WorldWideScience

Sample records for abrasive dusts avaliacao

  1. Lung scintigraphy evaluation in workers exposed to abrasive dusts; Avaliacao cintilografica pulmonar em trabalhadores de industria de abrasivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra Filho, Mario

    1995-12-31

    The production process of abrasives use aluminium, or silicon carbide a synthetic material with a hardness only slightly less than that of a diamond. It is popularly known as carborundum since it was first manufactured as an abrasive in 1891, produced by the fusion of high grade silica and petroleum coke with sawdust. For many years silicon carbide was thought not to give rise to pulmonary lesions. Recently several researchers suggested the existence of a carborundum pneumoconiosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m} Technetium chelated to diethylene-triamine penta-acetate ({sup 99m} Tc DTPA), and {sup 67} Gallium lung scanning in workers exposed to abrasive dusts. Thirty seven subjects, 13 smokers and 24 nonsmokers and ex smokers were studied. In 32 (86,48%) {sup 67} Gallium lung scanning was positive including 13 (40,62%) retired workers. We conclude that non smoking workers of abrasives plants have a pulmonary alveolar epithelial permeability disturbance similar as observed in smoking workers and smoking controls. Most workers, ex-workers of these industries and in patients with carborundum pneumoconiosis there is an evidence of pulmonary inflammation measured with abnormal {sup 67} Gallium lung scan. (author) 101 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Lung scintigraphy evaluation in workers exposed to abrasive dusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production process of abrasives use aluminium, or silicon carbide a synthetic material with a hardness only slightly less than that of a diamond. It is popularly known as carborundum since it was first manufactured as an abrasive in 1891, produced by the fusion of high grade silica and petroleum coke with sawdust. For many years silicon carbide was thought not to give rise to pulmonary lesions. Recently several researchers suggested the existence of a carborundum pneumoconiosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the pulmonary clearance of 99m Technetium chelated to diethylene-triamine penta-acetate (99m Tc DTPA), and 67 Gallium lung scanning in workers exposed to abrasive dusts. Thirty seven subjects, 13 smokers and 24 nonsmokers and ex smokers were studied. In 32 (86,48%) 67 Gallium lung scanning was positive including 13 (40,62%) retired workers. We conclude that non smoking workers of abrasives plants have a pulmonary alveolar epithelial permeability disturbance similar as observed in smoking workers and smoking controls. Most workers, ex-workers of these industries and in patients with carborundum pneumoconiosis there is an evidence of pulmonary inflammation measured with abnormal 67 Gallium lung scan. (author)

  3. Abrasive Wear Map of Polymer Tapes in Sand Dust Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tong-hai; DIAO Dong-feng

    2006-01-01

    To make clear the wear conditions of ATM (Automatic Teller Machine) tribosystem when servicing in Chinese sand dust environment, abrasive wear of two kinds of polymer tapes specified for ATM, PI (Polyimide) and PEN (Polyethylene-2, 6-naphthalenedicarboxylate), was investigated in simulated sand dust environment with ATM tape-scraper tribosystem under various conditions of loads and sliding distances. The surface profiles of worn tape were measured with a surface profiler in order to calculating the wear cross-section areas and the wear volumes. The specific wear rates of polymer tapes were calculated under load conditions of 0.6, 1 and 1.5 N, and wear mechanisms were investigated with optical topography photos. As main results, the specific wear rates show stage variations in the wear process and the wear resistance of polymer tape shows good relationship with the mechanical deformation factors. In consideration of the service life, four wear models are generalized according to the magnitude of specific wear rates,which include no wear, mild wear, normal wear and severe wear model and the corresponding wear mechanisms for the four wear models are discussed with typical worn topographies. Based on the wear models and corresponding wear mechanisms, the abrasive wear maps of two polymer tapes servicing in sand dust environments are concluded for its industrial applications.

  4. Defining an Abrasion Index for Lunar Surface Systems as a Function of Dust Interaction Modes and Variable Concentration Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and subcategorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include: (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  5. Evaluation of emery dust on the manufacture of abrasives by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is presented an evaluation on the degree of contamination by emery dust in a working area where abrasives are manufactured, in a factory located in the industrial area of Toluca City by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The samples were collected on Whatman filters and attacked with hot concentrated HCl. The elements founded were: Al, Si, V, Mg, Br, Mn, Ni, Zn, Fe, Cr, Ca and Pb. They are a risk for the health of the workers. (Author)

  6. Multi-Use Coating for Abrasion Prevention, Wear Protection, and Lunar Dust Removal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The deleterious effects of lunar dust, typically less than 50 5m in diameter, have to be addressed prior to establishing a human base and long duration human...

  7. Air Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  8. Evaluation of secondary crystallization effect in poly hydroxybutyrate and silanized coir dust composites; Avaliacao do efeito da cristalizacao secundaria em compositos de polihidroxibutirato e po de coco silanizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Carolina C. de; Costa, Marysilvia F. da; Thire, Rossana M.S.M., E-mail: ccmello@metalmat.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Centro de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate is a natural and biodegradable polyester, susceptible to secondary crystallization when it is stored at environment temperature. Coir dust is an agroindustrial waste which has good prospects for use as filler in composites. In this context, PHB-coir dust composites were produced. The compatibilization was made by coir dust silanization. The secondary crystallization evolution on materials was evaluated by x-ray diffraction. Its effect was verified by tension tests which presented that elastic modulus increases when crystallinity increases. (author)

  9. Sustainability of abrasive processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aurich, J.C.; Linke, B.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of research on sustainability of abrasive processes. It incorporates results from a round robin study on ‘‘energy-efficiency of abrasive processes’’ which has been carried out within the scientific technical committee ‘‘abrasive processes’’ (STC G) of CIRP...

  10. Ultrasonic magnetic abrasive finishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ya-ping; MA Ji; ZHANG Jun-qiang; WANG Long-shan

    2006-01-01

    Put forward a new kind of polishing method, ultrasonic magnetic abrasive finishing (UMAF), and studied its mechanism of improving polishing efficiency. By analyzing all kind of forces acting on single abrasive particle in the polishing process and calculating the size of the composition of forces, get the conclusion that UMAF will enhance the efficiency of the normal magnetic abrasive finishing(MAF) due to the ultrasonic vibration increases the cutting force and depth. At last the idea of designing the UMAF system based on numerical control milling machine is put forward which is convenient to setup and will accelerate the practical application of MAF.

  11. Performance Enhancement of Abrasive Waterjet Cutting

    OpenAIRE

    Vu Ngoc Pi

    2008-01-01

    Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) Machining is a recent non-traditional machining process. This technology is widely used in industry for cutting difficult-to-machine-materials, milling slots, polishing hard materials etc. AWJ machining has many advantages, e.g. it can cut net-shape parts, no heat is generated during the cutting process, it is particularly environmentally friendly as it is clean and it does not create dust. Although AWJ machining has many advantages, a big disadvantage of this technolo...

  12. Assessment of contamination for inorganic elements and phthalate esters in household dust from the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo; Avaliacao da contaminacao por elementos inorganicos e esteres ftalicos em poeira domestica da regiao metropolitana de Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scapin, Valdirene de Oliveira

    2009-07-01

    Household dust has been identified as an important vector of exposure by inorganic and organic substances potentially toxic in children and adults. The dust composition has a strong influence of contaminants provided from internal and external environments. During the natural process of wearing or weather incidents of artifacts and materials variety, the chemical substances are released into the environment in the steam form or by leaching from final products. Once released, they can be accumulated and enriched in the dust; and by continuous exposure (inhalation, ingestion and dermal contact mechanisms), these substances are harmful to human health. In this work, a study to determine the inorganic constituents and phthalate esters concentrations in residential indoor environment dust samples, correlating them with the probable anthropogenic sources was proposed. Dust samples were collected from 69 residences in neighborhoods Pirituba, Freguesia do O, Jaragua and Perus of the Sao Paulo metropolitan region, using a domestic vacuum cleaner, between 2006 and 2008. The samples were sieved in the fractions of 850, 850-300, 300-150, 150-75, 75-63 and <63 {mu}m. The analysis by X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) showed the presence of Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb. The presence of phthalate esters (DEHP, DnBP, DEP, DEHA, DMP and BBP) was detected, by GCMS analyses. From the enrichment factor (EF), the elements P, S, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were classified as being significant and extremely enriched in the dust. The natural and anthropogenic contributions by statistical tools as factor analysis (AF) and cluster were identified. The elements Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were present significantly elevated concentrations in relation to the total exposure values (ingestion, inhalation and skin contact) and to risk. (author)

