instruments were compensated through an adjustment factor derived from EO-1 Hyperion data. Through this method, the variations affecting the radiometric response of New AstroSat Optical Modular Instrument (NAOMI-1, have been corrected based on collections over the Frenchman Flat calibration site. The results of a preliminary evaluation of the pre-flight and updated coefficients have shown a significant improvement in the accuracy of at-sensor radiances and TOA reflectances: an average agreement of 2.63% (RMSE was achieved for the multispectral bands of both instruments. This research will provide a basis for the continuity of calibration and validation tasks of future Chilean space missions.

  19. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT THE CHINA RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION TEST SITE FOR THE REMOTE SENSING SATELITE SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉香; 张广顺; 刘志权; 张立军; 朱顺斌; 戎志国; 邱康睦

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive field experiment was made with the support of the project of China Radiometric Calibration Site (CRCS) during June-July 1999. Ground reflectance spectra were measured at Dunhuang Calibration Test Site in the experiment. More than two thousands of spectral curves were acquired in a 20 km × 20 km area. The spectral coverage is from 350 nm to 2500 nm. The measurement values show that reflectance is between 10% and 33% at the VISSWIR spectral region. The standard deviation of reflectance is between 1.0% and 2.0% for the spectral range. Optical characteristics and ground reflectance measurements at the Dunhuang test site, result analysis and error source were described. In addition, a comparison of the reflectance obtained in 1999 with those measured in 1994 and 1996 was also made.

  20. Sensitivity of satellite-derived net shortwave irradiance at the Earth's surface to radiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, C.; Frouin, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radiometric calibration uncertainties on satellite-derived net shortwave irradiance at the Earth's surface was examined. Net shortwave irradiance sensitivity to calibration is expressed as a function of two basic components that depend on surface and cloud albedo sensitivities, respectively. The analysis of these sensitivities for a wide range of atmospheric and surface conditions, as well as radiation geometries, shows that a 10 percent uncertainty in the calibration induces up to 40 W/sqm errors in instantaneous net shortwave irradiance (negative when the calibration uncertainty is positive). The maximum relative errors are obtained in overcast conditions when cloud albedos are high. On a monthly time scale, the induced error becomes typically 13 W/sqm in the tropics and 16 W/sqm in higher latitude regions during summer. The error almost vanishes at high latitudes during winter. A 10 percent positive uncertainty in the calibration gives a net shortwave irradiance error similar to that induced by the 3 hr sampling of the ISCCP Project.

  1. A new method for the absolute radiance calibration for UV/vis measurements of scattered sun light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Absolute radiometric calibrations are important for measurements of the atmospheric spectral radiance. Such measurements can be used to determine actinic fluxes, the properties of aerosols and clouds and the short wave energy budget. Conventional calibration methods in the laboratory are based on calibrated light sources and reflectors and are expensive, time consuming and subject to relatively large uncertainties. Also, the calibrated instruments might change during transport from the laboratory to the measurement sites. Here we present a new calibration method for UV/vis instruments that measure the spectrally resolved sky radiance, like for example zenith sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS- instruments or Multi-AXis (MAX- DOAS instruments. Our method is based on the comparison of the solar zenith angle dependence of the measured zenith sky radiance with radiative transfer simulations. For the application of our method clear sky measurements during periods with almost constant aerosol optical depth are needed. The radiative transfer simulations have to take polarisation into account. We show that the calibration results are almost independent from the knowledge of the aerosol optical properties and surface albedo, which causes a rather small uncertainty of about <7%. For wavelengths below about 330 nm it is essential that the ozone column density during the measurements is constant and known.

  2. A new method for the absolute radiance calibration for UV/vis measurements of scattered sun light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Penning de Vries, M.; Remmers, J.; Rozanov, A.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2015-05-01

    Absolute radiometric calibrations are important for measurements of the atmospheric spectral radiance. Such measurements can be used to determine actinic fluxes, the properties of aerosols and clouds and the short wave energy budget. Conventional calibration methods in the laboratory are based on calibrated light sources and reflectors and are expensive, time consuming and subject to relatively large uncertainties. Also, the calibrated instruments might change during transport from the laboratory to the measurement sites. Here we present a new calibration method for UV/vis instruments that measure the spectrally resolved sky radiance, like for example zenith sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS-) instruments or Multi-AXis (MAX-) DOAS instruments. Our method is based on the comparison of the solar zenith angle dependence of the measured zenith sky radiance with radiative transfer simulations. For the application of our method clear sky measurements during periods with almost constant aerosol optical depth are needed. The radiative transfer simulations have to take polarisation into account. We show that the calibration results are almost independent from the knowledge of the aerosol optical properties and surface albedo, which causes a rather small uncertainty of about <7%. For wavelengths below about 330 nm it is essential that the ozone column density during the measurements is constant and known.

  3. Computational Methodology for Absolute Calibration Curves for Microfluidic Optical Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona E. Zaghloul

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical fluorescence and absorption are two of the primary techniques used for analytical microfluidics. We provide a thorough yet tractable method for computing the performance of diverse optical micro-analytical systems. Sample sizes range from nano- to many micro-liters and concentrations from nano- to milli-molar. Equations are provided to trace quantitatively the flow of the fundamental entities, namely photons and electrons, and the conversion of energy from the source, through optical components, samples and spectral-selective components, to the detectors and beyond. The equations permit facile computations of calibration curves that relate the concentrations or numbers of molecules measured to the absolute signals from the system. This methodology provides the basis for both detailed understanding and improved design of microfluidic optical analytical systems. It saves prototype turn-around time, and is much simpler and faster to use than ray tracing programs. Over two thousand spreadsheet computations were performed during this study. We found that some design variations produce higher signal levels and, for constant noise levels, lower minimum detection limits. Improvements of more than a factor of 1,000 were realized.

  4. Consistency of L4 TM absolute calibration with respect to the L5 TM sensor based on near-simultaneous image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Helder, D.L.; Malla, R.; Micijevic, E.; Mettler, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Landsat archive provides more than 35 years of uninterrupted multispectral remotely sensed data of Earth observations. Since 1972, Landsat missions have carried different types of sensors, from the Return Beam Vidicon (RBV) camera to the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). However, the Thematic Mapper (TM) sensors on Landsat 4 (L4) and Landsat 5 (L5), launched in 1982 and 1984 respectively, are the backbone of an extensive archive. Effective April 2, 2007, the radiometric calibration of L5 TM data processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) was updated to use an improved lifetime gain model, based on the instrument's detector response to pseudo-invariant desert site data and cross-calibration with the L7 ETM+. However, no modifications were ever made to the radiometric calibration procedure of the Landsat 4 (L4) TM data. The L4 TM radiometric calibration procedure has continued to use the Internal Calibrator (IC) based calibration algorithms and the post calibration dynamic ranges, as previously defined. To evaluate the "current" absolute accuracy of these two sensors, image pairs from the L5 TM and L4 TM sensors were compared. The number of coincident image pairs in the USGS EROS archive is limited, so the scene selection for the cross-calibration studies proved to be a challenge. Additionally, because of the lack of near-simultaneous images available over well-characterized and traditionally used calibration sites, alternate sites that have high reflectance, large dynamic range, high spatial uniformity, high sun elevation, and minimal cloud cover were investigated. The alternate sites were identified in Yuma, Iraq, Egypt, Libya, and Algeria. The cross-calibration approach involved comparing image statistics derived from large common areas observed eight days apart by the two sensors. This paper summarizes the average percent differences in reflectance estimates obtained between the

  5. The construction of a radiometric calibration facility at Lanseria Airport, Republic of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of standard sources suitable for the calibration of airborne and truck-mounted gamma-spectrometer systems is described. Four sources were built, three of which were doped with preselected quantities of uranium, thorium or potassium. A fourth source was left barren so as to provide a measure of the background radiation in the area. The sources are 8 m in diameter, 0,35 m thick and are recessed into the disused northern portion of runway 17 at Lanseria Airport, north of Johannesburg. Adopted concentrations of the major radioelements in the sources are: 6,10 % k2O in the potasssium source, 67,0 ppm U3O8 in the uranium source (radiometric), 158 ppm ThO2 in the thorium source

  6. Radiometric calibration and stability of the Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L.; Barsi, Julia A.; Kaita, Edward; Ong, Lawrence; Morfitt, Ron A.; Haque, Md. O.

    2015-09-01

    Landsat-8 and its two Earth imaging sensors, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) have been operating on-orbit for 2 1/2 years. The OLI radiometric calibration, which is monitored using on-board lamps, on-board solar diffusers, the moon and vicarious calibration techniques has been stable to within 1% over this period of time. The Coastal Aerosol band, band 1, shows the largest change at about 1% over the period; all other bands have shown no significant trend. OLI bands 1- 4 show small discontinuities in response (+0.1% to 0.2%) beginning about 7 months after launch and continuing for about 1 month associated with a power cycling of the instrument, though the origin of the recovery is unclear. To date these small changes have not been compensated for, but this will change with a reprocessing campaign that is currently scheduled for Fall 2015. The calibration parameter files (each typically covering a 3 month period) will be updated for these observed gain changes. A fitted response to an adjusted average of the lamps, solar and lunar results will represent the trend, sampled at the rate of one value per CPF.

  7. ScaRaB: first results of absolute and cross calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trémas, Thierry L.; Aznay, Ouahid; Chomette, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    ScaRaB (SCAnner for RAdiation Budget) is the name of three radiometers whose two first flight models have been launched in 1994 and 1997. The instruments were mounted on-board Russian satellites, METEOR and RESURS. On October 12th 2011, a last model has been launched from the Indian site of Sriharikota. ScaRaB is a passenger of MEGHA-TROPIQUES, an Indo-French joint Satellite Mission for studying the water cycle and energy exchanges in the tropics. ScaRaB is composed of four parallel and independent channels. Channel-2 and channel-3 are considered as the main ones. Channel-1 is dedicated to measure solar radiance (0.5 to 0.7 μm) while channel-4 (10 to 13 μm) is an infrared window. The absolute calibration of ScaRab is assured by internal calibration sources (black bodies and a lamp for channel-1). However, during the commissioning phase, the lamp used for the absolute calibration of channel-1 revealed to be inaccurate. We propose here an alternative calibration method based on terrestrial targets. Due to the spectral range of channel-1, only calibration over desert sites (temporal monitoring) and clouds (cross band) is suitable. Desert sites have been widely used for sensor calibration since they have a stable spectral response over time. Because of their high reflectances, the atmospheric effect on the upward radiance is relatively minimal. In addition, they are spatially uniform. Their temporal instability without atmospheric correction has been determined to be less than 1-2% over a year. Very-high-altitude (10 km) bright clouds are good validation targets in the visible and near-infrared spectra because of their high spectrally consistent reflectance. If the clouds are very high, there is no need to correct aerosol scattering and water vapor absorption as both aerosol and water vapor are distributed near the surface. Only Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption need to be considered. This method has been found to give a 4% uncertainty. Radiometric cross

  8. The Mauna Kea Observatories Near-Infrared Filter Set. III. Isophotal Wavelengths and Absolute Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Tokunaga, A T

    2005-01-01

    The isophotal wavelengths, flux densities, and AB magnitudes for Vega (alpha Lyr) are presented for the Mauna Kea Observatories near-infrared filter set. We show that the near-infrared absolute calibration for Vega determined by Cohen et al. and Megessier are consistent within the uncertainties, so that either absolute calibration may be used.

  9. Absolute ages from crater statistics: Using radiometric ages of Martian samples for determining the Martian cratering chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.

    1988-01-01

    In the absence of dates derived from rock samples, impact crater frequencies are commonly used to date Martian surface units. All models for absolute dating rely on the lunar cratering chronology and on the validity of its extrapolation to Martian conditions. Starting from somewhat different lunar chronologies, rather different Martian cratering chronologies are found in the literature. Currently favored models are compared. The differences at old ages are significant, the differences at younger ages are considerable and give absolute ages for the same crater frequencies as different as a factor of 3. The total uncertainty could be much higher, though, since the ratio of lunar to Martian cratering rate which is of basic importance in the models is believed to be known no better than within a factor of 2. Thus, it is of crucial importance for understanding the the evolution of Mars and determining the sequence of events to establish an unambiguous Martian cratering chronology from crater statistics in combination with clean radiometric ages of returned Martian samples. For the dating goal, rocks should be as pristine as possible from a geologically simple area with a one-stage emplacement history of the local formation. A minimum of at least one highland site for old ages, two intermediate-aged sites, and one very young site is needed.

  10. Geometric Calibration and Radiometric Correction of LiDAR Data and Their Impact on the Quality of Derived Products

    OpenAIRE

    Wai-Yeung Yan; Ahmed Shaker; Habib, Ayman F.; Kersting, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR sys...

  11. Radiometric calibration stability of the EO-1 advanced land imager: 5 years on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Ong, L.; Barsi, J.A.; Mendenhall, J.A.; Lencioni, D.E.; Helder, D.L.; Hollaren, D.M.; Morfitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was developed as a prototype sensor for follow on missions to Landsat-7. It was launched in November 2000 on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite as a nominal one-year technology demonstration mission. As of this writing, the sensor has continued to operate in excess of 5 years. Six of the ALl's nine multi-spectral (MS) bands and the panchromatic band have similar spectral coverage as those on the Landsat-7 ETM+. In addition to on-board lamps, which have been significantly more stable than the lamps on ETM+, the ALI has a solar diffuser and has imaged the moon monthly since launch. This combined calibration dataset allows understanding of the radiometric stability of the ALI system, its calibrators and some differentiation of the sources of the changes with time. The solar dataset is limited as the mechanism controlling the aperture to the solar diffuser failed approximately 18 months after launch. Results over 5 years indicate that: the shortest wavelength band (443 nm) has degraded in response about 2%; the 482 nm and 565 nm bands decreased in response about 1%; the 660 nm, 790 nm and 868 nm bands each degraded about 5%; the 1250 nm and 1650 nm bands did not change significantly and the 2215 nm band increased in response about 2%.

  12. Atmospheric measurement analysis for the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    The Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) was developed by the University of Arizona in the early 2000s to collect ground-based data in support of the calibration and validation of Earth-observing sensors. It uses the reflectance-based approach, which requires measurements of the atmosphere and surface reflectance. The measurements are used in MODTRAN to determine the at-sensor radiance for a given time and date. In the traditional reflectance-based approach, on-site personnel use an automated solar radiometer (ASR) to measure the atmospheric attenuation, but in the case of RadCaTS, an AERONET Cimel sun photometer is used to make atmospheric measurements. This work presents a comparison between the Cimel-derived atmospheric characteristics such as aerosol optical depth, the Angstrom exponent, and the columnar water vapor, to those derived using a traditional solar radiometer. The top-of-atmosphere radiance derived using the Cimel and ASR measurements are compared using Landsat 8 OLI bands as a test case for the period 2012-2014 to determine if any biases exist between the two methodologies.

  13. Radiometric in-situ calibration of satelital sensors of Earth observation using a spectroradiometer

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo

    2012-01-01

    By using the satelital information of Earth observation unloaded by a station constructed in the country and reflectances measurements of the soil, we found the total radiation attenuation of the atmosphere for a small region of the Colombian territory. It was necessary to use the Fourier's theory that describes the ideal filters of signals to find the transfer functions between the spectral response of an spectroradiometer and the satelital sensor, whose radiative sign we are going to calibrate. After that, we used the reflectance spectrum of the soil taken with our spectroradiometer, the information in digital numbers (DN) of a pixel of the satelital image of the same region at the same time, and using again the theory of ideal filters we found the transfer function between the responses of both sensors to the radiance of the soil. The relation between both signals provides us the total intensity of the radiation attenuation of the atmosphere for pixel, which is fundamental to do a radiometric calibration o...

  14. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; Koenig, Kristina; Groom, Geoff; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about the magnitude of localised flooding of riverine areas is crucial for appropriate land management and administration at regional and local levels. However, detection and delineation of localised flooding with remote sensing techniques are often hampered on floodplains by the presence of herbaceous vegetation. To address this problem, this study presents the application of full-waveform airborne laser scanning (ALS) data for detection of floodwater extent. In general, water surfaces are characterised by low values of backscattered energy due to water absorption of the infrared laser shots, but the exact strength of the recorded laser pulse depends on the area covered by the targets located within a laser pulse footprint area. To account for this we analysed the physical quantity of radiometrically calibrated ALS data, the backscattering coefficient, in relation to water and vegetation coverage within a single laser footprint. The results showed that the backscatter was negatively correlated to water coverage, and that of the three distinguished classes of water coverage (low, medium, and high) only the class with the largest extent of water cover (>70%) had relatively distinct characteristics that can be used for classification of water surfaces. Following the laser footprint analysis, three classifiers, namely AdaBoost with Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest, were utilised to classify laser points into flooded and non-flooded classes and to derive the map of flooding extent. The performance of the classifiers is highly dependent on the set of laser points features used. Best performance was achieved by combining radiometric and geometric laser point features. The accuracy of flooding maps based solely on radiometric features resulted in overall accuracies of up to 70% and was limited due to the overlap of the backscattering coefficient values between water and other land cover classes. Our point-based classification methods assure a high

  15. Absolute calibration of soft X-ray plates by using a self-calibrated X-ray bolometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of soft X-ray plates, Kodak 101-05 and ILFORD Q-PLATE at 1.1 keV was measured by using a self-calibrated X-ray bolometer as a standard detector for absolute measurements of soft X-rays. Cross-calibration was also made by using an X-ray sensitive diamond detector. Good agreement in the absolute sensitivity was obtained between the bolometer and the diamond detector. (author)

  16. PLEIADES-HR 1A&1B image quality commissioning: innovative radiometric calibration methods and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Vincent; Blanchet, Gwendoline; Kubik, Philippe; Lacherade, Sophie; Latry, Christophe; Lebegue, Laurent; Lenoir, Florie; Porez-Nadal, Florence

    2013-09-01

    PLEIADES is an earth observing system conducted by the French National Space Agency, CNES. It consists of two satellites launched on December 2011 (PHR-1A) and December 2012 (PHR-1B), both designed to provide optical pushbroom imagery on five spectral bands to civilian and defense users, with ground sample distance up to 70 cm. During inflight image quality commissioning, radiometric activities included inter-detector normalization coefficients computation, refocusing operations, MTF assessment and estimation of signal to noise ratios. This paper presents inflight results for both satellites. It focuses on several innovative methods that were implemented, taking advantage of the satellite platform great agility. These methods are based on processing images obtained through dedicated exotic guidance. In particular, slow-motion steering enables an efficient estimation of the instrumental noise model, since during acquisition each detector has been viewing a stable ground target along different time samples. Conversely, rotated retina guidance is used to guarantee that all different elementary detectors have successively viewed the same set of landscape samples during acquisition. Non-uniformity of detector sensitivities can then be characterized, and on-board coefficients used prior to compression can be calibrated in order to prevent vertical striping effects on operational images. Defocus control and Point Spread Function estimation can be easily obtained through processing acquisitions of stars associated to various spectral characteristics, for different adjustments of the refocusing system. All these methods allow an accurate estimation of radiometric performance on the whole range of specified spectral radiances, while drastically reducing the number of required acquisitions on natural targets.

  17. Absolute spectral radiance responsivity calibration of sun photometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun photometers are designed to measure direct solar irradiance and diffused sky radiance for the purpose of atmospheric parameters characterization. A sun photometer is usually calibrated by using a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source for its band-averaged radiance responsivity, which normally has an uncertainty of 3%-5% at present. Considering the calibration coefficients may also change with time, a regular high precision calibration is important to maintain data quality. In this paper, a tunable-laser-based facility for spectral radiance responsivity calibration has been developed at the Key Laboratory of Optical Calibration and Characterization, Chinese Academy of Sciences. A reference standard radiance radiometer, calibrated against cryogenic radiometer, is used to determine the radiance from a laser-illuminated integrating sphere source. Spectral radiance responsivity of CIMEL CE318-2 sun photometer is calibrated using this new calibration system with a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.8%. As a validation, the derived band-averaged radiance responsivity are compared to that from a Goddard Space Flight Center lamp-based sphere calibration and good agreements (difference <1.4%) are found from 675 to 1020 nm bands.

  18. Absolute calibration of space-resolving soft X-ray spectrograph for plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Okamoto, Y.; Kawamori, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Watabe, C.; Yamaguchi, N.; Tamano, T.

    2001-07-01

    A grazing incidence flat-field soft X-ray (20-350 Å) spectrograph was constructed and applied for impurity diagnostics in the GAMMA 10 fusion plasma. The spectrograph consisted of a limited height entrance slit, an aberration-corrected concave grating, a microchannel-plate intensified detector and an instant camera/a high speed solid state camera. An absolute calibration experiment for the SX spectrograph was performed at the Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization with monitoring the incident synchrotron beam intensity by using an absolutely calibrated XUV silicon photodiode. From the results of absolute calibration of the spectrograph, the radiation loss from the plasma was obtained.

  19. Absolute calibration of space-resolving soft X-ray spectrograph for plasma diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshikawa, M; Kawamori, E; Watanabe, Y; Watabe, C; Yamaguchi, N; Tamano, T

    2001-01-01

    A grazing incidence flat-field soft X-ray (20-350 A) spectrograph was constructed and applied for impurity diagnostics in the GAMMA 10 fusion plasma. The spectrograph consisted of a limited height entrance slit, an aberration-corrected concave grating, a microchannel-plate intensified detector and an instant camera/a high speed solid state camera. An absolute calibration experiment for the SX spectrograph was performed at the Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization with monitoring the incident synchrotron beam intensity by using an absolutely calibrated XUV silicon photodiode. From the results of absolute calibration of the spectrograph, the radiation loss from the plasma was obtained.

  20. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  1. Validation of the onboard radiometric calibration of the GOES I-M visible channel by reflectance-based vicarious methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisso, Nathan P.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S.

    2007-09-01

    The current generation of the Geostationary Operations Environmental Satellite (GOES) platform employs a total of 5 sensors to monitor and record atmospheric conditions used in predictions of upcoming weather events. Included in this package is a 5-band imager that, from the 36,000-km geosynchronous orbit inhabited by GOES platform, enables multiple fixed full-disc surface images of the earth during the course of a 24-hour day. There is currently no on-board radiometric calibration for the visible bands of the imager and radiometric calibration relies on vicarious approaches. The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona uses a vicarious approach that relies on ground-based measurements to determine the radiometric calibration for multiple sun-synchronous and airborne visible and near-infrared sensors. The current work extends the approach to the GOES I-M series of sensor. The paper presents the methods and results of the reflectance-based method applied to the 1-km visible channel of GOES-11using large North American high-desert test sites. Modifications to the RSG's methods to take into account the location of the test sites at large zenith angles within the full-disk GOES image. The work provides an opportunity to evaluate uncertainties of the spectral BRF of the test sites at large view angles and resulting importance to the accurate radiometric calibration of a sensor. In addition, the impact of increased path length caused by the large view angle is evaluated with an emphasis on the increased effect of the atmospheric characterization.

  2. Optical subsystems calibration and derived radiometric instrument response of the PHEBUS spectrometer on board of the BepiColombo Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probing of Hermean By Ultraviolet Spectroscopy (PHEBUS) is a double spectrometer that will fly onboard of the BepiColombo mission. It will investigate the composition and dynamic of Mercury's exosphere to better understand the coupled surface - exosphere - magnetosphere system of the planet. The radiometric calibration tests are ongoing and an approach based on the Mueller Matrix formalism has been adopted to determine the pure efficiency of the instrument. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a such complete method is applied to the calibration of space instrumentation.

  3. Radiometric calibration of IR Fourier transform spectrometers - Solution to a problem with the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Buijs, H.; Howell, Hugh B.; Laporte, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    A calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer, known as the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), has been flown on the NASA U-2 research aircraft to measure the infrared emission spectrum of the earth. The primary use - atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding - requires high radiometric precision and accuracy (of the order of 0.1 and 1 C, respectively). To meet these requirements, the HIS instruments, the HIS instrument performs inflight radiometric calibration, using observations of hot and cold blackbody reference sources as the basis for two-point calibrations at each wavenumber. Initially, laboratory tests revealed a calibration problem with brightness temperature errors as large as 15 C between 600 and 900/cm. The symptom of the problem, which occurred in one of the three spectral bands of HIS, was a source-dependent phase response. Minor changes to the calibration equations completely eliminated the anomalous errors. The new analysis properly accounts for the situation in which the phase response for radiance from the instrument itself differs from that for radiance from an external source. The mechanism responsible for the dual phase response of the HIS instrument is identified as emission from the interferometer beam splitter.

  4. Assessment and Correction of on-Orbit Radiometric Calibration for FY-3 VIRR Thermal Infrared Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available FengYun-3 (FY-3 Visible Infrared Radiometer (VIRR, along with its predecessor, Multispectral Visible Infrared Scanning Radiometer (MVISR, onboard FY-1C&D have had continuous global observation more than 14 years. This data record is valuable for weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environment research. Data quality is vital for satellite data assimilations in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP and quantitative remote sensing applications. In this paper, the accuracies of radiometric calibration for VIRR onboard FY-3A and FY-3B, in thermal infrared (TIR channels, are evaluated using the Low Earth Orbit (LEO-LEO simultaneous nadir overpass intercalibration method. Hyperspectral and high-quality observations from Infrared Atmosphere Sounding Instrument (IASI onboard METOP-A are used as reference. The biases of VIRR measurements with respect to IASI over one-and-a-half years indicate that the TIR calibration accuracy of FY-3B VIRR is better than that of FY-3A VIRR. The brightness temperature (BT measured by FY-3A/VIRR is cooler than that measured by IASI with monthly mean biases ranging from −2 K to −1 K for channel 4 and −1 K to 0.2 K for channel 5. Measurements from FY-3B/VIRR are more consistent with that from IASI, and the annual mean biases are 0.84 ± 0.16 K and −0.66 ± 0.18 K for channels 4 and 5, respectively. The BT biases of FY-3A/VIRR show scene temperature-dependence and seasonal variation, which are not found from FY-3B/VIRR BT biases. The temperature-dependent biases are shown to be attributed to the nonlinearity of detectors. New nonlinear correction coefficients of FY-3A/VIRR TIR channels are reevaluated using various collocation samples. Verification results indicate that the use of the new nonlinear correction can greatly correct the scene temperature-dependent and systematic biases.

  5. First Absolutely Calibrated Localized Measurements of Ion Velocity in the MST in Locked and Rotating Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Munaretto, S.

    2015-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used on MST for high time-resolution passive and active measurements of impurity ion emission. Absolutely calibrated measurements of flow are difficult because the spectrometer records data within 0.3 nm of the C+5 line of interest, and commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range . A novel optical system was designed to absolutely calibrate the IDS. The device uses an UV LED to produce a broad emission curve in the desired region. A Fabry-Perot etalon filters this light, cutting transmittance peaks into the pattern of the LED emission. An optical train of fused silica lenses focuses the light into the IDS with f/4. A holographic diffuser blurs the light cone to increase homogeneity. Using this light source, the absolute Doppler shift of ion emissions can be measured in MST plasmas. In combination with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, localized ion velocities can now be measured. Previously, a time-averaged measurement along the chord bisecting the poloidal plane was used to calibrate the IDS; the quality of these central chord calibrations can be characterized with our absolute calibration. Calibration errors may also be quantified and minimized by optimizing the curve-fitting process. Preliminary measurements of toroidal velocity in locked and rotating plasmas will be shown. This work has been supported by the US DOE.

  6. Level 0 to 1 processing of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Neubert, T.; Ribalda, R.; Sha, M. K.; Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Ebersoldt, A.; Kretschmer, E.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olschewski, F.; Preusse, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer that is capable of operating on various high-altitude research aircraft. It measures the atmospheric emission in the thermal infrared spectral region in limb and nadir geometry. GLORIA consists of a classical Michelson interferometer combined with an infrared camera. The infrared detector has a usable area of 128 × 128 pixels, measuring up to 16 384 interferograms simultaneously. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometers impose a number of challenges with respect to instrument calibration and algorithm development. The optical setup with extremely high optical throughput requires the development of new methods and algorithms for spectral and radiometric calibration. Due to the vast amount of data there is a high demand for scientifically intelligent optimisation of the data processing. This paper outlines the characterisation and processing steps required for the generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra. Methods for performance optimisation of the processing algorithm are presented. The performance of the data processing and the quality of the calibrated spectra are demonstrated for measurements collected during the first deployments of GLORIA on aircraft.

  7. Level 0 to 1 processing of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kleinert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA is an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer that is capable of operating on various high-altitude research aircraft. It measures the atmospheric emission in the thermal infrared spectral region in limb and nadir geometry. GLORIA consists of a classical Michelson interferometer combined with an infrared camera. The infrared detector has a usable area of 128 × 128 pixels, measuring up to 16 384 interferograms simultaneously. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometers impose a number of challenges with respect to instrument calibration and algorithm development. The optical setup with extremely high optical throughput requires the development of new methods and algorithms for spectral and radiometric calibration. Due to the vast amount of data there is a high demand for scientifically intelligent optimisation of the data processing. This paper outlines the characterisation and processing steps required for the generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra. Methods for performance optimisation of the processing algorithm are presented. The performance of the data processing and the quality of the calibrated spectra are demonstrated for measurements collected during the first deployments of GLORIA on aircraft.

  8. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Illing, Sebastian; Kern, Christoph; Alvarez Nieves, Jose Manuel; Vogel, Leif; Zielcke, Johannes; Delgados Granados, Hugo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide emission rate measurements are an important tool for volcanic monitoring and eruption risk assessment. The SO2 camera technique remotely measures volcanic emissions by analysing the ultraviolet absorption of SO2 in a narrow spectral window between 300 and 320 nm using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere. The SO2 absorption is selectively detected by mounting band-pass interference filters in front of a two-dimensional, UV-sensitive CCD detector. One important step for correct SO2 emission rate measurements that can be compared with other measurement techniques is a correct calibration. This requires conversion from the measured optical density to the desired SO2 column density (CD). The conversion factor is most commonly determined by inserting quartz cells (cuvettes) with known amounts of SO2 into the light path. Another calibration method uses an additional narrow field-of-view Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system (NFOVDOAS), which measures the column density simultaneously in a small area of the camera’s field-of-view. This procedure combines the very good spatial and temporal resolution of the SO2 camera technique with the more accurate column densities obtainable from DOAS measurements.

  9. A Laser Frequency Comb System for Absolute Calibration of the VTT Echelle Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Doerr, H -P; Holzwarth, R; Schmidt, T Kentischer und W

    2012-01-01

    A wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb (LFC) was developed in a co-operation between the Kiepenheuer-Institut f\\"ur Sonnenphysik, Freiburg, Germany and the Max-Planck-Institut f\\"ur Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany for permanent installation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The system was installed successfully in October 2011. By simultaneously recording the spectra from the Sun and the LFC, for each exposure a calibration curve can be derived from the known frequencies of the comb modes that is suitable for absolute calibration at the meters per second level. We briefly summarize some topics in solar physics that benefit from absolute spectroscopy and point out the advantages of LFC compared to traditional calibration techniques. We also sketch the basic setup of the VTT calibration system and its integration with the existing echelle spectrograph.

  10. The Absolute, Relative and Multi-Wavelength Calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory Fluorescence Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapik, R.; Bauleo, P.; Becker, B.R.; Brack, J.; Caruso, R.; Fratte, C.Delle; Dorofeev, A.; Harton, J.; Insolia, A.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Menshikov, A.

    2007-08-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a 375 nm light source at the telescope aperture. This end-to-end technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The relative response has been measured at wavelengths of 320, 337, 355, 380 and 405 nm, defining a spectral response curve which has been normalized to the absolute calibration. Before and after each night of data taking a relative calibration of the phototubes is performed. This relative calibration is used to track both short and long term changes in the detector's response. A cross check of the calibration in some phototubes is performed using an independent laser technique. Overall uncertainties, current results and future plans are discussed.

  11. A Laser Frequency Comb System for Absolute Calibration of the VTT Echelle Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, H.-P.; Steinmetz, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Kentischer, T.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-10-01

    A wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb (LFC) was developed in a co-operation between the Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Freiburg, Germany and the Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany for permanent installation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The system was installed successfully in October 2011. By simultaneously recording the spectra from the Sun and the LFC, for each exposure a calibration curve can be derived from the known frequencies of the comb modes that is suitable for absolute calibration at the meters per second level. We briefly summarize some topics in solar physics that benefit from absolute spectroscopy and point out the advantages of LFC compared to traditional calibration techniques. We also sketch the basic setup of the VTT calibration system and its integration with the existing echelle spectrograph.

  12. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration of the whole system for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 19% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomical transients with LOFAR

  13. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Nelles, A; Karskens, T; Krause, M; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Erdmann, M; Falcke, H; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Krause, R; Link, K; Norden, M J; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Schellart, P; Scholten, O; Schröder, F G; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Trinh, T N G; Weidenhaupt, K; Wijnholds, S J; Anderson, J; Bähren, L; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Bregman, J; Brouw, W N; Bruüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Carbone, D; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; van Haarlem, M P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kohler, J; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Schwarz, D; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw- Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 35% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomic...

  14. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  15. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    OpenAIRE

    B. Partridge; López-Caniego, M.; Perley, R. A.; Stevens, J.; Butler, B. J.; Rocha, G.; Walter, B; Zacchei, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite's annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated VLA and ATCA observations of 65 strong, unresolv...

  16. Absolute Magnitude Calibration for Dwarfs Based on the Colour-Magnitude Diagrams of Galactic Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Karaali, S; Bilir, S; Guctekin, S Tuncel

    2014-01-01

    We present two absolute magnitude calibrations for dwarfs based on colour-magnitude diagrams of Galactic clusters. The combination of the $M_g$ absolute magnitudes of the dwarf fiducial sequences of the clusters M92, M13, M5, NGC 2420, M67 and NGC 6791 with the corresponding metallicities provides absolute magnitude calibration for a given $(g-r)_0$ colour. The calibration is defined in the colour interval $0.25\\leq (g-r)_0 \\leq 1.25$ mag and it covers the metallicity interval $-2.15\\leq \\lbrack Fe/H\\rbrack \\leq +0.37$ dex. The absolute magnitude residuals obtained by the application of the procedure to another set of Galactic clusters lie in the interval $-0.15 \\leq \\Delta M_g \\leq +0.12$ mag. The mean and standard deviation of the residuals are $=-0.002$ and $\\sigma=0.065$ mag, respectively. The calibration of the $M_J$ absolute magnitude in terms of metallicity is carried out by using the fiducial sequences of the clusters M92, M13, 47 Tuc, NGC 2158 and NGC 6791. It is defined in the colour interval $0.90 ...

  17. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  18. [Research on absolute calibration of sun channel of sun photometer using laser raster scanning method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Bin; Li, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, a new calibration method of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of sun channel of sun photometer was developed. A tunable laser was used as source and a standard tranfer detector, calibrated against cryogenic absolute radiometer, was used to measure laser beam power. By raster scanning of a single collimated laser beam to generate the uniform irradiance field at the plane of effective aperture stop of sun photometer, the absolute irradiance responsivity of center wavelength of the 870 nm unpolarized sun channels of sun photometer was obtained accurately. The relative spectral irradiance responsivity of corresponding channel was obtained by using lamp-monochromator system and then used to acquire the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity in the laboratory. On the basis of the above results, the top-of-the-atmosphere responsive constant V0 was obtained by integration with extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance data. Comparing the calibration result with that from GSFC, NASA in 2009, the difference is only 3.75%. In the last, the uncertainties of calibration were evaluated and reached to 2.06%. The principle feasibility of the new method was validated.

  19. Effect of MODIS Terra radiometric calibration improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products: Validation and Terra/Aqua consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by ˜0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and ˜0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by ˜10% and ˜5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  20. Radiometric Cross Calibration of Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+)

    OpenAIRE

    Nischal Mishra; Md Obaidul Haque; Larry Leigh; David Aaron; Dennis Helder; Brian Markham

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the radiometric consistency between Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) using cross calibration techniques. Two approaches are used, one based on cross calibration between the two sensors using simultaneous image pairs, acquired during an underfly event on 29–30 March 2013. The other approach is based on using time series of image statistics acquired by these two sensors over the Libya 4 pseudo invariant calibration ...

  1. EMISAR: An Absolutely Calibrated Polarimetric L- and C-band SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Lintz; Skou, Niels; Dall, Jørgen;

    1998-01-01

    EMISAR is a high-resolution (2×2 m), fully polarimetric, dual-frequency (L- and C-band) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system designed for remote-sensing applications. The SAR is operated at high altitudes on a Gulfstream G-3 jet aircraft. The system is very well calibrated and has low sidelobes...... and low cross-polar contamination. Digital technology has been utilized to realize a flexible and highly stable radar with variable resolution, swath width, and imaging geometry. Thermal control and several calibration loops have been built into the system to ensure system stability and absolute...... calibration. Accurately measured antenna gains and radiation patterns are included in the calibration. The processing system is developed to support data calibration, which is the key to most of the current applications. Recent interferometric enhancements are important for many scientific applications...

  2. Portable, Solid-State Light Sources for Field Radiometric Calibrations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Various Earth Science fields require well-calibrated field radiometers whose calibrations must be tracked and verified in the field. NASA has long recognized...

  3. Portable, Solid-State Light Sources for Field Radiometric Calibrations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Various Earth Science fields require well-calibrated field radiometers whose calibrations must be tracked and verified in the field. NASA has long recognized the...

  4. Calibration of the absolute amplitude scale of the Tunka Radio Extension (ICRC 2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Hiller, R; Budnev, N M; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Lubsandorzhiev, N; Mirgazov, R R; Monkhoev, R; Pakhorukov, A; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Schröder, F G; Wischnewski, R; Zagorodnikov, A

    2015-01-01

    The Tunka Radio Extension (Tunka-Rex) is an array of 44 radio antenna stations, distributed over 3 km$^{2}$, constituting a radio detector for air showers with an energy threshold around 10$^{17}$ eV. It is an extension to Tunka-133, an air-Cherenkov detector in Siberia, which is used as an external trigger for Tunka-Rex and provides a reliable reconstruction of energy and shower maximum. Each antenna station consists of two perpendicularly aligned active antennas, called SALLAs. An antenna calibration of the SALLA with a commercial reference source enables us to reconstruct the detected radio signal on an absolute scale. Since the same reference source was used for the calibration of LOPES and, in a calibration campaign in 2014, also for LOFAR, these three experiments now have a consistent calibration and, therefore, absolute scale. This was a key ingredient to resolve a longer standing contradiction between measurements of two calibrated experiments. We will present how the calibration was performed and com...

  5. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  6. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fat’yanov, O. V., E-mail: fatyan1@gps.caltech.edu; Asimow, P. D., E-mail: asimow@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences 252-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  7. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  8. Radiometric Inter-Calibration between Himawari-8 AHI and S-NPP VIIRS for the Solar Reflective Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI on-board Himawari-8, which was launched on 7 October 2014, is the first geostationary instrument housed with a solar diffuser to provide accurate onboard calibrated data for the visible and near-infrared (VNIR bands. In this study, the Ray-matching and collocated Deep Convective Cloud (DCC methods, both of which are based on incidently collocated homogeneous pairs between AHI and Suomi NPP (S-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS, are used to evaluate the calibration difference between these two instruments. While the Ray-matching method is used to examine the reflectance difference over the all-sky collocations with similar viewing and illumination geometries, the near lambertian collocated DCC pxiels are used to examine the difference for the median or high reflectance scenes. Strong linear relationships between AHI and VIIRS can be found at all the paired AHI and VIIRS bands. Results of both methods indicate that AHI radiometric calibration accuracy agrees well with VIIRS data within 5% for B1-4 and B6 at mid and high reflectance scenes, while AHI B5 is generally brighter than VIIRS by ~6%–8%. No apparent East-West viewing angle dependent calibration difference can be found at all the VNIR bands. Compared to the Ray-matching method, the collocated DCC method provides less uncertainty of inter-calibration results at near-infrared (NIR bands. As AHI has similar optics and calibration designs to the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI, which is currently scheduled to launch in fall 2016, the on-orbit AHI data provides a unique opportunity to develop, test and examine the cal/val tools developed for ABI.

