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Sample records for absence epilepsy identifies

  1. Functional study of NIPA2 mutations identified from the patients with childhood absence epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xie

    Full Text Available Recently many genetic mutations that are associated with epilepsy have been identified. The protein NIPA2 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2 is a highly selective magnesium transporter encoded by the gene NIPA2 in which we have found three mutations (p.I178F, p.N244S and p.N334_E335insD within a population of patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE. In this study, immunofluorescence labeling, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES, MTT metabolic rate detection and computational modeling were utilized to elucidate how these mutations result in CAE. We found in cultured neurons that NIPA2 (wild-type proteins were localized to the cell periphery, whereas mutant proteins were not effectively trafficked to the cell membrane. Furthermore, we found a decrease in intracellular magnesium concentration in the neurons transfected with mutant NIPA2, but no effect on the survival of neurons. To understand how low intracellular magnesium resulted in hyperexcitability, we built and analyzed a computational model to simulate the effects of mutations. The model suggested that lower intracellular magnesium concentration enhanced synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR currents. This study primarily reveals that a selective magnesium transporter NIPA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE.

  2. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences.

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    Manonmani, V; Wallace, S J

    1994-04-01

    The cases are described of eight children, five of them girls, who had epilepsy with myoclonic absences. The mean age of onset was 4.9 years. Brief episodes of loss of awareness with bilateral clonic jerking of the upper limbs were associated with rhythmic 3 cycles/second spike-wave discharges on electroencephalogram. Generalised tonic-clonic or astatic seizures, or both, also occurred in seven patients. All now have learning difficulties, and seven have behavioural problems. Conventional treatment for absences was effective in only two children. Of six patients treated with lamotrigine, five have improved substantially, but only one is in sustained complete remission. One recently diagnosed patient continues to have frequent myoclonic absences. As the response to treatment and long term outcome are much poorer, it is important to differentiate myoclonic absences from typical childhood absence epilepsy.

  3. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Tolmacheva, E.A.; Budziszewska, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime, es

  4. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Budziszewska, B.; Tolmacheva, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime, es

  5. [Absence epilepsy models in rodents].

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    Eguibar, José R; Cortés, M del Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Animal models are a useful tool because it is possible to perform neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and pharmacological studies throughout their development. The most common models for experimental studies of absence seizures are the GAERS (Genetic Absence Epilepsy rat from Strasbourg) and the WAG/Rij (Wistar Absence Glaxo from Rijswik) rats. In WAG/RU rats it has been demonstrated that the perioral region in the somatosensorial cortex shows a zone with hyperexcitability which is the origin of spike wave discharges (SWD). In fact, this cortical area shows modifications in sodium channels which increase the excitability of cortical neurons; for this reason, local application of phenytoin or lidocaine, which block sodium channels, reduce SWD. Ethosuximide decreases and pentylenetetrazol increases SWD in GAERS and WAG/Rij rats. At the Institute of Physiology in the Benemérita Autonomous University of Puebla we have obtained a myelin mutant rat called "taiep", which is the acronym of tremor, ataxia, immobility episodes, epilepsy, and paralysis. This model shows a SWD with higher frequency during awaking periods; the SWD increases with systemic administration of pentylenetetrazol and decreases with ethosuximide. All these findings in animal models are susceptible to be tested in human beings through magneto- and electro-encephalographic recording techniques to discern the source of this type of epilepsy. Thus, in biomedical research, animal models are useful tools to discern the neural and network alterations responsible for the absence seizures, and allow to design of more specific therapeutic options with fewer side effects.

  6. Automatic characterization of dynamics in Absence Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Katrine N. H.; Nielsen, Trine N.; Kjær, Troels W.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of the spike-wave paroxysms in Childhood Absence Epilepsy (CAE) are automatically characterized using novel approaches. Features are extracted from scalograms formed by Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). Detection algorithms are designed to identify an estimate of the temporal development...

  7. Natural history of absence epilepsy in children.

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    Wirrell, Elaine C

    2003-08-01

    Absence seizures may be seen in a variety of epileptic syndromes in childhood. Identification of the specific syndrome is important to determine medical prognosis. With childhood absence epilepsy, approximately two thirds of children can be expected to enter long-term remission, while in juvenile absence epilepsy, seizure control is often achieved, however, lifelong treatment is usually required. Other absence syndromes have a poorer prognosis, with lower rates of seizure control and remission. Psychosocial outcome is often poor, even in patients with more benign forms of absence epilepsy. Remission of epilepsy does not preclude psychosocial morbidity.

  8. Memory Functioning in Children with Epilepsy: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Childhood Absence Epilepsy, and Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Filipa Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE, childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children, aged 6–15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  9. Memory functioning in children with epilepsy: frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

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    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Robalo, Conceição; Simões, Mário Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS)) and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children), aged 6-15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  10. Genome wide high density SNP-based linkage analysis of childhood absence epilepsy identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 3p23-p14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chioza, Barry A; Aicardi, Jean; Aschauer, Harald;

    2009-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) characterised by typical absence seizures manifested by transitory loss of awareness with 2.5-4 Hz spike-wave complexes on ictal EEG. A genetic component to the aetiology is well recognised but the mechanism of inheritance...

  11. Epidemiology of absence epilepsy. III. Clinical aspects.

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    Olsson, I; Hagberg, G

    1991-11-01

    Absence epilepsy was studied in a Swedish population, aged 0-15 years, in 1978-1982. Cases were selected by electroencephalographic criteria. In the 134 children with 3 Hz spike-and-wave discharges, 97 (72.4%) had absences alone or in combination with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (grand mal): 56 had absences alone, 31 absences followed by grand mal, and 10 started with initial grand mal. Two distinct groups could be discerned: 1) childhood absence epilepsy: onset before the age of 12, with a quick response to therapy, little or no risk of grand mal, and a high remission rate; 2) juvenile absence epilepsy: onset at the age of 12 or later, a very high risk of grand mal, and usually a good response to therapy, but a high risk of relapses at withdrawal. This classification of absence epilepsy into subgroups may be useful for prognostic guidelines.

  12. Genetic models of absence epilepsy: New concepts and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery, development, and use of genetic rodent models of absence epilepsy have led to a new theory about the origin of absence seizures. A focal zone has been identified in the peri-oral region of the somatosensory cortex in WAG/Rij and GAERS – the two most commonly used models – from which

  13. Pretreatment seizure semiology in childhood absence epilepsy.

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    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Shinnar, Shlomo; Cnaan, Avital; Dlugos, Dennis; Conry, Joan; Hirtz, Deborah G; Hu, Fengming; Liu, Chunyan; Mizrahi, Eli M; Moshé, Solomon L; Clark, Peggy; Glauser, Tracy A

    2017-07-19

    To determine seizure semiology in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy and to evaluate associations with short-term treatment outcomes. For participants enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness trial, semiologic features of pretreatment seizures were analyzed as predictors of treatment outcome at the week 16 to 20 visit. Video of 1,932 electrographic absence seizures from 416 participants was evaluated. Median seizure duration was 10.2 seconds; median time between electrographic seizure onset and clinical manifestation onset was 1.5 seconds. For individual seizures and by participant, the most common semiology features were pause/stare (seizure 95.5%, participant 99.3%), motor automatisms (60.6%, 86.1%), and eye involvement (54.9%, 76.5%). The interrater agreement for motor automatisms and eye involvement was good (72%-84%). Variability of semiology features between seizures even within participants was high. Clustering analyses revealed 4 patterns (involving the presence/absence of eye involvement and motor automatisms superimposed on the nearly ubiquitous pause/stare). Most participants experienced more than one seizure cluster pattern. No individual semiologic feature was individually predictive of short-term outcome. Seizure freedom was half as likely in participants with one or more seizure having the pattern of eye involvement without motor automatisms than in participants without this pattern. Almost all absence seizures are characterized by a pause in activity or staring, but rarely is this the only feature. Semiologic features tend to cluster, resulting in identifiable absence seizure subtypes with significant intraparticipant seizure phenomenologic heterogeneity. One seizure subtype, pause/stare and eye involvement but no motor automatisms, is specifically associated with a worse treatment outcome. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Hormones and absence epilepsy in genetic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolmacheva, E.A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones are known to have a tremendous impact on seizures and might play a prominent role in epileptogenesis. However, little is known about the role of steroid hormones in absence epilepsy. Here we review recently combined electrophysiological, pharmacological and behavioural studies in a

  15. Childhood absence epilepsy successfully treated with the paleolithic ketogenic diet.

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    Clemens, Zsófia; Kelemen, Anna; Fogarasi, András; Tóth, Csaba

    2013-12-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy is an epilepsy syndrome responding relatively well to the ketogenic diet with one-third of patients becoming seizure-free. Less restrictive variants of the classical ketogenic diet, however, have been shown to confer similar benefits. Beneficial effects of high fat, low-carbohydrate diets are often explained in evolutionary terms. However, the paleolithic diet itself which advocates a return to the human evolutionary diet has not yet been studied in epilepsy. Here, we present a case of a 7-year-old child with absence epilepsy successfully treated with the paleolithic ketogenic diet alone. In addition to seizure freedom achieved within 6 weeks, developmental and behavioral improvements were noted. The child remained seizure-free when subsequently shifted toward a paleolithic diet. It is concluded that the paleolithic ketogenic diet was effective, safe and feasible in the treatment of this case of childhood absence epilepsy.

  16. Stress, glucocorticoids and absences in a genetic epilepsy model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolmacheva, E.A.; Oitzl, M.S.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Although stress can alter the susceptibility of patients and animal models to convulsive epilepsy, little is known about the role of stress and glucocorticoid hormones in absence epilepsy. We measured the basal and acute stress-induced (foot-shocks: FS) concentrations of corticosterone in WAG/Rij ra

  17. Attention impairment in childhood absence epilepsy : An impulsivity problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerminara, Caterina; D'Agati, Elisa; Casarelli, Livia; Kaunzinger, Ivo; Lange, Klaus W.; Pitzianti, Mariabernarda; Parisi, Pasquale; Tucha, Oliver; Curatolo, Paolo

    Although attention problems have often been described in children with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), the use of different methodological approaches, neuropsychological tests, and heterogeneous experimental groups has prevented identification of the selective areas of attention deficit in this

  18. Refractory absence epilepsy associated with GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2011-05-01

    GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS) is a disorder of cerebral glucose transport associated with early infantile epilepsy and microcephaly. We report two boys who presented with refractory absence epilepsy associated with hypoglycorrhachia, both of whom have genetically confirmed GLUT-1 DS. We propose that these children serve to expand the phenotype of GLUT-1 DS and suggest that this condition should be considered as a cause of refractory absence seizures in childhood.

  19. Adult absence semiology misinterpreted as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Hurst, Rebecca; Chiota-McCollum, Nicole; Tatum, William

    2014-12-01

    Correct diagnosis of seizure type and epilepsy syndrome is the foundation for appropriate antiepileptic drug selection. Inappropriate medication choices occur in the treatment of generalized epilepsy and may aggravate some seizure types, including absence seizures, potentially leading to pseudo-drug resistance. Fortunately, a correct diagnosis of absence seizures is usually not difficult, though rarely demonstrates electroclinical overlap with focal seizures. EEG can be especially misleading when secondary bilateral synchronous discharges occur in patients with focal seizures. However, the semiology of focal seizures associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy has a characteristic and consistent semiology that is the mark of this common epilepsy syndrome in adulthood. We recently encountered a 53-year-old female with refractory seizures and a semiology strongly suggesting mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Instead of focal seizures, prolonged absence seizures were validated by video-EEG monitoring and she became seizure-free after a change to broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs. This case further expands our understanding of the complexity of semiology in electroclinical classification and the spectrum that may occur in adult absence seizures. It serves to underscore the need for ictal EEG recordings and the importance of concordance with the clinical course during the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with lesions and drug-resistant epilepsy. [Published with video sequences].

  20. Childhood Absence Epilepsy Successfully Treated with the Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens, Zsófia; Kelemen, Anna; Fogarasi, András; Tóth, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Childhood absence epilepsy is an epilepsy syndrome responding relatively well to the ketogenic diet with one-third of patients becoming seizure-free. Less restrictive variants of the classical ketogenic diet, however, have been shown to confer similar benefits. Beneficial effects of high fat, low-carbohydrate diets are often explained in evolutionary terms. However, the paleolithic diet itself which advocates a return to the human evolutionary diet has not yet been studied in epi...

  1. Childhood Absence Epilepsy Successfully Treated with the Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens, Zsófia; Kelemen, Anna; Fogarasi, András; Tóth, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Childhood absence epilepsy is an epilepsy syndrome responding relatively well to the ketogenic diet with one-third of patients becoming seizure-free. Less restrictive variants of the classical ketogenic diet, however, have been shown to confer similar benefits. Beneficial effects of high fat, low-carbohydrate diets are often explained in evolutionary terms. However, the paleolithic diet itself which advocates a return to the human evolutionary diet has not yet been studied in epi...

  2. Long-term outcome of childhood absence epilepsy : Dutch Study of Epilepsy in Childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, Petra M. C.; Bouma, Paul A. D.; Geerts, Ada T.; Arts, Willem Frans M.; Stroink, Hans; Peeters, Els A. J.; van Donselaar, Cees A.; Peters, A. C. Boudewijn; Brouwer, Oebele F.

    2009-01-01

    We determined long-term outcome and the predictive value of baseline and EEG characteristics on seizure activity evolution in 47 children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) included in the Dutch Study of Epilepsy in Childhood. All children were followed for 12-17 years. The childr

  3. Two epileptic syndromes, one brain: childhood absence epilepsy and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

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    Cerminara, Caterina; Coniglio, Antonella; El-Malhany, Nadia; Casarelli, Livia; Curatolo, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS), or benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), are the most common forms of childhood epilepsy. CAE and BCECTS are well-known and clearly defined syndromes; although they are strongly dissimilar in terms of their pathophysiology, these functional epileptic disturbances share many features such as similar age at onset, overall good prognosis, and inheritance factors. Few reports are available on the concomitance of CAE and BCECTS in the same patients or the later occurrence of generalized epilepsy in patients with a history of partial epilepsy. In most cases described in the literature, absence seizures always started after the onset of benign focal epilepsy but the contrary has never occurred yet. We describe two patients affected by idiopathic generalized epileptic syndrome with typical absences, who experienced BCECTS after remission of seizures and normalization of EEG recordings. While the coexistence of different seizure types within an epileptic syndrome is not uncommon, the occurrence of childhood absence and BCECTS in the same child appears to be extremely rare, and this extraordinary event supports the hypothesis that CAE and BCECTS are two distinct epileptic conditions. However, recent interesting observations in animal models suggest that BCECTS and CAE could be pathophysiologically related and that genetic links could play a large role.

  4. Absence epilepsy: Continuum of clinical presentation and epigenetics?

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    Guilhoto, Laura M

    2017-01-01

    Although absence seizures do predominate in childhood they may occur at all ages and clinical presentation varies widely. Albeit considered a benign seizure type, chronic evolution with therapeutic refractoriness is possible in some patients with absences. The aim of this paper is to summarize the main syndromic presentation of absence seizures and its outcome regarding treatment and prognosis. We performed a review of literature with emphasis in historic and classical manuscripts about absence epilepsy. Absence was described in the beginning of last century as a seizure type with good evolution, but it is still difficult to preview a strict prognosis for an individual patient. Some positive early predictors were reported such as response to initial treatment and seizure onset in childhood. Genetic aspects are not yet well understood although some families have been reported with rare mutations in ion channel coding genes. Absence seizures are present in different epilepsy syndromes and nosological classification is not always possible. Outcome depends on clinical variables such as age of onset, presence of other seizure types and initial response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The WAG/Rij strain: A genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depressiony

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkisova, K.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    A great number of clinical observations show a relationship between epilepsy and depression. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy, including absence epilepsy, has a genetic basis. The review provides evidence that WAG/Rij rats can be regarded as a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comor

  6. Evaluation of CACNA1H in European patients with childhood absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chioza, Barry; Everett, Kate; Aschauer, Harald; Brouwer, Oebele; Callenbach, Petra; Covanis, Athanasios; Dulac, Olivier; Durner, Martina; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar; Feucht, Martha; Friis, Mogens; Heils, Armin; Kjeldsen, Marianne; Larsson, Katrin; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Nabbout, Rima; Olsson, Ingrid; Sander, Thomas; Siren, Auli; Robinson, Robert; Rees, Michele; Gardiner, R. Mark

    2006-01-01

    CACNA1H was evaluated in a resource of Caucasian European patients with childhood absence epilepsy by linkage analysis and typing of sequence variants previously identified in Chinese patients. Linkage analysis of 44 pedigrees provided no evidence for a locus in the CACNA1H region and none of the Ch

  7. Transition issues for benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children, childhood absence epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

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    Camfield, Carol S; Berg, Anne; Stephani, Ulrich; Wirrell, Elaine C

    2014-08-01

    This chapter covers the syndromes of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children (NLFN), and the genetic generalized epilepsies. BECTS is an epilepsy syndrome that always enters terminal remission before the general age of a planned transition of adolescents. This is also the case for the majority (65%) of those with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). Approximately 15% of patients with CAE who initially remit during their childhood years later develop juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) as teenagers. They will have many issues for continuing medical care and transition, because their seizure disorder generally persists into adulthood. A significant minority of NLFN (~35%) and most patients with JME continue to have active epilepsy into adulthood. In addition, CAE, JME, and NLFN patients are at risk of a number of significant adverse social outcomes that require ongoing advice and counseling.

  8. Stress, glucocorticoids and absences in a genetic epilepsy model.

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    Tolmacheva, Elena A; Oitzl, Melly S; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can alter the susceptibility of patients and animal models to convulsive epilepsy, little is known about the role of stress and glucocorticoid hormones in absence epilepsy. We measured the basal and acute stress-induced (foot-shocks: FS) concentrations of corticosterone in WAG/Rij rats, non-epileptic inbred ACI rats and outbred Wistar rats. The WAG/Rij strain is a genetic model for absence epilepsy and comorbidity for depression, which originates from the population of Wistar rats and, therefore, shares their genetic background. In a separate experiment, WAG/Rij rats were exposed to FS on three consecutive days. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded before and after FS, and the number of absence seizures (spike-wave-discharges, SWDs) was quantified. Both WAG/Rij rats and ACI rats exhibited elevated basal levels of corticosterone and a rapid corticosterone increase in response to acute stress. The WAG/Rij rats also displayed the most rapid normalization of corticosterone during the recovery phase compared to that of ACI and Wistar rats. FS had a biphasic effect on SWDs; an initial suppression was followed by an aggravation of the SWDs. By the third day, this aggravation of seizures was present in the hour preceding FS. This increase in SWDs may arise from anticipatory stress about the upcoming FS. Together, these results suggest that the distinct secretion profile of corticosterone found in WAG/Rij rats may contribute to the severity of the epileptic phenotype. Although the acute stressor results in an initial suppression of SWDs followed by an increase in SWDs, stress prior to a predictable negative event aggravates absences.

  9. Neuropsychological impairment in childhood absence epilepsy: Review of the literature.

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    Verrotti, A; Matricardi, S; Rinaldi, V E; Prezioso, G; Coppola, G

    2015-12-15

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is a paediatric epilepsy syndrome characterized by typical absence seizures in school age children. Although it is commonly considered to have a good prognosis, with a good response to antiepileptic drugs, recent studies questioned this traditional view of a “benign” disorder, in particular regarding neuropsychological functioning. The aim of this study is to review the neuropsychological involvement in patients affected by CAE. A literature search was carried out in PubMed's and Medline's databases for all relevant studies published between 1924 and 2014. The keywords used were neuropsychology, absence seizures, and CAE. Specific review articles, systematic reviews, textbooks and case reports were examined for any further publications. In intellectual functioning, CAE patients seem to perform worse than healthy children, even if their IQ scores fall within the normal range. Similarly, CAE seems to affect verbal skills and learning. Executive functions have been reported to be mildly impaired. Data regarding memory are still conflicting. Given the neuropsychological deficits in many CAE patients which significantly affect their quality of life, CAE should not be considered entirely “benign”. An early identification of neuropsychological dysfunction in CAE children is essential for appropriate treatment.

  10. EEG features of absence seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Impact of syndrome, age, and state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadleir, L.G.; Scheffer, I.E.; Smith, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Factors influencing the electroencephalography (EEG) features of absence seizures in newly presenting children with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have not been rigorously studied. We examined how specific factors such as state, provocation, age, and epilepsy syndrome affect the E...

  11. Are Absence Epilepsy and Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy System Epilepsies of the Sleep/Wake System?

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    Halász, Péter

    2015-01-01

    System epilepsy is an emerging concept interpreting major nonlesional epilepsies as epileptic dysfunctions of physiological systems. I extend here the concept of reflex epilepsy to epilepsies linked to input dependent physiological systems. Experimental and clinical reseach data were collected to create a coherent explanation of underlying pathomechanism in AE and NFLE. We propose that AE should be interpreted as epilepsy linked to the corticothalamic burst-firing mode of NREM sleep, released by evoked vigilance level oscillations characterized by reactive slow wave response. In the genetic variation of NFLE the ascending cholinergic arousal system plays an essential role being in strong relationship with a gain mutation of the nicotinic acethylcholin receptors, rendering the arousal system hyperexcitable. I try to provide a more unitary interpretation for the variable seizure manifestation integrating them as different degree of pathological arosuals and alarm reactions. As a supporting hypothesis the similarity between arousal parasomnias and FNLE is shown, underpinned by overlaping pathomechanism and shared familiarity, but without epileptic features. Lastly we propose that both AE and NFLE are system epilepsies of the sleep-wake system representing epileptic disorders of the antagonistic sleep/arousal network. This interpretation may throw new light on the pathomechanism of AE and NFLE. PMID:26175547

  12. Evaluation of creative thinking in children with idiopathic epilepsy (absence epilepsy).

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    Di Filippo, T; Parisi, L; Roccella, M

    2012-02-01

    Creativity represents the silent character of human behaviour. In children with epilepsy, cognitive performance of has mainly been investigated under the assumption that the disorder represents a risk factor for the development of intellectual function. In subjects with different forms of epilepsy, neuropsychologic disorders have been detected even when cognitive-global functioning is unimpaired. The cognitive functions of subjects with epilepsy have been widely studied, but their creativity has been never evaluated to date. The aim of this study was to describe the development of creative thinking in a group of children with absence epilepsy. The test battery included: the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-revised (WISC-R) and the Goodenough Human Figure Drawing Test. Statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) showed a statistically significant difference (P test scores between two groups of subjects (children with epilesy vs control group), with higher scores for figure originality, figure fluidity and figure elaboration in the control group. There was a significant correlation (Spearman's rho) between verbal IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscale scores and between performance IQ and figure elaboration, between total IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscales (P 0.30). Low scores on the figure originality subscales seem to confirm the hypothesis that adverse psychodynamic and relational factors impoverish autonomy, flexibility and manipulator interests. The communication channels between subjects with epilepsy and their family members were affected by the disorder, as were the type of emotional dynamics and affective flux.

  13. Animal models of absence epilepsies: What do they model and do sex and sex hormones matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Onat, F.Y.; Gallagher, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    While epidemiological data suggest a female prevalence in human childhood- and adolescence-onset typical absence epilepsy syndromes, the sex difference is less clear in adult-onset syndromes. In addition, although there are more females than males diagnosed with typical absence epilepsy syndromes, t

  14. Animal models of absence epilepsies: What do they model and do sex and sex hormones matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Onat, F.Y.; Gallagher, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    While epidemiological data suggest a female prevalence in human childhood- and adolescence-onset typical absence epilepsy syndromes, the sex difference is less clear in adult-onset syndromes. In addition, although there are more females than males diagnosed with typical absence epilepsy syndromes, t

  15. Feasibility of a mobile cognitive intervention in childhood absence epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Glynn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Children with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE frequently present with cognitive comorbidities and school performance concerns. The present study evaluated the feasibility of an intervention for such comorbidities using a mobile cognitive therapy application on an iPad. Eight children with CAE and school concerns aged 7-11 participated in a four-week intervention. They were asked to use the application for 80 minutes per week (20 minutes/day, 4 times/week. Parents and children completed satisfaction surveys regarding the application. Participants were evaluated before and after the intervention using the Cognitive Domain of the NIH Toolbox and by parental completion of the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF. All eight patients completed the study, using the iPad for an average of 78 minutes/week. Children and parents reported high satisfaction with the application. Though a demonstration of efficacy was not the focus of the study, performance improvements were noted on a processing speed task and on a measure of fluid intelligence. An iPad based cognitive therapy was found to be a feasible intervention for children with CAE.

  16. Amygdala Kindling in the WAG-Rij Rat Model of Absence Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aker, R.G.; Yananli, H.R.; Gurbanova, A.A.; Özkaynakçi, A.E.; Ates, N.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Onat, F.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: Purpose: The kindling model in rats with genetic absence epilepsy is suitable for studying mechanisms involved in the propagation and generalization of seizure activity in the convulsive and nonconvulsive components of epilepsy. In the present study, we compared the amygdala kindling rate a

  17. Progress and Outlooks in a Genetic Absence Epilepsy Model (WAG/Rij)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Zobeiri, M.

    2014-01-01

    The WAG/Rij model is a well characterized and validated genetic animal epilepsy model in which the for absence epilepsy highly characteristic spike-wave discharges (SWDs) develop spontaneously. In this review we discuss first some older and many new studies, with an emphasis on pharmacological and n

  18. Spatiotemporal mapping of interictal epileptiform discharges in human absence epilepsy: A MEG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, Y.J.W.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Ossenblok, P.P.W.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although absence epilepsy is considered to be a prototypic type of generalized epilepsy, it is still under debate whether generalized 3 Hz spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) might have a cortical focal origin. Here it is investigated whether focal interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs),

  19. The role of SCL2A1 in Early Onset and Childhood Absence Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    Introduction: Early onset absence epilepsy (EOAE) constitutes an idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome with typical absences starting before the age of four years. Mutations in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter of the blood-brain barrier (GLUT-1), account for approximately 10% of EOAE......>C) leading to an amino acid exchange (336Leu>Val), the family history was unremarkable. The other EOAE patient with a very early onset of a severe epilepsy phenotype and movement disorder had a base exchange at position c.1189C>T causing a stop codon (p.Q397X) in exon 9. Familial GTCS were reported in his...

  20. The Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg model of absence epilepsy exhibits alterations in fear conditioning and latent inhibition consistent with psychiatric comorbidities in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Wendie N; Cavanagh, Mary E; Greba, Quentin; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural, neurological, and genetic similarities exist in epilepsies, their psychiatric comorbidities, and various psychiatric illnesses, suggesting common aetiological factors. Rodent models of epilepsy are used to characterize the comorbid symptoms apparent in epilepsy and their neurobiological mechanisms. The present study was designed to assess Pavlovian fear conditioning and latent inhibition in a polygenetic rat model of absence epilepsy, i.e. Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and the non-epileptic control (NEC) strain. Electrophysiological recordings confirmed the presence of spike-wave discharges in young adult GAERS but not NEC rats. A series of behavioural tests designed to assess anxiety-like behaviour (elevated plus maze, open field, acoustic startle response) and cognition (Pavlovian conditioning and latent inhibition) was subsequently conducted on male and female offspring. Results showed that GAERS exhibited significantly higher anxiety-like behaviour, a characteristic reported previously. In addition, using two protocols that differed in shock intensity, we found that both sexes of GAERS displayed exaggerated cued and contextual Pavlovian fear conditioning and impaired fear extinction. Fear reinstatement to the conditioned stimuli following unsignalled footshocks did not differ between the strains. Male GAERS also showed impaired latent inhibition in a paradigm using Pavlovian fear conditioning, suggesting that they may have altered attention, particularly related to previously irrelevant stimuli in the environment. Neither the female GAERS nor NEC rats showed evidence of latent inhibition in our paradigm. Together, the results suggest that GAERS may be a particularly useful model for assessing therapeutics designed to improve the emotional and cognitive disturbances associated with absence epilepsy.

  1. The involvement of limbic structures in typical and atypical absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onat, F.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Nehlig, A.; Snead, O.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical and atypical seizures of absence epilepsy are thought to be generated by a rhythmogenic interplay between the cortex and the thalamus. However, the question remains as to which other subcortical and extrathalamic structures are involved in the pathophysiology of typical and atypical absence

  2. Global and focal aspects of absence epilepsy: The contribution of genetic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Sitnikova, E.Y.

    2006-01-01

    The cortico-reticular theory of absence epilepsy explains the origin of the bilateral generalized spike-wave discharges (SWDs) characterizing absence seizures via a subcortical pacemaker that is responsible for both normal sleep spindles and pathological SWDs. This pacemaker is the reticular

  3. Assessment of the attention impairment in absence epilepsy: comparison of visual and auditory P300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Connie C; Mirsky, Allan F; Lovelace, Christopher T; Theodore, William H

    2009-08-01

    We report an investigation of P300 measures of information processing in patients with generalized epilepsy of the absence type and those with complex partial epilepsy. Studies have demonstrated that absence patients perform more poorly than complex partial patients on behavioral tests of sustained attention (the Continuous Performance Test, or CPT). Duncan [Duncan, C.C., 1988. Application of event-related brain potentials to the analysis of interictal attention in absence epilepsy. In: Myslobodsky, M.S., Mirsky, A.F. (Eds.), Elements of Petit Mal Epilepsy. Peter Lang, New York, pp. 341-364] reported that P300 was significantly reduced in a group of absence patients as compared with healthy controls. The present investigation was undertaken to compare the attention deficit in absence patients to that in complex partial seizure patients. Thus, ERPs were recorded while participants with absence seizure disorder, complex partial seizure disorder, and healthy controls performed auditory and visual versions of the CPT. A significant reduction in the amplitude of P300 on the visual CPT was observed in both groups of seizure patients as compared to controls. In contrast, P300 on the auditory CPT was reduced only in the group with absence seizures. These ERP data support and amplify previous behavioral findings of the impaired capacity of absence patients to mobilize and sustain attentional resources. Auditory sustained attention seems to be more affected by the pathophysiology of absence epilepsy than visual attention. Two possible factors may be involved: (a) There are separate visual and auditory attention systems in the brain, and the latter is more vulnerable than the former [Duncan, C.C., Kosmidis, M.H., Mirsky, A.F., 2005. Closed head injury-related information processing deficits: An event-related potential analysis. Int. J. Psychophysiol. 58, 133-157]; and (b) Auditory processing depends on intact mechanisms in the brainstem, which are dysfunctional in patients

  4. The acute and chronic effect of vagus nerve stimulation in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S Dedeurwaerdere; K. Vonck; P Hese van; W.J. Wadman; P Boon

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acute and chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). This is a validated model for absence epilepsy, characterized by frequent spontaneous absences concomitant with spike and wave disc

  5. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences: Electroclinical characteristics in a distinctive pediatric epilepsy phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzmera, Paresh; Menon, Ramshekhar N; Karkare, Kalyani; Soni, Himanshu; Jagtap, Sujit; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article was to study the electroclinical characteristics and seizure outcome of children with epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA). In this descriptive cohort study, we reviewed clinical records of patients who met the criteria for EMA. Each patient's demographic data, birth/developmental history, seizure semiology/pattern, antiepileptic drugs (AED), clinical examination, video-electroencephalography (VEEG), and neuroimaging data were reviewed. Response to AED and change in seizure frequency/pattern on follow-up were noted. Responders were defined by seizure freedom/>50% reduction in seizure frequency on follow-up. Twelve children were diagnosed with EMA between 2008 and 2013 [50% male; mean age of onset: 3.5years]. Main seizure types were the characteristic myoclonic absences (100%) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (42%). Ictal correlate on VEEG was 3- to 3.5-Hz spike-and-wave discharges (82%) and fast recruiting bifrontal rhythm (25%). One patient had specific MRI abnormalities. Mean duration of follow-up was 23.9months. Seizure frequency had significantly improved on follow-up (p=0.005), and at last follow-up, nine patients were in the responder group: four seizure-free for at least 1year, two with >90%, and three with >50% reduction in seizure frequency. The number of AED reduced significantly between initial visit and last follow-up among responders. Two patients on follow-up developed different seizure patterns, with generalized tonic and complex partial seizures. One responder expired because of unprovoked generalized convulsive status epilepticus. This cohort, the largest from the Indian subcontinent on the rare syndrome of EMA, suggests mild heterogeneity in a seemingly homogenous electroclinical phenotype. Clinical semiology while unique may demonstrate focality and variable ictal patterns. Most patients respond to either valproate monotherapy or valproate-lamotrigine combination; however, the prognosis remains guarded. The

  6. Animal models of absence epilepsies: what do they model and do sex and sex hormones matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Onat, Filiz Yilmaz; Gallagher, Martin J

    2014-12-01

    While epidemiological data suggest a female prevalence in human childhood- and adolescence-onset typical absence epilepsy syndromes, the sex difference is less clear in adult-onset syndromes. In addition, although there are more females than males diagnosed with typical absence epilepsy syndromes, there is a paucity of studies on sex differences in seizure frequency and semiology in patients diagnosed with any absence epilepsy syndrome. Moreover, it is unknown if there are sex differences in the prevalence or expression of atypical absence epilepsy syndromes. Surprisingly, most studies of animal models of absence epilepsy either did not investigate sex differences, or failed to find sex-dependent effects. However, various rodent models for atypical syndromes such as the AY9944 model (prepubertal females show a higher incidence than prepubertal males), BN model (also with a higher prevalence in males) and the Gabra1 deletion mouse in the C57BL/6J strain offer unique possibilities for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in sex differences. Although the mechanistic bases for the sex differences in humans or these three models are not yet known, studies of the effects of sex hormones on seizures have offered some possibilities. The sex hormones progesterone, estradiol and testosterone exert diametrically opposite effects in genetic absence epilepsy and pharmacologically-evoked convulsive types of epilepsy models. In addition, acute pharmacological effects of progesterone on absence seizures during proestrus are opposite to those seen during pregnancy. 17β-Estradiol has anti-absence seizure effects, but it is only active in atypical absence models. It is speculated that the pro-absence action of progesterone, and perhaps also the delayed pro-absence action of testosterone, are mediated through the neurosteroid allopregnanolone and its structural and functional homolog, androstanediol. These two steroids increase extrasynaptic thalamic tonic GABAergic

  7. Identifying Brain Image Level Endophenotypes in Epilepsy

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Wei; Tian, Ge; Feng, Jianfeng; Wang, Zhengge; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, GuangMing

    2012-01-01

    A brain wide association study (BWAS) based on the logistic regression was first developed and applied to a large population of epilepsy patients (168) and healthy controls (136). It was found that the most significant links associated with epilepsy are those bilateral links with regions mainly belonging to the default mode network and subcortex, such as amygdala, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, insula, middle occipital gyrus, cuneus. These links were found to have much higher odd ratios than other links, and all of them showed reduced functional couplings in patients compared with controls. Interestingly, with the increasing of the seizure onset frequency or duration of illness, the functional connection between these bilateral regions became further reduced. On the other hand, as a functional compensation and brain plasticity, connections of these bilateral regions to other brain regions were abnormally enhanced and became even much stronger with t...

  8. Learning skills and academic performance in children and adolescents with absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talero-Gutiérrez, C; Sánchez-Torres, J M; Velez-van-Meerbeke, A

    2015-03-01

    Although cognitive and learning disorders have been described in patients with epilepsy, very few studies focus on specific disorders such as absence epilepsy. The aim of this study was to evaluate learning skills and academic performance in children and adolescents with absence epilepsy. Observational case-control study. Cases were chosen from the Central League against Epilepsy's clinic in Bogotá, Colombia. Controls were selected from a private school and matched with cases by age, school year, and sex. Medical history, seizure frequency, antiepileptic treatment, and academic performance were assessed. Academic abilities were tested with Batería de Aptitudes Diferenciales y Generales (BADyG) (a Spanish-language test of differential and general aptitudes). Data were analysed using Student t-test. The sample consisted of 19 cases and 19 controls aged between 7 and 16. In 15 patients, seizures were controlled; all patients had received antiepileptic medication at some point and 78.9% were actively being treated. Although cases had higher rates of academic failure, a greater incidence of grade retention, and more therapeutic interventions than controls, these differences were not significant. Similarly, there were no significant differences on the BADyG test, except for the immediate memory subcategory on which cases scored higher than controls (P=.0006). Children treated pharmacologically for absence epilepsy, whose seizures are controlled, have normal academic abilities and skills for their age. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in the thalamocortical network: strategic targets for the treatment of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngomba, R.T.; Santolini, I.; Salt, T.E.; Ferraguti, F.; Battaglia, G.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are positioned at synapses of the thalamocortical network that underlie the development of spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) associated with absence epilepsy. The modulatory role of individual mGlu receptor subtypes on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic

  10. Genetic animal models for Absence epilepsy: a review of the WAG/Rij strain of rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, A.M.L.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Based on the reviewed literature and the data presented in this paper, conclusions can be drawn with respect to the validity of the WAG/Rij strain of rats as a model for absence epilepsy in humans. The view that the WAG/Rij model has "face validity" is supported by the simultaneous presence of clini

  11. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences - favourable response to add-on rufinamide treatment in 3 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häusler, M; Kluger, G; Nikanorova, M

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) is a rare epileptic syndrome with frequently poor response to antiepileptic treatment. Rufinamide (RUF) is a relatively new EMEA- and FDA-approved anticonvulsant licensed as an orphan drug for the adjunctive treatment of patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome....

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in the thalamocortical network: strategic targets for the treatment of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngomba, R.T.; Santolini, I.; Salt, T.E.; Ferraguti, F.; Battaglia, G.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are positioned at synapses of the thalamocortical network that underlie the development of spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) associated with absence epilepsy. The modulatory role of individual mGlu receptor subtypes on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmi

  13. Quantitative EEG analysis of the maturational changes associated with childhood absence epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, O. A.; Hyslop, W.; Gerlach, R.; Smith, R. L. L.; Rostas, J. A. P.; Hunter, M.

    2005-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the background electroencephalography (EEG) in children with childhood absence epilepsy, a condition whose presentation has strong developmental links. EEG hallmarks of absence seizure activity are widely accepted and there is recognition that the bulk of inter-ictal EEG in this group is normal to the naked eye. This multidisciplinary study aimed to use the normalized total wavelet entropy (NTWS) (Signal Processing 83 (2003) 1275) to examine the background EEG of those patients demonstrating absence seizure activity, and compare it with children without absence epilepsy. This calculation can be used to define the degree of order in a system, with higher levels of entropy indicating a more disordered (chaotic) system. Results were subjected to further statistical analyses of significance. Entropy values were calculated for patients versus controls. For all channels combined, patients with absence epilepsy showed (statistically significant) lower entropy values than controls. The size of the difference in entropy values was not uniform, with certain EEG electrodes consistently showing greater differences than others.

  14. Functional Network Connectivity Patterns between Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy with Myoclonic and Absence Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifu Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extensive cerebral cortex and subcortical structures are considered as the major regions related to the generalized epileptiform discharges in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. However, various clinical syndromes and electroencephalogram (EEG signs exist across generalized seizures, such as the loss of consciousness during absence seizures (AS and the jerk of limbs during myoclonic seizures (MS. It is presumed that various functional systems affected by discharges lead to the difference in syndromes of these seizures. Twenty epileptic patients with MS, 21 patients with AS, and 21 healthy controls were recruited in this study. The functional network connectivity was analyzed based on the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The statistical analysis was performed in three groups to assess the difference in the functional brain networks in two types of generalized seizures. Twelve resting-state networks were identified in three groups. Both patient groups showed common abnormalities, including decreased functional connectivity in salience network (SN, cerebellum network, and primary perceptional networks and decreased connection between SN and visual network, compared with healthy controls. Interestingly, the frontal part of high-level cognitive resting-state networks showed increased functional connectivity (FC in patients with MS, but decreased FC in patients with AS. Moreover, patients with MS showed decreased negative connections between high-level cognitive networks and primary system. The common alteration in both patient groups, including SN, might reflect a similar mechanism associated with the loss of consciousness during generalized seizures. This study provided the evidence of brain network in generalized epilepsy to understand the difference between MS and AS.

  15. Long-term seizure outcome in patients with juvenile absence epilepsy; a retrospective study in a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhofer, Pavlína; Brázdil, Milan; Ošlejšková, Hana; Kuba, Robert

    2014-06-01

    The study aim was to evaluate pharmacotherapy effects and long-term seizure outcomes in patients with juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) during a five-year follow-up period. The secondary aim was to identify factors from patient history and determine their influence on seizure control. We retrospectively studied 46 patients with JAE in the period between 2006 and 2011. The age at seizure onset, onset seizure type, family history of epilepsy, status epilepticus in history, medication history, and the rate of seizure control were studied. There were 30 females (65.2%) and 16 males (34.8%) in the study. The mean age at seizure onset was 12.9±5.6 years (ranged from 3 to 28 years). In 30 patients (65.2%), seizure onset was with absences, in 15 patients (32.6%) with generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS), and in 1 patient (2.2%) with absence status. In 43 patients (93.5%), GTCS occurred in the course of the disease. Family history for epilepsy was positive in 10 patients (21.7%). In the five-year follow-up period, seizure freedom (Group 1) was achieved in 7 patients (15.2%). In total, 22 patients (47.8%) were classified into the groups involving very poor seizure control and antiepileptic drug resistance (Groups 5 and 6). The mean number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used in the course of the disease in appropriate therapeutic doses was 3.8±2.3 (1-10 AEDs). The study results show that almost half of JAE patients have poor seizure control with a high rate of pharmacoresistance. The outcome of JAE can be very uncertain. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EEG-fMRI study of resting-state networks in childhood absence epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Ling

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the alterations of resting-state brain functional networks in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI analysis, and to explore the cognitive disorders of children in epileptic seizures. Methods According to case selection criteria, 12 children with absence seizure were selected, from whom 17 fMRI data with generalized slow-wave discharges (GSWD and the matched data without discharges were collected by using electroencephalogram (EEG-fMRI synchronization. Independent component analysis was used to investigate the alterations in different states of 7 resting-state networks including the thalamus, default-mode network, dorsal attention network, central execution network and perceptive networks. Results Paired t-test and correlation analysis were used for statistical analysis. The thalamus showed increased coherence of brain activity in GSWD state, and the increased coherence was positively correlated with the durations of GSWD (r = 0.890, P = 0.000. The default-mode network (r = - 0.706, P = 0.000, dorsal attention network (r = - 0.829, P = 0.000 and central execution network (r = - 0.905, P = 0.000, which dealt with high -grade cognitive functions, showed decreased coherence, and the brain activity coherence in these networks were negatively correlated with GSWD durations. However, none of low-grade perceptive networks was found to have significant alteration in GSWD state. Conclusion The increased coherence of brain activity in the thalamus may be associated with the generation of GSWD in childhood absence epilepsy. Besides the default brain function, the processes of attention and cognitive execution may also be impaired in childhood absence epilepsy, while low-grade perceptive functions may not be greatly impacted. This study may contribute to the understanding of pathophysiological mechanism of impaired consciousness in childhood absence epilepsy.

  17. Age-dependent decline in learning and memory performances of WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Karson Ayşe; Utkan Tijen; Balcı Fuat; Arıcıoğlu Feyza; Ateş Nurbay

    2012-01-01

    RESEARCH Open Access Age-dependent decline in learning and memory performances of WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy Ayşe Karson1*, Tijen Utkan2, Fuat Balcı3, Feyza Arıcıoğlu4 and Nurbay Ateş1 Abstract Recent clinical studies revealed emotional and cognitive impairments associated with absence epilepsy. Preclinical research with genetic models of absence epilepsy however have primarily focused on dysfunctional emotional processes and paid relatively less attention t...

  18. Abnormal benzodiazepine and zinc modulation of GABAA receptors in an acquired absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Ellsworth, Kevin; Ellsworth, Marc; Schroeder, Katherine M; Smith, Kris; Fisher, Robert S

    2004-07-01

    Brain cholesterol synthesis inhibition (CSI) at a young age in rats has been shown to be a faithful model of acquired absence epilepsy, a devastating condition for which few therapies or models exist. We employed the CSI model to study cellular mechanisms of acquired absence epilepsy in Long-Evans Hooded rats. Patch-clamp, whole-cell recordings were compared from neurons acutely dissociated from the nucleus reticularis of thalamus (nRt) treated and untreated with a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, U18666A. In U18666A-treated animals, 91% of rats developed EEG spike-waves (SWs). Patchclamp results revealed that although there was no remarkable change in GABAA receptor affinity, both a loss of ability of benzodiazepines to enhance GABAA-receptor responses and an increase of Zn2+ inhibition of GABAA-receptor responses of nRt neurons occurred in Long-Evans Hooded rats previously administered U18666A. This change was specific, since no significant changes were found in neurons exposed to the GABA allosteric modulator, pentobarbital. Taken collectively, these findings provide evidence for abnormalities in benzodiazepine and Zn2+ modulation of GABAA receptors in the CSI model, and suggest that decreased gamma2 subunit expression may underlie important aspects of generation of thalamocortical SWs in atypical absence seizures. The present results are also consistent with recent findings that mutation of the gamma2 subunit of the GABAA receptor changes benzodiazepine modulation in families with generalized epilepsy syndromes.

  19. Identifying workers at risk of sickness absence by questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, Corne A. M.; van der Pol, Tjepke R.; Koopmans, Petra C.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    2006-01-01

    Background Sickness absence is an important economic problem, because of high costs and lost productivity. Determining factors associated with increased risk of sickness absence may lead to the development of preventive measures. Aims To determine whether self-report questionnaires can identify thos

  20. A balanced translocation disrupts SYNGAP1 in a patient with intellectual disability, speech impairment, and epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitten, Laura L; Møller, Rikke S; Nikanorova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) is a rare form of generalized epilepsy occurring in childhood and is often difficult to treat. The underlying etiology of EMA is unknown in the majority of patients. Herein, we describe a patient with EMA and intellectual disability who carries a de novo bal...

  1. Neonatal sensory deprivation promotes development of absence seizures in adult rats with genetic predisposition to epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, Evgenia

    2011-03-04

    Absence epilepsy has age-related onset. In a WAG/Rij rat genetic model, absence seizures appear after puberty and they are increased with age. It is known that (1) epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is initiated at the perioral area in the somatosensory cortex; (2) sensory deprivation, i.e., whisker trimming during the critical period of development, could enhance excitatory activity in the somatosensory cortex. It is hypothesized that the cortex may become more excitable after neonatal vibrissae removal, and this may precipitate absence seizures in adult rats. We found that whisker trimming during the first postnatal weeks caused more rapid development of EEG seizure activity in adult WAG/Rij rats. Epileptic discharges in the trimmed rats were more numerous (vs control), showed longer duration and often appeared in desynchronized and drowsy EEG. The number of absence-like spindle-shaped EEG events (spike-wave spindles) in the whisker-trimmed rats was higher than in control, especially during the intermediate sleep state. An age-dependent increase of intermediate sleep state was found in the trimmed rats, but not in the intact animals. We discuss epigenetic factors that can modulate absence epilepsy in genetically prone subjects.

  2. Automatic Detection of Childhood Absence Epilepsy Seizures: Toward a Monitoring Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Madsen, Rasmus E.; Remvig, Line S.;

    2012-01-01

    long-term prognoses, balancing antiepileptic effects and side effects. The electroencephalographic appearance of paroxysms in childhood absence epilepsy is fairly homogeneous, making it feasible to develop patient-independent automatic detection. We implemented a state-of-the-art algorithm...... to investigate the performance of paroxysm detection. Using only a single scalp electroencephalogram channel from 20 patients with a total of 125 paroxysms >2 seconds, 97.2% of paroxysms could be detected with no false detections. This result leads us to recommend further investigations of tiny, one......-channel electroencephalogram systems in an ambulatory setting....

  3. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; psemiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multimodal neuroimaging investigations of alterations to consciousness: the relationship between absence epilepsy and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Andrew P; Rollings, David T; Khalsa, Sakh; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The link between epilepsy and sleep is well established on many levels. The focus of the current review is on recent neuroimaging investigations into the alterations of consciousness that are observed during absence seizures and the descent into sleep. Functional neuroimaging provides simultaneous cortical and subcortical recording of activity throughout the brain, allowing a detailed definition and characterization of large-scale brain networks and the interactions between them. This has led to the identification of a set of regions which collectively form the consciousness system, which includes contributions from the default mode network (DMN), ascending arousal systems, and the thalamus. Electrophysiological and neuroimaging investigations have also clearly demonstrated the importance of thalamocortical and corticothalamic networks in the evolution of sleep and absence epilepsy, two phenomena in which the subject experiences an alteration to the conscious state and a disconnection from external input. However, the precise relationship between the consciousness system, thalamocortical networks, and consciousness itself remains to be clarified. One of the fundamental challenges is to understand how distributed brain networks coordinate their activity in order to maintain and implement complex behaviors such as consciousness and how modifications to this network activity lead to alterations in consciousness. By taking into account not only the level of activation of individual brain regions but also their connectivity within specific networks and the activity and connectivity of other relevant networks, a more specific quantification of brain states can be achieved. This, in turn, may provide a more fundamental understanding of the alterations to consciousness experienced in sleep and epilepsy. © 2013.

  5. The sleep-wakefulness cycle of Wistar rats with spontaneous absence-like epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Sanfelice André

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Possible interactions between the sleep-wakefulness cycle and a new kind of spontaneous epilepsy, expressed as absence-like seizures and spike-wave bursts in FMUSP rats, are evaluated. The electro-oscillograms of some cortical and subcortical regions of the brain were recorded, as well as head, rostrum/vibrissae and eye movements. Recordings were performed uninterruptedly during 24 hours. The seizures were mostly concentrated in the wakefulness state but they could occur in any other phase, including paradoxical sleep. After the seizure, the rats usually returned to the same phase that was interrupted, although they often returned to wakefulness. There was an intense fragmentation of the sleep-wakefulness cycle. The incidence of each cycle phase was significantly reduced, except SIII of synchronized sleep and paradoxical sleep, thus maintaining the overall duration and architecture of the sleep-wakefulness cycle. The fragmentation of the cycle seems to be due to an impairment of the very processes that generate sleep and wakefulness. Electrophysiological and behavioral profiles of the FMUSP rats recommend accurate and comprehensive study of the animal model owing to its resemblance to seizures in humans and also to discrepancies with existing genetic or experimental epilepsy models.

  6. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences - favourable response to add-on rufinamide treatment in 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, M; Kluger, G; Nikanorova, M

    2011-02-01

    Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) is a rare epileptic syndrome with frequently poor response to antiepileptic treatment. Rufinamide (RUF) is a relatively new EMEA- and FDA-approved anticonvulsant licensed as an orphan drug for the adjunctive treatment of patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. A retrospective data analysis in 3 patients was performed. Add-on RUF treatment was initiated in 3 boys with EMA refractory to conventional antiepileptic therapy (primidone + valproic acid, n=1; levetiracetame + ethosuximide, n=2). It resulted in complete cessation of all seizures in 2, and a 50% reduction of the seizure frequency in one child, respectively. RUF add-on therapy should be considered in children with EMA not responding to conventional antiepileptic therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Attention Contributes to Arithmetic Deficits in New-Onset Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dazhi Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological studies indicate that new-onset childhood absence epilepsy (CAE is associated with deficits in attention and executive functioning. However, the contribution of these deficits to impaired academic performance remains unclear. We aimed to examine whether attention and executive functioning deficits account for the academic difficulties prevalent in patients with new-onset CAE. We analyzed cognitive performance in several domains, including language, mathematics, psychomotor speed, spatial ability, memory, general intelligence, attention, and executive functioning, in 35 children with new-onset CAE and 33 control participants. Patients with new-onset CAE exhibited deficits in mathematics, general intelligence, attention, and executive functioning. Furthermore, attention deficits, as measured by a visual tracing task, accounted for impaired arithmetic performance in the new-onset CAE group. Therefore, attention deficits, rather than impaired general intelligence or executive functioning, may be responsible for arithmetic performance deficits in patients with new-onset CAE.