  13. Abrasive Blasting Unit (ABU) - 16270

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUKEM Technologies was contracted to supply a dry, automated drum belt (tumbling) Abrasive Blasting Unit (ABU) to the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission in Ispra, Italy. The ABU was installed in the centralised radioactive waste management area of the JRC-Ispra site in Italy. The unit is to be employed for the decontamination to clearance levels of slightly contaminated metal components and, where practical, concrete or heavy concrete (density ∼3200 kg/m3) blocks arising from the dismantling of nuclear facilities. The presentation is based on the successful construction and installation of the ABU at the JRC Ispra site. Among the several possibilities of adapting conventional abrasive units to nuclear applications, an automatic tumbling machine was preferred, due to the larger output and (mainly) for the ease of operation, with minimum direct handling of contaminated material by operators, thus satisfying the ALARA principle. Consideration was also given to Belgoprocess' successful experience with a predecessor, similar unit. After adequate size reduction batches of up to about 800 kg of material to be decontaminated are automatically introduced into the blasting chamber. Pieces between 100 mm and 800 mm long, between 100 mm and 500 mm wide and between 5 mm and 300 mm high can be effectively treated in the unit, the maximum weight of a single piece being limited to 100 kg. Short lengths of pipe may be included; the final dimensions of pipe to be decontaminated will be established during the nuclear commissioning tests. Other components with hard-to-reach surfaces may also be included. The content of the chamber is tumbled by two bladed drums, while sharp steel grit is sprayed onto the contaminated components, thus removing the surface layer including any contamination. From experience, 30 minutes of treatment is sufficient to remove contamination to levels below expected clearance levels for most materials. The decontaminated components are removed

  14. Rock Abrasion Tool Exhibits the Deep Red Pigment of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    During recent soil-brushing experiments, the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit became covered with dust, as shown here. An abundance of iron oxide minerals in the dust gave the device a reddish-brown veneer. Investigators were using the rock abrasion tool to uncover successive layers of soil in an attempt to reveal near-surface stratigraphy. Afterward, remnant dirt clods were visible on both the bit and the brush of the tool. Designers of the rock abrasion tool at Honeybee Robotics and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a plan to run the brush on the rock abrasion tool in reverse to dislodge the dirt and return the tool to normal operation. Subsequent communications with the rover revealed that the procedure is working and the rock abrasion tool remains healthy. Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 893rd sol, or Martian day (July 8, 2006). The image combines exposures taken through three of the camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 430 nanometers.

  15. Control technology for crystalline silica exposures in construction: wet abrasive blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golla, Vijay; Heitbrink, William

    2004-03-01

    This study was designed to document the effect that wet abrasive blasting has on reducing worker exposure to crystalline silica, which has been associated with silicosis and premature death. In this study, worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica was monitored during wet abrasive blasting on the exterior walls of a parking garage to remove surface concrete and expose the underlying aggregate. In this process a wet sand mix comprised of 80% dry sand and 20% water was used. Sampling and analysis revealed that the geometric mean respirable quartz concentration was 0.2 mg/m(3) for workers conducting abrasive blasting and 0.06 mg/m(3) for helpers. When abrasive blasting was conducted in areas that apparently had reduced natural ventilation, dust exposures appeared to increase. When compared with other published data, this case study suggests that wet abrasive blasting causes less exposure to crystalline silica than dry abrasive blasting. PMID:15204868

  16. Abrasion of ultrafine WC-Co by fine abrasive particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Abrasive wear of a series of WC-(5%-14%, mass fiaction)Co hardmetals was investigated employing coarse and fine SiC abrasive under two-body dry abrasion conditions with pin-on-disc and edge-on-disc test arrangements. Unexpectedly, it is found that submicron grades demonstrate substantially higher wear rates comparing with the coarse grades if fine abrasive is utilized in pin-on-disc tests. Such a behavior is attributed to changes in a ratio of abrasive size to size of hard phase as finer abrasive is used.The edge-on-disc test demonstrates that edge wear may be described in two stages with the highest wear rates at the beginning stage.This behavior is associated with a transition of wear mechanisms as edge is wider due to wear. Compared with the ultrafine grades of the same Co content, the coarse grades demonstrate higher wear rates at the beginning, but lower wear rates at the final stage. Wear rates and mechanisms observed at final stage correlate well to the results observed for pin-on-disc tests employing fine abrasive.

  17. Comparative pulmonary toxicity of 6 abrasive blasting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbs, A.F.; Minhas, N.S.; Jones, W.; Greskevitch, M.; Battelli, L.A.; Porter, D.W.; Goldsmith, W.T.; Frazer, D.; Landsittel, D.P.; Ma, J.Y.C.; Barger, M.; Hill, K.; Schwegler-Berry, D.; Robinson, V.A.; Castranova, V. [Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, WV (USA). Health Effects Laboratory Division

    2001-05-01

    Inhalation of silica dust is associated with pulmonary fibrosis, Therefore, substitute abrasive materials have been suggested for use in abrasive blasting operations. To date, toxicological evaluation of most substitute abrasives has been incomplete. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the pulmonary toxicity of a set of substitute abrasives (garnet, staurolite, coal slag, specular hematite, and treated sand) to that of blasting sand. Rats were exposed to blasting sand or an abrasive substitute by intratracheal instillation and pulmonary responses to exposure were monitored 4 weeks postexposure. Pulmonary damage was monitored as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the acellular lavage fluid. Pulmonary inflammation was evaluated from the yield of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. The activity of alveolar macrophages was determined by measuring: zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Blasting sand caused lung damage and showed histologic evidence for inflammation and fibrosis, Garnet, staurolite, and treated sand exhibited toxicity and inflammation that were similar to blasting sand. while coal slag caused greater pulmonary damage and inflammation than blasting sand, In contrast, specular hematite did not significantly elevate LDH or PMN levels and did not stimulate macrophage activity 4 weeks postexposure.

  18. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  19. PROGRESS IN THERMO-ABRASIVE BLASTING SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Quality of surface preparation of components and structures for further painting and/or coating is important in many fields of engineering. One of the most widely used methods of surface preparation is abrasive blasting. In the last few years, a new method for surface preparation has evolved, namely thermo-abrasive blasting. This technique utilises a high enthalpy thermal jet, generated by the thermo-abrasive blasting gun, to propel abrasive particles. Thermo-abrasi...

  20. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive blasting. 72.610 Section 72.610... HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 72.610 Abrasive blasting. (a) Surface and...

  1. A light-scattering study of Al2O3 abrasives of various grit sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinson, Yuli W.; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2016-09-01

    We report light scattering phase function measurements for irregularly shaped Al2O3 abrasive powders of various grit sizes. Q-space analysis is applied to the angular scattering to reveal a forward scattering regime, Guinier regime, power law regime with quantifiable exponents, and an enhanced backscattering regime. The exponents of the power laws for Al2O3 abrasives decrease with increasing internal coupling parameter ρ ‧ , which is in agreement with previous observations for other irregular particles. Unlike other dust particles previously studied showing single power laws under Q-space analysis, the largest three abrasives, for which ρ ‧ ≳ 100 , showed a kink in the power law, which is possibly due to the higher degree of symmetry for the abrasives than for all the particles studied previously. Direct comparison of the 1200, 1000, and 800 grit abrasive scattering to scattering by corresponding spheres shows that the scatterings approximately coincide at the spherical particle qR ≃ ρ ‧ crossover point. Furthermore, the scattering at the maximum qR = 2 kR by the irregularly shaped abrasives is close to the geometric centers of the glories of the spheres.

  2. Progress in abrasive and grinding technology

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xipeng

    2009-01-01

    The grinding and abrasive processing of materials are machining techniques which use bonded or loose abrasives to remove material from workpieces. Due to the well-known advantages of grinding and abrasive processes, advances in abrasive and grinding technology are always of great import in enhancing both productivity and component quality. In order to highlight the recent progress made in this field, the editor invited 21 world-wide contributions with the aim of gathering together all of the achievements of leading researchers into a single publication. The authors of the 21 invited papers, of

  3. Abrasion of flat rotating shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, A.E.; Marques, C. M.; Durian, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the erosion of flat linoleum "pebbles" under steady rotation in a slurry of abrasive grit. To quantify shape as a function of time, we develop a general method in which the pebble is photographed from multiple angles with respect to the grid of pixels in a digital camera. This reduces digitization noise, and allows the local curvature of the contour to be computed with a controllable degree of uncertainty. Several shape descriptors are then employed to follow the evolution of dif...