  9. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Earth Radiation Measurement on FY-3B and Its Comparison with CERES/Aqua Data%风云三号B星(FY-3B)上地球辐射探测仪的绝对辐射定标及其与Aqua卫星上云和地球辐射能量系统(CERES)数据之间的对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱红; 胡丽琴; 张艳; 陆段军; 齐瑾

    2013-01-01

    correction, the error of the ERM LW radiance is reduced from−3.00 to−0.60 W/(sr· m2). For the SW radiance, the bias is reduced from 6.00 to 4.00 W/(sr · m2). Based on the ERM in-orbit calibration data, the stability of the ERM LW radiometric response is analyzed, and it is shown that the gains are stable with a variation of less than 1.5%during its ifrst 9months in orbit. However, the gains at the SWchannels have larger changes and exceed 3%. These drifts might be caused by the detector degradation. Also, the NFOV scanner at the SW channel is no longer working after its 8 months in orbit.

  10. Providing radiometric traceability for the calibration home base of DLR by PTB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubert, D. R.; Hollandt, J.; Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Hoepe, A.; Hauer, K.-O. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig und Berlin, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Gege, P.; Schwarzmaier, T.; Lenhard, K.; Baumgartner, A. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fuer Methodik der Fernerkundung, 82234 Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)

    2013-05-10

    A dedicated calibration technique was applied for the calibration of the spectral radiance transfer standard (RASTA) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), consisting of two independent but complementing calibration procedures to provide redundancy and smallest possible calibration uncertainties. Procedure I included two calibration steps: In a first step the optical radiation source of RASTA, an FEL lamp, was calibrated in terms of its spectral irradiance E{sub {lambda}}({lambda}) in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 2400 nm using the PTB Spectral Irradiance Calibration Equipment (SPICE), while in a second step the spectral radiance factor {beta}{sub 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of the RASTA reflection standard was calibrated in a 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 1700 nm at the robot-based gonioreflectometer facility of PTB. The achieved relative standard uncertainties (k= 1) range from 0.6 % to 3.2 % and 0.1 % to 0.6 % respectively. Procedure II was completely independent from procedure I and allowed to cover the entire spectral range of RASTA from 350 nm to 2500 nm. In the second procedure, the 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of RASTA was directly calibrated at the Spectral Radiance Comparator Facility (SRCF) of PTB. The relative uncertainties for this calibration procedure range from 0.8 % in the visible up to 7.5 % at 2500 nm (k= 1). In the overlapping spectral range of both calibration procedures the calculated spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign ,calc}({lambda}) from procedure I is in good agreement with the direct measurement of procedure II, i.e. well within the combined expanded uncertainties (k= 2) of both procedures.

  11. Effect of MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration Improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue Aerosol Products: Validation and Terra/Aqua Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by approximately 0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and approximately 0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by approximately 10% and approximately 5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  12. Absolute calibration of an EMCCD camera by quantum correlation linking photon counting to analog regime

    OpenAIRE

    Avella, Alessio; Berchera, Ivano Ruo; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Brida, Giorgio; Genovese, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We show how the same set-up and procedure, exploiting spatially multi-mode quantum correlations, allows the absolute calibration of a EMCCD camera from the analog regime down to the single photon counting level, just by adjusting the brightness of the quantum source. At single photon level EMCCD can be operated as an on-off detector, where quantum efficiency depends on the discriminating threshold. We develop a simple model to explain the connection of the two different regime demonstrating t...

  13. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peřina, Jan, E-mail: jan.perina.jr@upol.cz [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Haderka, Ondřej [Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Allevi, Alessia [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell' Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bondani, Maria [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-IFN, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-01-27

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  14. Radiometric calibration of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite reflective solar bands with robust characterizations and hybrid calibration coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Wang, Menghua

    2015-11-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is now entering its fourth year of in-orbit global environmental observation and is producing a wide range of scientific output. The ocean color products in particular require a level of accuracy from the reflective solar bands (RSBs) that is a magnitude higher than the specification. In this work, we present an updated and completed core calibration pipeline that achieves the best sensor data records (SDR) to date and helps the ocean color products to reach maturity. We review the core calibration methodology of the RSBs and describe each essential input, including the solar diffuser stability monitor, the solar diffuser (SD), and lunar calibrations. Their associated issues, along with the successful mitigation and improved results, are described and presented. In particular, we illuminate the inaccuracy suffered due to the evolving angular dependence in the degradation of the on-board SD that impacts the heart of the RSB calibration, but also show that lunar-based calibration instead provides the correct long-term baseline for the successful restoration of the core methodology. The new look-up tables, which combine the coefficients from the SD-based and lunar-based calibrations, produce the optimal result, with an estimated accuracy of ∼0.2%. This hybrid approach highlights significant progress in the VIIRS RSB calibration and marks a completion of the core calibration result upon which other physical impacts or scientific issues can then be more accurately examined. We demonstrate the significant improvement and its impact on the ocean color products by comparing the current official output to the newly generated result. Lastly, we point out that this hybrid calibration coefficients scheme is made possible by a VIIRS design and layout change over its predecessor, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, that allows both the SD and the moon to be viewed by the RSB at the same angle of incidence

  15. Absolute calibration of SARAL/AltiKa in Kavaratti during its initial calibration-validation phase

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Babu, K.N.; Shukla, A.K.; Suchandra, A.B.; ArunKumar, S.V.V.; Bonnefond, P.; Testut, L.; Mehra, P.; Laurain, O.

    ), Baltic Sea (Liebsch et al. 2002), Catalunya, Spain (Martinez-Benjamin et al. 2004), Lake Erie (Cheng 2005; Shum et al. 2003), Lake Issykkul in Central Asia (Cretaux et al. 2009), and others. Most of these sites are found to be located off tropic while...- urements to the tide gauges locations. At present, no local geoid has been performed to correct for this at the Kavaratti calibration site, and EGM08 has been used. However, geoid models are less accurate when approaching the coast; hence, the geoid height...

  16. Radiometric Modeling and Calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)Ground Based Measurement Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere s thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  17. Calibration of Fourier domain short coherence interferometer for absolute distance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montonen, R; Kassamakov, I; Hæggström, E; Österberg, K

    2015-05-20

    We calibrated and determined the measurement uncertainty of a custom-made Fourier domain short coherence interferometer operated in laboratory conditions. We compared the optical thickness of two thickness standards and three coverslips determined with our interferometer to the geometric thickness determined by SEM. Using this calibration data, we derived a calibration function with a 95% confidence level system uncertainty of (5.9×10(-3)r+2.3)  μm, where r is the optical distance in μm, across the 240 μm optical measurement range. The confidence limit includes contributions from uncertainties in the optical thickness, geometric thickness, and refractive index measurements as well as uncertainties arising from cosine errors and thermal expansion. The results show feasibility for noncontacting absolute distance characterization with micrometer-level accuracy. This instrument is intended for verifying the alignment of the discs of an accelerating structure in the possible future compact linear collider.

  18. Solar Tower Experiments for Radiometric Calibration and Validation of Infrared Imaging Assets and Analysis Tools for Entry Aero-Heating Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Horvath, Thomas J.; Mercer, David C.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ross, Martin N.; Tietjen, Alan; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsored Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements assessment team has a task to perform radiometric calibration and validation of land-based and airborne infrared imaging assets and tools for remote thermographic imaging. The IR assets and tools will be used for thermographic imaging of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry aero-heating to provide flight boundary layer transition thermography data that could be utilized for calibration and validation of empirical and theoretical aero-heating tools. A series of tests at the Sandia National Laboratories National Solar Thermal Test Facility were designed for this task where reflected solar radiation from a field of heliostats was used to heat a 4 foot by 4 foot test panel consisting of LI 900 ceramic tiles located on top of the 200 foot tall Solar Tower. The test panel provided an Orbiter-like entry temperature for the purposes of radiometric calibration and validation. The Solar Tower provided an ideal test bed for this series of radiometric calibration and validation tests because it had the potential to rapidly heat the large test panel to spatially uniform and non-uniform elevated temperatures. Also, the unsheltered-open-air environment of the Solar Tower was conducive to obtaining unobstructed radiometric data by land-based and airborne IR imaging assets. Various thermocouples installed on the test panel and an infrared imager located in close proximity to the test panel were used to obtain surface temperature measurements for evaluation and calibration of the radiometric data from the infrared imaging assets. The overall test environment, test article, test approach, and typical test results are discussed.

  19. [Validation of HJ-1B thermal infrared channels onboard radiometric calibration based on spectral response differences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Fu, Qiao-yan; Shi, Ting-ting; Wang, Ai-chun; Zhang, Xue-wen

    2014-08-01

    Since HJ-1B was launched, 7 sets of blackbody data have been used to calculate onboard calibration coefficients, but the research work on the validation of coefficients is rare. According to the onboard calibration principle, calibration coefficients of HJ-1B thermal infrared channel on Sep 14th, 2009 were calculated with the half-width, moments and look-up table methods. MODIS was selected for the reference sensor, and algorithms of spectral match were improved between the HJ-1B thermal infrared channel and MODIS 31, 32 channels based on the spectral response divergence. The relationship of top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance between the remote sensors was calculated, based on which the surface leaving brightness temperature was calculated by Planck function to validate the brightness temperature calculated through the onboard calibration coefficients. The equivalent brightness temperature calculated by spectral response divergence method is 285.97 K, and the inversion brightness temperature calculated by half-width, moments and look-up table methods is 288.77, 274.52 and 285.97 K respectively. The difference between the inversion brightness temperature and the equivalent brightness temperature is 2.8, -11.46 and 0.02 K, respectively, which demonstrate that onboard calibration coefficients calculated by the look-up table method has better precision and feasibility.

  20. Outdoor RCS Measurement Range for Spaceborne SAR Calibration Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, Björn; Schwerdt, Marco; Bauer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The Microwaves and Radar Institute regularly performs calibration campaigns for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, among which have been X-SAR, SRTM, and ASAR. Tight performance specifications for future spaceborne SAR systems like TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X demand an absolute radiometric accuracy of better than 1 dB. The relative and absolute radiometric calibration of SAR systems depends on reference point targets (i. e. passive corner reflectors and active transponders), which...

  1. The absolute calibration of semiconductor detectors in the Neutrino beam of CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes a method for the calibration of semiconductor detectors. A nuclear emulsion is exposed to charged particles (muons) immediately in front of the detector. The muons also scatter delta electrons which give traces in the emulsion. The traces can be counted under a microscope. The separation of the muons and delta electrons takes place by angular distribution. The muons are counted per area unit. The flow is related to the signal of the detector and an absolute counting is achieved. (G.B)

  2. Autonomous absolute calibration of an ICCD camera in single-photon detection regime

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Luo; Leuchs, Gerd; Chekhova, Maria V

    2016-01-01

    Intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) cameras are widely used in various applications such as microscopy, astronomy, spectroscopy. Often they are used as single-photon detectors, with thresholding being an essential part of the readout. In this paper, we measure the quantum efficiency of an ICCD camera in the single-photon detection mode using the Klyshko absolute calibration technique. The quantum efficiency is obtained as a function of the threshold value and of the wavelength of the detected light. In addition, we study the homogeneity of the photon sensitivity over the camera chip area. The experiment is performed in the autonomous regime, without using any additional detectors. We therefore demonstrate the self-calibration of an ICCD camera.

  3. First Results of Field Absolute Calibration of the GPS Receiver Antenna at Wuhan University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Wang, Guangxing; Dai, Zhiqiang; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    GNSS receiver antenna phase center variations (PCVs), which arise from the non-spherical phase response of GNSS signals have to be well corrected for high-precision GNSS applications. Without using a precise antenna phase center correction (PCC) model, the estimated position of a station monument will lead to a bias of up to several centimeters. The Chinese large-scale research project "Crustal Movement Observation Network of China" (CMONOC), which requires high-precision positions in a comprehensive GPS observational network motived establishment of a set of absolute field calibrations of the GPS receiver antenna located at Wuhan University. In this paper the calibration facilities are firstly introduced and then the multipath elimination and PCV estimation strategies currently used are elaborated. The validation of estimated PCV values of test antenna are finally conducted, compared with the International GNSS Service (IGS) type values. Examples of TRM57971.00 NONE antenna calibrations from our calibration facility demonstrate that the derived PCVs and IGS type mean values agree at the 1 mm level. PMID:26580616

  4. First Results of Field Absolute Calibration of the GPS Receiver Antenna at Wuhan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Hu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available GNSS receiver antenna phase center variations (PCVs, which arise from the non-spherical phase response of GNSS signals have to be well corrected for high-precision GNSS applications. Without using a precise antenna phase center correction (PCC model, the estimated position of a station monument will lead to a bias of up to several centimeters. The Chinese large-scale research project “Crustal Movement Observation Network of China” (CMONOC, which requires high-precision positions in a comprehensive GPS observational network motived establishment of a set of absolute field calibrations of the GPS receiver antenna located at Wuhan University. In this paper the calibration facilities are firstly introduced and then the multipath elimination and PCV estimation strategies currently used are elaborated. The validation of estimated PCV values of test antenna are finally conducted, compared with the International GNSS Service (IGS type values. Examples of TRM57971.00 NONE antenna calibrations from our calibration facility demonstrate that the derived PCVs and IGS type mean values agree at the 1 mm level.

  5. First Results of Field Absolute Calibration of the GPS Receiver Antenna at Wuhan University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Wang, Guangxing; Dai, Zhiqiang; Li, Tao

    2015-11-13

    GNSS receiver antenna phase center variations (PCVs), which arise from the non-spherical phase response of GNSS signals have to be well corrected for high-precision GNSS applications. Without using a precise antenna phase center correction (PCC) model, the estimated position of a station monument will lead to a bias of up to several centimeters. The Chinese large-scale research project "Crustal Movement Observation Network of China" (CMONOC), which requires high-precision positions in a comprehensive GPS observational network motived establishment of a set of absolute field calibrations of the GPS receiver antenna located at Wuhan University. In this paper the calibration facilities are firstly introduced and then the multipath elimination and PCV estimation strategies currently used are elaborated. The validation of estimated PCV values of test antenna are finally conducted, compared with the International GNSS Service (IGS) type values. Examples of TRM57971.00 NONE antenna calibrations from our calibration facility demonstrate that the derived PCVs and IGS type mean values agree at the 1 mm level.

  6. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, B.; López-Caniego, M.; Perley, R. A.; Stevens, J.; Butler, B. J.; Rocha, G.; Walter, B.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite’s annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus, Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated Very Large Array (VLA) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1%–2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 2%–3% ± 1.0% below Planck values with an uncertainty of +/- 1.0%; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 5%–6% ± 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  7. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Partridge, B; Perley, R A; Stevens, J; Butler, B J; Rocha, G; Walter, B; Zacchei, A

    2015-01-01

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite's annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated VLA and ATCA observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1-2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 3.6% +- 1.0% below Planck values; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 6.2% +- 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  8. Spatio-Temporal Assessment of Tuz Gölü, Turkey as a Potential Radiometric Vicarious Calibration Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent O. Odongo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an assessment of Tuz Gölü, a site in Turkey proposed for the radiometric vicarious calibration of satellite sensors, in terms of its spatial homogeneity as expressed in visible and near-infrared (VNIR wavelengths over a 25-year period (1984–2009. By combining the coefficient of variation (CV and Getis statistic (Gi*, a spatially homogenous and temporally stable area at least 720 m × 330 m in size was identified. Analysis of mid-summer Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM images acquired over the period 1984–2009 showed that the hemispherical-directional reflectance factor of this area had a spatial variability, as defined by the CV, in the range of 0.99% to 3.99% in Landsat TM bands 2–4. This is comparable with the reported variability of other test sites around the world, but this is the first time an area has been shown to have this degree of homogeneity over such a long period of time.

  9. Photovoltaics radiometric issues and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of issues discussed at the photovoltaic radiometric measurements workshop. Topics included radiometric measurements guides, the need for well-defined goals, documentation, calibration checks, accreditation of testing laboratories and methods, the need for less expensive radiometric instrumentation, data correlations, and quality assurance.

  10. VNIR, MWIR, and LWIR source assemblies for optical quality testing and spectro-radiometric calibration of earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compain, Eric; Maquet, Philippe; Leblay, Pierrick; Gavaud, Eric; Marque, Julien; Glastre, Wilfried; Cortese, Maxime; Sugranes, Pierre; Gaillac, Stephanie; Potheau, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    This document presents several original OGSEs, Optical Ground Support Equipment, specifically designed and realized for the optical testing and calibration of earth observation satellites operating in a large spectral band from 0.4μm to 14.7μm. This work has been mainly supported by recent development dedicated to MTG, Meteosat Third Generation, the ESA next generation of meteorological satellites. The improved measurement capabilities of this new satellite generation has generated new challenging requirements for the associated optical test equipments. These improvements, based on design and component innovation will be illustrated for the MOTA, the GICS and the DEA OGSEs. MOTA and GICS are dedicated to the AIT, Assembly Integration and Test, of FCI, the Flexible Combined Imager of the imaging satellite MTG-I. DEA OGSE is dedicated to the AIT of the DEA, Detection Electronics Assembly, which is part of IRS instrument, an IR sounder part of MTG-S satellite. From an architectural point of view, the presented original designs enable to run many optical tests with a single system thanks to a limited configuration effort. Main measurement capabilities are optical quality testing (MTF based mainly on KEF measurement), Line of Sight (LoS) stability measurement, straylight analyses, VNIR-MWIR-LWIR focal plane array co-registration, and broadband large dynamic spectro-radiometric calibration. Depending on the AIT phase of the satellite, these source assemblies are operated at atmospheric pressure or under secondary vacuum. In operation, they are associated with an opto-mechanical projection system that enables to conjugate the image of the source assembly with the focal plane of the satellite instruments. These conjugation systems are usually based on high resolution, broadband collimator, and are optionally mounted on hexapod to address the entire field of instruments.

  11. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable Wide-Band on Board Calibration Source for In-Flight Data Validation in Imaging Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, J. B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Kroll, Linley A.; Nolte, Scott H.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the quantitative spectral data collected by an imaging spectrometer instrument is critically dependent upon the accuracy of the spectral and radiometric calibration of the system. In order for the collected spectra to be scientifically useful, the calibration of the instrument must be precisely known not only prior to but during data collection. Thus, in addition to a rigorous in-lab calibration procedure, the airborne instruments designed and built by the NASA/JPL Imaging Spectroscopy Group incorporate an on board calibrator (OBC) system with the instrument to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The output of the OBC source illuminates a target panel on the backside of the foreoptics shutter both before and after data collection. The OBC and in-lab calibration data sets are then used to validate and post-process the collected spectral image data. The resulting accuracy of the spectrometer output data is therefore integrally dependent upon the stability of the OBC source. In this paper we describe the design and application of the latest iteration of this novel device developed at NASA/JPL which integrates a halogen-cycle source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system and a fiber-based intensity monitoring feedback loop. The OBC source in this Airborne Testbed Spectrometer was run over a period of 15 hours while both the radiometric and spectral stabilities of the output were measured and demonstrated stability to within 1% of nominal.

  12. Pantomime-grasping: Advance knowledge of haptic feedback availability supports an absolute visuo-haptic calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin eDavarpanah Jazi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An emerging issue in movement neurosciences is whether haptic feedback influences the nature of the information supporting a simulated grasping response (i.e., pantomime-grasping. In particular, recent work by our group contrasted pantomime-grasping responses performed with (i.e., PH+ trials and without (i.e., PH- trials terminal haptic feedback in separate blocks of trials. Results showed that PH- trials were mediated via relative visual information. In contrast, PH+ trials showed evidence of an absolute visuo-haptic calibration – a finding attributed to an error signal derived from a comparison between expected and actual haptic feedback (i.e., an internal forward model. The present study examined whether advanced knowledge of haptic feedback availability influences the aforementioned calibration process. To that end, PH- and PH+ trials were completed in separate blocks (i.e., the feedback schedule used in our group’s previous study and a block wherein PH- and PH+ trials were randomly interleaved on a trial-by-trial basis (i.e., random feedback schedule. In other words, the random feedback schedule precluded participants from predicting whether haptic feedback would be available at the movement goal location. We computed just-noticeable-difference (JND values to determine whether responses adhered to, or violated, the relative psychophysical principles of Weber’s law. Results for the blocked feedback schedule replicated our group’s previous work, whereas in the random feedback schedule PH- and PH+ trials were supported via relative visual information. Accordingly, we propose that a priori knowledge of haptic feedback is necessary to support an absolute visuo-haptic calibration. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the presence and expectancy of haptic feedback is an important consideration in contrasting the behavioral and neural properties of natural and stimulated (i.e., pantomime-grasping grasping.

  13. Absolute polarization angle calibration using polarized diffuse Galactic emission observed by BICEP

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Tomotake; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Battle, John O; Bierman, Evan M; Bock, James J; Chiang, H Cynthia; Crill, Brendan P; Dowell, C Darren; Duband, Lionel; Hivon, Eric F; Holzapfel, William L; Hristov, Viktor V; Jones, William C; Keating, Brian G; Kovac, John M; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lange, Andrew E; Leitch, Erik M; Mason, Peter V; Nguyen, Hien T; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Pryke, Clem; Richter, Steffen; Rocha, Graca M; Takahashi, Yuki D; Yoon, Ki Won

    2010-01-01

    We present a method of cross-calibrating the polarization angle of a polarimeter using BICEP Galactic observations. \\bicep\\ was a ground based experiment using an array of 49 pairs of polarization sensitive bolometers observing from the geographic South Pole at 100 and 150 GHz. The BICEP polarimeter is calibrated to +/-0.01 in cross-polarization and less than +/-0.7 degrees in absolute polarization orientation. BICEP observed the temperature and polarization of the Galactic plane (R.A= 100 degrees ~ 270 degrees and Dec. = -67 degrees ~ -48 degrees). We show that the statistical error in the 100 GHz BICEP Galaxy map can constrain the polarization angle offset of WMAP Wband to 0.6 degrees +\\- 1.4 degrees. The expected 1 sigma errors on the polarization angle cross-calibration for Planck or EPIC are 1.3 degrees and 0.3 degrees at 100 and 150 GHz, respectively. We also discuss the expected improvement of the BICEP Galactic field observations with forthcoming BICEP2 and Keck observations.

  14. A New Radiometric Calibration Paradigm for the OMPS Nadir Total Column and Profile Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Donald; Georgiew, Georgi

    2011-01-01

    A fused silica Mie Scattering Diffuser (MSD) has been developed at Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp. that has measured characteristics which could be used to increase the accuracy of the spectral albedo calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Nadir ozone total column and profile instrument by almost an order of magnitude. Measurements have been made of the optical characteristics on both natural and synthetic forms of fused silica MSDs. Preliminary measurements suggest that MSDs are useable in the solar reflective wavelength region from 250 nm to 3.7 m. To date synthetic and natural MSDs have been irradiated for 60 hours of UV radiation from a solar simulator, and synthetic MSDs have been irradiated with increasing doses of Co-60 gamma rays at 30, 500 krads up to 1.5 Mrads, and 30 krads of 200 MeV protons. The principal effects have been small loses in transmittance at wavelengths < 350 nm. The high energy particle irradiation measurements were provided by Neal Nickles and Dean Spieth.

  15. Investigating the influence of radiometric calibration on tree species determination based on small footprint full-waveform airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, W.; Briese, C.; Hollaus, M.; Pfeifer, N.; Wagner, W.

    2013-12-01

    Small footprint airborne LiDAR is a well-established measurement technique in forestry, where cost- and time efficient wide-area data acquisition of the vegetation structure is required. Gathering stand-based information about tree species composition is of particular interest for forestry applications. Modern LiDAR systems provide, next to the acquired 3D (i.e. geometric) information, also a quantification of the signal strength of each echo. In order to utilize this information for tree species determination independently from different overlapping LiDAR swaths, different LiDAR sensors or acquisition times, radiometric calibration is a necessity. This contribution summarises the theoretical background of radiometric LiDAR data calibration on the physical basis of the radar equation. Using LiDAR observations of reference targets with known reflectivity the so-called calibration constant is computed. It accounts for sensor specific parameters, as well as atmospheric attenuation of the laser signal. Hence the backscatter properties of the laser echoes can be determined and physical observables characterizing the reflectivity of the scanned surface can be estimated. A practical calibration workflow is demonstrated on the example of a single wavelength full-waveform LiDAR data set from a mixed woodland in Austria. Subsequently, an automated method for tree species determination that is based on the laser light scattering mechanisms in the forest canopy is applied on both (calibrated and un-calibrated) data sets. First, an edge-based segmentation approach is used to aggregate LiDAR echoes to segments representing single tree crowns. Second, metrics are computed for each tree crown describing radiometric and geometric features that are related to foliage composition. Third, these metrics are used in a knowledge-based fuzzy classification scheme for the determination of segments representing coniferous and deciduous trees. Influences of the radiometric calibration on the

  16. Absolute Energy Calibration of Solid-State Detectors for Fission Fragments and Heavy Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed measurements of the pulse-height response of silicon solid-state detectors to energetic heavy ions and fission fragments have been made. These studies have now led to a reliable method of absolute energy calibration of solid-state detectors for fission fragments, as well as to a better understanding of the somewhat peculiar response characteristics of the detectors to fission fragments and heavy ions. The use of silicon solid-state detectors in fragment kinetic energy measurements in recent years has been widespread; at the same time, questions have been raised about the detailed interpretation of such measurements because of the increasing evidence for anomalous behaviour in charge production, charge collection and charge multiplication in the case of densely ionizing particles. The present report discusses systematics and possible origins of these effects. Application of the absolute energy calibration method, which takes into account the mass and energy dependence of the response, is based simply on a Cf252 or U235 fragment pulse- height spectrum. Our studies were carried out with mono-energetic Br71, Br81 and I127 ions of energies from 30 to 120 MeV, and with fission fragments from spontaneous fission of Cf252 and neutron-induced fission of U235 and Pu239. It is shown that for a given fragment mass, over a wide energy range, the fragment energy versus pulse-height relationship is of the form E = ax + b, where E is the fragment energy and x is the measured pulse height. A dependence of pulse height on fragment mass has also been established, which leads to an energy versus pulse-height relationship, for the range of fission-fragment masses and energies, of the form E = (a + a'm)x + b + b'M, where M is the fragment mass. The effect of detector window and of detector type, resistivity and electric field have been studied. Guides to the selection of detectors and to their use with fission fragments are given. The effect of the more exact calibration

  17. Comb-calibrated frequency-modulated continuous-wave ladar for absolute distance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Esther; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Coddington, Ian; Sinclair, Laura C; Knabe, Kevin; Swann, William C; Newbury, Nathan R

    2013-06-15

    We demonstrate a comb-calibrated frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser detection and ranging (FMCW ladar) system for absolute distance measurements. The FMCW ladar uses a compact external cavity laser that is swept quasi-sinusoidally over 1 THz at a 1 kHz rate. The system simultaneously records the heterodyne FMCW ladar signal and the instantaneous laser frequency at sweep rates up to 3400 THz/s, as measured against a free-running frequency comb (femtosecond fiber laser). Demodulation of the ladar signal against the instantaneous laser frequency yields the range to the target with 1 ms update rates, bandwidth-limited 130 μm resolution and a ~100 nm accuracy that is directly linked to the counted repetition rate of the comb. The precision is <100 nm at the 1 ms update rate and reaches ~6 nm for a 100 ms average. PMID:23938965

  18. Absolute calibration of an EMCCD camera by quantum correlation, linking photon counting to the analog regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avella, A; Ruo-Berchera, I; Degiovanni, I P; Brida, G; Genovese, M

    2016-04-15

    We show how the same setup and procedure, exploiting spatially multimode quantum correlations, allows the absolute calibration of an electron-multiplying charge-coupled (EMCCD) camera from the analog regime down to the single-photon-counting level, just by adjusting the brightness of the quantum source. At the single-photon level, an EMCCD can be operated as an on-off detector, where quantum efficiency depends on the discriminating threshold. We develop a simple model to explain the connection of the two different regimes demonstrating that the efficiency estimated in the analog (bright) regime allows us to accurately predict the detector behavior in the photocounting regime and vice versa. This work establishes a bridge between two regions of the optical measurements that up to now have been based on completely different standards, detectors, and measurement techniques. PMID:27082359

  19. Techniques and Review of Absolute Flux Calibration from the Ultraviolet to the Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlin, Ralph C; Tremblay, P -E

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of precise absolute fluxes for stellar sources has been pursued with increased vigor since the discovery of the dark energy and the realization that its detailed understanding requires accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of redshifted Ia supernovae in the rest frame. The flux distributions of spectrophotometric standard stars were initially derived from the comparison of stars to laboratory sources of known flux but are now mostly based on calculated model atmospheres. For example, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) models provide the basis for the HST CALSPEC archive of flux standards. The basic equations for quantitative spectrophotometry and photometry are explained in detail. Several historical lab based flux calibrations are reviewed; and the SEDs of stars in the major on-line astronomical databases are compared to the CALSPEC reference standard spectrophotometry. There is good evidence that relative fluxes from the visible to the near-IR wavelength of ~2.5 micron are currently accu...

  20. Pantomime-Grasping: Advance Knowledge of Haptic Feedback Availability Supports an Absolute Visuo-Haptic Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah Jazi, Shirin; Heath, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    An emerging issue in movement neurosciences is whether haptic feedback influences the nature of the information supporting a simulated grasping response (i.e., pantomime-grasping). In particular, recent work by our group contrasted pantomime-grasping responses performed with (i.e., PH+ trials) and without (i.e., PH− trials) terminal haptic feedback in separate blocks of trials. Results showed that PH− trials were mediated via relative visual information. In contrast, PH+ trials showed evidence of an absolute visuo-haptic calibration—a finding attributed to an error signal derived from a comparison between expected and actual haptic feedback (i.e., an internal forward model). The present study examined whether advanced knowledge of haptic feedback availability influences the aforementioned calibration process. To that end, PH− and PH+ trials were completed in separate blocks (i.e., the feedback schedule used in our group’s previous study) and a block wherein PH− and PH+ trials were randomly interleaved on a trial-by-trial basis (i.e., random feedback schedule). In other words, the random feedback schedule precluded participants from predicting whether haptic feedback would be available at the movement goal location. We computed just-noticeable-difference (JND) values to determine whether responses adhered to, or violated, the relative psychophysical principles of Weber’s law. Results for the blocked feedback schedule replicated our group’s previous work, whereas in the random feedback schedule PH− and PH+ trials were supported via relative visual information. Accordingly, we propose that a priori knowledge of haptic feedback is necessary to support an absolute visuo-haptic calibration. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the presence and expectancy of haptic feedback is an important consideration in contrasting the behavioral and neural properties of natural and simulated grasping. PMID:27199718

  1. Digital PCR provides sensitive and absolute calibration for high throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan H Christina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation DNA sequencing on the 454, Solexa, and SOLiD platforms requires absolute calibration of the number of molecules to be sequenced. This requirement has two unfavorable consequences. First, large amounts of sample-typically micrograms-are needed for library preparation, thereby limiting the scope of samples which can be sequenced. For many applications, including metagenomics and the sequencing of ancient, forensic, and clinical samples, the quantity of input DNA can be critically limiting. Second, each library requires a titration sequencing run, thereby increasing the cost and lowering the throughput of sequencing. Results We demonstrate the use of digital PCR to accurately quantify 454 and Solexa sequencing libraries, enabling the preparation of sequencing libraries from nanogram quantities of input material while eliminating costly and time-consuming titration runs of the sequencer. We successfully sequenced low-nanogram scale bacterial and mammalian DNA samples on the 454 FLX and Solexa DNA sequencing platforms. This study is the first to definitively demonstrate the successful sequencing of picogram quantities of input DNA on the 454 platform, reducing the sample requirement more than 1000-fold without pre-amplification and the associated bias and reduction in library depth. Conclusion The digital PCR assay allows absolute quantification of sequencing libraries, eliminates uncertainties associated with the construction and application of standard curves to PCR-based quantification, and with a coefficient of variation close to 10%, is sufficiently precise to enable direct sequencing without titration runs.

  2. Evaluation of relative radiometric correction techniques on Landsat 8 OLI sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Antonio; Caradonna, Grazia; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2016-08-01

    The quality of information derived from processed remotely sensed data may depend upon many factors, mostly related to the extent data acquisition is influenced by atmospheric conditions, topographic effects, sun angle and so on. The goal of radiometric corrections is to reduce such effects in order enhance the performance of change detection analysis. There are two approaches to radiometric correction: absolute and relative calibrations. Due to the large amount of free data products available, absolute radiometric calibration techniques may be time consuming and financially expensive because of the necessary inputs for absolute calibration models (often these data are not available and can be difficult to obtain). The relative approach to radiometric correction, known as relative radiometric normalization, is preferred with some research topics because no in situ ancillary data, at the time of satellite overpasses, are required. In this study we evaluated three well known relative radiometric correction techniques using two Landsat 8 - OLI scenes over a subset area of the Apulia Region (southern Italy): the IR-MAD (Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection), the HM (Histogram Matching) and the DOS (Dark Object Subtraction). IR-MAD results were statistically assessed within a territory with an extremely heterogeneous landscape and all computations performed in a Matlab environment. The panchromatic and thermal bands were excluded from the comparisons.

  3. Telescope Spectrophotometric and Absolute Flux Calibration, and National Security Applications, Using a Tunable Laser on a Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Rhodes, J; Albert, Justin; Burgett, William; Rhodes, Jason

    2006-01-01

    We propose a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes. As uncertainties on the photometry, due to imperfect knowledge of both telescope optics and the atmosphere, will in the near future begin to dominate the uncertainties on fundamental cosmological parameters such as Omega_Lambda and w in measurements from SNIa, weak gravitational lensing, and baryon oscillations, a method for reducing such uncertainties is needed. We propose to improve spectrophotometric calibration, currently obtained using standard stars, by placing a tunable laser and a wide-angle light source on a satellite by early next decade (perhaps included in the upgrade to the GPS satellite network) to improve absolute flux calibration to 0.1% and relative spectrophotometric calibration to better than 0.001% across the visible and near-infrared spectrum. As well as fundamental astrophysical applications, the system proposed here potentially...

  4. In situ radiometric dating on mars: investigation of the feasibility of K-Ar dating using flight-type mass and X-ray spectrometers

    OpenAIRE

    Talboys, D. L.; Barber, S.; Bridges, J. C.; S. P. Kelley; Pullan, D.; Verchovsky, A. B.; G. Butcher; Fazel, A; Fraser, G. W.; Pillinger, C.T.; Sims, M.R.; Wright, I. P.

    2009-01-01

    The absolute chronology of Mars is poorly known and as a consequence a key science aim is to perform accurate radiometric dating of martian geological materials. The scientific benefits of in situ radiometric dating are significant and arguably of most importance is the calibration of the martian cratering rate, similar to what has been achieved for the Moon, to reduce the large uncertainties on absolute boundary ages of martian epochs. The Beagle 2 Mars lander was capable of performing radio...

  5. Absolute Magnitude Calibration for Red Giants based on the Colour-Magnitude Diagrams of Galactic Clusters. III-Calibration with 2MASS

    CERN Document Server

    Karaali, S; Gokce, E Yaz

    2012-01-01

    We present two absolute magnitude calibrations, $M_{J}$ and $M_{K_s}$, for red giants with the colour magnitude diagrams of five Galactic clusters with different metallicities i.e. M92, M13, M71, M67, and NGC 6791. The combination of the absolute magnitudes of the red giant sequences with the corresponding metallicities provides calibration for absolute magnitude estimation for red giants for a given colour. The calibrations for $M_{J}$ and $M_{K_s}$ are defined in the colour intervals $1.3\\leq(V-J)_{0}\\leq2.8$ and $1.75 \\leq (V-K_{s})_{0}\\leq 3.80$ mag, respectively, and they cover the metallicity interval $-2.15 \\leq \\lbrack Fe/H \\rbrack \\leq +0.37$ dex. The absolute magnitude residuals obtained by the application of the procedure to another set of Galactic clusters lie in the intervals $-0.08= 0.137$ and $\\sigma_{M_J}=0.080$, and $=0.109$ and $\\sigma_{M_{K_{s}}}=0.123$ mag. The derived relations are applicable to stars older than 4 Gyr, the age of the youngest calibrating cluster.

  6. A BAYESIAN METHOD FOR CALCULATING REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR CALIBRATION CURVES USING ABSOLUTE PLASMID DNA STANDARDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In real-time quantitative PCR studies using absolute plasmid DNA standards, a calibration curve is developed to estimate an unknown DNA concentration. However, potential differences in the amplification performance of plasmid DNA compared to genomic DNA standards are often ignore...

  7. Absolute calibration of the Chans'E-1 IIM camera and its preliminary application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU YunZhao; XU XiSheng; XIE ZhiDong; TANG ZeSheng

    2009-01-01

    The interference imaging spectroradiometer (IIM) onboard the first lunar satellite of China "Chang'E-l" can now provide approximately global high spectral and spatial resolution reflectance spectra of the Moon. It is the essential instrument with which to accomplish one of the four missions of the first lunar satellite of China. As the current data provided by the Lunar Exploration Program Center and National Astronomical Observatories (NAOC) are not reflectance and the sensor response is inhomogeneous in the line direction, users can not use the current data directly. Moreover, due to the narrow band range,IIM data cannot cover the absorption peak of the mafic minerals of the Moon completely, which limits its ability for identifying minerals. The main objective of this study is to describe the methods for absolute calibration, correction and acquiring the absorption center of minerals for IIM data. The results from our study show that in the space domain the sensor response decreases toward the left, and in the spectral domain the response of the longer bands is more inhomogeneous than that of the shorter bands. After the calibration and correction, the reflectance of IIM matches the earth-based telescopic spectra well,which suggests the possible use of the processed data in the geological research. A high correlation was found between the absorption center and the wavelength at which the first derivative equals 0, i.e.,the so-called Stagnation Point in the mathematical sense. In the end, we show a preliminary applied study of the two craters with diameter larger than 35 km using the calibrated data. The spectra of IIM data show that the lunar crust has compositional diversity within the km scale. Pure anorthosite may be found on the wall and floor of the Aristarchus crater with the map of absorption center, which indicates that anorthosite is ubiquitously present within the lunar crust. IIM, with its capacity to acquire lunar composition at the regional and

  8. Absolute calibration of the Chang’E-1 IIM camera and its preliminary application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The interference imaging spectroradiometer (IIM) onboard the first lunar satellite of China "Chang’E-1" can now provide approximately global high spectral and spatial resolution reflectance spectra of the Moon. It is the essential instrument with which to accomplish one of the four missions of the first lunar satellite of China. As the current data provided by the Lunar Exploration Program Center and National Astronomical Observatories (NAOC) are not reflectance and the sensor response is inhomogeneous in the line direction,users can not use the current data directly. Moreover,due to the narrow band range,IIM data cannot cover the absorption peak of the mafic minerals of the Moon completely,which limits its ability for identifying minerals. The main objective of this study is to describe the methods for absolute calibration,correction and acquiring the absorption center of minerals for IIM data. The results from our study show that in the space domain the sensor response decreases toward the left,and in the spectral domain the response of the longer bands is more inhomogeneous than that of the shorter bands. After the calibration and correction,the reflectance of IIM matches the earth-based telescopic spectra well,which suggests the possible use of the processed data in the geological research. A high correlation was found between the absorption center and the wavelength at which the first derivative equals 0,i.e.,the so-called Stagnation Point in the mathematical sense. In the end,we show a preliminary applied study of the two craters with diameter larger than 35 km using the calibrated data. The spectra of IIM data show that the lunar crust has compositional diversity within the km scale. Pure anorthosite may be found on the wall and floor of the Aristarchus crater with the map of absorption center,which indicates that anorthosite is ubiquitously present within the lunar crust. IIM,with its capacity to acquire lunar composition at the regional and global scale

  9. Absolute reactivity calibration of accelerator-driven systems after RACE-T experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RACE-T experiments that were held in november 2005 in the ENEA-Casaccia research center near Rome allowed us to improve our knowledge of the experimental techniques for absolute reactivity calibration at either startup or shutdown phases of accelerator-driven systems. Various experimental techniques for assessing a subcritical level were inter-compared through three different subcritical configurations SC0, SC2 and SC3, about -0.5, -3 and -6 dollars, respectively. The area-ratio method based of the use of a pulsed neutron source appears as the most performing. When the reactivity estimate is expressed in dollar unit, the uncertainties obtained with the area-ratio method were less than 1% for any subcritical configuration. The sensitivity to measurement location was about slightly more than 1% and always less than 4%. Finally, it is noteworthy that the source jerk technique using a transient caused by the pulsed neutron source shutdown provides results in good agreement with those obtained from the area-ratio technique. (authors)

  10. A Bayesian method for calculating real-time quantitative PCR calibration curves using absolute plasmid DNA standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haugland Richard A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In real-time quantitative PCR studies using absolute plasmid DNA standards, a calibration curve is developed to estimate an unknown DNA concentration. However, potential differences in the amplification performance of plasmid DNA compared to genomic DNA standards are often ignored in calibration calculations and in some cases impossible to characterize. A flexible statistical method that can account for uncertainty between plasmid and genomic DNA targets, replicate testing, and experiment-to-experiment variability is needed to estimate calibration curve parameters such as intercept and slope. Here we report the use of a Bayesian approach to generate calibration curves for the enumeration of target DNA from genomic DNA samples using absolute plasmid DNA standards. Results Instead of the two traditional methods (classical and inverse, a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC estimation was used to generate single, master, and modified calibration curves. The mean and the percentiles of the posterior distribution were used as point and interval estimates of unknown parameters such as intercepts, slopes and DNA concentrations. The software WinBUGS was used to perform all simulations and to generate the posterior distributions of all the unknown parameters of interest. Conclusion The Bayesian approach defined in this study allowed for the estimation of DNA concentrations from environmental samples using absolute standard curves generated by real-time qPCR. The approach accounted for uncertainty from multiple sources such as experiment-to-experiment variation, variability between replicate measurements, as well as uncertainty introduced when employing calibration curves generated from absolute plasmid DNA standards.