  8. Time-frequency dynamics during sleep spindles on the EEG in rodents with a genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij rats)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Khramova, Marina V.

    2015-03-01

    Sleep spindles are known to appear spontaneously in the thalamocortical neuronal network of the brain during slow-wave sleep; pathological processes in the thalamocortical network may be the reason of the absence epilepsy. The aim of the present work is to study developed changes in the time-frequency structure of sleep spindles during the progressive development of the absence epilepsy in WAG/Rij rats. EEG recordings were made at age 7 and 9 months. Automatic recognition and subsequent analysis of sleep spindles on the EEG were performed using the continuous wavelet transform. The duration of epileptic discharges and the total duration of epileptic activity were found to increase with age, while the duration of sleep spindles, conversely, decreased. In terms of the mean frequency, sleep spindles could be divided into three classes: `slow' (mean frequency 9.3Hz), `medium' (11.4Hz), and `fast' (13.5Hz). Slow and medium (transitional) spindles in five-month-old animals showed increased frequency from the beginning to the end of the spindle. The more intense the epilepsy is, the shorter are the durations of spindles of all types. The mean frequencies of `medium' and `fast' spindles were higher in rats with more intense signs of epilepsy. Overall, high epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats was linked with significant changes in spindles of the transitional type, with less marked changes in the two traditionally identified types of spindle, slow and fast.

  9. Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  10. Epilepsy diagnostic and treatment needs identified with a collaborative database involving tertiary centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Szurhaj, William; Vercueil, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Cances, Claude; Auvin, Stéphane; Chassagnon, Serge; Napuri, Sylvia; Allaire, Catherine; Derambure, Philippe; Marchal, Cécile; Caubel, Isabelle; Ricard-Mousnier, Brigitte; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Pinard, Jean-Marc; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; de Baracé, Claire; Kahane, Philippe; Gautier, Agnès; Hamelin, Sophie; Coste-Zeitoun, Delphine; Rosenberg, Sarah-Dominique; Clerson, Pierre; Nabbout, Rima; Kuchenbuch, Mathieu; Picot, Marie-Christine; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-05-01

    To obtain perspective on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers in France, and describe etiology, epilepsy syndromes, and identify factors of drug resistance and comorbidities. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the characteristics of 5,794 pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy included in a collaborative database in France between 2007 and 2013. Comparisons between groups used Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test for binary or categorical variables. Factors associated with drug resistance and intellectual disability were evaluated in multi-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean age at inclusion was 17.9 years; children accounted for 67%. Epilepsy was unclassified in 20% of patients, and etiology was unknown in 65%, including those with idiopathic epilepsies. Etiologies differed significantly in adult- when compared to pediatric-onset epilepsy; however, among focal structural epilepsies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis began as often in the pediatric as in adult age range. Drug resistance concerned 53% of 4,210 patients evaluable for seizure control and was highest in progressive myoclonic epilepsy (89%), metabolic diseases (84%), focal cortical dysplasia (70%), other cortical malformations (69%), and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (67%). Fifty-nine percent of patients with focal structural epilepsy and 69% with epileptic encephalopathies were drug resistant; however, 40-50% of patients with West syndrome and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep were seizure-free. Ages at onset in infancy and in young adults shared the highest risk of drug resistance. Epilepsy onset in infancy comprised the highest risk of intellectual disability, whereas specific cognitive impairment affected 36% of children with idiopathic focal epilepsy. Our study provides a snapshot on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers and discloses needs for diagnosis and treatment

  11. The expression of Fetuin-A in brain tissues of WAG/Rij Rats, genetic rat model of absence epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yüksel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to determine the Fetuin-A levels in different regions of the brain in absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij rats in order to contribute the identification of new potential biomarkers of the diagnosis, prognosis and follow up the epilepsy treatment. Methods: 1, 3 and 6 months old male WAG/Rij rats (n=21 with absence epilepsy were used in this study. All of the rats were decapitated under anesthesia and their cortex and thalamus tissues were isolated. Fetuin-A levels of the groups were determined by Western Blot method by using standard techniques and differences between densities of the groups were compared. Results: According to data obtained, there was no Fetuin-A expression in brain cortex and thalamus tissues of WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy. Conclusion: In this study, it was shown that Fetuin-A is not expressed in brain cortex and thalamus tissues of WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy throughout the age-related development. By evaluating the findings obtained, extensive researches that contain molecular and histological methods must be planned, Fetuin-A findings that are obtained experimentally must be confirmed. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (4: 387-390

  12. The ovarian hormones and absence epilepsy: a long-term EEG study and pharmacological effects in a genetic absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijtelaar, G; Budziszewska, B; Jaworska-Feil, L; Ellis, J; Coenen, A; Lasoń, W

    2001-09-01

    In the first experiment, the relationship between the phase of the estrous cycle and the number of spontaneously occurring spike-wave discharges was investigated in WAG/Rij rats, a model for generalized absence epilepsy. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was continuously recorded for 96 h in eight rats chronically equipped with cortical EEG electrodes. A circadian pattern emerged for the number of spike-wave discharges: a nadir during the first hours of the light period, and an acrophase during the first hours of the dark period. This daily maximum was increased at proestrus day compared with the other days of the cycle, when the plasma level of progesterone is enhanced specifically at these hours of this day. This suggests that progesterone enhances spike-wave discharges. There was no difference in the first few hours of the light period in the number of spike-wave discharges between proestrus and the three other days, suggesting that estradiol has no effect on spike-wave discharges. In the second study, the effects of the systemic administration of progesterone and 17 beta-estradiol on spike-wave discharges and spontaneous behavior were investigated. It was shown that progesterone (20 and 30 mg/kg) but not estradiol (0.17-1.5 mg/kg) increased the number and total duration of spike-wave discharges. On the other hand, injection of RU 38486 (10 and 30 mg/kg), an antagonist of intracellular progesterone receptors, had no effect on spike-wave discharges and did not block the stimulatory effect of progesterone. The antagonist of 17 beta-estradiol tamoxifen (1 and 3 mg/kg) did not evoke alterations in the number or duration of spike-wave discharges. Our results indicate that progesterone aggravates spike-wave discharges, but is not mediated through intracellular receptors. Since progesterone is rapidly metabolized in the brain to the positive modulator of GABA(A) receptor allopregnanolone, which increases spike-wave discharges in WAG/Rij rats, it is possible that the

  13. Differentiating Interictal and Ictal States in Childhood Absence Epilepsy through Permutation Rényi Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mammone

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Permutation entropy (PE has been widely exploited to measure the complexity of the electroencephalogram (EEG, especially when complexity is linked to diagnostic information embedded in the EEG. Recently, the authors proposed a spatial-temporal analysis of the EEG recordings of absence epilepsy patients based on PE. The goal here is to improve the ability of PE in discriminating interictal states from ictal states in absence seizure EEG. For this purpose, a parametrical definition of permutation entropy is introduced here in the field of epileptic EEG analysis: the permutation Rényi entropy (PEr. PEr has been extensively tested against PE by tuning the involved parameters (order, delay time and alpha. The achieved results demonstrate that PEr outperforms PE, as there is a statistically-significant, wider gap between the PEr levels during the interictal states and PEr levels observed in the ictal states compared to PE. PEr also outperformed PE as the input to a classifier aimed at discriminating interictal from ictal states.

  14. Progress and outlooks in a genetic absence epilepsy model (WAG/Rij).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijtelaar, G; Zobeiri, M

    2014-01-01

    The WAG/Rij model is a well characterized and validated genetic animal epilepsy model in which the for absence epilepsy highly characteristic spike-wave discharges (SWDs) develop spontaneously. In this review we discuss first some older and many new studies, with an emphasis on pharmacological and neurochemical studies towards the role of GABA and glutamate and the ion channels involved in the pathological firing patterns. Next, new insights and highlights from the last 5-10 years of reaearch in WAG/Rij rats are discussed. First, early environmental factors modulate SWD characteristics and antiepileptogenesis is possible. Also new is that the classically assumed association between sleep spindles and SWDs seems no longer valid as an explanatory role for the occurrence of SWDs in the genetic rodent models. A role of cortical and thalamic glial cells has been revealed, indicating a putative role for inflammatory cytokines. Neurophysiologic and signal analytical studies in this and in another rodent model (GAERS) point towards a cortical site of origin, that SWDs do not have a sudden onset, and propose a more important role for the posterior thalamus than was previously assumed. Finally it is proposed that the reticular nucleus of the thalamus might be heterogeneous with respect to its role in propagation and maintenance of SWDs. The presence of a well-established cortical region in which SWDs are elicited allows for research towards new non-invasive treatment options, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The first results show the feasibility of this new approach.

  15. Benzodiazepine amplification of valproate teratogenic effects in children of mothers with absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laegreid, L; Kyllerman, M; Hedner, T; Hagberg, B; Viggedahl, G

    1993-04-01

    Valproate (VPA) is one of the most frequently used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Concern has recently been raised regarding VPA medication during pregnancy and teratogenic effects in the offspring. Both neural tube defects (5, 18, 34) and a constellation of signs termed the fetal valproate syndrome (1, 12) have been reported. Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are also widely used and sometimes as effective adjunctives in AED therapy. Both VPA and BZD have close connections to GABA transmission. Recently, clinical and epidemiological human studies (26, 27, 37, 39), supported by animal studies (17, 24, 40), have indicated that BZDs may act as human teratogens. We report on 7 children with congenital malformations, dysmorphism and abnormal neurological signs from birth. The mothers had well controlled primary generalized absence epilepsy without major seizures during pregnancy. Five children had been exposed to VPA monotherapy and two children to VPA and BZD combined during the first trimester. Those two infants had myelomeningoceles and the most pronounced dysmorphism in the group. We propose that these observations indicate a possible amplifying action of BZDs on VPA teratogenicity. Unrecognized BZD use during pregnancies exposed to VPA may be of importance when estimating the teratogenic risks of VPA therapy.

  16. The role of SLC2A1 mutations in myoclonic astatic epilepsy and absence epilepsy, and the estimated frequency of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Johannesen, Katrine Marie; Ek, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    The first mutations identified in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) protein of the blood-brain barrier, were associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. Recently, dominant SLC2A1 mutations were found in rare autosomal dominant families with various forms of epilepsy inc...

  17. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. The epilepsies have many ... sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. The epilepsies have many ...

  18. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  19. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of epilepsy medicines Use of alcohol or other recreational drugs Other considerations: People with epilepsy should wear medical ... panel Dementia Diabetes Encephalitis Head injury - first aid HIV/AIDS Meningitis Neurosyphilis Phenylketonuria Prerenal azotemia Seizures Stroke ...

  20. Genetic Variants Identified from Epilepsy of Unknown Etiology in Chinese Children by Targeted Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Du, Xiaonan; Bin, Rao; Yu, Shanshan; Xia, Zhezhi; Zheng, Guo; Zhong, Jianmin; Zhang, Yunjian; Jiang, Yong-hui; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors play a major role in the etiology of epilepsy disorders. Recent genomics studies using next generation sequencing (NGS) technique have identified a large number of genetic variants including copy number (CNV) and single nucleotide variant (SNV) in a small set of genes from individuals with epilepsy. These discoveries have contributed significantly to evaluate the etiology of epilepsy in clinic and lay the foundation to develop molecular specific treatment. However, the molecular basis for a majority of epilepsy patients remains elusive, and furthermore, most of these studies have been conducted in Caucasian children. Here we conducted a targeted exome-sequencing of 63 trios of Chinese epilepsy families using a custom-designed NGS panel that covers 412 known and candidate genes for epilepsy. We identified pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants in 15 of 63 (23.8%) families in known epilepsy genes including SCN1A, CDKL5, STXBP1, CHD2, SCN3A, SCN9A, TSC2, MBD5, POLG and EFHC1. More importantly, we identified likely pathologic variants in several novel candidate genes such as GABRE, MYH1, and CLCN6. Our results provide the evidence supporting the application of custom-designed NGS panel in clinic and indicate a conserved genetic susceptibility for epilepsy between Chinese and Caucasian children. PMID:28074849

  1. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Identifying risk and preventing mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhatoo, Samden; Noebels, Jeffrey; Whittemore, Vicky

    2015-11-01

    Premature death among individuals with epilepsy is higher than in the general population, and sudden unexpected death is the most common cause of this mortality. A new multisite collaborative research consortium, the Center for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Research (CSR), has received major funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to examine the possible biologic mechanisms underlying this potentially preventable comorbidity and develop predictive biomarkers for interventions that could lower SUDEP incidence. This inaugural report describes the structure of the CSR, its priorities for human and experimental research, and the strategic collaborations and advanced tools under development to reduce this catastrophic outcome of epilepsy. The CSR Partners Program will work closely with committed volunteer agencies, industry, and academic institutions to accelerate and communicate these advances to the professional and lay community.

  2. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and clas......-sification. More than two thirds of patients with epilepsy can obtain complete seizure control. The remainders, counting around 12.000 patients in Denmark, having medical refractory epilepsy should be considered for other treatment options; epilepsy surgery or other non-pharmacological treatment....

  3. A balanced translocation disrupts SYNGAP1 in a patient with intellectual disability, speech impairment, and epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitten, Laura L; Møller, Rikke S; Nikanorova, Marina; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Hjalgrim, Helle; Tommerup, Niels

    2011-12-01

    Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) is a rare form of generalized epilepsy occurring in childhood and is often difficult to treat. The underlying etiology of EMA is unknown in the majority of patients. Herein, we describe a patient with EMA and intellectual disability who carries a de novo balanced translocation: t(6;22)(p21.32;q11.21). We mapped the translocation breakpoints by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the breakpoint at 6p21.32 was found to truncate the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor associated gene SYNGAP1. The breakpoint at 22q11.21 was within a highly variable region without known protein-coding genes. Mutations of SYNGAP1 are associated with nonsyndromal intellectual disability (NSID). Two-thirds of the patients described so far also have generalized epilepsy. This finding, together with our report, suggests that dysfunction of SYNGAP1 contributes to the development of generalized epilepsy, including EMA.

  4. Identifying and Analyzing Novel Epilepsy-Related Genes Using Random Walk with Restart Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a pathological condition, epilepsy is caused by abnormal neuronal discharge in brain which will temporarily disrupt the cerebral functions. Epilepsy is a chronic disease which occurs in all ages and would seriously affect patients’ personal lives. Thus, it is highly required to develop effective medicines or instruments to treat the disease. Identifying epilepsy-related genes is essential in order to understand and treat the disease because the corresponding proteins encoded by the epilepsy-related genes are candidates of the potential drug targets. In this study, a pioneering computational workflow was proposed to predict novel epilepsy-related genes using the random walk with restart (RWR algorithm. As reported in the literature RWR algorithm often produces a number of false positive genes, and in this study a permutation test and functional association tests were implemented to filter the genes identified by RWR algorithm, which greatly reduce the number of suspected genes and result in only thirty-three novel epilepsy genes. Finally, these novel genes were analyzed based upon some recently published literatures. Our findings implicate that all novel genes were closely related to epilepsy. It is believed that the proposed workflow can also be applied to identify genes related to other diseases and deepen our understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases.

  5. Identifying and Analyzing Novel Epilepsy-Related Genes Using Random Walk with Restart Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Shang, Dong-Mei; Cao, Jing-Hui; Feng, Kaiyan; Wang, ShaoPeng

    2017-01-01

    As a pathological condition, epilepsy is caused by abnormal neuronal discharge in brain which will temporarily disrupt the cerebral functions. Epilepsy is a chronic disease which occurs in all ages and would seriously affect patients' personal lives. Thus, it is highly required to develop effective medicines or instruments to treat the disease. Identifying epilepsy-related genes is essential in order to understand and treat the disease because the corresponding proteins encoded by the epilepsy-related genes are candidates of the potential drug targets. In this study, a pioneering computational workflow was proposed to predict novel epilepsy-related genes using the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm. As reported in the literature RWR algorithm often produces a number of false positive genes, and in this study a permutation test and functional association tests were implemented to filter the genes identified by RWR algorithm, which greatly reduce the number of suspected genes and result in only thirty-three novel epilepsy genes. Finally, these novel genes were analyzed based upon some recently published literatures. Our findings implicate that all novel genes were closely related to epilepsy. It is believed that the proposed workflow can also be applied to identify genes related to other diseases and deepen our understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases.

  6. Electric stimulation of the tuberomamillary nucleus affects epileptic activity and sleep-wake cycle in a genetic absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blik, Vitaliya

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising approach for epilepsy treatment, but the optimal targets and parameters of stimulation are yet to be investigated. Tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN) is involved in EEG desynchronization-one of the proposed mechanisms for DBS action. We studied whether TMN stimulation could interfere with epileptic spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in WAG/Rij rats with inherited absence epilepsy and whether such stimulation would affect sleep-wake cycle. EEG and video registration were used to determine SWD occurrence and stages of sleep and wake during three-hours recording sessions. Stimulation (100Hz) was applied in two modes: closed-loop (with previously determined interruption threshold intensity) or open-loop mode (with 50% or 70% threshold intensity). Closed-loop stimulation successfully interrupted SWDs but elevated their number by 148 ± 54% compared to baseline. It was accompanied by increase in number of episodes but not total duration of both active and passive wakefulness. Open-loop stimulation with amplitude 50% threshold did not change measured parameters, though 70% threshold stimulation reduced SWDs number by 40 ± 9%, significantly raised the amount of active wakefulness and decreased the amount of both slow-wave and rapid eye movement sleep. These results suggest that the TMN is unfavorable as a target for DBS as its stimulation may cause alterations in sleep-wake cycle. A careful choosing of parameters and control of sleep-wake activity is necessary when applying DBS in epilepsy.

  7. Absence of gender effect on amygdala volume in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ivaldo; Lin, Katia; Jackowski, Andrea P; Centeno, Ricardo da Silva; Pinto, Magali L; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza M; Amado, Débora

    2010-11-01

    Sexual dimorphism has already been described in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). This study evaluated the effect of gender on amygdala volume in patients with TLE-MTS. One hundred twenty-four patients with refractory unilateral or bilateral TLE-MTS who were being considered for epilepsy surgery underwent a comprehensive presurgical evaluation and MRI. Amygdalas of 67 women (27 with right; 32 with left, and 8 with bilateral TLE) and 57 men (22 with right, 30 with left, and 5 with bilateral TLE) were manually segmented. Significant ipsilateral amygdala volume reduction was observed for patients with right and left TLE. No gender effect on amygdala volume was observed. Contralateral amygdalar asymmetry was observed for patients with right and left TLE. Although no gender effect was observed on amygdala volume, ipsilateral amygdala volume reductions in patients with TLE might be related to differential rates of cerebral maturation between hemispheres.

  8. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008481 Application of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation to the temporal lobe epilepsy with bilateral hippocampal sclerosis: an fMRI study. ZHANG Zhiqiang(张志强), et al.Dept Med Imaging, Clin Sch, Med Coll, Nanjing Univ, Nanjing 210002.Natl Med J China 2008;88(23):1594-1598. Objective To study the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of the resting-fMRI in the mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) with

  9. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008115 Effect of commonly used antiepileptic drugs on cognitive functions of rats with pentylenetetrazol-induced epilepsy. WANG Xiaopeng(王晓鹏), et al. Dept Neurol, 2nd Hosp, Hebei Med Univ, Shijiazhuang 050000. Shanghai Med J 2007;30(12):920-923. Objective To observe the effect of antiepileptic drugs on the cognitive functions of rats with induced epilepsy. Methods Seventy male SD rats in their puberty were randomized into 7 groups,

  10. Identifying clinical correlates for suicide among epilepsy patients in South Korea: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hochang Benjamin; Ahn, Myung Hee; Park, Subin; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Hoon-Jin; Ryu, Han Uk; Kang, Joong-Koo; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-12-01

    Suicide is a major cause of premature mortality in patients with epilepsy. We aimed to identify the clinical correlates of suicide in these patients. We conducted a matched, case-control study based on a clinical case registry of epilepsy patients (n = 35,638) treated between January 1994 and December 2011 at an academic tertiary medical center in Seoul, Korea. Each epilepsy patient in the suicide group (n = 74) was matched with three epilepsy patients in the nonsuicide group (n = 222) by age, gender, and approximate time at first treatment. The clinical characteristics of the patients in both groups were then compared. In a univariate analysis, seizure frequency during the year before suicide, use of antiepileptic drug polytherapy, lack of aura before seizure, diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy, use of levetiracetam, psychiatric comorbidity, and use of antidepressants were all significantly higher in the suicide group than in the nonsuicide group. Multivariate analysis revealed that a high seizure frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-10.2), a lack of aura before seizure (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.3), temporal lobe epilepsy (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.6-8.6), and use of levetiracetam (OR 7.6, 95% CI 1.1-53.7) and antidepressants (OR 7.2, 95% CI 1.5-34.1) were all associated with a higher probability of suicide. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who experience seizures weekly or more frequently, experience a lack of aura, use levetiracetam, or take antidepressants are all at a higher risk of suicide and should be monitored closely. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Absence and mixed forms of epilepsy in WAG/Rij rats : characteristics and brain aminergic modulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Midzyanovskaya, Inna Stanislavovna

    2006-01-01

    The neuroanatomical substrates of absence seizures and convulsive seizures differ; absence seizures are generated in the cortico-thalamic loop, whereas the brain stem and limbic structures are involved in audiogenic convulsive seizures. In spite of this difference, the two seizure types share a majo

  12. Absence of GABRA1 Ala322Asp mutation in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy families from India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Kapoor; J. Vijai; H. M. Ravishankar; P. Satishchandra; K. Radhakrishnan; A. Anand

    2003-04-01

    An Ala322Asp mutation in the GABRA1 gene was recently reported to be responsible for causing the autosomal dominant (AD) form of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) in a French-Canadian family. To study if JME families from India exhibiting the AD mode of inheritance carry the Ala322Asp mutation, we examined 35 unrelated JME-affected individuals from such families for the Ala322Asp mutation in GABRA1. Ala322Asp mutation was not observed in any of these JME-affected individuals, suggesting that this mutation is unlikely to be a predominant mutation involved in causation of epilepsy. To evaluate the possibility of other mutation(s) in and around GABRA1 that may predispose to JME, we compared the allele frequencies at two marker loci, D5S2118 and D5S422, flanking GABRA1, in probands and 100 matched population controls. One of the allele frequencies at D5S422 shows a significant difference between the cases and controls (2 = 11.44, d.f. = 1, $P = 0.0007$), suggesting genetic association between JME and genes located in the proximity of the DNA marker.

  13. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005267 Expression and their clinical significances of five multidrug resistance gene products in refractory epilepsy brain tissues. XIAO Zheng (肖争), et al. Dept Neurol,Lab, Affili Hosp, Chongqing Med Univ, Chongqing 400016, Chin J Neurol, 2004;37(6) 500-503. Objective: To investigate the expression and their clinical significances of five multidrug resistance gene products in human epileptogenic pathologies. Methods: 17 refractory epilepsy patients were divided into two groups: long course group (≥10 years) and short course group (<10 years). The expression

  14. Cingulate Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawadri, Rafeed; So, Norman K.; Van Ness, Paul C.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The literature on cingulate gyrus epilepsy in the magnetic resonance imaging era is limited to case reports and small case series. To our knowledge, this is the largest study of surgically confirmed epilepsy arising from the anterior or posterior cingulate region. OBJECTIVE To characterize the clinical and electrophysiological findings of epilepsies arising from the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied consecutive cingulate gyrus epilepsy cases identified retrospectively from the Cleveland Clinic and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center epilepsy databases from 1992 to 2009. Participants included 14 consecutive cases of cingulate gyrus epilepsies confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was improvement in seizure frequency following surgery. The clinical, video electroencephalography, neuroimaging, pathology, and surgical outcome data were reviewed. RESULTS All 14 patients had cingulate epilepsy confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. They were divided into 3 groups based on anatomical location of the lesion and corresponding seizure semiology. In the posterior cingulate group, all 4 patients had electroclinical findings suggestive of temporal origin of the epilepsy. The anterior cingulate cases were divided into a typical (Bancaud) group (6 cases with hypermotor seizures and infrequent generalization with the presence of fear, laughter, or severe interictal personality changes) and an atypical group (4 cases presenting with simple motor seizures and a tendency for more frequent generalization and less-favorable long-term surgical outcome). All atypical cases were associated with an underlying infiltrative astrocytoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Posterior cingulate gyrus epilepsy may

  15. Inherited cortical HCN1 channel loss amplifies dendritic calcium electrogenesis and burst firing in a rat absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Maarten H P; Bräuer, Anja U; Stuart, Greg J

    2007-01-15

    While idiopathic generalized epilepsies are thought to evolve from temporal highly synchronized oscillations between thalamic and cortical networks, their cellular basis remains poorly understood. Here we show in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij) that a rapid decline in expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated (HCN1) channels (I(h)) precedes the onset of seizures, suggesting that the loss of HCN1 channel expression is inherited rather than acquired. Loss of HCN1 occurs primarily in the apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the cortex, leading to a spatially uniform 2-fold reduction in dendritic HCN current throughout the entire somato-dendritic axis. Dual whole-cell recordings from the soma and apical dendrites demonstrate that loss of HCN1 increases somato-dendritic coupling and significantly reduces the frequency threshold for generation of dendritic Ca2+ spikes by backpropagating action potentials. As a result of increased dendritic Ca2+ electrogenesis a large population of WAG/Rij layer 5 neurons showed intrinsic high-frequency burst firing. Using morphologically realistic models of layer 5 pyramidal neurons from control Wistar and WAG/Rij animals we show that the experimentally observed loss of dendritic I(h) recruits dendritic Ca2+ channels to amplify action potential-triggered dendritic Ca2+ spikes and increase burst firing. Thus, loss of function of dendritic HCN1 channels in layer 5 pyramidal neurons provides a somato-dendritic mechanism for increasing the synchronization of cortical output, and is therefore likely to play an important role in the generation of absence seizures.

  16. Sociability impairments in Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg: Reversal by the T-type calcium channel antagonist Z944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henbid, Mark T; Marks, Wendie N; Collins, Madeline J; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2017-10-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is associated with interictal co-morbid symptoms including abnormalities in social behaviour. Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) is a model of CAE that exhibits physiological and behavioural alterations characteristic of the human disorder. However, it is unknown if GAERS display the social deficits often observed in CAE. Sociability in rodents is thought to be mediated by neural circuits densely populated with T-type calcium channels and GAERS contain a missense mutation in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of the clinical stage pan-T-type calcium channel blocker, Z944, on sociability behaviour in male and female GAERS and non-epileptic control (NEC) animals. Female GAERS showed reduced sociability in a three-chamber sociability task whereas male GAERS, male NECs, and female NECs all showed a preference for the chamber containing a stranger rat. In drug trials, pre-treatment with 5mg/kg of Z944 normalized sociability in female GAERS. In contrast, female NECs showed impaired sociability following Z944 treatment. Dose-dependent decreases in locomotor activity were noted following Z944 treatment in both strains. Treatment with 10mg/kg of Z944 altered exploration such that only 8 of the 16 rats tested explored both sides of the testing chamber. In those that explored the chamber, significant preference for the stranger rat was observed in GAERS but not NECs. Overall, the data suggest that T-type calcium channels are critical in regulating sociability in both GAERS and NEC animals. Future research should focus on T-type calcium channels in the treatment of sociability deficits observed in disorders such as CAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The EEG response to pyridoxine-IV neither identifies nor excludes pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, L.A.; Maurits, N.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Jakobs, C.; Teune, L.K.; Poll-The, B.T.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Toet, M.C.; Hagebeuk, E.E.; Brouwer, O.F.; Hoeven, J.H. van; Sival, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is characterized by therapy-resistant seizures (TRS) responding to intravenous (IV) pyridoxine. PDE can be identified by increased urinary alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (alpha-AASA) concentrations and mutations in the ALDH7A1 (antiquitin) gene. Prompt re

  18. The EEG response to pyridoxine-IV neither identifies nor excludes pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, Levinus A; Maurits, Natasha M; Willemsen, Michèl A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Teune, Laura K; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Toet, Mona C; Hagebeuk, Eveline E; Brouwer, Oebele F; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Sival, Deborah A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is characterized by therapy-resistant seizures (TRS) responding to intravenous (IV) pyridoxine. PDE can be identified by increased urinary alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (α-AASA) concentrations and mutations in the ALDH7A1 (antiquitin) gene. Prompt recogn

  19. The α2δ subunit and absence epilepsy: Beyond calcium channels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celli, R.; Santolini, I.; Guiducci, M.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Parisi, P.; Striano, P.; Gradini, R.; Battaglia, G.; Ngomba, R.T.; Nicoletti, F.

    2017-01-01

    Spike-wave discharges, underlying absence seizures, are generated within a cortico-thalamo-cortical network that involves the somatosensory cortex, the reticular thalamic nucleus, and the ventrobasal thalamic nuclei. Activation of T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) contributes to the

  20. Head-to head comparison of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor activation in chronic treatment of absence epilepsy in WAG/Rij rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Amore, V.; Santolini, I.; Celli, R.; Lionetto, L.; Fusco, A. de; Simmaco, M.; Rijn, C.M. van; Vieira, E.; Stauffer, S.R.; Conn, P.J.; Bosco, P.; Nicoletti, F.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Ngomba, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Acute treatment with positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of mGlu1 and mGlu5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (RO0711401 and VU0360172, respectively) reduces the incidence of spike-and wave discharges in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy. However, from the therapeutic standpoint, it was imp

  1. Effects of remacemide and its metabolite Fpl-12495 on spike-wave discharges, EEG, and behavior in rats with absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Coenen, A.M.L.

    1995-01-01

    Anticonvulsant drugs may or may not be effective against generalized absence epilepsy. Carbamazepine and phenytoin aggravate spike-wave discharges (SWD) whereas valproate and benzodiazepines reduce SWD. The effects of the new anticonvulsant remacemide on SWD are unknown, which prompted us to

  2. Effects of remacemide and its metabolite FPL 12495 on spike-wave discharges, electroencephalogram and behaviour in rats with absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Coenen, A.M.L.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the anti-convulsant drug remacemide and one of its active metabolites FPL 12495 were examined in a genetic model for generalized absence epilepsy, the WAG/Rij strain of rats. Number, mean and total duration of spike-wave discharges were measured following oral administration of

  3. The selective GABAB antagonist CGP-35348 blocks spike-wave bursts in the cholesterol synthesis rat absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K A; Fisher, R S

    1996-08-12

    Slow IPSPs, which are believed to be involved in generation of the wave of spike-wave epileptiform discharges, are mediated by the GABAB receptor. We therefore examined the effect of the GABAB antagonist, Ciba Geigy Product, CGP-35348, in the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor model of absence epilepsy in rat. Rats received Ayerst-9944 (AY-9944), from 6-45 mg i.p. in the first few weeks of life. By 2 months after AY-9944 administration these rats exhibited recurrent spike-waves and behavioral arrests. In 10 such animals CGP-35348 was administered intraperitoneally in doses of 0 (vehicle), 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg. EEG recordings were obtained via previously implanted bone screws. Technologists blinded to treatment group counted spike-waves over a 4 h period post-injection. The average number of spike-wave burst seconds per 4 h of recording for all dosages and times was 52.4 +/- 81.4 (mean +/- S.D.) s. Mean burst times (seconds) were vehicle = 93.5 +/- 106.5; 10 mg/kg = 69.9 +/- 79.7; 25 mg/kg = 30.8 +/- 46.9; 100 mg/kg = 15.2 +/- 54, a mean 84% reduction at 100 mg/kg (ANOVA regression significant at 0.0001). Spike-waves were suppressed for at least 4 h after injection of CGP-35348. These findings supplement similar findings in other absence models, and support a potential role for GABAB antagonists in treatment of absence seizures.

  4. Absence epilepsy and sinus dysrhythmia in mice lacking the pacemaker channel HCN2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Andreas; Budde, Thomas; Stieber, Juliane; Moosmang, Sven; Wahl, Christian; Holthoff, Knut; Langebartels, Anke; Wotjak, Carsten; Munsch, Thomas; Zong, Xiangang; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Lancel, Marike; Chien, Kenneth R.; Konnerth, Arthur; Pape, Hans-Christian; Biel, Martin; Hofmann, Franz

    2003-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation (HCN) channels are believed to be involved in the generation of cardiac pacemaker depolarizations as well as in the control of neuronal excitability and plasticity. The contributions of the four individual HCN channel isoforms (HCN1–4) to these diverse functions are not known. Here we show that HCN2-deficient mice exhibit spontaneous absence seizures. The thalamocortical relay neurons of these mice displayed a near complete loss of the HCN current, resulting in a pronounced hyperpolarizing shift of the resting membrane potential, an altered response to depolarizing inputs and an increased susceptibility for oscillations. HCN2-null mice also displayed cardiac sinus dysrhythmia, a reduction of the sinoatrial HCN current and a shift of the maximum diastolic potential to hyperpolarized values. Mice with cardiomyocyte- specific deletion of HCN2 displayed the same dysrhythmia as mice lacking HCN2 globally, indicating that the dysrhythmia is indeed caused by sinoatrial dysfunction. Our results define the physiological role of the HCN2 subunit as a major determinant of membrane resting potential that is required for regular cardiac and neuronal rhythmicity. PMID:12514127

  5. Gender and age differences in expression of GABAA receptor subunits in rat somatosensory thalamus and cortex in an absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Huguenard, John R; Fisher, Robert S

    2007-03-01

    Absence epilepsy is more prevalent in females, but reasons for this gender asymmetry are unknown. We reported previously that perinatal treatment of Long-Evans Hooded rats with the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor (CSI) AY9944 causes a life-long increase in EEG spike-wave discharges (SWDs), correlated with decreased expression of GABA(A) receptor subunit gamma2 protein levels in thalamic reticular and ventrobasal nuclei (SS thalamus) [Li, H., Kraus, A., Wu, J., Huguenard, J.R., Fisher, R.S., 2006. Selective changes in thalamic and cortical GABA(A) receptor subunits in a model of acquired absence epilepsy in the rat. Neuropharmacology 51, 121-128]. In this study, we explored time course and gender different effects of perinatal AY9944 treatment on expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and gamma2 subunits in SS thalamus and SS cortex. Perinatal AY9944 treatment-induced decreases in GABA(A) gamma2 receptor subunits in rat SS thalamus and increases in SS cortex are gender and age specific. The findings suggest a mechanism for the higher prevalence of absence epilepsy in female patients.

  6. Strong Memory in Time Series of Human Magnetoencephalograms Can Identify Photosensitive Epilepsy

    CERN Document Server

    Yulmetyev, R M; Hänggi, P; Khusaenova, E V; Shimojo, S; Yulmetyeva, D G

    2006-01-01

    o discuss the salient role of the statistical memory effects in the human brain functioning we have analyzed a set of stochastic memory quantifiers that reflects the dynamical characteristics of neuromagnetic brain responses to a flickering stimulus of different color combinations from a group of control subjects which is contrasted with those from a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (PSE). We have discovered the emergence of strong memory and the accompanying transition to a regular and robust regime of chaotic behavior of the signals in the separate areas for a patient with PSE. This finding most likely identifies the regions of the location the protective mechanism in a human organism against occurrence of PSE.

  7. SWDreader: a wavelet-based algorithm using spectral phase to characterize spike-wave morphological variation in genetic models of absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, C D; Tanenbaum, A; Audit, B; Arneodo, A; Khalil, A; Frankel, W N

    2015-03-15

    Spike-wave discharges (SWD) found in neuroelectrical recordings are pathognomonic to absence epilepsy. The characteristic spike-wave morphology of the spike-wave complex (SWC) constituents of SWDs can be mathematically described by a subset of possible spectral power and phase values. Morlet wavelet transform (MWT) generates time-frequency representations well-suited to identifying this SWC-associated subset. MWT decompositions of SWDs reveal spectral power concentrated at harmonic frequencies. The phase relationships underlying SWC morphology were identified by calculating the differences between phase values at SWD fundamental frequency from the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonics, then using the three phase differences as coordinates to generate a density distribution in a {360°×360°×360°} phase difference space. Strain-specific density distributions were generated from SWDs of mice carrying the Gria4, Gabrg2, or Scn8a mutations to determine whether SWC morphological variants reliably mapped to the same regions of the distribution, and if distribution values could be used to detect SWD. To the best of our knowledge, this algorithm is the first to employ spectral phase to quantify SWC morphology, making it possible to computationally distinguish SWC morphological subtypes and detect SWDs. Proof-of-concept testing of the SWDfinder algorithm shows: (1) a major pattern of variation in SWC morphology maps to one axis of the phase difference distribution, (2) variability between the strain-specific distributions reflects differences in the proportions of SWC subtypes generated during SWD, and (3) regularities in the spectral power and phase profiles of SWCs can be used to detect waveforms possessing SWC-like morphology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of deep gray matter volume, cortical thickness and white matter integrity in patients with typical absence epilepsy: a study using voxelwise-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, D.G.; Ventura, N.; Tukamoto, G.; Gasparetto, E.L. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Zimmermann, N. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Department of Psychology, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Doring, T.M. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Leme, J.; Pereira, M. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Andrea, I. d' ; Rego, C.; Alves-Leon, S.V. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Center, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cortical thickness and the volume of deep gray matter structures, measured from 3D T1-weighted gradient echo imaging, and white matter integrity, by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with typical absence epilepsy (AE). Patients (n = 19) with typical childhood AE and juvenile AE, currently taking antiepileptic medication, were compared with control subjects (n = 19), matched for gender and age. 3D T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo-weighted imaging and DTI along 30 noncolinear directions were performed using a 1.5-T MR scanner. FreeSurfer was used to perform cortical volumetric reconstruction and segmentation of deep gray matter structures. For tract-based spatial statistics analysis of DTI, a white matter skeleton was created, along with a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations. A threshold of p < 0.05 was used to identify abnormalities in fractional anisotropy (FA). The mean, radial, and axial diffusivities were also projected onto the mean FA skeleton. Patients with AE presented decreased FA and increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity values in the genu and the body of the corpus callosum and right anterior corona radiata, as well as decreased axial diffusivity in the left posterior thalamic radiation, inferior cerebellar peduncle, right cerebral peduncle, and right corticospinal tract. However, there were no significant differences in cortical thickness or deep gray matter structure volumes between patients with AE and controls. Abnormalities found in white matter integrity may help to better understand the pathophysiology of AE and optimize diagnosis and treatment strategies. (orig.)

  9. On-off intermittency of thalamo-cortical neuronal network oscillations in the electroencephalogram of rodents with genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Yu.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Runnova, Anastasija E.; Shurugina, Sveltlana A.; Ivanov, Alexey V.

    2013-02-01

    Spike-wave discharges are electroencephalographic hallmarks of absence epilepsy. Spike-wave discharges are known to originate from thalamo-cortical neuronal network that normally produces sleep spindle oscillations. Although both sleep spindles and spike-wave discharges are considered as thalamo-cortical oscillations, functional relationship between them is still uncertain. The present study describes temporal dynamics of spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles as determined in long-time electroencephalograms (EEG) recorded in WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy. We have proposed the wavelet-based method for the automatic detection of spike-wave discharges, sleep spindles (10-15Hz) and 5-9Hz oscillations in EEG. It was found that non-linear dynamics of spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles fits well to the law of 'on-off intermittency'. Intermittency in sleep spindles and spike-wave discharges implies that (1) temporal dynamics of these oscillations are deterministic in nature, and (2) it might be controlled by a system-level mechanism responsible for circadian modulation of neuronal network activity.

  10. 特发性全面性癫痫的遗传学研究进展%Advance in genetic study for idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜玉武; 谢涵

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a kind of common neurological diseases in the world. Over 50% of epilepsies have genetic basis. We define "idiopathic epilepsy" as a kind of epilepsy or epilepsy syndrome only with genetic factors, and idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) is a major type of idiopathic epilepsies. Susceptibility genes of epilepsies are mainly ion channel genes. Both gene mutation and copy number variation lead to epilepsies. Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is a crucial part of IGEs. Due to the consistency of CAE' s phenotype and results of EEG, studies related to CAE susceptibility genes tend to be easier to conduct. Through these studies about IGEs /CAE susceptibility genes, we can determine pathogenic model of epilepsy genetics, and find the way to diagnose accurately in molecular genetics, to identify types of epilepsies, to detect targets of antiepileptic drugs, and provide a basis for gene therapy.

  11. Epigenetics and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopra, Avtar; Dingledine, Raymond; Hsieh, Jenny

    2012-12-01

    Seizures can give rise to enduring changes that reflect alterations in gene-expression patterns, intracellular and intercellular signaling, and ultimately network alterations that are a hallmark of epilepsy. A growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with epilepsy are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. One transcription factor in particular, repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), has received a lot of attention due to the possibility that it may control fundamental transcription patterns that drive circuit excitability, seizures, and epilepsy. REST represses a suite of genes in the nervous system by utilizing nuclear protein complexes that were originally identified as mediators of epigenetic inheritance. Epigenetics has traditionally referred to mechanisms that allow a heritable change in gene expression in the absence of DNA mutation. However a more contemporaneous definition acknowledges that many of the mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are utilized by neurons to control activity-dependent gene expression. This review surveys what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in epilepsy. We discuss how REST controls gene expression to affect circuit excitability and neurogenesis in epilepsy. We also discuss how the repressor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and activator cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) regulate neuronal activity and are themselves controlled by activity. Finally we highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and epilepsy.

  12. Identifying Family History and Substance Use Associations for Adult Epilepsy from the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Elizabeth S.; Leppik, Ilo; Pakhomov, Serguei; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a prevalent chronic neurological disorder afflicting about 50 million people worldwide. There is evidence of a strong relationship between familial risk factors and epilepsy, as well as associations with substance use. The goal of this study was to explore the interactions between familial risk factors and substance use based on structured data from the family and social history modules of an electronic health record system for adult epilepsy patients. A total of 8,957patients with 38,802 family history entries and 8,822 substance use entries were gathered and mined for associations at different levels of granularity for three age groupings (>18, 18-64, and ≥65 years old). Our results demonstrate the value of an association rule mining approach to validate knowledge of familial risk factors. The preliminary findings also suggest that substance use does not demonstrate significant association between social and familial risk factors for epilepsy. PMID:27570679

  13. Accuracy of Conventional Diagnostic Methods for Identifying Structural Changes in Patients with Focal Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakaj, Nazim; Kruja, Jera; Jashari, Fisnik; Boshnjaku, Dren; Shatri, Nexhat; Zeqiraj, Kamber

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by abnormal firing of nerve impulses in the brain. Aim: This study aims to investigate the frequency of appearance of pathological changes in conventional examination methods (electroencephalography–EEG, brain computerized tomography -CT or brain magnetic resonance imaging – MRI) in patients with epilepsy, and relationship between clinical manifestations and localization of changes in CT or MRI. Methods: In this study we have included 110 patients with focal epilepsy who fulfilled the inclusion criteria out of 557 initially diagnosed patients. Detailed clinical examination together with brain imaging (CT and MRI) and electroencephalography examination was performed. We have evaluated the accuracy of each diagnostic method to localize the epileptic focus. Diagnosis of epilepsy was determined by the ILAE (International League Against Epilepsy) criteria of the year 1989, and classification of epileptic seizures was made according to the ILAE classification 2010. Results: Electroencephalography presented changes in 60.9% of patients; brain CT in 42.1%, and MRI in 78% of the patients. The results of our study showed that clinical manifestations were not always conveyed with pathological changes in conventional examining methods performed. Of the total of 79 patients with changes in imaging (8 with changes in CT and 71 in MRI), 79.7% presented a clinical picture compatible with the region in which morphological changes were found, while in 20.3% of patients the presented morphological changes were not aligned with the clinical picture. Conclusion: In patients with epilepsy, conventional examination methods do not always find pathological changes, while clinical manifestations of epilepsy did not always coincide with the location of changes in imaging. Further studies are needed to see if there is clear border between focal and generalized epilepsy. PMID:28077892

  14. Unilateral and bilateral cortical resection: Effects on spike-wave discharges in a genetic absence epilepsy model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scicchitano, F.; Rijn, C.M. van; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2015-01-01

    Research Question Recent discoveries have challenged the traditional view that the thalamus is the primary source driving spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs). At odds, SWDs in genetic absence models have a cortical focal origin in the deep layers of the perioral region of the somatosensory cortex. The

  15. Clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of epilepsy with myoclonic absences%肌阵挛失神癫癎临床及脑电图特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨志仙; 刘晓燕; 秦炯; 张月华; 吴晔; 姜玉武

    2009-01-01

    目的 肌阵挛失神癫癎(epilepsy with myoclonic absences,EMA)是一种以肌阵挛失神(myoclonic absences,MA)为主要发作类型的儿童癫癎综合征.本研究旨在探讨EMA的临床及神经电生理特征.方法 对6例EMA患儿均进行视频脑电图(VEEG)监测,2例同步监测双侧三角肌肌电图(EMG).对EMA的临床、神经电生理特征、治疗及预后进行分析.结果 6例中女3例,男3例.起病年龄为2岁3个月~11岁,平均5岁2个月.5例以MA为惟一发作类型,1例以全身强直-阵挛发作起病,后转变为MA.MA临床表现为:不同程度意识改变,上肢为主的节律性肌阵挛抽搐、常伴强直性收缩、有时可见头及身体的偏斜或不对称抽搐,持续时间为2~30 s,发作突发突止,发作频繁时每日可达数次~30余次,过度换气常可诱发.所有患儿发作期EEG为双侧对称同步的3 Hz棘慢波节律性暴发,2例双侧三角肌EMG记录到与发作期放电频率一致的节律性肌电暴发,其中1例还记录到伴随的持续强直性肌电活动.所有患儿发作间期EEG均有醒睡各期全导棘慢波发放,部分存在少量局灶性放电.治疗主要采用丙戊酸单药或联合其他抗癫癎药.随访时年龄为6岁4个月~19岁,4例发作控制8个月~3年;1例因开始治疗晚、1例未及时正规治疗并伴病程中全身强直-阵挛发作,分别随访2年半及5年,目前仍有发作,且有智力受损.结论 EMA为一种少见的儿童癫癎性疾病,发作类型主要为MA.临床表现结合发作期VEEG及同步EMG可确诊MA.早期恰当的选用丙戊酸或联合其他抗癫癎药对EMA有效.治疗不及时或伴有全身强直-阵挛发作时预后相对不良.%Objective Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) is a type of childhood epilepsy characterized by a specific seizure type, i.e. myoclonic absences (MA). This study aimed to investigate the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of EMA. Method Video-EEG monitoring was

  16. The development and validation of two prediction models to identify employees at risk of high sickness absence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, Corne A.; van Rhenen, Willem; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J.; Bultmann, Ute; Heymans, Martijn W.

    Background: Sickness absence (SA) is a public health risk marker for morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to develop and validate prediction models to identify employees at risk of high SA. Methods: Two prediction models were developed using self-rated health (SRH) and prior SA as

  17. Whole exome sequencing identifies the first STRADA point mutation in a patient with polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Glass, Ian A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Sun, Angela

    2016-08-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is an ultra rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe, infantile-onset intractable epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, macrocephaly, and craniofacial dysmorphism. The molecular diagnosis of this condition has thus far only been made in 16 Old Order Mennonite patients carrying a homozygous 7 kb founder deletion of exons 9-13 of STRADA. We performed clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) on a 4-year-old Indian male with global developmental delay, history of failure to thrive, infantile spasms, repetitive behaviors, hypotonia, low muscle mass, marked joint laxity, and dysmorphic facial features including tall forehead, long face, arched eyebrows, small chin, wide mouth, and tented upper lip. A homozygous single nucleotide duplication, c.842dupA (p.D281fs), in exon 10 of STRADA was identified. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the individual and identified both parents as carriers. In light of the molecular discoveries, the patient's clinical phenotype was considered to be a good fit for PMSE. We identified for the first time a homozygous point mutation in STRADA causing PMSE. Additional bi-allelic mutations related to PMSE thus far have not been observed in Baylor ∼6,000 consecutive clinical WES cases, supporting the rarity of this disorder. Our findings may have treatment implications for the patient since previous studies have shown rapamycin as a potential therapeutic agent for the seizures and cognitive problems in PMSE patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Genome-wide linkage meta-analysis identifies susceptibility loci at 2q34 and 13q31.3 for genetic generalized epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leu, Costin; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Zara, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) have a lifetime prevalence of 0.3% with heritability estimates of 80%. A considerable proportion of families with siblings affected by GGEs presumably display an oligogenic inheritance. The present genome-wide linkage meta-analysis aimed to map: (1...... ancestry including 982 relatives with GGEs. To dissect out seizure type-related susceptibility genes, two family subgroups were stratified comprising 235 families with predominantly genetic absence epilepsies (GAEs) and 118 families with an aggregation of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). To map shared...... Findings: For the entire set of 379 GGE-multiplex families, linkage analysis revealed six loci achieving suggestive evidence for linkage at 1p36.22, 3p14.2, 5q34, 13q12.12, 13q31.3, and 19q13.42. The linkage finding at 5q34 was consistently supported by both NPL and parametric linkage results across all...

  19. Gastaut type idiopathic occipital epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Volkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic occipital epilepsy is a rare epileptic syndrome. Its incidence in a Novosibirsk cohort of patients with idiopathic focal epilepsy is 0.9%. Objective: to present a clinical description of new cases of Gastaut syndrome, the types of its course, and treatment options in these patients. Patients and methods. The study covers 17 cases of Gastaut type idiopathic occipital epilepsy in 13 women and 4 men aged 11–53 years. Results. Among 17 cases we present 4 family cases with the disease. Three generations in 2 families were observed to have epilepsy, including Gastaut syndrome concurrent with childhood absence epilepsy. The adolescent onset of the disease was seen in most cases. Its main symptoms were focal visual seizures (100%, focal sensory seizures (58.9%, cephalalgia (47.1%, speech disorders (41.2%, and secondarily generalized convulsive seizures (35.3%. According to the frequency of seizures, the investigators identified 5 types of the course: single focal seizures, rare focal seizures with or without convulsions, frequent focal seizures with or without convulsions. The identity of the course of epilepsy was found in familial cases. 76.5% of the patients had a good quality of life: 41.2% of them were untreated while 35.3% were treated; no seizures were noted. 