  4. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  5. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive blasting. 58.610 Section...

  6. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  7. Corneal abrasions associated with pepper spray exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L; Takeuchi, D; Challoner, K

    2000-05-01

    Pepper spray containing oleoresin capsicum is used by law enforcement and the public as a form of nonlethal deterrent. Stimulated by the identification of a case of a corneal abrasion associated with pepper spray exposure, a descriptive retrospective review of a physician-maintained log of patients presenting to a jail ward emergency area over a 3-year period was performed. The objective was to give some quantification to the frequency with which an emergency physician could expect to see corneal abrasions associated with pepper spray exposure. Of 100 cases of pepper spray exposure identified, seven patients had sustained corneal abrasions. We conclude that corneal abrasions are not rare events when patients are exposed to pepper spray and that fluorescein staining and slit lamp or Wood's lamp examination should be performed on all exposed patients in whom corneal abrasions cannot be excluded on clinical grounds. PMID:10830682

  8. Search for magnetic minerals in Martian rocks: Overview of the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) magnet investigation on Spirit and Opportunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, W.; Leer, K.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.;

    2008-01-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is a grinding tool designed to remove dust coatings and/or weathering rinds from rocks and expose fresh rock material. Four magnets of different strengths that are built into the structure of the RAT have been attracting...

  9. Lunar Dust Chemical, Electrical, and Mechanical Reactivity: Simulation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar dust is recognized to be a highly reactive material in its native state. Many, if not all Constellation systems will be affected by its adhesion, abrasion, and reactivity. A critical requirement to develop successful strategies for dealing with lunar dust and designing tolerant systems will be to produce similar material for ground-based testing.

  10. Life cycle and sustainability of abrasive tools

    CERN Document Server

    Linke, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This monograph focuses on abrasive tools for grinding, polishing, honing, and lapping operations. The book describes the life cycle of abrasive tools from raw material processing of abrasive grits and bonding, manufacturing of monolithic or multi-layered tools, tool use to tool end-of-life. Moreover, this work highlights sustainability challenges including economic, environmental, social and technological aspects. The target audience primarily comprises research and industry experts in the field of manufacturing, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  11. Abrasive Wear of Digger Tooth Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Sarhan sarhan, Nofal Al-Araji, Rateb Issa , Mohammad Alia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of silicon carbide SiC abrasive particles of 20, 30, 40, 50 and60μm size on carburized digger tooth steel was studied. Four types of steel, withdifferent hardness, were tested at two constant linear sliding speeds and undervarious loads of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50N. Tests were carried out for sliding time of0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5min. Experimental results showed that there wasconsistent reduction in abrasive wear as the hardness of the materials wasincreased. It was found that wear increased with the increase of applied load,linear sliding speed and sliding time. Also, it was noticed that the wear increasedwith increase in abrasive particle size, and the most effective size was 40 μm.SEM observations of the worm surface showed that the cutting and ploughingwere the dominant abrasive wear mechanisms.

  12. The measurement of abrasive particles velocities in the process of abrasive water jet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Říha, Zdeněk

    2014-08-01

    An optimization of the design of the abrasive cutting head using the numerical simulation requires gathering as much information about processes occurring in the cutting head as possible. Detailed knowledge of velocities of abrasive particles in the process of abrasive water jet generation is vital for the verification of the numerical model. A method of measurement of abrasive particles at the exit of focusing tube using the FPIV technique was proposed and preliminary tests are described in the paper. Results of analysis of measured velocity fields are presented in the paper.

  13. Impact-abrasion and abrasion of WC-Co: wear mechanisms in severe environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.; Osara, K. (Outokumpu Research Oy)

    2003-10-01

    Hard and super-hard materials have very good abrasive wear resistance. However, in many severe wear environments that make use of these materials, impact is a significant component of that environment. Consequently, the behavior of many of these hard materials in impact-wear conditions need to be understood with respect to the mechanisms of material removal such small scale fracture and subsequent crack growth in the carbide. This study details the behavior of several ?hard? materials in abrasion and impact-abrasion focusing on the mechanisms of material removal due to impact and abrasion.

  14. Performance of recycling abrasives in rock cutting by abrasive water jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokhan Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Rock cutting performance of recycling abrasives was investigated in terms of cutting depth, kerf width, kerf taper angle and surface roughness. Gravity separation technique was employed to separate the abrasives and the rock particles. The recycling abrasive particles were then dried and sieved for determination of their disintegration behaviors. Before each cutting with recycling abrasives, the abrasive particles less than 106mm were screened out. It is revealed that a considerable amount of used abrasives can be effectively reused in the rock cutting. The reusabilities of abrasives are determined as 81.77%, 57.50%, 34.37%and 17.72%after the first, second, third and fourth cuttings, respectively. Additionally, it is determined that recycling must be restricted three times due to the excessive disintegration of abrasives with further recycling. Moreover, it is concluded that cutting depth, kerf width and surface roughness decreases with recycling. No clear trend is found between the kerf taper angle and recycling. Particle size distribution is determined as an important parameter for improving the cutting performance of recycling abrasives.

  15. Abrasive water jet: a complementary tool

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, J. P.; Peças, P.; E NUNES; H. Gouveia

    1998-01-01

    The abrasive water jet is a powerful cutting tool, whose main advantages lie in the absence of thermal effects and the capability of cutting highly thick materials. Compared with Laser, the abrasive water jet allows the cutting of a larger range of thicknesses and a wider variety of materials such as: ornamental stones, metals, polymers, composites, wood, glass and ceramics. The application of this technology has suffered an extensive growth, with successful applications in varied industrial ...

  16. Third abrasive wear mode: is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Câmara Cozza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose an initial discussion on the characterization of a third abrasive wear mode. The results obtained in a previous work [1] under different test conditions revealed the occurrence of the superposition of the “rolling” and “grooving” abrasive wear modes. This phenomenon was denoted “micro-rolling abrasion” due to the observation that “rolling abrasion” was found to act on “grooving abrasion”.

  17. Does the source migration pathway of HBCDs to household dust influence their bio-accessibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alcega, Sonia; Rauert, Cassie; Harrad, Stuart; Collins, Chris D

    2016-11-01

    A study was conducted to assess the human bioaccessibility of dust contaminated with hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) via two migration pathways a) volatilisation with subsequent partitioning to dust particles, and b) abrasion of treated textile fibres directly to the dust. This was achieved using previously developed experimental chamber designs to generate dust samples contaminated with HBCDs emitted from a HBCD treated textile curtain. The generated dust samples were exposed to an in vitro colon extended physiologically based extraction test (CE-PBET). The bioaccessibility of the HBCDs which were incorporated within dust as a result of volatilisation from the curtain material with subsequent partitioning to dust was higher than in dusts contaminated with HBCDs via abrasion of the curtain (35% and 15% respectively). We propose this occurs due to a stronger binding of HBCDs to treated fabric fibres than that experienced following volatilisation and sorption of HBCDs to dust particles. PMID:27343943

  18. Characterization of abrasion-induced nanoparticle release from paints into liquids and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanski, L.; Gaborieau, A.; Guiot, A.; Uzu, G.; Chatenet, J.; Tardif, F.

    2011-07-01

    Two standard methods for the characterization of the abrasion nanoparticle release into air and liquid from coatings containing nanoparticles were developed. Details of the abrasion processes and the measurement methods are shown. Paints were formulated in an industrial facility. Standard abrasion conditions in wet environments were simulated. The size distribution of the particles abraded into liquid was analyzed by a laser granulometer: submicrometric and micrometric particles were observed, but no nanometric particles. The nanoparticles released in liquid were deposited on filters for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. No free or agglomerated nanoparticles were observed by SEM: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix. The same coatings were abraded in the air using another standard method. The ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor) was used to determine the number size distribution of the dust generated. Abrasion is found to produce submicrometric and micrometric particles in the air but no nanoparticles. Further characterizations by SEM confirmed that no free or agglomerated nanoparticles were emitted: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix.