  11. In-Field Absolute Calibration of Ground and Airborne VIS-NIR-SWIR Hyperspectral Point Spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offer Rozenstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectrometer calibration and measurements of spectral radiance are often required when performing ground, aerial, and space measurements. While calibrating a spectrometer in the field using an integrating sphere is practically unachievable, calibration against a quartz halogen (QH lamp is a quite easy and feasible option. We describe a calibration protocol whereby a professional QH lamp, operating with a stabilized current source, is first calibrated in the laboratory against a US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST traceable integrating sphere and, then, used for the field calibration of a spectrometer before a ground or airborne campaign. Another advantage of the lamp over the integrating sphere is its ability to create a continuous calibration curve at the spectrometer resolution, while the integrating sphere is calibrated only for a few discrete wavelengths. A calibrated lamp could also be used for a secondary continuous calibration of an un-calibrated integrating sphere.

  12. Radiometric calibration of optical microscopy and microspectroscopy apparata over a broad spectral range using a special thin-film luminescence standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Valenta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Application capabilities of optical microscopes and microspectroscopes can be considerably enhanced by a proper calibration of their spectral sensitivity. We propose and demonstrate a method of relative and absolute calibration of a microspectroscope over an extraordinary broad spectral range covered by two (parallel detection branches in visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The key point of the absolute calibration of a relative spectral sensitivity is application of the standard sample formed by a thin layer of Si nanocrystals with stable and efficient photoluminescence. The spectral PL quantum yield and the PL spatial distribution of the standard sample must be characterized by separate experiments. The absolutely calibrated microspectroscope enables to characterize spectral photon emittance of a studied object or even its luminescence quantum yield (QY if additional knowledge about spatial distribution of emission and about excitance is available. Capabilities of the calibrated microspectroscope are demonstrated by measuring external QY of electroluminescence from a standard poly-Si solar-cell and of photoluminescence of Er-doped Si nanocrystals.

  13. Absolute Calibration of Image Plate for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Back, N L; Eder, D C; Ping, Y; Song, P M; Throop, A

    2007-12-10

    The authors measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV to 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on the solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate Photon Stimulated Luminescence PSL per electrons at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energies depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of the absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  14. Radiometric calibration and performance trends of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Mohan; Priestley, Kory; Smith, Nathaniel; Smith, Nitchie; Thomas, Susan; Walikainen, Dale

    2015-10-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments help to study the impact of clouds on the earth's radiation budget. There are currently five instruments- two each on board Aqua and Terra spacecraft and one on the Suomi NPP spacecraft to measure the earth's reflected shortwave and emitted longwave energy, which represent two components of the earth's radiation energy budget. Flight Models (FM) 1 and 2 are on Terra, FM 3 and 4 are on Aqua, and FM5 is on Suomi NPP. The measurements are made by three sensors on each instrument: a shortwave sensor that measures the 0.3-5 microns wavelength band, a window sensor that measures the water vapor window between 8-12 microns, and a total sensor that measures all incident energy (0.3- >100 microns). The required accuracy of CERES measurements of 0.5% in the longwave and 1% in the shortwave is achieved through an extensive pre-launch ground calibration campaign as well as on-orbit calibration and validation activities. Onorbit calibration is carried out using the Internal Calibration Module (ICM) that consists of a tungsten lamp, blackbodies, and a solar diffuser known as the Mirror Attenuator Mosaic (MAM). The ICM calibration provides information about the stability of the sensors' broadband radiometric gains on-orbit. Several validation studies are conducted in order to monitor the behavior of the instruments in various spectral bands. The CERES Edition-4 data products for the FM1-FM4 instruments incorporate the latest calibration methodologies to improve on the Edition-3 data products. In this paper, we discuss the updated calibration methodology and present some validation studies to demonstrate the improvement in the trends using the CERES Edition-4 data products for all four instruments.

  15. Determining the importance of model calibration for forecasting absolute/relative changes in streamflow from LULC and climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, Rewati; Meixner, Thomas; Norman, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) and climate changes are important drivers of change in streamflow. Assessing the impact of LULC and climate changes on streamflow is typically done with a calibrated and validated watershed model. However, there is a debate on the degree of calibration required. The objective of this study was to quantify the variation in estimated relative and absolute changes in streamflow associated with LULC and climate changes with different calibration approaches. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied in an uncalibrated (UC), single outlet calibrated (OC), and spatially-calibrated (SC) mode to compare the relative and absolute changes in streamflow at 14 gaging stations within the Santa Cruz River Watershed in southern Arizona, USA. For this purpose, the effect of 3 LULC, 3 precipitation (P), and 3 temperature (T) scenarios were tested individually. For the validation period, Percent Bias (PBIAS) values were >100% with the UC model for all gages, the values were between 0% and 100% with the OC model and within 20% with the SC model. Changes in streamflow predicted with the UC and OC models were compared with those of the SC model. This approach implicitly assumes that the SC model is “ideal”. Results indicated that the magnitude of both absolute and relative changes in streamflow due to LULC predicted with the UC and OC results were different than those of the SC model. The magnitude of absolute changes predicted with the UC and SC models due to climate change (both P and T) were also significantly different, but were not different for OC and SC models. Results clearly indicated that relative changes due to climate change predicted with the UC and OC were not significantly different than that predicted with the SC models. This result suggests that it is important to calibrate the model spatially to analyze the effect of LULC change but not as important for analyzing the relative change in streamflow due to climate change. This

  16. Multichannel IR Sensor Calibration Validation Using Planck’s Law for Next Generation Environmental Geostationary Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pearlman, Aaron; Datla, Raju; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-01-01

    Multichannel radiometric sensors such as the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series, and the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), which is currently onboard Himawari 8, provide the possibility to use Planck’s law to validate the absolute calibration of each channel pre-launch as well as on orbit especially in the IR. A technique is developed to use the Planck’s law and evaluate the radiometric calibration of each of the ...

  17. A Laser Frequency Comb System for Absolute Calibration of the VTT Echelle Spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Doerr, H. -P.; T Steinmetz; Holzwarth, R.; Schmidt, T. Kentischer und W.

    2012-01-01

    A wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb (LFC) was developed in a co-operation between the Kiepenheuer-Institut f\\"ur Sonnenphysik, Freiburg, Germany and the Max-Planck-Institut f\\"ur Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany for permanent installation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The system was installed successfully in October 2011. By simultaneously recording the spectra from the Sun and the LFC, for each exposure a calibration curve ...

  18. Absolute calibration of OH density in a nanosecond pulsed plasma filament in atmospheric pressure He-H2O: comparison of independent calibration methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreycken, T.; van der Horst, R. M.; Sadeghi, N.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-11-01

    The absolute density of OH radicals generated in a nanosecond pulsed filamentary discharge in atmospheric pressure He +0.84% H2O is measured independently by UV absorption and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) calibrated with Rayleigh scattering. For the calibration of LIF with Rayleigh scattering, two LIF models, with six levels and four levels, are studied to investigate the influence of the rotational and vibrational energy transfers. In addition, a chemical model is used to deduce the OH density in the afterglow from the relative LIF intensity as function of time. The different models show good correspondence and by comparing these different methods, the accuracy and the effect of assumptions on the obtained OH density are discussed in detail. This analysis includes an analysis of the sensitivity to parameters used in the LIF models.

  19. Absolute calibration of the Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ and delivered dose verification using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbeck, Amaury, E-mail: amauryhornbeck@gmail.com, E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Garcia, Tristan, E-mail: amauryhornbeck@gmail.com, E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Cuttat, Marguerite; Jenny, Catherine [Radiotherapy Department, Medical Physics Unit, University Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris (France)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Elekta Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} (LGK) is a radiotherapy beam machine whose features are not compliant with the international calibration protocols for radiotherapy. In this scope, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel and the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital decided to conceive a new LKG dose calibration method and to compare it with the currently used one. Furthermore, the accuracy of the dose delivered by the LGK machine was checked using an “end-to-end” test. This study also aims to compare doses delivered by the two latest software versions of the Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The dosimetric method chosen is the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of alanine. Dose rate (calibration) verification was done without TPS using a spherical phantom. Absolute calibration was done with factors calculated by Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-X). For “end-to-end” test, irradiations in an anthropomorphic head phantom, close to real treatment conditions, are done using the TPS in order to verify the delivered dose. Results: The comparison of the currently used calibration method with the new one revealed a deviation of +0.8% between the dose rates measured by ion chamber and EPR/alanine. For simple fields configuration (less than 16 mm diameter), the “end-to-end” tests showed out average deviations of −1.7% and −0.9% between the measured dose and the calculated dose by Gammaplan v9 and v10, respectively. Conclusions: This paper shows there is a good agreement between the new calibration method and the currently used one. There is also a good agreement between the calculated and delivered doses especially for Gammaplan v10.

  20. The Eurosdr Project "RADIOMETRIC Aspects of Digital Photogrammetric IMAGES" - Results of the Empirical Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkavaara, E.; Arbiol, R.; Markelin, L.; Martínez, L.; Bovet, S.; Bredif, M.; Chandelier, L.; Heikkinen, V.; Korpela, I.; Lelegard, L.; Pérez, F.; Schläpfer, D.; Tokola, T.

    2011-09-01

    This article presents the empirical research carried out in the context of the multi-site EuroSDR project "Radiometric aspects of digital photogrammetric images" and provides highlights of the results. The investigations have considered the vicarious radiometric and spatial resolution validation and calibration of the sensor system, radiometric processing of the image blocks either by performing relative radiometric block equalization or into absolutely reflectance calibrated products, and finally aspects of practical applications on NDVI layer generation and tree species classification. The data sets were provided by Leica Geosystems ADS40 and Intergraph DMC and the participants represented stakeholders in National Mapping Authorities, software development and research. The investigations proved the stability and quality of evaluated imaging systems with respect to radiometry and optical system. The first new-generation methods for reflectance calibration and equalization of photogrammetric image block data provided promising accuracy and were also functional from the productivity and usability points of view. The reflectance calibration methods provided up to 5% accuracy without any ground reference. Application oriented results indicated that automatic interpretation methods will benefit from the optimal use of radiometrically accurate multi-view photogrammetric imagery.

  1. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent (National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV); Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel); Droemer, Darryl W. (National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV); Crain, Marlon D. (National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV)

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  2. Radiometric Inter-Calibration between Himawari-8 AHI and S-NPP VIIRS for the Solar Reflective Bands

    OpenAIRE

    Fangfang Yu; Xiangqian Wu

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) on-board Himawari-8, which was launched on 7 October 2014, is the first geostationary instrument housed with a solar diffuser to provide accurate onboard calibrated data for the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) bands. In this study, the Ray-matching and collocated Deep Convective Cloud (DCC) methods, both of which are based on incidently collocated homogeneous pairs between AHI and Suomi NPP (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), are used...

  3. Absolute calibration and beam reconstruction of MITO (a ground-based instrument in the millimetric region)

    CERN Document Server

    Savini, G; Battistelli, E S; De Petris, M; Lamagna, L; Luzzi, G; Palladino, E

    2003-01-01

    An efficient sky data reconstruction derives from a precise characterization of the observing instrument. Here we describe the reconstruction of performances of a single-pixel 4-band photometer installed at MITO (Millimeter and Infrared Testagrigia Observatory) focal plane. The strategy of differential sky observations at millimeter wavelengths, by scanning the field of view at constant elevation wobbling the subreflector, induces a good knowledge of beam profile and beam-throw amplitude, allowing efficient data recovery. The problems that arise estimating the detectors throughput by drift scanning on planets are shown. Atmospheric transmission, monitored by skydip technique, is considered for deriving final responsivities for the 4 channels using planets as primary calibrators.

  4. EMISAR: An Absolutely Calibrated Polarimetric L- and C-band SAR

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Erik Lintz; Skou, Niels; Dall, Jørgen; Woelders, Kim; Jørgensen, Jan Hjelm; Granholm, Johan; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1998-01-01

    EMISAR is a high-resolution (2×2 m), fully polarimetric, dual-frequency (L- and C-band) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system designed for remote-sensing applications. The SAR is operated at high altitudes on a Gulfstream G-3 jet aircraft. The system is very well calibrated and has low sidelobes and low cross-polar contamination. Digital technology has been utilized to realize a flexible and highly stable radar with variable resolution, swath width, and imaging geometry. Thermal control and s...

  5. On the absolute calibration of a DT fusion neutron yield diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz C.L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF have underscored the need for accurate total yield measurements of DT neutrons because yield measurements provide a measure of the predicted performance of the experiments. Future gas-puff DT experiments at Sandia National Laboratory's Z facility will also require similar measurements. For ICF DT experiments, the standard technique for measuring the neutron (14.1 MeV yield, counts the activity (counts/minute induced in irradiated copper samples. This activity occurs by the 63Cu(n,2n62Cu reaction where 62Cu decays by positrons (β+ with a half-life of 9.67 minutes. The calibrations discussed here employ the associated-particle method (APM, where the α (4He particles from the T(d,n4He reaction are measured to infer neutron fluxes on a copper sample. The flux induces 62Cu activity, measured in a coincidence counting system. The method leads to a relationship between a DT neutron yield and copper activity known as the F-factor. The goal in future experiments is to apply this calibration to measure the yield at NIF with a combined uncertainty approaching 5%.

  6. SU-E-J-85: Leave-One-Out Perturbation (LOOP) Fitting Algorithm for Absolute Dose Film Calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To introduce an outliers-recognition fitting routine for film dosimetry. It cannot only be flexible with any linear and non-linear regression but also can provide information for the minimal number of sampling points, critical sampling distributions and evaluating analytical functions for absolute film-dose calibration. Methods: The technique, leave-one-out (LOO) cross validation, is often used for statistical analyses on model performance. We used LOO analyses with perturbed bootstrap fitting called leave-one-out perturbation (LOOP) for film-dose calibration . Given a threshold, the LOO process detects unfit points (“outliers”) compared to other cohorts, and a bootstrap fitting process follows to seek any possibilities of using perturbations for further improvement. After that outliers were reconfirmed by a traditional t-test statistics and eliminated, then another LOOP feedback resulted in the final. An over-sampled film-dose- calibration dataset was collected as a reference (dose range: 0-800cGy), and various simulated conditions for outliers and sampling distributions were derived from the reference. Comparisons over the various conditions were made, and the performance of fitting functions, polynomial and rational functions, were evaluated. Results: (1) LOOP can prove its sensitive outlier-recognition by its statistical correlation to an exceptional better goodness-of-fit as outliers being left-out. (2) With sufficient statistical information, the LOOP can correct outliers under some low-sampling conditions that other “robust fits”, e.g. Least Absolute Residuals, cannot. (3) Complete cross-validated analyses of LOOP indicate that the function of rational type demonstrates a much superior performance compared to the polynomial. Even with 5 data points including one outlier, using LOOP with rational function can restore more than a 95% value back to its reference values, while the polynomial fitting completely failed under the same conditions

  7. New method to remove the electronic noise for absolutely calibrating low gain photomultiplier tubes with a higher precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P.; Laubach, Mitchell A.

    2014-08-01

    A new method to remove the electronic noise in order to absolutely calibrate low gain photomultiplier tubes with a higher precision is proposed and validated with experiments using a digitizer-based data acquisition system. This method utilizes the fall time difference between the electronic noise (about 0.5 ns) and the real PMT signal (about 2.4 ns for Hamamatsu H10570 PMT assembly). Using this technique along with a convolution algorithm, the electronic noise and the real signals are separated very well, even including the very small signals heavily influenced by the electronic noise. One application that this method allows is for us to explore the energy relationship for gamma sensing in Cherenkov radiators while maintaining the fastest possible timing performance and high dynamic range.

  8. In-flight calibration of the experimental Absolute Scalar Magnetometer vector mode on board the Swarm satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Cattin, V.; Fratter, I.; Brocco, L.; Vigneron, P.; Lalanne, X.; Hulot, G.

    2014-12-01

    While the role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Fluxgate Magnetometer, it can also deliver simultaneously vector measurements with no impact on its scalar performance. Since these scalar and vector measurements are both perfectly synchronous and spatially coherent, their comparison can be directly used to assess the ASM performances at instrument level with no need to correct for the various magnetic perturbations generated by the satellites. This presentation will detail the ASM vector calibration process, with an emphasis on its susceptibility to the ASM operational conditions (primarily the sensor temperature and attitude, but also sun exposition parameters). The evolution of the instrument's performances during the first year of the Swarm mission will then be discussed, with a particular interest in the long term scalar residuals behaviour. These results will be analyzed to demonstrate both the noise performances of the ASM scalar and vector measurements and their excellent long term stability.

  9. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule. PMID:26026524

  10. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule

  11. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule

  12. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, C. J., E-mail: cjwaugh@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  13. Absolute sensitivity calibration of vacuum and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer systems and Z(eff) measurement based on bremsstrahlung continuum in HL-2A tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hangyu; Cui, Zhengying; Morita, Shigeru; Fu, Bingzhong; Goto, Motoshi; Sun, Ping; Dong, Chunfeng; Gao, Yadong; Xu, Yuan; Lu, Ping; Yang, Qingwei; Duan, Xuru

    2012-10-01

    A grazing-incidence flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been newly developed in HL-2A tokamak. Typical spectral lines are observed from intrinsic impurities of carbon, oxygen, iron, and extrinsic impurity of helium in the wavelength range of 20 Å-500 Å. Bremsstrahlung continuum is measured at different electron densities of HL-2A discharges to calibrate absolute sensitivity of the EUV spectrometer system and to measure effective ionic charge, Z(eff). The sensitivity of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer system is also absolutely calibrated in overlapped wavelength range of 300 Å-500 Å by comparing the intensity between VUV and EUV line emissions. PMID:23126850

  14. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-Star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Diaz-Trigo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the...

  15. Radiometric Normalization of Large Airborne Image Data Sets Acquired by Different Sensor Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, S.; Beshah, B. T.

    2016-06-01

    Generating seamless mosaics of aerial images is a particularly challenging task when the mosaic comprises a large number of im-ages, collected over longer periods of time and with different sensors under varying imaging conditions. Such large mosaics typically consist of very heterogeneous image data, both spatially (different terrain types and atmosphere) and temporally (unstable atmo-spheric properties and even changes in land coverage). We present a new radiometric normalization or, respectively, radiometric aerial triangulation approach that takes advantage of our knowledge about each sensor's properties. The current implementation supports medium and large format airborne imaging sensors of the Leica Geosystems family, namely the ADS line-scanner as well as DMC and RCD frame sensors. A hierarchical modelling - with parameters for the overall mosaic, the sensor type, different flight sessions, strips and individual images - allows for adaptation to each sensor's geometric and radiometric properties. Additional parameters at different hierarchy levels can compensate radiome-tric differences of various origins to compensate for shortcomings of the preceding radiometric sensor calibration as well as BRDF and atmospheric corrections. The final, relative normalization is based on radiometric tie points in overlapping images, absolute radiometric control points and image statistics. It is computed in a global least squares adjustment for the entire mosaic by altering each image's histogram using a location-dependent mathematical model. This model involves contrast and brightness corrections at radiometric fix points with bilinear interpolation for corrections in-between. The distribution of the radiometry fixes is adaptive to each image and generally increases with image size, hence enabling optimal local adaptation even for very long image strips as typi-cally captured by a line-scanner sensor. The normalization approach is implemented in HxMap software. It has been

  16. Radiometric dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on radiometric dating is a chapter in a handbook of Holocene Palaeoecology and Palaeohydrology. This chapter is part of a section on dating methods. Radiocarbon dating is discussed with respect to the apparent ages of lake sediments, seawater, sea creatures and plants. Isotope dating methods for the late Holocene deposits involving 210Pb, 137Cs, sup(239, 240)Pu, 241Am, 32Si and 39Ar are also described. (U.K.)

  17. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI).

  18. Continuous absolute g monitoring of the mobile LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter - a new tool to calibrate superconducting gravimeters -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, Sébastien; Gillot, Pierre; Cheng, Bing; Pereira Dos Santos, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry allows for the realization of a new generation of instruments for inertial sensing based on laser cooled atoms. We have developed an absolute gravimeter (CAG) based on this technic, which can perform continuous gravity measurements at a high cycling rate. This instrument, operating since summer 2009, is the new metrological french standard for gravimetry. The CAG has been designed to be movable, so as to participate to international comparisons and on field measurements. It took part to several comparisons since ICAG'09 and operated in both urban environments and low noise underground facilities. The atom gravimeter operates with a high cycling rate of 3 Hz. Its sensitivity is predominantly limited by ground vibration noise which is rejected thanks to isolation platforms and correlation with other sensors, such as broadband accelerometers or sismometers. These developments allow us to perform continuous gravity measurements, no matter what the sismic conditions are and even in the worst cases such as during earthquakes. At best, a sensitivity of 5.6 μGal at 1 s measurement time has been demonstrated. The long term stability averages down to 0.1 μGal for long term measurements. Presently, the measurement accuracy is 4 μGal, which we plan to reduce to 1 μGal or below. I will present the instrument, the principle of the gravity acceleration measurement and its performances. I will focus on continuous gravity measurements performed over several years and compared with our superconducting gravimeter iGrav signal. This comparison allows us to calibrate the iGrav scale factor and follow its evolution. Especially, we demonstrate that, thanks to the CAG very high cycling rate, a single day gravity measurement allows to calibrate the iGrav scaling factor with a relative uncertainty as good as 4.10-4.

  19. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars I: The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Ribas, Ignasi

    2016-01-01

    Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures, metallicity, and gravities avoiding the degeneracy present in photo...

  20. DAQ Software Contributions, Absolute Scale Energy Calibration and Background Evaluation for the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, Eric Lewis [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The NOvA (NuMI Off-axis ve [nu_e] Appearance) Experiment is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment currently in its second year of operations. NOvA uses the Neutrinos from the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab, and there are two main off-axis detectors: a Near Detector at Fermilab and a Far Detector 810 km away at Ash River, MN. The work reported herein is in support of the NOvA Experiment, through contributions to the development of data acquisition software, providing an accurate, absolute-scale energy calibration for electromagnetic showers in NOvA detector elements, crucial to the primary electron neutrino search, and through an initial evaluation of the cosmic background rate in the NOvA Far Detector, which is situated on the surface without significant overburden. Additional support work for the NOvA Experiment is also detailed, including DAQ Server Administration duties and a study of NOvA’s sensitivity to neutrino oscillations into a “sterile” state.

  1. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  2. In-situ absolute calibration of electric-field amplitude measurements with the LPDA radio detector stations of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Briechle, Florian

    2016-01-01

    With the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) located at the Pierre Auger Observatory, radio emission of extensive air showers is observed. To exploit the physics potential of AERA, electric-field amplitude measurements with the radio detector stations need to be well-calibrated on an absolute level. A convenient tool for far-field calibration campaigns is a flying drone. Here we make use of an octocopter to place a calibrated source at freely chosen positions above the radio detector array. Special emphasis is put on the reconstruction of the octocopter position and its accuracy during the flights. The antenna response pattern of the radio detector stations was measured in a recent calibration campaign. Results of these measurements are presented and compared to simulations. It is found that measurements and simulations are in good agreement.

  3. Cryogenic absolute radiometers as laboratory irradiance standards, remote sensing detectors, and pyroheliometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, Peter V.; Hoyt, C.; Kochling, H.; Miller, P.

    1990-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in heat diffusivity of pure Cu at liquid-He temperatures makes possible very important advances in the absolute accuracy, reproducibility, sensitivity, and time constant of cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs), relative to conventional ESRs. The design and characterization of a table-top cryogenic ESR now available for detector calibration work to the 0.01-percent level of absolute accuracy under laser illumination is discussed. A sensitive cryogenic ESR recently delivered to the NIST for radiometric calibrations of black bodies is also described, along with the design and testing of a very fast cryogenic ESR developed for NASA remote-sensing studies of the earth's radiation budget.

  4. Metrological support for climatic time series of satellite radiometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapritsky, Victor I.; Burdakin, Andrey A.; Khlevnoy, Boris B.; Morozova, Svetlana P.; Ogarev, Sergey A.; Panfilov, Alexander S.; Krutikov, Vladimir N.; Bingham, Gail E.; Humpherys, Thomas; Tansock, Joseph J.; Thurgood, Alan V.; Privalsky, Victor E.

    2009-02-01

    A necessary condition for accumulating fundamental climate data records is the use of observation instruments whose stability and accuracy are sufficiently high for climate monitoring purposes; the number of instruments and their distribution in space should be sufficient for measurements with no spatial or temporal gaps. The continuous acquirement of data over time intervals of several decades can only be possible under the condition of simultaneous application of instruments produced by different manufacturers and installed on different platforms belonging to one or several countries. The design of standard sources for pre-flight calibrations and in-flight monitoring of instruments has to meet the most stringent requirements for the accuracy of absolute radiometric measurements and stability of all instruments. This means that the radiometric scales should be stable, accurate, and uniform. Current technologies cannot ensure the high requirements for stability and compatibility of radiometric scales: 0.1% per decade within the 0.3 - 3 μm band and 0.01 K per decade within the 3 - 25 μm band. It is suggested that these tasks can be aided through the use of the pure metals or eutectic alloy phase transition phenomenon that always occur under the same temperature. Such devices can be used for pre-flight calibrations and for on-board monitoring of the stability of radiometric instruments. Results of previous studies of blackbody models based upon the phase transition phenomenon are quite promising. A study of the phase transition of some materials in small cells was conducted for future application in onboard monitoring devices and its results are positive and allow us to begin preparations for similar experiments in space.

  5. Absolute calibration of a SPRED [Spectrometer Recording Extended Domain] EUV [extreme ultraviolet] spectrograph for use on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed an absolute intensity calibration of a SPRED multichannel EUV spectrograph using synchrotron radiation from the NBS SURF-II electron storage ring. The calibration procedure and results for both a survey grating (450 g/mm) and a high-resolution (2100 g/mm) grating are presented. The spectrograph is currently in use on the DIII-D tokamak with a tangential line-of-sight at the plasma midplane. Data is first acquired and processed by a microcomputer; the absolute line intensities are then sent to the DIII-D database for comparison with data from other diagnostics. Representative data from DIII-D plasma operations will be presented. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars. I. The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Dutra-Ferreira, L.; Ribas, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. Aims: The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines, λλ 8498, 8542, and 8662) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. Methods: We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and gravities (log g) avoiding the degeneracy usually present in photometric continuum calibrations based solely on color indices. Results: The internal uncertainties achieved for continuum absolute flux calculations are ≈2% of the solar chromospheric flux, one order of magnitude lower than for photometric calibrations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we gauge the impact of observational errors on the final chromospheric fluxes due to the absolute continuum flux calibration and find that Teffuncertainties are properly mitigated by the photospheric correction leaving [Fe/H] as the dominating factor in the chromospheric flux uncertainty. Conclusions: Across the FGK spectral types, the Ca II IRT lines are sensitive to chromospheric activity. The reduced internal uncertainties reported here enable us to build a new chromospheric absolute flux scale and explore the age-activity relation from the active regime down to very low activity levels and

  7. The PREMOS/PICARD instrument calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutz, Werner; Fehlmann, André; Hülsen, Gregor; Meindl, Peter; Winkler, Rainer; Thuillier, Gérard; Blattner, Peter; Buisson, François; Egorova, Tatiana; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Fox, Nigel; Gröbner, Julian; Hochedez, Jean-François; Koller, Silvio; Meftah, Mustapha; Meisonnier, Mireille; Nyeki, Stephan; Pfiffner, Daniel; Roth, Hansjörg; Rozanov, Eugene; Spescha, Marcel; Wehrli, Christoph; Werner, Lutz; Wyss, Jules U.

    2009-08-01

    PREMOS is a space experiment scheduled to fly on the French solar mission PICARD. The experiment comprises filter radiometers and absolute radiometers to measure the spectral and total solar irradiance. The aim of PREMOS is to contribute to the long term monitoring of the total solar irradiance, to use irradiance observations for 'nowcasting' the state of the terrestrial middle atmosphere and to provide long term sensitivity calibration for the solar imaging instrument SODISM on PICARD. In this paper we describe the calibration of the instruments. The filter radiometer channels in the visible and near IR were characterized at PMOD/WRC and the UV channels were calibrated at PTB Berlin. The absolute radiometers were compared with the World Radiometric Reference at PMOD/WRC and a power calibration relative to a primary cryogenic radiometer standard was performed in vacuum and air at NPL.

  8. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-Star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Guver, Tolga; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Diaz-Trigo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0$\\pm$0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared to EPIC-MOS1, MOS2 and ACIS-S detectors. We also address the calibration uncertainty in the RXTE/PCA int...

  9. Environmental dosimetry of radon-222 and daughters: measurement of absolute calibration factors of CR-39 considering the plate-out effects and environmental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this work concerns with the measurement of absolute calibration factors for the use of CR-39 as an absolute detector in indoor and daughters monitoring. Up to now the usefulness of calibration factors was restricted to environmental conditions equal (or very close) to those worthing during their determinations. This fact is consequence of the difficulties related to the understanding of the plate-out properties of radon daughters activity in the air. The plate-out effects on radon daughters monitoring performed by SSNTDs are studied. Our experimental results are in agreement with those of other authors about the great sensitivity of CR-39 to the plate-out effects, fact that recommended its use in this work. Being succeeded in the employment of CR-39 as an alpha-spectrometer we concluded that some important information (like the radon daughters deposition rates on the walls of an environment) can be achieved. The knowledge about the behavior of plate-out made possible the determination of the ranges in zenithal angle and energy where CR-39 can detect alpha-particles with efficiency of 100%, at our conditions of track observation. In this way, we obtained calibration factors for CR-39 that are weakly dependent on environmental conditions. We think that these results can contribute to the improvement of RD (Radiation Detector) detection techniques. (author). 159 refs, 106 figs, 05 tabs

  10. Data use investigations for applications Explorer Mission A (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission): HCMM's role in studies of the urban heat island, Great Lakes thermal phenomena and radiometric calibration of satellite data. [Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester New York and Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Schimminger, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The utility of data from NASA'a heat capacity mapping mission satellite for studies of the urban heat island, thermal phenomena in large lakes and radiometric calibration of satellite sensors was assessed. The data were found to be of significant value in all cases. Using HCMM data, the existence and microstructure of the heat island can be observed and associated with land cover within the urban complex. The formation and development of the thermal bar in the Great Lakes can be observed and quantitatively mapped using HCMM data. In addition, the thermal patterns observed can be associated with water quality variations observed both from other remote sensing platforms and in situ. The imaging radiometer on-board the HCMM satellite is shown to be calibratible to within about 1.1 C of actual surface temperatures. These findings, as well as the analytical procedures used in studying the HCMM data, are included.

  11. Alaska Radiometric Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Radiometric Age file is a database of radiometric ages of rocks or minerals sampled from Alaska. The data was collected from professional publications...

  12. 数字微镜光谱仪的互补S编码矩阵的设计及实验%Imaging Spectrometry Radiometric Cross-Calibration Based on Precise Spectral Response Matching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张智海; 高玲肖; 郭媛君; 王伟; 莫祥霞

    2012-01-01

    数字微镜光谱仪在应用中编码矩阵的选取至关重要.最佳的理论编码矩阵H矩阵存在非循环、编码复杂、双光路系统实现困难的问题而得不到广泛应用;而最佳实用S矩阵较H矩阵信噪比提高优势略逊.为此本文针对数字微镜光谱仪设计了一种互补S编码矩阵,介绍了其构造、实现过程以及对杂散光和暗电流噪声的削弱作用,通过对其噪声改善程度理论的分析,说明该算法结合了H矩阵与S矩阵的优点,达到了理论与实用的双优.经实验验证,该算法较S矩阵编码模板信噪比提高了2.05倍.%The present research describes the development of an improved cross-calibration method of on-orbit satellite sensor. The EO-1/Hyperion was taken as the referenced sensor and HJ-1A/HSI was taken as the uncalibrated sensor. The differences between the bands configurations were removed by the precise spectral response matching using the deconvolution method, which significantly reduced the radiometric calibration uncertainty of HSI sensor. The calibration coefficients of HSI for all 115 bands were acquired. The uncertainties of calibration coefficient from band 1 to band 60 stably lie in 5%~8%, and for all the other bands excerpt for the oxygen absorption which lies in at 760 run and the water vapor absorption which lies in at 940 nm, the uncertainties of calibration coefficients are changed from 7% to 18%, which increased as the wavelength increased. Contrasted Compared with the traditional spectral matching method, the method proposed can improve the calibration accuracy by about 50%, which can meet the demand of the quantitive application for hyperspectral remote sensing data. It demonstrated the good precision and reliability of the method. It solved the spectral matching problem when the band configuration is big enough so that the cross calibration accuracy is too low and is difficult to apply in hyperspectral sensor cross-calibration, and provides a new

  13. Sand Dune Ridge Alignment Effects on Surface BRF over the Libya-4 CEOS Calibration Site

    OpenAIRE

    Govaerts, Yves M.

    2015-01-01

    The Libya-4 desert area, located in the Great Sand Sea, is one of the most important bright desert CEOS pseudo-invariant calibration sites by its size and radiometric stability. This site is intensively used for radiometer drift monitoring, sensor intercalibration and as an absolute calibration reference based on simulated radiances traceable to the SI standard. The Libya-4 morphology is composed of oriented sand dunes shaped by dominant winds. The effects of sand dune spatial organization on...

  14. Development of an absolute method for efficiency calibration of a coaxial HPGe detector for large volume sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Pablo C.

    2015-09-01

    In this work an absolute method for the determination of the full energy peak efficiency of a gamma spectroscopy system for voluminous sources is presented. The method was tested for a high-resolution coaxial HPGe detector and cylindrical homogeneous volume source. The volume source is represented by a set of point sources filling its volume. We found that the absolute efficiency of a volume source can be determined as the average over its volume of the absolute efficiency of each point source. Experimentally, we measure the intrinsic efficiency as a function upon source-detector position. Then, considering the solid angle and the attenuations of the gamma rays emitted to the detector by each point source, considered as embedded in the source matrix, the absolute efficiency for each point source inside of the volume was determined. The factor associate with the solid angle and the self-attenuation of photons in the sample was deduced from first principles without any mathematical approximation. The method was tested by determining the specific activity of 137Cs in cylindrical homogeneous sources, using IAEA reference materials with specific activities between 14.2 Bq/kg and 9640 Bq/kg at the moment of the experimentation. The results obtained shown a good agreement with the expected values. The relative difference was less than 7% in most of the cases. The main advantage of this method is that it does not require of the use of expensive and hard to produce standard materials. In addition it does not require of matrix effect corrections, which are the main cause of error in this type of measurements, and it is easy to implement in any nuclear physics laboratory.

  15. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. L.

    2006-10-01

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si (Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3keV (˜50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.

  16. Absolutely calibrated vacuum ultraviolet spectra in the 150-250-nm range from plasmas generated by the NIKE KrF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, Uri; Holland, G. E.; Weaver, J. L.; Mostovych, A. N.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Lehmberg, R.; Kjornarattanawanich, Benjawan; Back, C. A.

    2005-06-01

    High-resolution vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectra were recorded from plasmas generated by the NIKE KrF laser for the purpose of observing emission from the two-plasmon decay instability (TPDI) at 2/3 the NIKE wavelength (165nm). The targets were irradiated by up to 43 overlapping beams with intensity up to ≈1014W/cm2 and with beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). The targets consisted of planar foils of CH, BN, Al, Si, S, Ti, Pd, and Au. Titanium-doped silica aerogels in Pyrex cylinders were also irradiated. The spectra of the target elements were observed from charge states ranging from the neutral atoms to five times ionized. The spectrometer was absolutely calibrated using synchrotron radiation, and absolute VUV plasma emission intensities were determined. Emission from the TPDI at 165-nm wavelength was not observed from any of the irradiated targets. An upper bound on the possible TPDI emission was less than 4×10-8 the incident NIKE laser energy. The NIKE laser radiation backscattered from the silica aerogel targets at 248nm was typically 6×10-6 the incident NIKE laser energy, and the spectral broadening corresponded to the 1-THz bandwidth of the ISI smoothing. The spectra from the moderately charged plasma ions (up to five times ionized), spectral linewidths, absolute continuum emission level, and slope of the continuum were consistent with plasma temperatures in the 100-300-eV range.

  17. An absolute calibration method of an ethyl alcohol biosensor based on wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, laser-based wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is applied to develop a non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol biosensor. WM-DPTR features unprecedented ethanol-specificity and sensitivity by suppressing baseline variations through a differential measurement near the peak and baseline of the mid-infrared ethanol absorption spectrum. Biosensor signal calibration curves are obtained from WM-DPTR theory and from measurements in human blood serum and ethanol solutions diffused from skin. The results demonstrate that the WM-DPTR-based calibrated alcohol biosensor can achieve high precision and accuracy for the ethanol concentration range of 0-100 mg/dl. The high-performance alcohol biosensor can be incorporated into ignition interlocks that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles in an effort to reduce incidents of drinking and driving

  18. An absolute calibration method of an ethyl alcohol biosensor based on wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi Jun; Mandelis, Andreas, E-mail: mandelis@mie.utoronto.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Guo, Xinxin [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    In this work, laser-based wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is applied to develop a non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol biosensor. WM-DPTR features unprecedented ethanol-specificity and sensitivity by suppressing baseline variations through a differential measurement near the peak and baseline of the mid-infrared ethanol absorption spectrum. Biosensor signal calibration curves are obtained from WM-DPTR theory and from measurements in human blood serum and ethanol solutions diffused from skin. The results demonstrate that the WM-DPTR-based calibrated alcohol biosensor can achieve high precision and accuracy for the ethanol concentration range of 0-100 mg/dl. The high-performance alcohol biosensor can be incorporated into ignition interlocks that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles in an effort to reduce incidents of drinking and driving.