  20. Early molecular and behavioral response to lipopolysaccharide in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy and depressive-like behavior, involves interplay between AMPK, AKT/mTOR pathways and neuroinflammatory cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emilio; Andreozzi, Francesco; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Dattilo, Vincenzo; Procopio, Teresa; Fiume, Giuseppe; Mimmi, Selena; Perrotti, Nicola; Citraro, Rita; Sesti, Giorgio; Constanti, Andrew; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2014-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been recently indicated as a suitable drug target for the prevention of epileptogenesis. The mTOR pathway is known for its involvement in the control of the immune system. Since neuroinflammation is recognized as a major contributor to epileptogenesis, we wished to examine whether the neuroprotective effects of mTOR modulation could involve a suppression of the neuroinflammatory process in epileptic brain. We have investigated the early molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of intracerebral administration of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, in relation to seizure generation and depressive-like behavior; we also tested whether the effects of LPS could be modulated by treatment with rapamycin (RAP), a specific mTOR inhibitor. We determined, in specific rat brain areas, levels of p-mTOR/p-p70S6K and also p-AKT/p-AMPK as downstream or upstream indicators of mTOR activity and tested the effects of LPS and RAP co-administration. Changes in the brain levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α and their relative mRNA expression levels were measured, and the involvement of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was also examined in vitro. We confirmed that RAP inhibits the aggravation of absence seizures and depressive-like/sickness behavior induced by LPS in the WAG/Rij rats through the activation of mTOR and show that this effect is correlated with the ability of RAP to dampen and delay LPS increases in neuroinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, most likely through inhibition of the activation of NF-κB. Our results suggest that such a mechanism could contribute to the antiseizure, antiepileptogenic and behavioral effects of RAP and further highlight the potential therapeutic usefulness of mTOR inhibition in the management of human epilepsy and other neurological disorders. Furthermore, we show that LPS-dependent neuroinflammatory effects are also mediated by a

  1. Epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S T; Dodson, W E

    1996-12-01

    Childhood epilepsies comprise a broad range of disorders which vary from benign to progressive and disabling. Accurate diagnosis of epilepsy type and determination of aetiology, when possible, are essential for appropriate treatment. The most common seizure type encountered in children is febrile seizures. These represent a benign condition which is not, in fact, epilepsy and usually does not require antiepileptic medication. When partial seizures occur in childhood, benign syndromes with spontaneous remission, such as rolandic epilepsy, must be distinguished from symptomatic epilepsies which may be refractory to medical management. Complex partial seizures in young children may appear different than in adults. The adverse effect profiles and dosing regimens of antiepileptic drugs in children are also different than in adults, and influence the choice of treatment. Epilepsy surgery should be considered for some children with intractible partial seizures. Generalized epilepsies also have a broader spectrum in children. The idiopathic generalized absence epilepsies are usually easy to control with medication. They range from childhood absence epilepsy which tends to remit in adolescence to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy which is a lifelong condition. In contrast, the seizures of West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome are difficult to control, and treatment involves therapeutic modalities rarely used in adults such as ACTH and the ketogenic diet. Many childhood epilepsy syndromes have a familial predisposition, and the genetic bases for several disorders have been described.

  2. Absence epilepsy and the CHD2 gene: an adolescent male with moderate intellectual disability, short-lasting psychoses, and an interstitial deletion in 15q26.1–q26.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Willem MA; Egger, Jos IM; Knegt, Alida C; Zuydam, José; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2016-01-01

    Deletions of the 15q26 region encompassing the chromodomain helicase DNA binding domain 2 (CHD2) gene have been associated with intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and several types of epilepsy. Including the cases mentioned in ECARUCA (European cytogeneticists association register of unbalanced chromosome aberrations) and DECIPHER (database of genomic variation and phenotype in humans using ensembl resources), so far, a total of 13 intellectually disabled patients with a genetically proven deletion of the CHD2 gene are described, of whom eleven had a history of severe forms of epilepsy starting from a young age. In this article, a moderately intellectually disabled 15-year-old male with a 15q26.1–q26.2 interstitial deletion is reported, who was referred for analysis of two recent short-lasting psychotic episodes that were nonresponsive to antipsychotic treatment and recurrent disinhibited behaviors since early infancy. Careful interdisciplinary assessment revealed that the psychotic phenomena originated from a previously unrecognized absence epilepsy. Treatment with valproic acid was started which resulted in full remission of psychotic symptoms, and consequently, substantial improvement of behavior. It was concluded that in case of (rare) developmental disorders with genetically proven etiology, a detailed inventory of anamnestic data and description of symptomatology over time may elucidate epilepsy-related psychopathology for which a specific treatment regimen is needed. PMID:27274247

  3. Guidelines for imaging infants and children with recent-onset epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, W.D. [Department of Neuroscience, Children' s National Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington DC (United States); Chiron, C. [Inserm, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Cross, H. [Neurosciences Unit, Institute of Child Health, and GreatOrmondStreet Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Harvey, S. [Department of Neurology, Royal Children' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Kuzniecky, R. [Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (US); Hertz-Pannier, L. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Universite Descartes, Paris (FR); CEA-DSV-I2BM-Neurospin, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR)

    2009-07-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Subcommittee for Pediatric Neuroimaging examined the usefulness of, and indications for, neuroimaging in the evaluation of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The retrospective and prospective published series with n {>=} 30 utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (1.5 T) that evaluated children with new-onset seizure(s) were reviewed. Nearly 50% of individual imaging studies in children with localization-related new-onset seizure(s) were reported to be abnormal; 15-20% of imaging studies provided useful information on etiology or and seizure focus, and 2-4% provided information that potentially altered immediate medical management. A significant imaging abnormality in the absence of a history of a localization-related seizure, abnormal neurologic examination, or focal electro-encephalography (EEG) is rare. Imaging studies in childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS) do not identify significant structural abnormalities. Imaging provides important contributions to establishing etiology, providing prognostic information, and directing treatment in children with recently diagnosed epilepsy. Imaging is recommended when localization-related epilepsy is known or suspected, when the epilepsy classification is in doubt, or when an epilepsy syndrome with remote symptomatic cause is suspected. When available, MRI is preferred to CT because of its superior resolution, versatility, and lack of radiation. (authors)

  4. Intelligent Technique for Signal Processing to Identify the Brain Disorder for Epilepsy Captures Using Fuzzy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurumurthy Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The new direction of understand the signal that is created from the brain organization is one of the main chores in the brain signal processing. Amid all the neurological disorders the human brain epilepsy is measured as one of the extreme prevalent and then programmed artificial intelligence detection technique is an essential due to the crooked and unpredictable nature of happening of epileptic seizures. We proposed an Improved Fuzzy firefly algorithm, which would enhance the classification of the brain signal efficiently with minimum iteration. An important bunching technique created on fuzzy logic is the Fuzzy C means. Together in the feature domain with the spatial domain the features gained after multichannel EEG signals remained combined by means of fuzzy algorithms. And for better precision segmentation process the firefly algorithm is applied to optimize the Fuzzy C-means membership function. Simultaneously for the efficient clustering method the convergence criteria are set. On the whole the proposed technique yields more accurate results and that gives an edge over other techniques. This proposed algorithm result compared with other algorithms like fuzzy c means algorithm and PSO algorithm.

  5. Clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of a cohort of patients with epilepsy and absence seizures Características clínicas e eletrencefalográficas de uma coorte de pacientes com epilepsia com crises de ausência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soniza Vieira Alves-Leon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epileptic syndromes with absence seizures (AS possess unique clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG characteristics. In typical or atypical AS, ictal phenomenology may include various characteristics. Vídeo-EEG monitoring enables findings to be correlated with ictal phenomenology. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the different AS in a cohort of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE based on the International League against Epilepsy (ILAE's 2006 classification, to correlate with ictal phenomenology recorded and to apply the Panayiotopoulos criteria. METHOD: This study included patients with criteria of AS followed up at the Epilepsy Clinic. A dual, cross-sectional cohort study was carried out between 2005 and 2008. Patients receiving care in the Epilepsy Program of the HUCFF-UFRJ, who had been investigated by video-EEG and who presented clinical and EEG criteria for absence seizures, typical or atypical, according to the criteria defined by the ILAE, were included in the study, independent of age onset, the review of clinical history, age onset, family history, epilepsy onset and evolution, seizures phenomenology, antiepileptic drugs response and neuroimaging studies were used to classify the patients among the different epileptic syndrome associated to absence seizures. RESULTS: Typical absences were more frequent (71.4% than atypical absences. Cases of juvenile absence epilepsy were the most frequent (19% in this series, followed by childhood absence epilepsy (14.4% and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (4.8%. In 14 patients (66.67%, diagnosis was modified from focal epilepsy to primary generalized epilepsy. Clinical and EEG diagnosis of absence epilepsy resulted in a dramatic improvement in the control of seizures following modification of diagnosis and indication of an appropriate antiepileptic drug. CONCLUSION: Our results show that typical AS are more frequent than atypical. AS was successfully defined in 10 patients following

  6. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association.

  7. Epilepsy Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become an Advocate for SUDEP Awareness Wellness Institute Healthy Eating Studio E: The Epilepsy Art Therapy Program Fitness and Exercise Important Information about epilepsy and seizures… About Epilepsy: ...

  8. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...... genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance...

  9. TYPICAL ABSENCES: RESULTS OF OWN INVESTIGATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical absences (TA are brief primary generalized epileptic seizures characterized by sudden onset and termination. According to their definition, absences consist of impairment of consciousness that is synchronously accompanied by electroencephalographic (EEG changes as generalized spike–slow wave discharges of 3 or more Hz. The authors conducted an investigation of 1261 patients with different forms of epilepsy with onset of seizures from the first days of life to the age of 18 years. The patients were followed up from 1990 to 2010. Absence seizures were detected in 231 patients, which accounts for 18.3 % of all the epileptic patients. TA were found in 102 patients, which constitutes 8.1 % of all cases of epilepsy with onset of seizures beyond the age of 18 years. The paper provides a detailed analysis of a group of patients with TA in terms of anamnestic, clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroimaging features and the results of therapy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. The age of onset of TA-associated epilepsy was from 9 months to 17 years (mean 9.4 ± 4.06 years. The disease occurred most frequently in young school-age children (41.2 %. Isolated TA as the only type of seizures were observed in the clinical picture of 28 (27.5 % patients. TA were concurrent with other types of seizures in other cases. The investigators have identified 4 types of seizures which TA (generalized convulsions, myoclonic seizures, febrile seizures, and eyelid myoclonia may be concurrent with. Neuroimaging stated there were no brain changes in 85.3 % of TA-associated epilepsy cases. Moderate diffuse subatrophic changes were detected in other cases (14.7 %. Local cerebral structural abnormalities were absent. The use of antiepileptic therapy as both monotherapy and polytherapy using different combinations showed the high efficacy of AEDs. Complete remission was achieved in 84.3 % of TA-associated epilepsy cases. An AED-induced reduction in the frequency of

  10. Idiopathic generalised epilepsies with 3 Hz and faster spike wave discharges: a population-based study with evaluation and long-term follow-up in 71 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siren, Auli; Eriksson, Kai; Jalava, Heli; Kilpinen-Loisa, Päivi; Koivikko, Matti

    2002-09-01

    For several years we have been following patients with intractable, childhood-onset idiopathic generalised epilepsies with > or = 3 Hz spike-wave discharges. Our need to find explanations for their intractability was the starting point for this study. We were interested in identifying characteristics, which would predict intractability; evaluating how these patients were treated and whether polytherapy was useful. We identified patients with > or = 3 Hz spike-wave discharges by reviewing EEG reports recorded between 1983 and 1992. Data were collected from medical records and through personal interviews. We identified 82 patients with tentative idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Eleven were excluded. Thirty-eight patients had childhood absence epilepsy, 18 had juvenile absence epilepsy, 13 had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and two had eyelid myoclonia with absences: 89.5, 78, 38 and 0% of the patients in each group, respectively, had been seizure free for more than 2 years. Twenty percent of the patients had intractable seizures. All intractable patients with juvenile absence epilepsy had rhythmic, random eyelid blinking and generalised tonic-clonic seizures. A history of more than ten generalised tonic-clonic seizures was associated with intractability in juvenile myoclonic patients. Monotherapy with ethosuximide or valproate resulted in seizure control in 65% of patients. Seventeen patients (24%) were treated with polytherapy, six achieved remission. These six patients had childhood absence epilepsy and juvenile absence epilepsy. Positive outcome was found in childhood absence epilepsy and juvenile absence epilepsy. Intractable seizures were more frequent among patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. None of them benefited from polytherapy with conventional anti-epileptic drugs.

  11. Patient Education: Identifying Risks and Self-Management Approaches for Adherence and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Buchhalter, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Patient education in epilepsy is one part of quality epilepsy care and is an evolving and growing field. Health outcomes, patient satisfaction, safety, patient/provider communication, and quality of life may all be affected by what people are taught (or not taught), what they understand, and how they use this information to make decisions and manage their health. Data regarding learning needs and interventions to address medication adherence and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy education can be used to guide clinicians in health care or community settings.

  12. Surgery for childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In about 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with antiepileptic drugs; such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and the major proportion is in the pediatric group (18 years old or less. Epilepsy surgery in children who have been carefully chosen can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90% reduction in seizures in approximately two-thirds of children with intractable seizures. Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging, neurosurgery, and neuroanaesthesia have improved the outcomes of surgery for children with intractable epilepsy. Early surgery improves the quality of life and cognitive and developmental outcome and allows the child to lead a normal life. Surgically remediable epilepsies should be identified early and include temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, lesional temporal and extratemporal epilepsy, hemispherical epilepsy, and gelastic epilepsy with hypothalamic hamartoma. These syndromes have both acquired and congenital etiologies and can be treated by resective or disconnective surgery. Palliative procedures are performed in children with diffuse and multifocal epilepsies who are not candidates for resective surgery. The palliative procedures include corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation while deep brain stimulation in epilepsy is still under evaluation. For children with "surgically remediable epilepsy," surgery should be offered as a procedure of choice rather than as a treatment of last resort.

  13. Paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, writer's cramp, migraine with aura and absence epilepsy in twin brothers with a novel SLC2A1 missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbizu, Aintzane; Cuenca-León, Ester; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Gratacòs, Margarida; Conill, Joan; Redecillas, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Macaya, Alfons

    2010-08-15

    We report two monochorionic twins that progressively developed, between ages 5 and 10, a combination of episodic neurological disorders including paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, migraine without or with aura, absence seizures and writer's cramp. CSF/serum glucose ratio was moderately decreased in both patients. Mutational analysis of SLC2A1 gene identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in exon 4. This novel mutation has been previously showed to disrupt glucose transport in vitro. Both patients showed immediate and near-complete response to ketogenic diet. This clinical observation suggests that a high index of suspicion for GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is warranted in evaluating patients with multiple neurological paroxysmal events.

  14. Presurgical language mapping in epilepsy: Using fMRI of reading to identify functional reorganization in a patient with long-standing temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Gould

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 55-year-old, right-handed patient with intractable left temporal lobe epilepsy, who previously had a partial left temporal lobectomy. The patient could talk during seizures, suggesting that he might have language dominance in the right hemisphere. Presurgical fMRI localization of language processing including reading of exception and regular words, pseudohomophones, and dual meaning words confirmed the clinical hypothesis of right language dominance, with only small amounts of activation near the planned surgical resection and, thus, minimal eloquent cortex to avoid during surgery. Postoperatively, the patient was rendered seizure-free without speech deficits.

  15. Absence epilepsy and the CHD2 gene: an adolescent male with moderate intellectual disability, short-lasting psychoses, and an interstitial deletion in 15q26.1–q26.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoeven WMA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Willem MA Verhoeven,1,2 Jos IM Egger,1,3,4 Alida C Knegt,5 José Zuydam,6 Tjitske Kleefstra7 1Centre of Excellence for Neuropsychiatry, Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Venray, 2Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, 3Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, 4Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, 5Department of Clinical Genetics, University of Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam, 6Reigersdaal Institute for Intellectual Disabilities, Heerhugowaard, 7Department of Genetics, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Abstract: Deletions of the 15q26 region encompassing the chromodomain helicase DNA binding domain 2 (CHD2 gene have been associated with intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and several types of epilepsy. Including the cases mentioned in ECARUCA (European cytogeneticists association register of unbalanced chromosome aberrations and DECIPHER (database of genomic variation and phenotype in humans using ensembl resources, so far, a total of 13 intellectually disabled patients with a genetically proven deletion of the CHD2 gene are described, of whom eleven had a history of severe forms of epilepsy starting from a young age. In this article, a moderately intellectually disabled 15-year-old male with a 15q26.1–q26.2 interstitial deletion is reported, who was referred for analysis of two recent short-lasting psychotic episodes that were nonresponsive to antipsychotic treatment and recurrent disinhibited behaviors since early infancy. Careful interdisciplinary assessment revealed that the psychotic phenomena originated from a previously unrecognized absence epilepsy. Treatment with valproic acid was started which resulted in full remission of psychotic symptoms, and consequently, substantial improvement of behavior. It was concluded that in case of (rare developmental disorders with genetically proven etiology, a detailed inventory of

  16. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy caused by a mutation in the GATOR1 complex gene NPRL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenke, Georg-Christoph; Eggert, Marlene; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in NPRL3, one of three genes that encode proteins of the mTORC1-regulating GATOR1 complex, have recently been reported to cause cortical dysplasia with focal epilepsy. We have now analyzed a multiplex epilepsy family by whole exome sequencing and identified a frameshift mutation (NM_001077350.2; c.1522delG; p.E508Rfs*46) within exon 13 of NPRL3. This truncating mutation causes an epilepsy phenotype characterized by early childhood onset of mainly nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The penetrance in our family was low (three affected out of six mutation carriers), compared to families with either ion channel- or DEPDC5-associated familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The absence of apparent structural brain abnormalities suggests that mutations in NPRL3 are not necessarily associated with focal cortical dysplasia but might be able to cause epilepsy by different, yet unknown pathomechanisms.

  17. The timing of pediatric epilepsy syndromes: what are the developmental triggers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Juliann M

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric epilepsy is characterized by multiple epilepsy syndromes with specific developmental triggers. They initiate spontaneously at critical periods of development and can just as spontaneously remit. Accompanying neurocognitive disabilities are often specific to the epileptic syndrome. Infantile or epileptic spasms have a very specific developmental window in the first year of life. Preceding the epilepsy, developmental arrest is common. The neurologic pathways underlying the development of spasms have been identified through PET scans as developmental abnormalities of serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem and basal ganglia. Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign centrotemporal epilepsy syndrome (BECTS) are both known genetic epilepsy syndromes; they have a discrete onset in childhood with remission by puberty. In CAE, disturbances of specific calcium channels at key developmental stages lead to aberrant disruption of thalamocortical synchrony. Similarly, a complex interplay between brain development, maturation, and susceptibility genes underlies the seizures and the neurocognitive deficits of BECTS.

  18. Shortened version of the work ability index to identify workers at risk of long-term sickness absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Lianne S; Bültmann, Ute; Heymans, Martijn W; Joling, Catelijne I; Twisk, Jos W R; Roelen, Corné A M

    2016-04-01

    The Work Ability Index (WAI) identifies non-sicklisted workers at risk of future long-term sickness absence (LTSA). The WAI is a complicated instrument and inconvenient for use in large-scale surveys. We investigated whether shortened versions of the WAI identify non-sicklisted workers at risk of LTSA. Prospective study including two samples of non-sicklisted workers participating in occupational health checks between 2010 and 2012. A heterogeneous development sample (N= 2899) was used to estimate logistic regression coefficients for the complete WAI, a shortened WAI version without the list of diseases, and single-item Work Ability Score (WAS). These three instruments were calibrated for predictions of different (≥2, ≥4 and ≥6 weeks) LTSA durations in a validation sample of non-sicklisted workers (N= 3049) employed at a steel mill, differentiating between manual (N= 1710) and non-manual (N= 1339) workers. The discriminative ability was investigated by receiver operating characteristic analysis. All three instruments under-predicted the LTSA risks in both manual and non-manual workers. The complete WAI discriminated between individuals at high and low risk of LTSA ≥2, ≥4 and ≥6 weeks in manual and non-manual workers. Risk predictions and discrimination by the shortened WAI without the list of diseases were as good as the complete WAI. The WAS showed poorer discrimination in manual and non-manual workers. The WAI without the list of diseases is a good alternative to the complete WAI to identify non-sicklisted workers at risk of future LTSA durations ≥2, ≥4 and ≥6 weeks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  19. Low job satisfaction does not identify nurses at risk of future sickness absence : Results from a Norwegian cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C. A. M.; Mageroy, N.; van Rhenen, W.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Klink, J. J. L.; Pallesen, S.; Bjorvatn, B.; Moen, B. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sickness absence is high in healthcare and contributes to nursing staff shortages reducing the efficiency and quality of patient care. Assessing the risk of sickness absence in working nurses opens opportunities for preventive strategies. Job satisfaction has attracted much attention in

  20. Low job satisfaction does not identify nurses at risk of future sickness absence : Results from a Norwegian cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C.A.M.; Magerøy, B.; Rhenen, van W.; Groothoff, J.W.; Klink, van der J.J.L.; Pallesen, S.

    2013-01-01

    Sickness absence is high in healthcare and contributes to nursing staff shortages reducing the efficiency and quality of patient care. Assessing the risk of sickness absence in working nurses opens opportunities for preventive strategies. Job satisfaction has attracted much attention in healthcare r

  1. Managing Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Managing Epilepsy Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... support strategies to use to empower PLWMCC. Managing Epilepsy Well Network The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network ...

  2. Common pediatric epilepsy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun T; Shahid, Asim M; Jammoul, Adham

    2015-02-01

    Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), childhood idiopathic occipital epilepsy (CIOE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) are some of the common epilepsy syndromes in the pediatric age group. Among the four, BRE is the most commonly encountered. BRE remits by age 16 years with many children requiring no treatment. Seizures in CAE also remit at the rate of approximately 80%; whereas, JME is considered a lifelong condition even with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Neonates and infants may also present with seizures that are self-limited with no associated psychomotor disturbances. Benign familial neonatal convulsions caused by a channelopathy, and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, have a favorable outcome with spontaneous resolution. Benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, also referred to as "fifth-day fits," are an example of another epilepsy syndrome in infants that carries a good prognosis. BRE, CIOE, benign familial neonatal convulsions, benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, and benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy are characterized as "benign" idiopathic age-related epilepsies as they have favorable implications, no structural brain abnormality, are sensitive to AEDs, have a high remission rate, and have no associated psychomotor disturbances. However, sometimes selected patients may have associated comorbidities such as cognitive and language delay for which the term "benign" may not be appropriate.

  3. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    Background A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Methods Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...... and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  4. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R;

    1989-01-01

    as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3......Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... dysfunction in the epilepsy group, the mere presence of a chronic disorder with potential social stigmatization influences personality....

  5. Protective role for type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptors against spike and wave discharges in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngomba, R.T.; Santolini, I.; Biagioni, F.; Molinaro, G.; Simonyi, A.; Rijn, C.M. van; D'Amore, V.; Mastroiacovo, F.; Olivieri, G.; Gradini, R.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Nicoletti, F.

    2011-01-01

    Eight-month old WAG/Rij rats, which developed spontaneous occurring absence seizures, showed a reduced function of mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the thalamus, as assessed by in vivo measurements of DHPG-stimulated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis, in the presence of the mGlu5 antagonist M

  6. Approaches to refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Engel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions, and 30 to 40% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are not controlled by medication. Patients are considered to have refractory epilepsy if disabling seizures continue despite appropriate trials of two antiseizure drugs, either alone or in combination. At this point, patients should be referred to multidisciplinary epilepsy centers that perform specialized diagnostic testing to first determine whether they are, in fact, pharmacoresistant, and then, if so, offer alternative treatments. Apparent pharmacoresistance can result from a variety of situations, including noncompliance, seizures that are not epileptic, misdiagnosis of the seizure type or epilepsy syndrome, inappropriate use of medication, and lifestyle issues. For patients who are pharmacoresistant, surgical treatment offers the best opportunity for complete freedom from seizures. Surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes have been identified, but patients with more complicated epilepsy can also benefit from surgical treatment and require more specialized evaluation, including intracranial EEG monitoring. For patients who are not surgical candidates, or who are unwilling to consider surgery, a variety of other alternative treatments can be considered, including peripheral or central neurostimulation, ketogenic diet, and complementary and alternative approaches. When such alternative treatments are not appropriate or effective, quality of life can still be greatly improved by the psychological and social support services offered by multidisciplinary epilepsy centers. A major obstacle remains the fact that only a small proportion of patients with refractory epilepsy are referred for expert evaluation and treatment.

  7. Imaging of the epilepsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Imaging of epilepsy patients is challenging, since epileptogenic lesions (defined as structural lesions causally related to the epilepsy syndrome) may be small and often do not change during life. Prior clinical information about the epilepsy syndrome and the semiology of the seizures is needed in order to plan the examination properly. The effort to detect an epileptogenic lesion is directed to partial (focal) epilepsy syndromes whereas - by definition - no lesion is identified in idiopathic epilepsies. Most patients with partial epilepsies suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsies. In these patients, 2- to 3-mm-thick T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) fast spin echo slices along or perpendicular to the temporal lobe length axis have the highest diagnostic efficacy. In contrast, in patients with extratemporal lobe epilepsies perpendicular FLAIR slices through the anatomic region, from which, due to clinical and EEG criteria, the seizures are likely to originate, are preferred. The imaging features of common epileptogenic lesions (hippocampal sclerosis, long-term epilepsy-associated tumours, focal cortical dysplasias, vascular malformations, encephalitis including limbic and Rasmussen's encephalitis, gyral scarring including ulegyria) are detailed in the second section of this paper. (orig.)

  8. Awakening epilepsy ('Aufwach-Epilepsie') revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, E

    1991-01-01

    The concept of 'awakening epilepsy' (introduced by Janz, 1953) occupies a crucial position for the comprehension of primary generalized epilepsy. The associated electroencephalographic manifestations are discussed and the role of abnormal (paroxysmal) arousal responses ('dyshormia') is stressed. The origin of these bilateral-synchronous discharges appears to be located below the frontal midline scalp region in mesial portions of the supplementary motor region. 'Awakening epilepsy' is also interesting from the viewpoint of sleep research. There is also an important age factor; these seizures (mostly grand mal and classical petit mal absences) are most common in older children, adolescents and young adults. The general management of these patients has to take into account the patient's special vulnerability after a night of poor sleep.

  9. Mental health symptoms identify workers at risk of long-term sickness absence due to mental disorders : prospective cohort study with 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoffen, Marieke F. A.; Joling, Catelijne I.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Roelen, Corne A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health problems are a leading cause of long-term sickness absence (LTSA). Workers at risk of mental LTSA should preferably be identified before they report sick. The objective of this study was to examine mental health symptoms as predictors of future mental LTSA in non-sicklisted

  10. Mental health symptoms identify workers at risk of long-term sickness absence due to mental disorders : prospective cohort study with 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoffen, Marieke F. A.; Joling, Catelijne I.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Roelen, Corne A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health problems are a leading cause of long-term sickness absence (LTSA). Workers at risk of mental LTSA should preferably be identified before they report sick. The objective of this study was to examine mental health symptoms as predictors of future mental LTSA in non-sicklisted

  11. Definition of intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shobhit; Siddiqui, Khurram A

    2011-01-01

    Defining intractable epilepsy is essential not only to identify up to 40% of patients refractory to pharmacological management, but also to facilitate selection and comparison of such patients for research purposes. The ideal definition still eludes us. Multiple factors including number of antiepileptic drug (AED) failures, seizure frequency and duration of unresponsiveness, etiology, and epilepsy syndromes are considered in formulating the definition of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Most definitions used in the literature agree on the number of AED failures, which seem to be 2 or 3, however, the seizure frequency and time factor are varied. The International League Against Epilepsy proposed a definition of drug-resistant epilepsy as a failure of adequate trials of 2 tolerated and appropriately chosen and used AED schedules. This for now, could provide an operational definition for clinical and research settings. However, with emergence of new data and novel treatments the criteria for intractability may change.

  12. T-current related effects of antiepileptic drugs and a Ca2+ channel antagonist on thalamic relay and local circuit interneurons in a rat model of absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broicher, Tilman; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Meuth, Patrick; Munsch, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Pape, Hans-Christian; Budde, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Channel blocking, anti-oscillatory, and anti-epileptic effects of clinically used anti-absence substances (ethosuximide, valproate) and the T-type Ca2+ current (IT) blocker mibefradil were tested by analyzing membrane currents in acutely isolated local circuit interneurons and thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons, slow intrathalamic oscillations in brain slices, and spike and wave discharges (SWDs) occurring in vivo in Wistar Albino Glaxo rats from Rijswijk (WAG/Rij). Substance effects in vitro were compared between WAG/Rij and a non-epileptic control strain, the ACI rats. Ethosuximide (ETX) and valproate were found to block IT in acutely isolated thalamic neurons. Block of IT by therapeutically relevant ETX concentrations (0.25-0.75 mM) was stronger in WAG/Rij, although the maximal effect at saturating concentrations (>or=10 mM) was stronger in ACI. Ethosuximide delayed the onset of the low threshold Ca2+ spike (LTS) of neurons recorded in slice preparations. Mibefradil (>or=2 microM) completely blocked IT and the LTS, dampened evoked thalamic oscillations, and attenuated SWDs in vivo. Computational modeling demonstrated that the complete effect of ETX can be replicated by a sole reduction of IT. However, the necessary degree of IT reduction was not induced by therapeutically relevant ETX concentrations. A combined reduction of IT, the persistent sodium current, and the Ca2+ activated K+ current resulted in an LTS alteration resembling the experimental observations. In summary, these results support the hypothesis of IT reduction as part of the mechanism of action of anti-absence drugs and demonstrate the ability of a specific IT antagonist to attenuate rhythmic burst firing and SWDs.

  13. Parietal lobe epilepsy: the great imitator among focal epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić, Aleksandar J; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; So, Norman; Wong, Chong; Najm, Imad M

    2012-03-01

    Comprising large areas of association cortex, the parietal lobe is part of an extensive synaptic network elaborately intertwined with other brain regions. We hypothesize that such widespread projections are responsible for producing inaccurate localisation readings on scalp EEG and clinical semiology in patients with parietal lobe epilepsies, as opposed to frontal or temporal lobe epilepsies. Our study included 50 patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, who were subsequently rendered seizure-free for ≥12 months (median: 23 months) following resections limited to the frontal (n=17), temporal (n=17), or parietal (n=16) lobes. Interictal and ictal EEG data with accompanying seizure video recordings were extracted from archived files of scalp video-EEG monitoring. Two blinded raters independently reviewed the EEG according to predetermined criteria. Videos of seizures were then observed, as raters formulated their final electroclinical impression (ECI), identifying patients' abnormal neuronal activities with parietal, temporal, and frontal lobe epilepsy, or unspecified localisation. Groups did not differ significantly in demographics, age at epilepsy onset, or presence of MRI abnormalities. Interictal discharges in parietal lobe epilepsy showed the greatest magnitude of scatter outside the lobe of origin; the majority of patients with parietal lobe epilepsy had more than one spike population (pparietal lobe epilepsy cases (p=0.024). Whenever raters confidently limited their ECI to one lobar subtype, overall accuracy was excellent. Lobar classifications by ECI were highly accurate for temporal lobe epilepsy, vacillating in frontal lobe epilepsy, and least accurate in parietal lobe epilepsy subjects. Scalp EEG readings of parietal lobe epilepsy patients showed a more variable scatter of interictal discharges and a lower localisation value of ictal recordings compared to temporal and frontal lobe epilepsy subjects, suggesting an increased likelihood of

  14. FN-Identify: Novel Restriction Enzymes-Based Method for Bacterial Identification in Absence of Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mohamed; Ouda, Osama; El-Refy, Ali; El-Feky, Fawzy A; Mosa, Kareem A; Helmy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and restriction analysis of genes like 16S rRNA and HSP60 are intensively used for molecular identification in the microbial communities. With aid of the rapid progress in bioinformatics, genome sequencing became the method of choice for bacterial identification. However, the genome sequencing technology is still out of reach in the developing countries. In this paper, we propose FN-Identify, a sequencing-free method for bacterial identification. FN-Identify exploits the gene sequences data available in GenBank and other databases and the two algorithms that we developed, CreateScheme and GeneIdentify, to create a restriction enzyme-based identification scheme. FN-Identify was tested using three different and diverse bacterial populations (members of Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium groups) in an in silico analysis using restriction enzymes and sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The analysis of the restriction maps of the members of three groups using the fragment numbers information only or along with fragments sizes successfully identified all of the members of the three groups using a minimum of four and maximum of eight restriction enzymes. Our results demonstrate the utility and accuracy of FN-Identify method and its two algorithms as an alternative method that uses the standard microbiology laboratories techniques when the genome sequencing is not available.

  15. FN-Identify: Novel Restriction Enzymes-Based Method for Bacterial Identification in Absence of Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouda, Osama; El-Refy, Ali; El-Feky, Fawzy A.; Mosa, Kareem A.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and restriction analysis of genes like 16S rRNA and HSP60 are intensively used for molecular identification in the microbial communities. With aid of the rapid progress in bioinformatics, genome sequencing became the method of choice for bacterial identification. However, the genome sequencing technology is still out of reach in the developing countries. In this paper, we propose FN-Identify, a sequencing-free method for bacterial identification. FN-Identify exploits the gene sequences data available in GenBank and other databases and the two algorithms that we developed, CreateScheme and GeneIdentify, to create a restriction enzyme-based identification scheme. FN-Identify was tested using three different and diverse bacterial populations (members of Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium groups) in an in silico analysis using restriction enzymes and sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The analysis of the restriction maps of the members of three groups using the fragment numbers information only or along with fragments sizes successfully identified all of the members of the three groups using a minimum of four and maximum of eight restriction enzymes. Our results demonstrate the utility and accuracy of FN-Identify method and its two algorithms as an alternative method that uses the standard microbiology laboratories techniques when the genome sequencing is not available. PMID:26880910

  16. The prognosis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Udaya; Cook, Mark; D'Souza, Wendyl

    2012-12-01

    Prognosis describes the trajectory and long-term outcome of a condition. Most studies indicate a better prognosis in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in comparison with other epilepsy syndromes. Studies looking at the long-term outcome of different IGE syndromes are relatively scant. Childhood absence epilepsy appears to have a higher rate of remission compared to juvenile absence epilepsy. In absence epilepsies, development of myoclonus and generalized tonic-clonic seizures predicts lower likelihood of remission. Although most patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) achieve remission on antiepileptic drug therapy, remission without treatment. Data on the prognosis of other IGE syndromes are scarce. There are contradictory findings reported on the value of electroencephalography as a predictor of prognosis. Comparisons are made difficult by study heterogeneity, particularly in methodology and diagnostic criteria.

  17. Epilepsy kills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Alexandre Scorza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available People with epilepsy are more likely to die prematurely, and the most common epilepsy-related category of death is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP. Thus, the purpose of this article was to alert the scientific community about SUDEP.

  18. Bayesian sample size for diagnostic test studies in the absence of a gold standard: Comparing identifiable with non-identifiable models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendukuri, Nandini; Bélisle, Patrick; Joseph, Lawrence

    2010-11-20

    Diagnostic tests rarely provide perfect results. The misclassification induced by imperfect sensitivities and specificities of diagnostic tests must be accounted for when planning prevalence studies or investigations into properties of new tests. The previous work has shown that applying a single imperfect test to estimate prevalence can often result in very large sample size requirements, and that sometimes even an infinite sample size is insufficient for precise estimation because the problem is non-identifiable. Adding a second test can sometimes reduce the sample size substantially, but infinite sample sizes can still occur as the problem remains non-identifiable. We investigate the further improvement possible when three diagnostic tests are to be applied. We first develop methods required for studies when three conditionally independent tests are available, using different Bayesian criteria. We then apply these criteria to prototypic scenarios, showing that large sample size reductions can occur compared to when only one or two tests are used. As the problem is now identifiable, infinite sample sizes cannot occur except in pathological situations. Finally, we relax the conditional independence assumption, demonstrating in this once again non-identifiable situation that sample sizes may substantially grow and possibly be infinite. We apply our methods to the planning of two infectious disease studies, the first designed to estimate the prevalence of Strongyloides infection, and the second relating to estimating the sensitivity of a new test for tuberculosis transmission. The much smaller sample sizes that are typically required when three as compared to one or two tests are used should encourage researchers to plan their studies using more than two diagnostic tests whenever possible. User-friendly software is available for both design and analysis stages greatly facilitating the use of these methods.

  19. Default mode network in childhood absence epilepsy by 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging%基于3.0T MRI的儿童失神癫痫患者默认网络研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳伟; 郑宏; 薛占尤; 王恩锋; 韩雄; 高丽; 郑美琼; 张颖; 任腾飞; 贺桂女; 晏僖

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the default mode network ( DMN) in childhood absence epilepsy ( CAE ) patients and examine their correlations between functional connectivity ( FC ) and clinical characteristics.Methods Fourteen CAE patients and 14 healthy volunteers were prospectively recruited from Henan Provincial People′s Hospital from September 2012 to June 2014.FC in DMN of each group, between-group comparison of DMN FC and their relationships with clinical characteristics were respectively analyzed with 3.0T resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging ( fMRI) FC analysis seeding at bilateral precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex ( PCC ) .Results Seeding at bilateral precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex ( PCC) , positive connection was found in bilateral angular gyrus, bilateral superior parietal gyrus, bilateral superior and middle frontal gyrus, bilateral superior medial frontal gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyrus and bilateral superior and middle occipital gyrus in controls.However, positive connection in CAE patients was observed in bilateral superior parietal gyrus and bilateral superior occipital gyrus.Between-group analysis of DMN connectivity revealed a reduction of DMN FC in bilateral medial orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral superior frontal gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus and left caudate in CAE patients.Moreover, increased DMN FC was present in right paracentral lobule and right middle cingulate gyrus.FC between PCC and bilateral medial orbitofrontal cortex or bilateral superior/middle frontal gyrus correlated negatively with disease duration, but there was no correlation with seizure frequency or initial age.Conclusion Brain′s default mode network in childhood absence epilepsy is impaired, presumably, as a result of unconsciousness and cognitive impairment during absence seizure.Abnormal DMN activities may be a biomaker of disease progress in absence epilepsy.%目的:探讨儿童失神癫痫( CAE

  20. Recurrent distal 7q11.23 deletion including HIP1 and YWHAG identified in patients with intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, and neurobehavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramocki, Melissa B; Bartnik, Magdalena; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Xia, Zhilian; Bravo, Jaclyn; Miller, G Steve; Rodriguez, Diana L; Williams, Charles A; Bader, Patricia I; Szczepanik, Elżbieta; Mazurczak, Tomasz; Antczak-Marach, Dorota; Coldwell, James G; Akman, Cigdem I; McAlmon, Karen; Cohen, Melinda P; McGrath, James; Roeder, Elizabeth; Mueller, Jennifer; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Bacino, Carlos A; Patel, Ankita; Bocian, Ewa; Shaw, Chad A; Cheung, Sau Wai; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2010-12-10

    We report 26 individuals from ten unrelated families who exhibit variable expression and/or incomplete penetrance of epilepsy, learning difficulties, intellectual disabilities, and/or neurobehavioral abnormalities as a result of a heterozygous microdeletion distally adjacent to the Williams-Beuren syndrome region on chromosome 7q11.23. In six families with a common recurrent ∼1.2 Mb deletion that includes the Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein gamma (YWHAG) genes and that is flanked by large complex low-copy repeats, we identified sites for nonallelic homologous recombination in two patients. There were no cases of this ∼1.2 Mb distal 7q11.23 deletion copy number variant identified in over 20,000 control samples surveyed. Three individuals with smaller, nonrecurrent deletions (∼180-500 kb) that include HIP1 but not YWHAG suggest that deletion of HIP1 is sufficient to cause neurological disease. Mice with targeted mutation in the Hip1 gene (Hip1⁻(/)⁻) develop a neurological phenotype characterized by failure to thrive, tremor, and gait ataxia. Overall, our data characterize a neurodevelopmental and epilepsy syndrome that is likely caused by recurrent and nonrecurrent deletions, including HIP1. These data do not exclude the possibility that YWHAG loss of function is also sufficient to cause neurological phenotypes. Based on the current knowledge of Hip1 protein function and its proposed role in AMPA and NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptor trafficking, we believe that HIP1 haploinsufficiency in humans will be amenable to rational drug design for improved seizure control and cognitive and behavioral function.

  1. Memory in children with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina A. Guimarães

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, memory deficit is not so well understood as it is in adults. The aim of this study was to identify and describe memory deficits in children with symptomatic TLE, and to verify the influence of epilepsy variables on memory. We evaluated 25 children with TLE diagnosed on clinical, EEG and MRI findings. Twenty-five normal children were compared with the patients. All children underwent a neuropsychological assessment to estimate intellectual level, attention, visual perception, handedness, and memory processes (verbal and visual: short-term memory, learning, and delayed recall. The results allowed us to conclude: besides memory deficits, other neuropsychological disturbances may be found in children with TLE such as attention, even in the absence of overall cognitive deficit; the earlier onset of epilepsy, the worse verbal stimuli storage; mesial lesions correlate with impairment in memory storage stage while neocortical temporal lesions correlate with retrieval deficits.

  2. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...... dimensions, healthy volunteers the lowest, while the psoriasis group repeatedly held an intermediate position in all sets of assessment (subjects, interviewers and relatives). A logistic regression analysis showed ixoide features being most important when the entire epilepsy group was compared with other...

  3. Obesity and its association with generalised epilepsy, idiopathic syndrome, and family history of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady D; Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2014-09-01

    Aim. Previous studies support the concept that obesity is a common comorbid condition in patients with epilepsy (PWE). In this study, we present the body mass index (BMI) and data from a survey to assess physical activity in a sample of PWE from an epilepsy clinic. Methods. Between June of 2011 and January of 2013, 100 PWE from an adult epilepsy clinic were included. We obtained BMI, waist circumference, and information regarding physical activity using a standardised questionnaire. Clinical, demographic, electrographic, and imaging parameters were collected from charts. Results. Mean age of patients was 40 ± 14 (18-77) years. The BMI distribution was as follows: 2 patients (2%) underweight, 26 (26%) normal weight, 34 (34%) overweight, 25 (25%) obese, and 13 (13%) with morbid obesity. In our study, obesity was defined as having a BMI ≥ 30. We found 38 (38%) patients in this range. There was no difference in the rate of drug-resistant epilepsy between obese and non-obese patients (55 vs. 55%; p=0.05). Leisure time habit was reported in 82% of obese patients and 79% of patients without obesity. Overall, the most frequent activity was walking (70%). Factors associated with obesity were generalised epilepsy (OR: 2.7, 1.1-6.6; p=0.012), idiopathic syndrome (OR: 2.7, 1.04-7; p=0.018), and family history of epilepsy (OR: 6.1, 1.5-24.2; p=0.002). Conclusion. Our study suggests an association between obesity, idiopathic generalised epilepsy, and family history of epilepsy. Our study shows that PWE are physically active and there is no clear relation between exercise and obesity. We could not identify any association between drug-resistant epilepsy and obesity. Absence of direct comparison with a control non-epileptic population; a cross-sectional design not allowing evaluation of a causal association among variables; and reliance on self-reported physical activity are to be considered as limitations of the present study.

  4. EATING EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rudakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating epilepsy (EE is one of the types of reflex epilepsy. The authors give the definition, classification position, possible pathogenic mechanisms and etiological factors associated with EE, as well as the semiology of seizures, the data of neuroimaging and electroencephalography and approaches to patient management and drug treatment. They also describe their observation of an 11-month-old girl with symptomatic focal temporal lobe epilepsy with focal dialeptic seizures provoked by eating.

  5. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  6. A locus identified on chromosome18p11.31 is associated with hippocampal abnormalities in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vianna Maurer-Morelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the region harboring a putative candidate gene associated with hippocampal abnormalities (HAb in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Genome-wide scan was performed in one large kindred with MTLE using a total of 332 microsatellite markers at ~12cM intervals. An additional 13 markers were genotyped in the candidate region. Phenotypic classes were defined according to the presence of hippocampal atrophy and/or hyperintense hippocampal T2 signal detected on magnetic resonance imaging. We identified a significant positive LOD score on chromosome 18p11.31 with a Zmax of 3.12 at D18S452. Multipoint LOD scores and haplotype analyses localized the candidate locus within a 6cM interval flanked by D18S976 and D18S967. We present here evidence that HAb, which were previously related mainly to environmental risk factors, may be influenced by genetic predisposition. This finding may have major impact in the study of the mechanisms underlying abnormalities in mesial temporal lobe structures and their relationship with MTLE.

  7. Submikroskopiske kromosomforandringer disponerer til epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Hjalgrim, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic generalised epilepsies (IGEs) affect up to 0.3% of the general population. Genetic factors play a predominant role in the aetiology of IGEs. Molecular genetic studies have mainly identified causative gene mutations in rare monogenic forms of idiopathic epilepsies. However, the genetic ...

  8. The Music Student with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Matthew C.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Laverghetta, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship can afford the music educator an opportunity to be the first to identify behaviors associated with epilepsy. A case of a student with epilepsy, based on the authors' experience, is described in which the music educators were the first and only individuals to become aware of a change in the student's behavior, after…

  9. The Music Student with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Matthew C.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Laverghetta, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship can afford the music educator an opportunity to be the first to identify behaviors associated with epilepsy. A case of a student with epilepsy, based on the authors' experience, is described in which the music educators were the first and only individuals to become aware of a change in the student's behavior, after…

  10. The molecular and phenotypic spectrum of IQSEC2-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerem, Ayelet; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Lev, Dorit; Blumkin, Lubov; Kivity, Sara; Linder, Ilan; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Palmer, Elizabeth Emma; Field, Michael; Boyle, Jackie; Chitayat, David; Gaillard, William D; Kossoff, Eric H; Willems, Marjolaine; Geneviève, David; Tran-Mau-Them, Frederic; Epstein, Orna; Heyman, Eli; Dugan, Sarah; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Piton, Ame'lie; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Pfundt, Rolph; Sato, Ryo; Tzschach, Andreas; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2016-11-01

    IQSEC2 is an X-linked gene associated with intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. Herein we characterize the epilepsy/epileptic encephalopathy of patients with IQSEC2 pathogenic variants. Forty-eight patients with IQSEC2 variants were identified worldwide through Medline search. Two patients were recruited from our early onset epileptic encephalopathy cohort and one patient from personal communication. The 18 patients who have epilepsy in addition to ID are the subject of this study. Information regarding the 18 patients was ascertained by questionnaire provided to the treating clinicians. Six affected individuals had an inherited IQSEC2 variant and 12 had a de novo one (male-to-female ratio, 12:6). The pathogenic variant types were as follows: missense (8), nonsense (5), frameshift (1), intragenic duplications (2), translocation (1), and insertion (1). An epileptic encephalopathy was diagnosed in 9 (50%) of 18 patients. Seizure onset ranged from 8 months to 4 years; seizure types included spasms, atonic, myoclonic, tonic, absence, focal seizures, and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures. The electroclinical syndromes could be defined in five patients: late-onset epileptic spasms (three) and Lennox-Gastaut or Lennox-Gastaut-like syndrome (two). Seizures were pharmacoresistant in all affected individuals with epileptic encephalopathy. The epilepsy in the other nine patients had a variable age at onset from infancy to 18 years; seizure types included GTC and absence seizures in the hereditary cases and GTC and focal seizures in de novo cases. Seizures were responsive to medical treatment in most cases. All 18 patients had moderate to profound intellectual disability. Developmental regression, autistic features, hypotonia, strabismus, and white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were prominent features. The phenotypic spectrum of IQSEC2 disorders includes epilepsy and epileptic encephalopathy. Epileptic encephalopathy is a main clinical

  11. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy: unmet needs in solving the puzzle(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Donald F; Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacoresistant epilepsy is a significant medical problem. The 2nd Halifax International Epilepsy Conference & Retreat identified crucial needs, which if successfully addressed, will aid in paving the way to improved lives for people with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. These are needs: (1) for an evidence-based and dynamic definition of pharmacoresistant epilepsy; (2) for a comprehensive description of the natural history of pharmacoresistant epilepsy; (3) for a comprehensive description of the complications and comorbidities of pharmacoresistant epilepsy; (4) for a rigorous delineation of the epidemiology and socioeconomic impact of pharmacoresistant epilepsy; (5) for clinically meaningful diagnostic and prognostic physiologically based electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers; (6) for clinically meaningful diagnostic and prognostic anatomically based (MRI Imaging) biomarkers; (7) for biomolecular/biochemical mechanistic understanding of etiopathogenesis for pharmacoresistant epilepsy; (8) for representative animal models of pharmacoresistant epilepsy; (9) for new and effective drugs or other novel treatments for pharmacoresistant epilepsy; and (10) to promote continuing research and research funding targeting pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  12. Comorbidities associated with epilepsy and headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalles P. Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Comorbidities are often associated with chronic neurological diseases, such as headache and epilepsy. OBJECTIVES: To identify comorbidities associated with epilepsy and headaches, and to determine possible drug interactions. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire with information about type of epilepsy/headache, medical history, and medication was administered to 80 adult subjects (40 with epilepsy and 40 with chronic headache. RESULTS: Patients with epilepsy had an average of two comorbidities and those with headache of three. For both groups, hypertension was the most prevalent. On average, patients with epilepsy were taking two antiepileptic medications and those with headache were taking only one prophylactic medication. Regarding concomitant medications, patients with epilepsy were in use, on average, of one drug and patients with headache of two. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with chronic neurological diseases, such as epilepsy and headaches, have a high number of comorbidities and they use many medications. This may contribute to poor adherence and interactions between different medications.

  13. Current and emerging treatments for absence seizures in young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrielynck P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pascal VrielynckWilliam Lennox Neurological Center, Reference Centre for Refractory Epilepsy, Catholic University of Louvain, BelgiumAbstract: In this report, we review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of the different absence seizure types as recently recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy: typical absences, atypical absences, myoclonic absences, and eyelid myoclonia with absences. Overall, valproate and ethosuximide remain the principal anti-absence drugs. Typical absence seizures exhibit a specific electroclinical semiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological response profile. A large-scale comparative study has recently confirmed the key role of ethosuximide in the treatment of childhood absence epilepsy, more than 50 years after its introduction. No new antiepileptic drug has proven major efficacy against typical absences. Of the medications under development, brivaracetam might be an efficacious anti-absence drug. Some experimental drugs also show efficacy in animal models of typical absence seizures. The treatment of other absence seizure types is not supported with a high level of evidence. Rufinamide appears to be the most promising new antiepileptic drug for atypical absences and possibly for myoclonic absences. The efficacy of vagal nerve stimulation should be further evaluated for atypical absences. Levetiracetam appears to display a particular efficacy in eyelid myoclonia with absences. Finally, it is important to remember that the majority of antiepileptic drugs, whether they be old or new, may aggravate typical and atypical absence seizures.Keywords: antiepileptic drug, typical absence, atypical absence, myoclonic absence, eyelid myoclonia with absence

  14. Epilepsie aktuell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Hüelsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.