  19. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced

  20. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  1. Basics of cutting and abrasive processes

    CERN Document Server

    Toenshoff, Hans Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing is the basic industrial activity generating real value. Cutting and abrasive technologies are the backbone of precision production in machine, automotive and aircraft building as well as of production of consumer goods. We present the knowledge of modern manufacturing in these technologies on the basis of scientific research. The theory of cutting and abrasive processes and the knowledge about their application in industrial practice are a prerequisite for the studies of manufacturing science and an important part of the curriculum of the master study in German mechanical engineering. The basis of this book is our lecture “Basics of cutting and abrasive processes” (4 semester hours/3 credit hours) at the Leibniz University Hannover, which we offer to the diploma and master students specializing in manufacturing science.

  2. Universal scaling relations for pebble abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The process of abrasion of gravel in bed load transport results from particle-to-particle collisions, where the energy involved is sufficient to cause chipping and spallation but not fragmentation of parent grains. The removed rock material is not infinitesimal; daughter products as large as coarse sand can be produced. Although previous work has shown that lithology, grain shape, and energy of collision are contributing factors that control abrasion rates of river-bed material, little is known regarding the relationship between these factors and diminution rates. Here we explicitly isolate and investigate how these three factors influence rates of abrasion and the size distribution of daughter products, with laboratory experiments. The apparatus is a double pendulum (Newton's cradle) that produces well-controlled binary collisions. A high-speed camera precisely measures collision energy, while mass of parent rocks. and the size and shape distributions of daughter products, are measured periodically. We examined abrasion of initially square-cut 'rocks' as they underwent successive collisions in the binary collision apparatus. We have examined mass loss rate for varied lithologies, and observe a similar power-law relationship between impact energy and mass abraded. When normalized by sensible material properties, mass loss curves for all materials collapse onto a single curve, suggesting that the underlying mechanics of abrasion for different materials are the same. The relationship does not display the linear trend expected from pure energetics, and we suggest that this is a shape effect as protruding - and hence easily eroded - corners are worn away. Analysis of daughter-product particle size distributions for different lithology fragments - including natural rocks and also bricks - show the same functional form. Surprisingly, it is the power-law relation expected for brittle materials undergoing fragmentation. This suggests that brittle fracture theory also

  3. Abrasion test of flexible protective materials on hydraulic structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WANG; Shao-ze LUO; Guang-sheng LIU; Lu-chen ZHANG; Yong WANG

    2014-01-01

    In this study, several kinds of flexible protective materials sprayed with polyurea elastomers (hereinafter referred to as polyurea elastomer protective material) were adopted to meet the abrasion resistance requirement of hydraulic structures, and their abrasion resistances against the water flow with suspended load or bed load were studied systematically through tests. Natural basalt stones were adopted as the abrasive for simulation of the abrasion effect of the water flow with bed load, and test results indicate that the basalt stone is suitable for use in the abrasion resistance test of the flexible protective material. The wear process of the polyurea elastomer protective material is stable, and the wear loss is linear with the time of abrasion. If the wear thickness is regarded as the abrasion resistance evaluation factor, the abrasion resistance of the 351 pure polyurea is about twice those of pure polyurea with a high level of hardness and aliphatic polyurea, and over five times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with suspended load. It is also about 50 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load. Overall, the abrasion resistance of pure polyurea presented a decreasing trend with increasing hardness. Pure polyurea with a Shore hardness of D30 has the best abrasion resistance, which is 60 to 70 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load, and has been recommended, among the five kinds of pure polyurea materials with different hardness, in anti-abrasion protection of hydraulic structures.

  4. Abrasion test of flexible protective materials on hydraulic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin WANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several kinds of flexible protective materials sprayed with polyurea elastomers (hereinafter referred to as polyurea elastomer protective material were adopted to meet the abrasion resistance requirement of hydraulic structures, and their abrasion resistances against the water flow with suspended load or bed load were studied systematically through tests. Natural basalt stones were adopted as the abrasive for simulation of the abrasion effect of the water flow with bed load, and test results indicate that the basalt stone is suitable for use in the abrasion resistance test of the flexible protective material. The wear process of the polyurea elastomer protective material is stable, and the wear loss is linear with the time of abrasion. If the wear thickness is regarded as the abrasion resistance evaluation factor, the abrasion resistance of the 351 pure polyurea is about twice those of pure polyurea with a high level of hardness and aliphatic polyurea, and over five times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with suspended load. It is also about 50 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load. Overall, the abrasion resistance of pure polyurea presented a decreasing trend with increasing hardness. Pure polyurea with a Shore hardness of D30 has the best abrasion resistance, which is 60 to 70 times that of high-performance abrasion-resistant concrete under the abrasion of the water flow with bed load, and has been recommended, among the five kinds of pure polyurea materials with different hardness, in anti-abrasion protection of hydraulic structures.

  5. Recent progress of abrasion-resistant materials: learning from nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2016-01-21

    Abrasion-resistant materials have attracted great attention for their broad applications in industry, biomedicine and military. However, the development of abrasion-resistant materials that have with unique features such as being lightweight and flexible remains a great challenge in order to satisfy unmet demands. The outstanding performance of natural abrasion-resistant materials motivates the development of new bio-inspired abrasion-resistant materials. This review summarizes the recent progress in the investigation of natural abrasion-resistant materials to explore their general design principles (i.e., the correlation between chemical components and structural features). Following natural design principles, several artificial abrasion-resistant materials have shown unique abrasion-resistant properties. The potential challenges in the future and possible solutions for designing bio-inspired abrasion-resistant materials are also briefly discussed. PMID:26335377

  6. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Florence Pascaretti-Grizon; Guillaume Mabilleau; Daniel Chappard

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscop...

  7. Concrete ice abrasion rig and wear measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamsutdinova, G.; Rike, P.B.; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Jacobsen, S.

    2015-01-01

    The wear of concrete material due to ice movement is a challenge for offshore and coastal structures. Concrete surfaces exposed to moving ice are subjected to wear at various rates depending on concrete and ice properties. At NTNU, Department of Structural Engineering, concrete ice abrasion phenomen

  8. Performance Enhancement of Abrasive Waterjet Cutting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Ngoc Pi

    2008-01-01

    Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) Machining is a recent non-traditional machining process. This technology is widely used in industry for cutting difficult-to-machine-materials, milling slots, polishing hard materials etc. AWJ machining has many advantages, e.g. it can cut net-shape parts, no heat is generate

  9. Thermal aspects of ice abrasive water jet technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Jerman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, different research groups have been developing systems for the transition of abrasive water jet into ice abrasive water jet. The aim of this new technology is to make the technology cleaner from both practical and ecological points of view. Mineral abrasive is replaced with ice grains that melt away after the machining process, leaving the workpiece uncontaminated. Several different approaches to this technology were studied. Thermal aspects of integrating the ice abrasive water jet technology into commercially available machines were considered. The results and analyses of water temperature measurements on the ice abrasive water jet machine are presented in this article.

  10. Usage of abrasion-resistant materials in agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Votava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soil-processing machines are subject to an extensive abrasive wear. This paper analyses technical materials and their fitness to exchangeable parts of plough bottoms, such as edge-tools and whole plough cutting edges. There were tested abrasion-resistant steels with different microstructures: austenite, martensite-bainite, and carbide. Steel with the pearlite-ferrite structure was used as an etalon. Abrasion resistance tests were processed in compliance with the norm CSN 01 5084, which is a test of abrasion wear on abrasive cloth.

  11. Properties, structure and machnining capabilities sintered corundum abrasives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cz.J. Niżankowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of sintered corundum abrasives used in both bonded and in the embankment of abrasive tools currently poses substantialproblems for their choice of technology to specific tasks. Therefore performed a comparative study of ownership structures and capacitiesof elected representatives machnining sintered corundum abrasives of different generations, and this is normal sintered alumina,submicrocrystalline alumina sintered and nanocrystalline alumina sintered. Were studied some properties of a set of abrasive particles,physicochemical properties and structural and mechanical and technological properties. The studies used the method of microscopicmeasurement to determine the shape of abrasive particles, the pycnometer to determine the density of abrasive, a spectrometer todetermine the chemical composition of the magnetic analyzer for determining the magnetic fraction, scanning electron microscope toanalysis of abrasive grains and a special position to designate the machining capacity abrasive grains. The results showed a significantincrease in machining capacity sintered corundum abrasives with increasing degree of fragmentation of the crystallites sintered corundum abrasives and distinctive bands in the emerging microchip. The originality of the development provides a comparative summary ofproperties of sintered corundum abrasives of different generations and functions obtained by the author making the change in value indexof machininhcapacity grit from cutting speeds for different generations of sintered corundum.