  19. An absolute calibration method of an ethyl alcohol biosensor based on wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi Jun; Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2015-11-01

    In this work, laser-based wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is applied to develop a non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol biosensor. WM-DPTR features unprecedented ethanol-specificity and sensitivity by suppressing baseline variations through a differential measurement near the peak and baseline of the mid-infrared ethanol absorption spectrum. Biosensor signal calibration curves are obtained from WM-DPTR theory and from measurements in human blood serum and ethanol solutions diffused from skin. The results demonstrate that the WM-DPTR-based calibrated alcohol biosensor can achieve high precision and accuracy for the ethanol concentration range of 0-100 mg/dl. The high-performance alcohol biosensor can be incorporated into ignition interlocks that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles in an effort to reduce incidents of drinking and driving.

  20. Chemisorption of sulfur on (100)Mo: growth of surface and volume sulfides, absolute calibration, thermodesorption of sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physico-chemical processes following the chemisorption of sulfur on (100)Mo, that is: growth of the surface and volume sulfides, their thermo-stability, variation of emission and catalytic properties of the surface are studied using high resolution (δ E/E ≤ 0.1%) EOS with recording of spectra directly from the specimen highly heated up to T = 2000 K. The work of yield and bound energy of sulfur atom depending on the level of Mo surface population by S atoms are determined. It is shown that Mo exposure in H2S atmosphere under T = 300-2000 K does not result in accumulation of S atoms within the specimen volume. The absolute concentration of sulfur atoms in the surface sulfide is determined and it is shown that its stoichiometry is MoS. 31 refs., 5 figs

  1. Radiometric instrumentation and measurements guide for photovoltaic performance testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.

    1997-04-01

    The Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs indoor and outdoor standardization, testing, and monitoring of the performance of a wide range of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion devices and systems. The PV Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team (PVSRME) within that project is responsible for measurement and characterization of natural and artificial optical radiation which stimulates the PV effect. The PV manufacturing and research and development community often approaches project members for technical information and guidance. A great area of interest is radiometric instrumentation, measurement techniques, and data analysis applied to understanding and improving PV cell, module, and system performance. At the Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Workshop conducted by the PVSRME team in July 1995, the need to communicate knowledge of solar and optical radiometric measurements and instrumentation, gained as a result of NREL`s long-term experiences, was identified as an activity that would promote improved measurement processes and measurement quality in the PV research and manufacturing community. The purpose of this document is to address the practical and engineering need to understand optical and solar radiometric instrument performance, selection, calibration, installation, and maintenance applicable to indoor and outdoor radiometric measurements for PV calibration, performance, and testing applications. An introductory section addresses radiometric concepts and definitions. Next, concepts essential to spectral radiometric measurements are discussed. Broadband radiometric instrumentation and measurement concepts are then discussed. Each type of measurement serves as an important component of the PV cell, module, and system performance measurement and characterization process.

  2. A revised radiometric normalisation standard for SAR

    OpenAIRE

    Small, D.; N. Miranda; Meier, E

    2009-01-01

    Improved geometric accuracy in SAR sensors implies that more complex models of the Earth may be used not only to geometrically rectify imagery, but also to more robustly calibrate their radiometry. Current beta, sigma, and gamma nought SAR radiometry conventions all assume a simple “flat as Kansas” Earth ellipsoid model. We complement these simple models with improved radiometric calibration that accounts for local terrain variations. In the era of ERS-1 and RADARSAT-1, image geolocation a...

  3. Relative and Absolute Calibration of a Multihead Camera System with Oblique and Nadir Looking Cameras for a Uas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, F.; Schima, R.; Grenzdörffer, G.

    2013-08-01

    Numerous unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are currently flooding the market. For the most diverse applications UAVs are special designed and used. Micro and mini UAS (maximum take-off weight up to 5 kg) are of particular interest, because legal restrictions are still manageable but also the payload capacities are sufficient for many imaging sensors. Currently a camera system with four oblique and one nadir looking cameras is under development at the Chair for Geodesy and Geoinformatics. The so-called "Four Vision" camera system was successfully built and tested in the air. A MD4-1000 UAS from microdrones is used as a carrier system. Light weight industrial cameras are used and controlled by a central computer. For further photogrammetric image processing, each individual camera, as well as all the cameras together have to be calibrated. This paper focuses on the determination of the relative orientation between the cameras with the „Australis" software and will give an overview of the results and experiences of test flights.

  4. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds. PMID:19498585

  5. The UV-A and visible solar irradiance spectrum: inter-comparison of absolutely calibrated, spectrally medium resolution solar irradiance spectra from balloon- and satellite-borne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gurlit

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the ENVISAT/-SCIAMACHY satellite validation, solar irradiance spectra are absolutely measured at moderate resolution in the UV/visible spectral range (in the UV from 316.7–418 nm and the visible from 400–652 nm at a full width half maximum resolution of 0.55 nm and 1.48 nm, respectively from aboard the azimuth-controlled LPMA/DOAS balloon gondola at around 32 km balloon float altitude. After accounting for the atmospheric extinction due to Rayleigh scattering and gaseous absorption (O3, and NO2, the measured solar spectra are compared with previous observations. Our solar irradiance is +1.6% larger than the re-calibrated Kurucz et al. (1984 solar spectrum (Fontenla et al., 1999, called MODTRAN 3.5 in the visible spectral range (435–650 nm, +1.5% larger in the (370–415 nm wavelength interval, but −4% smaller in the UV spectral range (316.7–370 nm, when the Kurucz spectrum is convolved to the spectral resolution of our instrument. The same comparison with the SOLSPEC solar spectrum (Thuillier et al., 1997, 1998a, b confirms the somewhat larger solar irradiance (+1.7% measured by the balloon instrument from 435–500 nm, but not from 500–650 nm, where the SOLSPEC is −1.3% lower than MODTRAN 3.5. Comparison of the SCIAMACHY solar spectrum from channels 1 to 4 (– re-calibrated by the University of Bremen – with MODTRAN 3.5 indicates an agreement of +0.2% in the visible spectral range (435–585 nm. With this calibration, the SCIAMACHY solar spectrum is congruent with the balloon observations (−1% in the 316.7–370 nm wavelength range, but both are up to −5%/−3% smaller than MODTRAN 3.5 and SOLSPEC, respectively. In agreement with findings of Skupin et al. (2002 our study emphasizes that the present ESA SCIAMACHY level 1 calibration is systematically +15% larger in the considered wavelength intervals when compared to all available other solar irradiance measurements.

  6. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  7. SkyProbe: Real-Time Precision Monitoring in the Optical of the Absolute Atmospheric Absorption on the Telescope Science and Calibration Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuillandre, J.-C.; Magnier, E.; Sabin, D.; Mahoney, B.

    2016-05-01

    Mauna Kea is known for its pristine seeing conditions but sky transparency can be an issue for science operations since at least 25% of the observable (i.e. open dome) nights are not photometric, an effect mostly due to high-altitude cirrus. Since 2001, the original single channel SkyProbe mounted in parallel on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) has gathered one V-band exposure every minute during each observing night using a small CCD camera offering a very wide field of view (35 sq. deg.) encompassing the region pointed by the telescope for science operations, and exposures long enough (40 seconds) to capture at least 100 stars of Hipparcos' Tycho catalog at high galactic latitudes (and up to 600 stars at low galactic latitudes). The measurement of the true atmospheric absorption is achieved within 2%, a key advantage over all-sky direct thermal infrared imaging detection of clouds. The absolute measurement of the true atmospheric absorption by clouds and particulates affecting the data being gathered by the telescope's main science instrument has proven crucial for decision making in the CFHT queued service observing (QSO) representing today all of the telescope time. Also, science exposures taken in non-photometric conditions are automatically registered for a new observation at a later date at 1/10th of the original exposure time in photometric conditions to ensure a proper final absolute photometric calibration. Photometric standards are observed only when conditions are reported as being perfectly stable by SkyProbe. The more recent dual color system (simultaneous B & V bands) will offer a better characterization of the sky properties above Mauna Kea and should enable a better detection of the thinnest cirrus (absorption down to 0.01 mag., or 1%).

  8. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  9. The final power calibration of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor for various configurations obtained from the measurements of the absolute average neutron flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandre Fonseca Povoa da, E-mail: alexandre.povoa@mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza; Betti, Flavio; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use of neutron activation foils is a widely spread technique applied to obtain nuclear parameters then comparing the results with those calculated using specific methodologies and available nuclear data. By irradiation of activation foils and subsequent measurement of its induced activity, it is possible to determine the neutron flux at the position of irradiation. The power level during operation of the reactor is a parameter which is directly proportional to the average neutron flux throughout the core. The objective of this work is to gather data from irradiation of gold foils symmetrically placed along a cylindrically configured core which presents only a small excess reactivity in order to derive the power generated throughout the spatial thermal and epithermal neutron flux distribution over the core of the IPEN/MB-01 Nuclear Reactor, eventually lending to a proper calibration of its nuclear channels. The foils are fixed in a Lucite plate then irradiated with and without cadmium sheaths so as to obtain the absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux. The correlation between the average power neutron flux resulting from the gold foils irradiation, and the average power digitally indicated by the nuclear channel number 6, allows for the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. The reactor power level obtained by thermal neutron flux mapping was (74.65 ± 2.45) watts to a mean counting per seconds of 37881 cps to nuclear channel number 10 a pulse detector, and 0.719.10{sup -5} ampere to nuclear linear channel number 6 (a non-compensated ionization chamber). (author)

  10. Establishment of a primary reference solar cell calibration technique in Korea: methods, results and comparison with WPVS qualified laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, SeungKyu; Ahn, SeJin; Yun, Jae Ho; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Winter, Stefan; Igari, Sanekazu; Yoon, KyungHoon

    2014-06-01

    A primary reference solar cell calibration technique recently established at the Korea Institute of Energy Research in Korea is introduced. This calibration technique is an indoor method that uses a highly collimated continuous-type solar simulator and absolute cavity radiometer traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. The results obtained using this calibration technique are shown with a precise uncertainty analysis, and the system configuration and calibration procedures are introduced. The calibration technique avoids overestimating the short-circuit current of a reference solar cell due to multiple reflections of incident simulator light using a novel method. In addition, the uncertainty analysis indicates that the calibration technique has an expanded uncertainty of approximately 0.7% with a coverage factor of k = 2 for a c-Si reference cell calibration. In addition, the developed primary reference solar cell calibration technique was compared with other techniques established in the World Photovoltaic Scale (WPVS) qualified calibration laboratories to verify its validity and reliability.

  11. Determination of Delta m(d) and absolute calibration of flavor taggers for the Delta m(s) analysis, in fully reconstructed decays at the CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Jonatan Piedra [University of Cantabria, (Spain). Inst. of Physics

    2005-04-21

    The new trigger processor, the Silicon Vertex Tracking (SVT), has dramatically improved the B physics capabilities of the upgraded CDF II Detector; for the first time in a hadron collider, the SVT has enabled the access to non-lepton-triggered B meson decays. Within the new available range of decay modes, the B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ signature is of paramount importance in the measurement of the Δms mixing frequency. The analysis reported here is a step towards the measurement of this frequency; two where our goals: carrying out the absolute calibration of the opposite side flavor taggers, used in the Δms measurement; and measuring the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing frequency in a B → Dπ sample, establishing the feasibility of the mixing measurement in this sample whose decay-length is strongly biased by the selective SVT trigger. We analyze a total integrated luminosity of 355 pb-1 collected with the CDF II Detector. By triggering on muons, using the conventional di-muon trigger; or displaced tracks, using the SVT trigger, we gather a sample rich in bottom and charm mesons.

  12. Radiometric Method for Emissivity Retrieval in High Reflective Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Canavero, Marco; Murk, Axel

    2013-01-01

    High reflective materials in the microwave region play a very important role in the realization of antenna reflectors for a broad range of applications, including radiometry. These reflectors have a characteristic emissivity which needs to be characterized accurately in order to perform a correct radiometric calibration of the instrument. Such a characterization can be performed by using open resonators, waveguide cavities or by radiometric measurements. The latter consists of comparative rad...

  13. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth`s radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  14. Influence of Calibration Parameter File (CPF)to Radiometric Correction on Landsat TM/ETM+%CPF 变化对 Landsat TM/ETM+辐射校正结果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄绍霖; 徐涵秋; 王琳

    2014-01-01

    随着时间的推移,卫星传感器的老化会使得原有的辐射定标参数文件(CPF)失效。最典型的当属 Landsat 5卫星,该卫星自1984年发射以来,已经进行了多次 CPF 修正;而 Landsat 7卫星的 CPF 也经过了数次修改,以保证辐射校正结果的准确性。以 Landsat TM/ETM+遥感影像为例,分别以2003、2009年的 CPF 对它们进行辐射校正,并对结果进行对比。结果表明,除 ETM+的绿光波段外,TM、ETM+影像基于2009年 CPF 计算的各波段均值都要小于2003年。而这一变化也使得由此计算的指数产生差异:归一化植被指数(NDVI)间的差异可达0.48%,建筑用地指数(IBI)间的差异可达5.94%。%As time goes by,the aged satellite sensors have made the original Calibration Parameter File (CPF)of the sensors become invalid.Typically the CPF of the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) was modified several times since its launch in 1984,and so did the CPF of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+).Otherwise the accuracy of the image radiometric correction is not ensured.In this study,two scenes of Landsat TM and ETM+ images have been corrected using their CPFs issued in 2003 and 2009,respectively.These radiometrically-corrected images were then compared to see whether there was any difference between the correction results.The band-by-band comparison reveals that,except the green band of ETM+,the mean value of TM and ETM+ bands calculated with the 2009 CPF is less than that calculated with the 2003 CPF.This also has influenced on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)and build-up index (IBI)computation.The difference in the mean value between the NDVIs calculated using the 2003 and 2009 CPFs amounts to 0.48%,while this figure between the IBIs can reach to 5.94%.

  15. Laboratory Calibration of a Field Imaging Spectrometer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxi Tong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new Field Imaging Spectrometer System (FISS based on a cooling area CCD was developed. This paper describes the imaging principle, structural design, and main parameters of the FISS sensor. The FISS was spectrally calibrated with a double grating monochromator to determine the center wavelength and FWHM of each band. Calibration results showed that the spectral range of the FISS system is 437–902 nm, the number of channels is 344 and the spectral resolution of each channel is better than 5 nm. An integrating sphere was used to achieve absolute radiometric calibration of the FISS with less than 5% calibration error for each band. There are 215 channels with signal to noise ratios (SNRs greater than 500 (62.5% of the bands. The results demonstrated that the FISS has achieved high performance that assures the feasibility of its practical use in various fields.

  16. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  17. Sentinel-3 OLCI Radiometric and Spectral Performance Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, L.; Blanot, L.; Lamquin, N.; Bruniquel, V.; Meskini, N.; Nieke, J.; Bouvet, M.; Fougnie, B.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the activities to be undertaken by ACRI-ST under ESA/ESTEC coordination for the assessment of OLCI Radiometric and Spectral Performances during the SENTINEL-3 Commissioning Phase. As an introduction, it briefly describes the instrument concept and available on-board calibration hardware, the context and main objective of the work. Insisting on the fact that radiometric calibration of OLCI is based on in-flight measurements, as was for MERIS, it then describes the methodology and tools to be used during Commissioning. Finally, as in-flight based radiometry implies the need for independent validation, it describes the corresponding methods and tools.

  18. Radiometric and Geometric Analysis of Hyperspectral Imagery Acquired from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy F. Glenn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV hyperspectral calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS and inertial navigation sensors (INS under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis. The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 m (based on RMSE with a flying height of 344 m above ground level (AGL.

  19. Principles of radiometric dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major contributions that the study of meteorites has made to our understanding of the origin of the solar system is in defining when that event took place. In addition, several other important events in early solar-system history have been dated using radiochronological techniques applied to meteorites. The principles on which those applications of radiometric dating are based are outlined. 24 references

  20. Radiometric chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiometric method of analysis is noted for its sensitivity and its simplicity in both apparatus and procedure. A few inexpensive radioactive reagents permit the analysis of a wide variety of chemical elements and compounds. Any particular procedure is generally applicable over a very wide range of concentrations. It is potentially an analytical method of great industrial significance. Specific examples of analyses are cited to illustrate the potentialities of ordinary equipment. Apparatus specifically designed for radiometric chemistry may shorten the time required, and increase the precision and accuracy for routine analyses. A sensitive and convenient apparatus for the routine performance of radiometric chemical analysis is a special type of centrifuge which has been used in obtaining the data presented in this paper. The radioactivity of the solution is measured while the centrifuge is spinning. This device has been used as the basis for an automatic analyser for phosphate ion, programmed to follow a sequence of unknown sampling, reagent mixing, centrifugation, counting data presentation, and phosphate replenishment. This analyser can repeatedly measure phosphate-concentration in the range of 5 to 50 ppm with an accuracy of ±5%. (author)

  1. Absolute advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA country is said to have an absolute advantage over another country in the production of a good or service if it can produce that good or service using fewer real resources. Equivalently, using the same inputs, the country can produce more output. The concept of absolute advantage can a

  2. Proposed low-energy absolute calibration of nuclear recoils in a dual-phase noble element TPC using D-D neutron scattering kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Verbus, J R; Malling, D C; Genecov, M; Ghosh, S; Moskowitz, A G; Chan, S; Chapman, J J; de Viveiros, L; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Huang, D Q; Pangilinan, M; Taylor, W C; Gaitskell, R J

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new technique for the calibration of nuclear recoils in large noble element dual-phase time projection chambers used to search for WIMP dark matter in the local galactic halo. This technique provides an $\\textit{in situ}$ measurement of the low-energy nuclear recoil response of the target media using the measured scattering angle between multiple neutron interactions within the detector volume. The low-energy reach and reduced systematics of this calibration have particular significance for the low-mass WIMP sensitivity of several leading dark matter experiments. Multiple strategies for improving this calibration technique are discussed, including the creation of a new type of quasi-monoenergetic 272 keV neutron source. We report results from a time-of-flight based measurement of the neutron energy spectrum produced by an Adelphi Technology, Inc. DD108 neutron generator, confirming its suitability for the proposed nuclear recoil calibration.

  3. Detection of 15 dB Squeezed States of Light and their Application for the Absolute Calibration of Photoelectric Quantum Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahlbruch, Henning; Mehmet, Moritz; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Squeezed states of light belong to the most prominent nonclassical resources. They have compelling applications in metrology, which has been demonstrated by their routine exploitation for improving the sensitivity of a gravitational-wave detector since 2010. Here, we report on the direct measurement of 15 dB squeezed vacuum states of light and their application to calibrate the quantum efficiency of photoelectric detection. The object of calibration is a customized InGaAs positive intrinsic negative (p-i-n) photodiode optimized for high external quantum efficiency. The calibration yields a value of 99.5% with a 0.5% (k =2 ) uncertainty for a photon flux of the order 1 017 s-1 at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The calibration neither requires any standard nor knowledge of the incident light power and thus represents a valuable application of squeezed states of light in quantum metrology.

  4. Proposed low-energy absolute calibration of nuclear recoils in a dual-phase noble element TPC using D-D neutron scattering kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Verbus, J. R.; Rhyne, C. A.; Malling, D.C.; Genecov, M.; Ghosh, S.; Moskowitz, A. G.; Chan, S.; Chapman, J. J.; Viveiros, L. de; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Huang, D. Q.; Pangilinan, M.; Taylor, W C; Gaitskell, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new technique for the calibration of nuclear recoils in large noble element dual-phase time projection chambers used to search for WIMP dark matter in the local galactic halo. This technique provides an $\\textit{in situ}$ measurement of the low-energy nuclear recoil response of the target media using the measured scattering angle between multiple neutron interactions within the detector volume. The low-energy reach and reduced systematics of this calibration have particular signi...

  5. Absolute calibration of the colour index and O4 absorption derived from Multi-AXis (MAX-) DOAS measurements and their application to a standardised cloud classification algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Thomas; Beirle, Steffen; Remmers, Julia; Shaiganfar, Reza; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed for the calibration of the colour index (CI) and the O4 absorption derived from Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on the comparison of measurements and radiative transfer simulations for well-defined atmospheric conditions and viewing geometries. Calibrated measurements of the CI and the O4 absorption are important for the detection and classification of clouds from MAX-DOAS observations. Such info...

  6. Research on Absolute Calibration of Sun Channel of Sun Photometer Using Laser Raster Scanning Method%激光点阵扫描法绝对定标太阳辐射计直射通道研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文斌; 李健军; 郑小兵

    2013-01-01

    利用可调谐激光器作为光源,以溯源于低温绝对辐射计的标准传递探测器作为激光束功率测量探测器,采用激光点阵扫描方法在太阳辐射计有效孔径光阑面形成均匀照度场,精确测量太阳辐射计870 nm无偏直射通道中心波长处绝对辐照度响应度.利用灯-单色仪系统扫描获得该通道相对光谱辐照度响应度,最终在实验室条件下获得该通道绝对光谱辐照度响应度,联合大气层外太阳照度谱数据通道内积分得到该通道大气层外响应常数V0值,与NASA的GSFC中心的2009年定标结果差异仅为3.75 %,定标不确定度达到2.06%,验证了这一新技术的原理可行性.%In the present paper, a new calibration method of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of sun channel of sun photometer was developed. A tunable laser was used as source and a standard tranfer detector, calibrated against cryogenic absolute radiometer, was used to measure laser beam power. By raster scanning of a single collimated laser beam to generate the uniform irradiance field at the plane of effective aperture stop of sun photometer, the absolute irradiance responsivity of center wavelength of the 870 nm unpolarized sun channels of sun photometer was obtained accurately. The relative spectral irradiance responsivity of corresponding channel was obtained by using lamp-monochromator system and then used to acquire the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity in the laboratory. On the basis of the above results, the top-of-the-atmosphere responsive constant V0 was obtained by integration with extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance data. Comparing the calibration result with that from GSFC, NASA in 2009, the difference is only 3. 75%. In the last, the uncertainties of calibration were evaluated and reached to 2. 06%. The principle feasibility of the new method was validated.

  7. Radiometric Correction of Multitemporal Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Biday,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Repeated observation of a given area over time yields potential for many forms of change detection analysis. These repeated observations are confounded in terms of radiometric consistency due to changes in sensor calibration over time, differences in illumination, observation angles and variation in atmospheric effects. Also major problem with satellite images is that regions below clouds are not covered by sensor. Cloud detection, removal and data prediction in cloudy region is essential for image interpretation. Approach: This study demonstrated applicability of empirical relative radiometric normalization methods to a set of multitemporal cloudy images acquired by Resourcesat-1 LISS III sensor. Objective of this study was to detect and remove cloud cover and normalize an image radiometrically. Cloud detection was achieved by using Average Brightness Threshold (ABT algorithm. The detected cloud removed and replaced with data from another images of the same area. We proposed a new method in which cloudy pixels are replaced with predicted pixel values obtained by regression. After cloud removal, the proposed normalization method was applied to reduce the radiometric influence caused by non surface factors. This process identified landscape elements whose reflectance values are nearly constant over time, i.e., the subset of non-changing pixels are identified using frequency based correlation technique. Further, we proposed another method of radiometric correction in frequency domain, Pseudo-Invariant Feature regression and this process removed landscape elements such as vegetation whose reflectance values are not constant over time. It takes advantage of vegetation being typically high frequency area, can be removed by low pass filter. Results: The quality of radiometric normalization is statistically assessed by R2 value and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE between each pair of analogous band. Further we verified that difference

  8. Absolute Energy Calibration with the Neutron-Activated Liquid-Source System at BaBar's CsI(Tl) Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Johannes M.; Group, for the BaBar Collaboration EMC

    2003-01-01

    The electro-magnetic calorimeter at the BaBar detector, part of the asymmetric B Factory at SLAC, measures photons in the energy range from 20 MeV to 8 GeV with good resolution. The calorimeter is calibrated at the low energy end with 6.13 MeV photons obtained from a liquid source system. During the calibration, a fluorine-rich liquid is activated via a neutron generator and pumped past the front of the calorimeter's crystals. Decays that occur in front of the crystals emit photons of well-de...

  9. Absolute calibration of the colour index and O4 absorption derived from Multi AXis (MAX-)DOAS measurements and their application to a standardised cloud classification algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thomas; Beirle, Steffen; Remmers, Julia; Shaiganfar, Reza; Wang, Yang

    2016-09-01

    A method is developed for the calibration of the colour index (CI) and the O4 absorption derived from differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on the comparison of measurements and radiative transfer simulations for well-defined atmospheric conditions and viewing geometries. Calibrated measurements of the CI and the O4 absorption are important for the detection and classification of clouds from MAX-DOAS observations. Such information is needed for the identification and correction of the cloud influence on Multi AXis (MAX-)DOAS profile inversion results, but might be also be of interest on their own, e.g. for meteorological applications. The calibration algorithm was successfully applied to measurements at two locations: Cabauw in the Netherlands and Wuxi in China. We used CI and O4 observations calibrated by the new method as input for our recently developed cloud classification scheme and also adapted the corresponding threshold values accordingly. For the observations at Cabauw, good agreement is found with the results of the original algorithm. Together with the calibration procedure of the CI and O4 absorption, the cloud classification scheme, which has been tuned to specific locations/conditions so far, can now be applied consistently to MAX-DOAS measurements at different locations. In addition to the new threshold values, further improvements were introduced to the cloud classification algorithm, namely a better description of the SZA (solar zenith angle) dependence of the threshold values and a new set of wavelengths for the determination of the CI. We also indicate specific areas for future research to further improve the cloud classification scheme.

  10. Radiometric Characterization of Hyperspectral Imagers using Multispectral Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, Joel; Kurt, Thome; Leisso, Nathan; Anderson, Nikolaus; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona has a long history of using ground-based test sites for the calibration of airborne and satellite based sensors. Often, ground-truth measurements at these test sites are not always successful due to weather and funding availability. Therefore, RSG has also automated ground instrument approaches and cross-calibration methods to verify the radiometric calibration of a sensor. The goal in the cross-calibration method is to transfer the calibration of a well-known sensor to that of a different sensor, This work studies the feasibility of determining the radiometric calibration of a hyperspectral imager using multispectral a imagery. The work relies on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (M0DIS) as a reference for the hyperspectral sensor Hyperion. Test sites used for comparisons are Railroad Valley in Nevada and a portion of the Libyan Desert in North Africa. Hyperion bands are compared to MODIS by band averaging Hyperion's high spectral resolution data with the relative spectral response of M0DlS. The results compare cross-calibration scenarios that differ in image acquisition coincidence, test site used for the calibration, and reference sensor. Cross-calibration results are presented that show agreement between the use of coincident and non-coincident image pairs within 2% in most brands as well as similar agreement between results that employ the different MODIS sensors as a reference.

  11. Self consistently calibrated photopyroelectric calorimeter for the high resolution simultaneous absolute measurement of the specific heat and of the thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Zammit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High temperature resolution study of the specific heat and of the thermal conductivity over the smecticA-nematic and nematic-isotropic phase transitions in octylcynobephenyl liquid crystal using a new photopyroelectric calorimetry configuration are reported, where, unlike previously adopted ones, no calibration is required other than the procedure used during the actual measurement. This makes photopyroelectric calorimetry suitable for “absolute” measurements of the thermal parameters like most other existing conventional calorimetric techniques where, however, the thermal conductivity cannot be measured.

  12. Landsat-7 ETM+: 12 years on-orbit reflective-band radiometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Haque, M.O.; Barsi, J.A.; Micijevic, E.; Helder, D.L.; Thome, K.J.; Aaron, D.; Czapla-Myers, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor has been operating on orbit for more than 12 years, and characterizations of its performance have been ongoing over this period. In general, the radiometric performance of the instrument has been remarkably stable: 1) noise performance has degraded by 2% or less overall, with a few detectors displaying step changes in noise of 2% or less; 2) coherent noise frequencies and magnitudes have generally been stable, though the within-scan amplitude variation of the 20 kHz noise in bands 1 and 8 disappeared with the failure of the scan line corrector and a new similar frequency noise (now about 18 kHz) has appeared in two detectors in band 5 and increased in magnitude with time; 3) bias stability has been better than 0.25 DN out of a normal value of 15 DN in high gain; 4) relative gains, the differences in response between the detectors in the band, have generally changed by 0.1% or less over the mission, with the exception of a few detectors with a step response change of 1% or less; and 5) gain stability averaged across all detectors in a band, which is related to the stability of the absolute calibration, has been more stable than the techniques used to measure it. Due to the inability to confirm changes in the gain (beyond a few detectors that have been corrected back to the band average), ETM+ reflective band data continues to be calibrated with the prelaunch measured gains. In the worst case, some bands may have changed as much as 2% in uncompensated absolute calibration over the 12 years.

  13. Absolute beginners

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Carlos Casimiro da; Costa, Jacinta Casimiro da

    2012-01-01

    Tomorrow, I m recovering my Thursday child as an absolute beginner , Transporting you to the essential touch of surface skin and space, Only for you, i do not regret, looking for education in a materia set. My love is your love , my materiality is you making things, The legacy of our ethnography, craftsmen s old and disappear, make me strong hard feelings, Recovering experiences and knowledge sprinkled in powder of stone, wood and metal ( ) reflecting in your dirty face the ...

  14. Experimental determination of electron-hole pair creation energy in 4H-SiC epitaxial layer: An absolute calibration approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Zavalla, Kelvin J.; Mandal, Krishna C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2013-01-21

    Electron-hole pair creation energy ({epsilon}) has been determined from alpha spectroscopy using 4H-SiC epitaxial layer Schottky detectors and a pulser calibration technique. We report an experimentally obtained {epsilon} value of 7.28 eV in 4H-SiC. The obtained {epsilon} value and theoretical models were used to calculate a Fano factor of 0.128 for 5.48 MeV alpha particles. The contributions of different factors to the ultimate alpha peak broadening in pulse-height spectra were determined using the calculated {epsilon} value and Monte-Carlo simulations. The determined {epsilon} value was verified using a drift-diffusion model of variation of charge collection efficiency with applied bias.

  15. Absolute Energy Calibration of X-ray TESs with 0.04 eV Uncertainty at 6.4 keV in a Hadron-Beam Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, H.; Doriese, W. B.; Bennett, D. A.; Curceanu, C.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J.; Gustafsson, F. P.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kuwabara, K.; Ma, Y.; Marton, J.; Noda, H.; O'Neil, G. C.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Reintsema, C. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Shi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, T.; Uhlig, J.; Ullom, J. N.; Widmann, E.; Yamada, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    A performance evaluation of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the environment of a pion beam line at a particle accelerator is presented. Averaged across the 209 functioning sensors in the array, the achieved energy resolution is 5.2 eV FWHM at Co K_{α } (6.9 keV) when the pion beam is off and 7.3 eV at a beam rate of 1.45 MHz. Absolute energy uncertainty of ± 0.04 eV is demonstrated for Fe K_{α } (6.4 keV) with in-situ energy calibration obtained from other nearby known X-ray lines. To achieve this small uncertainty, it is essential to consider the non-Gaussian energy response of the TESs and thermal cross-talk pile-up effects due to charged particle hits in the silicon substrate of the TES array.

  16. Absolute Energy Calibration of X-ray TESs with 0.04 eV Uncertainty at 6.4 keV in a Hadron-Beam Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Tatsuno, H; Bennett, D A; Curceanu, C; Fowler, J W; Gard, J; Gustafsson, F P; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Iliescu, M; Ishimoto, S; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Kuwabara, K; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Noda, H; O'Neil, G C; Okada, S; Outa, H; Reintsema, C D; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Shi, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Uhlig, J; Ullom, J N; Widmann, E; Yamada, S; Zmeskal, J; Swetz, D S

    2016-01-01

    A performance evaluation of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the environment of a pion beam line at a particle accelerator is presented. Averaged across the 209 functioning sensors in the array, the achieved energy resolution is 5.2 eV FWHM at Co $K_{\\alpha}$ (6.9 keV) when the pion beam is off and 7.3 eV at a beam rate of 1.45 MHz. Absolute energy uncertainty of $\\pm$0.04 eV is demonstrated for Fe $K_{\\alpha}$ (6.4 keV) with in-situ energy calibration obtained from other nearby known x-ray lines. To achieve this small uncertainty, it is essential to consider the non-Gaussian energy response of the TESs and thermal cross-talk pile-up effects due to charged-particle hits in the silicon substrate of the TES array.

  17. Thermal-structure coupled deformation in an optical-mechanical system for radiometric calibration of satellite IR remote sensor%卫星红外遥感器辐射定标光机系统热-结构耦合变形分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖庆生; 杨林华; 赵寿根

    2011-01-01

    The thermal deformation of a radiometric calibration optical-structure system under simulated space environments would cause a great damage to the imaging quality of the system, and reduce the precision of the calibration test eventually.In this paper, a finite element model of such a system is built.Based on the model, with the temperature values at nodes obtained in the radiometric calibration test for the satellite multi-spectral scanner, the distribution of the thermal-structure coupling deformation is calculated and analyzed.The results show that the thermal distortion of the optical bracket would cause rigid displacements of the primary mirror and the primary reflector,making them off the axis or acclivitous and the black body off the focus, and changing the focal distance of the system in a non-uniform steady-state Iow temperature condition.But the root-mean-square (RMS) values of deformation of the anamorphic mirrors are both less than one fortieth of the wave length, within the actual surface shape accuracy requirements of the optical system.%辐射定标光机系统在模拟空间环境下的热变形直接影响定标光学系统成像质量,并决定星载遥感器辐射定标试验精度.文章建立的辐射定标光机系统有限元模型,以某卫星多光谱扫描仪辐射定标试验中的实测温度变化作为温度载荷,计算和研究了该系统在真空低温环境下的热-结构耦合变形的分布情况和分布规律.结果表明:在非均匀稳态低温环境下,该系统光学支架热变形使主镜及主反射镜发生刚性位移,引起垂轴方向位移、倾斜,黑体的离焦和光学系统焦距变化;反射镜表面畸变RMS值均为1/40波长以下,可以满足实际光学系统的面形准确度要求.

  18. Calibrating ground-based microwave radiometers: Uncertainty and drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, N.; Turner, D. D.; Löhnert, U.; Crewell, S.

    2016-04-01

    The quality of microwave radiometer (MWR) calibrations, including both the absolute radiometric accuracy and the spectral consistency, determines the accuracy of geophysical retrievals. The Microwave Radiometer Calibration Experiment (MiRaCalE) was conducted to evaluate the performance of MWR calibration techniques, especially of the so-called Tipping Curve Calibrations (TCC) and Liquid Nitrogen Calibrations (LN2cal), by repeatedly calibrating a fourth-generation Humidity and Temperature Profiler (HATPRO-G4) that measures downwelling radiance between 20 GHz and 60 GHz. MiRaCalE revealed two major points to improve MWR calibrations: (i) the necessary repetition frequency for MWR calibration techniques to correct drifts, which ensures stable long-term measurements; and (ii) the spectral consistency of control measurements of a well known reference is useful to estimate calibration accuracy. Besides, we determined the accuracy of the HATPRO's liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody's temperature. TCCs and LN2cals were found to agree within 0.5 K when observing the liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody with a physical temperature of 77 K. This agreement of two different calibration techniques suggests that the brightness temperature of the LN2 cooled blackbody is accurate within at least 0.5 K, which is a significant reduction of the uncertainties that have been assumed to vary between 0.6 K and 1.5 K when calibrating the HATPRO-G4. The error propagation of both techniques was found to behave almost linearly, leading to maximum uncertainties of 0.7 K when observing a scene that is associated with a brightness temperature of 15 K.

  19. Absolute Summ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  20. Comparison Among Cross, Onboard and Vicarious Calibrations for Terra/ASTER/VNIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative study on radiometric calibration methods among onboard, cross and vicarious calibration for visible to near infrared radiometers onboard satellites is conducted. The data sources of the aforementioned three calibration methods are different and independent. Therefore, it may say that the reliable Radiometric Calibration Accuracy: RCC would be the RCC which are resemble each other two of three RCCs. As experimental results, it is found that vicarious and cross calibration are reliable than onboard calibration. Also vicarious calibration based cross calibration method is proposed here. The proposed cross calibration method should be superior to the conventional cross calibration method based on band-to-band data comparison. Through experiments, it is also found that the proposed cross calibration is better than the conventional cross calibration. The radiometric calibration accuracy of the conventional cross calibration method can be evaluated by using the proposed cross calibration method.

  1. Radiometric force in dusty plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatov, A M

    2000-01-01

    A radiofrequency glow discharge plasma, which is polluted with a certain number of dusty grains, is studied. In addition to various dusty plasma phenomena, several specific colloidal effects should be considered. We focus on radiometric forces, which are caused by inhomogeneous temperature distribution. Aside from thermophoresis, the role of temperature distribution in dusty plasmas is an open question. It is shown that inhomogeneous heating of the grain by ion flows results in a new photophoresis like force, which is specific for dusty discharges. This radiometric force can be observable under conditions of recent microgravity experiments.

  2. Radiometric Calibration of Fluorescence Detection System with Different Gain Settings%溢油荧光光谱探测系统不同增益下的光谱定标

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨俊; 亓洪兴

    2011-01-01

    A spectral irradiance calibration method for UV-induced fluorescence spectra detection of oil spill was presented. A CC-3-UV cosine corrector was used to correct the calibrate curve. The method uses two standard light sources . deuterium lamp and halogen lamp instead of one light source. which could overcome the hard to calibrate (250-400) nm band problem caused by the weak ultraviolet response of most spectral radiometer and poor signal-noise ratio. The calibration curve is tested under the condition of fixed integration time and different MCP gains and the relationship of the response and the MCP gain is studied. The response characteristics under deferent gain levels of detection system can be used as a reference in designing auto gain adjustment algorithm for oil detection. Fluorescence detection system calibrated by this method is used in lubricating and diesel oil detection experiments and the spectra obtaines indicates that there is fluorescence wave crest around 360 nm which could be used as the character of oil spill on the water.%提出了一种采用氘灯、卤钨灯双标准光源对溢油荧光光谱探测系统进行光谱辐照度定标的方法,并使用光纤耦合余弦校准器对光谱仪的定标数据做了余弦校正.用于紫外-可见光波段溢油紫外光诱导荧光光谱的探测,解决了卤钨灯在(250-400)nm波段辐射强度弱和大多数光谱仪器在紫外波段响应较差而导致的定标困难问题.对增强型CCD不同的增益情况下分别进行了光谱仪辐射定标,分析了光谱探测信噪比对定标系数与增益之间的线性关系的影响.为荧光光谱探测的自动增益控制系统提供了有效的参考数据.使用定标后的光谱仪获取了柴油和润滑油经宽谱段紫外灯激发的诱导荧光光谱,其紫外光诱导荧光在360nm处附近存在响应峰值,可以用于水面溢油监测.

  3. RADIOMETRIC PROPERTIES OFAGRICULTURAL PERMEABLE COVERINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Castellano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nets are commonly used for agricultural applications. However, only little is known about the radiometric properties of net types and how to influence them. In order to investigate the influence of net construction parameters on their radiometric properties, a set of radiometric tests were performed on 45 types of agricultural nets. Laboratory tests on large size net samples was performed using a large and a small integrating sphere. Open field radiometric test were carried out by means of an experimental set up (120x120x50 cm and a full scale shade house. Small differences (less than 5% occurred between laboratory and open field tests. Results highlighted that the porosity and the mesh size, combined with the colour and secondarily, with the fabric and the kind of threads of the net influenced the shading performance of the net. The colour influenced the spectral distribution of the radiation passing through the net absorbing its complementary colours. Since nets are three-dimensional structures the transmissivity of direct light under different angles of incident of solar radiation changes when installed in the warp or weft direction. Transmissivity could be considered one of the main parameters involved in the agronomic performances of the netting system.