    2016-01-01

    of the consensus statements “IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals” and “IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in German language to inform German veterinarians and professional...... circles about new knowledge and innovations in these fields. In the first part of the article, it is explained, why a new classification system of epilepsy and a common language to describe the disease is necessary. The proposals of the IVETF regarding the classification system and the terminology...... animals” und „IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in deutscher Sprache zusammengefasst, um die deutsche Tierärzteschaft über aktuelle Erkenntnisse und Neuerungen auf diesen Gebieten zu informieren. Im ersten Teil des Artikels werden...

  15. Targeting Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... productivity) each year. Adults with epilepsy report worse mental health, more cognitive impairment, barriers in social participation, and ... to care, such as lack of transportation or stigma. Health professionals can also earn continuing education credits for ...

  16. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2012:chap 50. Freeman J, Harvey S. Seizures and epilepsies. In: South M, Ashwal S, Isaacs ... School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  17. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient.

  18. [Photosensitive epilepsy and television epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, D; Blondeau, C

    2000-01-01

    Photosensitivity is defined by the appearance of occipital or more diffuse electroencephalographic spikes and waves induced by intermittent light stimulation (ILS), particular patterns, TV-watching, and video games. Photosensitivity is a genetic characteristic. Only the diffuse spikes and waves induced by ILS are correlated with epilepsy. Pure photogenic epilepsy is characterized by seizures which are only visually induced, usually by watching TV. Video games sometimes add a trigger effect due to slowly moving patterns or intense brightness. Several epileptic syndromes are associated with a photosensitivity with or without visually-induced seizures, mainly generalized idiopathic epilepsy.

  19. Neuroimaging of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  20. Insular epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprasert, Pramote; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Handler, Michael H

    2017-04-01

    Since it was originally described nearly 70 years ago, insular epilepsy has been increasingly recognized and may explain failures after apparently well-planned operations. We review the history of awareness of the phenomenon, techniques for its assessment, and its surgical management. Insular epilepsy can mimic features of frontal, parietal, or temporal seizures. It should be considered when a combination of somatosensory, visceral, and motor symptoms is observed early in a seizure. Extraoperative intracranial recordings are required to accurately diagnose insular seizures. Stereo-electroencephalography (EEG) or craniotomy with implantation of surface and depth electrodes have been used successfully to identify insular onset of seizures. Surgical resection of an insular focus may be performed with good success and acceptable risk. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Work Absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna; Wallette, Mårten

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates whether low levels of absence increase the probability of permanent employment and reduce that of unemployment for Swedish temporary workers. We investigate two reasons for absence: worker sickness and sickness of a dependent child. Using a competing risk estimation model......, we find that sick leave reduces the probability of permanent employment for women and increases the probability of unemployment for men. Absence due to child sickness increases the risk of unemployment for women. Although the influence of sick leave varies substantially among different temporary jobs...

  3. [The use of depakene and depakene-chrono in idiopathic generalized epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perunova, N Iu

    2003-01-01

    During 5 years, 104 patients with different types of idiopathic generalized epilepsy were treated with depakine and depakine-chrono in monotherapy and polytherapy schedule. Thirty-three patients had childhood absence epilepsy, 34--juvenile absence epilepsy, 33--juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and 3--generalized convulsive seizures in wake up periods. Mean medication dose was 1200 mg daily. Significant improvement of the patient's state was revealed in 50% of the cases, being most efficient in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (60.6%) and in children absence epilepsy (57.5%). Indices of remission formation and quality changed in the same direction--complete remissions were more frequent in juvenile absence epilepsy. Depakine is concluded to be an effective medication for the treatment of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

  4. Duchenne muscular dystrophy and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, M; Messina, S; Bruno, C; D'Amico, A; Villanova, M; Brancalion, B; Sivo, S; Bianco, F; Striano, P; Battaglia, D; Lettori, D; Vita, G L; Bertini, E; Gualandi, F; Ricotti, V; Ferlini, A; Mercuri, E

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive and behavioral difficulties occur in approximately a third of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of epilepsy in a cohort of 222 DMD patients. Epileptic seizures were found in 14 of the 222 DMD patients (6.3%). The age of onset ranged from 3 months to 16 years (mean 7.8). Seizures were more often focal epilepsy (n=6), generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n=4) or absences (n=4). They were present in 12 of the 149 boys with normal IQ (8.1%) and in two of the 73 with mental retardation (2.7%). In two cases the parents did not report any past or present history of seizures but only 'staring episodes' interpreted as a sign of 'poor attention'. In both patients EEG showed the typical pattern observed in childhood absence epilepsy. Our results suggest that the prevalence of epilepsy in our study (6.3%) is higher than in the general pediatric population (0.5-1%). The risk of epilepsy does not appear to increase in patients with mental retardation.

  5. Priorities in pediatric epilepsy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Christine B.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Dlugos, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The Priorities in Pediatric Epilepsy Research workshop was held in the spirit of patient-centered and patient-driven mandates for developing best practices in care, particularly for epilepsy beginning under age 3 years. The workshop brought together parents, representatives of voluntary advocacy organizations, physicians, allied health professionals, researchers, and administrators to identify priority areas for pediatric epilepsy care and research including implementation and testing of interventions designed to improve care processes and outcomes. Priorities highlighted were 1) patient outcomes, especially seizure control but also behavioral, academic, and social functioning; 2) early and accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment; 3) role and involvement of parents (communication and shared decision-making); and 4) integration of school and community organizations with epilepsy care delivery. Key factors influencing pediatric epilepsy care included the child's impairments and seizure presentation, parents, providers, the health care system, and community systems. Care was represented as a sequential process from initial onset of seizures to referral for comprehensive evaluation when needed. We considered an alternative model in which comprehensive care would be utilized from onset, proactively, rather than reactively after pharmacoresistance became obvious. Barriers, including limited levels of evidence about many aspects of diagnosis and management, access to care—particularly epilepsy specialty and behavioral health care—and implementation, were identified. Progress hinges on coordinated research efforts that systematically address gaps in knowledge and overcoming barriers to access and implementation. The stakes are considerable, and the potential benefits for reduced burden of refractory epilepsy and lifelong disabilities may be enormous. PMID:23966254

  6. Familial aggregation of focal seizure semiology in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobochnik, Steven; Fahlstrom, Robyn; Shain, Catherine; Winawer, Melodie R

    2017-07-04

    To improve phenotype definition in genetic studies of epilepsy, we assessed the familial aggregation of focal seizure types and of specific seizure symptoms within the focal epilepsies in families from the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project. We studied 302 individuals with nonacquired focal epilepsy from 149 families. Familial aggregation was assessed by logistic regression analysis of relatives' traits (dependent variable) by probands' traits (independent variable), estimating the odds ratio for each symptom in a relative given presence vs absence of the symptom in the proband. In families containing multiple individuals with nonacquired focal epilepsy, we found significant evidence for familial aggregation of ictal motor, autonomic, psychic, and aphasic symptoms. Within these categories, ictal whole body posturing, diaphoresis, dyspnea, fear/anxiety, and déjà vu/jamais vu showed significant familial aggregation. Focal seizure type aggregated as well, including complex partial, simple partial, and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Our results provide insight into genotype-phenotype correlation in the nonacquired focal epilepsies and a framework for identifying subgroups of patients likely to share susceptibility genes. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. CHD2 mutations are a rare cause of generalized epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivisano, Marina; Striano, Pasquale; Sartorelli, Jacopo; Giordano, Lucio; Traverso, Monica; Accorsi, Patrizia; Cappelletti, Simona; Claps, Dianela Judith; Vigevano, Federico; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 2 (CHD2) gene mutations have been reported in patients with myoclonic-atonic epilepsy (MAE), as well as in patients with Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet, and Jeavons syndromes and other epileptic encephalopathies featuring generalized epilepsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of CHD2 mutations in a series of patients with MAE. Twenty patients affected by MAE were included in the study. We analyzed antecedents, age at onset, seizure semiology and frequency, EEG, treatment, and neuropsychological outcome. We sequenced the CHD2 gene with Sanger technology. We identified a CHD2 frameshift mutation in one patient (c.4256del19). He was a 17-year-old boy with no familial history for epilepsy and normal development before epilepsy onset. Epilepsy onset was at 3years and 5months: he presented with myoclonic-atonic seizures, head drops, myoclonic jerks, and absences. Interictal EEGs revealed slow background activity associated with generalized epileptiform abnormalities and photoparoxysmal response. His seizures were highly responsive to valproic acid, and an attempt to withdraw it led to seizure recurrence. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed moderate intellectual disability. Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 2 is not the major gene associated with MAE. Conversely, CHD2 could be responsible for a proper phenotype characterized by infantile-onset generalized epilepsy, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity, which might overlap with MAE, Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet, and Jeavons syndromes.

  8. Chronotypes in Patients with Epilepsy: Does the Type of Epilepsy Make a Difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallie Kendis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms govern all biological functions. Circadian misalignment has a major impact on health. Late chronotype is a risk factor for circadian misalignment which in turn can affect the control of seizures in epilepsy patients. We compared a group of 87 confirmed epilepsy patients regardless of subtypes with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We compared generalized epilepsy patients with localization related epilepsy patients and with healthy controls. We found that primary generalized epilepsy patients were 5 times more likely to have a late chronotype than healthy controls. We did not find any significant differences between localization related epilepsy patients and healthy controls or between the overall epilepsy cohort and healthy controls. Generalized epilepsy patients are more likely to be evening types as compared to those with focal epilepsy or subjects without epilepsy. Epilepsy patients do not experience the same age related increase in morningness as do age-matched healthy controls. This is important in regard to timing of AED, identifying and preventing sleep deprivation, and integrating chronotype evaluations and chronotherapy in comprehensive epilepsy care. Further studies, using objective phase markers or the impact of chronotherapy on seizure control, are necessary.

  9. Clinical neurophysiological correlates of histopathological abnormalities in epilepsy surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrier, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    In search for variables that determine outcome in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy who undergo epilepsy surgery, we identified specific combinations of clinical neurophysiological findings with their underlying histopathology. These findings may have important surgical consequences. In a

  10. Paraneoplastic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Anna; Lukas, Rimas V; VanHaerents, Stephen; Warnke, Peter; Tao, James X; Rose, Sandra; Wu, Shasha

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy can be a manifestation of paraneoplastic syndromes which are the consequence of an immune reaction to neuronal elements driven by an underlying malignancy affecting other organs and tissues. The antibodies commonly found in paraneoplastic encephalitis can be divided into two main groups depending on the target antigen: 1) antibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens, such as against neurotransmitter (N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) receptors, ion channels (voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)), and channel-complex proteins (leucine rich, glioma inactivated-1 glycoprotein (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2)) and 2) antibodies against intracellular neuronal antigens (Hu/antineuronal nuclear antibody-1 (ANNA-1), Ma2/Ta, glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), less frequently to CV2/collapsin response mediator protein 5 (CRMP5)). In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of the current literature on paraneoplastic epilepsy indexed by the associated onconeuronal antibodies. While a range of seizure types can be seen with paraneoplastic syndromes, temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common because of the association with limbic encephalitis. Early treatment of the paraneoplastic syndrome with immune modulation/suppression may prevent the more serious potential consequences of paraneoplastic epilepsy.

  11. 染色体15q11.2和15q13.3区域的微缺失与中国儿童失神癫痫的相关性%Association of Microdeletions in 15q11.2 and 15q13.3 with Childhood Absence Epilepsy in Chinese Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张平平; 王静敏; 吴晔; 吴沪生; 许克铭; 刘晓燕; 陈彪; 姜玉武; 张月华; 桑田; 张锋; 季涛云; 黄琼辉; 谢涵; 赵海娟; 蔡斌

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨15q11.2和15q13.3区域的拷贝数变异(CNV)是否与中国汉族儿童失神癫痫(CAE)患儿的表型相关.方法 采用Affymetrix SNP 5.0芯片技术对198例CAE患儿和198名北方汉族健康成人进行特发性全面性癫痫(IGEs)相关的CNV检测,对发现的阳性CNV采用高密度寡核苷酸为基础的比较基因组杂交芯片技术进一步验证.应用Accucopy技术对另外200例CAE息儿进行15q11.2和15q13.3区域的CNV检测.结果 通过Affymetrix SNP 5.0芯片技术在198例CAE患儿中发现3例存在15q11.2的微缺失,1例存在15q13.3的微缺失,而在198名健康对照中没有发现.另外200例CAE患儿中发现1例存在15q11.2的微缺失.发现的5例微缺失中除1例为新发CNV外,余4例均遗传自母亲,这些患儿的母亲没有发现明确的癫痫表现.结论 15q11.2和15q13.3的微缺失是CAE患儿重要的疾病相关CNV,并且15q11.2微缺失在中国汉族人群中具有较15q13.3微缺失更高的发生率.%Objective To investigated whether the copy number variations (CNV) in 15qll.2 and 15ql3.3 are associated with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) in Chinese children. Methods Idiopathic generalized epilepsies(IGE) - related CNV in 198 patients with CAE and 198 healthy controls from northern China were assessed by Affymetrix SNP5. 0 microarrays,and the CNV identified by high -density oligonucleotide - based CGH microarrays were verified. The Accucopy technology was conducted to detect the CNV in 15qll.2 and 15ql3.3 in another 200 patients with CAE. Results lSqll.2 microdeletion in 3 cases out of 198 ( 1.5% ) CAE patients and 15ql3.3 microdeletion in 1 case out of 198 (0.5% ) CAE patients were found,but none were detected in 198 controls. 15qll.2 microdeletion was also found in 1 patient among another 200 CAE patients. Among these S cases,only 1 case had de novo CNV and the other4 cases inherited the CNV from their mothers with normal phenotype. Conclusions 15ql 1. 2 microdeletion and 15ql3

  12. Do recurrent seizure-related head injuries affect seizures in people with epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David E.; Chiang, Sharon; Tobias, Ronnie S.

    2015-01-01

    Seizure-related head injuries (SRHIs) are among the most commonly encountered injuries in people with epilepsy (PWE). Whether head injury has an effect on preexisting epilepsy is not known. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess for any possible effects of SRHIs on seizure frequency and seizure semiology over a 2-year period. We identified 204 patients who have been followed at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 2008 to 2010. SRHI occurred in 18.1% of the cohort. Most injuries (91%) were classified as mild. Though seizure frequency varied following head injury, overall seizure frequency was not significantly impacted by presence or absence of SRHI over the 2-year study period. Changes in seizure semiology were not observed in those with SRHIs. Although mild SRHI is common among PWE, it does not appear to have an effect on seizure characteristics over a relatively short period. PMID:22227592

  13. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View the poster schedule and more information here . Epilepsy Currents Generic Substitution of AEDs: Is it Time ... provides seizure protection in genetic epilepsy models More Epilepsy Professional News AES Releases New Guildeline for Treatment ...

  14. Dental students' knowledge and attitudes toward patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassona, Yazan M; Mahmoud, Ahmad Abd Al-Aziz; Ryalat, Soukaina M; Sawair, Faleh A

    2014-07-01

    Inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy can affect the provision of health services for patients with epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy among clinical dental students in Jordan. The study was conducted using a 21-item questionnaire to assess professional experience with epilepsy, knowledge about epilepsy, social tolerance, and willingness to care for patients with epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. More than one-third of dental students believed that epilepsy is due to insanity or mental illness. Only 45% were able to identify convulsion or shaking as a sign of epilepsy, and more than one-third did not know how to act in case of an epileptic seizure in the dental clinic. Disappointingly, 43.4% of the respondents were of the opinion that people with epilepsy should not have children, and only 38.6% thought that people with epilepsy should be employed at the same jobs as other people. About 50% indicated that their families would be concerned about them treating patients with epilepsy, and 30% believed that knowing that patients with epilepsy were treated in their clinic might make other patients reluctant to continue their treatment there. The results revealed an inadequate level of knowledge and negative attitudes toward epilepsy among dental students at the University of Jordan. There is an urgent need to educate dental students about epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychosis and epilepsy in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax Pericall, M T; Taylor, E

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of children and young people under 19 with both epilepsy and a psychotic state (schizophrenia-like psychotic episode, organic delusional disorder, or other brief psychotic episode). In total, the clinical case notes for 17 young people with these characteristics were identified retrospectively from three different sources. Compared with a group of young people with psychosis without epilepsy, children with epilepsy and psychosis more frequently had other neuropsychological problems like learning disability and autism. Both groups had a high rate of family histories of mental illness and social disability. Contrary to the findings in adults with psychosis and epilepsy, in this group of young people, psychosis was associated neither with temporal lobe epilepsy nor with mesial temporal sclerosis. The children with psychosis and epilepsy had a variety of seizure types and structural abnormalities.

  16. [Epilepsy And Driving Ability: The New Guideline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurthen, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The Swiss Guideline concerning epilepsy and driving has recently been revised. Recommendations have changed significantly in several respects. Some modifications arise indirectly from a change in the overall concept of epilepsy. As a consequence of the application of the new ILAE definition and diagnostic criteria for epilepsy, there are now cases in which the diagnosis of epilepsy is established even after one single seizure. Furthermore, a concept of imminent epilepsy was introduced to identify patients without seizures, but with a high risk of a first seizure within twelve months. On the other hand, the concept of a "resolved epilepsy" was established to loosen driving regulations for longterm seizure-free patients. In addition, the new guideline provides differential recommendations for provoked vs. unprovoked seizures in several clinical constellations.

  17. Narrative Absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Ravinder

    2008-01-01

    are largely built around the narratives produced by upper caste and upper middle-class migrants and exclude the experiences of Untouchable migrants. This narrative absence becomes a gauge of both the discursive and physical exclusion of ‘Untouchable' refugees from the legitimate community of Partition......The core of symbolic communities, like the community of Partition migrants, is formed through the discursive ownership of historical experiences-for instance, the loss of human lives, personal property and dismemberment of national territory; followed by the restoration of that loss through...... examples of successful refugee resettlement and national self-assertion. Within the master narrative of Partition migration history, however, the experiences of forced movement and resettlement suffered by the ‘Untouchables' are obscured. Popular accounts of violence, forced movement and suffering...

  18. Phytocannabinoids and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, R G; Hallak, J E C; Leite, J P; Zuardi, A W; Crippa, J A S

    2015-04-01

    Antiepileptic drugs often produce serious adverse effects, and many patients do not respond to them properly. Phytocannabinoids produce anticonvulsant effects in preclinical and preliminary human studies, and appear to produce fewer adverse effects than available antiepileptic drugs. The present review summarizes studies on the anticonvulsant properties of phytocannabinoids. Literature search using the PubMed database to identify studies on phytocannabinoids and epilepsy. Preclinical studies suggest that phytocannabinoids, especially cannabidiol and cannabidivarin, have potent anticonvulsant effects which are mediated by the endocannabinoid system. Human studies are limited in number and quality, but suggest that cannabidiol has anticonvulsant effects in adult and infantile epilepsy and is well tolerated after prolonged administration. Phytocannabinoids produce anticonvulsant effects through the endocannabinoid system, with few adverse effects. Cannabidiol and cannabidivarin should be tested in randomized, controlled clinical trials, especially in infantile epileptic syndromes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Fischer, Andrea; Mandigers, Paul J. J.

    2015-01-01

    of the dog with epilepsy in everyday clinical practice and furthermore may promote canine epilepsy research. The following manuscript reviews the evidence available for breeds which have been identified as being predisposed to idiopathic epilepsy with a proven or suspected genetic background, and highlights...

  20. Is there such a thing as "generalized" epilepsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Behr, C.; Avoli, M.

    2014-01-01

    The distinction between generalized and partial epilepsies is probably one, if not the most, pregnant assertions in modern epileptology. Both absence and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, the prototypic seizures found in generalized epilepsies, are classically seen as the result of a rapid, synchro

  1. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Deep PATTANAYAK

    2012-06-01

     model. Epilepsia 2007;48(9:1639-51.32. Ott D, Caplan R, Guthrie D, Siddarth P, Komo S, Shields WD, et al. Measures of psychopathology in children with complex partial seizures and primary generalized epilepsy with absence. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2001;40(8:907-14.33. Mathiak KA, Luba M, Mathiak, K, Karzel, K, Wolanczyk, Szczepanik E, et al. Quality of life in childhood epilepsy with lateralized epileptogenic foci. BMC Neurol 2010;10:69.34. Bulteau C, Jambaque I, Viguier D, Kieffer V, Dellatolas G, Dulac O. Epileptic syndromes, cognitive assessment and school placement: a study of 251 children. Dev Med Child Neurol 2000;42(5:319-27.35.Noeker M, Haverkamp F. Neuropsychological deficiencies as a mediator between CNS dysfunction and inattentive behaviour in childhood epilepsy. Dev Med Child Neurol 2003;45(10:717-8.36. Sillanpää M, Helen Cross J. The psychosocial impact of epilepsy in childhood. Epilepsy Behav 2009;15 Suppl 1:S5-10.37. Miller V, Palermo TM, Grewe SD. Quality of life in pediatric epilepsy: Demographic and disease-related predictors and comparison with healthy controls. Epilepsy Behav 2003,4(1:36-42.38. Kokkonen J, Kokkonen ER, Saukkonen AL, Pennanen P. Psychosocial outcome of young adults with epilepsy in childhood. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1997;62(3:265-8.39. Pal DK, Chaudhury G, Sengupta S, Das T: Social integration of children with epilepsy in rural India. Soc Sci Med 2002;54(12:1867-74.40. Modi AC. The impact of a new pediatric epilepsy diagnosis on parents: parenting stress and activity patterns. Epilepsy Behav 2009;14(1:237-42.41. Shore C, Austin J, Musick B, Dunn D, McBride A, Creasy K. Psychosocial care needs of parents of children with new-onset seizures. J Neurosci Nurs 1998;30:169-74.42. Rodenburg R, Marie Meijer A, Dekovic´ M, Aldenkamp AP. Family predictors of psychopathology in children with epilepsy. Epilepsia 2006;47(3:601-14.43.Mims J. Self-esteem, behavior, and concerns surrounding epilepsy in siblings

  2. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C) 199

  3. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  4. Neuropsychological outcome following frontal lobectomy for pharmacoresistant epilepsy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Robyn M; Floden, Darlene P; Ferguson, Lisa; Mahmoud, Shamseldeen; Mullane, Audrina; Jones, Stephen; Jehi, Lara; Bingaman, William; Najm, Imad M

    2017-02-14

    This retrospective cohort study characterized cognitive and motor outcomes in a large sample of adults who underwent frontal lobe resections for treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Ninety patients who underwent unilateral frontal lobe resection for epilepsy (42 language-dominant hemisphere/48 nondominant hemisphere) between 1989 and 2014 completed comprehensive preoperative and postoperative neuropsychological evaluations that included measures of verbal and nonverbal intellectual functioning, attention/working memory, processing speed, language, executive functioning, verbal and visual memory, and motor functioning. Objective methods were used to assess meaningful change across a wide range of abilities and to identify factors associated with neuropsychological decline following frontal lobectomy. Detailed postoperative neuroimaging analysis was conducted to characterize region, extent, and volume of resection. Forty-eight percent of patients did not demonstrate meaningful postoperative declines in cognition and an additional 42% demonstrated decline in 1 or 2 cognitive domains. When cognitive decline was observed, it usually occurred on measures of intelligence, visuomotor processing speed, or executive functioning. Side and site of resection were unrelated to cognitive outcome, but played a role in decline of contralateral manual dexterity following supplementary motor area resection. Higher preoperative ability, older age at surgery, absence of a malformation of cortical development on MRI, and poor seizure outcome were related to cognitive decline on some measures, but had poor sensitivity in identifying at-risk patients. The vast majority of patients who undergo frontal lobectomy for treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy demonstrate good cognitive and motor outcomes. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Erratum to “The WAG/Rij strain: A genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depression” [Prog Neuro-Psychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 35 (4) 854-876

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkisova, K.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2012-01-01

    The Publisher regrets that an error occurred in the spelling of the word ‘depression’ in the title of this paper. It incorrectly appeared as 12 ‘depressiony’. There is also an error in Fig.3. The text reads as follows "The open field test measures in non-epileptic and absence-epileptic Wistar WAG/Ri

  6. The preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495, reduces the frequency of spike-wave discharges in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngomba, R.T.; Biagioni, F.; Casciato, S.; Willems-van Bree, P.C.M.; Battaglia, G.; Bruno, V.; Nicoletti, F.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2005-01-01

    We examined the expression and function of group-II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors in an animal model of absence seizures using genetically epileptic WAG/Rij rats, which develop spontaneous non-convulsive seizures after 2-3 months of age. Six-month-old WAG/Rij rats showed an increased expre

  7. Socioeconomic outcome of epilepsy surgery: A controlled national study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Sabers, Anne; Christensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epilepsy surgery has been a standard treatment for refractory epilepsies that cannot be controlled by standard medical treatment. We aimed to evaluate the health and social consequences of resective surgery relative to controls from a study of national data. METHODS: Using the Danish...... National Patient Registry we identified all subjects with an epilepsy diagnosis between 1996 and 2009 and compared them with a group of patients with an epilepsy diagnosis who had had neither epilepsy surgery nor a vagus stimulation diagnosis by the index date, and who were matched by gender, index year...... for epilepsy diagnosis, and index year for epilepsy surgery. We considered all the health and social information available in the Danish health, medication and social registers. The duration of follow-up was three years. RESULTS: 254 epilepsy patients and 989 controls were analyzed. Surgery patients were more...

  8. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementat...

  9. Incidence and prevalence of epilepsy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob; Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Marianne G

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To estimate the occurrence of epilepsy in Denmark between 1977 and 2002, taking gender, age, and secular trends into consideration. METHODS: We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify all persons born in Denmark and the Danish National Hospital Register to identify persons...... registered with epilepsy between 1977 and 2002. RESULTS: Between 1977 and 2002 the average incidence of epilepsy was 68.8 new epilepsy patients per 100,000 person-years at risk. However, the incidence changed with calendar time and increased steeply from 1990 to 1995, probably due to changes in diagnostic...... declined from a high level in children to a low level between 20 and 40 years of age, and thereafter a gradual increase was seen. The incidence rate was slightly higher in men than in women except for the age range 10-20 years. About 2% of the population was diagnosed with epilepsy at some point during...

  10. Epilepsy, Cognition, and Behavior: The clinical picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne T.

    2010-01-01

    Although epilepsy is defined by the occurrence of spontaneous epileptic seizures, a large body of evidence indicates that epilepsy is linked to a spectrum behavioral, psychiatric, and cognitive disorders as well as to sudden death. Explanations for these associations include: (1) The effects of structural lesions which may impair the functions subserved by the regions of the brain involved in the lesion. (2) The effects of seizure activity which may begin well before a clinical seizure occurs and may persist long after it is over raising questions about what truly constitutes “interictal.” In addition, encephalopathic effects of epilepsy in infancy during critical periods in development may be particularly severe and potentially irreversible. (3) Shared mechanisms underlying seizures as well as these other disorders in the absence of structural lesions or separate diseases of the CNS. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrate the elevated risk of cognitive, psychiatric, and behavioral disorders not just during but also prior to the onset of epilepsy (seizures) itself. These may outlast the active phase of epilepsy as well. The mounting evidence argues strongly for the recognition of epilepsy as part of a spectrum of disorders and against the notion that even uncomplicated epilepsy can a priori be considered benign. PMID:21214534

  11. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  12. The spectrum of epilepsy and electroencephalographic abnormalities due to SHANK3 loss-of-function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J Lloyd; Quach, Michael M

    2016-10-01

    The coincidence of autism with epilepsy is 27% in those individuals with intellectual disability.(1) Individuals with loss-of-function mutations in SHANK3 have intellectual disability, autism, and variably, epilepsy.(2-5) The spectrum of seizure semiologies and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities has never been investigated in detail. With the recent report that SHANK3 mutations are present in approximately 2% of individuals with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities and 1% of individuals with autism, determining the spectrum of seizure semiologies and electrographic abnormalities will be critical for medical practitioners to appropriately counsel the families of patients with SHANK3 mutations. A retrospective chart review was performed of all individuals treated at the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Child Neurology who have been identified as having either a chromosome 22q13 microdeletion encompassing SHANK3 or a loss-of-function mutation in SHANK3 identified through whole-exome sequencing. For each subject, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure semiology, frequency, age of onset, and efficacy of therapy were determined. Electroencephalography studies were reviewed by a board certified neurophysiologist. Neuroimaging was reviewed by both a board certified pediatric neuroradiologist and child neurologist. There is a wide spectrum of seizure semiologies, frequencies, and severity in individuals with SHANK3 mutations. There are no specific EEG abnormalities found in our cohort, and EEG abnormalities were present in individuals diagnosed with epilepsy and those without history of a clinical seizure. All individuals with a mutation in SHANK3 should be evaluated for epilepsy due to the high prevalence of seizures in this population. The most common semiology is atypical absence seizure, which can be challenging to identify due to comorbid intellectual disability in individuals with SHANK3 mutations; however, no consistent seizure semiology

  13. Anxiety in adolescent epilepsy. A clinimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Marchetti, Daniela; Laino, Daniela; Minna, Maria; Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Fulcheri, Mario; Verrotti, Alberto; Bech, Per

    2016-08-01

    Background Anxiety and depression have been considered to be neglected disorders in epilepsy. Because panic disorder is one of the most important anxiety disorders, it has been problematic to use very comprehensive anxiety questionnaires in epilepsy patients, as panic attacks and epileptic seizures, although two distinct clinical entities from a diagnostic point of view, show a significant overlap of symptoms. Aims We have focused on single items for anxiety and depression as screening candidates in adolescent epilepsy. Methods The individual panic attack item in the Screen for Children Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Scale (SCARED) and the single depression item in the Kellner Symptom Questionnaire were tested. Our samples consisted of adolescent patients with epilepsy and a matched control group with healthy participants, as well as two numerical groups acting as controls. Results The single panic attack item identified panic anxiety in 24.1% in the group of patients with epilepsy and 0.0% in the matched control group (p = 0.01). The single depression item identified 52.2% with depression in the epilepsy group and 6.2% in the matched control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion As screening instruments, single items of panic attack and depression are sufficient to screen for these affective states in adolescent epilepsy. The clinical implications are that it is important to be quite specific when screening for depression and panic attacks in adolescent patients with epilepsy.

  14. [Eponyms and epilepsy (history of Eastern civilizations)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Drulović, J; Stojsavljević, N; Veskov, R; Ivanus, J

    1996-01-01

    The history of eponyms for epilepsy in the lands of the Eastern globe present the portrait of the attitudes of both the laymen and skilled people towards the disease and patient, as well as to the Nature itself. As opposed to the West which during the Middle ages changed its concepts of epilepsy as the organic brain disease for the sublime 'alchemic' position, the people of the East were more prone to consider from the beginning of their civilization till the XIX century that epilepsy is the consequence of the evanescent spiritual and extracorporal forces which by themselves were out of their reach. As compared to the western civilization, the historical resources are, often as a consequence of a linguistic barriers, more scarce-as consequently is the number of eponyms, but are nevertheless picturesque. The medical science from Babylonian period presumed that epileptic manifestations are the consequence of the demonic or ill spiritual actions. There existed an attitude that at the beginning of an epileptic attack the patient was possessed by a demon (the Akkadic, i.e., Babylonian verb "sibtu" denoting epilepsy, had the meaning "to seize" or "to be obsessed"); at the end of the clonic phase the demon departed from the body. Different demons were responsible for different forms of epilepsy such as nocturnal and children epilepsy, absence epilepsy and pure convulsions, simple and complex automatisms, and gelastic epilepsy. Thus, the doctors from the period of Babylon aside from making primordial classification of epilepsies, knew about their clinical picture (prodromal symptoms and aura, Jackson's epilepsy. Todd's paralysis), postictal phenomena and intericatl emotional instability; provocative factors were also known (sleep deprivation, emotions, as well as alcohol, albeit in a negative sense-as a cure for epilepsy). There is no doubt than in the period of Babylon the clinical picture of serial fits and its progress to status epilepticus were clearly recognized and

  15. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation in a genetic absence model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zobeiri, M.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The proposed area of onset for absence epilepsy characteristic of spontaneously occurring spike and slow-wave discharges (SWDs) in the genetic absence rat model is the subgranular layer of the somatosensory cortex. Modulation of the hyperexcitable cortical foci by bilateral transcranial direct curre

  16. The challenges that parents of children with epilepsy face

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampra, Matina; Tzerakis, Nikolas; Thomsen, Louise Lund Holm

    2017-01-01

    Objective This qualitative study explored the challenges that Greek parents/caregivers of children with controlled epilepsy (CwE) face regarding the disorder. Methods Interviews were conducted based on open-ended questions guided by a review of the literature. A total of 91 parents/caregivers were......E: the disclosure of epilepsy and the absence of adequate information about coping with epilepsy. Parents in Greece were hesitant to reveal their child's epilepsy to school staff and their wider social milieu. Also, although satisfied with the patient-centered approach they experienced with their hospital doctor......, parents/caregivers found that they needed more education about the existing sources of psychosocial and emotional support to cope with their child's epilepsy personally and as a family. Finally, the parents/caregivers who let their child know about the epilepsy and discussed the implications...

  17. Pediatric Headache and Epilepsy Comorbidity in the Pragmatic Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasiliou, Antigone S; Bregianni, Marianna; Nikaina, Irene; Kotsalis, Charalambos; Paraskevoulakos, Evangelos; Bazigou, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Demographic and clinical data were collected from three cross-sectional samples, from the headache and epilepsy clinics according to respective protocols. During structured interviews, we examined the co-occurrence of headaches and epilepsy in children and their families: (1) 172 children from the headache clinic, were questioned for the number and type of epileptic seizures and epilepsy diagnosis. (2) Around 70 children from the epilepsy clinic for the frequency and type of headaches and headache syndrome diagnosis. (3) A total of 149 parents of children with benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BCECTS) and childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), for the relative frequency of headaches in first- and second-degree relatives. Out of 172, 84 (48.8%) children with headache had a migraine and 60 (34.9%) had tension headaches; 3 children (1.7%) had epilepsy or unprovoked seizures. Migraine and epilepsy, co-occurred in 2/84 (2.3%). Eight out of 70 patients with epilepsy had headaches (11.4%); none had migraine. Around 43% of patients with BCECTS or CAE had a family history of headache, more prevalent in first-degree relatives of children with BCECTS than CAE. Contrary to existing literature, migraine and epilepsy, co-occurred infrequently in these highly selected samples. Family history of headache was frequent in patients with BCECTS and CAE, without any significant difference between the two. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. AN AYURVEDIC INSIGHT TOWARDS EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Karam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Ayurveda, Mental disorders and psychological temperaments have been broadly described [e.g. vata vyadhi (nervous disorders, unmada (insanity, murccha, moha (loss of consciousness, vismriti (amnesia, apasmara (epilepsy etc.]. In Ayurveda, Apasmara (or epilepsy has been described among the maharoga (a group of eight diseases well-known for causing serious morbidity. In the Ayurvedic texts, Apasmara (Epilepsy is defined as sudden abhorrent bodily activities (vibhatsa-cheshta accompanied by momentary blackouts or loss of consciousness (tama-pravesha owing to disturbance in mental faculties of dhi (intelligence, dhriti (retention and smriti (memory. Epilepsy is a major public health problem all over world. The estimated proportion of the general population with active epilepsy (i.e. continuing seizures or the need for treatment at a given time ranges from 4-10 per 1,000 people. Herbal remedies have been recommended in various medical treatises for the cure of different diseases. In this regard, there is great prospective for identifying excellent Ayurvedic components or its active principles, particularly in consideration of the fact that such substances may provide maximum advantage with cost effectiveness, least side effects, and improvement of patient compliance.

  20. Video game epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh R

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflex epilepsy is the commonest form of epilepsy in which seizures are provoked by specific external stimulus. Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is provoked by environmental flicker stimuli. Video game epilepsy is considered to be its variant or a pattern sensitive epilepsy. The mean age of onset is around puberty and boys suffer more commonly as they are more inclined to play video games. Television set or computer screen is the commonest precipitants. The treatment remains the removal of the offending stimulus along with drug therapy. Long term prognosis in these patients is better as photosensitivity gradually declines with increasing age. We present two such case of epilepsy induced by video game.

  1. Cannabinoids for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, David; Vickrey, Barbara

    2014-03-05

    Marijuana appears to have anti-epileptic effects in animals. It is not currently known if it is effective in patients with epilepsy. Some states in the United States of America have explicitly approved its use for epilepsy. To assess the efficacy and safety of cannabinoids when used as monotherapy or add-on treatment for people with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (9 September 2013), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 8), MEDLINE (Ovid) (9 September 2013), ISI Web of Knowledge (9 September 2013), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (9 September 2013), and ClinicalTrials.gov (9 September 2013). In addition, we included studies we personally knew about that were not found by the searches, as well as searched the references in the identified studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) whether blinded or not. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted the data. The primary outcome investigated was seizure freedom at one year or more, or three times the longest interseizure interval. Secondary outcomes included responder rate at six months or more, objective quality of life data, and adverse events. We found four randomized trial reports that included a total of 48 patients, each of which used cannabidiol as the treatment agent. One report was an abstract and another was a letter to the editor. Anti-epileptic drugs were continued in all studies. Details of randomisation were not included in any study report. There was no investigation of whether the control and treatment participant groups were the same or different. All the reports were low quality.The four reports only answered the secondary outcome about adverse effects. None of the patients in the treatment groups suffered adverse effects. No reliable conclusions can be drawn at present regarding the efficacy of cannabinoids as a treatment for epilepsy. The dose of 200 to 300 mg daily of cannabidiol was

  2. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semah, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DSV-CEA, 91 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    The research projects on epilepsy addressed two main issues: the pathophysiology of the inter-ictal hypo-metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy and the role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizure. Our research projects focused primarily on temporal lobe epilepsy: The pathophysiology of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism and its correlation with the epileptogenic network was investigated in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Inter-ictal hypo-metabolism is commonly found in mesio-temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that metabolic changes reflect the preferential networks involved in ictal discharges. We analyzed the topography of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism according to electro-clinical patterns in 50 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and consistent features of MTLE. Based on electro-clinical correlations we identified 4 groups:1) mesial group characterized by mesial seizure onset without evidence of early spread beyond the temporal lobe; 2) anterior mesio-lateral group (AML) with early anterior spread, involving the anterior lateral temporal cortex and insulo-fronto-opercular areas; 3) widespread mesio-lateral group (WML) with widespread spread, involving both anterior and posterior lateral temporal and peri-sylvian areas; 4) bi-temporal group (BT) with early contralateral temporal spread. Results of FDG-PET imaging in each group were compared to control subjects using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). MRI data and surgical outcome in each group were compared to metabolic findings. Hypo-metabolism was limited to the hippocampal gyrus, the temporal pole and the insula in the mesial group. Gradual involvement of the lateral temporal cortex, the insula and the peri-sylvian areas was observed in the AML and WML groups. The BT group differed from the others by mild bi-temporal involvement, bilateral insular hypo-metabolism and longer epilepsy duration. MRI

  3. Characteristics of headache in children with epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Sano, Fumikazu; Ishii, Sayaka; Ohyama, Tetsuo; Sugita, Kanji; Aihara, Masao

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the types and frequency of seizure-associated headaches among pediatric patients with epilepsy, and to identify their risk factors with special...

  4. Neocortical gamma oscillations in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedek, Krisztina; Berenyi, Antal; Gombkoto, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Absence seizures in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) may in part be explained by a decrease in phasic GABAA (type-A c-aminobutyric acid) receptor function, but the mechanisms are only partly understood. Here we studied the relation between ictal and interictal spike-...

  5. Management in refractory epilepsy: Beyond epilepsy surgery...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roop Gursahani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although definititions of refractory epilepsy vary, about 40% of prevalent cases of epilepsy are not controlled by anti-epileptic drugs. A substantial proportion of this population requires palliative therapy since only a minority are candidates for epilepsy surgery. Drug therapy can be optimised after accurate classification of the epilepsy. Monotherapy is often as effective as polytherapy with fewer adverse effects. Depression and CNS adverse effects significantly impact quality of life and must be systematically screened for and treated. The ketogenic diet and vagal nerve stimulation provide substantial seizure control in a significant number of cases and may be used synergistically. Deep brain stimulation is another promising modality.

  6. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Motamedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the problem of seizures requires knowledge of the clinical details and features of the seizures, the functional abnormality in the brain as shown on the EEG, and the structural assessment of the brain with an MRI study optimized for epilepsy. Usually MRI or computed tomographic (CT scan should be performed in evaluating the cause of a newly diagnosed seizure disorder. MRI is preferred over CT because of its greater sensitivity and specificity for identifying small lesions."nBecause there is an option of surgical excision of the "seizure focus," which may cure the patient, the detection of a focal abnormality of the brain is important for the formulation of the reason for the seizures and the options available for treatment. Knowledge of the brain abnormalities early in the course of treating the patient greatly helps the management of each individual. The challenge to epileptologists is that the problem of epilepsy is a special one, which requires optimized protocols dedicated to it."nMRI interpretation is different when used in a screening way and when viewed in the context of other investigations. This is particularly important when the patient has partial seizures and may be considered for surgical treatment."nMost centers that deal with epilepsy spend a great deal of time in ensuring the quality of their EEG and EEG interpretation. However, unless there is a radiologist with an interest in epilepsy or an epileptologist who spends time with radiologist colleagues, it can be difficult to establish good epilepsy-focused MRI with appropriate sequences, radiography, and interpretation. MRI acquisition and interpretation need to be focused on the problem of epilepsy."nIndication"nThe American academy of neurology has published practice parameters for neuroimaging (NI studies (MRI, CT of patients having a first seizure. Emergent NI (scan immediately should be performed when a health care provider suspects a serious

  7. EEG-fMRI study of resting-state networks in childhood absence epilepsy%儿童期失神癫(癎)静息态脑网络改变的脑电图联合功能磁共振成像研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玲; 焦青; 卢光明; 张志强; 王正阁; 王茂雪; 袁翠平; 沈连芳; 陈光辉; 杨防; 谭启富

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the alterations of resting-state brain functional networks in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) using resting - state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis, and to explore the cognitive disorders of children in epileptic seizures. Methods According to case selection criteria, 12 children with absence seizure were selected, from whom 17 fMRI data with generalized slow-wave discharges (GSWD) and the matched data without discharges were collected by using electroencephalogram (EEG) - fMRI synchronization. Independent component analysis was used to investigate the alterations in different states of 7 resting-state networks including the thalamus, default-mode network, dorsal attention network, central execution network and perceptive networks. Results Paired t-test and correlation analysis were used for statistical analysis. The thalamus showed increased coherence of brain activity in GSWD state, and the increased coherence was positively correlated with the durations of GSWD (r = 0.890, P = 0.000). The default-mode network (r = - 0.706, P = 0.000), dorsal attention network (r = - 0.829, P = 0.000) and central execution network (r = - 0.905, P = 0.000), which dealt with high - grade cognitive functions, showed decreased coherence, and the brain activity coherence in these networks were negatively correlated with GSWD durations. However, none of low-grade perceptive networks was found to have significant alteration in GSWD state. Conclusion The increased coherence of brain activity in the thalamus may be associated with the generation of GSWD in childhood absence epilepsy. Besides the default brain function, the processes of attention and cognitive execution may also be impaired in childhood absence epilepsy, while low - grade perceptive functions may not be greatly impacted. This study may contribute to the understanding of pathophysiological mechanism of impaired consciousness in childhood absence epilepsy.%目的 采用静息态

  8. In patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, the new ACR/EULAR definition of remission identifies patients with persistent absence of functional disability and suppression of ultrasonographic synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Garifallia; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Caporali, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    To test the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) and disease activity score in 44 and 28 joints (DAS, DAS28) definitions of remission in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), against disability and ultrasound-detectable synovitis. In an observational study of early RA patients, remission rates were determined and compared in 166 patients. The remission definitions included the simplified disease activity index (SDAI≤3.3), ACR/EULAR (categorical), DAS28 (EULAR remission. DAS28, SDAI and ACR/EULAR remission was cross-sectionally associated with low functional disability and absent PDPS. All definitions were longitudinally associated with low functional disability: positive likelihood ratios (LR+) of 3.24 for DAS28, 2.14 for DAS, 4.86 for SDAI, 5.67 for ACR/EULAR criteria, and with absent PDPS for DAS28 (LR+ 1.66), SDAI (LR+ 6.46), ACR/EULAR (LR+ 5.07). The new remission definitions confirmed their validity in an observational setting and identify patients with better disease control.

  9. The absence of longitudinal data limits the accuracy of high-throughput clinical phenotyping for identifying type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei-Qi; Leibson, Cynthia L; Ransom, Jeanine E; Kho, Abel N; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of insufficient longitudinal data on the accuracy of a high-throughput clinical phenotyping (HTCP) algorithm for identifying (1) patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and (2) patients with no diabetes. Retrospective study conducted at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Eligible subjects were Olmsted County residents with ≥1 Mayo Clinic encounter in each of three time periods: (1) 2007, (2) from 1997 through 2006, and (3) before 1997 (N = 54,283). Diabetes relevant electronic medical record (EMR) data about diagnoses, laboratories, and medications were used. We employed the HTCP algorithm to categorize individuals as T2DM cases and non-diabetes controls. Considering the full 11 years (1997-2007) as the gold standard, we compared gold-standard categorizations with those using data for 10 subsequent intervals, ranging from 1998-2007 (10-year data) to 2007 (1-year data). Positive predictive values (PPVs) and false-negative rates (FNRs) were calculated. McNemar tests were used to determine whether categorizations using shorter time periods differed from the gold standard. Statistical significance was defined as P FNRs, respectively, were 70% and 25% for case identification and 59% and 67% for control identification. All time frames differed significantly from the gold standard, except for the 10-year period. The accuracy of the algorithm reduced remarkably as data were limited to shorter observation periods. This impact should be considered carefully when designing/executing HTCP algorithms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroimaging in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahina Bano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease worldwide and is second only to stroke in causing neurological morbidity. Neuroimaging plays a very important role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with epilepsy. This review article highlights the specific role of various imaging modalities in patients with epilepsy, and their practical applications in the management of epileptic patients.

  11. Epilepsy is a disease!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition of disease, epilepsy shall not be considered neither a symptom nor a syndrome. Epilepsy is a generic term for a group of diseases characterized by seizures. It implies a state quite distinct from health. Therefore it seems worthy to keep epilepsy as such in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD.

  12. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    formulae for the spherical mean radon transform,” Inverse Probl. 23(1), 373–383 (2007). 5. D. Finch, S. Patch, and Rakesh, “Determining a Function from...Vickrey, B.G., 2007. Stopping antiepileptic drugs after epilepsy surgery: a survey of U.S. epilepsy center neurologists. Epilepsy Behav. 10, 219– 222

  13. Natural approaches to epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaby, Alan R

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews research on the use of diet, nutritional supplements, and hormones in the treatment of epilepsy. Potentially beneficial dietary interventions include identifying and treating blood glucose dysregulation, identifying and avoiding allergenic foods, and avoiding suspected triggering agents such as alcohol, aspartame, and monosodium glutamate. The ketogenic diet may be considered for severe, treatment-resistant cases. The Atkins diet (very low in carbohydrates) is a less restrictive type of ketogenic diet that may be effective in some cases. Nutrients that may reduce seizure frequency include vitamin B6, magnesium, vitamin E, manganese, taurine, dimethylglycine, and omega-3 fatty acids. Administration of thiamine may improve cognitive function in patients with epilepsy. Supplementation with folic acid, vitamin B6, biotin, vitamin D, and L-carnitine may be needed to prevent or treat deficiencies resulting from the use of anticonvulsant drugs. Vitamin K1 has been recommended near the end of pregnancy for women taking anticonvulsants. Melatonin may reduce seizure frequency in some cases, and progesterone may be useful for women with cyclic exacerbations of seizures. In most cases, nutritional therapy is not a substitute for anticonvulsant medications. However, in selected cases, depending on the effectiveness of the interventions, dosage reductions or discontinuation of medications may be possible.

  14. Musical and poetic creativity and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesdorffer, Dale C; Trimble, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Associations between epilepsy and musical or poetic composition have received little attention. We reviewed the literature on links between poetic and musical skills and epilepsy, limiting this to the Western canon. While several composers were said to have had epilepsy, John Hughes concluded that none of the major classical composers thought to have had epilepsy actually had it. The only composer with epilepsy that we could find was the contemporary composer, Hikari Oe, who has autism and developed epilepsy at age 15years. In his childhood years, his mother found that he had an ability to identify bird sound and keys of songs and began teaching him piano. Hikari is able to compose in his head when his seizures are not severe, but when his seizures worsen, his creativity is lost. Music critics have commented on the simplicity of his musical composition and its monotonous sound. Our failure to find evidence of musical composers with epilepsy finds parallels with poetry where there are virtually no established poets with epilepsy. Those with seizures include Lord George Byron in the setting of terminal illness, Algernon Swinburne who had alcohol-related seizures, Charles Lloyd who had seizures and psychosis, Edward Lear who had childhood onset seizures, and Vachel Lindsay. The possibility that Emily Dickinson had epilepsy is also discussed. It has not been possible to identify great talents with epilepsy who excel in poetic or musical composition. There are few published poets with epilepsy and no great composers. Why is this? Similarities between music and poetry include meter, tone, stress, rhythm, and form, and much poetry is sung with music. It is likely that great musical and poetic compositions demand a greater degree of concentration and memory than is possible in epilepsy, resulting in problems retaining a musical and mathematical structure over time. The lack of association between recognizable neuropsychiatric disorders and these skills is a gateway to

  15. Animal models of epilepsy: use and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandratavicius L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ludmyla Kandratavicius,1 Priscila Alves Balista,1 Cleiton Lopes-Aguiar,1 Rafael Naime Ruggiero,1 Eduardo Henrique Umeoka,2 Norberto Garcia-Cairasco,2 Lezio Soares Bueno-Junior,1 Joao Pereira Leite11Department of Neurosciences and Behavior, 2Department of Physiology, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, BrazilAbstract: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition characterized by recurrent seizures that affects millions of people worldwide. Comprehension of the complex mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and seizure generation in temporal lobe epilepsy and other forms of epilepsy cannot be fully acquired in clinical studies with humans. As a result, the use of appropriate animal models is essential. Some of these models replicate the natural history of symptomatic focal epilepsy with an initial epileptogenic insult, which is followed by an apparent latent period and by a subsequent period of chronic spontaneous seizures. Seizures are a combination of electrical and behavioral events that are able to induce chemical, molecular, and anatomic alterations. In this review, we summarize the most frequently used models of chronic epilepsy and models of acute seizures induced by chemoconvulsants, traumatic brain injury, and electrical or sound stimuli. Genetic models of absence seizures and models of seizures and status epilepticus in the immature brain were also examined. Major uses and limitations were highlighted, and neuropathological, behavioral, and neurophysiological similarities and differences between the model and the human equivalent were considered. The quest for seizure mechanisms can provide insights into overall brain functions and consciousness, and animal models of epilepsy will continue to promote the progress of both epilepsy and neurophysiology research.Keywords: epilepsy, animal model, pilocarpine, kindling, neurodevelopment

  16. Inherent vulnerabilities in monoaminergic pathways predict the emergence of depressive impairments in an animal model of chronic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel-Matus, Jesús-Servando; Shin, Don; Sankar, Raman; Mazarati, Andrey

    2017-08-01

    The objective was to determine whether the depression comorbid with epilepsy could be predicted based on inherent premorbid patterns of monoaminergic transmission. In male Wistar rats, despair-like and anhedonia-like behaviors were examined using forced swimming and taste preference tests, respectively. Serotonergic raphe nucleus (RN)-prefrontal cortex (PFC) and dopaminergic ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens (NAcc) pathways were interrogated by fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). The assays were performed before and 2 months after pilocarpine status epilepticus. In a subset of naive rats, FSCV, coupled with the intensity-dependent stimulation paradigm, detected specific deviations in each pathway (six rats for RN-PFC and seven rats for VTA-NAcc, with overlap in two, of 19 total subjects) in the absence of behavioral impairments. During epilepsy, animals with preexisting deviations in RN-PFC invariably developed despair, and rats with deviations in VTA-NAcc developed anhedonia. Serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways, respectively, showed signs of explicit deterioration. We suggest that epilepsy triggers decompensations in the already vulnerable depression-relevant neuronal circuits, which culminate in depression. The established connection between the identified specific signatures in monoamine transmission in naive rats and specific symptoms of epilepsy-associated depression may help in understanding causes of comorbidity and in developing its early biomarkers. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Genetics of idiopathic generalized epilepsy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. V. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is a common type of epilepsy. Strong support for a genetic role in IGE comes from twin and family studies. Several subtypes of IGE have been reported but families often have members affected with different subtypes. Major advances have been made in the understanding of genetic basis of monogenic inherited epilepsies. However, most IGEs are complex genetic diseases and some susceptible IGE genes are shared across subtypes that determine subtypes in specific combinations. The high throughput technologies like deoxyribonucleic acid microarrays and sequencing technologies have the potential to identify causative genes or loci in non-familial cases.