  12. INTERNAL FINISHING OF CYLINDRICAL PIPES USING SINTERED MAGNETIC ABRASIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PALWINDER SINGH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An internal magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF process was proposed to produce highly finished inner surfaces of workpieces used in critical applications. The process principle and the finishing characteristics of magnetic abrasive finishing of cylindrical pipes using sintered magnetic abrasives are described in this research work. Thesintered magnetic abrasive is a mixture of Al2O3 abrasive and ferromagnetic particles. The Al2O3 based sintered magnetic abrasives have been developed in sintering machine. The surface roughness measurements resulting from finishing experiments demonstrate the effects of the abrasive behavior on the surface modifications. Thesurface finish was analysed in terms of percent improvement in surface finish (PISF. Also surface finish was analysed using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. The obtained maximum PISF was 95% and minimum surface roughness was 0.05 μm Ra. To further study the improvement in surface finish, the surface was microscopically examined using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD.

  13. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05. The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required.

  14. Liquid abrasive pressure pot scoping tests report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary initiatives of the LITCO Decontamination Development group at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) are the development of methods to eliminate the use of sodium bearing decontamination chemicals and minimization of the amount of secondary waste generated during decontamination activities. In July of 1994, a Commerce Business Daily (CBD) announcement was issued by the INEL to determine commercial interest in the development of an in-situ liquid abrasive grit blasting system. As a result of the CBD announcement, Klieber ampersand Schulz issued an Expression of Interest letter which stated they would be interested in testing a prototype Liquid Abrasive Pressure Pot (LAPP). LITCO's Decontamination group and Kleiber ampersand Schulz entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in which the Decontamination Development group tested the prototype LAPP in a non-radioactive hot cell mockup. Test results are provided

  15. Lunar Dust Simulant in Mechanical Component Testing - Paradigm and Practicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, T.; Street, K.; Abel, P.; Richmond, R.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the uniquely harsh lunar surface environment, terrestrial test activities may not adequately represent abrasive wear by lunar dust likely to be experienced in mechanical systems used in lunar exploration. Testing to identify potential moving mechanism problems has recently begun within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center Mechanical Systems Lunar Dust Assessment activity in coordination with the Exploration Technology and Development Program Dust Management Project, and these complimentary efforts will be described. Specific concerns about differences between simulant and lunar dust, and procedures for mechanical component testing with lunar simulant will be considered. In preparing for long term operations within a dusty lunar environment, the three fundamental approaches to keeping mechanical equipment functioning are dust avoidance, dust removal, and dust tolerance, with some combination of the three likely to be found in most engineering designs. Methods to exclude dust from contact with mechanical components would constitute mitigation by dust avoidance, so testing seals for dust exclusion efficacy as a function of particle size provides useful information for mechanism design. Dust of particle size less than a micron is not well documented for impact on lunar mechanical components. Therefore, creating a standardized lunar dust simulant in the particulate size range of ca. 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer is useful for testing effects on mechanical components such as bearings, gears, seals, bushings, and other moving mechanical assemblies. Approaching actual wear testing of mechanical components, it is beneficial to first establish relative wear rates caused by dust on commonly used mechanical component materials. The wear mode due to dust within mechanical components, such as abrasion caused by dust in grease(s), needs to be considered, as well as the effects of vacuum, lunar thermal cycle, and electrostatics on wear rate.

  16. Tangental Turning of Incoloy Alloy 925 Using Abrasive Water Jet

    OpenAIRE

    Cárach, J.; S. Hloch; Hlaváček, P.; K. Vasilko; Lehocká, D.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with tangential turning of Incoloy alloy 925 with the diameter 50mm using the abrasive water jet. Experiment was done using the abrasive water jet of pressure p=400MPa and traverse speed at levels of v=1,5;3;4,5;6;7,5;9mm min-1. the abrasive particles were feeded to the water jet in the amount of 400 g min-1. Revolution of Incoloy workpiece during turning was n=34rpm.

  17. Abrasion Resistance Comparison between Rotor and Ring Spun Yarn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian-ping; YU Chong-wen

    2002-01-01

    On the base of literature review and the analysis of yarn properties, yarn structure and some other facts, the abrasion resistance of both rotor spun yarn and ring spun yarns are discussed. The results show that with the same raw material and twist, the rotor spun yarn has lower abrasion resistance than that of ring spun yarn, because of the higher twist employed, the abrasion resistance of rotor spun yarn is higher than that of ring spun yarn.

  18. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use.

  19. Abrasive water jet: a complementary tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte, J. P.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The abrasive water jet is a powerful cutting tool, whose main advantages lie in the absence of thermal effects and the capability of cutting highly thick materials. Compared with Laser, the abrasive water jet allows the cutting of a larger range of thicknesses and a wider variety of materials such as: ornamental stones, metals, polymers, composites, wood, glass and ceramics. The application of this technology has suffered an extensive growth, with successful applications in varied industrial sectors like the automotive, aerospace, textile, metalworking, ornamental stones, etc. The present communication aims at introducing the abrasive water jet as a complementary tool to laser cutting, presenting its advantages by showing some documented examples of pieces cut for different industries.

    O jacto de água abrasivo é uma poderosa ferramenta de corte, tendo como principais vantagens a ausência de processo térmico e permitir o corte de elevadas espessuras. Comparativamente com o laser o jacto de água abrasivo permite cortar uma maior gama de espessuras, e uma maior diversidade de materiais: rochas ornamentais, metais, polimeros, compósitos, madeiras, vidro e cerâmicos. A aplicação desta tecnologia tem sofrido um crescimento acentuado, existindo aplicações de sucesso nos mais variados sectores industriáis como a indústria automóvel, aeroespacial, têxtil, metalomecânica e rochas ornamentáis. Esta comunição pretende apresentar o corte por jacto de agua abrasivo como uma ferramenta de corte complementar ao corte por laser, apresentando as suas vantagens documentadas através de alguns exemplos de peças executadas para as diferentes indústrias.

  20. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin. PMID:24642975

  1. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin.

  2. The Abrasion-resistance Investigation of Rubberized Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Jingfu; ZHANG Bo; LI Guangyu

    2012-01-01

    The abrasion resistance properties of rubberized concrete were comparatively studied by taking silica fume and crumb tire rubber as the additives.The abrasion tests were conducted in accordance with the Chinese standard test method DL/T 5150-2001,two recommended test methods:under water method and ring method,were used.The crumb tire rubbers with the sieve size of 8-mesh and 16-mesh were incorporated into the concrete by replacing same volume of sand and as an additive.The abrasion resistance of concrete was evaluated according to the abrasion resistance strength and the mass loss.Test results show that the addition of silica fume enhanced both compressive strength and abrasion resistance of concrete,and the addition of crumb rubber reduced the compressive strength but increased notably the abrasion resistance of the concrete.Silica fume concrete performed a better abrasion resistance than control concrete,and the rubberized concrete performed a much better abrasion resistance than silica fume concrete.The abrasion resistance of rubberized concrete increased with the increase of rubber content.

  3. Research on Premixed Abrasive Jet Derusting Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The structure, working principles, and main technological parameters of the premajet derusting machineare introduced. Experiments were made to test the relationship among such jet parameters as working pressure,rate of water flow, abrasive weight consistency and derusting efficiency. Reasonable parameters were decided. Re-su lts prove that the derusting machine is characterized by its high derusting efficiency (as high as 20 m2/h), goodderusting quality (as good as ISO8501-1 Sa 2.5), and low specific power consumption (about 0.3 kW · h/m2).Therefore it is a new type of high efficiency derusting machine.

  4. Impact of toothpaste slurry abrasivity and toothbrush filament stiffness on abrasion of eroded enamel - an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Annette; Schwerzmann, Martina; Sener, Beatrice; Magalhães, Ana C.; Roos, Malgorzata; Ziebolz, Dirk; Imfeld, Thomas; Attin, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Toothbrush abrasion is significant in the development of tooth wear, particularly when combined with erosion. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the impact of toothpaste slurry abrasivity and toothbrush filament stiffness on abrasion of eroded enamel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eroded enamel samples (hydrochloric acid, pH: 2.6, 15 s) were brushed with 40 strokes in an automatic brushing machine using manual toothbrushes with different filament stiffness (filament diameter: 0.15, 0.20...