  4. Radiometric survey in mammography: problems and challenges; Levantamento radiometrico em mamografia: problemas e desafios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, M.V.T.; Navarro, V.C.C.; Garcia, I.F.M.; Ferreira, M.J.; Macedo, E.M., E-mail: navarro@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Laboratorio de Produtos para a Saude

    2015-07-01

    In addition to being mandatory, the radiometric survey is a necessity, especially in the Brazilian reality with the construction of smaller and smaller rooms. However, calibration conditions, the instrumentation and its use, can produce underestimated factors. Measures made at Labprosaud/IFBA, with five different instruments and the ISO N 25 radiation quality, show the possibility of the values presented in the radiometric surveys are underestimated by up to 10 times. The results indicate the need for meters to be calibrated in ISO N qualities, in mammography energy range, in integrated dose mode and exposure times shorter or equal to 1 s. (author)

  5. Analysis and modeling of radiometric error caused by imaging blur in optical remote sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xufen; Zhang, Yuncui; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Imaging blur changes the digital output values of imaging systems. It leads to radiometric errors when the system is used for measurement. In this paper, we focus on the radiometric error due to imaging blur in remote sensing imaging systems. First, in accordance with the radiometric response calibration of imaging systems, we provide a theoretical analysis on the evaluation standard of radiometric errors caused by imaging blur. Then, we build a radiometric error model for imaging blur based on the natural stochastic fractal characteristics of remote sensing images. Finally, we verify the model by simulations and physical defocus experiments. The simulation results show that the modeling estimation result approaches to the simulation computation. The maximum difference of relative MSE (Mean Squared Error) between simulation computation and modeling estimation can achieve 1.6%. The physical experimental results show that the maximum difference of relative MSE between experimental results and modeling estimation is only 1.29% under experimental conditions. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the proposed model is correct, which can be used to estimate the radiometric error caused by imaging blur in remote sensing images. This research is of great importance for radiometric measurement system evaluation and application.

  6. Radiometric rectification - Toward a common radiometric response among multidate, multisensor images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. G.; Strebel, D. E.; Nickeson, J. E.; Goetz, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed for relating scene digital counts among several images of the same scene by identifying radiometric control sets with mean reflectances that are basically constant. The average digital-count values of the control sets are utilized to compute linear transforms that relate digital count values between images. Two Landsat TM images are studied by means of the technique using simulations of a wide range of atmospheric conditions. In the visible and near-IR bands the algorithm effectively adjusts the surface reflectance for the effects of relative atmospheric differences to within 1 percent. The proposed method is found to be an effective relative correction procedure that can be used when atmospheric optical-depth data and calibration coefficients are not available.

  7. Electrically calibrated radiometer using a thin film thermopile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, L.P.; Smith, T.C.

    1978-10-01

    The fabrication and principal characteristics of an electrically calibrated absolute radiometer are described. The receiver substrate incorporates an evaporated chromium--nickel thermopile, and electrical shield, a copper thermal diffuser disk, an evaporated chromium electrical heating element, and a goldblack absorber. All insulating layers are evaporated silicon monoxide; the thermopile and heater are made by a photoetching process. The performances of several radiometers are discussed. For example, a 28-junction version has a responsivity and NEP of 93 mV/W and 50 nW, respectively, in air, with a time constant of 15 sec and a surface responsivity uniform to better than 1%. The radiometers require only a few corrections of small magnitude. An analysis of sources of error and residual uncertainties shows that the over-all precision of this type of radiometer is at least 0.5% for a power level of 50 XW. Comparative radiometric measurements are described that support this claim.

  8. Trinocular Calibration Method Based on Binocular Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAO Dan-Dan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the self-occlusion problem in plane-based multi-camera calibration system and expand the measurement range, a tri-camera vision system based on binocular calibration is proposed. The three cameras are grouped into two pairs, while the public camera is taken as the reference to build the global coordinate. By calibration of the measured absolute distance and the true absolute distance, global calibration is realized. The MRE (mean relative error of the global calibration of the two camera pairs in the experiments can be as low as 0.277% and 0.328% respectively. Experiment results show that this method is feasible, simple and effective, and has high precision.

  9. Summary of KOMPSAT-5 Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.; Jeong, H.; Lee, S.; Kim, B.

    2013-12-01

    including pointing, relative and absolute calibration as well as geolocation accuracy determination. The absolute calibration will be accomplished by determining absolute radiometric accuracy using already deployed trihedral corner reflectors on calibration and validation sites located southeast from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. To establish a measure for the assess the final image products, geolocation accuracies of image products with different imaging modes will be determined by using deployed point targets and available Digital Terrain Model (DTM), and on different image processing levels. In summary, this paper will present calibration and validation activities performed during the LEOP and IOT of KOMPSAT-5. The methodology and procedure of calibration and validation will be explained as well as its results. Based on the results, the applications of SAR image products on geophysical processes will be also discussed.

  10. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI Radiometric Performance On-Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Morfitt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Expectations of the Operational Land Imager (OLI radiometric performance onboard Landsat-8 have been met or exceeded. The calibration activities that occurred prior to launch provided calibration parameters that enabled ground processing to produce imagery that met most requirements when data were transmitted to the ground. Since launch, calibration updates have improved the image quality even more, so that all requirements are met. These updates range from detector gain coefficients to reduce striping and banding to alignment parameters to improve the geometric accuracy. This paper concentrates on the on-orbit radiometric performance of the OLI, excepting the radiometric calibration performance. Topics discussed in this paper include: signal-to-noise ratios that are an order of magnitude higher than previous Landsat missions; radiometric uniformity that shows little residual banding and striping, and continues to improve; a dynamic range that limits saturation to extremely high radiance levels; extremely stable detectors; slight nonlinearity that is corrected in ground processing; detectors that are stable and 100% operable; and few image artifacts.

  11. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfitt, Ron; Barsi, Julia A.; Levy, Raviv; Markham, Brian L.; Micijevic, Esad; Ong, Lawrence; Scaramuzza, Pat; Vanderwerff, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance onboard Landsat-8 have been met or exceeded. The calibration activities that occurred prior to launch provided calibration parameters that enabled ground processing to produce imagery that met most requirements when data were transmitted to the ground. Since launch, calibration updates have improved the image quality even more, so that all requirements are met. These updates range from detector gain coefficients to reduce striping and banding to alignment parameters to improve the geometric accuracy. This paper concentrates on the on-orbit radiometric performance of the OLI, excepting the radiometric calibration performance. Topics discussed in this paper include: signal-to-noise ratios that are an order of magnitude higher than previous Landsat missions; radiometric uniformity that shows little residual banding and striping, and continues to improve; a dynamic range that limits saturation to extremely high radiance levels; extremely stable detectors; slight nonlinearity that is corrected in ground processing; detectors that are stable and 100% operable; and few image artifacts.

  12. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000 year old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Brook, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ~350 kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 +/- 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by 1) 85Kr ...

  13. Process system of radiometric and magnetometric aerial information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has been working first in the National Institute of Nuclear Energy (Mexico) and then in URAMEX (Uranio Mexicano) since 1975 to 1983, integrated to radiometric and magnetometric aerial prospecting projects in computerized processing of information aspects. During this period the author participated in the work out of computing systems, information processing and mathematical procedures definition for the geophysical reduction of the calibration equipment data. With cumulated experience, in this thesis are presented aspects concerning to management and operation of computerized processing of information systems. Operation handbooks of the majority of modules are presented. Program lists are not included. (Author)

  14. Advanced Calibration Source for Planetary and Earth Observing Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiometric calibration is critical to many NASA activities.  At NASA SSC, imaging cameras have been used in-situ to monitor propulsion test stand...

  15. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  16. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Kashani, Alireza G.; Olsen, Michael J.; Parrish, Christopher E.; Nicholas Wilson

    2015-01-01

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record “intensity”, loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data...

  17. Radiometric studies of Mycobacterium lepraemurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, E E; Larson, S M; Tepper, B S; Wagner, H N

    1976-01-01

    The radiometric method has been applied for studying the metabolism of M. lepraemurium and the conditions which might force or inhibit its metabolic activity in vitro. These organisms assimilate and oxidize (U-14C) glycerol, and (U-14C) acetate, but are unable to oxidize (U-14C) glucose, (U-14C) pyruvate, (U-14C) glycine and 14C-formate. When incubated at 30 degrees C M. lepraemurium oxidizes (U-14C) acetate to 14CO2 faster than 37 degrees C. The smae effect was observed with increasing concentrations of polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), or the 14C-substrate. No change in metabolic rate was observed when the organisms were kept at -20 degrees C for 12 days. Although tried several times, it was not possible to demonstrate any "inhibitors" of bacterial metabolism in the reaction system. The radiometric method seems to be an important tool for studying metabolic pathways and the influence of physical and biochemical factors on the metabolism of M. lepraemurium in vitro.

  18. A procedure for radiometric recalibration of Landsat 5 TM reflective-band data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Haque, M.O.; Micijevic, E.; Barsi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the Earth science user community has been benefiting from a historical record of remotely sensed data. The multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone for this extensive archive. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for the L5 TM imagery used the detectors' response to the internal calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset for each detector. The IC system degraded with time, causing radiometric calibration errors up to 20%. In May 2003, the L5 TM data processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science Center through the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) were updated to use a lifetime lookup-table (LUT) gain model to radiometrically calibrate TM data instead of using scene-specific IC gains. Further modification of the gain model was performed in 2007. The L5 TM data processed using IC prior to the calibration update do not benefit from the recent calibration revisions. A procedure has been developed to give users the ability to recalibrate their existing level-1 products. The best recalibration results are obtained if the work-order report that was included in the original standard data product delivery is available. However, if users do not have the original work-order report, the IC trends can be used for recalibration. The IC trends were generated using the radiometric gain trends recorded in the NLAPS database. This paper provides the details of the recalibration procedure for the following: 1) data processed using IC where users have the work-order file; 2) data processed using IC where users do not have the work-order file; 3) data processed using prelaunch calibration parameters; and 4) data processed using the previous version of the LUT (e.g., LUT03) that was released before April 2, 2007.

  19. Reduction of Radiometric Miscalibration—Applications to Pushbroom Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Roessner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of hyperspectral images is an important task in Remote Sensing. Foregoing radiometric calibration results in the assignment of incident electromagnetic radiation to digital numbers and reduces the striping caused by slightly different responses of the pixel detectors. However, due to uncertainties in the calibration some striping remains. This publication presents a new reduction framework that efficiently reduces linear and nonlinear miscalibrations by an image-driven, radiometric recalibration and rescaling. The proposed framework—Reduction Of Miscalibration Effects (ROME—considering spectral and spatial probability distributions, is constrained by specific minimisation and maximisation principles and incorporates image processing techniques such as Minkowski metrics and convolution. To objectively evaluate the performance of the new approach, the technique was applied to a variety of commonly used image examples and to one simulated and miscalibrated EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program scene. Other examples consist of miscalibrated AISA/Eagle VNIR (Visible and Near Infrared and Hawk SWIR (Short Wave Infrared scenes of rural areas of the region Fichtwald in Germany and Hyperion scenes of the Jalal-Abad district in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Recovery rates of approximately 97% for linear and approximately 94% for nonlinear miscalibrated data were achieved, clearly demonstrating the benefits of the new approach and its potential for broad applicability to miscalibrated pushbroom sensor data.

  20. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  1. Radiometric studies of mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwaldo E. Camargo

    1987-02-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro assay system that included automated radiometric quantification of 14CO2 released as a result of oxidation of 14C- substrates was applied for studying the metabolic activity of M. tuberculosis under various experimental conditions. These experiments included the study of a mtabolic pathways, b detection times for various inoculum sizes, c effect of filtration on reproducibility of results, d influence of stress environment e minimal inhibitory concentrations for isoniazid, streptomycin, ethambutol and rifampin, and f generation times of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. These organisms were found to metabolize 14C-for-mate, (U-14C acetate, (U-14C glycerol, (1-14C palmitic acid, 1-14C lauric acid, (U-14C L-malic acid, (U-14C D-glucose, and (U-14C D-glucose, but not (1-14C L-glucose, (U-14C glycine, or (U-14C pyruvate to 14CO2. By using either 14C-for-mate, (1-14C palmitic acid, or (1-14C lauric acid, 10(7 organisms/vial could be detected within 24 48 hours and as few as 10 organisms/vial within 16-20 days. Reproducible results could be obtained without filtering the bacterial suspension, provided that the organisms were grown in liquid 7H9 medium with 0.05% polysorbate 80 and homogenized prior to the study. Drugs that block protein synthesis were found to have lower minimal inhibitory concentrations with the radiometric method when compared to the conventional agar dilution method. The mean generation time obtained for M. bovis and different strains of M. tuberculosis with various substrates was 9 ± 1 hours.

  2. Eosinophil count - absolute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  3. Survey of emissivity measurement by radiometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honner, M; Honnerová, P

    2015-02-01

    A survey of the state of the art in the field of spectral directional emissivity measurements by using radiometric methods is presented. Individual quantity types such as spectral, band, or total emissivity are defined. Principles of emissivity measurement by various methods (direct and indirect, and calorimetric and radiometric) are discussed. The paper is focused on direct radiometric methods. An overview of experimental setups is provided, including the design of individual parts such as the applied reference sources of radiation, systems of sample clamping and heating, detection systems, methods for the determination of surface temperature, and procedures for emissivity evaluation.

  4. Survey of emissivity measurement by radiometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honner, M; Honnerová, P

    2015-02-01

    A survey of the state of the art in the field of spectral directional emissivity measurements by using radiometric methods is presented. Individual quantity types such as spectral, band, or total emissivity are defined. Principles of emissivity measurement by various methods (direct and indirect, and calorimetric and radiometric) are discussed. The paper is focused on direct radiometric methods. An overview of experimental setups is provided, including the design of individual parts such as the applied reference sources of radiation, systems of sample clamping and heating, detection systems, methods for the determination of surface temperature, and procedures for emissivity evaluation. PMID:25967774

  5. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Source For System-Level Testing Of Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance.

  6. The Three-Transponder Method: A Novel Approach for Traceable (E)RCS Calibration of SAR Transponders

    OpenAIRE

    Björn J. Döring; Reimann, Jens; Raab, Sebastian; Jirousek, Matthias; Rudolf, Daniel; Schwerdt, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The radiometric calibration of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems is typically based on the known backscatter of calibration point targets such as transponders. Before a SAR calibration campaign can begin it is therefore necessary to determine the backscatter (radar cross section or RCS) of the transponder itself. Known methods suffer from unnecessarily high uncertainty contributions and therefore also affect the radiometric uncertainty of the calibrated SAR system. In this paper we prese...

  7. Lunar highland stratigraphy and radiometric dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiometric age data for lunar highland rocks do not in any simple way reflect the time of excavation of the major circular basins from which they are believed to originate. Instead, many rocks are of a more local origin and, in addition, radiometric clocks are not necessarily reset at the occasion of the basin forming impact. The concept of thick hot ejecta blankets far away from the basin cannot be maintained. Arguments supporting this (small) 'crater dominated chronology' are summarized. (author)

  8. Training course on radiometric prospecting techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A training course on radiometric prospecting techniques was presented by the Atomic Energy Board in collaboration with the South African Geophysical Association and the Geological Society of South Africa. Various aspects related to uranium prospecting were discussed e.g. the uranium supply and demand position, the basic physics of radioactivity, uranium geochemistry, mineralogy and mobility, the instrumentation and techniques used in uranium exploration, for example, borehole logging, radon emanometry and airborne radiometric surveys and also data processing and interpretation methods

  9. Radiometric surveys in underground environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasquale, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Due to their ability to travel through the air for several metres, gamma-rays emitted from natural radioactive elements can be successfully used in surveys carried out both with airborne and ground equipments. Besides the concentration of the radio-elements contained in rocks and soils and the intrinsic characteristics of the gamma-ray detector, the detected count rate depends on the solid angle around the spectrometer. On a flat outcrop, ground spectrometry detects the radiation ideally produced by a cylindrical mass of rock of about two metres in diameter and thickness of about half a meter. Under these geometrical conditions, the natural radioactivity can be easily evaluated. With operating conditions different from the standard ones, such as at the edge of an escarpment, the count rate halves because of the missing material, whereas in the vicinity of a rock wall the count rate will increase. In underground environment, the recorded count rate may even double and the in situ assessment of the concentration of radio-elements may be rather difficult, even if the ratios between the different radio-elements may not be affected. We tested the applicability of gamma-ray spectrometry for rapid assessment of the potential hazard levels related to radon and radiation dose rate in underground environment. A mine shaft, located in a zone of uranium enrichment in Liguria (Italy), has been investigated. A preliminary ground radiometric survey was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, the radiometric investigation was focussed on the mine shaft. Due to rock mass above the shaft vault, the background gamma radiation can be considered of negligible influence on measurements. In underground surveys, besides deviations from a flat geometry, factors controlling radon exhalation, emanation and stagnation, such as fractures, water leakage and the presence of ventilation, should be carefully examined. We attempted to evaluate these control factors and collected

  10. Off-line radiometric analysis of Planck-LFI data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, M; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Galeotta, S; Maris, M [LFI-DPC INAF-OATs, Via Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Lowe, S R [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mendes, L [Planck Science Office, European Space Agency, ESAC, P.O. box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Leonardi, R; Meinhold, P [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Villa, F; Sandri, M; Cuttaia, F; Terenzi, L; Valenziano, L; Butler, R C [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti, 101, 40129, Bologna (Italy); Cappellini, B [INAF-IASF Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gregorio, A [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Via Valerio, 2 Trieste I-34127 (Italy); Salmon, M J [Departamento de IngenierIa de Comunicaciones, Universidad de Cantabria, Avenida de los Castros s/n. 39005 Santander (Spain); Binko, P [ISDC Data Centre for Astrophysics, University of Geneva, ch. d' Ecogia 16, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); D' Arcangelo, O, E-mail: tomasi@lambrate.inaf.i [IFP-CNR, Via Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is an array of 22 pseudo-correlation radiometers on-board the Planck satellite to measure temperature and polarization anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in three frequency bands (30, 44 and 70 GHz). To calibrate and verify the performances of the LFI, a software suite named LIFE has been developed. Its aims are to provide a common platform to use for analyzing the results of the tests performed on the single components of the instrument (RCAs, Radiometric Chain Assemblies) and on the integrated Radiometric Array Assembly (RAA). Moreover, its analysis tools are designed to be used during the flight as well to produce periodic reports on the status of the instrument. The LIFE suite has been developed using a multi-layered, cross-platform approach. It implements a number of analysis modules written in RSI IDL, each accessing the data through a portable and heavily optimized library of functions written in C and C++. One of the most important features of LIFE is its ability to run the same data analysis codes both using ground test data and real flight data as input. The LIFE software suite has been successfully used during the RCA/RAA tests and the Planck Integrated System Tests. Moreover, the software has also passed the verification for its in-flight use during the System Operations Verification Tests, held in October 2008.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Predicting the Radiometric Biases between ABI and VIIRS Due to Spectral Response Function Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, Dave; Cao, Changyong

    2012-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) was launched last year aboard the Suomi NPP satellite. The high quality of the radiometric data can be attributed to thorough pre-launch spectral response characterization by the vendor and validation using the Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations Using Uniform Sources (SIRCUS) facility provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The GOES-R program is similarly developing an imaging radiomete...

  13. ABSOLUTE NEUTRINO MASSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schechter, J.; Shahid, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos.......We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos....

  14. JPSS-1 VIIRS pre-launch radiometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudrari, Hassan; McIntire, Jeff; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Efremova, Boryana; Ji, Qiang; Lee, Shihyan; Schwarting, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on-board the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) completed its sensor level testing on December 2014. The JPSS-1 (J1) mission is scheduled to launch in December 2016, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) mission. VIIRS instrument was designed to provide measurements of the globe twice daily. It is a wide-swath (3,040 km) cross-track scanning radiometer with spatial resolutions of 370 and 740 m at nadir for imaging and moderate bands, respectively. It covers the wavelength spectrum from reflective to long-wave infrared through 22 spectral bands [0.412 μm to 12.01 μm]. VIIRS observations are used to generate 22 environmental data products (EDRs). This paper will briefly describe J1 VIIRS characterization and calibration performance and methodologies executed during the pre-launch testing phases by the independent government team, to generate the at-launch baseline radiometric performance, and the metrics needed to populate the sensor data record (SDR) Look-Up-Tables (LUTs). This paper will also provide an assessment of the sensor pre-launch radiometric performance, such as the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs), dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, bands spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS), near field and stray light responses. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to the SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  15. Computer-aided radiometric densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The densimeter by the Cs-137 γ-radiation principle has an extensively autonomous calibration of the measured length and an automatic adjustment of measuring time. A time constant switch is provided, and the influence of modules on measuring accuracy has been largely eliminated by diagnostic programs. The modular structure makes it feasible to provide a self monitoring of nearly all system components by means of the microcomputer without additional expenditure. The logarithmical dependency of impulse rate and density can be linearised by the microcomputer. The attenuation of intensity of the material caused by the radioactive decay is compensated. (DG)

  16. Solar irradiance absolute radiometer with ability of automatic solar tracking%自动寻日的太阳辐照绝对辐射计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红睿; 方伟

    2011-01-01

    为了准确测量太阳总量辐射,研制了具备自动跟踪能力的太阳辐照绝对辐射计SIAR-3a.介绍了SIAR-3a的原理,提出了双轴太阳跟踪的控制方法.SIAR-3a采用电来标定待测量的太阳总量辐射,可以在测量太阳总量辐射的同时较为准确地跟踪太阳.标定实验中,SIAR-3a在3σ范围内的相对均方根误差是0.06%,已经标定到了保存在瑞士达沃斯世界辐射中心的世界辐射基准.太阳辐照实验结果表明,SIAR-3a工作可靠,测量结果准确.%To measure total solar irradiance accurately, the solar irradiance absolute radiometer SIAR-3a with the ability of automatic solar tracking is designed and constructed. The principle and structure of the solar irradiance absolute radiometer SIAR-3a are presented in this paper and its control scheme for automatic double-axis solar tracking is proposed. The solar irradiance absolute radiometer SIAR-3a imposes electricity to calibrate the total solar irradiance, which is able to measure the total solar irradiance and follow the sun simultaneously.In the calibration experiments, the corresponding rms error limit of SIAR-3a amounts to 0.06% at the 3σ level, which has been calibrated to World Radiometric Reference stored in World Radiation Centre(WRC)in Davos, Switzerland. The experiment results indicate that SIAR-3a works reliably and accurately.

  17. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 2.1-mm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulich, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Sun, new Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and of the flux density of DR21 at 2.1-mm wavelength are reported. Relative measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength are also preented which resolve the absolute calibration discrepancy between The University of Texas 16-ft radio telescope and the Aerospace Corporation 15-ft antenna. The use of the bright planets and DR21 as absolute calibration sources at millimeter wavelengths is discussed in the light of recent observations.

  18. Calibration of ground-based microwave radiometers - Accuracy assessment and recommendations for network users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Küchler, Nils; Löhnert, Ulrich; Crewell, Susanne; Czekala, Harald; Güldner, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are becoming widely used in atmospheric remote sensing and start to be routinely operated by national weather services and other institutions. However, common standards for calibration of these radiometers and a detailed knowledge about the error characteristics is needed, in order to assimilate the data into models. Intercomparisons of calibrations by different MWRs have rarely been done. Therefore, two calibration experiments in Lindenberg (2014) and Meckenheim (2015) were performed in the frame of TOPROF (Cost action ES1303) in order to assess uncertainties and differences between various instruments. In addition, a series of experiments were taken in Oklahoma in autumn 2014. The focus lay on the performance of the two main instrument types, which are currently used operationally. These are the MP-Profiler series by Radiometrics Corporation as well as the HATPRO series by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). Both instrument types are operating in two frequency bands, one along the 22 GHz water vapour line, the other one at the lower wing of the 60 GHz oxygen absorption complex. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR were developed and recommendations for radiometer users were compiled. We focus here mainly on data types, integration times and optimal settings for calibration intervals, both for absolute (liquid nitrogen, tipping curve) as well as relative (hot load, noise diode) calibrations. Besides the recommendations for ground-based MWR operators, we will present methods to determine the accuracy of the calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. In addition, some results from the intercomparison of different radiometers will be discussed.

  19. RADIOMETRIC TECHNIQUES IN HEAVY MINERAL EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; TANCZOS, IC; STAPEL, C

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the Environmental Research Group of the KVI has been developing a number of radiometric techniques that may be employed in mineral sand exploration. These techniques involve: radiometric fingerprinting for assessing sand provenances and mineralogical composition; thermoluminescence f

  20. High-speed radiometric imaging with a gated, intensified, digitally controlled camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Charles C.; Sturz, Richard A.

    1997-05-01

    The development of an advanced instrument for real-time radiometric imaging of high-speed events is described. The Intensified Digitally-Controlled Gated (IDG) camera is a microprocessor-controlled instrument based on an intensified CCD that is specifically designed to provide radiometric optical data. The IDG supports a variety of camera- synchronous and camera-asynchronous imaging tasks in both passive imaging and active laser range-gated applications. It features both automatic and manual modes of operation, digital precision and repeatability, and ease of use. The IDG produces radiometric imagery by digitally controlling the instrument's optical gain and exposure duration, and by encoding and annotating the parameters necessary for radiometric analysis onto the resultant video signal. Additional inputs, such as date, time, GPS, IRIG-B timing, and other data can also be encoded and annotated. The IDG optical sensitivity can be readily calibrated, with calibration data tables stored in the camera's nonvolatile flash memory. The microprocessor then uses this data to provide a linear, calibrated output. The IDG possesses both synchronous and asynchronous imaging modes in order to allow internal or external control of exposure, timing, and direct interface to external equipment such as event triggers and frame grabbers. Support for laser range-gating is implemented by providing precise asynchronous CCD operation and nanosecond resolution of the intensifier photocathode gate duration and timing. Innovative methods used to control the CCD for asynchronous image capture, as well as other sensor and system considerations relevant to high-speed imaging are discussed in this paper.

  1. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  2. Absolute Pitch on Music

    OpenAIRE

    Çuhadar, C.Hakan

    2008-01-01

    Musicians are debated people in the academic circles with the claim of they have both various characteristics and different cognitive personalities on the analogy those other people. One of these different characteristics is absolute pitch ability. Absolute pitch (AP) is a cognitive ability which can be characterized as to identify any tones (labeling) at a given pitch without using any external references. According to the different studies which were held in different times, the prevalence ...

  3. Absolute polarimetry at RHIC

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, H.; Alekseev, I.; Bravar, A; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Gill, R; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Jinnouchi, O.; Makdisi, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Nass, A.; Saito, N; Stephenson, E.

    2007-01-01

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy of $\\Delta P_{beam}/P_{beam} < 5%$. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detector...

  4. Automatic Radiometric Normalization of Multitemporal Satellite Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Schmidt, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The linear scale invariance of the multivariate alteration detection (MAD) transformation is used to obtain invariant pixels for automatic relative radiometric normalization of time series of multispectral data. Normalization by means of ordinary least squares regression method is compared...... normalization, compare favorably with results from normalization from manually obtained time-invariant features....

  5. Kernel MAD Algorithm for Relative Radiometric Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Tang, Ping; Hu, Changmiao

    2016-06-01

    The multivariate alteration detection (MAD) algorithm is commonly used in relative radiometric normalization. This algorithm is based on linear canonical correlation analysis (CCA) which can analyze only linear relationships among bands. Therefore, we first introduce a new version of MAD in this study based on the established method known as kernel canonical correlation analysis (KCCA). The proposed method effectively extracts the non-linear and complex relationships among variables. We then conduct relative radiometric normalization experiments on both the linear CCA and KCCA version of the MAD algorithm with the use of Landsat-8 data of Beijing, China, and Gaofen-1(GF-1) data derived from South China. Finally, we analyze the difference between the two methods. Results show that the KCCA-based MAD can be satisfactorily applied to relative radiometric normalization, this algorithm can well describe the nonlinear relationship between multi-temporal images. This work is the first attempt to apply a KCCA-based MAD algorithm to relative radiometric normalization.

  6. Cross-calibration of the Terra MODIS, Landsat 7 ETM+ and EO-1 ALI sensors using near-simultaneous surface observation over the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada, test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Angal, A.; Choi, T.; Meyer, D.J.; Xiong, X.; Teillet, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    A cross-calibration methodology has been developed using coincident image pairs from the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Earth Observing EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI) to verify the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy of these sensors with respect to each other. To quantify the effects due to different spectral responses, the Relative Spectral Responses (RSR) of these sensors were studied and compared by developing a set of "figures-of-merit." Seven cloud-free scenes collected over the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada (RVPN), test site were used to conduct the cross-calibration study. This cross-calibration approach was based on image statistics from near-simultaneous observations made by different satellite sensors. Homogeneous regions of interest (ROI) were selected in the image pairs, and the mean target statistics were converted to absolute units of at-sensor reflectance. Using these reflectances, a set of cross-calibration equations were developed giving a relative gain and bias between the sensor pair.

  7. Absolute calibration of the [sup 16]O([alpha],[alpha])[sup 16]O elastic scattering resonance at 7. 30-7. 65 MeV and applications to oxygen depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, F.J.D. (Accelerator Lab., McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)); Davies, J.A. (Accelerator Lab., McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)); Jackman, T.E. (Inst. for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1993-08-01

    The differential cross-section of the [sup 16]O([alpha],[alpha])[sup 16]O elastic scattering resonance at 7.30-7.65 MeV has been calibrated with an overall accuracy of 4% at 170 scattering angle (laboratory frame of reference) using anodized Ta[sub 2]O[sub 5] films of pre-calibrated thickness as standards. This extremely strong (about 170 times the Rutherford cross-section) and broad (about 300 keV wide) resonance varies slowly with energy in the range 7.34-7.64 MeV, has a maximum value of 837 mb/sr at 7.61 MeV, and falls off abruptly above 7.64 MeV and below 7.34 MeV. The angular dependence of the resonance was measured in the range 140-172 at incident energy 7.62 MeV and was found to increase monotonically toward 180 . This strong resonance allowed us to measure the oxygen content in the very heavy element target ThO[sub 2] pellets and in oxidized InP substrates with detection sensitivity in the atomic monolayer range. The large width of this resonance allowed oxygen depth profiling to several microns with depth resolution a few tens of nm. Measurements combined with RUMP computer simulations using TRIM stopping cross-sections and our measured values of the elastic resonance scattering cross-section have been used to depth profile SiO[sub 2] surface and buried layers in SIMOX structures. (orig.)

  8. New Sentinel-2 radiometric validation approaches (SEOM program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruniquel, Véronique; Lamquin, Nicolas; Ferron, Stéphane; Govaerts, Yves; Woolliams, Emma; Dilo, Arta; Gascon, Ferran

    2016-04-01

    SEOM is an ESA program element whose one of the objectives aims at launching state-of-the-art studies for the scientific exploitation of operational missions. In the frame of this program, ESA awarded ACRI-ST and its partners Rayference and National Physical Laboratory (NPL) early 2016 for a R&D study on the development and intercomparison of algorithms for validating the Sentinel-2 radiometric L1 data products beyond the baseline algorithms used operationally in the frame of the S2 Mission Performance Centre. In this context, several algorithms have been proposed and are currently in development: The first one is based on the exploitation of Deep Convective Cloud (DCC) observations over ocean. This method allows an inter-band radiometry validation from the blue to the NIR (typically from B1 to B8a) from a reference band already validated for example with the well-known Rayleigh method. Due to their physical properties, DCCs appear from the remote sensing point of view to have bright and cold tops and they can be used as invariant targets to monitor the radiometric response degradation of reflective solar bands. The DCC approach is statistical i.e. the method shall be applied on a large number of measurements to derive reliable statistics and decrease the impact of the perturbing contributors. The second radiometric validation method is based on the exploitation of matchups combining both concomitant in-situ measurements and Sentinel-2 observations. The in-situ measurements which are used here correspond to measurements acquired in the frame of the RadCalNet networks. The validation is performed for the Sentinel-2 bands similar to the bands of the instruments equipping the validation site. The measurements from the Cimel CE 318 12-filters BRDF Sun Photometer installed recently in the Gobabeb site near the Namib desert are used for this method. A comprehensive verification of the calibration requires an analysis of MSI radiances over the full dynamic range

  9. On-orbit radiometric performance characterization of S-NPP VIIRS reflective solar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Sirish; Blonski, Slawomir; Cao, Changyong

    2016-05-01

    It has been nearly four years that the S-NPP was launched. In an effort to improve the VIIRS calibration, VIIRS has undergone a number of major look up table updates during this period. RSB bands such as M1 through M3 suggested higher solar diffuser degradation rate. Similarly, for higher wavelengths, even though the solar diffuser degradation is much smaller and even negligible for SWIR bands, bands such as M7 suffer from major degradation due to RTA throughput degradation. Even though the solar diffuser and mirror degradation is well characterized, the data quality needs to be independently validated to ensure that data are well within the specification. We have used on-orbit calibration/validation techniques such as extended SNOs to estimate the bias of these bands and quantify the radiometric performance since launch. Assuming MODIS as a standard reference, intercomparison was performed to analyze the VIIRS radiometric performance. It was observed that some of the VIIRS bands such as M5 and M7 suggest bias on the order of 1.5% or more for most of the time period since early launch. VIIRS bias trends keep changing over time which can be mainly correlated to calibration updates and instrument anomalies. Results on VIIRS on-orbit calibration performance and its bias since early launch will be presented during meeting to help users better understand the data quality and its impacts on broader scientific research and applications.

  10. Signal Processing and Calibration of Continuous-Wave Focused CO2 Doppler Lidars for Atmospheric Backscatter Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Chambers, Diana M.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Bowdle, David A.; Jones, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Two continuous-wave(CW)focused C02 Doppler lidars (9.1 and 10.6 micrometers) were developed for airborne in situ aerosol backscatter measurements. The complex path of reliably calibrating these systems, with different signal processors, for accurate derivation of atmospheric backscatter coefficients is documented. Lidar calibration for absolute backscatter measurement for both lidars is based on range response over the lidar sample volume, not solely at focus. Both lidars were calibrated with a new technique using well-characterized aerosols as radiometric standard targets and related to conventional hard-target calibration. A digital signal processor (DSP), a surface acoustic and spectrum analyzer and manually tuned spectrum analyzer signal analyzers were used. The DSP signals were analyzed with an innovative method of correcting for systematic noise fluctuation; the noise statistics exhibit the chi-square distribution predicted by theory. System parametric studies and detailed calibration improved the accuracy of conversion from the measured signal-to-noise ratio to absolute backscatter. The minimum backscatter sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 9.1 micrometers and approximately 9 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 10.6 micrometers. Sample measurements are shown for a flight over the remote Pacific Ocean in 1990 as part of the NASA Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) survey missions, the first time to our knowledge that 9.1-10.6 micrometer lidar intercomparisons were made. Measurements at 9.1 micrometers, a potential wavelength for space-based lidar remote-sensing applications, are to our knowledge the first based on the rare isotope C-12 O(2)-18 gas.

  11. Spectrally Tunable Sources for Advanced Radiometric Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, S. W.; Rice, J. P; Neira, J. E.; Johnson, B. C.; Jackson, J D

    2006-01-01

    A common radiometric platform for the development of application-specific metrics to quantify the performance of sensors and systems is described. Using this platform, sensor and system performance may be quantified in terms of the accuracy of measurements of standardized sets of source distributions. The prototype platform consists of spectrally programmable light sources that can generate complex spectral distributions in the ultraviolet, visible and short-wave infrared regions for radiomet...

  12. Extension of the absolute flux density scale to 22.285 GHz. [radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M. A.; Golden, L. M.; Welch, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Extending the absolute flux density scale at microwave wavelengths, the absolute flux densities at 22.285 GHz of several standard sources were determined using the absolute calibrations of the 6.1 meter antenna of the Hat Creek Observatory. Interpolation formulas for each nonthermal standard source have been derived by combining these data with those determined at lower frequencies. The suitability of employing the standard sources for calibrating other antennas is discussed.

  13. Geometric and Radiometric Evaluation of Rasat Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Ali; Topan, Hüseyin; Oruç, Murat; Özendi, Mustafa; Bayık, Çağlar

    2016-06-01

    RASAT, the second remote sensing satellite of Turkey, was designed and assembled, and also is being operated by TÜBİTAK Uzay (Space) Technologies Research Institute (Ankara). RASAT images in various levels are available free-of-charge via Gezgin portal for Turkish citizens. In this paper, the images in panchromatic (7.5 m GSD) and RGB (15 m GSD) bands in various levels were investigated with respect to its geometric and radiometric characteristics. The first geometric analysis is the estimation of the effective GSD as less than 1 pixel for radiometrically processed level (L1R) of both panchromatic and RGB images. Secondly, 2D georeferencing accuracy is estimated by various non-physical transformation models (similarity, 2D affine, polynomial, affine projection, projective, DLT and GCP based RFM) reaching sub-pixel accuracy using minimum 39 and maximum 52 GCPs. The radiometric characteristics are also investigated for 8 bits, estimating SNR between 21.8-42.2, and noise 0.0-3.5 for panchromatic and MS images for L1R when the sea is masked to obtain the results for land areas. The analysis show that RASAT images satisfies requirements for various applications. The research is carried out in Zonguldak test site which is mountainous and partly covered by dense forest and urban areas.

  14. Calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Bingham, G. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D. C.; LaPorte, D. D.; Smith, W. L.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA New Millennium Program's Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) requires highly accurate radiometric and spectral calibration in order to carry out its mission to provide water vapor, wind, temperature, and trace gas profiling from geostationary orbit. A calibration concept has been developed for the GIFTS Phase A instrument design. The in-flight calibration is performed using views of two on-board blackbody sources along with cold space. A radiometric calibration uncertainty analysis has been developed and used to show that the expected performance for GIFTS exceeds its top level requirement to measure brightness temperature to better than 1 K. For the Phase A GIFTS design, the spectral calibration is established by the highly stable diode laser used as the reference for interferogram sampling, and verified with comparisons to atmospheric calculations.

  15. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasao, M; Bertalot, L; Ishikawa, M; Popovichev, S

    2010-10-01

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10(10) n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10(8) n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  16. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 1010 n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 108 n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  17. A summary of the joint GSICS - CEOS/IVOS lunar calibration workshop: moving towards intercalibration using the Moon as a transfer target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, S. C.; Hewison, T.; Stone, T.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Xiong, X.

    2015-10-01

    In December 2014 experts from 14 different agencies and departments attended the joint GSICS - CEOS/IVOS Lunar Calibration Workshop meeting organised by EUMETSAT in collaboration with USGS, CNES and NASA. Altogether, this represents potentially more than 25 instruments capable of observing the Moon. The main objectives of the workshop were i) to work across agencies with the GSICS Implementation of the ROLO model (GIRO) - a common and validated implementation of the USGS lunar radiometric reference, ii) to share knowledge and expertise on lunar calibration and iii) to generate for the first time a reference dataset that could be used for validation and comparisons. This lunar calibration community endorsed the GIRO to be the established publicly available reference for lunar calibration, directly traceable to the USGS ROLO model. However, further effort is required to reach inter-calibration between instruments, in particular for each instrument team to accurately estimate the over-sampling factor for their images of the Moon. A way to develop a cross-calibration algorithm and GSICS inter-calibration products is proposed. This includes key issues of fixing the GIRO calibration to an absolute scale, addressing spectral differences between instruments, and improving the existing calibration reference, which translates into future updates of the GIRO. The availability of extensive Moon observation datasets will help to further improve this reference and is expected to grow with the availability of additional lunar observations from past, current and future missions. All participants agreed on EUMETSAT pursuing its efforts in developing and maintaining the GIRO in collaboration with USGS to ensure traceability to the reference ROLO model.

  18. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000 year old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Buizert, Christo; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    We present the first successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ~350 kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 +/- 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by 1) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination, and 2) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (MIS 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samp...