  18. Quantitative EEG and Current Source Density Analysis of Combined Antiepileptic Drugs and Dopaminergic Agents in Genetic Epilepsy: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Hamlin; Wells, Christopher; Mizrahi, Neptune

    2015-07-01

    Two adolescent females with absence epilepsy were classified, one as attention deficit and the other as bipolar disorder. Physical and cognitive exams identified hypotension, bradycardia, and cognitive dysfunction. Their initial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were considered slightly slow, but within normal limits. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) data included relative theta excess and low alpha mean frequencies. A combined treatment of antiepileptic drugs with a catecholamine agonist/reuptake inhibitor was sequentially used. Both patients' physical and cognitive functions improved and they have remained seizure free. The clinical outcomes were correlated with statistically significant changes in QEEG measures toward normal Z-scores in both anterior and posterior regions. In addition, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) Z-scored source correlation analyses of the initial and treated QEEG data showed normalized patterns, supporting a neuroanatomic resolution. This study presents preliminary evidence for a neurophysiologic approach to patients with absence epilepsy and comorbid disorders and may provide a method for further research.

  19. Prevalence of epilepsy in rural Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Liu, Yi; Paschal, Angelia M; Hawley, Suzanne; Thurman, David; Hauser, W Allen

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of active epilepsy in two southeastern rural Kansas counties. Medical records were abstracted from the emergency rooms, out- and inpatient services and clinics of 9 hospitals, from 10 doctors' offices, and 1 nursing home in and surrounding the two counties. Letters were mailed from hospitals and doctors' offices to invite their potentially eligible patients to participate in an interview. Medical record information and the interview, when available, were used for the final determination of active epilepsy, seizure type, etiology, syndrome, age, and gender in consensus conferences. Prevalence of epilepsy was calculated, and capture-recapture methodology, which estimates prevalence based on what is known about the population, was employed to assess active epilepsy in the two counties. This study identified 404 individuals with active prevalent epilepsy who visited at least one of the 20 facilities during the observation period. The overall prevalence of active epilepsy was 7.2 per 1000. The seizure type for 71.3% of prevalent cases was unknown; among the 76 cases with known and classifiable seizure type, 55.3% had focal with secondary generalized seizures. Among the 222 cases with classifiable etiology, 53.1% were idiopathic/cryptogenic. About 75% (n=301) were captured at only one center, 72% (n=75) of the remaining 103 patients were captured at two centers, and 28 patients were identified at three or more centers. The capture-recapture assessment yielded an estimation of 982 prevalent patients. The overall estimated prevalence of epilepsy in the two Kansas counties using capture-recapture was 17 per 1000. The crude prevalence of epilepsy, using medical record survey methods, was similar to, but on the high end, of other total population prevalence studies in the United States. The capture-recapture assessment suggested that epilepsy prevalence might be considerably higher than the crude prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  20. Hemimegalencephaly without epilepsy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Greg; Shanmuganathan, Mano; Harkness, William

    2014-09-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare sporadic brain malformation characterized by enlargement of one cerebral hemisphere. The classical clinical triad consists of intractable epilepsy, severe psychomotor delay and hemiparesis. In this report, we describe a case of a 3-year-old girl, with all the radiological features of severe hemimegalencephaly but with a comparatively benign clinical course. She had no hemiparesis, mild delay and no seizures. An extensive literature review reveals only one previously reported case of hemimegalencephaly with the absence of seizures, as part of case series. This is the first dedicated case report, with clinical description and radiological images, of this entity.

  1. Sydney epilepsy incidence study to measure illness consequences: the SESIMIC observational epilepsy study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy affects an estimated 50 million people and accounts for approximately 1% of days lost to ill health globally, making it one of the most common, serious neurological disorders. While there are abundant global data on epilepsy incidence, prevalence and treatment, there is a paucity of Australian incidence data. There is also a general lack of information on the psychosocial impact and socioeconomic consequences of a new diagnosis of epilepsy on an individual, their family, household, and community which are often specific to the health and social system of each country. Methods/Design The Sydney Epilepsy Incidence Study to Measure Illness Consequences (SEISMIC is an Australian population-based epilepsy incidence and outcome study that will recruit every newly diagnosed case of epilepsy in the Sydney South West Area Health Service to an epilepsy register. Multiple and overlapping sources of notification will be used to identify all new cases of epilepsy over a 24 month period in the Eastern Zone of the Sydney South West Area Health Service (SSWAHS and follow up will occur over 12 months. SEISMIC will use the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE definitions and classifications for epidemiologic studies of epilepsy. The study will examine outcomes including mood, quality of life, employment, education performance, driving status, marital and social problems, medication use, health care usage, costs and stigma. Discussion This study is designed to examine how clinical, psychological factors, socioeconomic circumstances, and healthcare delivery influence the experience of epilepsy for individuals and families allowing better targeting of specific services and informing policy makers and practitioners. In addition, the study will provide the basis for a longitudinal population-based cohort study and potentially inform qualitative sub-studies and randomised controlled trials of intervention strategies. The study has

  2. Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

  3. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and......Two groups of epilepsy patients (28 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 15 patients with primary generalized epilepsy) entered a study of personality traits related to epilepsy, based on a modification of Bellak's semistructured interview for assessment of ego strength. Two groups of subjects...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  4. Mutational analysis of paediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex in Korea: genotype and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Sook; Lim, Byung Chan; Chae, Jong-Hee; Hwang, Yong Seung; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Kim, Ki Joong

    2014-12-01

    To date, only a few studies have reported that, in tuberous sclerosis, TSC2 mutations are more frequently associated with infantile spasms and cognitive impairment compared to TSC1 mutations. We analyzed the mutational spectrum of patients with tuberous sclerosis in Korea and attempted to explore the associations between genotype and seizure type/outcome. We performed mutational analyses on 70 unrelated patients with clinically confirmed tuberous sclerosis by using direct DNA sequencing and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The patients' medical records, including epilepsy type and outcome, were reviewed retrospectively. We identified pathogenic mutations in 55 patients (79%), 25 of which were novel. There were 12 TSC1 mutations and 43 TSC2 mutations. TSC1 mutations included 8 frameshift and 4 nonsense mutations. TSC2 mutations included 12 frameshift, 10 nonsense, 6 splicing, and 6 missense mutations, as well as 4 in-frame deletions and 5 large deletions. Fifty-eight patients had epilepsy (83%), including 19 patients with a history of infantile spasms. Compared to patients with TSC1 mutations, individuals with TSC2 mutations had a significantly higher frequency of epilepsy (p<0.05) and tended to have a higher frequency of infantile spasms (37% vs 17%; p<0.3). Most of the patients with TSC2 mutations who developed infantile spasms exhibited subsequent epilepsy (13/14; 93%). However, the presence/absence of infantile spasms did not influence seizure remission or cognitive outcome.

  5. [Mood disorders and epilepsy surgery: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrondi, A; Arbus, C; Valton, L; Schmitt, L

    2017-04-01

    Historically, there is a strong link between depression and epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy are four to five times more likely to develop a depressive syndrome. It seems that the link between epilepsy and depression is bidirectional. There is little data on mood disorders secondary to epilepsy surgery. The goal of epilepsy surgery is to reduce the number and frequency of attacks, which in turn would allow improvements in mood disorders and cognitive impairment. A systematic search of the international literature was performed using the bibliographic search engines PubMed and Embase. The following MESH terms were used: epilepsy surgery AND (depression OR depressive disorder OR mood disorder). We also used the "related articles" of PubMed, bibliography surveys, conference abstracts and Google Scholar to identify additional relevant papers. Of the 130 studies found by the systematic search, 112 are excluded because they did not take into account the mood disorders secondary to epilepsy surgery. Fifteen studies are included in this review of the literature with a case study. Depression is the psychopathological condition that is the most frequently studied. According to several studies, the prevalence of depression is approximately 30% with nearly 70% of cases diagnosed during the first three months following epilepsy surgery. The majority of patients presented depressive symptoms during the first 3 to 12months after epilepsy surgery. In these studies, the risk of developing depression is correlated with the existence of previous depressive elements relative to the epilepsy surgery. A small number of studies reported cases of de novo depression. Studies have shown a correlation between very good to excellent control of epileptic seizures and a persistent improvement of mood disorders. It would seem that depressive symptoms post-surgery are more common when the surgical intervention concerns the temporal lobe and in particular mesial resections. There are only very

  6. Single-Gene Determinants of Epilepsy Comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2015-11-02

    Common somatic conditions are bound to occur by chance in individuals with neurological disorders as prevalent as epilepsy, but when biological links underlying the comorbidity can be uncovered, the relationship may provide clues into the origin and mechanisms of both. The expanding list of monogenic epilepsies and their associated clinical features offer a remarkable opportunity to mine the epilepsy genome for coordinate neurodevelopmental phenotypes and examine their pathogenic mechanisms. Defined single-gene-linked epilepsy syndromes identified to date include all of the most frequently cited comorbidities, such as cognitive disorders, autism, migraine, mood disorders, late-onset dementia, and even premature lethality. Gene-linked comorbidities may be aggravated by, or independent of, seizure history. Mutations in these genes establish clear biological links between abnormal neuronal synchronization and a variety of neurobehavioral disorders, and critically substantiate the definition of epilepsy as a complex spectrum disorder. Mapping the neural circuitry of epilepsy comorbidities and understanding their single-gene risk should substantially clarify this challenging aspect of clinical epilepsy management.

  7. [The ecstatic epilepsy of Teresa of Jesus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Albea, E

    Our aim is to define the ecstasies (raptures) of Teresa de Ahumada (Teresa of Jesus) and to link them with ecstasies recently identified as convulsive seizures (Dostoevsky s epilepsy, Saint Paul s disease, ecstatic epilepsy). We review the Carmelite nun's pathography, with special attention given to the excellent detailed descriptions of her ecstasies. The stereotypic movements and comparison with similar cases leads us to consider them as being epileptic, possibly secondary to neurocysticercosis.

  8. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, Erik H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, the field of neuroimaging has undergone dramatic development. Specifically, of importance for clinicians and researchers managing patients with epilepsies, new methods of brain imaging in search of the seizure-producing abnormalities have been implemented, and older methods have undergone additional refinement. Methodology to predict seizure freedom and cognitive outcome has also rapidly progressed. In general, the image data processing methods are very different and more complicated than even a decade ago. In this review, we identify the recent developments in neuroimaging that are aimed at improved management of epilepsy patients. Advances in structural imaging, diffusion imaging, fMRI, structural and functional connectivity, hybrid imaging methods, quantitative neuroimaging, and machine-learning are discussed. We also briefly summarize the potential new developments that may shape the field of neuroimaging in the near future and may advance not only our understanding of epileptic networks as the source of treatment-resistant seizures but also better define the areas that need to be treated in order to provide the patients with better long-term outcomes.

  9. The challenges that parents of children with epilepsy face

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampra, Matina; Tzerakis, Nikolas; Thomsen, Louise Lund Holm

    2017-01-01

    with the child found that parent–child communication improved. Conclusion This study provides valuable insight into the impact of epilepsy on parents of CwE, which might help hospital and school staff support families with greater understanding, sensitivity, and skill. The findings suggest that Greek authorities......Objective This qualitative study explored the challenges that Greek parents/caregivers of children with controlled epilepsy (CwE) face regarding the disorder. Methods Interviews were conducted based on open-ended questions guided by a review of the literature. A total of 91 parents/caregivers were......E: the disclosure of epilepsy and the absence of adequate information about coping with epilepsy. Parents in Greece were hesitant to reveal their child's epilepsy to school staff and their wider social milieu. Also, although satisfied with the patient-centered approach they experienced with their hospital doctor...

  10. Yoga for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Sridharan, Kalpana; Ramaratnam, Sridharan

    2015-05-02

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002.Yoga may induce relaxation and stress reduction, and influence the electroencephalogram and the autonomic nervous system, thereby controlling seizures. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy if proved effective. To assess whether people with epilepsy treated with yoga:(a) have a greater probability of becoming seizure free;(b) have a significant reduction in the frequency or duration of seizures, or both; and(c) have a better quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (26 March 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 26 March 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 26 March 2015), SCOPUS (1823 to 9 January 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (26 March 2015), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (26 March 2015), and also registries of the Yoga Biomedical Trust and the Research Council for Complementary Medicine. In addition, we searched the references of all the identified studies. No language restrictions were imposed. The following study designs were eligible for inclusion: randomised controlled trials (RCT) of treatment of epilepsy with yoga. Eligible participants were adults with uncontrolled epilepsy comparing yoga with no treatment or different behavioural treatments. Three review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. The following outcomes were assessed: (a) percentage of people rendered seizure free; (b) seizure frequency and duration; (c) quality of life. Analyses were on an intention-to-treat basis. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% Cl) were estimated for the outcomes. Two unblinded trials recruited a total of 50 people (18 treated with yoga and 32 to control interventions). Antiepileptic drugs were continued in all the participants. Baseline phase lasted 3 months

  11. Risk factors of childhood epilepsy in Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Varghese Attumalil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to identify the risk factors for epilepsy in children. Materials and Methods: This case-control retrospective study was carried out in the pediatric neurology outpatient service of the Trivandrum Medical College. All children (1-12 years with epilepsy satisfying the selection criteria were included, after obtaining consent from parents. Those with single seizures or febrile seizures were excluded. Controls were children without epilepsy attending the same hospital. Parents were interviewed and clinical data were obtained from medical records. Statistical analysis included chi-square test, odds ratio (OR, and logistic regression. Results: There were 82 cases and 160 controls whose mean age was 6.9 + 3.6 and 5.2 + 3.1, years respectively. On univariate analysis, family history of epilepsy, prolonged labor, cyanosis at birth, delayed cry after birth, admission to newborn intensive care unit, presence of congenital malformations, neurocutaneous markers, incessant cry in the first week, delayed developmental milestones, meningitis, encephalitis, and head trauma were found to be significant. On logistic regression, family history of epilepsy (OR 4.7, newborn distress (OR 8.6, delayed developmental milestones (OR 12.6, and head trauma (OR 5.8 were found to be significant predictors. Infants who had history of newborn distress are likely to manifest epilepsy before 1 year if they are eventually going to have epilepsy (OR 3.4. Conclusion: Modifiable factors such as newborn distress and significant head trauma are significant risk factors for childhood epilepsy. Newborn distress is a risk factor for early-onset (<1 year age epilepsy.

  12. The mean age of petit mal epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsarunnesa Syeda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Petit mal epilepsy or absence seizures involve brief, sudden lapses of consciousness and most often occurs in people under age of 20 years. This study was done to find out the most likely significant age affected by petit mal epilepsy and whether they had higher rate of behavioral, educational, and social problems. Materials and Methods: We run tests on total 32 patients (male 16 and female 16 from newborns to 20 years of age. Results: The most affected ages were from 4 to 9 years and both genders were equally affected. They have higher rate of behavioral, educational, and social problems, and most likely recovering ages from the disease were from 15 to 20 years. Conclusion: These findings could contribute in diagnosis and treatment of Petit Mal Epilepsy, as it often misinterpreted as daydreaming or inattention.

  13. [Current management of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Global neurological knowledge is essential for differential diagnosis of epileptic syndromes due to the diversity of ictal semiology, causes and syndromes. Neurologists play an important role in planning the medical care for patients with epilepsy, as medication is the most fundamental therapeutic strategy. Some patients with early-onset epilepsy require joint care by pediatric neurologists, those with intractable epilepsy by neurosurgeons, and those with psychological comorbidity by psychiatrists, and neurologists should play a coordinating role. While there is a great need for neurologists to participate in epilepsy care, neurologists in Japan currently do not participate substantially in the epilepsy management system. It is necessary to train more neurologists who can provide epilepsy care and conduct basic and clinical research on epilepsy by providing continuous education on epilepsy for general neurologists as well as pre- and post-graduate medical students. Most of the patients who require long-term treatment experience many medical problems and social handicaps, such as adverse effects of medication, social stigma, educational disadvantages and difficulties in obtaining driver's license. To improve the quality of life of patients with epilepsy, it is desirable to build broad medical-social networks participated by patients, doctors, neurological nurses, psychologists, social workers, school teachers, managers of employment support facilities and care givers.

  14. Hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis with emphasis on seizure predictors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Han; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Kai; Shao, Xiao-Qiu; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Conflicting conclusions have been reported regarding several factors that may predict seizure outcomes after hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy. The goal of this study was to identify the possible predictors of seizure outcome by pooling the rates of postoperative seizure freedom found in the published literature. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library identified English-language articles published since 1970 that describe seizure outcomes in patients who underwent hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy. Two reviewers independently assessed article eligibility and extracted the data. The authors pooled rates of seizure freedom from papers included in the study. Eight potential prognostic variables were identified and dichotomized for analyses. The authors also compared continuous variables within seizure-free and seizure-recurrent groups. Random- or fixed-effects models were used in the analyses depending on the presence or absence of heterogeneity. The pooled seizure-free rate among the 1528 patients (from 56 studies) who underwent hemispheric surgery was 73%. Patients with an epilepsy etiology of developmental disorders, generalized seizures, nonlateralization on electroencephalography, and contralateral MRI abnormalities had reduced odds of being seizure-free after surgery. Hemispheric surgery is an effective therapeutic modality for medically intractable epilepsy. This meta-analysis provides useful evidence-based information for the selection of candidates for hemispheric surgery, presurgical counseling, and explanation of seizure outcomes.

  15. Prognosis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy 45 years after onset: seizure outcome and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Philine; Schmitz, Bettina; Holtkamp, Martin; Janz, Dieter

    2013-12-10

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is the most common idiopathic generalized epilepsy subsyndrome, contributing to approximately 3% to 11% of adolescent and adult cases of epilepsy. However, little is known about the long-term medical evolution of this clinical entity. The aim of this study was to analyze long-term outcome in a clinically well-defined series of patients with JME for seizure evolution and predictors of seizure outcome. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed seizure outcome in 66 patients who had JME, were treated at the Department of Neurology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and were initially diagnosed by a single senior epileptologist. After a mean follow-up time of 44.6 years (20-69 years), 59.1% of patients remained free of seizures for at least 5 years before the last contact. Among the seizure-free patients, 28 (71.8%) were still taking antiepileptic drugs and 11 (28.2%) were off medication for at least the last 5 years. We identified manifestation of additional absence seizures at onset of JME as an independent predictor of an unfavorable outcome regarding seizure freedom. A significant proportion of patients with JME were seizure-free and off antiepileptic drug therapy in the later course of their disorder. Patients with JME and additional absence seizures might represent a different JME subtype with a worse outcome.

  16. The specific features and pattern of febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Shalkevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentations, diagnosis and treatment in children with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES and the aspects of identifying this disease as an individual nosological entity. It details a study of the possible etiological factors of FIRES, such as metabolic, genetic, and immunological disorders, aseptic inflammatory processes, as well as a search for a certain infectious agent by inoculations of different biological environments of the body and by polymerase chain reaction; the diagnostic characteristics of FIRES at the present stage, including the use of electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging; different approaches to drug therapy for FIRES at the onset stages of its clinical manifestations, protracted status epilepticus, and drugresistant epilepsy. The issues of the predictable outcome of this disease, including survival and the probability of further development of epilepsy and maintenance of cognitive functions, are also viewed. Diagnostic criteria for the syndrome, such as age at its onset 3 to 15 years in previously healthy children; acute onset as fever to develop high-frequency focal seizures several days later; the absence of the identified disease pathogen detected by the examinations of cerebrospinal fluid, serum, and other environments of the body; the development of drug-resistant epilepsy and severe permanent cognitive and motor deficits after the completion of an acute period in most cases are presented. The paper is clinically exemplified by the authors’ observation of an 11-year-old boy who meets the above criteria for the syndrome, but has a relatively favorable course, without developing severe drug-resistant epilepsy.

  17. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy in Adults with TSC Individuals with tuberous sclerosis ... being well controlled for long periods of time. Epilepsy and Seizures Epilepsy is any brain disorder that ...

  18. 77 FR 59197 - Epilepsy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Epilepsy Program AGENCY: Health Resources... to the Epilepsy Foundation of America. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration will be issuing noncompetitive supplemental funding under the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's Epilepsy...

  19. Epilepsy and non-organic non-affective psychosis. National epidemiologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredkjaer, S R; Mortensen, P B; Parnas, Josef

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study tests the hypothesis that epilepsy increases the risk of developing schizophrenia and other non-affective functional psychoses using a nationwide sample of people with epilepsy. METHOD: A record linkage study between a sample from the National Patient Register, consisting...... of 67,116 people with epilepsy, and the Danish Psychiatric Register identified all people with non-affective psychoses with onset after the first epilepsy diagnosis. The relation between risk of psychiatric disorder in people with epilepsy and the general Danish population was estimated. RESULTS...... of an association between epilepsy and the risk of subsequent non-affective psychosis....

  20. 16p13.11 microdeletion in a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miteff, Christina I; Smith, Robert L; Bain, Nicole L; Subramanian, Gopinath; Brown, Janis E; Kamien, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. The pathophysiology of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome remains uncertain and there are probably multiple potential contributing factors. Our patient had a chromosomal 16p13.11 microdeletion that confers susceptibility to various types of epilepsy. This is the first report detailing an association of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome with a 16p13.11 deletion and identifies another potential causal factor for hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome.

  1. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosillo-de la Torre, Argelia; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; García, Perla; Lazarowski, Alberto; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders. Furthermore, it is associated to diminished health-related quality of life and is thus considered a major public health problem. In spite of the large number of available and ongoing development of several new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a high percentage of patients with epilepsy (35-40%) are resistant to pharmacotherapy. A hypothesis to explain pharmacoresistance in epilepsy suggests that overexpression of multidrug resistance proteins, such as P-glycoprotein, on the endothelium of the blood brain barrier represents a challenge for effective AED delivery and concentration levels in the brain. Proven therapeutic strategies to control pharmacoresistant epilepsy include epilepsy surgery and neuromodulation. Unfortunately, not all patients are candidates for these therapies. Nanotechnology represents an attractive strategy to overcome the limited brain access of AEDs in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This manuscript presents a review of evidences supporting this idea.

  2. Social Cognition in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Mccagh, J T

    2011-01-01

    Some of the psychological problems associated with epilepsy have their origins in the ability of people with epilepsy (PWE) to engage in meaningful and appropriate social interactions. PWE often report difficulties in social settings, yet there is a paucity of research investigating the socio-cognitive skills of this group. This thesis aimed to investigate these skills and relate them to the patient's perceived impact of epilepsy on their social competence. An additional objective was to see ...

  3. Copy number variation plays an important role in clinical epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather; Shen, Yiping; Avallone, Jennifer; Sheidley, Beth R.; Pinsky, Rebecca; Bergin, Ann M.; Berry, Gerard T.; Duffy, Frank H.; Eksioglu, Yaman; Harris, David J.; Hisama, Fuki M.; Ho, Eugenia; Irons, Mira; Jacobsen, Christina M.; James, Philip; Kothare, Sanjeev; Khwaja, Omar; Lipton, Jonathan; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Markowitz, Jennifer; Maski, Kiran; Megerian, J. Thomas; Neilan, Edward; Raffalli, Peter C.; Robbins, Michael; Roberts, Amy; Roe, Eugene; Rollins, Caitlin; Sahin, Mustafa; Sarco, Dean; Schonwald, Alison; Smith, Sharon E.; Soul, Janet; Stoler, Joan M.; Takeoka, Masanori; Tan, Wen-Han; Torres, Alcy R.; Tsai, Peter; Urion, David K.; Weissman, Laura; Wolff, Robert; Wu, Bai-Lin; Miller, David T.; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of copy number abnormalities detectable by chromosomal microarray (CMA) testing in patients with epilepsy at a tertiary care center. Methods We identified patients with ICD-9 codes for epilepsy or seizures and clinical CMA testing performed between October 2006 and February 2011 at Boston Children’s Hospital. We reviewed medical records and included patients meeting criteria for epilepsy. We phenotypically characterized patients with epilepsy-associated abnormalities on CMA. Results Of 973 patients who had CMA and ICD-9 codes for epilepsy or seizures, 805 patients satisfied criteria for epilepsy. We observed 437 copy number variants (CNVs) in 323 patients (1–4 per patient), including 185 (42%) deletions and 252 (58%) duplications. Forty (9%) were confirmed de novo, 186 (43%) were inherited, and parental data were unavailable for 211 (48%). Excluding full chromosome trisomies, CNV size ranged from 18 kb to 142 Mb, and 34% were over 500 kb. In at least 40 cases (5%), the epilepsy phenotype was explained by a CNV, including 29 patients with epilepsy-associated syndromes and 11 with likely disease-associated CNVs involving epilepsy genes or “hotspots.” We observed numerous recurrent CNVs including 10 involving loss or gain of Xp22.31, a region described in patients with and without epilepsy. Interpretation Copy number abnormalities play an important role in patients with epilepsy. Given that the diagnostic yield of CMA for epilepsy patients is similar to the yield in autism spectrum disorders and in prenatal diagnosis, for which published guidelines recommend testing with CMA, we recommend the implementation of CMA in the evaluation of unexplained epilepsy. PMID:24811917

  4. Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Doug; O'Brien, Terence J; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G; Balding, David J; Johnson, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy.

  5. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanavana Subbareddy Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  6. Epilepsy: Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Nandanavana Subbareddy; Sinha, Sanjib; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-01

    There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  7. Active Epilepsy as Indicator of Neurocysticercosis in Rural Northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Raina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the contribution of neurocysticercosis as a cause for active epilepsy and to establish Neurocysticercosis as major definable risk of epilepsy in our setup. Methods. We conducted a door-to-door survey of 2,209 individuals of Bhore Pind and Bhore Kullian villages in Chattah zone of district Jammu (Jumma and Kashmir, Northwest India to identify patients with symptomatic epilepsy. Patients with active epilepsy were investigated with neuroimaging techniques to establish diagnosis of NCC (neurocysticercosis. Results. Among 25 patients with epilepsy 10(40% had CT/MR evidence of past or recent NCC infection. This gave us the point prevalence of 4.5/1000 for Neurocysticercosis in our study population. Interpretation. The study shows a high prevalence of NCC accounting for symptomatic epilepsy in our part of India.

  8. Epilepsy research 150 years after Darwin's theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, Fulvio A; Terra, Vera C; Scorza, Carla A; Arida, Ricardo M; Cavalheiro, Esper A

    2009-12-01

    On February 12, 2009, we commemorated the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of the first edition of the 'On the origin of species'. Only in the sixth edition of the Origin Darwin explicitly stated that natural selection applied to the brain as to all other organs and contemporary epilepsy research plays an interesting role in this scenario. Epilepsy affects approximately 3 percent of the general population and is a complex disease. At least 11 genes have now been described for human epilepsy and over 50 more genes have been identified in animal models of epilepsy. The complex gene to gene interactions and gene-environment interactions may account for epilepsy susceptibility and antiepileptic drug response. Darwin's thoughts on evolution are relevant to understand these gene interactions, contributing to current development of new treatments and prevention of chronic diseases, such as epilepsy.

  9. Persons with Epilepsy: Between Social Inclusion and Marginalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlinar, Simona; Petek, Davorina; Cotič, Živa; Mencin Čeplak, Metka; Zaletel, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that can lead to complex psychosocial consequences. Epilepsy can change the social status of persons with epilepsy (PWE) and has an effect on their social inclusion as well as their perception of social inclusion. This study aims to explore subjective experiences with social inclusion of PWE in Slovenia. This study takes a qualitative approach. Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted with eleven participants. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Epilepsy has physical, emotional, and social consequences. Physical consequences of epilepsy are mainly tiredness and exhaustion following an epileptic episode, frequently accompanied by headaches. Emotional consequences are different forms of fear. The main social consequence identified is a negative effect on PWE's social network, which leads to (self-)isolation and social distrust. PWE experience of social inclusion depends on various psychosocial factors and differs from person to person. The consequences of epilepsy are shown in PWE social contacts and their sense of social inclusion and autonomy.

  10. Cost of epilepsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelczyk, Adam; Reese, Jens Peter; Dodel, Richard; Hamer, Hajo M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to overview published cost-of-illness (COI) studies of epilepsy and their methodological approaches. Epilepsy imposes a substantial burden on individuals and society as a whole. The mean prevalence of epilepsy is estimated at 0.52% in Europe, 0.68% in the US, and peaks up to 1.5% in developing countries. Estimation of the economic burden of epilepsy is of pivotal relevance to enable a rational distribution of healthcare resources. This is especially so with the introduction of the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the marketing of vagal-nerve stimulators and the resurgence of new surgical treatment options, which have the potential to considerably increase the costs of treating epilepsy.A systematic literature review was performed to identify studies that evaluated direct and indirect costs of epilepsy. Using a standardized assessment form, information on the study design, methodological framework and data sources were extracted from each publication and systematically reported. We identified 22 studies worldwide on costs of epilepsy. The majority of the studies reflected the costs of epilepsy in Europe (three studies each for the UK and Italy, one study each for Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, France and the EU) and the US (four studies), but studies were also available from India (two), Hong Kong, Oman, Burundi, Chile and Mexico. The studies utilized different frameworks to evaluate costs. All used a bottom-up approach; however, only 12 studies (55%) evaluated direct as well as indirect costs. The range for the mean annual direct costs lay between 40 International Dollar purchasing power parities (PPP-$) in rural Burundi and PPP-$4748 (adjusted to 2006 values) in a German epilepsy centre. Recent studies suggest AEDs are becoming the main contributor to direct costs. The mean indirect costs ranged between 12% and 85% of the total annual costs. Epilepsy is a cost-intensive disorder. A reliable comparison of the different COI

  11. Refractory epilepsy and the ketogenic diet: Pathophysiological aspects and possible implications in dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, A.; V P Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy denotes any disorder characterized by recurrent seizures due to abnormal paroxysmal neuronal discharge in the brain. Symptoms range from sensory absences to convulsive movements and loss of consciousness. Antiepileptic drugs are the first line of treatment. However, 20% individuals with epilepsy have drug-resistant seizures despite optimal treatment. For those with refractory epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is an effective alternative therapeutic approach. The ketogenic diet is a high-f...

  12. Sudden cardiac arrest in people with epilepsy in the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Robert J.; Blom, Marieke T.; Wassenaar, Merel; Bardai, Abdennasser; Leijten, Frans S.; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Sander, Josemir W.; Thijs, Roland D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain whether characteristics of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF) differed between people with epilepsy and those without and which individuals with epilepsy were at highest risk. Methods: We ascertained 18 people with active epilepsy identified in a community-based registry of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) with ECG-confirmed VT/VF (cases). We compared them with 470 individuals with VT/VF without epilepsy (VT/VF controls) and 54 individuals with epilepsy without VT/VF (epilepsy controls). Data on comorbidity, epilepsy severity, and medication use were collected and entered into (conditional) logistic regression models to identify determinants of VT/VF in epilepsy. Results: In most cases, there was an obvious (10/18) or presumed cardiovascular cause (5/18) in view of preexisting heart disease. In 2 of the 3 remaining events, near–sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) was established after successful resuscitation. Cases had a higher prevalence of congenital/inherited heart disease (17% vs 1%, p = 0.002), and experienced VT/VF at younger age (57 vs 64 years, p = 0.023) than VT/VF controls. VT/VF in cases occurred more frequently at/near home (89% vs 58%, p = 0.009), and was less frequently witnessed (72% vs 89%, p = 0.048) than in VT/VF controls. Cases more frequently had clinically relevant heart disease (50% vs 15%, p = 0.005) and intellectual disability (28% vs 1%, p epilepsy controls. Conclusion: Cardiovascular disease rather than epilepsy characteristics is the main determinant of VT/VF in people with epilepsy in the community. SCA and SUDEP are partially overlapping disease entities. PMID:26092917

  13. Exploring the Relationship between Autism Spectrum Disorder and Epilepsy Using Latent Class Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccaro, Michael L.; Tuchman, Roberto F.; Hamilton, Kara L.; Wright, Harry H.; Abramson, Ruth K.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Gilbert, John R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy co-occurs frequently in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Understanding this co-occurrence requires a better understanding of the ASD-epilepsy phenotype (or phenotypes). To address this, we conducted latent class cluster analysis (LCCA) on an ASD dataset (N = 577) which included 64 individuals with epilepsy. We identified a 5-cluster…

  14. Prevalence and characteristics of visual aura in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor-Tuncer, Ozlem; Baykan, Betul; Altindag, Ebru; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2012-12-01

    Some patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE) experience visual aura, which can confuse the diagnosis. We sought to determine the frequency and characteristics of visual auras in IGE patients. Among the 176 IGE patients, 4 men and 7 women reported visual auras (mean age - 24 years). Syndromic diagnoses were juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in four, eyelid myoclonia with absences (EMA) in three, juvenile absence epilepsy in three, and other in one. Visual auras consisted of flashing lights, macropsia, illusional movements, and blindness. Eyelid myoclonia with absences was significantly more common in the group with visual aura (3 of 11 patients vs. 8 of 165 IGE patients; P=0.02). Furthermore, photosensitivity was found significantly more common in IGE patients with visual aura (90% vs 46% of the total IGE patients) (P=0.004). In conclusion, the visual auras do not exclude a diagnosis of IGE. The presence of visual aura in the EMA syndrome is also remarkable.

  15. Ictal EEG modifications in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Veronica; Mai, Roberto; Francione, Stefano; Gozzo, Francesca; Sartori, Ivana; Nobili, Lino; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Pizzanelli, Chiara; Tassi, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common type of epilepsy in adults with medically intractable, localisation-related epilepsy, amenable to surgery. Together with clinical and neuroimaging data, presurgical ictal scalp-EEG findings are often sufficient to define the epileptogenic zone. It is widely believed that ictal scalp-EEG findings in temporal lobe epilepsy are represented by 5-9-Hz lateralised rhythmic theta activity or 2-5-Hz lateralised rhythmic delta activity. On the basis of experimental models and experience with intra-cerebral EEG recordings, the pattern of low-voltage fast activity is considered to be the electrophysiological hallmark of the epileptogenic zone. We reviewed the ictal scalp-EEG data relating to 111 seizures in 47 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who underwent video-EEG recordings during presurgical work-up. We found that 35 patients (74.4%) showed flattening, low-voltage fast activity or fast activity as the initial EEG pattern. When visible, the rhythmic delta or theta activity followed the fast activity. Low-voltage fast activity, flattening or fast activity occurs in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and represents the main ictal EEG pattern. Low-voltage fast activity (or similar) is also identifiable as the initial ictal EEG pattern in scalp-EEG recordings.

  16. Tlazolteotl, the Aztec goddess of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy has afflicted humanity during most of the extent of documented history. The Aztecs believed that illnesses were punishments that were sent from a furious goddess. In particular, epilepsy was considered in Aztec culture as a "sacred disease", and convulsions were traditionally associated with a deified woman who had died at childbirth. As the goddess Shiva and Apasmâra in ancient India and Saint Valentine in Germany, Tlazolteotl was considered able to bring about and send away epilepsy. We performed a comprehensive review to identify Tlazolteotl depictions and its historical context related with epilepsy. Tlazolteotl is one of the most endearing and complex goddesses of the Mesoamericans. She was the deity of the black fertile and fecund earth that gains its energy from death and in turn feeds life. Associated with purification, expiation, and regeneration, she embodied fertility and turned all garbage, physical and metaphysical, into rich life. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with Tlazolteotl. We also present a modern depiction of the Aztec goddess of epilepsy from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino, displaying the supernatural view of epilepsy in America. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Increasing Epilepsy Awareness in Schools: A Seizure Smart Schools Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Heather A.; Hiltz, Cynthia M.; Kopplin, Vicki L.; Lindeke, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    A high prevalence of epilepsy diagnoses and seizure events among students was identified at a large Midwestern school district. In partnership with the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN), a quality improvement project was conducted to provide education and resources to staff caring for school children with seizures. School nurses (N = 26)…

  18. Increasing Epilepsy Awareness in Schools: A Seizure Smart Schools Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Heather A.; Hiltz, Cynthia M.; Kopplin, Vicki L.; Lindeke, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    A high prevalence of epilepsy diagnoses and seizure events among students was identified at a large Midwestern school district. In partnership with the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN), a quality improvement project was conducted to provide education and resources to staff caring for school children with seizures. School nurses (N = 26)…

  19. Fertility Treatment and Childhood Epilepsy - a Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura Ozer; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst

    2017-01-01

    of treatment and indications, as well as subtypes of epilepsy. METHODS: In this nationwide birth cohort study, we included all pregnancies in Denmark resulting in live-born singletons, 1995-2003. Children conceived by fertility treatment and children developing epilepsy (until 2013) were identified from Danish...

  20. The molecular and phenotypic spectrum of IQSEC2-related epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerem, A.; Haginoya, K.; Lev, D.; Blumkin, L.; Kivity, S.; Linder, I.; Shoubridge, C.; Palmer, E.E.; Field, M.; Boyle, J.; Chitayat, D.; Gaillard, W.D.; Kossoff, E.H.; Willems, M.; Genevieve, D.; Tran-Mau-Them, F.; Epstein, O.; Heyman, E.; Dugan, S.; Masurel-Paulet, A.; Piton, A.; Kleefstra, T.; Pfundt, R.; Sato, R.; Tzschach, A.; Matsumoto, N.; Saitsu, H.; Leshinsky-Silver, E.; Lerman-Sagie, T.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: IQSEC2 is an X-linked gene associated with intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. Herein we characterize the epilepsy/epileptic encephalopathy of patients with IQSEC2 pathogenic variants. METHODS: Forty-eight patients with IQSEC2 variants were identified worldwide through Medline sear

  1. Role of Electroencephalography in Presurgical Evaluation of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharam Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains a therapeutic option for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Comprehensive presurgical evaluation includes electroencephalography (EEG and video EEG in identifying patients who are likely to benefit from surgery. Here, we discuss in detail the utility of EEG in presurgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy along with illustrative cases.

  2. Epilepsy and oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  3. Epilepsi og orale manifestationer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Endrup; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John Rosendahl

    2016-01-01

    Risiko for sygdom I mundhulen hos patienter med epilepsy Epilepsi er en kronisk neurologisk lidelse, der ofte vil kræve medicinsk behandling for at holde patienterne fri for anfald. Lidelsen kan have betydning for patientens psykosociale og kognitive udvikling, der indirekte kan have betydning...

  4. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served as cont...

  5. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological mecha

  6. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological

  7. Familial risk of epilepsy: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peljto, Anna L.; Barker-Cummings, Christie; Vasoli, Vincent M.; Leibson, Cynthia L.; Hauser, W. Allen; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Almost all previous studies of familial risk of epilepsy have had potentially serious methodological limitations. Our goal was to address these limitations and provide more rigorous estimates of familial risk in a population-based study. We used the unique resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all 660 Rochester, Minnesota residents born in 1920 or later with incidence of epilepsy from 1935–94 (probands) and their 2439 first-degree relatives who resided in Olmsted County. We assessed incidence of epilepsy in relatives by comprehensive review of the relatives’ medical records, and estimated age-specific cumulative incidence and standardized incidence ratios for epilepsy in relatives compared with the general population, according to proband and relative characteristics. Among relatives of all probands, cumulative incidence of epilepsy to age 40 was 4.7%, and risk was increased 3.3-fold (95% confidence interval 2.75–5.99) compared with population incidence. Risk was increased to the greatest extent in relatives of probands with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (standardized incidence ratio 6.0) and epilepsies associated with intellectual or motor disability presumed present from birth, which we denoted ‘prenatal/developmental cause’ (standardized incidence ratio 4.3). Among relatives of probands with epilepsy without identified cause (including epilepsies classified as ‘idiopathic’ or ‘unknown cause’), risk was significantly increased for epilepsy of prenatal/developmental cause (standardized incidence ratio 4.1). Similarly, among relatives of probands with prenatal/developmental cause, risk was significantly increased for epilepsies without identified cause (standardized incidence ratio 3.8). In relatives of probands with generalized epilepsy, standardized incidence ratios were 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.93–15.31) for generalized epilepsy and 2.5 (95% confidence interval 0.92–4.00) for focal epilepsy. In relatives of

  8. Rational management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkataraman

    2014-09-01

    Management of epilepsies in children has improved considerably over the last decade, all over the world due to the advances seen in the understanding of the patho-physiology of epileptogenesis, availability of both structural and functional imaging studies along with better quality EEG/video-EEG recordings and the availability of a plethora of newer anti-epileptic drugs which are tailormade to act on specific pathways. In spite of this, there is still a long way to go before one is able to be absolutely rational about which drug to use for which type of epilepsy. There have been a lot of advances in the area of epilepsy surgery and is certainly gaining ground for specific cases. Better understanding of the genetic basis of epilepsies will hopefully lead to a more rational treatment plan in the future. Also, a lot of work needs to be done to dispel various misunderstandings and myths about epilepsy which still exists in our country.

  9. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization.

  10. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Marcos H C; Guimarães, Catarina A; Montenegro, Maria Augusta; Neri, Marina L; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners' Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%), seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  11. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos H. C. Duran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners’ Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%, seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  12. Sex, epilepsy, and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders that are associated with a wide range of pathogenic mechanisms, seizure manifestations, comorbidity profiles, and therapeutic responses. These characteristics are all influenced quite significantly by sex. As with other conditions exhibiting such patterns, sex differences in epilepsy are thought to arise-at the most fundamental level-from the "organizational" and "activational" effects of sex hormones as well as from the direct actions of the sex chromosomes. However, our understanding of the specific molecular, cellular, and network level processes responsible for mediating sex differences in epilepsy remains limited. Because increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are involved both in epilepsy and in brain sexual dimorphism, we make the case here that analyzing epigenetic regulation will provide novel insights into the basis for sex differences in epilepsy.

  13. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Managing Epilepsy in Pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Dwyer, V

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest medical conditions affecting women of childbearing age1. In the most recent triennial report into maternal deaths in Ireland and the UK, two thirds of women who died had a medical condition. In this report, 14 maternal deaths during pregnancy and up to 42 days postpartum were attributable to epilepsy or seizures; a rate of 0.4 per 100,000 maternities. In 12 of these women’ the cause was sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. Thus, epilepsy remains a high-risk condition in pregnancy. The gold standard of care is a multidisciplinary approach involving obstetricians, a neurologist and an epilepsy nurse specialist2. Like other units in Ireland this multidisciplinary service is currently provided in the National Maternity Hospital’s maternal medicine clinic, in conjunction with neurology services in Beaumont Hospital.

  15. Previously diagnosed influenza infections and the risk of developing epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J C; Toovey, S; Jick, S S; Meier, C R

    2015-08-01

    Several epidemiological studies suggest a possible involvement of viral infection in the development of epilepsy. While recent research from in vitro studies increasingly supports the role of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, little is known about the role of other viral infections such as influenza. Using data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), we conducted a matched case-control analysis to assess the association between GP-diagnosed influenza infections and the risk of developing an incident diagnosis of epilepsy. During the study period 11 244 incident epilepsy cases and 44 976 matched control patients were identified. Prior exposure to influenza was reported in 7·5% of epilepsy cases and 6·7% of controls [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·03-1·22]. Prior history of 'complicated influenza', i.e. influenza associated with a possible super-infection, was associated with a slightly increased epilepsy risk (aOR 1·64, 95% CI 1·10-2·46), particularly if recorded within the 2 months preceding the epilepsy diagnosis (aOR 6·03, 95% CI 1·10-33·2). Our findings suggest that prior influenza exposure does not appear to materially alter the risk of developing epilepsy. By contrast, influenza episodes accompanied by complications were associated with a slightly increased epilepsy risk.

  16. Epilepsy: Asia versus Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Tan, Chong Tin; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-09-01

    Is epilepsy truly an "African ailment"? We aimed to determine this, since international health agencies often refer to epilepsy as an African disease and the scientific literature has spoken the same tone. Various published materials, mainly reports, articles, were used to gather Asian and African evidence on various aspects of epilepsy and many of its risk and associated factors. Our results suggest that in no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment and such characterization is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. In comparison to Africa, Asia has a 5.0% greater burden from all diseases, and is 17.0% more affected from neuropsychiatric disorders (that include epilepsy). Given that more countries in Asia are transitioning, there may be large demographic and lifestyle changes in the near future. However these changes are nowhere close to those expected in Africa. Moreover, 23 million Asians have epilepsy in comparison to 3.3 million Africans and 1.2 million sub-Saharan Africans. In comparison to Africa, Asia has more untreated patients, 55.0% more additional epilepsy cases every year, because of its larger population, with greater treatment cost and possibly higher premature mortality. Of several associated factors discussed herein, many have more importance for Asia than Africa. The current state of epilepsy in Asia is far less than ideal and there is an urgent need to recognize and accept the importance of epilepsy in Asia. In no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment. This is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here.

  17. Cognitive Findings in Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Occipital Paroxysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kolsal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the cognitive and visual perceptive functions in children with childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (CEOP. Material and Method: Hospital charts of children ages 1 to 18 years who admitted to pediatric neurology out-patient clinic between 2009 and 2010 were reviewed. Twenty one children with a diagnosis of CEOP were identified. Sixteen of these children who accepted to include the study were evaluated with neuropsychological tests. Results: Two of five patients who were evaluated with Denver developmental screening test were found to have lower scores than their reference standards. Remaining 11 patients were evaluated with Wechsler Scales of Intelligence tests, 4 were mildly mental retarded and 1 had null intelligence. Eleven patients were also evaluated with Bender Gestalt Visual Motor Test and 7of them had disturbances in visual perception. Reading speed and writing norm tests were applied to 9 literate patients and 7 of them showed slower reading ability and writing ability was found worse in 6 patients. Discussion: The absence of neurological and neuropsylogical deficits has long been considered as a prerequisite for diagnosis of benign childhood partial epilepsies. However, only a few studies describing the cognitive profile of patients with CEOP have been published. The present study has demonstrated that the patients with CEOP had varying degree of cognitive dysfunction and disturbance in visual perception. In order to provide appropriate intervention, cognitive functions should be assessed in children with CEOP.

  18. Pediatric Absence Status Epilepticus: Prolonged Altered Mental Status in an 8-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Adams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Absence status epilepticus is characterized by a prolonged state of impaired consciousness or altered sensorium with generalized electroencephalographic abnormalities. It is most commonly diagnosed in patients with known idiopathic generalized epilepsy; however, it may also be the first presentation of epilepsy. Due to the subtle and variable manifestations of the condition, absence status epilepticus may be underrecognized, particularly in children. We present the case of an 8-year-old boy who experienced two episodes of prolonged altered mental status, subsequently determined to be absence status epilepticus with idiopathic generalized epilepsy with phantom absences. We discuss the classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and electroencephalographic findings of pediatric absence status epilepticus and provide a practical overview for management.

  19. Absence epileptic activity in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rat mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zsolt; Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Barna, János; Dobolyi, Árpád

    2017-02-15

    Absence epileptic activity was analyzed during pregnancy, the postpartum period and after weaning to establish alterations of seizures throughout the reproductive cycle. Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats were used in the study as a model of absence epilepsy and because their seizures do not interfere with rearing offspring. The number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) was gradually elevated from the 19th pregnancy day to delivery. Meanwhile, the characteristics of individual SWDs did not change suggesting that SWD generation remained the same. In the postpartum and postweaning periods, the number of SWDs was not increased in the absence of pups. However, returning the pups to mothers resulted in a markedly elevated number of SWDs for 1h. If pups were taken away after 30min, the number of SWDs dropped immediately suggesting that the presence of pups increased the SWD number. The time mothers spent with the litter and in kyphosis suckling posture were in correlation with their SWD number further suggesting the importance of interaction with pups in SWD induction. Suckling elevates prolactin levels but surprisingly, its intracerebroventricular injection markedly reduced SWD number in suckled WAG/Rij mothers suggesting that the SWD-inducing effect of suckling is not mediated by prolactin. Rather, the elevated prolactin level may provide some protection against pro-epileptic effects of suckling. In conclusion, we first identified periods within the reproductive cycle with increased absence epileptic activity, implying that more attention should be devoted to epileptic activity changes in mothers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Using Relevance Feedback to Distinguish the Changes in EEG During Different Absence Seizure Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Xianzeng; Ouyang, Gaoxiang

    2016-07-01

    We carried out a series of statistical experiments to explore the utility of using relevance feedback on electroencephalogram (EEG) data to distinguish between different activity states in human absence epilepsy. EEG recordings from 10 patients with absence epilepsy are sampled, filtered, selected, and dissected from seizure-free, preseizure, and seizure phases. A total of 112 two-second 19-channel EEG epochs from 10 patients were selected from each phase. For each epoch, multiscale permutation entropy of the EEG data was calculated. The feature dimensionality was reduced by linear discriminant analysis to obtain a more discriminative and compact representation. Finally, a relevance feedback technique, that is, direct biased discriminant analysis, was applied to 68 randomly selected queries over nine iterations. This study is a first attempt to apply the statistical analysis of relevance feedback to the distinction of different EEG activity states in absence epilepsy. The average precision in the top 10 returned results was 97.5%, and the standard deviation suggested that embedding relevance feedback can effectively distinguish different seizure phases in absence epilepsy. The experimental results indicate that relevance feedback may be an effective tool for the prediction of different activity states in human absence epilepsy. The simultaneous analysis of multichannel EEG signals provides a powerful tool for the exploration of abnormal electrical brain activity in patients with epilepsy.