  5. Ultrasonic Abrasion: An Alternative for Cavity Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Simone Barrôso VIEIRA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Restorative dentistry aims to repair damages caused by caries disease. Along the years, researchers have developed effective and less invasive methods with the goal of preserving the teeth from caries destruction. Therefore, the improvement of scientific knowledge, auxiliary diagnostic systems, dental materials, and new instruments has changed the approaches and treatments in this field. In addition to conservative removal of carious tissue, patient’s comfort has also become a concern in modern dentistry.Purpose: Considering that ultrasonic abrasion has attracted great interest of dental professionals, this article discusses an alternative technique for cavity preparation by literature review, addressing its indications, contra-indications, advantages and limitations compared to the conventional high-speed method.Conclusion: There are not many studies on this subject. The available studies have demonstrated several qualities of the ultrasonic abrasion system, but some aspects remain unclear. Therefore, it is important to highlight that laboratorial and clinical studies in primary/permanent teeth should be conducted to elucidate questionable issues, such as time of cavity preparation, topography, presence of smear layer and microleakage, in order to offer safety to the extensive use of this new technology for both the professional and the patient. In this context, the dentist should always be attentive to innovations referring to minimally invasive techniques.

  6. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Pascaretti-Grizon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. RESULTS: Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. CONCLUSION: Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials.

  7. Abrasion Resistant Refractory Materials GB/T 23294-2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lingyuan

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the definition, classification, technical requirements, test methods, quality appraisal procedure, packing, marking, transportation, storage, and quality certificate of abrasion resistant refractory materials. This standard is applicable to abrasion resistant refractory materials for circulating fluidized bed boilers, daily waste incinerator, industrial waste incinerator, medical waste incinerator, ordinary solid waste incinerator, hazardous waste incinerator, etc.

  8. Testing of Commercial Cutting Heads for Abrasive Water Jet Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Klich, J. (Jiří); Hlaváček, P.; M. Zeleňák; Sitek, L. (Libor); Foldyna, J.

    2013-01-01

    Five different cutting heads designed for cutting by high-speed abrasive water jet technology were tested from cutting ability point of view. Straight kerfs were cut in several metal materials by abrasive water jet. Material removal volume was determined as a measure of performance of specific cutting head. Quality of cutting surface was observed, too. Results are compared and discussed.

  9. Soybean seedlings tolerate abrasion from air-propelled grit

    Science.gov (United States)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean production in organic systems. Air-propelled abrasive grit is one such tool that performs well for in-row weed control in corn, but crop safety in soybean is unknown. We examined responses to abrasion by corn-cob grit of soybean seedlings a...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.215 - Abrasive wheel machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive wheel machinery. 1910.215 Section 1910.215 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.215 Abrasive wheel machinery. (a... wheel in motion. (5) Excluded machinery. Natural sandstone wheels and metal, wooden, cloth, or...

  11. Research and development of blasting abrasive made of steelmaking slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Oujing

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of a new type of nonmetallic steelmaking slag abrasive.The performance,processing,and application of steelmaking slag as a nonmetallic abrasive are introduced.The chemical composition,hardness,crushing value,and particle gradation of steelmaking slag are analyzed.A processing method for steelmaking slag as a blasting abrasive is suggested and evaluated.Compared with conventional abrasives such as copper ore sand and cast iron shot,processed steelmaking slag exhibits similar performance and can satisfy abrasive technical requirements.The derusting effect provided by steelmaking slag for a ship deck can reach the Sa2.0 level,and its recyclability is higher than that of copper ore sand.The derusting performance of steelmaking slag is similar to that of copper ore,and it can thus be used in repairing ship decks.

  12. Hydro-abrasive erosion: Problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, K.

    2014-03-01

    The number of hydro power plants with hydro-abrasive erosion is increasing worldwide. An overall approach is needed to minimize the impact of this phenomenon. Already at the start of the planning phase an evaluation should be done to quantify the erosion and the impact on the operation. For this, the influencing parameters and their impact on the erosion have to be known. The necessary information for the evaluation comprises among others the future design, the particle parameters of the water, which will pass the turbine, and the power plant owner's framework for the future operation like availability or maximum allowable efficiency loss, before an overhaul needs to be done. Based on this evaluation of the erosion, an optimised solution can then be found, by analysing all measures in relation to investments, energy production and maintenance costs as decision parameters. Often a more erosion-resistant design, instead of choosing the turbine design with the highest efficiency, will lead to higher revenue. The paper will discuss the influencing parameters on hydro-abrasive erosion and the problems to acquire this information. There are different optimisation possibilities, which will be shown in different case studies. One key aspect to reduce the erosion and prolong the operation time of the components is to coat all relevant parts. But it is very important that this decision is taken early in the design stage, as the design has to be adapted to the requirements of the coating process. The quality of coatings and their impact on the operation will be discussed in detail in the paper as due to the non-availability of standards many questions arise in projects.

  13. Mechanics, kinematics and geometry of pebble abrasion from binary collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    As sediment is transported downstream as bedload, it collides with the bed causing sharp edges to chip and wear away, rounding the rock through the process of abrasion. Previous work has linked abrasion to downstream fining and rounding of grains, however, there has been little attempt to understand the underlying kinematics of abrasion. Furthermore, most studies neglect the fine particle produced during the abrasion process, as the initial grain gets smaller and rounder. In this research, we preform well-controlled laboratory experiments to determine the functional dependence between impact energy and mass lost from abrasion. We use a double-pendulum "Newton's Cradle" set-up to examine the abrasion between two grains and with a high-speed camera, we can quantify the impact energies during collision. Results from experiments verify that mass loss is proportional to kinetic energy. We define a material parameter that incorporates material density, Young's modulus, and tensile stress and show that this parameter is directly related to the proportionality between mass loss and energy. We identify an initial region of the mass loss curves in which abrasion is independent of energy and material properties; results suggest this region is determined by shape. We show that grain size distributions of daughter products are universal and independent of material; they follow a Weibull distribution, which is expected distribution from brittle fracture theory. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a thin damage zone near the surface, suggesting that collision energy is attenuated over some small skin depth. Overall, we find that pebble abrasion by collision can be characterized by two universal scaling relations - the mass loss versus energy curves and the size distribution of daughter products. Results will be useful for estimating expected abrasion rates in the field, and additionally demonstrate that low-energy collisions produce large quantities of sand

  14. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  15. Some results of tangential turning with an abrasive water jet

    OpenAIRE

    Cárach, J.; Hlaváček, P.; K. Vasilko; Klich, J. (Jiří); S. Hloch

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the visual comparison of the finished surface of sandstone using the tangential abrasive water jet. The continual abrasive water jet with turning was used with the constant pressure of 400 MPa for all sections of turning and with a depth of cut of 2mm. The abrasive particles were added to the water jet in the amount of 400 g.min-1. The traverse speed (vf = 60, 30, 10 mm.min-1) was gradually changing at a constant speed of rotation of workpiece n = 30min-1. Th...

  16. An Investigation of Different Material on Abrasive Water jet Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Vaibhav.j.limbachiya; Prof Dhaval.M.Patel

    2011-01-01

    Abrasive water jet machine (AWJM) is a nontraditional machining process. Abrasive water jet machining is a process of removal of material by impact erosion of high pressure (1500-4000 bar), high velocity of water and entrained high velocity of grit abrasives on a work piece. It’s a non-conventional machining process. At herefirst works on theoretical work after it make some experimental work and then analyses both results. Theoretical MRR found equal to the experimental MRR. In this paper inv...

  17. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  18. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  19. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Ching CHENG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed that concrete with higher compressive strength in Los Angeles abrasion tests also had better abrasion resistance. The inclusion of steel fibers into test concrete with a water-binder ratio of 0.35 resulted in a significant increase in compressive strength. This concrete also displayed better abrasion resistance and splitting tensile strength than reference concrete; in the test sample with a water-binder ratio of 0.55, the added steel fibers was unable to effectively produce cementation with the concrete. The inclusion of silica fume improved the abrasion resistance of concretes. In water abrasion testing, the abrasion resistance of concrete containing steel fiber was worse than that of concrete without steel fibers. In the water abrasion testing, the surface of steel fiber reinforced concrete was eroded by water and steel balls, and the impact caused the steel fibers to separate from the concrete and led to higher wear loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6460

  20. An Investigation of Different Material on Abrasive Water jet Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav.j.limbachiya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive water jet machine (AWJM is a nontraditional machining process. Abrasive water jet machining is a process of removal of material by impact erosion of high pressure (1500-4000 bar, high velocity of water and entrained high velocity of grit abrasives on a work piece. It’s a non-conventional machining process. At herefirst works on theoretical work after it make some experimental work and then analyses both results. Theoretical MRR found equal to the experimental MRR. In this paper investigation for three different materials like en8,acrylic and aluminum is carried out using Taguchi design of experiment method. Experiments are carried out using L25 Orthogonal array by varying Material traverse speed and abrasive mass flow rate for each material respectively. Anova carried out for identifies significant parameters.