  19. The radiometric industries of the countries of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic development of the radiometric industries in the EEC and the USA since 1960 is studied on the basis of sales statistics. The study covers the supply and the use of radioisotopes, the application of radiometric techniques, the scope and the development of the foreign trade as well as the structure of the firms concerned. The future need for radiometric apparatus is estimated as regards radiation protection, laboratories, industry, nuclear power plants and medicine

  20. Radiometric stability of Phase 3 WISP arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, David S.; Marlow, Steven A.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Murrer, Robert Lee

    2000-07-01

    Phase 3 WISP arrays and BRITE arrays are currently being used extensively in many projection systems in many different facilities. These arrays have not been annealed at the factory, and previous tests with the arrays have revealed instabilities in the radiometric output when the arrays are driven at higher voltages. In some applications, the instabilities can be avoided by operating the arrays at lower voltages. In many KHILS applications, it is desirable to drive the arrays with the highest possible voltages to simulate hot missile targets. In one KHILS application (the KHILS VAcuum Cold Chamber, KVACC), the arrays are cooled to near cryogenic temperatures and then driven to high voltages. At lower substrate temperatures, the characteristic responses of the emitters change. Thus, it is important that the response and the stability of the radiometric output of the arrays be well understood for various substrate temperatures, and that the arrays either be annealed or operated below the voltage where the emitters begin to anneal. KHILS has investigated annealing procedures in the past, but there was concern that the annealing procedures themselves -- driving the arrays at high voltages for long times -- would damage the arrays. In order to understand the performance of the arrays better, and to reduce risks associated with driving the arrays at high voltages and operating the arrays at low substrate temperatures, a systematic measurement program was initiated. The radiometric output of new Phase 3 WISP arrays was accurately measured as a function of voltage and time. Arrays designated for testing were driven to the higher voltages and the radiometric output was measured for as long as two hours. Curves indicative of the annealing were observed, and it was determined that the maximum stable output without annealing was about 500 K (MWIR apparent temperature). Blocks of emitters were annealed and tested again. It was determined that stable output of as much as 680 K

  1. Development of an absolute neutron dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, C; Birstein, L; Loyola, H [Section de Desarrollos Innovativos, Comision Chilena de EnergIa Nuclear (CCHEN), Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: lbirstei@cchen.cl

    2008-11-01

    An Absolute Neutron Dosimeter was developed to be used as a calibration standard for the Radiation Metrology Laboratory at CCHEN. The main component of the Dosimeter consists of a Proportional Counter of cylindrical shape, with Polyethylene walls and Ethylene gas in its interior. It includes a cage shaped arrangement of graphite bars that operates like the Proportional Counter cathode and a tungsten wire of 25 {mu}m in diameter {mu}m as the anode. Results of a Montecarlo modeling for the Dosimeter operation and results of tests and measurements performed with a radioactive source are presented.

  2. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  3. Absolute polarimetry at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, H; Bravar, A; Bunce, G; Dhawan, S; Eyser, K O; Gill, R; Haeberli, W; Huang, H; Jinnouchi, O; Makdisi, Y; Nakagawa, I; Nass, A; Saitô, N; Stephenson, E; Sviridia, D; Wise, T; Wood, J; Zelenski, A

    2007-01-01

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy of $\\Delta P_{beam}/P_{beam} < 5%$. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features \\textit{proton-proton} elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power $A_N$ of this process has allowed us to achieve $\\Delta P_{beam}/P_{beam} =4.2%$ in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of $A...

  4. MARCS-Model Stellar Atmospheres, and Their Application to the Photometric Calibration of the Spitzer-IRS

    CERN Document Server

    Decin, L

    2004-01-01

    We describe state-of-the-art MARCS-code model atmospheres generated for a group of A dwarf, G dwarf, and late-G to mid-K giant standard stars, selected to photometrically calibrate the Spitzer-IRS, and compare the synthetic spectra to observations of HR 6688, HR 6705, and HR 7891. The general calibration processes and uncertainties are briefly described, and the differences between various templated composite spectra of the standards are addressed. In particular, a contrast between up-to-date model atmospheres and previously published composite and synthetic spectra is illustrated for wavelength ranges around 8um (where the SiO Delta(v) = 1 band occurs for the cooler standards) and lambda greater than 20um, where the use of the Engelke function will lead to increasingly large discrepancies due to the neglect of gravity in cool stars. At this point, radiometric requirements are being met, absolute flux calibration uncertainties (1-sigma) are ~20% in the SH and LH, and ~15% in the SL and LL data, and order-to-o...

  5. Transponder-aided joint calibration and synchronization compensation for distributed radar systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Qin Wang

    Full Text Available High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF. The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results.

  6. Transponder-aided joint calibration and synchronization compensation for distributed radar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results. PMID:25794158

  7. Transponder-aided joint calibration and synchronization compensation for distributed radar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results.

  8. Sand Dune Ridge Alignment Effects on Surface BRF over the Libya-4 CEOS Calibration Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaerts, Yves M.

    2015-01-01

    The Libya-4 desert area, located in the Great Sand Sea, is one of the most important bright desert CEOS pseudo-invariant calibration sites by its size and radiometric stability. This site is intensively used for radiometer drift monitoring, sensor intercalibration and as an absolute calibration reference based on simulated radiances traceable to the SI standard. The Libya-4 morphology is composed of oriented sand dunes shaped by dominant winds. The effects of sand dune spatial organization on the surface bidirectional reflectance factor is analyzed in this paper using Raytran, a 3D radiative transfer model. The topography is characterized with the 30 m resolution ASTER digital elevation model. Four different regions-of-interest sizes, ranging from 10 km up to 100 km, are analyzed. Results show that sand dunes generate more backscattering than forward scattering at the surface. The mean surface reflectance averaged over different viewing and illumination angles is pretty much independent of the size of the selected area, though the standard deviation differs. Sun azimuth position has an effect on the surface reflectance field, which is more pronounced for high Sun zenith angles. Such 3D azimuthal effects should be taken into account to decrease the simulated radiance uncertainty over Libya-4 below 3% for wavelengths larger than 600 nm. PMID:25654721

  9. Sand dune ridge alignment effects on surface BRF over the Libya-4 CEOS calibration site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaerts, Yves M

    2015-01-01

    The Libya-4 desert area, located in the Great Sand Sea, is one of the most important bright desert CEOS pseudo-invariant calibration sites by its size and radiometric stability. This site is intensively used for radiometer drift monitoring, sensor intercalibration and as an absolute calibration reference based on simulated radiances traceable to the SI standard. The Libya-4 morphology is composed of oriented sand dunes shaped by dominant winds. The effects of sand dune spatial organization on the surface bidirectional reflectance factor is analyzed in this paper using Raytran, a 3D radiative transfer model. The topography is characterized with the 30 m resolution ASTER digital elevation model. Four different regions-of-interest sizes, ranging from 10 km up to 100 km, are analyzed. Results show that sand dunes generate more backscattering than forward scattering at the surface. The mean surface reflectance averaged over different viewing and illumination angles is pretty much independent of the size of the selected area, though the standard deviation differs. Sun azimuth position has an effect on the surface reflectance field, which is more pronounced for high Sun zenith angles. Such 3D azimuthal effects should be taken into account to decrease the simulated radiance uncertainty over Libya-4 below 3% for wavelengths larger than 600 nm. PMID:25654721

  10. Sand Dune Ridge Alignment Effects on Surface BRF over the Libya-4 CEOS Calibration Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves M. Govaerts

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Libya-4 desert area, located in the Great Sand Sea, is one of the most important bright desert CEOS pseudo-invariant calibration sites by its size and radiometric stability. This site is intensively used for radiometer drift monitoring, sensor intercalibration and as an absolute calibration reference based on simulated radiances traceable to the SI standard. The Libya-4 morphology is composed of oriented sand dunes shaped by dominant winds. The effects of sand dune spatial organization on the surface bidirectional reflectance factor is analyzed in this paper using Raytran, a 3D radiative transfer model. The topography is characterized with the 30 m resolution ASTER digital elevation model. Four different regions-of-interest sizes, ranging from 10 km up to 100 km, are analyzed. Results show that sand dunes generate more backscattering than forward scattering at the surface. The mean surface reflectance averaged over different viewing and illumination angles is pretty much independent of the size of the selected area, though the standard deviation differs. Sun azimuth position has an effect on the surface reflectance field, which is more pronounced for high Sun zenith angles. Such 3D azimuthal effects should be taken into account to decrease the simulated radiance uncertainty over Libya-4 below 3% for wavelengths larger than 600 nm.

  11. Sand Dune Ridge Alignment Effects on Surface BRF over Libya-4 Calibration Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaerts, Yves

    2015-12-01

    The Libya-4 desert area, located in the Great Sand Sea, is one of the most important bright desert CEOS pseudo-invariant calibration sites by its size and radiometric stability. This site is intensively used for radiometer drift monitoring, sensor intercalibration and as an absolute calibration reference based on simulated radiances traceable to the SI standard. The Libya-4 morphology is composed of oriented sand dunes shaped by dominant winds. The effects of sand dune spatial organization on the surface bidirectional reflectance factor is analyzed in this paper using Raytran, a 3D radiative transfer model. The topography is characterized with the 30 m resolution ASTER digital elevation model. Four different regions-of-interest sizes, ranging from 10 km up to 100 km, are analyzed. Results show that sand dunes generate more backscattering than forward scattering at the surface. The mean surface reflectance averaged over different viewing and illumination angles is pretty much independent of the size of the selected area, though the standard deviation differs. Sun azimuth position has an effect on the surface reflectance field, which is more pronounced for high Sun zenith angles. Such 3D azimuthal effects should be taken into account to decrease the simulated radiance uncertainty over Libya-4 below 3% for wavelengths larger than 600 nm..

  12. Intercomparison of Laboratory Radiance Calibration Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavri, Betina; Chrien, Tom; Green, Robert; Williams, Orlesa

    2000-01-01

    Several standards for radiometric calibration were measured repeatedly with a spectroradiometer in order to understand how they compared in accuracy and stability. The tested radiance standards included a NIST 1000 W bulb and halon panel, two calibrated and stabilized integrating spheres, and a cavity blackbody. Results indicate good agreement between the blackbody and 1000 W bulb/spectralon panel, If these two radiance sources are assumed correct, then the integrating spheres did not conform. to their manufacturer-reported radiances in several regions of the spectrum. More detailed measurements am underway to investigate the discrepancy.

  13. On-Orbit Radiometric Performance of the Landsat 8 ThermalInfrared Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Montanaro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS requirements for noise, stability, and uniformity were designed to ensure the radiometric integrity of the data products. Since the launch of Landsat 8 in February 2013, many of these evaluations have been based on routine measurements of the onboard calibration sources, which include a variable-temperature blackbody and a deep space view port. The noise equivalent change in temperature (NEdT of TIRS data is approximately 0.05 K @ 300 K in both bands, exceeding requirements by about a factor of 8 and Landsat 7 ETM+ performance by a factor of 3. Coherent noise is not readily apparent in TIRS data. No apparent change in the detector linearization has been observed. The radiometric stability of the TIRS instrument over the period between radiometric calibrations (about 40 min is less than one count of dark current and the variation in terms of radiance is less than 0.015 \\(W/m^2/sr/\\mu m\\ (or 0.13 K at 300 K, easily meeting the short term stability requirements. Long term stability analysis has indicated a degradation of about 0.2% or less per year. The operational calibration is only updated using the biases taken every orbit, due to the fundamental stability of the instrument. By combining the data from two active detector rows per band, 100% detector operability is maintained for the instrument. No trends in the noise, operability, or short term radiometric stability are apparent over the mission life. The uniformity performance is more difficult to evaluate as scene-varying banding artifacts have been observed in Earth imagery. Analyses have shown that stray light is affecting the recorded signal from the Earth and inducing the banding depending on the content of the surrounding Earth surface. As the stray light effects are stronger in the longer wavelength TIRS band11 (12.0 \\(\\mu m\\, the uniformity is better in the shorter wavelength band10 (10.9 \\(\\mu m\\. Both bands have exceptional noise and

  14. The development and application of quantitative methods for the determination of in-situ radiometric uranium grade on the Witwatersrand gold and uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed investigation of background radiation levels near the reef zone in the uranium section of the Western Areas Mine was conducted using a collimated radiometric face scanner. This study demonstrated that these radiation levels can be high; 25% or more of the counts measured when sampling a reef face may originate from a background source, especially from uranium ore rubble on the footwall close to the reef face. A method using a 20mm frontal shield was devised to obtain an accurate background correction. Three calibration schemes, the Area method, the Gamlog method, and the Deconvolution method were implemented for the production of accurate in-situ radiometric uranium grades. This involved the construction of a step-response calibration pad at Pelindaba together with the establisment of appropriate software and underground radiometric sampling procedures. Radiometric grades generated by these calibration procedures from 60 channel sections were on average 10% below those procured from conventional chip sampling. A correlation between gold and uranium grades was also evident. Crushed rock samples were collected to investigate the thorium problem and are still undergoing analysis at the time of writing. Refinements in the design of the collimated face scanner are also described

  15. Development of an Operational Calibration Methodology for the Landsat Thermal Data Archive and Initial Testing of the Atmospheric Compensation Component of a Land Surface Temperature (LST Product from the Archive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Cook

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Landsat program has been producing an archive of thermal imagery that spans the globe and covers 30 years of the thermal history of the planet at human scales (60–120 m. Most of that archive’s absolute radiometric calibration has been fixed through vicarious calibration techniques. These calibration ties to trusted values have often taken a year or more to gather sufficient data and, in some cases, it has been over a decade before calibration certainty has been established. With temperature being such a critical factor for all living systems and the ongoing concern over the impacts of climate change, NASA and the United States Geological Survey (USGS are leading efforts to provide timely and accurate temperature data from the Landsat thermal data archive. This paper discusses two closely related advances that are critical steps toward providing timely and reliable temperature image maps from Landsat. The first advance involves the development and testing of an autonomous procedure for gathering and performing initial screening of large amounts of vicarious calibration data. The second advance discussed in this paper is the per-pixel atmospheric compensation of the data to permit calculation of the emitted surface radiance (using ancillary sources of emissivity data and the corresponding land surface temperature (LST.

  16. Radiometric sorting of Rio Algom uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ore sample of about 0.2 percent uranium from Quirke Mine was subjected to radiometric sorting by Ore Sorters Limited. Approximately 60 percent of the sample weight fell within the sortable size range: -150 + 25 mm. Rejects of low uranium content (2 (2 counts/in2) but only 7.6 percent of the ore, by weight, was discarded. At 0.8-0.9 counts/cm2 (5-6 counts/in2) a significant amount of rejects was removed (> 25 percent) but the uranium loss was unacceptably high (7.7 percent). Continuation of the testwork to improve the results is proposed by trying to extend the sortable size range and to reduce the amount of fines during crushing

  17. 1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Lambertian nature of tissue phantoms for use as calibrators in near infrared fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litorja, Maritoni; Lorenzo, Simón; Zhu, Banghe; Sevick Muraca, Eva

    2016-03-01

    The use of tissue phantoms as calibrators to transfer SI-referenced scale to an imager offers convenience, compared to other methods of calibration. The tissue phantoms are calibrated separately for radiance at emission wavelength per irradiance at excitation wavelength. This calibration is only performed at a single geometric configuration, typically with the detector normal to the sample. In the clinic however, the imager can be moved around, resulting in a geometric configuration different from the calibration configuration. In this study, radiometric measurements are made at different sample-imager angles to test whether the tissue phantoms are Lambertian and the angular limits to which the calibration values hold true.

  19. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    uncertainty was verified from independent measurements of the same sample by demonstrating statistical control of analytical results and the absence of bias. The proposed method takes into account uncertainties of the measurement, as well as of the amount of calibrant. It is applicable to all types......Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration...

  20. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency

  1. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  2. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  3. Data acquisition and processing - helicopter radiometric survey, Krageroe, 1998

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, L P

    2000-01-01

    On 07 October 1998 a helicopter radiometric survey was flown in the vicinity of Krageroe municipality. The purpose of the survey was to provide radiometric information to help assess radon hazard from radioactive rocks in the area. A total of 60 line-kilometres of radiometric data were acquired in a single flight, covering an area of approximately 3 square km with a 50-m line spacing. The data were collected by Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) personnel and processed at NGU. Radiometric data were reduced using the three-channel procedure recommended by the International Atomic Energy Association. All data were gridded using square cells with 30-m sides and geophysical maps were produced at a scale of 1:5000. This report covers aspects of data acquisition and processing (Author)

  4. MISR radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the Radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask dataset. It is used to determine whether a scene is classified as clear or cloudy. A new parameter...

  5. Radiometric report for a blast furnace tracing with radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the methods to monitor refractory wall of blast furnace is its tracing with radioactive isotopes. The tracer isotope can be detected by two ways: the external dosimetric measurement at the armour of the blast furnace and/or the radiometric measurement of the iron sample charge by charge. Any change in radiometric situation of tracer radioisotope is recorded in a radiometric report. This paper presents an original concept of radiometric report based upon PARADOX and CORELDRAW soft kits. Their advantage are: quick and easy changes, easy recording of current radioactivity of tracer isotope, short history of changes, visual mapping of the tracer isotope and others. In this way we monitored 6 blast furnaces and more than 180 radioactive sources

  6. Suomi NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands Operational Calibration Reprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Blonski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiometric calibration coefficients for the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite reflective solar bands have been reprocessed from the beginning of the Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership mission until present. An automated calibration procedure, implemented in the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration JPSS (Joint Polar Satellite System operational data production system, was applied to reprocess onboard solar calibration data and solar diffuser degradation measurements. The latest processing parameters from the operational system were used to include corrected solar vectors, optimized directional dependence of attenuation screens transmittance and solar diffuser reflectance, updated prelaunch calibration coefficients without an offset term, and optimized Robust Holt-Winters filter parameters. The parameters were consistently used to generate a complete set of the radiometric calibration coefficients for the entire duration of the Suomi NPP mission. The reprocessing has demonstrated that the automated calibration procedure can be successfully applied to all solar measurements acquired from the beginning of the mission until the full deployment of the automated procedure in the operational processing system. The reprocessed calibration coefficients can be further used to reprocess VIIRS SDR (Sensor Data Record and other data products. The reprocessing has also demonstrated how the automated calibration procedure can be used during activation of the VIIRS instruments on the future JPSS satellites.

  7. Radiometric resolution of motion-induced synthetic aperture radiometer

    OpenAIRE

    Hyuk, Park; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Choi, Min Gyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    The radiometric resolution of a motion-induced synthetic aperture radiometer (MISAR) is analytically obtained from the standard deviation of a baseline response, an observation scenario, and the imaging method of the MISAR. The intrinsic long integration time given by the whole dwell time on moving platforms improves the radiometric resolution compared with the snapshot resolution of other nominal synthetic aperture radiometers. In addition, it is illustrated that the MISAR imaging hold...

  8. Potassium determination in antique glasses by means of radiometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-destructive methods are very important in investigations of antique objects. The main purpose of that work was to compare two radiometric methods which were used for determination of potassium in glasses. In the radiometric methods the natural radioactivity of potassium isotope 40K was used. Samples of glasses were examined by autoradiography and gamma spectrometry. The precissions of mentioned methods, possibilities, limitation and restriction using them in investigations of antique glasses were determined. (author)

  9. A radiometric airborne geophysical survey of the Isle of Wight

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, David; White, James C.

    2011-01-01

    A high resolution airborne geophysical survey across the Isle of Wight and Lymington area conducted in 2008 provided the first modern radiometric survey across the geological formations that characterise much of southern England. The basic radiometric data are presented and it is evident that bedrock geology exerts a controlling influence on the broad response characteristics of the naturally occurring radioelements. A GIS-based geological classification of the data provides a quantitative as...

  10. Radiometric modulation measuring device of intensity of optical radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Yanenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The paper proposed a block diagram of radiometric measuring the intensity of optical radiation from modulation conversion parameter input . To assess the intensity of use periodically comparing the reference signal (shaded and measurement (open photodi-odes. Studies. The proposed radiometric modulation meter provides increased sensitivity and measurement accuracy by reducing the influence of dark current measurement and reference photodiodes and compensation intrinsic noise measuring channel through their periodic anti-phase comparison.

  11. Antiquity of man in America indicated by radiometric dates on the Yuha burial site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J.L.; Merriam, R.; Childers, W.M.; Protsch, R.

    1976-01-01

    MUCH evidence suggests that man was present in the Western Hemisphere before 12,000 yr ago, but the case has remained less than conclusive 1. In some situations, the geological age of the site is reasonably well established but the association or nature of the artefacts is questionable2,3. In other cases, museum specimens of human bones dated by radiocarbon analysis of collagen lack desirable information concerning site location, geology, and stratigraphy even though the accuracy of their absolute ages seems valid4-6. We report here the results of radiometric dates of the Yuha burial site from Imperial County, California, for which the geology and stratigraphy have been documented and reported in detail7. ?? 1976 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Study of Radiation Calibration for LWIR Hyperspectral Imager Spectrometer%长波红外高光谱成像光谱仪的辐射定标

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁小春; 杨智雄; 余春超; 郑为建; 雷正刚; 严敏

    2015-01-01

    Infrared radiometric calibration is of critical importance for information quantification of remote sensing of environment in infrared spectrum. In the quantitative analysis, the calibration of the measured spectra is very imporant. LWIR Interferometric Hyperspectral imager Spectrometer Prototype(CHIPED-I) is developed for studying Radiation Calibration. Two-point linear calibration method is carried out for the spectrometer by using blackbody respectively. Firstly, relative intensity is converted to the absolute radiation lightness of the object. Then, radiation intensity of the object is converted into the brightness temperature spectrum by the method of brightness temperature. The result indicats that such method of Radiation Calibration calibration is very good , which is of significance to the further analysis of atmospheric transmission and the retrieval of the concentration of infrared active gas in atmosphere.%红外辐射定标是红外遥感信息定量化的关键技术,对所测光谱进行定标是定量分析中的重要环节。采用自行研制长波红外高光谱成像光谱仪原理实验装置(简称 CHIPED-I)进行验证,用黑体对实验装置进行了两点线性定标,将测量的相对强度转化成目标的绝对辐射亮度谱,采用亮温法算出标定后的亮温光谱。结果表明,这种辐射定标方法用于长波红外高光谱成像光谱仪方法可行,这对进一步分析大气透过率和反演大气中红外活性气体浓度具有实际意义。

  13. JPSS-1 VIIRS DNB nonlinearity and its impact on SDR calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shihyan; Wang, Wenhui; Cao, Changyong

    2015-09-01

    During JPSS-1 VIIRS testing at Raytheon El Segundo, a larger than expected radiometric response nonlinearity was discovered in Day-Nigh Band (DNB). In addition, the DNB nonlinearity is aggregation mode dependent, where the most severe non-linear behavior are the aggregation modes used at high scan angles (LGS) and could vary from sample-to-sample. The non-linearity is also more significant in EV than in calibration view samples. The HGS nonlinearity is difficult to quantify due to the higher uncertainty in determining source radiance. Since the radiometric response non-linearity is most significant at low dn ranges, it presents challenge in DNB cross-stage calibration, an critical path to calibration DNB's High Gain Stage (HGS) for nighttime imagery. Based on the radiometric characterization, we estimated the DNB on-orbit calibration accuracy and compared the expected DNB calibration accuracy using operational calibration approaches. The analysis showed the non-linearity will result in cross-stage gain ratio bias, and have the most significant impact on HGS. The HGS calibration accuracy can be improved when either SD data or only the more linearly behaved EV pixels are used in cross-stage calibration. Due to constrain in test data, we were not able to achieve a satisfactory accuracy and uniformity for the JPSS-1 DNB nighttime imagery quality. The JPSS-1 DNB nonlinearity is a challenging calibration issue which will likely require special attention after JPSS-1 launch.

  14. 紫外臭氧垂直探测仪(SBUS)辐射定标和反演臭氧垂直廓线验证%Radiometric Calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Sounder and Validation of Ozone Proifle Retrievals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄富祥; 黄煜; Lawrence E.Flynn; 王维和; 曹冬杰; 王淑荣

    2013-01-01

    风云三号卫星(FY-3)是中国第二代极轨气象卫星,紫外臭氧垂直探测仪(SBUS)是该卫星11个主要星载遥感仪器之一。阐述了卫星发射前和发射后紫外臭氧垂直探测仪定标、数据及产品验证的结果。主要内容包括仪器发射前的定标和特性描述、在轨监测、臭氧垂直廓线反演产品检验,以及其产品在2011年北极严重臭氧损耗中的监测应用。紫外臭氧垂直探测仪发射前定标,实验室定标不确定性估计大约为4.7%,在轨监测表明漫反射板反射率252nm通道大约衰减15%,其他11个通道大约衰减3%~5%。与美国NOAA卫星同类载荷SBUV/2s反演产品进行比较,FY-3A SBUS反演产品相对差异百分率大约为±7%,而FY-3B SBUS产品相对偏差百分率大约为±6%。利用FY-3 SBUS臭氧垂直廓线监测2011年春季北极严重臭氧损耗,表明从对流层上层到平流层下部的臭氧损耗占臭氧总量损耗的70%~80%。%The Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Sounder (SBUS) is one of the 11 main payload instruments onboard Feng Yun-3 (FY-3), the second generation of Chinese polar orbit meteorological satellites. This paper presents the results of SBUS instrument calibration, and data and product validation during the prelaunch and postlaunch periods. Topics include the instrument of the ozone proifles retrieved from the FY-3 SBUS measurements, and an application of the retrievals to monitoring the 2011 Arctic ozone depletion. For the prelaunch calibration of SBUS, the estimated uncertainty of laboratory calibration is approximately 4.7%. The in-orbit solar irradiance measurements indicate that the diffuser relfectivity degraded approximately 15%for the 252-nm channel, and 3%to 5%for the other 11 channels during a 12-mo period. Using ozone vertical proifles retrieved from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV)/2s as a“truth,”the initial comparison of ozone

  15. Calibration of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Gaug, Markus; Berge, David; Reyes, Raquel de los; Doro, Michele; Foerster, Andreas; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Parsons, Dan; van Eldik, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The construction of the Cherenkov Telescope Array is expected to start soon. We will present the baseline methods and their extensions currently foreseen to calibrate the observatory. These are bound to achieve the strong requirements on allowed systematic uncertainties for the reconstructed gamma-ray energy and flux scales, as well as on the pointing resolution, and on the overall duty cycle of the observatory. Onsite calibration activities are designed to include a robust and efficient calibration of the telescope cameras, and various methods and instruments to achieve calibration of the overall optical throughput of each telescope, leading to both inter-telescope calibration and an absolute calibration of the entire observatory. One important aspect of the onsite calibration is a correct understanding of the atmosphere above the telescopes, which constitutes the calorimeter of this detection technique. It is planned to be constantly monitored with state-of-the-art instruments to obtain a full molecular and...

  16. The calibration system for the GERDA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GERDA experiment uses the neutrinoless double beta decay to probe three fundamental questions in neutrino physics - Are they Dirac or Majorana particles? What is their absolute mass? What is the mass hierarchy of the three generations? In my talk I present the calibration system for the Ge semiconductor diodes enriched in Ge-76. The system is used to set the energy scale and calibrate the pulse shapes which will be used to further reject background events. The lowest possible background is crucial for the whole experiment and therefore the calibration system must not interfere with the data acquisition phase while at the same time operate efficiently during the calibration runs.

  17. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be fn∼4.1x10-4 with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 108 neutrons per discharge.

  18. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  19. Recent advances in airborne radiometric technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its inception, the DOE Remote Sensing Laboratory has made dramatic innovations in airborne radiometric technology. In the past few years there have been at least four major changes in operational philosophy. (1) The helicopter is now the prime radiation survey vehicle. Surveys are conducted at low speed and low altitude, with lines spaced only a few hundred feet apart. Radiation anomalies and subtle changes in background can be readily identified. (2) Much greater emphasis is now placed on accurate, detailed analysis and interpretation of radiation data. Dramatic improvements in survey hardware and software provide much more data of considerably better quality. (3) Recent Laboratory research has been concentrated on error-free, positive identification of point radiation sources. In the past, the extent and magnitude of dispersed sources were the major concerns. (4) Integrated remote sensing has been strongly emphasized at the Laboratory in recent years. This involves the simultaneous use of radiation detectors, aerial cameras, and the multispectral scanner imagery. The synergistic effects of such data correlation are of significantly greater value in analyzing the terrestrial environment. Many of the changes in operational philosophy are directly traceable to new or dramatically improved hardware and software employed at the Laboratory. Six items have been instrumental in the above technological advances: (1) the UHF Transponder System and its predecessor, the Microwave Ranging System; (2) Model IC of the REDAR data acquisition system; (3) the development of the search algorithm; (4) continued improvements in the REDACA data analysis system; (5) deployment of polyscin sodium iodide radiation detectors; and (6) development of the Graphic Overview System

  20. A Method to Estimate Uncertainty in Radiometric Measurement Using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) Method; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Radiometric data with known and traceable uncertainty is essential for climate change studies to better understand cloud radiation interactions and the earth radiation budget. Further, adopting a known and traceable method of estimating uncertainty with respect to SI ensures that the uncertainty quoted for radiometric measurements can be compared based on documented methods of derivation.Therefore, statements about the overall measurement uncertainty can only be made on an individual basis, taking all relevant factors into account. This poster provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements from radiometers. The approach follows the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). derivation.Therefore, statements about the overall measurement uncertainty can only be made on an individual basis, taking all relevant factors into account. This poster provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements from radiometers. The approach follows the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM).

  1. ROE Absolute Sea Level Changes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This raster dataset represents changes in absolute sea level along U.S. coasts from 1993 to 2014. Data were provided by the University of Colorado at Boulder (2015)...

  2. Standard Test Method for Calibration of Non-Concentrator Photovoltaic Secondary Reference Cells

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers calibration and characterization of secondary terrestrial photovoltaic reference cells to a desired reference spectral irradiance distribution. The recommended physical requirements for these reference cells are described in Specification E1040. Reference cells are principally used in the determination of the electrical performance of a photovoltaic device. 1.2 Secondary reference cells are calibrated indoors using simulated sunlight or outdoors in natural sunlight by reference to a primary reference cell previously calibrated to the same desired reference spectral irradiance distribution. 1.3 Secondary reference cells calibrated according to this test method will have the same radiometric traceability as the of the primary reference cell used for the calibration. Therefore, if the primary reference cell is traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR, see Test Method E816), the resulting secondary reference cell will also be traceable to the WRR. 1.4 This test method appli...

  3. Design and Calibration of a Cryogenic Blackbody Calibrator at Centimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J; Fixsen, D J; Limon, M; Mirel, P G A; Levin, S; Seiffert, M; Lubin, P M

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design and calibration of an external cryogenic blackbody calibrator used for the first two flights of the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) instrument. The calibrator consists of a microwave absorber weakly coupled to a superfluid liquid helium bath. Half-wave corrugations viewed 30 deg off axis reduce the return loss below -35 dB. Ruthenium oxide resistive thermometers embedded within the absorber monitor the temperature across the face of the calibrator. The thermal calibration transfers the calibration of a reference thermometer to the flight thermometers using the flight thermometer readout system. Data taken near the superfluid transition in 8 independent calibrations 4 years apart agree within 0.3 mK, providing an independent verification of the thermometer calibration at temperatures near that of the cosmic microwave background.

  4. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Accurate solar radiation data sets are critical to reducing the expenses associated with mitigating performance risk for solar energy conversion systems, and they help utility planners and grid system operators understand the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies and the resulting calibration responsivities provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors, and some are calibrated outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1% to 2% differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the radiometer data and will assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  5. Radiometric Study of Soil Profiles in the Infrared Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, T. V.; Ponomarev, E. I.

    2016-02-01

    The applicability of radiometric survey of soil profiles in the infrared range for the analysis of soil physical properties was studied. Radiometric data were obtained for different dates of the growing season for a number of soil profiles. The specificity of temperature profiles of texture-differentiated soils (Luvisols and Retisols) as related to weather conditions of the growing season was examined. The correlation analysis showed a close relationship between the air and surface soil temperatures and between the radiometric and thermodynamic soil temperatures in the upper 10 cm. In the studied profiles, the gradient of radiometric temperatures reached 0.5-0.8°C/cm in the humus horizons and sharply decreased at the depth of more than 15-20 cm. The gradient analysis of radiometric images made it possible to outline the boundaries of soil horizons. For the texture-differentiated soils, the most distinct boundaries were established between the gray-humus AY horizon and the underlying eluvial EL horizon in podzolic soils and between the AY horizon and the underlying humus-eluvial AEL horizon in gray soils.

  6. Multielement X-ray radiometric analysis with application of semiconductor detectors and automatic processing of the results of measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of complex extraction of useful components from the ores with compound composition demand to ensure multielement analysis having the accuracy which is sufficient for practical purposes. Great possibilities has the X-ray-radiometric analysis with application of semiconductor detectors (SD) and with processing the results of measurements by means of mini- or micro-computers. Present state in the detection and computation techniques permits to introduce the said instruments into the practical use in the analytical laboratories of the mining enterprises. On the base of discussion of the practical tasks in analysis of different types of ores, in the paper basic principles of the multielement X-ray-radiometric analysis for industrial purposes have been formulated. First of all it is an installation with few channels. The main requirement in creation of such installations is to ensure high relaibility and stability of their performance. A variant is given of such analyzer, constructed with use of SiLi or Ge detecting blocks. Possibility for quick change of the excitation sources made of the set of iron-55, cadmium-109, americium-241 or cobalt-57 ensures effective excitation of elements in the range from calcium to uranium. Some practical methods of analysis have been discussed in the paper. They are based both on the methods of passive and active experiments at the calibration stages. Accuracy of these methods is enough for change of ordinary chemical analysis by the radiometric one. Problems are discussed of application of mini- and micro-computers, permitting processing of information according to the metods of analysis having been developed. Some examples are given of practical realization of the multielement X-ray-radiometric analysis of the lead-zinc, cppper-molybdenum, lead-barite and some other types of ores and also of the products of processing of ores

  7. Biogeographic calibrations for the molecular clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Simon Y W; Tong, K Jun; Foster, Charles S P; Ritchie, Andrew M; Lo, Nathan; Crisp, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Molecular estimates of evolutionary timescales have an important role in a range of biological studies. Such estimates can be made using methods based on molecular clocks, including models that are able to account for rate variation across lineages. All clock models share a dependence on calibrations, which enable estimates to be given in absolute time units. There are many available methods for incorporating fossil calibrations, but geological and climatic data can also provide useful calibrations for molecular clocks. However, a number of strong assumptions need to be made when using these biogeographic calibrations, leading to wide variation in their reliability and precision. In this review, we describe the nature of biogeographic calibrations and the assumptions that they involve. We present an overview of the different geological and climatic events that can provide informative calibrations, and explain how such temporal information can be incorporated into dating analyses.

  8. Potential and limitations of radiometric 230Th/U dating of tufa (travertine) in Stuttgart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second largest springs in Europe discharge mineralized groundwater with a recent rate of 500 l/s within the region of Stuttgart since at least 500 000 years. Most of the precipitated travertine (Sauerwasserkalk) can be dated chronostratigraphically by artifacts, biostratigraphically by macrofossils and geologically by the elevation of the terraces of the River Neckar. All travertines were formed during warm periods. The deposition of huge travertine deposits from different geological periods, at the same place and from the same mineral water system has been a challenge for the absolute age determination in order to correlate the regional climatic chronology with the global one. Since the beginning of the eighties radiometric 230Th/U datings were carried out from various research groups. In the middle of the nineties 230Th/U dating by the modern thermion mass spectrometry (TIMS) opened a more precise and more reliable age determination of travertine. Hence, the comparison of the methodically differing results from the same samples offered the possibility to search for criteria to justify the reliability of the 230Th/U dates of such deposits as a whole and deliver a reliable absolute chronology. (orig.)

  9. An Overview of Lunar Calibration and Characterization for the EOS Terra and Aqua MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Salomonson, V. V.; Sun, J.; Chiang, K.; Xiong, S.; Humphries, S.; Barnes, W.; Guenther, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Moon can be used as a stable source for Earth-observing sensors on-orbit radiometric and spatial stability monitoring in the VIS and NIR spectral regions. It can also serve as a calibration transfer vehicle among multiple sensors. Nearly identical copies of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODE) have been operating on-board the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites since their launches in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. Terra and Aqua MODIS each make observations in 36 spectral bands covering the spectral range from 0.41 to 14.5 microns and are calibrated on-orbit by a set of on-board calibrations (OBCs) including: 1) a solar diffuser (SD), 2) a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), 3) a blackbody (BB), and 4) a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). In addition to fully utilizing the OBCs, the Moon has been used extensively by both Terra and Aqua MODIS to support their on-orbit calibration and characterization. A 4 This paper provides an overview of applications of lunar calibration and characterization from the MODIS perspective, including monitoring radiometric calibration stability for the reflective solar bands (RSBs), tracking changes of the sensors response versus scan-angle (RVS), examining the sensors spatial performance , and characterizing optical leaks and electronic crosstalk among different spectral bands and detectors. On-orbit calibration consistency between the two MODIS instruments is also addressed. Based on the existing on-orbit time series of the Terra and Aqua MODIS lunar observations, the radiometric difference between the two sensors is less than +/-1% for the RSBs. This method provides a powerful means of performing calibration comparisons among Earth-observing sensors and assures consistent data and science products for the long-term studies of climate and environmental changes.

  10. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    OpenAIRE

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation. This paper describes how such measurements are carried out as well as a suitable experimental setup. The main reflector of the European Space Agency's MIMR system is used to demonstrate the principle

  11. Development of landsat-5 thematic mapper internal calibrator gain and offset table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Micijevic, E.; Markham, B.L.; Haque, Md. O.

    2008-01-01

    The National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) has been the primary processing system for Landsat data since U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (EROS) started archiving Landsat data. NLAPS converts raw satellite data into radiometrically and geometrically calibrated products. NLAPS has historically used the Internal Calibrator (IC) to calibrate the reflective bands of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM), even though the lamps in the IC were less stable than the TM detectors, as evidenced by vicarious calibration results. In 2003, a major effort was made to model the actual TM gain change and to update NLAPS to use this model rather than the unstable IC data for radiometric calibration. The model coefficients were revised in 2007 to reflect greater understanding of the changes in the TM responsivity. While the calibration updates are important to users with recently processed data, the processing system no longer calculates the original IC gain or offset. For specific applications, it is useful to have a record of the gain and offset actually applied to the older data. Thus, the NLAPS calibration database was used to generate estimated daily values for the radiometric gain and offset that might have been applied to TM data. This paper discusses the need for and generation of the NLAPSIC gain and offset tables. A companion paper covers the application of and errors associated with using these tables.

  12. Post-Launch Calibration Support for VIIRS Onboard NASA NPP Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxion; Chiang, Kwo-Fu; McIntire, Jeffrey; Schwaller, Matthew; Butler, James

    2011-01-01

    The NPP Instrument Calibration Support Element (NICSE) is one of the elements within the NASA NPP Science Data Segment (SDS). The primary responsibility of NICSE is to independently monitor and evaluate on-orbit radiometric and geometric performance of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument and to validate its Sensor Data Record (SDR) [1]. The NICSE interacts and works closely with other SDS Product Evaluation and Analysis Tools Elements (PEATE) and the NPP Science Team (ST) and supports their on-orbit data product calibration and validation efforts. The NICSE also works closely with the NPP Instrument Calibration Support Team (NICST) during sensor pre-launch testing in ambient and thermal vacuum environment [2]. This paper provides an overview of NICSE VIIRS sensor post-launch calibration support with a focus on the use of sensor on-board calibrators (OBC) for the radiometric calibration and characterization. It presents the current status of NICSE post-launch radiometric calibration tool development effort based on its design requirements

  13. Calibration Techniques for VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, David

    2007-01-01

    VERITAS is an array of four identical telescopes designed for detecting and measuring astrophysical gamma rays with energies in excess of 100 GeV. Each telescope uses a 12 m diameter reflector to collect Cherenkov light from air showers initiated by incident gamma rays and direct it onto a `camera' comprising 499 photomultiplier tubes read out by flash ADCs. We describe here calibration methods used for determining the values of the parameters which are necessary for converting the digitized PMT pulses to gamma-ray energies and directions. Use of laser pulses to determine and monitor PMT gains is discussed, as are measurements of the absolute throughput of the telescopes using muon rings.

  14. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  15. Absolute luminosity measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Hopchev, Plamen

    2011-01-01

    Absolute luminosity measurements are of general interest for colliding-beam experiments at storage rings. These measurements are necessary to determine the absolute cross-sections of reaction processes and are valuable to quantify the performance of the accelerator. LHCb has applied two methods to determine the absolute scale of its luminosity measurements for proton-proton collisions at the LHC running at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In addition to the classic ``van der Meer'' scan method a novel technique has been developed which makes use of direct imaging of the individual beams using both proton-gas and proton-proton interactions. The beam imaging method is made possible by the high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector and the close proximity of the detector to the beams, and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. We describe both methods and compare the two results. In addition, we present the techniques used to transport the absolute luminosity measurement ...