  1. Use of a Cumulative Risk Scale to Predict Poor Intellectual and Academic Outcomes in Childhood Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Brian C; Scarborough, Vanessa Ramos; Salorio, Cynthia F

    2016-06-01

    Discrete risk factors for poor outcomes in childhood epilepsy have been identified, but it is unclear whether the combined effect of several risk factors better predicts outcome. The Epilepsy Cumulative Risk Scale was developed to quantify cumulative risk for poor outcomes in childhood epilepsy. Participants included 156 clinic-referred children with epilepsy. The Epilepsy Cumulative Risk Scale was developed using variables previously associated with functional outcomes. Scale utility was examined through its association with intellectual and academic functioning. All Epilepsy Cumulative Risk Scale variables were significantly associated with functioning. The Total Score (ie, cumulative effect) was most strongly correlated with cognition and academic skills. A Total Score ≥ 5 had the best sensitivity and specificity for differentiating those at high risk for poor outcomes. The Epilepsy Cumulative Risk Scale shows promise as a practical, data-driven tool for quantification of cumulative risk for poor outcomes in childhood epilepsy and may be helpful in detecting those needing referral for additional services.

  2. Scalp high frequency oscillations helps identify epileptogenic zone in secondary epilepsy%头皮脑电高频振荡波对继发性癫痫致痫灶的定位价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 但炜; 熊伟茗; 胡铁弋; 谢延风; 石全红; 詹彦

    2014-01-01

    epileptogenic zone.Methods A retrospective analysis study of video electroencephalogram (V-EEG) data in our hospital from September 2011 to September 2012 including 37 patients with secondary epilepsy was carried out.The channels with interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) were defined as area A (namely irritability area) and those without IEDs were defined as area B.The channels with ictal discharge (ID) in l0 to 30 s before the seizure onset were defined as area C and those without ID were defined as area D.IEDs (1 to 30 Hz) and ripples (80 to 250 Hz) in each area were marked.We analyzed the occurrence rate,quantity,distribution and sensitivity,specificity and accuracy to determine the SOZ.Results (1) The total occurrence rate of IEDs and ripples was 100% (37/37) and 48.6% (18/37) in 37 patients,respectively,and that of IEDs was significantly higher (Chi-square test,P <0.01).The average rates (times/min) of ripples in area A,B,C and D were 0.08 ± 0.15,0.03 ± 0.03,0.12 ± 0.29,and 0.04 ± 0.06,respectively,suggesting that the average rate of ripples of area A was greater than that of area B and area C greater than area D (t test,P <0.01).(2) The average channel of ripples was 4.2 ±3.6 in each patient,significantly less than that of IEDs 12.4 ± 5.8 (t test,P < 0.01).(3) Compared to the IEDs,the ripples were less sensitive (ripples 51.1% vs IEDs 81.6%) but more specific (ripples 87.9% vs IEDs 57.1%) and more accurate (ripples 80.6% vs IEDs 54%) in determining the SOZ.Conclusion High frequency oscillations are closely associated with epileptiform discharges in the epileptogenic zone of secondary epilepsy patients,with higher specificity to identify SOZ.But the sensitivity is too low to replace IEDs to identify SOZ independently.High frequency oscillations help IEDs to localize epileptogenic zone.

  3. Family communication in the context of pediatric epilepsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, S; Benson, A; Lambert, V; Gallagher, P; Shahwan, A; Austin, J K

    2015-10-01

    In childhood chronic illness, family communication can impact the child's and parents' psychosocial well-being. However, little is known about family communication in the context of epilepsy in childhood. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the existing evidence available on communication strategies adopted by families living with childhood epilepsy, including; the facilitators, barriers and challenges experienced by families when choosing to communicate, or not, about epilepsy; and the consequences of this communication. Papers published in the English language prior to March 2015 were identified following a search of six electronic databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Scopus. Studies were included if they involved a sample of parents of children with epilepsy or children/young people with epilepsy (0-18years of age) and used qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods. Following a comprehensive search and screening process, 26 studies were identified as eligible for inclusion in the review. No studies identified specific communication strategies adopted by families living with childhood epilepsy. Some studies found that talking about epilepsy with family members had positive consequences (e.g., communication as an effective coping strategy), with no negative consequences reported in any of the studies. The main barrier to communication for parents was an unwillingness to use the word "epilepsy" because of the perceived negative social connotations associated with the health condition. For children with epilepsy, barriers were as follows: parental desire to keep epilepsy a secret, parents' tendency to deny that the child had epilepsy, parental overprotection, and parents' tendency to impose greater restrictions on the child with epilepsy than on siblings without epilepsy. Future research investigating the communication strategies of families living with epilepsy is needed in order to create effective communication

  4. Epilepsy is Dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-10-01

    In "Epilepsy is Dancing", in Antony and the Johnsons' album "The Crying Light"(2009), the lyrics and accompanying music video depicts an epileptic seizure in which the person is transferred to another beautiful and magical world. This may be called "enchanted epilepsy"; i.e., the experience of epilepsy as deeply nourishing and (positively) transforming, is conveyed not only in the lyrics but also the visual and auditory qualities of the video. The seizure in the video gives associations to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's dream". If epilepsy appears in music lyrics, the focus is mostly on negative aspects of the illness, such as horror, fear and repulsive sexuality associated with the fits [1,2]. Contradictory to these lyrics, Anthony and the Johnsons' song is an example of a positive portrayal of epilepsy. It is open to a multitude of meanings, emotional valence and appraisal of epilepsy. By widening the experiential range associated with epileptic seizures, these lyrics highlight the inherently construed nature of epileptic experience. The song stands out in several ways. First, it describes epilepsy in positive terms, prioritising the euphoric, ecstatic, potentially empowering and enhancing aspects of epileptic seizures. Second, the lyrics and accompanying video point to divine experiences associated with epileptic seizures. Through the lyrics and the music video we are, as an audience, able to sense a snicket of an epileptic seizure, but also the universal experience of loosing control.

  5. Psychosocial aspects of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pravina

    2002-05-01

    Social attitudes towards epilepsy cause more distress to the patient and his/her near and dear ones, than the disease itself. The major psychosocial issues related to epilepsy are: Quality of medical management, overprotection, education, employment, marriage and pregnancy. Inadequate treatment is the major reason involved in psychosocial issues. Constant overprotection and pampering leads to behavioural pattern which makes epileptic patient dependent for ever. Education is hampered in epileptic persons. Teachers and students should have proper information regarding seizures. If seizures are well controlled, job opportunities increase. Employers and employees need to be educated about epilepsy. Self-employment is the best in epileptic patients. Regarding marriage, each patient is to be judged on individual merits and type of epilepsy. Society needs to be educated about the facts and consequences of epilepsy. Risk of anti-epileptic drug's usage is very insignificant compared to risk of seizures in pregnancy. So girls are advised to seek medical advice before pregnancy and during follow-up. With more and more support from the society, persons with epilepsy will have the courage and confidence to speak about themselves and their illness. It is only then that we will realise that persons with epilepsy are 'normal' or 'near-normal' and this will break the vicious cycle of stigma.

  6. Experimental models of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojlović Olivera P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction An epileptic seizure is a clinical event and epilepsy is rather a group of symptoms than a disease. The main features all epilepsies have in common include: spontaneous occurrence, repetitiveness, and ictal correlation within the EEG. Epilepsies are manifested with distinct EEG changes, requiring exact clinical definition and consequential treatment. Current data show that 1% of the world's population (approximately 50 million people suffers from epilepsy, with 25% of patients being refractory to therapy and requiring search for new substances in order to decrease EEG and behavioral manifestations of epilepsies. Material and methods In regard to discovery and testing of anticonvulsant substances the best results were achieved by implementation of experi- mental models. Animal models of epilepsy are useful in acquiring basic knowledge regarding pathogenesis, neurotransmitters (glutamate, receptors (NMDA/AMPA/kainate, propagation of epileptic seizures and preclinical assessment of antiepileptics (competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists. Results and conclusions In our lab, we have developed a pharmacologic model of a (metaphit, NMDA and remacemide-cilastatin generalized, reflex, and audiogenic epilepsy. The model is suitable for testing various anticonvulsant substances (e.g. APH, APV, CPP, Mk-801 and potential antiepileptics (e.g. DSIP, its tetra- and octaanalogues.

  7. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process.

  8. [Migraine and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are both common episodic disorders that share many clinical features and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The comorbidity of these two conditions is well known. However, the temporal association between migraine and epilepsy is a controversial issue, since these two conditions may occur in numerous ways. Four types of association between headache and epileptic seizure are recognized: pre-ictal headache, headache as the expression of an epileptic manifestation, post-ictal headache, and inter-ictal headache. The classification of epilepsy by the International League Against Epilepsy did not refer to the epileptic headache. On the other hand, the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD-3) defines three entities: migraine aura-triggered seizure which sometimes referred to as migralepsy, hemicrania epileptica, and post-ictal headache. However, ICHD-3 mentions that there is a complex and bidirectional association between migraine and epilepsy. Most of the previous reports of migralepsy corresponded to occipital seizures that mimic migraine with aura. The term migralepsy has recently been criticized. Migraine and epilepsy share several pathophysiological mechanisms which involve neurotransmitters and iron channel dysfunctions. There is the hypothesis of a shared genetic susceptibility to migraine and epilepsy. Strong support of a shared genetic basis comes from familial hemiplegic migraine.

  9. Epilepsy due to 20q13.33 subtelomere deletion masquerading as pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Heather C; Cook, Joseph; Gospe, Sidney M

    2012-12-01

    A cause of antiepileptic medication resistant seizures presenting in neonates and young infants is pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE), an organic aciduria, which is due to recessive mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, resulting in deficiency of antiquitin. Since the discovery of molecular basis of this disorder, a few patients have been reported with a similar clinical phenotype but without evidence of antiqutin dysfunction. We report on a patient who had carried a clinical diagnosis of PDE for 7 years, but who was than shown to have normal ALDH7A1 sequencing and the absence of biomarkers characteristic of this familial epilepsy. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) demonstrated a 1.5-Mb terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 20, which included deletion of the KCNQ2 and CHRNA4 genes, both of which have been associated with specific epilepsy syndromes. We suggest that this boy's neonatal epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disabilities are secondary to this deletion and that his clinical response to pyridoxine was coincidental. This patient's history emphasizes the utility of array CGH in the evaluation of children with epilepsy of unknown etiology.

  10. From Genetics to Genomics of Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Garofalo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of DNA microarrays and DNA sequencing technologies in medical genetics and diagnostics has been a challenge that has significantly transformed medical practice and patient management. Because of the great advancements in molecular genetics and the development of simple laboratory technology to identify the mutations in the causative genes, also the diagnostic approach to epilepsy has significantly changed. However, the clinical use of molecular cytogenetics and high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies, which are able to test an entire genome for genetic variants that are associated with the disease, is preparing a further revolution in the near future. Molecular Karyotype and Next-Generation Sequencing have the potential to identify causative genes or loci also in sporadic or non-familial epilepsy cases and may well represent the transition from a genetic to a genomic approach to epilepsy.

  11. Characteristics of epilepsy in severely mentally retarded individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, K; Takamatsu, J; Ogata, A; Miyazaki, C; Kaneyama, H; Katsuragi, S; Deshimaru, M; Sumiyoshi, S; Miyakawa, T

    2000-02-01

    In order to clarify the characteristics of epilepsy in patients with severe mentally retarded (SMR) subjects, we analyzed 52 SMR subjects with epilepsy from the institute for SMR subjects at Kikuchi National Hospital, Kumamoto, Japan. A total of 61.5% patients had uncontrolled seizures which were resistant to treatment. The most common combinations of seizure types in those not responding to conventional anticonvulsants were generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) with tonic seizure and GTCS with atypical absence. Their clinical features were characterized by spastic paralysis associated with a slower background electroencephalogram and abnormal computed tomography scans of the head, suggesting the involvement of cortical damage. These findings suggest that a large proportion of epilepsy in SMR subjects does not respond to treatment and that the severity of organic brain damage may therefore affect the natural course of epilepsy in such patients.

  12. Prognosis of pediatric epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish C Nair

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a significant and commonplace neurological disability in the pediatric population. Data from increasingly larger and more representative studies have brought about noteworthy changes in our understanding of the prognosis of epilepsy in the pediatric age-group. Prevalence rates for epilepsy in both the developing and the developed world are surprisingly similar despite distinct differences in incidence and large treatment gaps in the developing world; this strongly points towards the possibility of spontaneous remission, at least in some patients. Prognosis after an isolated first seizure is generally quite favorable, but worsens with recurring seizures, remote symptomatic etiology, and the presence of abnormalities on EEG. Presently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are at best seizure suppressant in their action and have not been shown to be antiepileptic in the sense that they alter the long-term prognosis of the epilepsy for the better. Epilepsy syndromes can be considered to belong to distinct groups on the basis of their prognosis. Some have an excellent outcome in terms of seizure freedom and neurological development; yet others have a grim prognosis with respect to these variables. Factors that impact on the prognosis of treated epilepsy are being understood and include the specific etiology, age of onset of epilepsy, and EEG findings. Epileptics, especially those with remote symptomatic seizures and refractory epilepsy, suffer higher mortality as compared to the general population. While the outcomes in terms of seizure freedom in patients with epilepsy appear favorable, disturbing data on psychosocial morbidity are coming to light and are reflected in the lower rates of higher education, employment, marriage, and fertility among epileptics.

  13. [Treatment of epilepsy: where are we today?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, H G

    1996-01-23

    The modern treatment of epilepsy has improved considerably in all three pillars. More than a century has passed, however, since Sir Charles Locock introduced the bromides in 1857 and Sir Victor Horsely pioneered epilepsy surgery in 1886 (18). In drug therapy, the 'classic AED' of the last decades, i.e. phenobarbital (Hauptmann, 1912) and phenytoin (Putnam and Merrit, 1938) are being largely displaced by valproate (Meunir, 1963) and carbamazepine (Lorge, 1963). Only ethosuximide (Zimmermann, 1951) has continued to maintain its position in 3/s spikewave-absence epilepsy, in particular in the USA (28, 29). Although it is an excellent drug against absences, it has the unpleasant property that it may induce GM seizures and should therefore be combined with a so-called 'GM protector' (mostly phenobarbital). For this reason ethosuximide has been relegated to second place in Europe by valproate. Thus, the decision as to which AED should be employed at the outset has been simplified considerably: actually, with valproate as the drug of first choice, which displays a very broad spectrum of action, we are on the right track for virtually all forms of epilepsy, perhaps with the exception of focal epilepsy (11). Especially in the event of focal epilepsy of temporal origin we employ carbamazepine as the preparation of first choice. In some countries (Denmark), because of the less severe side effects, oxcarbazepine is already preferred (Mogens Dam, personal communication). Considerable experience and knowledge are still required, however, when resistance has developed to traditionally applied classic monotherapy. Here, the range of further treatment can also be greatly extended by the availability of the 'new AED'. A generally accepted protocol for the replacement of one preparation with another first- or second-choice drug and, above all, for the 'right' combination with third-choice preparations can as yet not be compiled. What we need here is the expert epileptologist who has

  14. Medical Marijuana for Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolikonda, Murali K; Srinivasan, Kavitha; Enja, Manasa; Sagi, Vishwanath; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-refractory epilepsy remains an important clinical problem. There is considerable recent interest by the public and physicians in using medical marijuana or its derivatives to treat seizures. The endocannabinoid system has a role in neuronal balance and ictal control. There is clinical evidence of success in diminishing seizure frequencies with cannabis derivatives, but also documentation about exacerbating epilepsy or of no discernible effect. There are lay indications and anecdotal reports of success in attenuating the severity of epilepsy, but without solid investigational corroboration. Marijuana remains largely illegal, and may induce adverse consequences. Clinical applications are not approved, thus are restricted and only recommended in selected treatment unresponsive cases, with appropriate monitoring.

  15. Cannabis agonist injection effect on the coupling architecture in cortex of WAG/Rij rats during absence seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sysoeva, M.V.; Kuznetsova, G.D.; Rijn, C.M. van; Sysoev, I.V.

    2016-01-01

    WAG/Rij rats are well known genetic model of absence epilepsy, which is traditionally considered as a nonconvulsive generalised epilepsy of unknown aetiology. In current study the effect of (R)-(+)-WIN 55,212-2 (cannabis agonist) injection on the coupling between different parts of cortex was studie

  16. PET studies in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. (18)Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced (11)C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and (18)F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased (11)C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and (11)C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. (11)C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that (11)C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous

  17. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile myoclonic epilepsy juvenile myoclonic epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy). ...

  18. Epilepsy and cysticercosis in Northwest Cameroon: a serological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Irene; Jerome, Ambanibe; Angwafor, Samuel A; Smith, Mary Lou; Takougang, Innocent; Noh, John; Tsang, Victor; Wilkins, Patricia; Cockburn, Lynn; Keystone, Jay; Njamnshi, Alfred K; Snead, O Carter

    2013-05-01

    The prevalence of epilepsy in Cameroon is higher than that of the industrialized world and other developing countries. Neurocysticercosis due to Taenia solium infestation has been reported as a major cause of epilepsy in some parts of Cameroon although there are some conflicting data. The prevalence of epilepsy is especially high in the Momo division of the North-West Province of Cameroon. We hypothesized that individuals with epilepsy in this region have a higher percentage of seropositivity to T. solium than matched controls. We conducted a case-control study in the Momo subdivision of Ngie. Individuals with epilepsy were recruited from the health centers in Ngie. Control subjects were selected from 19 Ngie villages. Potential cases of people with epilepsy (PWE) were identified through a questionnaire applied by trained field workers, using history of epileptic seizures as a key indicator. Blood samples were taken from all consenting individuals by finger prick, stored in StabilZyme Select, and assayed for antibodies to T. solium in an Atlanta based reference laboratory. We accrued 249 patients with epilepsy, of whom 237 met the inclusion criteria, and 245 age-matched controls. There was no significant difference in seropositivity to T. solium between those individuals with epilepsy (5%) and controls (4.9%). Our data do not support the hypothesis that epilepsy is associated with seropositivity to T. solium. It is highly unlikely that cysticercosis plays a causative role in the high prevalence of epilepsy in this region of Cameroon. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Screening of GABRB3 in French-Canadian families with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Martin, Caroline; Poulin, Chantal; Gravel, Micheline; Carmant, Lionel; Cossette, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Mutations in the GABRB3 have been recently associated with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) in families from Honduras and Mexico. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of mutation in this gene in our cohort of families with CAE and other related idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) syndromes. We screened the open reading frame of GABRB3 in 183 French-Canadian individuals with IGE, including 88 with CAE. A total of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified,five of which are novel. The previously described P11S missense mutation was found in three affected and one unaffected individuals from a French-Canadian family. However, the P11S variant was also found in one of our 190 control individuals of French-Canadian origin, suggesting that this variant is rather a rare polymorphism in this population. Further screening of other IGE cohorts from various ethnic origins would help to confirm the association between this rare functional variant and epilepsy.

  20. Comorbidities of epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    H Srinivas; Urvashi Shah

    2017-01-01

    .... This article besides addressing these issues also explores the therapeutic management. A systematic search of PubMed from Jan 2006 to August 2016 was undertaken using the terms "comorbidities" and "epilepsy...

  1. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593. Read More Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Epilepsy - overview Seizures Stereotactic radiosurgery - ...

  2. [Treatment of pediatric epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the treatment strategy for pediatric epilepsy has been dramatically changed in Japan, because of the approval of new-generation antiepileptic drugs. Since 2006, a total of 6 new antiepileptic drugs, including gabapentin (GBP; adults/pediatric patients: 2006/2011 [year of approval]), topiramate (TPM; 2007/2013), lamotrigine (LTG; 2008/2008), levetiracetam (LEV; 2010/2013), stiripentol (STP; 2012/2012), and rufinamide (RUF; 2013/2013), have been introduced. Thus far, valproate (VPA) and carbamazepine (CBZ) have been first indicated for "generalized" epilepsy and "focal" epilepsy syndromes/types, respectively, in Japan. However, the approval of these new drugs could allow us to choose more effective and less toxic ones at an early stage of treatment. In this chapter, we describe the latest domestic and foreign guidelines for the treatment of pediatric epilepsy.

  3. Epilepsy and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Sarah; Forty, Liz; Craddock, Nick; Thomas, Rhys H

    2015-11-01

    It is well recognized that mood disorders and epilepsy commonly co-occur. Despite this, our knowledge regarding the relationship between epilepsy and bipolar disorder is limited. Several shared features between the two disorders, such as their episodic nature and potential to run a chronic course, and the efficacy of some antiepileptic medications in the prophylaxis of both disorders, are often cited as evidence of possible shared underlying pathophysiology. The present paper aims to review the bidirectional associations between epilepsy and bipolar disorder, with a focus on epidemiological links, evidence for shared etiology, and the impact of these disorders on both the individual and wider society. Better recognition and understanding of these two complex disorders, along with an integrated clinical approach, are crucial for improved evaluation and management of comorbid epilepsy and mood disorders.

  4. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  5. Employees with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alert systems to send message Other Accommodations Attendance/Absenteeism: Seizure activity can affect a person’s attendance at ... JAN suggested using a two‑way radio. A student with epilepsy used hedge-cutters and other landscaping ...

  6. Prevalence and etiology of epilepsy in a Norwegian county-A population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Marte; Nakken, Karl Otto; Edland, Astrid; Hansen, Gunnar; Hellum, Morten Kristoffer; Koht, Jeanette

    2015-05-01

    Epilepsy represents a substantial personal and social burden worldwide. When addressing the multifaceted issues of epilepsy care, updated epidemiologic studies using recent guidelines are essential. The aim of this study was to find the prevalence and causes of epilepsy in a representative Norwegian county, implementing the new guidelines and terminology suggested by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Included in the study were all patients from Buskerud County in Norway with a diagnosis of epilepsy at Drammen Hospital and the National Center for Epilepsy at Oslo University Hospital. The study period was 1999-2014. Patients with active epilepsy were identified through a systematic review of medical records, containing information about case history, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetic tests, blood samples, treatment, and other investigations. Epilepsies were classified according to the revised terminology suggested by the ILAE in 2010. In a population of 272,228 inhabitants, 1,771 persons had active epilepsy. Point prevalence on January 1, 2014 was 0.65%. Of the subjects registered with a diagnostic code of epilepsy, 20% did not fulfill the ILAE criteria of the diagnosis. Epilepsy etiology was structural-metabolic in 43%, genetic/presumed genetic in 20%, and unknown in 32%. Due to lack of information, etiology could not be determined in 4%. Epilepsy is a common disorder, affecting 0.65% of the subjects in this cohort. Every fifth subject registered with a diagnosis of epilepsy was misdiagnosed. In those with a reliable epilepsy diagnosis, every third patient had an unknown etiology. Future advances in genetic research will probably lead to an increased identification of genetic and hopefully treatable causes of epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Bmi-1 absence causes premature brain degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangliang Cao

    Full Text Available Bmi-1, a polycomb transcriptional repressor, is implicated in cell cycle regulation and cell senescence. Its absence results in generalized astrogliosis and epilepsy during the postnatal development, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of four-week-old Bmi-1 null mice. The mice showed various hallmarks of neurodegeneration including synaptic loss, axonal demyelination, reactive gliosis and brain mitochondrial damage. Moreover, astroglial glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase decreased in the Bmi-1 null hippocampus, which might contribute to the sporadic epileptic-like seizures in these mice. These results indicate that Bmi-1 is required for maintaining endogenous antioxidant defenses in the brain, and its absence subsequently causes premature brain degeneration.

  8. Pregabalin in the management of partial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M Arain

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Amir M ArainVanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pregabalin is a new antiepileptic medication that works by binding to alpha 2 delta subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channels present in presynaptic neurons. Its pharmacokinetic advantages include rapid and almost complete absorption, lack of protein binding, linear kinetics, absence of enzyme induction, and absence of interactions with other drugs. Pregabalin was found effective as adjunctive therapy for refractory partial-onset seizures, with up to 51% responder at a dose of 600 mg/day. The lowest effective dose was 150 mg/day. Pregabalin is also approved for treatment of painful diabetic polyneuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia and pain with fibromyalgia. Studies also suggest a beneficial effect on sleep and generalized anxiety disorders. Its main adverse effects in randomized adjunctive trials in adults have been mild to moderate. Most common side effects were dizziness, ataxia, somnolence and diplopia. Weight gain was not prominent in pivotal pregabalin trials, but was more problematic in long-term postmarketing analyses in epilepsy patients. Pregabalin, with its potent antiseizure effect, favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and effectiveness in common co-morbidities is an important addition to the treatment of epilepsy.Keywords: epilepsy, seizures, pregabalin, pharmacology, antiepileptic drugs, tolerability

  9. Sex, epilepsy, and epigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders that are associated with a wide range of pathogenic mechanisms, seizure manifestations, comorbidity profiles, and therapeutic responses. These characteristics are all influenced quite significantly by sex. As with other conditions exhibiting such patterns, sex differences in epilepsy are thought to arise—at the most fundamental level—from the “organizational” and “activational” effects of sex hormones as well as from the direct actions of ...

  10. Epigenetics and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Seizures can give rise to enduring changes that reflect alterations in gene expression patterns, intra and inter cellular signaling and ultimately network alterations that are a hallmark of epilepsy. A growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with epilepsy are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. One transcription factor in particular, REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor), has received a lot of attention due to...

  11. GEM THERAPY AND EPILEPSY

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The authors present in this paper the status of treatment and cause of epilepsy. They propose further research to be undertaken to document the data and a study of human magnetic aura followed by blood spectral studies. They have suggested that based upon these studies it should be possible to determine the cause of epilepsy and its treatment by the physical application of suitable precious and semi-previous stones followed by administration of Ayurvedic formulation.

  12. Identification of a novel idiopathic epilepsy locus in Belgian Shepherd dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Koskinen, Lotta L.E.; Gulløv, Christina Hedal;

    2012-01-01

    collected 159 cases and 148 controls and confirmed the presence of epilepsy through epilepsy questionnaires and clinical examinations. The MRI was normal while interictal EEG revealed abnormalities and variable foci in the clinically examined affected dogs. A genome-wide association study using Affymetrix......, or as primary generalized. Nine genes have been identified for symptomatic (storage diseases) and one for idiopathic epilepsy in different breeds. However, the genetic background of common canine epilepsies remains unknown. We have studied the clinical and genetic background of epilepsy in Belgian Shepherds. We...

  13. Epilepsy and non-organic non-affective psychosis. National epidemiologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredkjaer, S R; Mortensen, P B; Parnas, Josef

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study tests the hypothesis that epilepsy increases the risk of developing schizophrenia and other non-affective functional psychoses using a nationwide sample of people with epilepsy. METHOD: A record linkage study between a sample from the National Patient Register, consisting...... of 67,116 people with epilepsy, and the Danish Psychiatric Register identified all people with non-affective psychoses with onset after the first epilepsy diagnosis. The relation between risk of psychiatric disorder in people with epilepsy and the general Danish population was estimated. RESULTS...

  14. Epilepsy-associated stigma in Bolivia: a community-based study among the Guarani population: an International League Against Epilepsy/International Bureau for Epilepsy/World Health Organization Global Campaign Against Epilepsy Regional Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Elisa; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Sofia, Vito; Rafael, Florentina; Magnelli, Donata; Padilla, Sandra; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Bartalesi, Filippo; Segundo, Higinio; Zappia, Mario; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Nicoletti, Alessandra

    2012-09-01

    Epilepsy is associated with a significant burden of social stigma that appears to be influenced by psychosocial and cultural factors. Stigma has a negative effect on the management of people with epilepsy (PWE), representing one of the major factors that contribute to the burden of epilepsy. To assess stigma perception among the Guarani population, one hundred thirty-two people living in Guaraní communities in Bolivia were invited to complete the Stigma Scale of Epilepsy questionnaire. The main determinants of stigma identified were: the fear linked to loss of control, the feelings of sadness and pity toward PWE, the difficulties faced by PWE in the professional and relationship fields, the level of education and type of seizure. Our study pointed out that, in this population, PWE face difficulties in everyday life because of epilepsy-associated stigma and the results attest to the importance of promoting community-based educational programs aimed at reducing the stigmatization process.

  15. Adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy and learning problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Janice M; Perkins, Susan M; Johnson, Cynthia S; Byars, Anna W; Fastenau, Philip S; Dunn, David W; Austin, Joan K

    2012-10-01

    In the study we describe adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy whose primary caregivers identified them as having learning problems. This was a cross-sectional study of 50 children with epilepsy and learning problems. Caregivers supplied information regarding the child's adaptive functioning and behavior problems. Children rated their self-concept and completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. Mean estimated IQ (PPVT-III) in the participant children was 72.8 (SD = 18.3). On average, children scored 2 standard deviations below the norm on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II and this was true even for children with epilepsy who had estimated IQ in the normal range. In conclusion, children with epilepsy and learning problems had relatively low adaptive functioning scores and substantial neuropsychological and mental health problems. In epilepsy, adaptive behavior screening can be very informative and guide further evaluation and intervention, even in those children whose IQ is in the normal range.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of seizure clusters in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Wong, Rebecca A; Jiang, Alfred; Kato, Kenneth; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-07-01

    In the current study, we explored the prevalence of physician-confirmed seizure clusters. We also investigated potential clinical factors associated with the occurrence of seizure clusters overall and by epilepsy type. We reviewed medical records of 4116 adult (≥16years old) outpatients with epilepsy at our centers for documentation of seizure clusters. Variables including patient demographics, epilepsy details, medical and psychiatric history, AED history, and epilepsy risk factors were then tested against history of seizure clusters. Patients were then divided into focal epilepsy, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), or symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), and the same analysis was run. Overall, seizure clusters were independently associated with earlier age of seizure onset, symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), central nervous system (CNS) infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, absence of 1-year seizure freedom, and having failed 2 or more AEDs (Pseizure clusters than patients with focal epilepsy (16.3%) and IGE (7.4%; all Pepilepsy type showed that absence of 1-year seizure freedom since starting treatment at one of our centers was associated with seizure clustering in patients across all 3 epilepsy types. In patients with SGE, clusters were associated with perinatal/congenital brain injury. In patients with focal epilepsy, clusters were associated with younger age of seizure onset, complex partial seizures, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, CNS infection, and having failed 2 or more AEDs. In patients with IGE, clusters were associated with presence of an aura. Only 43.5% of patients with seizure clusters were prescribed rescue medications. Patients with intractable epilepsy are at a higher risk of developing seizure clusters. Factors such as having SGE, CNS infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus or an early seizure onset, can also independently increase one's chance of having seizure clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published

  17. Epilepsy and homicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Neil S; Vrbancic, Mirna; Ladino, Lady Diana; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy. Patients and methods We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides. Results We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility. Conclusion The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse. PMID:23700367

  18. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An unknown quantity--the worldwide prevalence of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Gail S; Neligan, Aidan; Sander, Josemir W

    2014-07-01

    The reported incidence (rate of new cases in a population) of epilepsy is consistently lower in high-income than in lower-income economies, whereas opinions vary regarding comparative prevalence rates (proportion of the population with epilepsy). For any condition that does not influence mortality, lifetime prevalence should approximate to the cumulative incidence. We suspected that epilepsy prevalence might be uniform throughout the world, whereas incidence is higher in resource-poor countries. To test whether our suspicion was reasonable, we conducted a Medline search to estimate the prevalence of active and lifetime epilepsy in different economic areas throughout the world. We found that the range of estimated prevalence of epilepsy may be broadly similar throughout the world, but comparison is limited by lack of door-to-door studies in high-income economies and by variations in the definitions of active epilepsy. We contend that any inconsistencies between incidence and prevalence are due largely to the excess premature death rate in people with epilepsy in lower-income economies. Much of the variability in epidemiologic indices arises from differences in study methodology, definitions, and risk factors. The epidemiology of epilepsy, and particularly its mortality, needs thorough investigation using uniform definitions that do not include antiepileptic drug use; causes of death should be identified and actions, including treatment and education, should be taken to avoid preventable deaths.

  20. Epilepsy in children with a history of febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun Ha; Eun, Baik-Lin; Eun, So-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Febrile seizure, the most common type of pediatric convulsive disorder, is a benign seizure syndrome distinct from epilepsy. However, as epilepsy is also common during childhood, we aimed to identify the prognostic factors that can predict epilepsy in children with febrile seizures. The study comprised 249 children at the Korea University Ansan Hospital who presented with febrile seizures. The relationship between the subsequent occurrence of epilepsy and clinical factors including seizure and fever-related variables were analyzed by multivariate analysis. Twenty-five patients (10.0%) had additional afebrile seizures later and were diagnosed with epilepsy. The subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in patients with a history of febrile seizures was associated with a seizure frequency of more than 10 times during the first 2 years after seizure onset (Pseizures during a febrile seizure attack (P=0.005), and epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) (P=0.008). Other factors such as the age at onset of first seizure, seizure duration, and family history of epilepsy were not associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in this study. Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. However, careful observation is needed, particularly for prediction of subsequent epileptic episodes in patients with frequent febrile seizures with known risk factors, such as developmental delay, history of preterm birth, several attacks during a febrile episode, and epileptiform discharges on EEG.

  1. Prevalence of River Epilepsy in the Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Colebunders

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased prevalence of epilepsy has been reported in many onchocerciasis endemic areas.To determine the prevalence and distribution of epilepsy in an onchocerciasis endemic region in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC.An epilepsy prevalence study was carried out in 2014, in two localities of the Bas-Uélé district, an onchocerciasis endemic region in the Orientale Province of the DRC. Risk factors for epilepsy were identified using a random effects logistic regression model and the distribution of epilepsy cases was investigated using the Moran's I statistic of spatial auto-correlation.Among the 12,776 individuals of Dingila, 373 (2.9% individuals with epilepsy were identified. In a house-to-house survey in Titule, 68 (2.3% of the 2,908 people who participated in the survey were found to present episodes of epilepsy. Epilepsy showed a marked spatial pattern with clustering of cases occurring within and between adjacent households. Individual risk of epilepsy was found to be associated with living close to the nearest fast flowing river where blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae-the vector of Onchocerca volvulus-oviposit and breed.The prevalence of epilepsy in villages in the Bas-Uélé district in the DRC was higher than in non-onchocerciasis endemic regions in Africa. Living close to a blackflies infested river was found to be a risk factor for epilepsy.

  2. The burden of premature mortality of epilepsy in high-income countries: A systematic review from the Mortality Task Force of the International League Against Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, David J; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Beghi, Ettore; Hauser, W Allen; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Newton, Charles R; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Sander, Josemir W; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    Since previous reviews of epidemiologic studies of premature mortality among people with epilepsy were completed several years ago, a large body of new evidence about this subject has been published. We aim to update prior reviews of mortality in epilepsy and to reevaluate and quantify the risks, potential risk factors, and causes of these deaths. We systematically searched the Medline and Embase databases to identify published reports describing mortality risks in cohorts and populations of people with epilepsy. We reviewed relevant reports and applied criteria to identify those studies likely to accurately quantify these risks in representative populations. From these we extracted and summarized the reported data. All population-based studies reported an increased risk of premature mortality among people with epilepsy compared to general populations. Standard mortality ratios are especially high among people with epilepsy aged <50 years, among those whose epilepsy is categorized as structural/metabolic, those whose seizures do not fully remit under treatment, and those with convulsive seizures. Among deaths directly attributable to epilepsy or seizures, important immediate causes include sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), status epilepticus, unintentional injuries, and suicide. Epilepsy-associated premature mortality imposes a significant public health burden, and many of the specific causes of death are potentially preventable. These require increased attention from healthcare providers, researchers, and public health professionals. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Clinical characteristics of adult epilepsy patients in the 1997 Hong Kong epilepsy registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics of 2952 patients with epilepsy who had received drug treatment from the neurology outpatient clinics of eight major hospitals in Hong Kong. Methods Retrospective review of outpatient records. Results 1601 (54.3%) males and 1351 (45.7%) females with a median age of 35.8 years (range, 10-94.8) were studied. Seizure types included generalized tonic-clonic in 80.7% of patients, complex partial in 28.3%, simple partial in 14.4%, atypical absence in 2.6% and myoclonic in 1.4%, and 30.4% of patients had more than one seizure type. EEG, CT brain, MRI brain and neuropsychological evaluation were obtained in 81.2%, 61.7%, 17.0% and 2.2% of patients, respectively. The etiology of epilepsy was cryptogenic in 59.9%, symptomatic in 35.1% and idiopathic in 3.9%; the commonest were intracranial infection, cerebral vascular disease, cranial trauma and perinatal insult. Phenytoin, carbamazepine and valproate were the most frequently used drugs and 25.9% of patients were taking more than two drugs. 48.3% of patients had active seizures in the past six months and 26.4% were considered to have unsatisfactory control of their epilepsy. Medical refractoriness of epilepsy was associated with a history of perinatal insult, intracranial infection, congenital brain malformation, intracranial neoplasm, cerebral vascular disease, hippocampal sclerosis, mental retardation and a history of status epilepticus (P<0.05). Conclusion In this local cohort of adult patients with epilepsy under specialist care, there were a considerable number of patients falling into the category of cryptogenic epilepsy. Risk factors associated with medical refractoriness are similar to previous studies.

  4. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... International TSC Research Conference Text Size Get Involved EPILEPSY IN ADULTS WITH TSC Download a PDF of ... age, including either new-onset seizures or ongoing epilepsy. Recent studies indicate that more than 80% of ...

  5. Epilepsy and homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya NS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neil S Pandya,1 Mirna Vrbancic,2 Lady Diana Ladino,3,4 José F Téllez-Zenteno31Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellin, ColombiaPurpose: We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy.Patients and methods: We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides.Results: We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility.Conclusion: The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse.Keywords: aggression, crime, epilepsy

  6. The language of absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Hayuta

    2008-06-01

    This paper will focus on the concept of 'absence', which describes a continuum of non-responsiveness and misattunement of the environment in the stage of absolute dependence; it refers to concepts like lack, failure, non-recognition, impingement, neglect, tantalizing, ranging to mental, physical and sexual abuse. An extreme external absence causes shock and fear. The automatic survival response is an inner absence, an intrapsychic absence, a dissociation of parts of the self. The external and the inner absence are the negative image of each other. The concept of absence points to the synchronicity of outer and inner reality and portrays the non-responded-to needs of the self. This point of view of the development of psychopathology of the self on the basis of massive dissociation is inherently an intersubjective-field-theory. As the inner absence is created as a reaction to an absence of the other, in analysis - the analyst has an active role in reviving it. This paper will explore the language of absence, that is, the derivatives and consequences of these situations in the inner realm, and in the relations with the analyst. It is the author's contention that understanding and speaking this language has important clinical and technical implications. Understanding the language of absence enables the analyst to recognize its intersubjective and its intrapsychic presence, to provide an environment that allows for its revival, and to facilitate and regulate the annihilation anxiety that awakens when dissociated self-states are experienced. When the absence is present, i.e. when the traumatic experience and the dissociated reactions to it are experienced in an attuned relationship, it is rendered with meaning, symbolization, and validation, and enables the survival mode of dissociation to be relinquished.

  7. K+ CHANNELEPSY: progress in the neurobiology of potassium channels and epilepsy

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    Maria Cristina D'Adamo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available K+ channels are important determinants of seizure susceptibility. These membrane proteins, encoded by more than 70 genes, make the largest group of ion channels that fine-tune the electrical activity of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the brain. Their ubiquity and extremely high genetic and functional diversity, unmatched by any other ion channel type, place K+ channels as primary targets of genetic variations or perturbations in K+-dependent homeostasis, even in the absence of a primary channel defect. It is therefore not surprising that numerous inherited or acquired K+ channels dysfunctions have been associated with several neurologic syndromes, including epilepsy, which often generate confusion in the classification of the associated diseases. Therefore, we propose to name the K+ channels defects underlying distinct epilepsies as K+ channelepsies, and introduce a new nomenclature (e.g. Kx.y-channelepsy, following the widely used K+ channel classification, which could be also adopted to easily identify other channelopathies involving Na+ (e.g. Navx.y-phenotype, Ca2+ (e.g. Cavx.y-phenotype, and Cl- channels. Furthermore, we discuss novel genetic defects in K+ channels and associated proteins that underlie distinct epileptic phenotypes in humans, and analyze critically the recent progress in the neurobiology of this disease that has also been provided by investigations on valuable animal models of epilepsy. The abundant and varied lines of evidence discussed here strongly foster assessments for variations in genes encoding for K+ channels and associated proteins in patients with idiopathic epilepsy, provide new avenues for future investigations, and highlight these proteins as critical pharmacological targets.

  8. National epilepsy movement in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    P T Fernandes; Noronha, A. L. A.; Sander, J. W.; L. M. Li

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a social network of epilepsy lay organization in Brazil to provide advocacy for people with epilepsy and eventually forma powerful National Epilepsy movement. Method.-We actively searched for any associations, support groups or organizations related to epilepsy in the country by personal contacts, internet search and by telephone search. Contact was then established with any entity found. Results: The first meeting was held in Campinas in March 2003, and was attended by ...

  9. Psychiatric disorders after epilepsy diagnosis: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

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    Hsiu-Ju Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychiatric manifestations after occurrence of epilepsy have often been noted. However, the association between newly diagnosed epilepsy and psychiatric disorders afterward is not completely understood. We conducted two longitudinal cohorts for patients with and without epilepsy to investigate the risk factors and hazard ratios of developing psychiatric disorders after patients were newly diagnosed with epilepsy. METHODS: We identified 938 patients with a new diagnosis of epilepsy and 518,748 participants without epilepsy from the National Health Insurance Research Database in 2000-2002 and tracked them until 2008. We compared the incidence of developing psychiatric disorders between the two cohorts, evaluated risk factors and measured the associated hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of developing psychiatric disorders. FINDINGS: The incidences of psychiatric disorders for people with and without epilepsy were 94.1 and 22.6 per 1000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting the covariates, the epilepsy cohort showed the highest risks in mental retardation (HR 31.5, 95% CI 18.9 to 52.4, bipolar disorder (HR 23.5, 95% CI 11.4 to 48.3 and alcohol or drug psychosis (HR 18.8, 95% CI 11.1 to 31.8 among psychiatric complications developed after newly diagnosed epilepsy. The risk increased with epileptic general seizure and frequency of outpatient visits for epilepsy, as well as with emergency room visits and hospitalizations for epilepsy, and with older age. Chronologically, the highest risk occurred in the first year after epilepsy diagnosis (HR 11.4, 95% CI 9.88 to 13.2. CONCLUSION: Various psychiatric disorders were demonstrated after newly diagnosed epilepsy and closely related to general seizure and use of medical services for epilepsy. This shows a need for integrated psychiatric care for patients newly diagnosed with epilepsy, especially in the first year.

  10. Rhythm and blues: animal models of epilepsy and depression comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, S Alisha; Weinshenker, David

    2013-01-15

    Clinical evidence shows a strong, bidirectional comorbidity between depression and epilepsy that is associated with decreased quality of life and responsivity to pharmacotherapies. At present, the neurobiological underpinnings of this comorbidity remain hazy. To complicate matters, anticonvulsant drugs can cause mood disturbances, while antidepressant drugs can lower seizure threshold, making it difficult to treat patients suffering from both depression and epilepsy. Animal models have been created to untangle the mechanisms behind the relationship between these disorders and to serve as screening tools for new therapies targeted to treat both simultaneously. These animal models are based on chemical interventions (e.g. pentylenetetrazol, kainic acid, pilocarpine), electrical stimulations (e.g. kindling, electroshock), and genetic/selective breeding paradigms (e.g. genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPRs), genetic absence epilepsy rat from Strasbourg (GAERS), WAG/Rij rats, swim lo-active rats (SwLo)). Studies on these animal models point to some potential mechanisms that could explain epilepsy and depression comorbidity, such as various components of the dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic, and GABAergic systems, as well as key brain regions, like the amygdala and hippocampus. These models have also been used to screen possible therapies. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the importance of animal models in research on comorbid epilepsy and depression and to explore the contributions of these models to our understanding of the mechanisms and potential treatments for these disorders.

  11. Idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut: report of 12 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Hideo; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Shohei; Motoki, Takahiro; Ohmori, Hiromitsu; Ishii, Eiichi

    2011-03-01

    This study sought to present clinical and outcome data of patients with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut, to validate previously reported characteristics of this epilepsy. The study group was comprised of 12 affected children (three boys and nine girls), with a median age of onset at 10.3 years. Common ictal manifestations included elementary visual hallucinations (75.0%), blindness or blurring of vision (50.0%), headache (50.0%), and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures (58.3%). Interictal electroencephalography revealed occipital spike-wave paroxysms reactive to eye closure and opening in all patients, accompanied by spike-wave activity in the extra-occipital areas in four (33.3%), and by generalized spike-wave discharges in two (16.7%). One patient exhibited the onset of occipital lobe seizures 1 year after manifesting absence epilepsy. Seizure remission occurred in 81.8% of cases, in half of which medication was discontinued by late adolescence. This study confirmed the previously delineated electroclinical features of epilepsy syndrome, with additional aspects including the frequent association of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and atypical evolution from childhood absence epilepsy.

  12. Correlates of disability related to seizures in persons with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajobi, Tolulope T; Jette, Nathalie; Fiest, Kirsten M; Patten, Scott B; Engbers, Jordan D T; Lowerison, Mark W; Wiebe, Samuel

    2015-09-01

    Seizure-related disability is an important contributor to health-related quality of life in persons with epilepsy. Yet, there is little information on patient-centered reports of seizure-related disability, as most studies focus on specific constructs of health-related disability, rather than epilepsy. We investigated how patients rate their own disability and how these ratings correlate with various clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. In a prospective cohort of 250 adults with epilepsy consecutively enrolled in the Neurological Disease and Depression Study (NEEDs), we obtained a broad range of clinical and patient-reported measures, including patients' ratings of seizure-related disability and epilepsy severity using self-completed, single-item, 7-point response global assessment scales. Spearman's correlation, multiple linear regression, and mediation analyses were used to examine the association between seizure-related disability scores and clinical and demographic characteristics of persons with epilepsy. The mean age and duration of epilepsy was 39.8 and 16.7 years, respectively. About 29.5% of the patients reported their seizures as "not at all disabling," whereas 5.8% of the patients reported them as "extremely disabling." Age, seizure freedom at 1 year, anxiety, and epilepsy severity were identified as statistically significant predictors of disability scores. The indirect effects of age and seizure freedom, attributable to mediation through epilepsy severity, accounted for 25.0% and 30.3% of the total effects of these determinants on seizure-related disability, respectively. Measuring seizure-related disability has heuristic value and it has important correlates and mediators that can be targeted for intervention in practice. Addressing modifiable factors associated with disability (e.g., seizure freedom and anxiety) could have a significant impact on decreasing the burden of disability in people with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015

  13. The borderland of migraine and epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Thilinie; Buchhalter, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    gains in understanding, improved classification methods are required to identify and further study these interrelated conditions and move towards improved diagnosis and treatment of disorders on the migraine-epilepsy continuum in children. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  14. APPROACH TO EPILEPSY IN CHILDHOOD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    their epilepsy (symptomatic), while the remainder were cryptogenic or ... access to medical resources and the continuing stigma around epilepsy.1-3 ... try and define the type of epilepsy as early as possible. .... Therapy is not always necessary and the natural history is for spontaneous .... and infantile spasms but has lost.

  15. The current state of epilepsy guidelines: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Khara M; Wiebe, Samuel; Dunkley, Colin; Janszky, Jozsef; Kumlien, Eva; Moshé, Solomon; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Pedley, Timothy A; Perucca, Emilio; Senties, Horacio; Thomas, Sanjeev V; Wang, Yuping; Wilmshurst, Jo; Jetté, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Epilepsy Guidelines Task Force, composed of 14 international members, was established in 2011 to identify, using systematic review methodology, international epilepsy clinical care guidelines, assess their quality, and determine gaps in areas of need of development. A systematic review of the literature (1985-2014) was performed in six electronic databases (e.g. Medline, Embase) using a broad search strategy without initial limits to language or study design. Six gray literature databases (e.g., American Academy of Neurology [AAN], ILAE) were also searched to minimize publication bias. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, reviewed full text articles, and performed data abstraction. Descriptive statistics and a meta-analysis were generated. The search identified 10,926 abstracts. Of the 410 articles selected for full text review, 63 met our eligibility criteria for a guideline. Of those included, 54 were in English and 9 were in other languages (French, Spanish, and Italian). Of all guidelines, 29% did not specify the target age groups, 27% were focused on adults, 22% included only children, and 6% specifically addressed issues related to women with epilepsy. Guidelines included in the review were most often aimed at guiding clinical practice for status epilepticus (n = 7), first seizure (n = 6), drug-resistant epilepsy (n = 5), and febrile seizures (n = 4), among others. Most of the guidelines were therapeutic (n = 35) or diagnostic (n = 16) in nature. The quality of the guidelines using a 1-7 point scale (7 = highest) varied and was moderate overall (mean = 4.99 ± 1.05 [SD]). We identified substantial gaps in topics (e.g., epilepsy in the elderly) and there was considerable heterogeneity in methodologic quality. The findings should offer a valuable resource for health professionals caring for people with epilepsy, since they will help guide the prioritization, development, and dissemination of future

  16. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor M. Dostoevsky (Moscow, 1821-Saint Petersburg, 1881) suffered epilepsy throughout his whole literary career. The aim here is to understand his condition in light of his novels, correspondence, and his contemporaries' accounts as well as through the eyes of later generations of neurologists. From Murin (The landlady, 1847) to Smerdyakov (The brothers Karamazov, 1880), Dostoevsky portrayed up to six characters with epilepsy in his literature. The first symptoms of the disease presented in early adulthood, but he was only diagnosed with epilepsy a decade later. In 1863 he went abroad seeking expert advice from the famous neurologists Romberg and Trousseau. Dostoevsky made an intelligent use of epilepsy in his literature (of his experiential auras or dreamy states particularly) and through it found a way to freedom from perpetual military servitude. His case offers an insight into the natural history of epilepsy (a cryptogenic localization related one of either fronto-medial or temporal lobe origin using contemporary medical terms), thus inspiring later generations of writers and neurologists. Furthermore, it illustrates the good use of an ordinary neurological disorder by an extraordinary writer who transformed adversity into opportunity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Parietal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, Vicenta

    2012-10-01

    Patients with parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE) exhibit an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome that is rarely seen even at large epilepsy centers. Clinically, most patients with PLE exhibit a somatosensory aura that may include painful dysesthesias, though vertigo, aphasia, disturbances of one's body image also occur, when ictal propagation occurs from the parietal lobe to the supplementary motor area, hypermotor manifestations are noted. When temporolimbic propagation occurs, complex visual or auditory hallucinations and automatisms may appear. Scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is often nonlocalizing. Ictal EEG is rarely localizing in PLE, and invasive EEG is often required for definitive localization and functional mapping. Recent advances in clinical neurophysiology during the evaluation of patients with refractory partial epilepsy include Ictal magnetic source imaging (MSI). Combined EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) may be useful for patients with PLE to refine the localization in patients undergoing a presurgical evaluation. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are more concentrated inside the seizure onset zone (SOZ), indicating that they may be used as interictal scalp EEG biomarker for the SOZ. When medical therapy fails, resective epilepsy surgery can result in seizure freedom or significant reduction especially when a lesion is present.