  1. Refractory, Abrasive, and Other Industrial Minerals Operations - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes refractory, abrasive, and other industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals...

  2. Anti-abrasive nanocoatings current and future applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings. The connections among fabrication parameters, the characteristics of nanocoatings and the resulting properties (i.e. nanohardness, toughness, wear rate, load-bearing ability, friction coefficient, and scratch resistance) are discussed. Size-affected mechanical properties of nanocoatings are examined, including their uses. Anti-abrasive nanocoatings, including metallic-, ceramic-, and polymeric-based layers, as well as different kinds of nanostructures, such as multi-layered nanocomposites and thin films, are reviewed. * Provides a comprehensive overview of the fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings* Discusses the connections among fabrication parameters, the characteristics of nanocoatings and the resulting properties* Reviews advantages and drawbacks of fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings and clarifies the place of these nanocoatings in the world of nanotechnology

  3. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  4. [Dependence of the dentinal abrasion of human teeth on their microhardness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remizov, S M; Pruzhanskiĭ, L Iu

    1989-01-01

    The dentin resistance against abrasion was studied as related to its microhardness. Sections of 15 intact teeth were investigated (central upper incisors). Water suspensions (40% weight-to weight) of dicalcium phosphate (DCP, FRG; and DKF-1 and DKF-2, USSR) were used as abrasives. Dentin microhardness was measured with a PMT-3 device, and abrasion assessed with profilographic technique. Dentin abrasion was related to its microhardness and to the kind of abrasive used. Dentin abrasion increased as its microhardness decreased. DCF showed minimal abrasive effect, DKF-2 had maximal effect with DKF-1 keeping the intermediate position.

  5. Hardness and elasticity of abrasive particles measured by instrumented indentation

    OpenAIRE

    Hvizdoš, P.

    2015-01-01

    Basic mechanical properties of seven types (from seven different sites) of abrasive garnet particles used for water jet cutting were measured using the technique of instrumented indentation (also called depth sensing indentation or nanoindentation). Hardness and modulus of elasticity were evaluated and compared. All the abrasives had similar measured mechanical properties (hardness 20 – 24.16 GPa), the highest values were found for the Czech garnet.

  6. Dermoscopy and Onychomycosis: guided nail abrasion for mycological samples*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bet, Diego Leonardo; dos Reis, Ana Lucia; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Belda Junior, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mycological examination is still the cornerstone for the diagnosis of onychomycosis for many dermatologists, but sampling technique interferes on its sensitivity and specificity. Nail abrasion may be used to reach the most proximal part of the lesion and can be easily accomplished with an electric abrasor. We suggest nail plate dermoscopy to identify the best location for localized abrasion to obtain adequate samples for mycological examination. PMID:26734877

  7. A review of micro-scale abrasion testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-scale abrasion (commonly referred to as 'ball cratering') is a small-scale tribological test method which can be operated on a desktop. It offers the possibility of providing a quick, cheap, localized abrasion test that can be used with small samples. In principle its operation is simple, but in practice there are issues with wear scar measurement, wear mode and its applicability to a wide variety of monolithic materials and coatings. (topical review)

  8. The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Mission documents from the six Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface have been studied in order to catalog the effects of lunar dust on Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) systems, primarily the Apollo surface space suit. It was found that the effects could be sorted into nine categories: vision obscuration, false instrument readings, dust coating and contamination, loss of traction, clogging of mechanisms, abrasion, thermal control problems, seal failures, and inhalation and irritation. Although simple dust mitigation measures were sufficient to mitigate some of the problems (i.e., loss of traction) it was found that these measures were ineffective to mitigate many of the more serious problems (i.e., clogging, abrasion, diminished heat rejection). The severity of the dust problems were consistently underestimated by ground tests, indicating a need to develop better simulation facilities and procedures.

  9. Abrasive supply for ancient Egypt revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the major research scheme 'Synchronization of Civilizations in the Eastern Mediterranean Region in the 2nd Millennium B.C' instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine 30 elements in pumice from archaeological excavations to reveal their specific volcanic origin. In ancient time, the widespread pumiceous products of several eruptions in the Aegean region have been used as abrasive tools and were therefore popular trade objects. The correlation of such archaeological findings to a specific eruption of known age would therefore allow to certify a maximum age of the respective stratum ('dating by first appearance'). Pumices from the Aegean region can easily be distinguished by their trace element distribution patterns. This has been shown by previous studies of the group. The elements Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, V, Yb, Zr and Zn were determined in 16 samples of pumice lumps from excavations in Tell-el-Dab'a and Tell-el-Herr (Egypt). Two irradiation cycles and five measurement runs were applied. To show the accuracy of the results obtained, typical samples of the most important pumice sources in the Aegean region, particularly from Milos, Nisyros, Kos and Thera were analyzed together with the Egyptian samples of unknown origin. A reliable identification of the samples is achieved by comparing these results to the database compiled in previous studies. The geographical positions of these islands are shown. Within the error range, most of the elements determined in typical representatives of Milos, Nisyros, Kos and Santorini were in perfect agreement with values from the literature. On the basis of the Cluster graphics presented, it is possible to relate unknown pumice to its primary source, just by comparing the relation of a few elements, like Ta-Eu and Th-Hf. One concludes that all samples except one can be related to the Minoan eruption of Thera

  10. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Solar Panels on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Mantovani, J. G.; Clements S.; Chen, A.; Mazumder, M. K.; Biris, A. S.; Nowicki, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    The Materials Adherence Experiment on the Mars Pathfinder mission measured an obscuration of the solar arrays due to dust deposition at a rate of about 0.2 8% per day. It was estimated that settling dust may cause degradation in performance of a solar panel of between 22% and 89% over the course of two years [1, 2]. These results were obtained without the presence of a global dust storm. Several types of adherence forces keep dust particles attached to surfaces. The most widely discussed adherence force is the electrostatic force. Laboratory experiments [3] as well as indirect evidence from the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on Pathfinder [4] indicate that it is very likely that the particles suspended in the Martian atmosphere are electrostatically charged.

  11. Study of abrasive resistance of composites for dental restoration by ball-cratering

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, P. Vale; Ramalho, A

    2003-01-01

    Two-body abrasion occurs in the mouth whenever there is tooth-to-tooth contact. This is what most dentists call attrition. Abrasive wear may also occur when there is an abrasive slurry interposed between two surfaces, such that the two solid surfaces are not actually in contact, this is called three-body abrasion, with food acting as the abrasive agent, and occurs in the mouth during mastication. Abrasion is the key physiological wear mechanism that is present in dental materials during norma...

  12. Comminution of Mica by Cavitation Abrasive Water Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chu-wen; LIU Lin-sheng; HAN Dong-tai; LI Ai-min; ZHANG Dong-hai

    2003-01-01

    The comminution of mica with an abrasive water jet is mainly based on three knids of effects, that is, high-speed collision, cavitating effect and shearing effect. Cavitation abrasive water jet was applied for the comminution of mica because cavitation abrasive water jet can make full use of the three effects mentioned above. Besides high speed impacting among particles,cavitation and shearing were also enhanced due to the divergent angle at the outlet of the cavitation nozzle.A JME-200CX transmission electron microscope was used for observing the size distribution of particles.Variance analysis on the experimental results indicates that the effect of cavitation is much more significant than that of collision.The effect of pressure on comminution results becomes less with the decrease of the particle size.

  13. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  14. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  15. An instrument for measuring abrasive water jet diameter

    OpenAIRE

    Junkar, Mihael; Lebar, Andrej; Orbanić, Henri

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of abrasive water jet (AW) machining the precise value of the jet diameter has to be known. Because of an aggressive environment caused by high velocity abrasive grains, the diameter is not easily measured. That is why a measuring device consisting of a load cell and a wear resistant probe was developed. The device measures the force of the jet while it passes over the edge of the probe. If the feed rate of the jet is constant and the time needed for jet to pa...