  16. [Field measurement of Gobi surface emissivity spectrum at Dunhuang calibration site of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Yuan; Rong, Zhi-guo; Hu, Xiu-qing; Zhang, Li-jun; Liu, Jing-jing

    2009-05-01

    Gobi surface emissivity spectrum of Dunhuang radiometric calibration site of China is one of the key factors to calibrate the thermal infrared remote sensors using land surface. Based on the iterative spectrally smooth temperature/emissivity separation (ISSTES)algorithm, Dunhuang Gobi surface emissivity spectrum was measured using BOMEM MR154 Fourier transform spectroradiometer and Infrared Golden Board. Emissivity spectrum data were obtained at different time and locations. These spectrum data were convolved with the channel response function of CE312 radiometer and compared with the channel emissivity measured by the same instrument. The results showed that the difference between these two kinds of channel emissivity was within 0.012 and exhibited a good consistency. With these measured emissivity spectra, all of the mainstream thermal infrared remote sensors can be calibrated using Dunhuang Gobi surface at radiometric calibration site of China.

  17. [Field measurement of Gobi surface emissivity spectrum at Dunhuang calibration site of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Yuan; Rong, Zhi-guo; Hu, Xiu-qing; Zhang, Li-jun; Liu, Jing-jing

    2009-05-01

    Gobi surface emissivity spectrum of Dunhuang radiometric calibration site of China is one of the key factors to calibrate the thermal infrared remote sensors using land surface. Based on the iterative spectrally smooth temperature/emissivity separation (ISSTES)algorithm, Dunhuang Gobi surface emissivity spectrum was measured using BOMEM MR154 Fourier transform spectroradiometer and Infrared Golden Board. Emissivity spectrum data were obtained at different time and locations. These spectrum data were convolved with the channel response function of CE312 radiometer and compared with the channel emissivity measured by the same instrument. The results showed that the difference between these two kinds of channel emissivity was within 0.012 and exhibited a good consistency. With these measured emissivity spectra, all of the mainstream thermal infrared remote sensors can be calibrated using Dunhuang Gobi surface at radiometric calibration site of China. PMID:19650456

  18. Determination of molybdenite leaching degree by x-ray radiometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibinov, S.A.; Gladyshev, V.P.; Yarmolik, A.S.; Kim, A.Ch.; Sokur, N.P. (Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij, i Proektnyj Inst. Tugoplavikh Metallov i Tverdykh Splavov, Moscow (USSR))

    1984-01-01

    A express chemical X-ray radiometric method for determination of leaching degree and analysis of molybdenite products is developed. The method comprises chemical preparation and the following X-ray radiometric determination of molybdenum. Total duration of the analysis is 1-1.5 h. The best reproductivity is obtained at X-ray radiometric analysis as compared with the chemical one.

  19. Determination of molybdenite leaching degree by x-ray radiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A express chemical X-ray radiometric method for determination of leaching degree and analysis of molybdenite products is developed. The method comprises chemical preparation and the following X-ray radiometric determination of molyb bdenum. Total duration of the analysis is 1-1.5 h. The best reproductivity is btained at X-ray radiometric analysis as compared with the chemical one

  20. Radiometric dating by alpha spectrometry on uranium series nuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Albert van der

    1987-01-01

    De Engelse titel van dit proegschrift \\"Radiometric Dating by Alpha Spectometry on Uranium Series Nuclides\\" kan in het Nederlands wellicht het best worden weergegeven door \\"ouderdomsdbepalingen door stralingsmeting aan kernen uit de uraniumreeks met behulp van alfaspectometrie\\". In dit laatste ho

  1. Pukaki 1-01 : initial luminescence dating and radiometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core from Pukaki 1-01 was sampled for luminescence dating and radiometric measurements on 14 March 2001 in the dark room laboratory at Victoria University. Seven samples were taken to get an overview of the crater history, and laboratory work was completed in August 2001. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Calibration of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschimmel, M.; Robinson, M. S.; Humm, D. C.; Denevi, B. W.; Lawrence, S. J.; Brylow, S.; Ravine, M.; Ghaemi, T.

    2008-12-01

    processing. All three cameras were calibrated in the laboratory under ambient conditions. Future thermal vacuum tests will characterize critical behaviors across the full range of lunar operating temperatures. In-flight tests will check for changes in response after launch and provide key data for meeting the requirements of 1% relative and 10% absolute radiometric calibration.

  3. A Method Suitable for In-Flight Calibration of a UAV Hyperspectral Remote Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haiwei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Zhengchao

    2014-01-01

    Imagery acquired with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has a great potential for incorporation into natural resource monitoring protocols due to their ability to be deployed quickly and repeatedly. A valid radiometric calibration of radiance measuring instruments is required for physically based analysis of the measured data. In the autumn of 2013, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle hyperspectral calibration experiment of the HeadWall imaging spectrometer was conducted at a civilian airport in Suizhon...

  4. Developments in radiocarbon calibration for archaeology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Buck, Caitlin E.; Manning, Sturt W.; Reimer, Paula; van der Plicht, Hans

    2006-01-01

    This update on radiocarbon calibration results from the 19th International Radiocarbon Conference at Oxford in April 2006, and is essential reading for all archaeologists. The way radiocarbon dates and absolute dates relate to each other differs in three periods: back to 12400 cal BR radiocarbon dat

  5. SIR-C/X-SAR data calibration and ground truth campaign over the NASA-CB1 test-site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notarnicola, C.; Posa, F.; Refice, A.; Sergi, R.; Smacchia, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Bari (Italy); Casarano, D. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella, MT (Italy); De Carolis, G.; Mattia, F. [Istituto di Tecnologia Informatica Spaziale-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Centro di Geodesia Spaziale G. Colombo, Terlecchia, MT (Italy); Schena, V.D. [Alenia Spazio, Rome (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    During the Space Shuttle Endeavour mission in October 1994, a remote-sensing campaign was carried out with the objectives of both radiometric and polarimetric calibration and ground truth data acquisition of bare soils. This paper presents the results obtained in the experiment. Polarimetric cross-talk and channel imbalance values, as well as radiometric calibration parameters, have been found to be within the science requirements for SAR images. Regarding ground truth measurements, a wide spread in the height rms values and correlation lengths has been observed, which was motivated a critical revisiting of surface parameters descriptors.

  6. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Radoslaw; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina;

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the magnitude of localised flooding of riverine areas is crucial for appropriate land management and administration at regional and local levels. However, detection and delineation of localised flooding with remote sensing techniques is often hampered on floodplains by the presenc...

  7. THE FUTURE SPACEBORNE HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGER ENMAP: ITS IN-FLIGHT RADIOMETRIC AND GEOMETRIC CALIBRATION CONCEPT

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, M; Müller, R; Krawzcyk, H.; Bachmann, M.; Storch, T.; V. Mogulsky; Hofer, S.

    2012-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center DLR – namely the Earth Observation Center EOC and the German Space Operations Center GSOC – is responsible for the establishment of the ground segment of the future German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program). The Earth Observation Center has long lasting experiences with air- and spaceborne acquisition, processing, and analysis of hyperspectral image data. In the first part of this paper, an overview of the...

  8. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  9. The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Hong Ma; Isabelle Wingerter

    The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop took place at LAPP-Annecy from the 1st to the 3rd of October; 45 people attended the workshop. A detailed program was setup before the workshop. The agenda was organised around very focused presentations where questions were raised to allow arguments to be exchanged and answers to be proposed. The main topics were: Electronics calibration Handling of problematic channels Cluster level corrections for electrons and photons Absolute energy scale Streams for calibration samples Calibration constants processing Learning from commissioning Forty-five people attended the workshop. The workshop was on the whole lively and fruitful. Based on years of experience with test beam analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, and the recent operation of the detector in the commissioning, the methods to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter are well known. Some of the procedures are being exercised in the commisssioning, which have demonstrated the c...

  10. Absolute Fluorescence Spectrum and Yield Measurements for a wide range of experimental conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Gorodetzky, P.; Moretto, C; Blaksley, C.; Dagoret-Campagne, D.; Gonnin, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Monard, H.; Wicek, F.

    2013-01-01

    For the JEM-EUSO Collaboration The fluorescence yield is a key ingredient in cosmic ray energy determination. It is sensitive to pressure, temperature and humidity. Up to now the fluorescence yield of the brightest line at 337 nm has been measured in an absolute way in one set of conditions, whereas fluorescence yields at the other wavelengths have been relatively measured for different conditions. Thus, absolute calibration for all the lines is unclear. We will do all measurements at once...

  11. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  12. Another look at volume self-calibration: calibration and self-calibration within a pinhole model of Scheimpflug cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornic, Philippe; Illoul, Cédric; Cheminet, Adam; Le Besnerais, Guy; Champagnat, Frédéric; Le Sant, Yves; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    We address calibration and self-calibration of tomographic PIV experiments within a pinhole model of cameras. A complete and explicit pinhole model of a camera equipped with a 2-tilt angles Scheimpflug adapter is presented. It is then used in a calibration procedure based on a freely moving calibration plate. While the resulting calibrations are accurate enough for Tomo-PIV, we confirm, through a simple experiment, that they are not stable in time, and illustrate how the pinhole framework can be used to provide a quantitative evaluation of geometrical drifts in the setup. We propose an original self-calibration method based on global optimization of the extrinsic parameters of the pinhole model. These methods are successfully applied to the tomographic PIV of an air jet experiment. An unexpected by-product of our work is to show that volume self-calibration induces a change in the world frame coordinates. Provided the calibration drift is small, as generally observed in PIV, the bias on the estimated velocity field is negligible but the absolute location cannot be accurately recovered using standard calibration data.

  13. Selection of stars to calibrate Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Voss, H.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.; Pancino, E.; Altavilla, G.

    2015-05-01

    Gaia is an all-sky survey satellite, launched by ESA on 19th December 2013, to obtain parallaxes and proper motions to microarcsecond level precision, radial velocities and astrophysical parameters for about one billion objects down to a limiting magnitude of 20. The chosen strategy to perform the photometric calibration is to split the process into two steps, internal and external calibration. The internal calibration will combine all different transits of a given source to a common reference internal system producing a 'mean' Gaia observation. This internal calibration accounts for the differential instrumental effects (in sensitivity, aperture, PSF, etc.). They depend on the colour and type of the source. For this reason, a selection of calibration sources ensuring a good representation of all kind of observed sources is needed. The entire magnitude and colour range of the sources have to be covered by these calibration stars and for all calibration intervals. It is a challenge to obtain a suitable colour distribution for the standards, especially for bright sources and the daily large scale calibration intervals. Once the mean Gaia observations are produced, a final step, the external calibration, transforms them to absolute fluxes and wavelengths. In principle, few calibration sources are needed (about 200 spectrophotometric standard stars, SPSS, are currently being considered). They need to have accurate determinations of their absolute fluxes and their non-variability need to be ensured below 1% precision. For this purpose, a big international observational effort is being done (using telescopes as 2.2m@CAHA, TNG@LaPalma, NTT@LaSilla, LaRuca@SPM, and others). During this observational effort some cases of non-expected variability of the SPSS candidates have been discovered.

  14. Metrological activity determination of {sup 133}Ba by sum-peak absolute method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.L. da; Delgado, J.U.; Poledna, R.; Santos, A.; Veras, E.V. de; Rangel, J.; Trindade, O.L. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, M.C.M. de, E-mail: marcandida@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: candida@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation provides gamma sources of radionuclide and standardized in activity with reduced uncertainties. Relative methods require standards to determine the sample activity while the absolute methods, as sum-peak, not. The activity is obtained directly with good accuracy and low uncertainties. {sup 133}Ba is used in research laboratories and on calibration of detectors for analysis in different work areas. Classical absolute methods do not calibrate {sup 133}Ba due to its complex decay scheme. The sum-peak method using gamma spectrometry with germanium detector standardizes {sup 133}Ba samples. Uncertainties lower than 1% to activity results were obtained.

  15. Metrological activity determination of 133Ba by sum-peak absolute method

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R. L.; de Almeida, M. C. M.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; Santos, A.; de Veras, E. V.; Rangel, J.; Trindade, O. L.

    2016-07-01

    The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation provides gamma sources of radionuclide and standardized in activity with reduced uncertainties. Relative methods require standards to determine the sample activity while the absolute methods, as sum-peak, not. The activity is obtained directly with good accuracy and low uncertainties. 133Ba is used in research laboratories and on calibration of detectors for analysis in different work areas. Classical absolute methods don't calibrate 133Ba due to its complex decay scheme. The sum-peak method using gamma spectrometry with germanium detector standardizes 133Ba samples. Uncertainties lower than 1% to activity results were obtained.

  16. The absolute gravity measurement by FG5 gravimeter at Great Wall Station, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Gravity measurement is of great importance to the height datum in Antarctica.The absolute gravity measurement was carried out at Great Wall Station, Antarctica, using FG5 absolute gravity instrument.The gravity data was processed with corrections of earth tide, ocean tide, polar motion and the atmospher, and the RMS is within +3 x 10 -s ms-2.The vertical and horizontal gravity gradients were measured using 2 LaCoaste & Romberg (LCR) gravimeters.The absolute gravity measurement provides the fundamental data for the validation and calibration of the satellite gravity projects such as CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE, and for the high accuracy geoid model.

  17. Technique of absolute efficiency determination for gamma radiation semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple technique is suggested to determine the absolute efficiency (E) of semiconductor detectors (SCD) which employes low-intensity neutron sources wide spread in scientific laboratories. The technique is based on using radioactive nuclide gamma radiation in decay chains of heavy element fission fragments, uranium-235, for example. Cumulative yields of a number of nulcides following heavy element fission are measured to a high accuracy (1-5%), which permits to . the value E is determined for a wide energy range (from X- ray to some MeV); using a nuclide with a well known decay scheme and measured to a high accuracy cumulative yield 140La, for example, one can calibrate in absolute values comparatively easily obtained plots of the SCD relative efficiency. The technique allows to determine the E value for extended plane (and volumetric) sources of an arbitrary form. Some nuclides, convenient for the determination of E, and their nuclear characteristics are tabulated

  18. Radiometric microbiologic assay for the biologically active forms of niacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertcher, J.A.; Guilarte, T.R.; Chen, M.F.; Rider, A.A.; McIntyre, P.A.

    1979-05-01

    A radiometric microbiologic assay has been developed for the determination of niacin in biologic fluids. Lactobacillus plantarum produced /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(U-/sup 14/C) malic acid in quantities proportional to the amount of niacin present. The assay is specific for the biologically active forms of niacin in humans. Thirty normal hemolysates were analyzed and the values ranged from 13.0 to 17.8 ..mu..g niacin/ml RBC (mean = 15.27 +- 1.33 s.d.). Good recovery and reproducibility studies were obtained with this assay. On thirty blood samples, correlation was excellent between the radiometric and the conventional turbidimetric assays.

  19. SCIAMACHY Level 1 data: calibration concept and in-flight calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lichtenberg

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of SCIAMACHY was thoroughly checked since the instrument was launched on-board ENVISAT in February 2002. While SCIAMACHY's functional performance is excellent since launch, a number of technical difficulties have appeared, that required adjustments to the calibration. The problems can be separated into three types: (1 Those caused by the instrument and/or platform environment. Among these are the high water content in the satellite structure and/or MLI layer. This results in the deposition of ice on the detectors in channels 7 and 8 which seriously affects the retrievals in the IR, mostly because of the continuous change of the slit function caused by scattering of the light through the ice layer. Additionally a light leak in channel 7 severely hampers any retrieval from this channel. (2 Problems due to errors in the on-ground calibration and/or data processing affecting for example the radiometric calibration. A new approach based on a mixture of on-ground and in-flight data is shortly described here. (3 Problems caused by principal limitations of the calibration concept, e.g. the possible appearance of spectral structures after the polarisation correction due to unavoidable errors in the determination of atmospheric polarisation. In this paper we give a complete overview of the calibration and problems that still have to be solved. We will also give an indication of the effect of calibration problems on retrievals where possible. Since the operational processing chain is currently being updated and no newly processed data are available at this point in time, for some calibration issues only a rough estimate of the effect on Level 2 products can be given. However, it is the intention of this paper to serve as a future reference for detailed studies into specific calibration issues.

  20. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ave, M.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Bohacova, M.; /Chicago U., EFI; Daumiller, K.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Di Carlo, P.; /INFN, Aquila; Di Giulio, C.; /INFN, Rome; Luis, P.Facal San; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzales, D.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Hojvat, C.; /Fermilab; Horandel, J.R.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Hrabovsky, M.; /Palacky U.; Iarlori, M.; /INFN, Aquila /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  1. Approaches on calibration of bolometer and establishment of bolometer calibration device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ming; Gao, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun'an; Xia, Junwen; Yin, Dejin; Li, Tiecheng; Zhang, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Bolometer is mainly used for measuring thermal radiation in the field of public places, labor hygiene, heating and ventilation and building energy conservation. The working principle of bolometer is under the exposure of thermal radiation, temperature of black absorbing layer of detector rise after absorption of thermal radiation, which makes the electromotive force produced by thermoelectric. The white light reflective layer of detector does not absorb thermal radiation, so the electromotive force produced by thermoelectric is almost zero. A comparison of electromotive force produced by thermoelectric of black absorbing layer and white reflective layer can eliminate the influence of electric potential produced by the basal background temperature change. After the electromotive force which produced by thermal radiation is processed by the signal processing unit, the indication displays through the indication display unit. The measurement unit of thermal radiation intensity is usually W/m2 or kW/m2. Its accurate and reliable value has important significance for high temperature operation, labor safety and hygiene grading management. Bolometer calibration device is mainly composed of absolute radiometer, the reference light source, electric measuring instrument. Absolute radiometer is a self-calibration type radiometer. Its working principle is using the electric power which can be accurately measured replaces radiation power to absolutely measure the radiation power. Absolute radiometer is the standard apparatus of laser low power standard device, the measurement traceability is guaranteed. Using the calibration method of comparison, the absolute radiometer and bolometer measure the reference light source in the same position alternately which can get correction factor of irradiance indication. This paper is mainly about the design and calibration method of the bolometer calibration device. The uncertainty of the calibration result is also evaluated.

  2. Android Apps for Absolute Beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Anybody can start building simple apps for the Android platform, and this book will show you how! Android Apps for Absolute Beginners takes you through the process of getting your first Android applications up and running using plain English and practical examples. It cuts through the fog of jargon and mystery that surrounds Android application development, and gives you simple, step-by-step instructions to get you started.* Teaches Android application development in language anyone can understand, giving you the best possible start in Android development * Provides simple, step-by-step exampl

  3. Radiometric dating by alpha spectrometry on uranium series nuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Wijk, Albert van der

    1987-01-01

    De Engelse titel van dit proegschrift \\"Radiometric Dating by Alpha Spectometry on Uranium Series Nuclides\\" kan in het Nederlands wellicht het best worden weergegeven door \\"ouderdomsdbepalingen door stralingsmeting aan kernen uit de uraniumreeks met behulp van alfaspectometrie\\". In dit laatste hoofdstuk wil ik proberen om op beknopte, ook voor de niet gespecialiseerde lezer, de inhoud en achtergrond van het onderzoek samen te vatten. Aan het eind van de vorige eeuw werd het verschijnsel ra...

  4. Radiometric dating of sediment records in European mountain lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Peter G. APPLEBY

    2000-01-01

    Sediment cores from seven European mountain lakes collected as part of a study of palaeolimnogical records of climate change (the MOLAR project) were dated radiometrically by 210Pb. In spite of the remote locations, only one site recorded more or less uniform sediment accumulation throughout the past 150 years. At three further sites the 210Pb record indicated uniform sedimentation up until ca 1950 but significant increases since then. Stratigraphic dates based on records of fallout 137Cs and...

  5. Validating Age Estimates for Bocaccio Rockfish with Radiometric Dating

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor M Cailliet

    2002-01-01

    Dr. Gregor Cailliet and colleagues at California State University sought to evaluate the accuracy of aging bocaccio by counting calcified layers in the fish’s bone-like ear structures, called otoliths. Otoliths are assumed to grow in annual bands.Their work suggests that otolith-based age estimates tend to underestimate ages of older fish, compared to age estimates based on radiometric analyses. In younger fish, whose otolith layers are more distinct and easy to count, both methods provide si...

  6. Device for absorption X-ray radiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for absorbtion X-ray radiometric analysis is presented, including ionizing radiation sources, collimators, a cell with the substance tested, a compensating wedge with a drive, ionizing radiation detectors, and an electronic recorder, being unique in that, in order to increase measuring accuracy, the compensating wedge drive is connected with the electronic recorder having the first input connected with the first detector, registering variations in the substance matrix composition, while the other input in connected with the second detector

  7. Astrid-2 EMMA Magnetic Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Risbo, Torben;

    1998-01-01

    The Swedish micro-satellite Astrid-2 contains a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer with the sensor co-located with a Technical University of Denmark (DTU) star camera for absolute attitude, and extended about 0.9 m on a hinged boom. The magnetometer is part of the RIT EMMA electric and magnetic fields...... experiment built as a collaboration between the DTU, Department of Automation and the Department of Plasma Physics, The Alfvenlaboratory, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT), Stockholm. The final magnetic calibration of the Astrid-2 satellite was done at the Lovoe Magnetic Observatory under the Geological...... Survey of Sweden near Stockholm on the night of May 15.-16., 1997. The magnetic calibration and the intercalibration between the star camera and the magnetic sensor was performed by measuring the Earth's magnetic field and simultaneously observing the star sky with the camera. The rotation matrix between...

  8. Absolute standardization of 106Ru by anti-coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system of absolute standardization activity of radionuclide by anti-coincidence counting and live-time techniques was implemented at LNMRI in 2008 to reduce the impacts of some influence factors in the determination of the activity with coincidence counting technique used for decades in the lab, for example, the measurement time. With the anti-coincidence system, the variety of radionuclides that can be calibrated by LNMRI was increased, in relation to the type of decay. The objective of this work is the standardization of 106Ru by the method of counting anti-coincidence and estimate its measurement uncertainties. (author)

  9. Emerging Techniques for Vicarious Calibration of Visible Through Short Wave Infrared Remote Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Harrington, Gary; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary; Russell, Jeffrey; Frisbie, Troy; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous Visible to SWIR ground-based vicarious Cal/Val will be an essential Cal/Val component with such a large number of systems. Radiometrically calibrated spectroradiometers can improve confidence in current ground truth data through validation of radiometric modeling and validation or replacement of traditional sun photometer measurement. They also should enable significant reduction in deployed equipment such as equipment used in traditional sun photometer approaches. Simple, field-portable, white-light LED calibration source shows promise for visible range (420-750 nm). Prototype demonstrated <0.5% drift over 10-40 C temperature range. Additional complexity (more LEDs) will be necessary for extending spectral range into the NIR and SWIR. LED long lifetimes should produce at least several hundreds of hours or more of stability, minimizing the need for expensive calibrations and supporting long-duration field campaigns.

  10. Traceable calibration of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector using characterized synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ingmar; Klein, Roman M.; Werner, Lutz

    2014-12-01

    Radiometric calibrations of fibre-coupled single photon detectors are experiencing growing demand, especially at the telecommunication wavelengths. In this paper, the radiometric calibration of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector at the telecom wavelength 1.55 µm by means of well-characterized synchrotron radiation is described. This substitution method is based on the unique properties of synchrotron radiation and the Metrology Light Source, the dedicated electron storage ring of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, and is suitable for fibre-coupled single photon detectors. The Metrology Light Source is used as a light source with a high dynamic range of the radiant power to bridge the radiometric gap occurring in the transition from radiant power measurements and the counting of photons with single photon detectors. Very low uncertainties below 2% have been achieved in the measurement of the detection efficiency of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector.

  11. Absolute Position Total Internal Reflection Microscopy with an Optical Tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lulu; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive, in-situ calibration method for Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRM) based on optical tweezing is presented which greatly expands the capabilities of this technique. We show that by making only simple modifications to the basic TIRM sensing setup and procedure, a probe particle's absolute position relative to a dielectric interface may be known with better than 10 nm precision out to a distance greater than 1 $\\mu$m from the surface. This represents an approximate 10x improvement in error and 3x improvement in measurement range over conventional TIRM methods. The technique's advantage is in the direct measurement of the probe particle's scattering intensity vs. height profile in-situ, rather than relying on calculations or inexact system analogs for calibration. To demonstrate the improved versatility of the TIRM method in terms of tunability, precision, and range, we show our results for the hindered near-wall diffusion coefficient for a spherical dielectric particle.

  12. Supervised Vicarious Calibration (SVC of Multi-Source Hyperspectral Remote-Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brook

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduced in 2011, the supervised vicarious calibration (SVC approach is a promising approach to radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral (HRS data. This paper presents a comprehensive study by which the SVC method has been systematically examined and a complete protocol for its practical execution has been established—along with possible limitations encountered during the campaign. The technique was applied to multi-sourced HRS data in order to: (1 verify the at-sensor radiometric calibration and (2 obtain radiometric and atmospheric correction coefficients. Spanning two select study sites along the southeast coast of France, data were collected simultaneously by three airborne sensors (AisaDUAL, AHS and CASI-1500i aboard two aircrafts (CASA of National Institute for Aerospace Technology INTA ES and DORNIER 228 of NERC-ARSF Centre UK. The SVC ground calibration site was assembled along sand dunes near Montpellier and the thematic data were acquired from other areas in the south of France (Salon-de-Provence, Marseille, Avignon and Montpellier on 28 October 2010 between 12:00 and 16:00 UTC. The results of this study confirm that the SVC method enables reliable inspection and, if necessary, in-situ fine radiometric recalibration of airborne hyperspectral data. Independent of sensor or platform quality, the SVC approach allows users to improve at-sensor data to obtain more accurate physical units and subsequently improved reflectance information. Flight direction was found to be important, whereas the flight altitude posed very low impact. The numerous rules and major outcomes of this experiment enable a new standard of atmospherically corrected data based on better radiometric output. Future research should examine the potential of SVC to be applied to super-and-hyperspectral data obtained from on-orbit sensors.

  13. New Radiometric Age Constraints for the Matuyama-Bruhnes Reversal and Santa Rosa Excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbas, A.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Kent, D. V.; Coe, R. S.; Konrad, K.; Clark, P. U.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling of the timing of the virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) position and the absolute paleointensities for geomagnetic events is vital for understanding the Earth's geodynamo. Here we present new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age determinations using an ARGUS-VI multi-collector mass spectrometer for lava flows on Floreana Island, Galapagos, and Tahiti Nui, Society Islands. New Galapagos ages (n=6) place the GA-79 lava flow on Floreana Island, which records an excursional VGP from an equatorial region (Cox and Dalrymple, 1966), within the Santa Rosa excursion. This flow contains extremely low paleointesity values of 1.1 x 1022 Am2 (n=11; Wang and Kent, 2013). We also present 52 new ages on 18 lava flows from the Punaruu valley, Tahiti, which record the Matuyama-Bruhnes reversal. The new ages confirm that the lavas record this reversal, but the ages differ from the original stratigraphy presented in Mochizuki et al. (2011). Our new ages using the Kuiper et al. (2008) fish canyon sanidine ages for Punaruu valley lava flows are concordant with previous astronomically tuned ages (Channell et al. 2002, 2009) and represent the highest precision radiometric ages for the most recent reversal. Here we show that paleointensity lows associated with excursional events can be comparable to or less than those associated with reversals. In addition, such field strength reductions can occur in time intervals as short as 3 thousand years.

  14. Calibration and control modules for gamma-ray borehole loggers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calibration pad for quantitative evaluation of gamma-ray logs, developed and constructed by CNEA is described. The facility is composed of a set of mineralized modules with which it is intended to reproduce the natural variable conditions found in boreholes drilled for uranium mineral exploration, such as the ore concentration, rock's density and porosity, water content, etc. The facility is able to operate under different radiometric models, as follow: 1) gross-count gamma-ray models; 2) gamma-spectrometer models; 3) neutronic-fission models, and 4) models for determination of magnetic susceptibility, density, neutron-neutron, etc. The gathered information allows the adequate quantitative radiometric evaluation of the ore bodies crossed by exploration holes, and also allows the correlation of gamma-ray logs obtained by different logger-equipments. The paper includes the description of the project development and the standards established for the facility's operation. (M.E.L.)

  15. AXAF calibration: the HXDS flow proportional counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargelin, Bradford J.; Kellogg, Edwin M.; McDermott, Walter C.; Evans, Ian N.; Vitek, S. A.

    1997-07-01

    The design, performance, and calibration of the seven flow proportional counters (FPCs) used during AXAF ground calibration are described. Five of the FPCs served as beam normalization detectors (BNDs), and two were used in the telescope focal plane in combination with a set of apertures to measure the point response functions and effective areas of the AXAF mirrors and transmission gratings. The BNDs also provide standards for determining the effective areas of the several telescope/grating/flight-detector combinations. With useful energy resolution and quantum efficiency over the entire 100-eV to 10 keV AXAF energy band, the FPCs provided most of the data acquired during AXAF calibration. Although the principles of proportional counter operation are relatively simple, AXAF's stringent calibration goals require detailed calibration and modeling of such effects as window- support-wire obscuration, window deformation between the support wires, electron diffusion and avalanche processes, gain nonuniformities, and gas pressure and temperature variations. Detector aperture areas and signal processing deadtime must also be precisely determined, and detector degradation during the many months of AXAF calibration must be prevented. The FPC calibration program is based on measurement of individual components (such as window transmission and aperture size) and the relative quantum efficiencies of complete detector systems, as well as absolute QE calibration of selected detectors at the BESSY synchrotron, an x-ray source of precisely known intensity.

  16. Cosmology with Negative Absolute Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, J P P; Lewis, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al (2013) has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion ($w<-1$) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  17. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  18. Absolute efficiency estimation of photon-number-resolving detectors using twin beams

    CERN Document Server

    Worsley, A P; Lundeen, J S; Mosley, P J; Smith, B J; Puentes, G; Thomas-Peter, N; Walmsley, I A; 10.1364/OE.17.004397

    2009-01-01

    A nonclassical light source is used to demonstrate experimentally the absolute efficiency calibration of a photon-number-resolving detector. The photon-pair detector calibration method developed by Klyshko for single-photon detectors is generalized to take advantage of the higher dynamic range and additional information provided by photon-number-resolving detectors. This enables the use of brighter twin-beam sources including amplified pulse pumped sources, which increases the relevant signal and provides measurement redundancy, making the calibration more robust.

  19. Calibration of the JEM-EUSO detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorodetzky P.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to unveil the mystery of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs, JEM-EUSO (Extreme Universe Space Observatory on-board Japan Experiment Module will observe extensive air showers induced by UHECRs from the International Space Station orbit with a huge acceptance. Calibration of the JEM-EUSO instrument, which consists of Fresnel optics and a focal surface detector with 5000 photomultipliers, is very important to discuss the origin of UHECRs precisely with the observed results. In this paper, the calibration before launch and on-orbit is described. The calibration before flight will be performed as precisely as possible with integrating spheres. In the orbit, the relative change of the performance will be checked regularly with on-board and on-ground light sources. The absolute calibration of photon detection efficiency may be performed with the moon, which is a stable light source in the nature.

  20. Calibration activities on the BepiColombo High-Resolution Channel (HRIC) of SIMBIO-SYS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Corte, V.; Zusi, M.; Palumbo, P.; Baroni, M.; Ficai Veltroni, I.; Flamini, E.; Mugnuolo, R.

    2015-10-01

    HRIC (High Resolution Imaging Channel) is the high resolution channel of the SIMBIO-SYS instrument on- board the ESA BepiColombo Mission. Calibration activities were performed at SelexES premises in spring- summer 2014 in order to check for Channel performances (radiometric performances, quality image and geometrical performances) and to obtain data necessary to setup a calibration pipeline necessary to process the raw images acquired by the channel when in operative scenario.

  1. Radiometric packaging of uncooled microbolometer FPA arrays for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Blanco, S.; Cote, P.; Leclerc, M.; Blanchard, N.; Desroches, Y.; Caron, J.-S.; Ngo Phong, L.; Chateauneuf, F.; Pope, T.

    2009-02-01

    INO has extensive experience in the design and fabrication of focal plane arrays (FPAs) of uncooled microbolometers. In particular, the FPA of 512×3 microbolometers, developed in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), has been selected for use in the NIRST (New Infrared Sensor Technology) radiometer of the SAC-D Aquarius mission. The FPA has been designed for pushbroom scanning of the Earth to provide radiometric data in the mid- and long-wave infrared for the monitoring of fires as well as thermal mapping of ocean temperature. Uncooled microbolometer detectors are suited for space applications due to their low power consumption while still exhibiting adequate performance. Furthermore, the spectral range of their response could be tuned from the mid- to the far-infrared to meet different mission requirements. In order to ensure that the detector receives only the thermal contribution from the desired target and to minimize radiometric error due to variation of the temperature of the surrounding during the measurements, a radiometric package is required. In a radiometric package the detector environment is thermally stabilized by means of a temperature controlled radiation shield. The radiation shield should also be designed to prevent stray radiation from reaching the detector. Under the Space Technology Development Program of the CSA, INO has designed, assembled and tested a radiometric package in order to characterize its performance and compatibility with the space environment. The operating spectral band is defined by the spectral characteristics of a bandpass filter placed in front of the FPA. For typical space missions, the package must pass standard environmental tests without degradation of its performance (thermal cycling from -55 to +85 °C according to MIL-STD-810, random acceleration up to 14 G RMS from 20-2000 Hz and shock up to 75 G). In order to ensure reliability in those conditions while maintaining optimum performance, an adequate

  2. SI-Traceable Calibrations of Celestial Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, C. E.; Lykke, K. R.; Woodward, J. T.

    2016-05-01

    Photometric calibration is currently the leading source of systematic uncertainty in supernova surveys that aim to determine the nature of dark energy. The bulk of this uncertainty is due to imperfect knowledge of the spectral energy distribution of stars used as primary standards. We review the challenges associated with establishing an absolute calibration of stellar spectra and describe how it is possible to do better by using recent advances in optical metrology, paying particular attention to the measurement chain establishing SI-traceability and reporting of measurement uncertainties.

  3. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  4. Radiometric method for the rapid detection of Leptospira organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manca, N.; Verardi, R.; Colombrita, D.; Ravizzola, G.; Savoldi, E.; Turano, A.

    1986-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive radiometric method for detection of Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona and Leptospira interrogans serovar copenhageni is described. Stuart's medium and Middlebrook TB (12A) medium supplemented with bovine serum albumin, catalase, and casein hydrolysate and labeled with /sup 14/C-fatty acids were used. The radioactivity was measured in a BACTEC 460. With this system, Leptospira organisms were detected in human blood in 2 to 5 days, a notably shorter time period than that required for the majority of detection techniques.

  5. Equipment for radiometric density measurement of white clinker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equipment uses the principle of radiometric measurement of gamma photons interaction with a material medium. In the passage of radiation through the material being investigated, the photon flux is attenuated as a result of interactions. The attenuation is proportional to the density of the medium which is characterized by bulk density of white clinker. Clinker is supplied to a measuring tube with two transducers via a vibrational sorter by means of a supply tube attached to the rotary furnace cooler. (J.B.)

  6. Absolute surface reconstruction by slope metrology and photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue

    Developing the manufacture of aspheric and freeform optical elements requires an advanced metrology method which is capable of inspecting these elements with arbitrary freeform surfaces. In this dissertation, a new surface measurement scheme is investigated for such a purpose, which is to measure the absolute surface shape of an object under test through its surface slope information obtained by photogrammetric measurement. A laser beam propagating toward the object reflects on its surface while the vectors of the incident and reflected beams are evaluated from the four spots they leave on the two parallel transparent windows in front of the object. The spots' spatial coordinates are determined by photogrammetry. With the knowledge of the incident and reflected beam vectors, the local slope information of the object surface is obtained through vector calculus and finally yields the absolute object surface profile by a reconstruction algorithm. An experimental setup is designed and the proposed measuring principle is experimentally demonstrated by measuring the absolute surface shape of a spherical mirror. The measurement uncertainty is analyzed, and efforts for improvement are made accordingly. In particular, structured windows are designed and fabricated to generate uniform scattering spots left by the transmitted laser beams. Calibration of the fringe reflection instrument, another typical surface slope measurement method, is also reported in the dissertation. Finally, a method for uncertainty analysis of a photogrammetry measurement system by optical simulation is investigated.

  7. Common Calibration Source for Monitoring Long-term Ozone Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Accurate long-term satellite measurements are crucial for monitoring the recovery of the ozone layer. The slow pace of the recovery and limited lifetimes of satellite monitoring instruments demands that datasets from multiple observation systems be combined to provide the long-term accuracy needed. A fundamental component of accurately monitoring long-term trends is the calibration of these various instruments. NASA s Radiometric Calibration and Development Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center has provided resources to minimize calibration biases between multiple instruments through the use of a common calibration source and standardized procedures traceable to national standards. The Facility s 50 cm barium sulfate integrating sphere has been used as a common calibration source for both US and international satellite instruments, including the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments, Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) (ESA), Scanning Imaging SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) (ESA), and others. We will discuss the advantages of using a common calibration source and its effects on long-term ozone data sets. In addition, sphere calibration results from various instruments will be presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the long-term characterization of the source itself.

  8. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength. [of sun, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulich, B. L.; Rhodes, P. J.; Davis, J. H.; Hollis, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Careful observations have been made at 86.1 GHz to derive the absolute brightness temperatures of the sun (7914 + or - 192 K), Venus (357.5 + or - 13.1 K), Jupiter (179.4 + or - 4.7 K), and Saturn (153.4 + or - 4.8 K) with a standard error of about three percent. This is a significant improvement in accuracy over previous results at millimeter wavelengths. A stable transmitter and novel superheterodyne receiver were constructed and used to determine the effective collecting area of the Millimeter Wave Observatory (MWO) 4.9-m antenna relative to a previously calibrated standard gain horn. The thermal scale was set by calibrating the radiometer with carefully constructed and tested hot and cold loads. The brightness temperatures may be used to establish an absolute calibration scale and to determine the antenna aperture and beam efficiencies of other radio telescopes at 3.5-mm wavelength.

  9. Calibration of film radiochromic EBT2 for sources of I-125 encapsulated; Calibracion de pelicula radiocromica EBT2 para fuentes de I-125 encapsulado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Luquero Llopis, N.; Torre Hernandez, I. de la; Ferrer Garcia, C.; Corredoira silva, E.; Serrada Hierro, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper determines the calibration curve in absolute dose for sources of I-125 encapsulated to estimate its uncertainty. In order to assess energy dependence is compared with the obtained for an accelerator of 6MV calibration curve. (Author)

  10. ACCESS: Design, Calibration Strategy, and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, M. E.; Access Team

    2016-05-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments designed to enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35–1.7μm bandpass. Establishing improved spectrophotometric standards is important for a broad range of missions and is relevant to many astrophysical problems. Systematic errors associated with problems such as dark energy now compete with the statistical errors and thus limit our ability to answer fundamental questions in astrophysics.

  11. Comprehensive Calibration and Validation Site for Information Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. R.; Tang, L. L.; Ma, L. L.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, C. X.; Wang, N.; Li, X. H.; Wang, X. H.; Zhu, X. H.