  18. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed

  19. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of

  20. EFFICACY OF ACTIVATION PROCEDURES TO ILLUSTRATE EEG CHANGES IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimpy Bhuyan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND EEG or Electroencephalogram, which is the most important diagnostic procedure to evaluate Epilepsy patients, may sometimes fall short of accurate sensitivity and may require few Activation Procedures such as ‘Hyperventilation’ and ‘Sleep’ to bring out the active changes of an Epileptic brain. The present study was done with the aim of knowing the efficacy of such Activation Procedures like ‘Hyperventilation’ and ‘Sleep’ in illustrating the EEG wave pattern changes of an Epileptic brain during the interictal period. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was done in the Department of Physiology in association with the Department of Neurology, Assam Medical College & Hospital, Dibrugarh, Assam from June 2014 to May 2015. ‘113’ clinically diagnosed cases of Epilepsy were studied and analysed through Electroencephalogram using the internationally accepted 10-20 electrode placement method. Hyperventilation was used in 28 Epilepsy cases and Sleep was used in 14 Epilepsy cases. History & Physical examination findings were recorded in a Proforma. Chi-square analysis was done through GraphPad Prism 6 software to assess the significance of the activation procedures used. RESULTS Our study found that EEG of 42 cases out of the total 113 cases required Activation Procedures to elicit the wave pattern changes of the Epileptic brain. Hyperventilation was helpful in adult age group and sleep was useful in children age group. Hyperventilation had overall 53.57% sensitivity in detecting Epilepsy, and Sleep had 64.29% sensitivity in detecting Epilepsy. Hyperventilation was specifically helpful to elicit absence seizures where it had 75% sensitivity. CONCLUSION The sensitivity of EEG in detecting Epilepsy can thus be increased by using activation procedures like sleep & Hyperventilation to ensure that no epilepsy cases are missed out in diagnosis & treatment.

  1. Intelligence quotient is associated with epilepsy in children with intellectual disability in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Lakhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a disorder that is commonly found in people with intellectual disability (ID. The prevalence of epilepsy increases with the severity of ID. The objective of this study was to determine if there is an association between intelligence quotient (IQ and epilepsy in children with ID. Materials and Methods: A total of 262 children, aged 3-18 years, with ID were identified as part of a community-based rehabilitation project. These children were examined for epilepsy and diagnosed by a psychiatrist and physicians based on results of electroencephalogram tests. A Spearman′s correlation (ρ was used to determine if there was an association between IQ scores and the occurrence of epilepsy. X2 statistics used to examine the relationship of epilepsy with gender, socioeconomic status, population type, severity of ID, family history of mental illness, mental retardation, epilepsy, and coexisting disorder. Results: Spearman′s rho -0.605 demonstrates inverse association of IQ with epilepsy. X 2 demonstrates statistically significant association (P < 0.05 with gender, severity of ID, cerebral palsy, behavior problems, and family history of mental illness, mental retardation, and epilepsy. Conclusions: Lower IQ score in children with ID has association with occurrence of epilepsy. Epilepsy is also found highly associated with male gender and lower age.

  2. Infertility treatment and umbilical cord length-novel markers of childhood epilepsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Räisänen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders of childhood, affecting about 0.4-0.8% of all children up to the age of 20. METHODOLOGY: A population-based retrospective cohort study. Aim was to determine incidence and identify perinatal and reproductive risk factors of epilepsy in children born between 1989 and 2008 among women (n = 43,389 delivered in Kuopio University Hospital. Risk factors of childhood epilepsy were determined by using logistic regression analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The incidence of childhood epilepsy was 0.7% (n = 302 of 43,389. Maternal epilepsy, major congenital anomalies and use of assisted reproductive technology (ART were associated with 4.25-, 3.61-, and 1.67- fold increased incidence of childhood epilepsy. A 10 cm increase in umbilical cord length was associated with a 15% decrease in the incidence of epilepsy (adjusted OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94. However, the above reproductive factors accounted for less than 2% of total incidence, whereas maternal epilepsy proved to be the highest risk factor. CONCLUSIONS: Perinatal and reproductive factors were shown to be minor risk factors of childhood epilepsy, implying that little can be done in obstetric care to prevent childhood epilepsy. Infertility treatment and umbilical cord length, independent of gestational age and congenital malformations, may be novel markers of childhood epilepsy.

  3. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.

    2016-01-01

    of a wide spectrum of epilepsies with age of onset spanning from the neonatal period to adulthood. A gene panel targeting 46 epilepsy genes was used on a cohort of 216 patients consecutively referred for panel testing. The patients had a range of different epilepsies from benign neonatal seizures...... to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease...

  4. The Epilepsy Foundation's 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Schachter, Steven C; Sirven, Joseph; Porter, Roger

    2015-05-01

    On June 5 and 6, 2014, the Epilepsy Foundation held its 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference, an initiative of the Epilepsy Therapy Project, which showcased the most promising epilepsy innovations from health-care companies and academic laboratories dedicated to pioneering and advancing drugs, biologics, technologies, devices, and diagnostics for epilepsy. Speakers and attendees included emerging biotech and medical technology companies, major pharmaceutical and device companies, as well as investigators and innovators at the cutting-edge of epilepsy. The program included panel discussions on collaboration between small and large companies, how to get products in need of funding to the marketplace, who is currently funding epilepsy and CNS innovation, and how the NIH facilitates early-stage drug development. Finally, the conference featured the third annual "Shark Tank" competition. The presentations are summarized in this paper, which is followed by a compilation of the meeting poster abstracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H;

    1988-01-01

    served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and......, to a lesser extent, compared with the psoriasis group. Areas of ego functioning most affected were "reality testing", "cognitive functioning", "integrative functioning" and "regulation and control of drives". Patients with more than one type of seizure were the most affected, as were patients who were younger...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  6. Cannabinoids and Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Evan C; Tsien, Richard W; Whalley, Benjamin J; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for centuries to treat seizures. Recent anecdotal reports, accumulating animal model data, and mechanistic insights have raised interest in cannabis-based antiepileptic therapies. In this study, we review current understanding of the endocannabinoid system, characterize the pro- and anticonvulsive effects of cannabinoids [e.g., Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (CBD)], and highlight scientific evidence from pre-clinical and clinical trials of cannabinoids in epilepsy. These studies suggest that CBD avoids the psychoactive effects of the endocannabinoid system to provide a well-tolerated, promising therapeutic for the treatment of seizures, while whole-plant cannabis can both contribute to and reduce seizures. Finally, we discuss results from a new multicenter, open-label study using CBD in a population with treatment-resistant epilepsy. In all, we seek to evaluate our current understanding of cannabinoids in epilepsy and guide future basic science and clinical studies.

  7. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and......, to a lesser extent, compared with the psoriasis group. Areas of ego functioning most affected were "reality testing", "cognitive functioning", "integrative functioning" and "regulation and control of drives". Patients with more than one type of seizure were the most affected, as were patients who were younger...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  8. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  9. Knowledge, attitude and practice towards epilepsy among secondary school students in Enugu, southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeala-Adikaibe, B A; Achor, J U; Onwukwe, Jojo; Ekenze, O S; Onwuekwe, I O; Chukwu, O; Onyia, H; Ihekwaba, M; Obu, C

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitude of secondary school students to epilepsy and its treatment that could pose as barriers in the treatment and care of epilepsy patients within the community. This study was cross-sectional and descriptive in design using a self administered custom designed multiple choice questionnaire with sections on general information on epilepsy, awareness and perception of epilepsy, treatment of epilepsy/seizures and attitude towards people living with epilepsy. Out of 969 questionnaires analyzed, the majority of the students (87.6%) had heard of epilepsy as a disease. The commonest sources of information were the electronic media (36.4%) and family members (25.6%). More than half (59.4%) had witnessed a convulsion in the past and 8.9% had a family member with epilepsy. Jerking (50.6%) and loss of consciousness (47.4%) were identified as the commonest manifestations of epilepsy. Epilepsy was considered a psychiatric disorder by 51.9% and as an infectious disease by 40.6%. About 39.3% considered epilepsy to be due to spiritual causes, old age or poisoning/bad blood. A total of 63.1% regarded orthodox medicine and prayers as the best means to treat epilepsy, while 6.8% chose herbal remedies. Concerning first aid treatment, 50.6% agreed that an object should be inserted into the mouth, while 49.5% would call for medical help and 28.8% would remove the person from harm. On attitude, 64.9% would not keep a friend with epilepsy, 69.1% would not play with someone with epilepsy, 84.2% would not marry someone with epilepsy. 41.1% of the students said that people with epilepsy should neither marry while 42.2% say they should not have children. Only 39.1.5% had an overall positive attitude towards people living with epilepsy. There is a persisting poor knowledge, attitude and practice of epilepsy among secondary school students in SE Nigeria. Efforts should be made to include basic facts about disorders with social

  10. Adenosinergic signaling in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boison, Detlev

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of at least 20 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) into clinical practice over the past decades, about one third of all epilepsies remain refractory to conventional forms of treatment. In addition, currently used AEDs have been developed to suppress neuronal hyperexcitability, but not necessarily to address pathogenic mechanisms involved in epilepsy development or progression (epileptogenesis). For those reasons endogenous seizure control mechanisms of the brain may provide alternative therapeutic opportunities. Adenosine is a well characterized endogenous anticonvulsant and seizure terminator of the brain. Several lines of evidence suggest that endogenous adenosine-mediated seizure control mechanisms fail in chronic epilepsy, whereas therapeutic adenosine augmentation effectively prevents epileptic seizures, even those that are refractory to conventional AEDs. New findings demonstrate that dysregulation of adenosinergic mechanisms are intricately involved in the development of epilepsy and its comorbidities, whereas adenosine-associated epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in epileptogenesis. The first goal of this review is to discuss how maladaptive changes of adenosinergic mechanisms contribute to the expression of seizures (ictogenesis) and the development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis) by focusing on pharmacological (adenosine receptor dependent) and biochemical (adenosine receptor independent) mechanisms as well as on enzymatic and transport based mechanisms that control the availability (homeostasis) of adenosine. The second goal of this review is to highlight innovative adenosine-based opportunities for therapeutic intervention aimed at reconstructing normal adenosine function and signaling for improved seizure control in chronic epilepsy. New findings suggest that transient adenosine augmentation can have lasting epigenetic effects with disease modifying and antiepileptogenic outcome. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled

  11. Comorbidity of tics and epilepsy in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Ermolenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tics are the most common forms of hyperkinesis among children and adolescents, the etiology of which is not fully clear. A study has shown a high comorbidity of tic disorders and epilepsy, as evidenced by video-EEG monitoring. In patients with tics even in the absence of epileptic seizures, epileptiform activity is an adverse predictor and a determinant of the potential risk of comorbid epilepsy especially during neuroleptic therapy. Antiepileptic drugs are the drugs of choice to treat this category of patients.

  12. Epilepsy in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J J; McArdle, N S; Wilson, M H; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition characterised by seizure activity. It has an approximate incidence of 1%. General dental practitioners will encounter these patients in practice. This article discusses the types of epilepsy, the medical management and considerations in dental management of epileptic patients. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence, with respect to prescribing of medications. The management of an epileptic seizure is discussed. Status epilepticus is a rare but serious complication of epileptic seizures. An easy-to-follow algorithm is provided to assist the practitioner in managing seizures.

  13. Epilepsy and bathtub drowning. Important neuropathological observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, A; Ang, L C

    1993-06-01

    Drowning is a well-recognized cause of death in persons with epilepsy. Investigation of bathtub drowning is often not straightforward. We report three cases of bathtub water drowning of patients with neuropathological bases for seizures. The importance of neuropathological examination is discussed. A high index of suspicion is required for all cases of bathtub-related death, even in the absence of history of previous seizure disorders. Neuropathological examination must be performed to look for anatomical lesions associated with seizures. Identification of these findings could be very helpful in ruling out homicide or suicide as the cause of death in bathtub drownings.

  14. The influence of managers' and colleagues' absence on public employee absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ann-Kristina Løkke; Jensen, Morten Berg

    2015-01-01

    public sector employees (De Paola, 2010). Research on the effect of managers’ own absence on their employees’ absence is scarce (Kristensen et al., 2006, Løkke, 2008) and so is the effect of colleagues’ absence in a large scale (Bradley et al., 2007, Dale-Olsen et al., 2010, Hesselius et al., 2009......). To date, research on the simultaneous effect of managers’ and colleagues’ absence behavior does not exist. The most acknowledged literature on absence (e.g., Steers and Rhodes, 1978) concludes that absence is influenced by many determinants; this makes it relevant to control for gender, age etc. Aim......: The aim of this study is to identify the effect of managers’ and colleagues’ absence on employee absence in the public sector. Method: We use register data from a large Danish municipality including 8000 employees. We use multilevel analysis to explain the number of periods of absence due to sickness...

  15. Developmental and epilepsy outcomes at age 4 years in the UKISS trial comparing hormonal treatments to vigabatrin for infantile spasms: a multi-centre randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darke, Katrina; Edwards, Stuart W; Hancock, Eleanor; Johnson, Anthony L; Kennedy, Colin R; Lux, Andrew L; Newton, Richard W; O'Callaghan, Finbar J K; Verity, Christopher M; Osborne, John P

    2010-05-01

    Infantile spasms is the name given to a difficult to treat, severe infantile epilepsy with high morbidity. The United Kingdom Infantile Spasms Study (UKISS) showed that absence of spasms on days 13 and 14 after randomisation was more common in infants allocated hormonal treatments than vigabatrin. At 12-14 months, those with no identified aetiology allocated hormonal treatment had better development. However, epilepsy outcome was not affected by treatment allocated. It is not known if the difference in development persists as the infants grow. Infants in UKISS were followed up blind to treatment allocation by telephone at a mean age of 4 years using the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) and an epilepsy questionnaire. 9 of 107 enrolled infants had died. 77 were traced and consented to take part. The median (quartile) VABS scores were 60 (42, 97) for the 39 allocated hormonal treatment and 50 (36, 67) for the 38 allocated vigabatrin (Mann-Whitney U=575; p=0.091; median difference (95% CI): 8 (-1 to 19)). For those with no identified aetiology, VABS scores were 96 (52, 102) for the 21 allocated hormonal treatment and 63 (37, 92) for the 16 allocated vigabatrin (U=98.5; p=0.033; median difference (95% CI): 14 (1 to 42)).The proportions in each treatment group with epilepsy were similar. For all 77 infants, development and epilepsy outcomes were not significantly different between the two treatment groups. The better development seen at 14 months in those with no identified aetiology allocated hormonal treatment was seen again at 4 years in this study.

  16. Screening LGI1 in a cohort of 26 lateral temporal lobe epilepsy patients with auditory aura from Turkey detects a novel de novo mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesim, Yesim F; Uzun, Gunes Altiokka; Yucesan, Emrah; Tuncer, Feyza N; Ozdemir, Ozkan; Bebek, Nerses; Ozbek, Ugur; Iseri, Sibel A Ugur; Baykan, Betul

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE) is an autosomal dominant epileptic syndrome characterized by focal seizures with auditory or aphasic symptoms. The same phenotype is also observed in a sporadic form of lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE), namely idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF). Heterozygous mutations in LGI1 account for up to 50% of ADLTE families and only rarely observed in IPEAF cases. In this study, we analysed a cohort of 26 individuals with LTLE diagnosed according to the following criteria: focal epilepsy with auditory aura and absence of cerebral lesions on brain MRI. All patients underwent clinical, neuroradiological and electroencephalography examinations and afterwards they were screened for mutations in LGI1 gene. The single LGI1 mutation identified in this study is a novel missense variant (NM_005097.2: c.1013T>C; p.Phe338Ser) observed de novo in a sporadic patient. This is the first study involving clinical analysis of a LTLE cohort from Turkey and genetic contribution of LGI1 to ADLTE phenotype. Identification of rare LGI1 gene mutations in sporadic cases supports diagnosis as ADTLE and draws attention to potential familial clustering of ADTLE in suggestive generations, which is especially important for genetic counselling.

  17. From the editors: Epilepsia's 2014 Operational Definition of Epilepsy survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Gary W; Beninsig, Laurie; Nehlig, Astrid

    2014-11-01

    From March 19 to June 30, 2014, Epilepsia conducted an open access online survey asking directed questions related to the 2014 Operational Definition of Epilepsy. This study reports the findings of that poll. The survey consisted of seven questions. Three questions addressed: (1) Criteria for when a person could be considered to have epilepsy after a single seizure; (2) if individuals with reflex seizures (unprovoked) have epilepsy; and (3) when epilepsy could be considered "resolved." Four added questions asked if responders were medical personal compared with patients and family members, geographic region of residence based on International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) regions, and if responders had read the paper and if they were ILAE/International Bureau for Epilepsy (IBE) members. Of 476 that started the survey, 324 (68%) completed it. As recommended in the ILAE report, 43% agreed that if the chance of a second seizure after a first one was 61-90%, then a person could be considered to have epilepsy. More medical professionals agreed with the 61-90% criteria (55%) compared with patients (21%), while more patients indicated that epilepsy should only be defined after two unprovoked seizures (51%) compared with medical professionals (21%; p < 0.0001). The majority indicated that reflex seizures qualify a person as having epilepsy (79%). As recommended in the ILAE report, 51% agreed that the definition of a person with "resolved" epilepsy would be 10 years seizure-free and off medication for the last 5 years. More medical professionals agreed with this definition (59%) compared with patients (37%), while more patients indicated that epilepsy is never resolved (32%) compared with medical professionals (7%; p < 0.0001). There were no differences based on geographic residence. This survey found that the ILAE recommendations had the highest responses. However, there was clear disagreement with identified differences comparing medical personal with patients

  18. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed.

  19. Epilepsy, behavior, and art (Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind, part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rektor, Ivan; Schachter, Steven C; Arzy, Shahar; Baloyannis, Stavros J; Bazil, Carl; Brázdil, Milan; Engel, Jerome; Helmstaedter, Gerhard; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Kesner, Ladislav; Komárek, Vladimír; Krämer, Günter; Leppik, Ilo E; Mann, Michael W; Mula, Marco; Risse, Gail L; Stoker, Guy W; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; Trimble, Michael; Tyrliková, Ivana; Korczyn, Amos D

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Brain diseases, structural and/or functional, underlie the appearance of epilepsy, but the notion of epilepsy is larger and cannot be reduced exclusively to the brain. We can therefore look at epilepsy from two angles. The first perspective is intrinsic: the etiology and pathophysiology, problems of therapy, impact on the brain networks, and the "mind" aspects of brain functions - cognitive, emotional, and affective. The second perspective is extrinsic: the social interactions of the person with epilepsy, the influence of the surrounding environment, and the influences of epilepsy on society. All these aspects reaching far beyond the pure biological nature of epilepsy have been the topics of two International Congresses of Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind that were held in Prague, Czech Republic, in 2010 and 2012 (the third Congress will be held in Brno, Czech Republic on April 3-5, 2014; www.epilepsy-brain-mind2014.eu). Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the 2012 Congress that focused on epilepsy, behavior, and art.

  20. Absence seizures with myoclonic features in a juvenile Chihuahua dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Roberto; Ochi, Ayako; Cortez, Miguel A

    2010-06-01

    Long-term video-EEG was recorded for an eight-month-old Chihuahua dog with recurrent episodes of altered behaviour associated with head and nose twitching. Each episode lasted one to two seconds, multiple times per day before treatment. Ictal EEG showed generalised bilaterally synchronous 4 Hz spike-and-wave complexes during the "absence-like" event, along with rhythmically correlated head and nose twitching. We present video documentation of such attacks and discuss their similarities to human epilepsy with myoclonic absences.

  1. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging......Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials...... sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification...

  2. Importance of genetic factors in the occurrence of epilepsy syndrome type: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corey, Linda A; Pellock, John M; Kjeldsen, Marianne J

    2011-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence that genetic factors contribute to risk for epilepsy, their role in the determination of syndrome type is less clear. This study was undertaken to address this question. Information related to epilepsy was obtained from twins included in 455 monozygotic and 868...... dizygotic pairs ascertained from population-based twin registries in Denmark, Norway and the United States. Syndrome type was determined based on medical record information and detailed clinical interviews and classified using the International Classification Systems for the Epilepsies and Epileptic...... Syndromes. Concordance rates were significantly increased in monozygotic versus dizygotic pairs for all major syndrome groups except localization-related cryptogenic epilepsy. Among generalized epilepsies, genetic factors were found to play an important role in the determination of childhood absence...

  3. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  4. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...

  5. 20.5.Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920184 Clinical analysis of 25 cases ofchronic alcoholic intoxication with epilepsy.PANG Zhixing (庞治兴),et al.Dept Psychol,1stTeaching Hosp.Norman Bethune Med Univ,130021 Chin J Nerv & Ment Dis 1991; 17 (5):289-291.The clinical manifestations of 25 cases (male)

  6. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects...

  7. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L;

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects ...

  8. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; Putten, van M.J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative t

  9. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  10. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Semiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. G. Blair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE. Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  11. Epilepsy and Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A large consanguinous family from Saudi Arabia with 4 affected children presenting with an autosomal recessive ataxia, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation is reported from the Institut de Genetique, Universite Louis Pasteur, Illkirch, France; Division of Pediatric Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and other centers.

  12. Epilepsy and Pregnancy: For healthy pregnancies and happy outcomes. Suggestions for service improvements from the Multispecialty UK Epilepsy Mortality Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, J P; Smith, P E; Craig, J; Bagary, M; Cavanagh, D; Duncan, S; Kelso, A R C; Marson, A G; McCorry, D; Nashef, L; Nelson-Piercy, C; Northridge, R; Sieradzan, K; Thangaratinam, S; Walker, M; Winterbottom, J; Reuber, M

    2017-08-01

    Between 2009 and 2012 there were 26 epilepsy-related deaths in the UK of women who were pregnant or in the first post-partum year. The number of pregnancy-related deaths in women with epilepsy (WWE) has been increasing. Expert assessment suggests that most epilepsy-related deaths in pregnancy were preventable and attributable to poor seizure control. While prevention of seizures during pregnancy is important, a balance must be struck between seizure control and the teratogenic potential of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). A range of professional guidance on the management of epilepsy in pregnancy has previously been issued, but little attention has been paid to how optimal care can be delivered to WWE by a range of healthcare professionals. We summarise the findings of a multidisciplinary meeting with representation from a wide group of professional bodies. This focussed on the implementation of optimal pregnancy epilepsy care aiming to reduce mortality of epilepsy in mothers and reduce morbidity in babies exposed to AEDs in utero. We identify in particular -What stage to intervene - Golden Moments of opportunities for improving outcomes -Which Key Groups have a role in making change -When - 2020 vision of what these improvements aim to achieve. -How to monitor the success in this field We believe that the service improvement ideas developed for the UK may provide a template for similar initiatives in other countries. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigational new drugs for focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco

    2016-01-01

    For more than 30 years, antiepileptic drug development has been based on specific assumptions regarding the neurobiology of epilepsy but all marketed drugs have not changed the proportion of drug refractory patients. It is, therefore, evident that new molecular targets need to be identified. Advances in neurobiology and molecular pharmacology are bringing into the epilepsy field new neurochemical functions such as those modulated by cannabinoid, serotonin, melatonin and galanin receptors. Among all the different compounds, the melatonin type 3 receptor agonist beprodone and cannabidiol are those at the more advanced stage of development. Interestingly, despite the structural analogies with tetrahydrocannabinol, the anticonvulsant activity of cannabidiol is not mediated by an interaction with cannabinoid receptors. Neurosteroids represent another remarkable class of drugs, and among them, ganaxolone is at the most advanced stage of development. Furthermore, for the first time, potential disease-modifying agents and techniques are entering the epilepsy market. Rapalogues such as everolimus and the antibiotic minocycline are currently under development for specific epileptic syndromes like tuberous sclerosis or Angelman syndrome. Finally, optogenetics, though still at an early stage of development, represents a futuristic therapeutic strategy for drug-refractory epilepsy.

  14. Non-invasive Evaluation for Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    IWASAKI, Masaki; JIN, Kazutaka; NAKASATO, Nobukazu; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is aimed to remove the brain tissues that are indispensable for generating patient’s epileptic seizures. There are two purposes in the pre-operative evaluation: localization of the epileptogenic zone and localization of function. Surgery is planned to remove possible epileptogenic zone while preserving functional area. Since no single diagnostic modality is superior to others in identifying and localizing the epileptogenic zone, multiple non-invasive evaluations are performed to estimate the location of the epileptogenic zone after concordance between evaluations. Essential components of non-invasive pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy include detailed clinical history, long-term video-electroencephalography monitoring, epilepsy-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neuropsychological testing. However, a significant portion of drug-resistant epilepsy is associated with no or subtle MRI lesions or with ambiguous electro-clinical signs. Additional evaluations including fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetoencephalography and ictal single photon emission computed tomography can play critical roles in planning surgery. FDG-PET should be registered on three-dimensional MRI for better detection of focal cortical dysplasia. All diagnostic tools are complementary to each other in defining the epileptogenic zone, so that it is always important to reassess the data based on other results to pick up or confirm subtle abnormalities. PMID:27627857

  15. Catamenial epilepsy: definition, prevalence pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Andrew G

    2008-03-01

    Seizures do not occur randomly. They tend to cluster in the majority of men and women with epilepsy. Seizure clusters, in turn, often show a periodicity. When the periodicity of seizure exacerbation aligns itself with that of the menstrual cycle, it is designated as catamenial epilepsy. The neuroactive properties of reproductive steroids and the cyclic variation in their serum concentrations are important pathophysiologic factors. Recent investigations have demonstrated and confirmed the existence of at least three patterns of catamenial seizure exacerbation: perimenstrual and periovulatory in ovulatory cycles and entire luteal phase in anovulatory cycles. A rational mathematical basis for the categorization of seizure exacerbation as catamenial epilepsy has been developed. It identifies approximately one third of women as having catamenial epilepsy. If seizures show hormonal sensitivity in their occurrence, they may also respond to hormonal treatment. Successful open label trials using cyclic natural progesterone supplement, depomedroxyprogesterone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues in women and using testosterone with or without aromatase inhibitor in men have been reported. Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind investigations are warranted and under way.

  16. Mutation screen of GABRA1, GABRB2 and GABRG2 genes in Japanese patients with absence seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Minako; Ohmori, Iori; Nakahori, Tomoyuki; Ouchida, Mamoru; Ohtsuka, Yoko

    2005-08-05

    Absence seizures are classified into typical and atypical absences according to clinical and EEG characteristics. Although missense mutations in the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunits (GABRG2) gene have recently been detected in two families with typical absence seizures, no study has been carried out to clarify the relationship between atypical absence and GABA(A) receptors. We performed mutation analysis of all the coding exons of GABA(A) receptor alpha1, beta2 and gamma2 subunit (GABRA1, GABRB2 and GABRG2) genes by direct sequencing to clarify whether there was common molecular biological mechanism underlying both typical and atypical absences. We recruited 52 unrelated Japanese patients, thirty-eight with typical absences and 14 with atypical absences. They consisted of 38 with childhood absence epilepsy, three with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, two with epilepsy with myoclonic-astatic seizures and nine with epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow wave sleep. All of the subjects were idiopathic or cryptogenic cases without any organic brain lesions or underlying diseases. We detected five polymorphisms (T156C in GABRA1, C1194T in GABRB2, and C315T, T588C and C1230T in GABRG2), and they are silent mutations. In conclusion, mutations in GABRA1, GABRB2 and GABRG2 do not seem to be a major genetic cause of epilepsy with typical and atypical absences in Japanese subjects.

  17. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  18. Therapeutic effects of cannabinoids in animal models of seizures, epilepsy, epileptogenesis, and epilepsy-related neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Evan C; Patra, Pabitra H; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2017-05-01

    cannabinoids, most notably cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabidavarin (CBDV), in models of seizures, epilepsy, epileptogenesis, and neuroprotection are less ambiguous, and consistent with reports of therapeutically beneficial effects of these compounds in clinical studies. However, continued paucity of firm information regarding the therapeutic molecular mechanism of CBD/CBDV highlights the continued need for research in this area in order to identify as yet under-exploited targets for drug development and raise our understanding of treatment-resistant epilepsies. The recent reporting of positive results for cannabidiol treatment in two Phase III clinical trials in treatment-resistant epilepsies provides pivotal evidence of clinical efficacy for one plant cannabinoid in epilepsy. Moreover, risks and/or benefits associated with the use of unlicensed Δ(9)-THC containing marijuana extracts in pediatric epilepsies remain poorly understood. Therefore, in light of these paradigm-changing clinical events, the present review's findings aim to drive future drug development for newly-identified targets and indications, identify important limitations of animal models in the investigation of plant cannabinoid effects in the epilepsies, and focuses future research in this area on specific, unanswered questions regarding the complexities of endocannabinoid signaling in epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue titled Cannabinoids and Epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism and Therapy for the Shared Susceptibility to Migraine and Epilepsy after Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    headache, post-traumatic epilepsy, migraine, epilepsy. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...the stage for epilepsy or chronic migraine Major Task 1. Acute/subacute experiments after controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI (Brennan, Dudek...mice9 to compare with our wild type animals. A mutation in CK1d was identified in two families having sleep phase syndrome and typical migraine with

  20. Health habits, attitudes and behavior towards oral health of children with epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Svetlana; Gajić Ivanka

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Children suffering from epilepsy are high at risk of oral diseases primarily due to their underlying medical condition which can have an impact on the maintenance level of oral hygiene, but also due to adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs. Objective. The aim of this paper was to identify habits, attitudes and behavior of children with epilepsy and parents in respect to oral health. Method. The experimental group consisted of 50 children with epilepsy, 24 boys and 26 girls, 7-1...

  1. Mapping preictal networks preceding childhood absence seizures using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs-Brichford, Eliza; Horn, Paul S; Tenney, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    The electrographic hallmark of childhood absence seizures is 3 Hz generalized spike and wave discharges; however, there is likely a focal thalamic or cortical onset that cannot be detected using scalp electroencephalography (EEG). The purpose of this study was to study the earliest preictal changes in children with absence epilepsy. In this report, magnetoencephalography recordings of 44 absence seizures recorded from 12 children with drug-naïve childhood absence seizures were used to perform time frequency analysis and source localization prior to the onset of the seizures. Evidence of preictal magnetoencephalography frequency changes were detected a mean of 694 ms before the initial spike on the EEG. A consistent pattern of focal sources was present in the frontal cortex and thalamus during this preictal period, but source localization occurred synchronously so that independent activity between the 2 structures could not be distinguished.

  2. A study of idiopathic generalised epilepsy in an Irish population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullins, G M

    2012-02-03

    Idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) is subdivided into syndromes based on clinical and EEG features. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to characterise all cases of IGE with supportive EEG abnormalities in terms of gender differences, seizure types reported, IGE syndromes, family history of epilepsy and EEG findings. We also calculated the limited duration prevalence of IGE in our cohort. METHODS: Data on abnormal EEGs were collected retrospectively from two EEG databases at two tertiary referral centres for neurology. Clinical information was obtained from EEG request forms, standardised EEG questionnaires and medical notes of patients. RESULTS: two hundred twenty-three patients met our inclusion criteria, 89 (39.9%) male and 134 (60.1%) females. Tonic clonic seizures were the most common seizure type reported, 162 (72.65%) having a generalised tonic clonic seizure (GTCS) at some time. IGE with GTCS only (EGTCSA) was the most common syndrome in our cohort being present in 94 patients (34 male, 60 female), with 42 (15 male, 27 female) patients diagnosed with Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), 23 (9 male, 14 female) with Juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) and 20 (9 male, 11 female) with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). EEG studies in all patients showed generalised epileptiform activity. CONCLUSIONS: More women than men were diagnosed with generalised epilepsy. Tonic clonic seizures were the most common seizure type reported. EGTCSA was the most frequent syndrome seen. Gender differences were evident for JAE and JME as previously reported and for EGTCSA, which was not reported to date, and reached statistical significance for EGTCA and JME.

  3. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000222.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures ( ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning in ...

  6. Future directions in the neuropsychology of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Carrie R; Taylor, Joanne; Hamberger, Marla; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Hermann, Bruce P; Schefft, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    Two important themes for future clinical research in the neuropsychology of epilepsy are proposed: (1) the neurobiological abnormalities that underlie neuropsychological impairment in people with epilepsy, and (2) neuropsychological status of persons with new-onset epilepsy.

  7. Developing clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy: A report from the ILAE Epilepsy Guidelines Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Khara M; Wiebe, Samuel; Perucca, Emilio; French, Jacqueline; Dunkley, Colin; de Marinis, Alejandro; Kirkpatrick, Martin; Jetté, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) contain evidence-based recommendations to guide clinical care, policy development, and quality of care improvement. A recent systematic review of epilepsy guidelines identified considerable variability in the quality of available guidelines. Although excellent frameworks for CPG development exist, processes are not followed uniformly internationally, and resources to develop CPGs may be limited in certain settings. An International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) working group was charged with proposing methodology to guide the development of future epilepsy-specific CPGs. A comprehensive literature search (1985-2014) identified articles related to CPG development and handbooks. Guideline handbooks were included if they were publicly available, and if their methodology had been used to develop CPGs. The working group's expertise also informed the creation of methodologies and processes to develop future CPGs for the ILAE. Five handbooks from North America (American Academy of Neurology), Europe (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network & National Institute for Health and Care Excellence), Australia (National Health and Medical Research Council), World Health Organization (WHO), and additional references were identified to produce evidence-based, consensus-driven methodology for development of epilepsy-specific CPGs. Key components of CPG development include the following: identifying the topic and defining the scope; establishing a working group; identifying and evaluating the evidence; formulating recommendations and determining strength of recommendations; obtaining peer reviews; dissemination, implementation, and auditing; and updating and retiring the CPG. A practical handbook and toolkit was developed. The resulting CPG development toolkit should facilitate the development of high-quality ILAE CPGs to improve the care of persons with epilepsy.

  8. Critical determinants of the epilepsy treatment gap: a cross-national analysis in resource-limited settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ana-Claire L.; Dua, Tarun; Boscardin, John; Escarce, José J.; Saxena, Shekhar; Birbeck, Gretchen L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological disorders worldwide. Our objective was to determine which economic, healthcare, neurology and epilepsy specific resources were associated with untreated epilepsy in resource-constrained settings. Methods A systematic review of the literature identified community-based studies in resource-constrained settings that calculated the epilepsy treatment gap, the proportion with untreated epilepsy, from prevalent active epilepsy cases. Economic, healthcare, neurology and epilepsy specific resources were taken from existing datasets. Poisson regression models with jackknifed standard errors were used to create bivariate and multivariate models comparing the association between treatment status and economic and health resource indicators. Relative risks were reported. Key Findings Forty-seven studies of 8285 individuals from 24 countries met inclusion criteria. Bivariate analysis demonstrated that individuals residing in rural locations had significantly higher risks of untreated epilepsy [Relative Risk(RR)=1.63; 95% confidence interval(CI):1.26,2.11]. Significantly lower risks of untreated epilepsy were observed for higher physician density [RR=0.65, 95% CI:0.55,0.78], presence of a lay [RR=0.74, 95%CI:0.60,0.91] or professional association for epilepsy [RR=0.73, 95%CI:0.59,0.91], or post-graduate neurology training program [RR=0.67, 95%CI:0.55, 0.82]. In multivariate models, higher physician density maintained significant effects [RR=0.67; 95%CI:0.52,0.88]. Significance Even among resource-limited regions, people with epilepsy in countries with fewer economic, healthcare, neurology and epilepsy specific resources are more likely to have untreated epilepsy. Community-based epilepsy care programs have improved access to treatment but in order to decrease the epilepsy treatment gap, poverty and inequalities of healthcare, neurological and epilepsy resources must be dealt with at the local, national, and global

  9. Dental injury during seizures associated with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R H; Higgins, S; Fuller, G N

    2009-01-01

    Patients can sustain injuries during seizures and the pattern and type of injury (eg, tongue biting) can be a useful silent witness in the diagnosis of seizures. In addition, the seizure type potentially influences the type of injury. Patients with dental injury were identified from the Gloucestershire Epilepsy Database (n = 1673). These patients' notes were reviewed and the following data collected: demographic data; seizure types and age of onset; injury; EEG; and MRI. 14 people had dental injuries: 10 incisors (seven had >1 incisor) and five other teeth. Eight had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two other primary generalised epilepsy and four focal onset epilepsy. Compared with the rest of the database population (JME; n = 81) there was a highly significant association of dental injury with JME (pseizure onset. This pattern of injury should prompt consideration of this diagnosis. It is hoped that recognition of this can both facilitate earlier diagnosis and help educate patients to protect their teeth.

  10. Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Bath, Kevin G.; Berg, Anne T.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Jensen, Frances E.; Kanner, Andres M.; O’Brien, Terence J.; Whittemore, Vicky H.; Winawer, Melodie R.; Patel, Manisha; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many symptoms of neurologic or psychiatric illness—such as cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety, attention deficits, and migraine—occur more frequently in people with epilepsy than in the general population. These diverse comorbidities present an underappreciated problem for people with epilepsy and their caregivers because they decrease quality of life, complicate treatment, and increase mortality. In fact, it has been suggested that comorbidities can have a greater effect on quality of life in people with epilepsy than the seizures themselves. There is increasing recognition of the frequency and impact of cognitive and behavioral comorbidities of epilepsy, highlighted in the 2012 Institute of Medicine report on epilepsy. Comorbidities have also been acknowledged, as a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Benchmark area for research in epilepsy. However, relatively little progress has been made in developing new therapies directed specifically at comorbidities. On the other hand, there have been many advances in understanding underlying mechanisms. These advances have made it possible to identify novel targets for therapy and prevention. As part of the International League Against Epilepsy/American Epilepsy Society workshop on preclinical therapy development for epilepsy, our working group considered the current state of understanding related to terminology, models, and strategies for therapy development for the comorbidities of epilepsy. Herein we summarize our findings and suggest ways to accelerate development of new therapies. We also consider important issues to improve research including those related to methodology, nonpharmacologic therapies, biomarkers, and infrastructure. PMID:23909853

  11. The role of cannabinoids and endocannabinoid system in the treatment of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pędracka Monika

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The treatment of epilepsy is still a major challenge. Despite the introduction of many new antiepileptic drugs, approximately 30% of patients still remain drug resistant. In the absence of a satisfactory therapy outcome, which is sometimes associated with numerous side effects, there is a need for new and effective drugs with low toxicity. Cannabinoids have been shown in preliminary animal model studies and in studies of patients with epilepsy to have antiepileptic activity.

  12. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eBiagini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The perirhinal cortex – which is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memory - plays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus.

  13. Epilepsy beyond seizures: a review of the impact of epilepsy and its comorbidities on health-related quality of life in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Volk, Holger A

    2015-09-26

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological conditions in the dog, estimated to affect 0.6 to 0.75 per cent of dogs. Owners of dogs with epilepsy have previously indicated that their dog's quality of life (QoL) is of greatest importance to them above seizure frequency; however, much of the research into canine epilepsy to date has focussed on seizure frequency, and how to reduce it via antiepileptic drug treatment. In people, the impact of epilepsy upon QoL has been widely studied, exploring not only its impact on physical health, but also the psychological health and cognitive capabilities of affected individuals. This paper reviews the existing literature on canine epilepsy, identifies potential threats to QoL, and draws parallels from human epilepsy research. We suggest that canine epilepsy poses threats to both quality and quantity of life, with treatment interventions posing a fine balance of potential benefits and harms to the patient. At present, little is known about the neurobehavioural, emotional and cognitive effects of epilepsy upon affected dogs. Further studies are needed to establish the extent to which unknown QoL-inhibiting comorbidities exist in the dog, in order to avoid their undertreatment, and to objectively quantify the effects of epilepsy on canine QoL.

  14. Natural History of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Antecedents and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Garima; Prasad, Asuri N.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy represents the largest group of patients with treatment resistant/medically intractable epilepsy undergoing epilepsy surgery. The underpinnings of common forms of TLE in many instances begin in early life with the occurrence of an initial precipitating event. The first epileptic seizure often occurs after a variable latency period following this event. The precise natural history and progression following the first seizure to the development of TLE, its subsequent resolution through spontaneous remission or the development of treatment resistant epilepsy remain poorly understood. Our present understanding of the role played by these initial events, the subsequent latency to development of temporal lobe epilepsy, and the emergence of treatment resistance remains incomplete. A critical analysis of published data suggest that TLE is a heterogeneous condition, where the age of onset, presence or absence of a lesion on neuroimaging, the initial precipitating event, association with febrile seizures, febrile status epilepticus, and neurotropic viral infections influence the natural history and outcome. The pathways and processes through which these variables coalesce into a framework will provide the basis for an understanding of the natural history of TLE. The questions raised need to be addressed in future prospective and longitudinal observational studies. PMID:22937237

  15. Natural History of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Antecedents and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Shukla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy represents the largest group of patients with treatment resistant/medically intractable epilepsy undergoing epilepsy surgery. The underpinnings of common forms of TLE in many instances begin in early life with the occurrence of an initial precipitating event. The first epileptic seizure often occurs after a variable latency period following this event. The precise natural history and progression following the first seizure to the development of TLE, its subsequent resolution through spontaneous remission or the development of treatment resistant epilepsy remain poorly understood. Our present understanding of the role played by these initial events, the subsequent latency to development of temporal lobe epilepsy, and the emergence of treatment resistance remains incomplete. A critical analysis of published data suggest that TLE is a heterogeneous condition, where the age of onset, presence or absence of a lesion on neuroimaging, the initial precipitating event, association with febrile seizures, febrile status epilepticus, and neurotropic viral infections influence the natural history and outcome. The pathways and processes through which these variables coalesce into a framework will provide the basis for an understanding of the natural history of TLE. The questions raised need to be addressed in future prospective and longitudinal observational studies.

  16. Mutations affecting GABAergic signaling in seizures and epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2010-01-01

    The causes of epilepsies and epileptic seizures are multifactorial. Genetic predisposition may contribute in certain types of epilepsies and seizures, whether idiopathic or symptomatic of genetic origin. Although these are not very common, they have offered a unique opportunity to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. Among the implicated gene mutations, a number of GABAA receptor subunit mutations have been recently identified that contribute to several idiopathic epilepsies, febrile seizures, and rarely to certain types of symptomatic epilepsies, like the severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy. Deletion of GABAA receptor genes has also been linked to Angelman syndrome. Furthermore, mutations of proteins controlling chloride homeostasis, which indirectly defines the functional consequences of GABAA signaling, have been identified. These include the chloride channel 2 (CLCN2) and the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC3. The pathogenic role of CLCN2 mutations has not been clearly demonstrated and may represent either susceptibility genes or, in certain cases, innocuous polymorphisms. KCC3 mutations have been associated with hereditary motor and sensory polyneuropathy with corpus callosum agenesis (Andermann syndrome) that often manifests with epileptic seizures. This review summarizes the recent progress in the genetic linkages of epilepsies and seizures to the above genes and discusses potential pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to the age, sex, and conditional expression of these seizures in carriers of these mutations. PMID:20352446

  17. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  18. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination.

  19. Absences of Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Benammar

    1994-01-01

    Humans always search for a sense of community, in order to transcent their individuality and project themselves as part of a group. This human craving is actually a desire for an absence of community; an "empty place to bury our ineradicable solitude", a form of universal community which is yet to c

  20. Coping and sickness absence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhenen, W. van; Schaufeli, W.B.; Dijk, F.J.H. van; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the role of coping styles in sickness absence. In line with findings that contrast the reactive-passive focused strategies, problem-solving strategies are generally associated with positive results in terms of well-being and overall health outcomes; ou

  1. Congenital Absence of Tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Sharma, Saleem Mir, Vikrant Sharma, Irshad Dar, Rafee

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of tibia is a rare anomaly. We repol1 a case who presented at the age of 3 years withabsence of tibia right side with associated anomolies and was managed by reconstruction of the kneeand ankle joints b transfer of fibula

  2. Occult maxillofacial trauma in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, C E; Burneo, J G; Helman, J

    2001-11-15

    Epilepsy is a relatively common neurological disorder with incidence in both developed and developing countries. Head, facial, and oral injuries can result from seizures experienced by the epileptic patient. Patients with severe epilepsy often experience other dental disease due to their inability to properly maintain their oral hygiene. This paper presents a case of a chronic mandibular fracture following an episode of seizures in a patient with epilepsy in whom the fracture was discovered when he developed a fistula in the submandibular region.

  3. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  4. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  5. Epilepsy in Prader-Willi syndrome:clinical, diagnostic and treatment aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Verrotti; Claudia Soldani; Daniela Laino; Renato d'Alonzo; Salvatore Grosso

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy associated with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) represents an early and important complication, often not clearly reported and described in the literature. Consequently, there are controversial data about the clinical characteristics of epilepsy and electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities found in these patients. Data sources: Based on recent original publications, we have reviewed the different types of seizures and EEG findings in PWS patients, the response to antiepileptic treatment, and the prognosis of epilepsy. Results: The frequency of epilepsy in PWS patients ranges from 4% to 26%. The types of seizure include generalized tonic-clonic seizures, complex partial seizures, atypical absence, staring spells, and myoclonic, tonic and hemiclonic seizures, but the most frequent type is focal epilepsy. Status epilepticus has never been reported. EEG abnormalities are not typical but variable in different patients. However, generalized and focal discharges are the most frequently reported findings. There is no evidence of relationship between the course of epilepsy and frequency, morphology and spread of EEG discharges. However, epilepsy in PWS patients is usually responsive to antiepileptic monotherapy with rapid seizure control and a good outcome. Conclusions: The frequency of epilepsy is higher in PWS patients than in general populations and this complication can be a challenge for the clinicians of these patients. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the good long-term prognosis.

  6. Childhood epilepsy in Ilorin, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojuawo, A; Joiner, K T

    1997-02-01

    Ninety eight children with epilepsy attending the Neurology clinic, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital over a two year period were studied prospectively. Males were more affected than females in a ratio of 5:3. Generalised tonic-clonic seizures accounted for 62.2% of the cases, and partial seizures for 17.4%. Infantile spasms were seen exclusively in infants less than two years old and absence and generalised seizures in children more than three years of age. Skull radiography showed abnormal findings in 11.2%. Ectroencephalography showed typical findings in 43.9%. Hemiplegia was the most common neurological sequelae (30.3%). Other sequelae include hyperactivity, irrational behaviour, expressive aphasia, mental subnormality, deafness, and blindness in that order. Therapy with a single appropriate anticonvulsant was usually effective for seizure control except in some patients with focal seizures, infantile spasms, severely delayed developmental milestones and prolonged seizures. Poor drug compliance remains the major constraint to adequate seizure control, further compounded in this environment by nonavailability of drugs and unaffordable costs.

  7. Seeking care for epilepsy and its impacts on households in a rural district in southern Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alister Munthali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a disability as defined in the 2012 Disability Act of the Government of Malawi.Objectives: This article explores the health-seeking behaviour of people with epilepsy in a rural town in southern Malawi and how having a person with epilepsy impacts on the households’ productivity.Method: A snowball approach was used to identify persons with various forms of disabilities. The article is based on a bigger study carried out in Malawi which explored how persons with disabilities seek health care. In this bigger study, a total of 63 interviews were done with persons with disabilities or their guardians. Eight of the 63 interviews were with persons with epilepsy and this article is based on these interviews.Results: The study found that persons with epilepsy seek both traditional and modern medicines to treat the condition. Informants mentioned that barriers to accessing western treatment include lack of medicines, congestion at health facilities, lack of knowledge about epilepsy, misdiagnosis by health workers and the belief that epilepsy caused by witchcraft cannot be treated by western medicine. The study also highlights the wider impacts of epilepsy on the household such as the failure of children to attend school, children dropping out of school, stigma and discrimination and households being driven deeper into poverty as a result of seeking care for members with epilepsy.Conclusion: The existing barriers to accessing treatment for epilepsy can be addressed by using a combination of public education, simple treatments and regular reviews. Ensuring constant availability of drugs for the treatment of epilepsy is key to effective treatment of the condition. This would contribute to closing the treatment gap for epilepsy as advocated by the Global Campaign against Epilepsy.

  8. Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy: a suggestive electroclinical pattern

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To determine if there is an electroencephalographic pattern suggestive of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy that could be used to improve the chances of early diagnosis.
METHODS—A retrospective study was made of all the clinical records and electroencephalograms of neonates identified with pyridoxine dependent seizures between 1983 and 1994, at this hospital. Neonates whose seizures began after more than 28 days of life were excluded; in all, five patients from four fami...

  9. Clinical spectrum of mutations in SCN1A gene: severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy and related epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tateki

    2006-08-01

    Severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI) manifests very frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC), accompanied by myoclonic seizures, absences and partial seizures [Dravet, C., 1978. Les épilepsie grave de l'enfant. Vie Méd. 8, 543-548; Dravet, C., Roger, J., Bureau, M., Dalla Bernardina, B., 1982. Myoclonic epilepsies in childhood. In: Akimoto, H., Kazamatsuri, H., Seino, M., Ward, A. (Eds.), Advances in Epileptology. Raven Press, New York, pp. 135-140; Dravet, C., Bureau, M., Oguni, H., Fukuyama, Y., Cokar, O., 2002. Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (Dravet syndrome). In: Roger, J., Bureau, M., Dravet, C., Genton, P., Tassinari, C.A., Wolf, P. (Eds.), Epileptic Syndromes in Infancy, Childhood and Adolescence, third ed. John Libbey, London, pp. 81-103]. However, there is a group of severe epilepsy that has many characteristics common to SMEI except for myoclonic seizures. We reported this group of epilepsy as intractable childhood epilepsy with GTC (ICEGTC) [Watanabe, M., Fujiwara, T., Yagi, K., Seino, M., Higashi, T., 1989b. Intractable childhood epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. J. Jpn. Epil. Soc. 7, 96-105 (in Japanese); Fujiwara, T., Watanabe, M., Takahashi, Y., Higashi, T., Yagi, K., Seino, M., 1992. Long-term course of childhood epilepsy with intractable grand mal seizures. Jpn. J. Psychiatr. Neurol. 46, 297-302]. Recently, mutations of the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel alphasubunit type 1 gene (SCN1A) have been found in SMEI [Claes, L., Del-Favero, J., Ceulemans, B., Lagae, L., Van Broeckhoven, C., De Jonghe, P., 2001, De novo mutations in the sodium-channel gene SCN1A cause severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 68, 327-1332]. Mutations in SCN1A are found in both SMEI and ICEGTC at high rates of 70-81%. The loci of the mutations seen in ICEGTC are quite similar to those found in SMEI, suggesting a genotypic continuity between these entities. The clinical spectrum of epilepsies harboring SCN1A

  10. [Neuropsychological disorders and childhood epilepsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Louis

    2012-12-01

    Neuropsychological consequences of epilepsy will be function of the specific anamnesis of the child, characteristics of epilepsy syndromes, and treatment. The effects of recurrent seizures, iatrogenic effects of medications, and school adaptation are reviewed. The neurodevelopmental origins of comorbidities are detailed, how they develop over time. Despite the good prognosis and the remission of seizures before adulthood with normal neurological and intellectual development, some subtle cognitive and behavioural deficits in children with benign epilepsy seem to occur. Cognition can be impaired leading to long-term intellectual disabilities. One factor that could potentially cause cognitive deficits is the frequent seizures that characterize intractable epilepsy.

  11. Yoga for control of epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yardi, Nandan

    2001-01-01

    ...). This paper reviews articles related to yoga and epilepsy, seizures, EEG, autonomic changes, neuro-psychology, limbic system, arousal, sleep, brain plasticity, motor performance, brain imaging studies...

  12. Application of adaptive nonlinear Granger causality: Disclosing network changes before and after absence seizure onset in a genetic rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sysoeva, M.V.; Sitnikova, E.Y.; Sysoev, I.V.; Bezruchko, B.P.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2014-01-01

    Background: Advanced methods of signal analysis of the preictal and ictal activity dynamics characterizing absence epilepsy in humans with absences and in genetic animal models have revealed new and unknown electroencephalographic characteristics, that has led to new insights and theories. New metho

  13. [Dietary therapy of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Katsumi; Ishihara, Eiko; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2014-05-01

    Reappraisal of ketogenic diets (KD) were delayed in Japan compared to USA and Korea. The reasons are unknown, but possible explanations are (1) Japanese food culture prefers rice and less fat and (2) ACTH therapy is preferred for West syndrome in Japan. Since Japanese child neurologists were surprised at dramatic effects on glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut-1DS) in 2003, KD have been slowly accepted for treatment of epilepsy in Japan. New generation KD including modified Atkins diet (mAD) are preferred to classical KD. KD can be causal therapy in Glut-1DS and some of mitochondrial disorders, though anti-epileptic drugs are symptomatic therapy. KD can alleviate intractable seizures in epilepsies with brain malformation in addition to West syndrome and Dravet syndrome, etc. KD may work for brain tumor, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. C7-8 triglycerides or fatty acid esters are under development as medicines replacing KD.

  14. Epilepsy and videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Michelle; Hirsch, Edouard; Vigevano, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Since the first case of videogame (VG) epilepsy was reported in 1981, many cases of seizures triggered by VGs were reported, not only in photosensitive, but also in non-photosensitive children and adolescents with epilepsy. We provide an overview of the literature with overall conclusions and recommendations regarding VG playing. Specific preventive measures concerning the physical characteristics of images included in commercially available VGs (flash rate, choice of colors, patterns, and contrast) can lead in the future to a clear decrease of this problem. In addition to the positive effect of such measures, the collaborative studies performed in France and in the rest of Europe have stressed the importance of a safe distance to the screen of > or = 2 m, and the less provocative role of 100-Hz screens.

  15. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  16. Die Psychosen bei Epilepsie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauninger G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In einer Übersicht werden die verschiedenen Formen psychotischer Zustandsbilder bei Epilepsiepatienten, deren Ätiopathogenese und Möglichkeiten der Behandlung dieser Störungen beschrieben. Risikofaktoren finden sich durch neurobiologische Gegebenheiten - besonders bei Mitbeteiligung des Temporallappens, durch psychosoziale Einflüsse und manchmal auch durch medikamentöse Behandlung. Anhand von Fallbeispielen sollen dem Leser typische Krankheitsverläufe von psychotischen Episoden bei Epilepsiepatienten, die zumeist erst bei einer schon länger dauernden Epilepsie auftreten, nähergebracht werden. Es wird deutlich, daß sich die Beschwerden von Patienten mit Epilepsie nicht auf iktale Phänomene beschränken. Bei der Behandlung dieser Patienten kommt einer guten interdisziplinären Zusammenarbeit besondere Bedeutung zu.

  17. [Biofeedback treatment for epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko

    2014-05-01

    Pharmacological treatment is the mainstay for the treatment of epilepsy. However concerns regarding long-term side effects of drugs are increasingly voiced. Behavioral treatments including biofeedback, represents an alternative management option for the control of epilepsy. Biofeedback is a non-invasive bio-behavioral procedure through which patients can learn to gain psychophysiological control over seizures. This article will first overview seizure precipitation from a psychological perspective, and then introduce three major biofeedback treatments. Sensory motor rhythm (SMR) and slow cortical potential(SCP) biofeedback uses electroencephalographic parameters and are categorized as neurofeedback. Electrodermal activity (EDA) biofeedback focuses on modulation of peripheral sympathetic tone. The neural mechanisms underlying biofeedback treatment will be discussed in relation to thalamo-cortical regulation(of neural excitability across brain networks).

  18. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecila P. Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Method Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A and 31 paired children (group B underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment performed with several standardized protocols. Our findings were categorized as: a dyslexia; b other difficulties; c without difficulties. Our results were compared and statistically analyzed. Results Our data showed that dyslexia occurred in 19.4% and other difficulties in 74.2% of our patients. This was highly significant when compared with the control group (p<0.001. Phonological awareness, writing, reading, arithmetic, and memory tests showed a statistically significant difference when comparing both groups. Conclusion Our findings show significant evidence of the occurrence of dyslexia in patients with BECTS.

  19. Atypical Vitamin B-6 Deficiency A Rare Cause of Unexplained Neonatal and Infantile Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgart, A.; von Spiczak, S.; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    . We identified 1 patient with an epilepsy phenotype resembling Dravet syndrome and likely pathogenic mutations in ALDH7A1. Presenting features were highly atypical of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, including febrile seizures, response to anticonvulsive drugs, and periods of seizure freedom without......ALDH7A1 and PNPO deficiencies are rare inborn errors of vitamin B-6 metabolism causing perinatal seizure disorders. The phenotypic variability, however, is broad. To assess the frequency of these deficiencies in unexplained infantile epilepsy, we screened 113 patients for mutations in both genes...... pyridoxine treatment. "Hidden" vitamin B-6 deficiencies might be rare but treatable causes of unexplained epilepsy extending beyond the classical phenotypes....

  20. Tuberous Sclerosis with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    50% of individuals with TS have learning difficulties that include autism , attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), behavioral issues...These findings of TS manifest themselves symptomatically as seizures, epilepsy, and learning disabilities including autism , ADHD, behavioral...molecular pathogenesis to rationale for treatment”. J Child Neurol 2005; 20:318 –325. 15) Chandra PS, Salamon N, Huang J, et al. “FDG-PET/MRI

  1. PET studies in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients...

  2. [Gelastic and cursive epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, K O

    1989-02-20

    When the most prominent ictal symptom in an epileptic seizure is laughing or running the condition has been termed respectively gelastic or cursive epilepsy. The article presents five patients with these ictal symptoms and discusses their clinical and EEG-features, etiology, and localisation of lesions responsible for the seizures. Laughter and running as ictal symptoms are usually part of complex partial seizures involving limbic structures or their efferent or afferent pathways.

  3. Neuropeptides in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Stjepana; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-12-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in modulating seizures and epilepsy. Unlike neurotransmitters which operate on a millisecond time-scale, neuropeptides have longer half lives; this leads to modulation of neuronal and network activity over prolonged periods, so contributing to setting the seizure threshold. Most neuropeptides are stored in large dense vesicles and co-localize with inhibitory interneurons. They are released upon high frequency stimulation making them attractive targets for modulation of seizures, during which high frequency discharges occur. Numerous neuropeptides have been implicated in epilepsy; one, ACTH, is already used in clinical practice to suppress seizures. Here, we concentrate on neuropeptides that have a direct effect on seizures, and for which therapeutic interventions are being developed. We have thus reviewed the abundant reports that support a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY), galanin, ghrelin, somatostatin and dynorphin in suppressing seizures and epileptogenesis, and for tachykinins having pro-epileptic effects. Most in vitro and in vivo studies are performed in hippocampal tissue in which receptor expression is usually high, making translation to other brain areas less clear. We highlight recent therapeutic strategies to treat epilepsy with neuropeptides, which are based on viral vector technology, and outline how such interventions need to be refined in order to address human disease.

  4. Epilepsie und polyzystisches Ovarialsyndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rösing B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsien sind gehäuft mit endokrinen Funktionsstörungen vergesellschaftet. Bei Frauen gehören Zyklusstörungen, Hyperandrogenismus, Gewichtszunahme und Subfertilität dazu. Die vorliegende Übersicht zeigt aktuelle Daten und pathophysiologische Vorstellungen zum Zusammenhang zwischen einer Erkrankung mit Epilepsie, ihrer Therapie, dem polyzstischen Ovarialsyndrom (PCOS, sowie assoziierten metabolischen Abweichungen. Mögliche Ursachen für das Auftreten endokriner Störungen bei Epilepsie sind (1. der direkte Einfluss temporal gelegener epileptogener Läsionen oder der antiepileptischen Medikamente (AED auf die hypothalamisch-hypophysär gonadale Achse (HHG, (2. der Einfluss von AED auf die ovarielle Funktion, (3. der Einfluss der AED auf den Steroidhormonmetabolismus inklusive ihrer Serumeiweißbindung und (4. AED-bedingte sekundäre endokrine Störungen durch Gewichtszunahme und veränderten Insulinmetabolismus. Die regelmäßige ärztliche Kontrolle klinischer endokriner Parameter wie Gewichtsentwicklung, Regeltempostörungen und Hirsutismus ist bei Frauen mit Epilepsie obligat. Einzelne auffällige Laborparameter (z. B. sinkendes sexualhormonbindendes Globulin [SHBG], ansteigende Testosteronwerte, Dysbalance der Gonadotropine luteinisierendes Hormon zu follikelstimulierendem Hormon (LH/FSH oder bildgebende Befunde (polyzystische Ovarien ohne klinisches Korrelat sollten engmaschig, zunächst 1–3-monatlich kontrolliert werden, um entstehende Endokrinopathien frühzeitig behandeln zu können.

  5. The epilepsy of Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiloh, L G

    1986-01-01

    The evidence in favour of a diagnosis of limbic epilepsy in the case of Dostoevsky is reviewed. Independent records from numerous biographical sources support the widely held view that Dostoevsky had frequent convulsive episodes, that the episodes began in childhood and continued throughout his life and that Dostoevsky himself was able accurately to record the premonitory aura and sequelae of such episodes. In addition the increasing memory impairment he suffered both for recent and remote events from the age of 40 supports the presence of progressive brain damage. This information renders implausible the analytic interpretations of Freud and his followers, that Dostoevsky's epilepsy was hysterical in origin, where epileptiform somatization was presumed to dispose of excessive psychic excitation, and that this process had its roots in Dostoevsky's unconscious hatred of his father and latent homosexuality. Nevertheless, Dostoevsky's neuroticism is clearly supported by his life-long hypochondriasis, obsessionality, paranoid traits, tendency to reactive depressions, and experience of quasi-hallucinatory episodes which were probably not epileptic in origin. Neither his epilepsy nor his neuroticism can explain or detract from the profundity and wisdom of the literary monuments which clearly attest Dostoevsky's ample genius.

  6. DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koralia Todorova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Depressive disorders are the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy but very often remain unrecognized and untreated. We examined 103 epileptic patients, aged 18-60 years, 40 males and 63 females, for the presence of interictal depressive disorder. All subjects underwent clinical psychiatric examination, including evaluation on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17. A questionnaire for demographic and seizure-related variables was also completed. Concurrent depressive disorder (clinically presented according to ICD-10 diagnostic criteria affected 28.3% of all evaluated patients. Based on HAM-D-17 scores depression was defined as mild - 80% of all depressed patients, moderate - 17% and severe - 3%. Atypical presentation of interictal depressive disorder was frequent. Depression has a tremendous effect on one’s family, social and psychological functioning, even more than the actual seizure frequency and severity. Diagnostic difficulties come through the atypical mode of presentation of depressive disorders in epilepsy. Proper neuropsychiatric evaluation is essential for improving treatment and quality of life for patients with epilepsy.

  7. Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy includes surgery, vagal nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet, and other alternative/complementary therapies, e.g., yoga, Ayurveda, electroencephalography (EEG biofeedback technique, aerobic exercise, music therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, acupuncture, and herbal remedies (traditional Chinese medicine. Alternative therapies, despite the term, should not be considered as an alternative to antiepileptic medication; they complement accepted drug treatment. Alternative therapies like yoga, through techniques that relax the body and mind, reduce stress, improve seizure control, and also improve quality of life. Ketogenic diet is a safe and effective treatment for intractable epilepsies; it has been recommended since 1921. The diet induces ketosis, which may control seizures. The most successful treatment of epilepsy is with modern antiepileptic drugs, which can achieve control of seizures in 70-80% cases. Patients opt for alternative therapies because they may be dissatisfied with antiepileptic drugs due to their unpleasant side effects, the long duration of treatment, failure to achieve control of seizures, cultural beliefs and, in the case of women, because they wish to get pregnant Surgical treatment may lead to physical and psychological sequelae and is an option only for a minority of patients. This article presents supportive evidence from randomized controlled trials done to assess the benefit of non-pharmacological treatment.

  8. Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Kossoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  9. Understanding of Epilepsy by Children and Young People with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann; Parsons, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    There is a striking dearth of studies focusing sensitively and in depth on the mainstream educational experiences of children with epilepsy, as viewed by those children themselves. The one-year project (2006-7) reported here addresses that gap. Children's perceptions about mainstream teachers' understanding of epilepsy and school-based needs are…

  10. Understanding of Epilepsy by Children and Young People with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann; Parsons, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    There is a striking dearth of studies focusing sensitively and in depth on the mainstream educational experiences of children with epilepsy, as viewed by those children themselves. The one-year project (2006-7) reported here addresses that gap. Children's perceptions about mainstream teachers' understanding of epilepsy and school-based needs are…

  11. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  12. Epilepsy After Febrile Seizures: Twins Suggest Genetic Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinfeld, Syndi A; Pellock, John M; Kjeldsen, Marianne J; Nakken, Karl Otto; Corey, Linda A

    2016-02-01

    A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin pairs in the Mid-Atlantic, Danish, and Norwegian Twin Registries. The information was verified using medical records and detailed clinical and family interviews. The initial study evaluated the genetic epidemiology of febrile seizures in this population. Further information was analyzed and used to evaluate genetic associations of different febrile seizure subtypes. Histories of febrile seizures were validated in 1051 twins in 900 pairs. The febrile seizure type was classified as simple, complex, or febrile status epilepticus. There were 61% simple, 12% complex, and 7% febrile status epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures gave the highest risk for the unaffected twin to develop seizures or other neurological issues. These results are consistent with previous findings. There is a subgroup of febrile seizures that can be associated with long-term consequences. This subgroup can be associated with a significant financial and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial EEG (icEEG monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  14. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Weifang; Chen, Hui; Xia, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Mei, Shanshan; Liu, Qingzhu; Li, Yunlin

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial EEG (icEEG) monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  15. The Pharmacological Basis of Cannabis Therapy for Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba; Golub, Victoria M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, cannabis has been suggested as a potential alternative therapy for refractory epilepsy, which affects 30% of epilepsy, both adults and children, who do not respond to current medications. There is a large unmet medical need for new antiepileptics that would not interfere with normal function in patients with refractory epilepsy and conditions associated with refractory seizures. The two chief cannabinoids are Δ-9-tetrahyrdrocannabinol, the major psychoactive component of marijuana, and cannabidiol (CBD), the major nonpsychoactive component of marijuana. Claims of clinical efficacy in epilepsy of CBD-predominant cannabis or medical marijuana come mostly from limited studies, surveys, or case reports. However, the mechanisms underlying the antiepileptic efficacy of cannabis remain unclear. This article highlights the pharmacological basis of cannabis therapy, with an emphasis on the endocannabinoid mechanisms underlying the emerging neurotherapeutics of CBD in epilepsy. CBD is anticonvulsant, but it has a low affinity for the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2; therefore the exact mechanism by which it affects seizures remains poorly understood. A rigorous clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical CBD products is needed to establish the safety and efficacy of their use in the treatment of epilepsy. Identification of mechanisms underlying the anticonvulsant efficacy of CBD is also critical for identifying other potential treatment options. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Long term course of childhood epilepsy following relapse after antiepileptic drug withdrawal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, OF

    Objective: To explore the course of epilepsy following relapse after antiepileptic drug (AED) withdrawal. Methods: Forty two patients were identified with onset of epilepsy in childhood in whom AEDs had been withdrawn after at least 2 years of seizure freedom, and in whom a relapse had occurred. Two

  17. 20th Annual Meeting of the German-Austrian-Swiss Epilepsy Working Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The stated purpose of the meeting was to summarize „current, new and proven approaches in diagnostics and epilepsy therapy”, to define optimal clinical practice and scientific research areas, highlight advances in clinical and basic science and to identify future approaches or directions in epilepsy treatment.

  18. Epilepsy audit: do we document everything?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iqbal, M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: An audit of the hospital notes and letters of patients with epilepsy sent to general practitioners was undertaken. AIMS: (a) To examine the frequency of important omissions in history taking and role of precipitants in seizure control, (b) to determine whether appropriate investigations had been performed and their results, (c) to assess whether letters sent to GPs contain all the appropriate information and advice, and to evaluate the waiting time for out-patient clinics and investigations. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital setting. A computerised search of the clinical database of a consultant neurologist was performed on patients with epilepsy. The notes of the first 100 names selected randomly by the computer were analysed. The study period was during the years 1998-2005. Age range was from 17-72 years. The male:female ratio was 1:1. CONCLUSION: Major deficiencies in documentation were identified in this study.

  19. Past absence as a predictor of present absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke Møller, Ann-Kristina Løkke

    2014-01-01

    that past days and past spells have an equal potential of predicting present absent. Past absence behaviour can thus be used as an early warning for managers. The study also confirms that personal characteristics such as age and seniority also influence absence duration. Moreover, job characteristics......This article investigates whether past absence behaviour is a predictor of present absence duration in a large Danish municipality with 17,499 individuals observed from 1996 to 2004. Past absence behaviour is measured in both absence days and absence spells. The article also investigates a number...... of confounders such as gender, age, seniority, wage, contracted number of work hours and season. The results of the empirical study show that there is a significant positive relationship between employees' absence duration and past absence spells and past absence days, respectively. The study thus confirms...

  20. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination.

  1. Electroencephalography in dogs with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Høgenhaven, H; Flagstad, Annette Borgbjerg

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder.......To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder....

  2. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  3. The Mozart Effect and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at Kaohsiung Medical University and other centers in Taiwan studied the long-term effect of listening to Mozart K-448 (Sonata for Two Pianos in D major) on the frequency of epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy, and analyzed the relationship between the number of epileptiform discharges and foci of origin, epilepsy etiology, age, IQ, and gender.

  4. Epilepsy informatics and an ontology-driven infrastructure for large database research and patient care in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The epilepsy community increasingly recognizes the need for a modern classification system that can also be easily integrated with effective informatics tools. The 2010 reports by the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) identified informatics as a critical resource to improve quality of patient care, drive clinical research, and reduce the cost of health services. An effective informatics infrastructure for epilepsy, which is underpinned by a formal knowledge model or ontology, can leverage an ever increasing amount of multimodal data to improve (1) clinical decision support, (2) access to information for patients and their families, (3) easier data sharing, and (4) accelerate secondary use of clinical data. Modeling the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification system in the form of an epilepsy domain ontology is essential for consistent use of terminology in a variety of applications, including electronic health records systems and clinical applications. In this review, we discuss the data management issues in epilepsy and explore the benefits of an ontology-driven informatics infrastructure and its role in adoption of a “data-driven” paradigm in epilepsy research. PMID:23647220

  5. Loss of function of the retinoid-related nuclear receptor (RORB) gene and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Mehrjouy, Mana M

    2016-01-01

    nuclear receptor (RORβ), in four affected family members. In addition, two de novo variants (c.218T>C/p.(Leu73Pro); c.1249_1251delACG/p.(Thr417del)) were identified in sporadic patients by trio-based exome sequencing. We also found two de novo deletions in patients with behavioral and cognitive impairment...... in various types of epilepsies in the past few years. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a family with GGE consistent with the diagnosis of eyelid myoclonia with absences. We found a nonsense variant (c.196C>T/p.(Arg66*)) in RORB, which encodes the beta retinoid-related orphan...

  6. Past absence as a predictor of present absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke Møller, Ann-Kristina Løkke

    2014-01-01

    of confounders such as gender, age, seniority, wage, contracted number of work hours and season. The results of the empirical study show that there is a significant positive relationship between employees' absence duration and past absence spells and past absence days, respectively. The study thus confirms...... such as wage and contracted number of work hours also influence absence duration. Finally, the season of the year seems to influence absence duration....

  7. Anti-epileptogenesis: Electrophysiology, diffusion tensor imaging and behavior in a genetic absence model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Mishra, A.M.; Edelbroek, P.M.; Coman, D.; Frankenmolen, N.L.; Schaapsmeerders, P.; Covolato, G.; Danielson, N.; Niermann, H.C.M.; Janeczko, K.; Kiemeneij, A.; Burinov, J.; Bashyal, C.; Coquillette, M.; Luttjohann, A.K.; Hyder, F.; Blumenfeld, H.; Rijn, C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of chronic and early pharmacological treatment with ethosuximide on epileptogenesis were studied in a genetic absence epilepsy model comorbid for depression. It was also investigated whether there is a critical treatment period and treatment length. Cortical excitability in th

  8. Epilepsy, language, and social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Rochelle

    2017-10-04

    Language and social skills are essential for intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning and quality of life. Since epilepsy impacts these important domains of individuals' functioning, understanding the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the relationship among epilepsy, language, and social skills has important theoretical and clinical implications. This review first describes the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the association between language and social behavior in children and in adults and their relevance for epilepsy. It reviews the findings of studies of social skills and the few studies conducted on the inter-relationship of language and social skills in pediatric and adult epilepsy. The paper concludes with suggested future research and clinical directions that will enhance early identification and treatment of epilepsy patients at risk for impaired language and social skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Definition and classification of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibiki, Itsuki

    2014-05-01

    The concept or definition of epilepsy was mentioned as a chronic disease of the brain consisting of repetitions of EEG paroxysm and clinical seizures caused by excessive discharges of the cerebral neurons, in reference with Gastaut's opinion and the other statements. Further, we referred to diseases to be excluded from epilepsy such as isolated, occasional and subclinical seizures and so on. Next, new classifications of seizures and epilepsies were explained on the basis of revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies in Report of the ILAE Communication in Classification and Terminology, 2005-09, in comparison with the Classification of Epileptic Seizures in 1981 and the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes in 1989.

  10. Gelastic epilepsy: Beyond hypothalamic hamartomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Uribe-San-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelastic epilepsy or laughing seizures have been historically related to children with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report three adult patients who had gelastic epilepsy, defined as the presence of seizures with a prominent laugh component, including brain imaging, surface/invasive electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and medical/surgical outcomes. None of the patients had hamartoma or other hypothalamic lesion. Two patients were classified as having refractory epilepsy (one had biopsy-proven neurocysticercosis and the other one hippocampal sclerosis and temporal cortical dysplasia. The third patient had no lesion on MRI and had complete control with carbamazepine. Both lesional patients underwent resective surgery, one with complete seizure control and the other one with poor outcome. Although hypothalamic hamartomas should always be ruled out in patients with gelastic epilepsy, laughing seizures can also arise from frontal and temporal lobe foci, which can be surgically removed. In addition, we present the first case of gelastic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

  11. The social and economic consequences of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy.......Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy....

  12. The social and economic consequences of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy.......Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy....

  13. 38 CFR 4.122 - Psychomotor epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Psychomotor epilepsy. 4... Psychomotor epilepsy. The term psychomotor epilepsy refers to a condition that is characterized by seizures... psychomotor epilepsy vary from patient to patient and in the same patient from seizure to seizure. (b) A...

  14. HCN channelopathy and cardiac electrophysiologic dysfunction in genetic and acquired rat epilepsy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kim L; Jones, Nigel C; Kennard, Jeremy T; Ng, Caroline; Urmaliya, Vijay; Lau, Shannen; Tran, Adora; Zheng, Thomas; Ozturk, Ezgi; Dezsi, Gabi; Megatia, Ika; Delbridge, Lea M; Pinault, Didier; Reid, Christopher A; White, Paul J; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-04-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies indicates that epilepsy can affect cardiac function, although the molecular basis of this remains poorly understood. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels generate pacemaker activity and modulate cellular excitability in the brain and heart, with altered expression and function associated with epilepsy and cardiomyopathies. Whether HCN expression is altered in the heart in association with epilepsy has not been investigated previously. We studied cardiac electrophysiologic properties and HCN channel subunit expression in rat models of genetic generalized epilepsy (Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg, GAERS) and acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (post-status epilepticus SE). We hypothesized that the development of epilepsy is associated with altered cardiac electrophysiologic function and altered cardiac HCN channel expression. Electrocardiography studies were recorded in vivo in rats and in vitro in isolated hearts. Cardiac HCN channel messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression were measured using quantitative PCR and Western blotting respectively. Cardiac electrophysiology was significantly altered in adult GAERS, with slower heart rate, shorter QRS duration, longer QTc interval, and greater standard deviation of RR intervals compared to control rats. In the post-SE model, we observed similar interictal changes in several of these parameters, and we also observed consistent and striking bradycardia associated with the onset of ictal activity. Molecular analysis demonstrated significant reductions in cardiac HCN2 mRNA and protein expression in both models, providing a molecular correlate of these electrophysiologic abnormalities. These results demonstrate that ion channelopathies and cardiac dysfunction can develop as a secondary consequence of chronic epilepsy, which may have relevance for the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identifying factors relevant in the assessment of return-to-work efforts in employees on long-term sickness absence due to chronic low back pain : a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijzer, Anna; Geertzen, Jan H.; de Boer, Wout E.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Efforts undertaken during the return to work (RTW) process need to be sufficient to prevent unnecessary applications for disability benefits. The purpose of this study was to identify factors relevant to RTW Effort Sufficiency (RTW-ES) in cases of sick-listed employees with chronic low b

  16. [Surgical treatment of non-lesional supplementary motor area epilepsy: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Masaki; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2009-03-01

    A 37-year-old male and a 12-year-old female presented with non-lesional epilepsy arising from the supplementary motor area in the medial frontal cortex, manifesting as daily brief tonic seizures involving the bilateral extremities, which were intractable to multiple antiepileptic medications. During the seizure, there was no impairment of awareness, and the tonus was always higher in the limbs contralateral to the epileptogenic hemisphere in both patients. Scalp EEG detected midline epileptiform discharges. Three-tesla MR imaging using the FLAIR and short tau inversion recovery sequences, interictal IMP-SPECT, IMZ-SPECT, and FDG-PET detected no focal abnormalities in either patient. Invasive intracranial EEG evaluation was performed using chronically implanted subdural electrodes on the interhemispheric frontoparietal cortices, based mainly on the seizure semiology and the associated EEG findings. Intracranial EEG successfully identified the location of the seizure onset in the supplementary motor area in the medial frontal cortex. Focal cortical resection including the area of seizure onset resulted in freedom from seizures and significant improvement in both patients. Histological study revealed focal cortical dysplasia in both patients. Recognition of the typical seizure semiology is very important in the correct diagnosis and surgical treatment of supplementary motor area epilepsy, especially in the absence of MR imaging lesions.

  17. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...... there are 17% false positives. CONCLUSION: NDDI-E in Danish is valid and slightly better than WHO-5 in the detection of depression in epilepsy patients. WHO-5 is valid for the detection of anxiety disorders. Combined use of NDDI-E and WHO-5 is recommended, since 95% of all epilepsy patients with depression and....../or anxiety disorder are identified with only a modest number of false positives....

  18. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and narcolepsy: A series of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Puja Aggarwal; Poduri, Annapurna; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2015-10-01

    This paper sets out to demonstrate the coexistence of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and narcolepsy that raises the possibility of a shared genetic predisposition to both conditions. The electronic medical records (EMRs) were searched for narcolepsy and JME over 10years. We identified three young adult women diagnosed with JME in their teenage years, with myoclonic, generalized tonic-clonic, and absence seizure semiologies, along with psychiatric comorbidity, well managed on lamotrigine and/or levetiracetam. Our patients were also found to have disturbed sleep preceding the diagnosis of JME by many years, including excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), fragmented nocturnal sleep, hypnagogic vivid hallucinations, and REM behavior disorder along with daytime cataplexy. They were ultimately diagnosed with coexisting narcolepsy, confirmed by sleep studies and multiple sleep latency testing, along with positive genetic testing for HLA-DQB1*0602 in all three patients. Stimulants, selective serotonin receptor inhibitors, and/or sodium oxybate were used to successfully treat their narcolepsy. The coexistence of JME and narcolepsy has not been well recognized and may be clinically relevant. In addition, it raises the possibility of a shared genetic predisposition to both conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epilepsie und psychiatrische Erkrankungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumgartner C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatrische Erkrankungen treten bei Epilepsiepatienten signifikant häufiger auf als in der Allgemeinbevölkerung und als bei Patienten mit anderen chronischen Erkrankungen. Die Depression stellt die häufigste psychiatrische Begleiterkrankung bei Epilepsie dar. Die Häufigkeit von Depressionen korreliert mit der Anfallskontrolle: Sie liegt zwischen 3 und 9 % bei gut kontrollierter Epilepsie, jedoch zwischen 20 und 55 % bei Patienten mit therapieresistenten Epilepsien. Umgekehrt ist bei Patienten mit neu diagnostizierten Epilepsien anamnestisch signifikant häufiger eine Depression zu erheben als in einem Vergleichskollektiv. Diese bidirektionale Beziehung zwischen Epilepsie und Depression könnte durch gemeinsame Pathomechanismen beider Erkrankungen erklärt werden. Obwohl das Vorliegen und der Schweregrad einer Depression die wichtigsten Prädiktoren für die Lebensqualität bei Epilepsiepatienten darstellen, werden Depressionen bei Epilepsiepatienten unterdiagnostiziert und unterbehandelt. Eine psychopharmakologische Behandlung sollte bei Vorliegen einer Begleitdepression deshalb unverzüglich initiiert werden, das epileptogene Potential von Antidepressiva stellt dabei ein vernachlässigbares Risiko dar. Die Prävalenz psychotischer Störungen bei Epilepsiepatienten liegt zwischen 2 und 8 %, wobei sogenannte episodische Psychosen (iktale, postiktale und Alternativpsychosen, die in einem zeitlichen Bezug zum Anfallsgeschehen stehen, und chronische Psychosen (interiktale Psychosen ohne zeitlichen Bezug zu den Anfällen, unterschieden werden können. Die Prävalenz von Angststörungen bei Epilepsiepatienten liegt zwischen 15 und 25 %. Man kann zwischen präiktaler, iktaler, postiktaler und interiktaler Angst unterscheiden.

  20. Clinical characteristics of children and young adults with co-occurring autism spectrum disorder and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Achkar, Christelle M; Spence, Sarah J

    2015-06-01

    The association between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and epilepsy has been described for decades, and yet we still lack the full understanding of this relationship both clinically and at the pathophysiologic level. This review evaluates the available data in the literature pertaining to the clinical characteristics of patients with autism spectrum disorder who develop epilepsy and, conversely, patients with epilepsy who develop autism spectrum disorder. Many studies demonstrate an increased risk of epilepsy in individuals with ASD, but rates vary widely. This variability is likely secondary to the different study methods employed, including the study population and definitions of the disorders. Established risk factors for an increased risk of epilepsy in patients with ASD include intellectual disability and female gender. There is some evidence of an increased risk of epilepsy associated with other factors such as ASD etiology (syndromic), severity of autistic features, developmental regression, and family history. No one epilepsy syndrome or seizure type has been associated, although focal or localization-related seizures are often reported. The age at seizure onset can vary from infancy to adulthood with some evidence of a bimodal age distribution. The severity and intractability of epilepsy in populations with ASD have not been well studied, and there is very little investigation of the role that epilepsy plays in the autism behavioral phenotype. There is evidence of abnormal EEGs (especially epileptiform abnormalities) in children with ASD even in the absence of clinical seizures, but very little is known about this phenomenon and what it means. The development of autism spectrum disorder in patients with epilepsy is less well studied, but there is evidence that the ASD risk is greater in those with epilepsy than in the general population. One of the risk factors is intellectual disability, and there is some evidence that the presence of a particular seizure

  1. The health care journeys experienced by people with epilepsy in Ireland: what are the implications for future service reform and development?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2011-02-01

    Opportunities exist to significantly improve the quality and efficiency of epilepsy care in Ireland. Historically, epilepsy research has focused on quantitative methodologies that often fail to capture the invaluable insight of patient experiences as they negotiate their health care needs. Using a phenomenological approach, we conducted one-to-one interviews with people with epilepsy, reporting on their understanding of their health care journey from onset of symptoms through to their first interaction with specialist epilepsy services. Following analysis of the data, five major themes emerged: delayed access to specialist epilepsy review; uncertainty regarding the competency and function of primary care services; significant unmet needs for female patients with epilepsy; disorganization of existing epilepsy services; and unmet patient information needs. The findings reveal important insights into the challenges experienced by people with epilepsy in Ireland and identify the opportunities for future service reorganization to improve the quality and efficiency of care provided.

  2. The health care journeys experienced by people with epilepsy in Ireland: what are the implications for future service reform and development?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2012-02-01

    Opportunities exist to significantly improve the quality and efficiency of epilepsy care in Ireland. Historically, epilepsy research has focused on quantitative methodologies that often fail to capture the invaluable insight of patient experiences as they negotiate their health care needs. Using a phenomenological approach, we conducted one-to-one interviews with people with epilepsy, reporting on their understanding of their health care journey from onset of symptoms through to their first interaction with specialist epilepsy services. Following analysis of the data, five major themes emerged: delayed access to specialist epilepsy review; uncertainty regarding the competency and function of primary care services; significant unmet needs for female patients with epilepsy; disorganization of existing epilepsy services; and unmet patient information needs. The findings reveal important insights into the challenges experienced by people with epilepsy in Ireland and identify the opportunities for future service reorganization to improve the quality and efficiency of care provided.

  3. Epilepsy and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly de Albuquerque

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed 155 subjects with STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory: 75 epileptic patients and 80 normal subjects used as a control group. A higher trait-anxiety score (chronic anxiety than that of controls was found for the epileptic group. For the epileptic group higher levels of the A-trait occurred in patients with EEG abnormalities with left temporal localization. We have also observed that the shorter the epilepsy lasts (less than two years, the higher the trait-anxiety levels. Convulsions and awareness loss during epileptic seizures do not modify state and trait-anxiety scores.

  4. Epilepsy in Dante's poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Dante Alighieri is the greatest Italian poet and one of the most important writers in Western literature. He is best known for the epic poem "Commedia", later named "La Divina Commedia" that has profoundly influenced not only poetic imagination but also all subsequent allegorical creations of imaginary worlds in literature. This paper examines the poetic description of some episodes of loss of consciousness in Dante's poetry discussing how and why typical elements of epileptic seizures have been used. On the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth, his poetry still remains to be an inspiring source of debate and reflection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  5. Epilepsy surgery in children and adolescents with malformations of cortical development--outcome and impact of the new ILAE classification on focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlebner, Angelika; Gröppel, Gudrun; Dressler, Anastasia; Reiter-Fink, Edith; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela; Dorfer, Christian; Czech, Thomas; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Coras, Roland; Blümcke, Ingmar; Feucht, Martha

    2014-11-01

    To determine long-term efficacy and safety of epilepsy surgery in children and adolescents with malformations of cortical development (MCD) and to identify differences in seizure outcome of the various MCD subgroups. Special focus was set on the newly introduced International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). This is a single center retrospective cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data. age at surgery <18 years, pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery performed at the Vienna pediatric epilepsy center, histologically proven MCD, complete follow-up data for at least 12 months. Clinical variables evaluated: type and localization of MCD, type of surgery and a variety of clinical characteristics reported to be associated with (un-)favorable outcomes. MCD were classified following the existing classification schemes (Barkovich et al., 2012. Brain. 135, 1348-1369; Palmini et al., 2004. Neurology. 62, S2-S8) and the ILAE classification for FCD recently proposed by Blümcke in 2011. Seizure outcome was classified using the ILAE classification proposed by Wieser in 2001. 60 Patients (51.7% male) were included. Follow up was up to 14 (mean 4.4 ± 3.2) years. Mean age at surgery was 8.0 ± 6.0 (median 6.0) years; mean age at epilepsy onset was 2.9 ± 3.2 (median 2.0) years; duration of epilepsy before surgery was 4.8 ± 4.4 (median 3.0) years. 80% of the patients were seizure free at last follow-up. AEDs were successfully withdrawn in 56.7% of all patients. Extended surgery, lesion localization in the temporal lobes and absence of inter-ictal spikes in postsurgical EEG recordings were predictive of favorable seizure outcomes after surgery. However, no association was found between outcome and MCD sub-types. Epilepsy surgery is highly effective in carefully selected drug-resistant children with MCD. Surrogate markers for complete resection of the epileptogenic zone remain the only significant predictors for

  6. JUVENILE MYOCLONIC EPILEPSY: A FOCUS ON THE EFFICACY OF THERAPY AND THE RATE OF RELAPSES ACCORDING TO LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME is a type of adolescent-onset idiopathic generalized epilepsy with the appearance of massive myoclonic seizures and, in most cases, generalized convulsions occurring chiefly in the period after awakening. It is assumed that there is a two-locus (dominant and recessive model of inheritance of JME; moreover, the dominant gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 6. JME is one of the most common types of epilepsy and most frequent among idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Its rate is 5 to 11 % of all types of epilepsy with some female predominance. The diagnosis of JME creates no problems in typical cases. The disease is generally manifested by a concurrence of myoclonic (usually in the hands and generalized clonic-tonic-clonic seizures occurring during waking. Typical absences and epileptic myoclonus of the eyelid are rarer. Seizures are clearly provoked by sleep deprivation. As in other types of idiopathic epilepsy, the patients’ neurological status is normal; no intellectual disabilities are observed. This type of epilepsy is well treatable and, when initial monotherapy is correctly used, sustainable remission occurs immediately in the vast majority (75–85 % of the patients with JME. However, the problem of these patients, unlike that of patients with many forms of idiopathic epilepsy, is that sleep pattern disturbance, missing a dose of antiepileptic drugs (AED, or therapy refusal give rise to relapse of seizures in the vast majority of patients even in long-term remission.Due to the fact that the data available in the literature on the efficacy of therapy in patients with JME and particularly on the results of its discontinuation are contradictory, the authors of the paper conducted an investigation to determine therapeutic effectiveness and the frequency of relapse of seizures in patients with JME during a long-term follow-up.The study enrolled 106 JME patients who had been regularly followed up at

  7. "It's good to know": experiences of gene identification and result disclosure in familial epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vears, Danya F; Dunn, Karen L; Wake, Samantha A; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2015-05-01

    Recognition of the role of genetics in the epilepsies has increased dramatically, impacting on clinical practice across many epilepsy syndromes. There is limited research investigating the impact of gene identification on individuals and families with epilepsy. While research has focused on the impact of delivering genetic information to families at the time of diagnosis in genetic diseases more broadly, little is known about how genetic results in epileptic diseases influences people's lives many years after it has been conveyed. This study used qualitative methods to explore the experience of receiving a genetic result in people with familial epilepsy. Interviews were conducted with individuals with familial epilepsies in whom the underlying genetic mutation had been identified. Recorded interviews underwent thematic analysis. 20 individuals from three families with different epilepsy syndromes and causative genes were interviewed. Multiple generations within families were studied. The mean time from receiving the genetic result prior to interview was 10.9 years (range 5-14 years). Three major themes were identified: 1) living with epilepsy: an individual's experience of the severity of epilepsy in their family influenced their view. 2) Clinical utility of the test: participants expressed varying reactions to receiving a genetic result. While for some it provided helpful information and relief, others were not surprised by the finding given the familial context. Some valued the use of genetic information for reproductive decision-making, particularly in the setting of severely affected family members. While altruistic reasons for participating in genetic research were discussed, participants emphasised the benefit of participation to them and their families. 3) 'Talking about the family genes': individuals reported poor communication between family members about their epilepsy and its genetic implications. The results provide important insights into the family

  8. Electrophysiology in epilepsy surgery: Roles and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward H Bertram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful epilepsy surgery depends on the localization of the seizure onset zone in an area of the brain that can be safely resected. Defining these zones uses multiple diagnostic approaches, which include different types of electroencephalography (EEG and imaging, and the results are best when all of the tests point to the same region. Although EEG obtained with scalp recordings is often sufficient for the purposes of localization, there are times when intracranial recordings directly from the brain are needed; but the planning, use, value, and interpretation of the these recordings are not standardized, in part because the questions that are to be answered vary considerably across many patients and their heterogenous types of epilepsy that are investigated. Furthermore, there is a desire to use the opportunity of direct brain recordings to understand the pathophysiology of epilepsy, as these recordings are viewed as an opportunity to answer questions that cannot be otherwise answered. In this review, we examine the situations that may require intracranial electrodes and discuss the broad issues that this powerful diagnostic tool can help address, for identifying the seizure focus and for understanding the large scale circuits of the seizures.

  9. Neuro-pharmacological functional MRI of epilepsy

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    Kiriyama, Hideki; Makabe, Tetsuo; Tomita, Susumu; Omoto, Takashi; Asari, Shoji [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Aihara, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Nishimoto, Akira; Ito, Takahiko

    2000-03-01

    We studied patients with epilepsy by neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam. Five normal volunteers and 7 patients with epilepsy were investigated. MRI was performed by a 1.5 T unit (SIGNA Horizon, GE) using the following parameters: TR/TE 5000 msec/80 msec, FA 90 deg, FOV 200 mm, matrix 128 x 128, slice thickness 7 mm. We performed MRI scanning over 5 minutes (2 minutes before and 3 minutes after injection of diazepam) for each 1 session; we scanned 3 sessions for each patient at intervals of 5 minutes. The diazepam was injected rapidly from the antecubital vein. The dose of diazepam was 0.05 mg/kg/injection (total dose was 0.15 mg/kg). The data were analyzed statistically using t-test. Signal change after administration of diazepam was less than 1 to 2% in healthy volunteers. By contrast, in patient with epilepsy, the signal change was almost 3%, which was significantly greater than that of the normal area (p=0.01). The neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam might be a useful method to identify epileptic foci. (author)

  10. Characteristics of headache in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Sano, Fumikazu; Ishii, Sayaka; Ohyama, Tetsuo; Sugita, Kanji; Aihara, Masao

    2013-10-01

    The association of headache with seizures is well known to neurologists but poorly understood. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the types and frequency of seizure-associated headaches among pediatric patients with epilepsy, and to identify their risk factors with special attention to the anatomic localization of the epileptogenic focus and seizure classification. Patients with focal and generalized active seizures and on treatment at the time of questionnaire administration were included. Patients were prospectively interviewed by questionnaire as to whether or not they suffered from headaches associated with epileptic seizures. Of 98 patients (age range: 5-18 years), 34 (34.7%) complained of seizure-associated headaches. In patients with seizure-associated headaches, headache was significantly more frequent (31/74, 41.9%) with partial seizures than with generalized seizures (3/24, 12.5%; p=0.012). The frequency of seizure attacks was 4.1 times per year in patients with seizure-associated headache and 1.3 times per year in those with non-seizure-associated headache. Of the 34 patients, 20 (58.8%) complained of headache at the frontal region. The location of headache was not always in agreement with electroencephalographic focus. Headache was more frequent in patients with partial epilepsy and frequent seizures. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of systems questionnaire helps differentiate psychogenic nonepileptic seizures from epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Rabiei, Amin H; Tinker, Jennifer; Tracy, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the utility of a very brief review of system (ROS) questionnaire in differentiating psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) from epilepsy. In this retrospective study, we investigated all patients with PNES admitted to Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from October 2013 through April 2015. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of PNES or epilepsy based on video-EEG monitoring were included. These were matched with respect to age and sex. All patients had a brief ROS questionnaire in their electronic charts. The questionnaire included 10 general yes/no questions about the presence or absence of any abnormality in body systems. Thirty patients with PNES and 30 patients with epilepsy were investigated. The mean of ROS responses for the presence of any abnormality (±standard deviation) for the PNES group was 2.43 (±1.33) and for the epilepsy group was 1.50 (±0.94) (p=0.01). Cut-off point of three positive ROS was able to differentiate these two conditions from each another (p=0.01; OR: 6, 95% confidence interval: 1.48-24.29). Presence of multiple complaints in the ROS questionnaire argues in favor of PNES compared with epilepsy. This brief and easy to apply ROS questionnaire may be used as a valuable ancillary tool to differentiate PNES from epilepsy during the initial screening visit. This may help prevent the delay in making the diagnosis.

  12. [Contemporary opinions on classification, pathogenesis and treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological disorders, both in children and adult persons. About 0.5-1% of general population suffer from epilepsy, which means that about 50 million people in the world are affected. First years of life and very late adulthood are periods in human's life particularly predisposing to epilepsy. Repetitive epileptic seizures may cause many life-threatening situations and significantly lower patient's quality of life. To the most serious complications belong status epilepticus and sudden unexpected deaths due to epilepsy (SUDEP). Absences from work or school caused by seizures, difficulties in social life, frequent injuries and necessity of polytherapy are also important for patients. All these factors result in low self-esteem and poor quality of life. The main aim of the treatment was control of epileptic seizures. However, despite of new antiepileptic drugs developed almost every year, in one third of all patients with epilepsy seizures remain out of control. Those patients are regarded to have "drug-resistant epilepsy". Despite of significant scale of the problem, there is no one definition of the phenomenon. In the presented review the authors outline current definitions, recent opinions on pathogenesis and risk factors, and provide practical rules of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, which should help to restrict drug-resistancy.

  13. Treatment of epilepsy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakgazi, Evren; French, Jacqueline A

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder in adults and requires treatment with antiepileptic medication. While the majority of patients with epilepsy can be treated with medication, about one third will fail on medical treatment. Therefore, other treatment options such as surgery, devices, and the ketogenic diet are other options to consider, in addition to medical treatment. The treatment of epilepsy requires many other factors to be taken into consideration, and these include, but are not limited to, age, gender, coexistent medical conditions, and the use of concomitant medications. The goal of treatment is to provide optimal seizure control while using the least possible number of medications, particularly for young females at reproductive age or the elderly who may suffer from other medical diseases and receive other concomitant medications. Certain conditions may co-exist with epilepsy, such as migraine, mood disorder, and memory disturbances, therefore the decision to choose the most appropriate medication for epilepsy patients should also involve treatment of these conditions. Here, we review current clinical practice in epilepsy and focus on the most common problems and conditions that clinicians face on a daily basis to treat adult patients with epilepsy. Side effect profiles, spectrum of efficacy and optimal choices per predominant type of seizures are summarized and can be used for educational purposes.

  14. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  15. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, J; Fitzsimons, M; Delanty, N; Collins, C; Boland, M; Normand, C

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  16. Electroencephalography in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Javidan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG has an important role in the diagnosis and classification of epilepsy. It can provide information for predicting the response to antiseizure drugs and to identify the surgically remediable epilepsies. In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE seizures could originate in the medial or lateral neocortical temporal region, and many of these patients are refractory to medical treatment. However, majority of patients have had excellent results after surgery and this often relies on the EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data in presurgical evaluation. If the scalp EEG data is insufficient or discordant, invasive EEG recording with placement of intracranial electrodes could identify the seizure focus prior to surgery. This paper highlights the general information regarding the use of EEG in epilepsy, EEG patterns resembling epileptiform discharges, and the interictal, ictal and postictal findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using scalp and intracranial recordings prior to surgery. The utility of the automated seizure detection and computerized mathematical models for increasing yield of non-invasive localization is discussed. This paper also describes the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of EEG for seizure recurrence after withdrawal of medications following seizure freedom with medical and surgical therapy.

  17. Electroencephalography in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidan, Manouchehr

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) has an important role in the diagnosis and classification of epilepsy. It can provide information for predicting the response to antiseizure drugs and to identify the surgically remediable epilepsies. In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures could originate in the medial or lateral neocortical temporal region, and many of these patients are refractory to medical treatment. However, majority of patients have had excellent results after surgery and this often relies on the EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in presurgical evaluation. If the scalp EEG data is insufficient or discordant, invasive EEG recording with placement of intracranial electrodes could identify the seizure focus prior to surgery. This paper highlights the general information regarding the use of EEG in epilepsy, EEG patterns resembling epileptiform discharges, and the interictal, ictal and postictal findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using scalp and intracranial recordings prior to surgery. The utility of the automated seizure detection and computerized mathematical models for increasing yield of non-invasive localization is discussed. This paper also describes the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of EEG for seizure recurrence after withdrawal of medications following seizure freedom with medical and surgical therapy. PMID:22957235

  18. [Memory and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease that begins in the early age and that is associated with frequent and disturbing memory deficits. Repeated seizures will lead to the formation of an epileptogenic network that may interfere with physiological neuronal networks and thus with normal brain function: by direct activation or indirectly by deactivation during a seizure, see for example the dreamy state or the ''déja vécu'' phenomenon during temporal seizures; by ictal or post-ictal inhibition, see for example ictal or post-ictal amnesia; by a repetitive and chronic modulation leading to a reorganization of the physiological neuronal networks. The study of these interactions between epileptic and physiological neural networks must lead to better explore the patient's memory and predict memory worsening before temporal lobe surgery and to better understand the reorganization of memory networks in chronic epilepsy. The goal is double: (1) improve the prediction of post-operative memory worsening and guide rehabilitation in epileptic clinical practice; (2) improve the pathophysiological knowledge about memory processes. © Société de Biologie, 2010.

  19. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky's novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuil, Piet H A

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881) suffered from epilepsy. Some type of psychopathology can be found in about 25% of the characters of his novels. Some of them have seizures. In at least five of them Dostoevsky clearly intends them to have epilepsy. Others are more likely to be created as people with hysteria or sometimes, for instance, possession. In this essay an inventory is given by more or less comprehensive quotes of different types of seizures in five novels. The seizures are named in the novels with a varying vocabulary based on the concepts of nosology in the 19th century, the knowledge of Dostoevsky of these concepts, his own experiences, and problems in translation and transliteration. In the discussion, analysis of the role these factors played in the understanding of what Dostoevsky really expressed is given attention. Special attention is given to the so-called ecstatic aura. This element of focal epileptic seizures is so rare that in the past the description of it raised doubts on its existence as such and therefore the embellishment by Dostoevsky, describing his own experience and/or that of his epileptic characters Kirillov and Myshkin. The consequence of this analytic approach, however, should not be losing one's amazement of the genius polyphonic creativity of Dostoevsky to integrate so many profound aspects of the human and especially the Russian soul in the characters of his novels. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Machado de Assis's epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C A

    1992-09-01

    Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is considered the most important Brazilian writer and a great universal literary figure. Little is know about his medical, personal and family history. He hid his "disease" as much as possible. Machado referred to "strange things" having happened to him in his childhood. He described seizures as "nervous phenomena", "absenses", "my illness". Laet observed a seizure and described it as: "... when Machado approached us and spoke to me in disconnected words. I looked at him in surprise and found his features altered. Knowing that from time to time he had nervous problems, ... and only permitted Machado take the Laranjeiras Street car, when I saw that he was completely well". A photographically documented seizure is shown. Alencar wrote, "The preoccupation with health was frequent: either he was having the consequences of a fit or was foreboding one". It is clear that Machado presented localized symptomatic epilepsy with complex partial seizures secondarily generalized of unknown etiology. The seizures which began in infancy or childhood had remission in adolescence and then recurred in his thirties and became more frequent in his later years. His depression got markedly worse with age. In our opinion, the greatest consequence of Machado's epilepsy, was his psychological suffering due to the prejudice of the times. Despite this Machado showed all his genius, which is still actual and universal.