    2015-04-01

    As a naturally part of information technology, Remote Sensing (RS) is strongly required to provide very precise and accurate information product to serve industry, academy and the public at this information economic era. To meet the needs of high quality RS product, building a fully functional and advanced calibration system, including measuring instruments, measuring approaches and target site become extremely important. Supported by MOST of China via national plan, great progress has been made to construct a comprehensive calibration and validation (Cal&Val) site, which integrates most functions of RS sensor aviation testing, EO satellite on-orbit caration and performance assessment and RS product validation at this site located in Baotou, 600km west of Beijing. The site is equipped with various artificial standard targets, including portable and permanent targets, which supports for long-term calibration and validation. A number of fine-designed ground measuring instruments and airborne standard sensors are developed for realizing high-accuracy stepwise validation, an approach in avoiding or reducing uncertainties caused from nonsynchronized measurement. As part of contribution to worldwide Cal&Val study coordinated by CEOS-WGCV, Baotou site is offering its support to Radiometric Calibration Network of Automated Instruments (RadCalNet), with an aim of providing demonstrated global standard automated radiometric calibration service in cooperation with ESA, NASA, CNES and NPL. Furthermore, several Cal&Val campaigns have been performed during the past years to calibrate and validate the spaceborne/airborne optical and SAR sensors, and the results of some typical demonstration are discussed in this study.

  12. Measurement of the absolute speed is possible?

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey V. Shevchenko; Tokarevsky, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of popular problems, which  are experimentally studied in physics in a long time, is the testing of the special relativity theory, first of all – measurements of isotropy and constancy of light speed; as well as attempts to determine so called “absolute speed”, i.e. the Earth speed in the absolute spacetime (absolute reference frame), if this spacetime (ARF) exists.  Corresponding experiments aimed at the measuring of proper speed of some reference frame in oth...

  13. Vicarious calibration of KOMPSAT-3 AEISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hoyong; Kim, Jinsoo; Jin, Cheonggil; Choi, Chuluong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3 (KOMPSAT-3) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2012 and 2014. Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3 sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. KOMPSAT-3 calibration coefficients for all bands estimated in 2012 continued to agree well with calibration coefficients estimated in 2014 (within 1.5%). The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3 and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3 was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3 sensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. To overcome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor (SBAF).

  14. MODIS and SeaWIFS on-orbit lunar calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Eplee, R.E., Jr.; Xiong, X.; Stone, T.; Meister, G.; McClain, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    The Moon plays an important role in the radiometric stability monitoring of the NASA Earth Observing System's (EOS) remote sensors. The MODIS and SeaWIFS are two of the key instruments for NASA's EOS missions. The MODIS Protoflight Model (PFM) on-board the Terra spacecraft and the MODIS Flight Model 1 (FM1) on-board the Aqua spacecraft were launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002, respectively. They view the Moon through the Space View (SV) port approximately once a month to monitor the long-term radiometric stability of their Reflective Solar Bands (RSB). SeaWIFS was launched on-board the OrbView-2 spacecraft on August 1, 1997. The SeaWiFS lunar calibrations are obtained once a month at a nominal phase angle of 7??. The lunar irradiance observed by these instruments depends on the viewing geometry. The USGS photometric model of the Moon (the ROLO model) has been developed to provide the geometric corrections for the lunar observations. For MODIS, the lunar view responses with corrections for the viewing geometry are used to track the gain change for its reflective solar bands (RSB). They trend the system response degradation at the Angle Of Incidence (AOI) of sensor's SV port. With both the lunar observation and the on-board Solar Diffuser (SD) calibration, it is shown that the MODIS system response degradation is wavelength, mirror side, and AOI dependent. Time-dependent Response Versus Scan angle (RVS) Look-Up Tables (LUT) are applied in MODIS RSB calibration and lunar observations play a key role in RVS derivation. The corrections provided by the RVS in the Terra and Aqua MODIS data from the 412 nm band are as large as 16% and 13%, respectively. For SeaWIFS lunar calibrations, the spacecraft is pitched across the Moon so that the instrument views the Moon near nadir through the same optical path as it views the Earth. The SeaWiFS system gain changes for its eight bands are calibrated using the geometrically-corrected lunar observations. The radiometric

  15. MAGNETIC GRADIOMETRY: Instrumentation, Calibration and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia

    calibration, the magnetometer intrinsic system is further related to an absolute coordinate system based on the stars by means of an advanced stellar compass. The pointing accuracy is better than 10arcsec.The magnetic gradiometry extends the subject of magnetic vectometry by the inclusion of differential....... GRADSAT, two 20km separated magnetic instrumented satellites, combines state-of-the-art technology with advanced instrumentation to produce world class science....

  16. Himawari-8/AHI latest performance of navigation and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Tasuku; Andou, Akiyoshi; Bessho, Kotaro; Date, Kenji; Dojo, Ryo; Hosaka, Keita; Mori, Nobutaka; Murata, Hidehiko; Nakayama, Ryuichiro; Okuyama, Arata; Takahashi, Masaya

    2016-05-01

    The new-generation Himawari-8 geostationary meteorological satellite of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) started operation in July 2015 after the completion of in-orbit testing and checking of the overall system. Himawari-8 features the new Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), which has 16 bands and double the spatial resolution of its MTSAT-series predecessor satellites [1]. Full-disk imagery is obtained every 10 minutes, and regional observation at 2.5-minute intervals is also conducted. These significant improvements are expected to bring unprecedented levels of performance in nowcasting services and short-range weather forecasting systems. To leverage the full potential of the advanced imager, high precision in navigation and radiometric calibration is essential. This is estimated in off-line processes such as pattern matching for navigation and the Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) for radiometric calibration. On 9 March 2016, JMA updated its ground processing system, including the image navigation and registration (INR) module, for further quality improvement. This update covered improvement of the band-to-band co-registration process for infrared bands, improvement of the resampling process, and implementation of a coherent noise reduction process. Results from the off-line processes showed that the update had improved Himawari Standard Data (HSD), which is Himawari-8/AHI L1B-equivalent data.

  17. PACS photometer calibration block analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Moór, A; Kiss, Cs; Balog, Z; Billot, N; Marton, G

    2013-01-01

    The absolute stability of the PACS bolometer response over the entire mission lifetime without applying any corrections is about 0.5% (standard deviation) or about 8% peak-to-peak. This fantastic stability allows us to calibrate all scientific measurements by a fixed and time-independent response file, without using any information from the PACS internal calibration sources. However, the analysis of calibration block observations revealed clear correlations of the internal source signals with the evaporator temperature and a signal drift during the first half hour after the cooler recycling. These effects are small, but can be seen in repeated measurements of standard stars. From our analysis we established corrections for both effects which push the stability of the PACS bolometer response to about 0.2% (stdev) or 2% in the blue, 3% in the green and 5% in the red channel (peak-to-peak). After both corrections we still see a correlation of the signals with PACS FPU temperatures, possibly caused by parasitic h...

  18. Optimal linear filters for radiometric transport belt balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to a very short measuring path, dynamic measurement can be performed with the radiometric transport band balance. The stochastic perturbations of the measured signal afford the use of adequate filter algorithms. In the case of highly dynamical measurements it may even become necessary to improve the dynamics of the drive system. With essential improvements, the loading measurements can be performed far in front of the belt discharge location. For this purpose a solution is developed on the basis of an optimal control loop synthesis. A simpler solution is based on the optimal choise of the measuring point in order to compensate partially for the inertance of the drive. In addition a linear filter is used to process the radiometric signals. For the optimal design of this filter a method is used, which allows to limit the pulse response to a final time interval. As a consequence, analytical equations can be deduced for the calculation and discussion of the expected filter characteristic. (orig./DG)

  19. The microwave radiometric mapping of the Great Tolbachinskii fractured volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basharinov, A.E.; Borodin, L.F.; Gusev, N.A.; Isaev, V.S.; Metnik, L.M.; Mironov, A.S.; Razina, A.A.; Zarembo, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of aerial and land surveying using microwave radiometric methods, conducted by the Institute of Radio Technology and Electronics of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR and the Institute of Volcanology of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR in the Great Tolbachinskii fractured volcano region are given. The flight altitude ranged from 400 to 3000 meters. The mapping layouts of the radio brightness temperature fields are demonstrated, in which recent lava flows represent higher values, and pumice fields represent lower values. The most evident positive anomolies are recorded over the craters of the New Tolbachinskii cones. Diagrams are obtained using the data from microwave radiometric surveying in the 1.35 to 27 centimeter range. It becomes obvious from the compared diagrams that by increasing the wavelength, the resolution of radio brightness isotherm maps increases. Radio brightness temperature spectra from recent lava flows attest to the presence of a positive temperature gradient in the near-surface layer. Studies of the cold lava and slagged flows is essentially independent of the wavelength. It is concluded that it is possible to classify underlying surfaces in the active volcanoe regions by using microwave radiometry by their qualitative conformity of air observations to contact surveys.

  20. New concepts for radiometric measurements of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Detection and Nuclear Sciences Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has a long history in conducting measurements of radioisotopes for various applications. This experience includes ultra-low background measurements, arrays of germanium detectors, automated sampling and measurement systems and coincidence measurement systems. A recent lab-supported effort has been studying how these capabilities, both in terms of hardware and experience, can be leveraged to enable environmental sampling measurements. One area of interest is the release of fission products and actinides into the environment from a reactor incident. While the initial survey of this area is still under way, one isotope of interest that surfaced early in the study is 238Pu. Existing techniques to assay this isotope suffer from measurement challenges. In alpha counting, there can be significant interference with 241Am, while in mass spectrometry, there can be interference with 238U. The authors are developing the concept for a detector that through coincidence counting techniques can distinguish 238Pu and 241Am. In addition, we will design the system to conduct radiometric measurements of other plutonium isotopes to enable a direct comparison of those isotopes. We will present our concept of the detector system for 238Pu, as well as discuss other radiometric measurements of fission products and actinides with which we intend to advance the state of the art for environmental measurements. (author)

  1. SWIR calibration of Spectralon reflectance factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.; Cooksey, Catherine; Ding, Leibo; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2011-11-01

    Satellite instruments operating in the reflective solar wavelength region require accurate and precise determination of the Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) of laboratory-based diffusers used in their pre-flight and on-orbit radiometric calibrations. BRF measurements are required throughout the reflected-solar spectrum from the ultraviolet through the shortwave infrared. Spectralon diffusers are commonly used as a reflectance standard for bidirectional and hemispherical geometries. The Diffuser Calibration Laboratory (DCaL) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is a secondary calibration facility with reflectance measurements traceable to those made by the Spectral Tri-function Automated Reference Reflectometer (STARR) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). For more than two decades, the DCaL has provided numerous NASA projects with BRF data in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and the Near InfraRed (NIR) spectral regions. Presented in this paper are measurements of BRF from 1475 nm to 1625 nm obtained using an indium gallium arsenide detector and a tunable coherent light source. The sample was a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter, 99% white Spectralon target. The BRF results are discussed and compared to empirically generated data from a model based on NIST certified values of 6°directional-hemispherical spectral reflectance factors from 900 nm to 2500 nm. Employing a new NIST capability for measuring bidirectional reflectance using a cooled, extended InGaAs detector, BRF calibration measurements of the same sample were also made using NIST's STARR from 1475 nm to 1625 nm at an incident angle of 0° and at viewing angle of 45°. The total combined uncertainty for BRF in this ShortWave Infrared (SWIR) range is less than 1%. This measurement capability will evolve into a BRF calibration service in SWIR region in support of NASA remote sensing missions.

  2. Review of Terra MODIS thermal emissive band L1B radiometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Chris; Menzel, W. P.; Quinn, Greg

    2014-09-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Earth Observing System Terra satellite, launched into orbit on 18 December 1999, will have a "first light" 15th anniversary on 24 February 2015. For nearly 15 years the MODIS instrument has provided radiances in all spectral bands. Though some detectors have fallen below SNR thresholds, the vast majority of spectral bands continue to provide high quality L1B measurements for use in L2 science algorithms supporting global climate research. Radiometric accuracy of the Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands (TEBs) in the C6 L1B product has been assessed using various approaches over the nearly 15 year Terra MODIS data record, including comparisons with instruments on the ground, in aircraft under-flights, and on other satellites. All of these approaches contribute to the understanding of the Terra MODIS radiometric L1B performance. Early in the lifetime of Terra, ground-based measurements and NASA ER-2 aircraft under-flights revealed that TEBs in the infrared window ("window" bands) are well calibrated and performing within accuracy specifications. The ER-2 under-flights also suggested that many atmospheric bands may be performing outside of specification, especially LWIR CO2 sensitive bands that are subject to optical crosstalk, although analysis uncertainties are larger for atmospheric bands. Beginning in 2007, MetOp-A IASI observations were used to evaluate Terra MODIS TEB performance through Simultaneous Nadir Overpass (SNO) comparisons. These inter-satellite comparisons largely affirm the early aircraft and ground-based evaluations, showing that all Terra MODIS window bands have small biases, minimal trending, and minor detector and mirror side striping over the 2007-2013 timeframe. Most atmospheric bands are performing satisfactorily near to specification; however, biases, striping and trending are large and significantly out of specification in the water vapor sensitive band 27 and ozone sensitive

  3. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  4. Calibration aspects of a polarimetric phased array airborne SAR [L'Etalonnage d'un SAR aeroporte polarimetrique a antenna active}

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeij, P.; Hoogeboom, P.; Koomen, P.J.; Vermeulen, B.C.B.; Paquay, M.H.A.; Pouwels, H.

    1994-01-01

    Purpose of calibration is to get an accurate and Precise instrument. The precision of the instrument can be determined using internal calibration, while the accuracy is denoted with absolute calibration. With internal calibration only the instrument is considered. Because of practical considerations

  5. Inequalities, Absolute Value, and Logical Connectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an approach to the concept of absolute value that alleviates students' problems with the traditional definition and the use of logical connectives in solving related problems. Uses a model that maps numbers from a horizontal number line to a vertical ray originating from the origin. Provides examples solving absolute value equations and…

  6. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  7. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  8. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  9. Herschel celestial calibration sources: Four large main-belt asteroids as prime flux calibrators for the far-IR/sub-mm range

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, T G; Nielbock, M; Lim, T; Teyssier, D; Olberg, M; Klaas, U; Linz, H; Altieri, B; Pearson, C; Bendo, G; Vilenius, E

    2013-01-01

    Celestial standards play a major role in observational astrophysics. They are needed to characterise the performance of instruments and are paramount for photometric calibration. During the Herschel Calibration Asteroid Preparatory Programme approximately 50 asteroids have been established as far-IR/sub-mm/mm calibrators for Herschel. The selected asteroids fill the flux gap between the sub-mm/mm calibrators Mars, Uranus and Neptune, and the mid-IR bright calibration stars. All three Herschel instruments observed asteroids for various calibration purposes, including pointing tests, absolute flux calibration, relative spectral response function, observing mode validation, and cross-calibration aspects. Here we present newly established models for the four large and well characterized main-belt asteroids (1) Ceres, (2) Pallas, (4) Vesta, and (21) Lutetia which can be considered as new prime flux calibrators. The relevant object-specific properties (size, shape, spin-properties, albedo, thermal properties) are w...

  10. The influence of the spectral emissivity of flat-plate calibrators on the calibration of IR thermometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flat Calibrators (FC) are an option for calibration of infrared thermometers (IT) with a fixed large target. FCs are neither blackbodies, nor gray-bodies; their spectral emissivity is lower than one and depends on wavelength. Nevertheless they are used as gray-bodies with a nominal emissivity value. FCs can be calibrated radiometrically using as reference a calibrated IR thermometer (RT). If an FC will be used to calibrate ITs that work in the same spectral range as the RT then its calibration is straightforward: the actual FC spectral emissivity is not required. This result is valid for any given fixed emissivity assessed to the FC. On the other hand, when the RT working spectral range does not match with that of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC then it is required to know the FC spectral emissivity as part of the calibration process. For this purpose, at CENAM, we developed an experimental setup to measure spectral emissivity in the infrared spectral range, based on a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Not all laboratories have emissivity measurement capability in the appropriate wavelength and temperature ranges to obtain the spectral emissivity. Thus, we present an estimation of the error introduced when the spectral range of the RT used to calibrate an FC and the spectral ranges of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC do not match. Some examples are developed for the cases when RT and IT spectral ranges are [8,13] μm and [8,14] μm respectively

  11. The influence of the spectral emissivity of flat-plate calibrators on the calibration of IR thermometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E. [Centro Nacional de Metrología, CENAM Km 4.5 Carretera a los Cués, El Marqués, Querétaro, 76246 (Mexico)

    2013-09-11

    Flat Calibrators (FC) are an option for calibration of infrared thermometers (IT) with a fixed large target. FCs are neither blackbodies, nor gray-bodies; their spectral emissivity is lower than one and depends on wavelength. Nevertheless they are used as gray-bodies with a nominal emissivity value. FCs can be calibrated radiometrically using as reference a calibrated IR thermometer (RT). If an FC will be used to calibrate ITs that work in the same spectral range as the RT then its calibration is straightforward: the actual FC spectral emissivity is not required. This result is valid for any given fixed emissivity assessed to the FC. On the other hand, when the RT working spectral range does not match with that of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC then it is required to know the FC spectral emissivity as part of the calibration process. For this purpose, at CENAM, we developed an experimental setup to measure spectral emissivity in the infrared spectral range, based on a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Not all laboratories have emissivity measurement capability in the appropriate wavelength and temperature ranges to obtain the spectral emissivity. Thus, we present an estimation of the error introduced when the spectral range of the RT used to calibrate an FC and the spectral ranges of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC do not match. Some examples are developed for the cases when RT and IT spectral ranges are [8,13] μm and [8,14] μm respectively.

  12. GOSAT TIR radiometric validation toward simultaneous GHG column and profile observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, F.; Knuteson, R. O.; Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Suto, H.; Saitoh, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) was launched on January 2009 and continues its operation for more than six years. The thermal and near infrared sensor for carbon observation Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) onboard GOSAT measures greenhouse gases (GHG), such as CO2 and CH4, with wide and high resolution spectra from shortwave infrared (SWIR) to thermal infrared (TIR). This instrument has the advantage of being able to measure simultaneously the same field of view in different spectral ranges. The combination of column-GHG form SWIR band and vertical profile-GHG from TIR band provide better understanding and distribution of GHG, especially in troposphere. This work describes the radiometric validation and sensitivity analysis of TANSO-FTS TIR spectra, especially CO2, atmospheric window and CH4 channels with forward calculation. In this evaluation, we used accurate in-situ dataset of the HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observation) airplane observation data and GOSAT vicarious calibration and validation campaign data in Railroad Valley, NV. The HIPPO aircraft campaign had taken accurate atmospheric vertical profile dataset (T, RH, O3, CO2, CH4, N2O, CO) approximately pole-to-pole from the surface to the tropopause over the ocean. We implemented these dataset for forward calculation and made the spectral correction model with respect to wavenumber and internal calibration blackbody temperature The GOSAT vicarious calibration campaign have conducted every year since 2009 near summer solstice in Railroad Valley, where high-temperature desert site. In this campaign, we have measured temperature and humidity by a radiosonde and CO2, CH4 and O3 profile by the AJAX airplane at the time of the GOSAT overpass. Sometimes, the GHG profiles over the Railroad Valley show the air mass advection in mid-troposphere depending on upper wind. These advections bring the different concentration of GHG in lower and upper troposphere. Using these cases, we made

  13. Origin, Petrogenesis and radiometric age dating of Pichagchi Batholith (North West Iran)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichagchi batholith, located in 35 Km southeast of Shahin Dez, northwest of Iran, is situated in Central Iran, cutting Paleozoic rocks. Absolute age determination for this batholith by K-Ar radiometric method gives 74.20 Ma. indicating Late Cretaceous-Paleocene time corresponding to lauramide orogeny. This batholith consists of quartz diorite, tonalite, granodiorite and quartz monzodiorite in which main mafic minerals are biotite and amphibole. Enclaves are mica schist and fine graind quartz diorite in various sizes. Sieve texture and zonation observed in plagioclase minerals indicate that the original magma has been produced by magma mixing of lower crust and upper mantle. Geochemistry study of the main elements shows that the batholith is calc-alkaline and meta luminous and A12O3, Na2O, K2O, FeO values are high where as MgO, CaO, MnO, P2O5, TiO2 are low. In addition, genetic parameters for this batholith is compatible with I-Type granites (Caledonian). Rare earth elements plotted in spider diagrams show that the average slope the curves is from K towards Cr (left to right), indicating partial melting. Depletion of compatible elements such as Ni, Cu, V and enrichment of incompatible elements imply that magma was not original and not initiated from mantle. Further mores trough of Nb could be interpreted by magma mixing with crustal materials or by subduction. Also trough of Ti and crest of Y elements show that the origin of the magma is I-type. Finally, Pichagchi batholith is orogenic and its tectonic setting is compatible with continental arc granitoids

  14. Heat Capacity Mapping Radiometer (HCMR) data processing algorithm, calibration, and flight performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohse, J. R.; Bewtra, M.; Barnes, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The rationale and procedures used in the radiometric calibration and correction of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data are presented. Instrument-level testing and calibration of the Heat Capacity Mapping Radiometer (HCMR) were performed by the sensor contractor ITT Aerospace/Optical Division. The principal results are included. From the instrumental characteristics and calibration data obtained during ITT acceptance tests, an algorithm for post-launch processing was developed. Integrated spacecraft-level sensor calibration was performed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) approximately two months before launch. This calibration provided an opportunity to validate the data calibration algorithm. Instrumental parameters and results of the validation are presented and the performances of the instrument and the data system after launch are examined with respect to the radiometric results. Anomalies and their consequences are discussed. Flight data indicates a loss in sensor sensitivity with time. The loss was shown to be recoverable by an outgassing procedure performed approximately 65 days after the infrared channel was turned on. It is planned to repeat this procedure periodically.

  15. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, D.J.; Finkbeiner, D.P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, M.R.; Brewington, H.J.; Gunn, J.E.; Harvanek, M.; Hogg, D.W.; Ivezic, Z.; Johnston, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Texas U., Astron. Dept. /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Caltech, JPL

    2007-03-01

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of ''relative'' calibrations from that of ''absolute'' calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve {approx}1% relative calibration errors across 8500 deg{sup 2} in griz; the errors are {approx}2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodeled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

  16. Inertial Sensor Error Reduction through Calibration and Sensor Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Stefan; Nogueira, Samuel L; Bortole, Magdo; Siqueira, Adriano A G; Terra, Marco H; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, José L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the comparison between cooperative and local Kalman Filters (KF) for estimating the absolute segment angle, under two calibration conditions. A simplified calibration, that can be replicated in most laboratories; and a complex calibration, similar to that applied by commercial vendors. The cooperative filters use information from either all inertial sensors attached to the body, Matricial KF; or use information from the inertial sensors and the potentiometers of an exoskeleton, Markovian KF. A one minute walking trial of a subject walking with a 6-DoF exoskeleton was used to assess the absolute segment angle of the trunk, thigh, shank, and foot. The results indicate that regardless of the segment and filter applied, the more complex calibration always results in a significantly better performance compared to the simplified calibration. The interaction between filter and calibration suggests that when the quality of the calibration is unknown the Markovian KF is recommended. Applying the complex calibration, the Matricial and Markovian KF perform similarly, with average RMSE below 1.22 degrees. Cooperative KFs perform better or at least equally good as Local KF, we therefore recommend to use cooperative KFs instead of local KFs for control or analysis of walking. PMID:26901198

  17. Application of a radiometric inventory protocol in radiodiagnostics facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiometric study was carried out in two Radiodiagnostic Units, with seven rooms being assessed. Methodology of the Radiodiagnostics Quality Control Protocol ARCAL XLIX (Cooperation Agreement for the Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America and the Caribbean) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) [1] was used.From radiation protection viewpoint, effective dose rates on surface for different relevant positions were calculated.The eighty-five percent (85%) of assessed positions showed effective dose rates within limit values established in the ARCAL XLIX Protocol. Nevertheless, occupationally-exposed personnel (OEP) placed at position A (controlled area)[2] -one meter distant from the phantom- was found to be exceeding by 7 the ARCAL XLIX advised values

  18. Radiometric dating of sediment records in Kuwait's marine area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six sediment cores collected from the Northwestern Arabian/Persian Gulf have been radiometrically dated by 210Pb. Three cores were collected from stations within the Kuwait Bay, and three others were collected from stations outside the bay. Two models have been used for 210Pb dating of sediment cores, i.e. Constant Flux: Constant Sedimentation (CF:CS) Model and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) Model. The average rates were found to vary significantly between 0.16 and 1.00 cm y-1 for stations outside and within the bay respectively. The variability of the sedimentation rate was essentially physiographic characteristics and variable hydrodynamic condition. In this study, 137Cs fallout radiotracer was also used to construct a realistic chronology. It was observed that the 137Cs in the entire vertical profile has been continuously contributed by fluvial and atmospheric deposition. (author)

  19. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Bøgh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne;

    2015-01-01

    radiation (RN), ground heat flux (G), air temperature (TA), and relative humidity (RH) measurements. A comparison of the STIC outputs with the eddy covariance measurements of λE and H revealed RMSDs of 7–16% and 40–74% in half-hourly λE and H estimates. These statistics were 5–13% and 10–44% in daily λ......Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC...... source for retrieving the “near surface” moisture availability (M) and the Priestley-Taylor coefficient (α). The performance of STIC is tested using high-temporal resolution TR observations collected from different international surface energy flux experiments in conjunction with corresponding net...

  20. Simulation study of element plastic migration from radiometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Faena M.L.; Manzoli, Jose Eduardo; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Soares, Eufemia Paez [Escola SENAI Fundacao Zerrenner, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: eufemia@sp.senai.br

    2007-07-01

    Element migration from plastic packaging to either foodstuffs or medicine is a serious public health. Many conventional experimental techniques such as chromatography-mass spectrometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy or calorimetric methods are used to measure total and specific migration of components from plastic packaging. The radiometric method is also used to measure the element migration. In this study a numerical technique was employed to simulate the experimental migration results obtained from measurements of elements from dairy product polymeric packages into 3% acetic acid solution which is a normative food simulant. This numerical technique can be used as complementary tool for the experimental measurements, allowing for a better understanding of the diffusion process and to estimate element migration situations not experimentally measured. (author)

  1. IRCM spectral signature measurements instrumentation featuring enhanced radiometric accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantagne, Stéphane; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Roy, Claude; Willers, Cornelius J.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) signature measurements are performed in military applications including aircraft- and -naval vessel stealth characterization, detection/lock-on ranges, and flares efficiency characterization. Numerous military applications require high precision measurement of infrared signature characterization. For instance, Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems and Infrared Counter-Countermeasure (IRCCM) system are continuously evolving. Infrared flares defeated IR guided seekers, IR flares became defeated by intelligent IR guided seekers and Jammers defeated the intelligent IR guided seekers [7]. A precise knowledge of the target infrared signature phenomenology is crucial for the development and improvement of countermeasure and counter-countermeasure systems and so precise quantification of the infrared energy emitted from the targets requires accurate spectral signature measurements. Errors in infrared characterization measurements can lead to weakness in the safety of the countermeasure system and errors in the determination of detection/lock-on range of an aircraft. The infrared signatures are analyzed, modeled, and simulated to provide a good understanding of the signature phenomenology to improve the IRCM and IRCCM technologies efficiency [7,8,9]. There is a growing need for infrared spectral signature measurement technology in order to further improve and validate infrared-based models and simulations. The addition of imagery to Spectroradiometers is improving the measurement capability of complex targets and scenes because all elements in the scene can now be measured simultaneously. However, the limited dynamic range of the Focal Plane Array (FPA) sensors used in these instruments confines the ranges of measurable radiance intensities. This ultimately affects the radiometric accuracy of these complex signatures. We will describe and demonstrate how the ABB hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer features enhanced the radiometric accuracy

  2. Absolute timing with IBIS, SPI and JEM-X aboard INTEGRAL

    OpenAIRE

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Walter, R.; Foschini, L.

    2003-01-01

    We have verified the absolute timing capabilities of the high-energy instruments aboard INTEGRAL, i.e. the imager IBIS, the spectrometer SPI and the X-ray monitor JEM-X. Calibration observations of the Crab, contemporaneous with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), have been used to measure the absolute phase of the main pulse of the Crab pulse profile using the same Jodrell Bank radio ephemeris. The three INTEGRAL instruments and RXTE give within the statistical and systematic uncertainti...

  3. Calibration aspects of the JEM-EUSO mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The JEM-EUSO telescope will be, after calibration, a very accurate instrument which yields the number of received photons from the number of measured photo-electrons. The project is in phase A (demonstration of the concept) including already operating prototype instruments, i.e. many parts of the instrument have been constructed and tested. Calibration is a crucial part of the instrument and its use. The focal surface (FS) of the JEM-EUSO telescope will consist of about 5000 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs), which have to be well calibrated to reach the required accuracy in reconstructing the air-shower parameters. The optics system consists of 3 plastic Fresnel (double-sided) lenses of 2.5 m diameter. The aim of the calibration system is to measure the efficiencies (transmittances) of the optics and absolute efficiencies of the entire focal surface detector. The system consists of 3 main components: (i) Pre-flight calibration devices on ground, where the efficiency and gain of the PMTs will be measured absolutely and also the transmittance of the optics will be. (ii) On-board relative calibration system applying two methods: a) operating during the day when the JEM-EUSO lid will be closed with small light sources on board. b) operating during the night, together with data taking: the monitoring of the background rate over identical sites. (iii) Absolute in-flight calibration, again, applying two methods: a) measurement of the moon light, reflected on high altitude, high albedo clouds. b) measurements of calibrated flashes and tracks produced by the Global Light System (GLS). Some details of each calibration method will be described in this paper.

  4. ORNL calibrations facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL

  5. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  6. Absolute distance metrology for space interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Swinkels, B L; Wendrich, T.J.; Bhattacharya, N; Wielders, A.A.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Space interferometers consisting of several free flying telescopes, such as the planned Darwin mission, require a complex metrology system to make all the components operate as a single instrument. Our research focuses on one of its sub-systems that measures the absolute distance between two satellites with high accuracy. For Darwin the required accuracy would be in the order of 10 μm over 250 meter. To measure this absolute distance, we are currently exploring the frequency sweeping interfer...

  7. Spiral reader calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method to calibrate the spiral reader (SR) is presented. A brief description of the main procedures of the calibration program SCALP, adapted for the IHEP equipment and purposes, is described. The precision characteristics of the IHEP SR have been analysed on the results, presented in the form of diagrams. There is a calibration manual for the user

  8. Primary calibrations of radionuclide solutions and sources for the EML quality assessment program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisenne, I.M. [Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The quality assurance procedures established for the operation of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Measurements Laboratory (DOE-EML`s) Quality Assessment Program (QAP) are essentially the same as those that are in effect for any EML program involving radiometric measurements. All these programs have at their core the use of radionuclide standards for their instrument calibration. This paper focuses on EML`s approach to the acquisition, calibration and application of a wide range of radionuclide sources that are required to meet its programmatic needs.

  9. High-precision absolute measurement of CEBAF beam mean energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute measurement of the beam mean energy with an accuracy of one part in 104 or higher is an important demand of the CEBAF Hall A physics program. This accuracy may reduce the uncertainty in the d(e, e'p)p cross section δσ/σ to 1%. The need for such an accurately calibrated beam is not particular to CEBAF; at other electron facilities uncertainty in the incident energy has proven to be among the dominant sources of systematic error. The following methods for solving the problem were considered at both CEBAF and the Yerevan Physics Institute during 1990--1991: Backscattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by the relativistic electron beam. Calculations show that the intensity of the backscattered radiation in a bandwidth of 10-4 near the maximum frequency is about 1 photon per second at 4 GeV and 0.3 mA. Magnetic spectrometers performing as three- and four-magnet chicanes with appropriate detector systems. Such a system was used at SLAC for absolute measurement of the SLC beams energy, where a maximum accuracy of 5 x 10-4 was achieved. Calculations show that a similar accuracy can be achieved for the CEBAF beam in both proposed systems. Measurement of the vertical distribution of synchrotron radiation. Calculations indicate that precision of about 2.5 x 10-5 is achievable for CEBAF

  10. Pre-Launch Algorithm and Data Format for the Level 1 Calibration Products for the EOS AM-1 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Bruce W.; Godden, Gerald D.; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Knight, Edward J.; Qiu, Shi-Yue; Montgomery, Harry; Hopkins, M. M.; Khayat, Mohammad G.; Hao, Zhi-Dong; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) radiometric calibration product is described for the thermal emissive and the reflective solar bands. Specific sensor design characteristics are identified to assist in understanding how the calibration algorithm software product is designed. The reflected solar band software products of radiance and reflectance factor both are described. The product file format is summarized and the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) Homepage location for the current file format is provided.

  11. Calibration of the fast 12-channel ECE spectrometer at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements on the 12-channel ECE grating polychromator at the Joint European Torus are reported. This report describes the performance of the spectrometer in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. Measures to improve the systems responsivity and to overcome some characteristic problems of the spectrometer are reported. In addition, a comparison between different methods of absolute calibration of the system is presented. (orig.)

  12. Calibration of the Ørsted vector magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Sabaka, T.J.;

    2003-01-01

    The vector fluxgate magnetometer of the Orsted satellite is routinely calibrated by comparing its output with measurements of the absolute magnetic intensity from the Overhauser instrument, which is the second magnetometer of the satellite. We describe the method used for and the result obtained...

  13. Calibration research: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Linda; Hacker, Douglas J

    2012-01-01

    Research on calibration remains a popular line of inquiry. Calibration is the degree of fit between a person's judgment of performance and his or her actual performance. Given the continued interest in this topic, the questions posed in this article are fruitful directions to pursue to help address gaps in calibration research. In this article, we have identified six research directions that if productively pursued, could greatly expand our knowledge of calibration. The six research directions are: (a) what are the effects of varying the anchoring mechanisms from which calibration judgments are made, (b) how does calibration accuracy differ as a function of incentives and task authenticity, (c) how do students self-report the basis of their calibration judgments, (d) how do group interactions and social comparisons affect calibration accuracy, (e) what is the relation between absolute and relative accuracy, and (f) to what extent does calibration accuracy predict achievement? To help point the way to where we go from here in calibration research, we provide these research questions, propose research methods designed to address them, and identify prior, related studies that have shown promise in leading the way to fill these gaps in the literature. PMID:22866041

  14. Calibration research: Where do we go from here?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eBol

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on calibration remains a popular line of inquiry. Calibration is the degree of fit between a person’s judgment of performance and his or her actual performance. Given the continued interest in this topic, the questions posed in this article are fruitful directions to pursue to help address gaps in calibration research. In this article, we have identified six research directions that if productively pursued, could greatly expand our knowledge of calibration. The six research directions are: (a what are the effects of varying the anchoring mechanisms from which calibration judgments are made, (b how does calibration accuracy differ as a function of incentives and task authenticity, (c how do students self-report the basis of their calibration judgments, (d how do group interactions and social comparisons affect calibration accuracy, (e what is the relation between absolute and relative accuracy, and (f to what extent does calibration accuracy predict achievement? To help point the way to where we go from here in calibration research, we provide these research questions, propose research methods, and identify prior, related studies that have shown promise in leading the way to fill these gaps in the literature.

  15. MODIS solar reflective calibration traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-08-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify measurement uncertainties, and to establish an absolute measurement scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2μm and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from pre-launch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  16. MODIS Solar Reflective Calibration Traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify, measurement uncertainties, and to establish absolute scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2 micrometers and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from prelaunch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  17. (25143) Itokawa: The power of radiometric techniques for the interpretation of remote thermal observations in the light of the Hayabusa rendezvous results*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Usui, Fumihiko

    2014-06-01

    The near-Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa was characterized in great detail by the Japanese Hayabusa mission. We revisited the available thermal observations in the light of the true asteroid properties with the goal of evaluating the possibilities and limitations of thermal model techniques. In total, we used 25 published ground-based mid-infrared photometric observations and five so far unpublished measurements from the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI in combination with improved H-G values (absolute magnitude and slope parameter). Our thermophysical model (TPM) approach allowed us to determine correctly the sense of rotation, to estimate the thermal inertia and to derive robust effective size and albedo values by only using a simple spherical shape model. A more complex shape model, derived from light-curve inversion techniques, improved the quality of the predictions considerably and made the interpretation of the thermal light curve possible. The radiometrically derived effective diameter value agrees within 2% with the true Itokawa size value. The combination of our TPM and the final (25143) Itokawa in-situ shape model was then used as a benchmark for deriving and testing radiometric solutions. The consolidated value for the surface-averaged thermal inertia is Γ = 700 ± 200 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1. We found that even the high-resolution shape models still require additional small-scale roughness in order to explain the disk-integrated infrared measurements. Our description of the thermal effects as a function of wavelengths, phase angle, and rotational phase facilitates the planning of crucial thermal observations for sophisticated characterization of small bodies, including other potentially hazardous asteroids. Our analysis shows the power of radiometric techniques to derive the size, albedo, thermal inertia, and also spin-axis orientation from small sets of measurements at thermal infrared wavelengths.

  18. Development of a heliostat facility for solar-radiation-based calibration of earth observing sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Michele A.; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Kaptchen, Paul; Good, William; Lin, Tony; To, Raymund; Biggar, Stuart; Thome, Kurtis

    2008-08-01

    A new heliostat facility at Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) in Boulder, CO will allow the use of the sun as the source in the calibration of earth observing sensors. The solar spectrum is the basic energy source for such instruments; therefore it is advantageous to perform initial ground radiometric calibrations using the sun. Using this method for preflight radiometric calibration reduces uncertainties caused by the spectral mismatch between the preflight and in-flight calibration, especially in the case in which a solar diffuser is the in-flight calibration method. This method also reduces stray light concerns as the instrument diffuser is measured in situ with the same radiance level it sees on orbit. This paper presents the design of a heliostat test facility which tracks the sun and directs the solar beam into a thermal vacuum chamber, allowing the instrument under test to be kept in a safe, clean and controllable environment. Design considerations that affect the uniformity and transmission of the system are discussed. The opto-mechanical logistics of creating a heliostat that will deliver a 13-inch solar beam into a thermal vacuum chamber are also presented. This facility is currently under construction at BATC and is expected to be operational by the end of 2008.

  19. Status of MODIS Instruments and Future Calibration Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Angal, A.; Wu, A.; Salomonson, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    MODIS is one of the key instruments currently operated on two major missions for the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) program: Terra and Aqua launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. Nearly 40 data products have been routinely generated from both Terra and Aqua MODIS observations and widely distributed to the science community and users worldwide for their studies of the earth's system and changes in its geophysical properties. To date, each MODIS instrument operation remains nominal and its on-board calibrators (OBC) continue to function satisfactorily. On a regular basis, MODIS reflective solar bands (RSB) calibration is performed by a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). For the thermal emissive bands (TEB), an on-board blackbody (BB) provides a scan-by-scan calibration reference. Since launch, extensive calibration and characterization activities have been scheduled and implemented by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) to produce and update calibration look-up tables (LUT). This presentation provides an overview of both Terra and Aqua MODIS instrument status, their on-orbit operation and calibration activities, and radiometric, spectral, and spatial performance. It describes calibration changes (algorithms and look-up tables) made for the MODIS Level 1B (L1B) data collection 6 (C6) and discusses remaining challenging issues and ongoing effort for future improvements. As expected, lessons from both Terra and Aqua MODIS have benefitted and will continue to help the S-NPP and JPSS VIIRS instruments in terms of on-orbit operation strategies and calibration enhancements.

  20. Evolution of Altimetry Calibration and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Haines, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, altimetry calibration has evolved from an engineering-oriented exercise to a multidisciplinary endeavor driving the state of the art. This evolution has been spurred by the developing promise of altimetry to capture the large-scale, but small-amplitude, changes of the ocean surface containing the expression of climate change. The scope of altimeter calibration/validation programs has expanded commensurately. Early efforts focused on determining a constant range bias and verifying basic compliance of the data products with mission requirements. Contemporary investigations capture, with increasing accuracies, the spatial and temporal characteristics of errors in all elements of the measurement system. Dedicated calibration sites still provide the fundamental service of estimating absolute bias, but also enable long-term monitoring of the sea-surface height and constituent measurements. The use of a network of island and coastal tide gauges has provided the best perspective on the measurement stability, and revealed temporal variations of altimeter measurement system drift. The cross-calibration between successive missions provided fundamentally new information on the performance of altimetry systems. Spatially and temporally correlated errors pose challenges for future missions, underscoring the importance of cross-calibration of new measurements against the established record.