  16. Evaluation of dentifrice abrasion on human dentin and teeth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiometric method is applied to the dentifrice abrasion indicators evaluation: radioactive dentin (RDA) and radioactive enamel abrasion (REA). The dentifrices analysed presented RDA values varying from 95 to 13 and REA values from 7.1 to 0.7, showing a good precision, generally with relative standard deviations lower than 15.4%. Also, the dentifrices were classified as having low and medium cleaning potential. A correlation between RDA and REA values was obtained, i.e. dentifrices with high RDA values presented high REA ones. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Design and manufacturing of abrasive jet machine for drilling operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal Divyansh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wide application of Abrasive Jet Machine (AJM is found in machining hard and brittle materials. Machining of brittle materials by AJM is due to brittle fracture and removal of micro chips from the work piece. Embedment of the abrasive particles in the brittle materials results in decrease of machining efficiency. In this paper design and manufacturing of AJM has been presented. Various parts of AJM have been designed using ANSYS 16.2 software. The parts are then manufactured indigenously as per designed parameters. The machine fabricated in this work will be used further for process optimization of AJM parameters for machining of glass and ceramics.

  18. Editor's Highlight: Abrasion of Artificial Stones as a New Cause of an Ancient Disease. Physicochemical Features and Cellular Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Cristina; Polimeni, Manuela; Tomatis, Maura; Corazzari, Ingrid; Turci, Francesco; Ghigo, Dario; Fubini, Bice

    2016-09-01

    New outbursts of silicosis were recently reported among workers manufacturing an engineered material known as "artificial stone," composed by high percentages of quartz (up to 98%) agglomerated with pigments and polymeric resins. Dusts released by abrasion during artificial stone polishing were characterized for particle size, morphology, and elemental composition and studied for (1) ability to catalyze free radical generation in acellular tests, (2) membranolytic potential on human erythrocytes, (3) cytotoxic activity (lactate dehydrogenase release) on murine alveolar macrophages (MH-S) and human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines, (4) induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in BEAS-2B cells. Min-U-Sil 5 was used as reference quartz. Artificial stone dusts exhibited morphological features close to quartz, but contained larger amount of metal transition ions (mainly, Fe, Cu, and Ti), potentially responsible for the high reactivity in free radical generation observed. Opposite to Min-U-Sil 5, they were neither hemolytic nor cytotoxic on MH-S cells, a low cytotoxicity only being observed with BEAS-2B cells. The presence on the particle surface of residues of the resin accounts for this attenuated behavior, as hemolysis appeared and cytotoxicity increased after thermal degradation of the resin, when the free quartz surface was exposed. All dusts induced EMT with loss of E-cadherin expression and increased the expression of mesenchymal proteins (α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin). This may contribute to explain the development of fibrosis on workers exposed to artificial stone dusts. PMID:27255382

  19. Editor's Highlight: Abrasion of Artificial Stones as a New Cause of an Ancient Disease. Physicochemical Features and Cellular Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Cristina; Polimeni, Manuela; Tomatis, Maura; Corazzari, Ingrid; Turci, Francesco; Ghigo, Dario; Fubini, Bice

    2016-09-01

    New outbursts of silicosis were recently reported among workers manufacturing an engineered material known as "artificial stone," composed by high percentages of quartz (up to 98%) agglomerated with pigments and polymeric resins. Dusts released by abrasion during artificial stone polishing were characterized for particle size, morphology, and elemental composition and studied for (1) ability to catalyze free radical generation in acellular tests, (2) membranolytic potential on human erythrocytes, (3) cytotoxic activity (lactate dehydrogenase release) on murine alveolar macrophages (MH-S) and human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines, (4) induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in BEAS-2B cells. Min-U-Sil 5 was used as reference quartz. Artificial stone dusts exhibited morphological features close to quartz, but contained larger amount of metal transition ions (mainly, Fe, Cu, and Ti), potentially responsible for the high reactivity in free radical generation observed. Opposite to Min-U-Sil 5, they were neither hemolytic nor cytotoxic on MH-S cells, a low cytotoxicity only being observed with BEAS-2B cells. The presence on the particle surface of residues of the resin accounts for this attenuated behavior, as hemolysis appeared and cytotoxicity increased after thermal degradation of the resin, when the free quartz surface was exposed. All dusts induced EMT with loss of E-cadherin expression and increased the expression of mesenchymal proteins (α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin). This may contribute to explain the development of fibrosis on workers exposed to artificial stone dusts.

  20. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Dust Control Tool Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Marshall, J.; Nuth, J.; Calle, C.

    2010-01-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the performance-compromising dust. Once in contact with surfaces, whether set in motion by natural or mechanical means, regolith fines, or dust, behave like abrasive Velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, making movement progressively more difticult, and being almost impossible to remove by mechanical mcans (brushing). The successful dust removal strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between Van der Waals and Coulombic forces. Here, proof of concept for an electrostatically-based concept for dust control tool is described and demonstrated. A low power focused electron beam is used in the presence of a small electrical field to increase the negative charge to mass ratio of a dusty surface until dust repulsion and attraction to a lower potential surface, acting as a dust collector, occurred. Our goal is a compact device of less than 5 kg mass and using less than 5 watts of power to be operational in less than 5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g ., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could hamess the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  1. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Tsan-Ching CHENG; Cheng, An; Huang, Ran; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed t...

  2. Healing effect of Sodium-Sucrose-Octasulfate and EGF on epithelial corneal abrasions in rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Sven; Heegaard, Steffen; Bjerrum, Kirsten Birgitte;

    1998-01-01

    ophthalmology, Sjögrens syndrome, cornea, abrasion, epidermal growth factor, sodium-sucrose-octasulfate......ophthalmology, Sjögrens syndrome, cornea, abrasion, epidermal growth factor, sodium-sucrose-octasulfate...

  3. Effect of particle size of Martian dust on the degradation of photovoltaic cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1991-01-01

    Glass coverglass and SiO2 covered and uncovered silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells were subjected to conditions simulating a Mars dust storm, using the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel, to assess the effect of particle size on the performance of PV cells in the Martian environment. The dust used was an artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil, which was sorted into four different size ranges. Samples were tested both initially clean and initially dusted. The samples were exposed to clear and dust laden winds, wind velocities varying from 23 to 116 m/s, and attack angles from 0 to 90 deg. It was found that transmittance through the coverglass approximates the power produced by a dusty PV cell. Occultation by the dust was found to dominate the performance degradation for wind velocities below 50 m/s, whereas abrasion dominates the degradation at wind velocities above 85 m/s. Occultation is most severe at 0 deg (parallel to the wind), is less pronounced from 22.5 to 67.5 deg, and is somewhat larger at 90 deg (perpendicular to the wind). Abrasion is negligible at 0 deg, and increases to a maximum at 90 deg. Occultation is more of a problem with small particles, whereas large particles (unless they are agglomerates) cause more abrasion.

  4. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance of rock aggregates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sair Kahraman; Mustafa Fener

    2008-04-01

    The prediction of Los Angeles (LA) abrasion loss from some indirect tests is useful for practical applications. For this purpose, LA abrasion, electrical resistivity, density and porosity tests were carried out on 27 different rock types. LA abrasion loss values were correlated with electrical resistivity and a good correlation between the two parameters was found. To see the effect of rock class on the correlation, regression analysis was repeated for igneous rocks, metamorphic rocks and sedimentary rocks, respectively. It was seen that correlation coefficients were increased for the rock classes. In addition, the data were divided into two groups according to porosity and density, respectively. After repeating regression analysis for these porosity and density groups, stronger correlations were obtained compared to the equation derived for all rocks. The validity of the derived equations was statistically tested and it was shown that all derived equations were significant. Finally, it can be said that all derived equations can alternatively be used for the estimation of LA abrasion loss from electrical resistivity.

  5. Exaggerated abrasion/erosion of human dental enamel surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, J; Moe, D; Pallesen, Ulla;

    1993-01-01

    An atypical, rapidly proceeding abrasion/erosion of the labial enamel surfaces of the maxillary and mandibular incisors and canines in a 27-yr-old man is reported. Ultrastructural examination of a replica of the teeth showed a practically structureless enamel surface both at the initial examinati...

  6. Numerical study of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh Nguyen, [No Value; Willemsz, Tofan; Frijlink, Henderik; Maarschalk, Kees van der Voort

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) was performed to investigate the phenomena concerning the abrasion and breakage of agglomerates in a diffusion powder mixer. Agglomerates were created by defining a single structure of particles with bonds of different strengths using th

  7. Potential of Air-Propelled Abrasives for Selective Weed Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel forms of selective weed control are needed by many types of growers, but especially organic growers who are restricted from using synthetic herbicides. Abrasive grit made from corn cobs was expelled from a sand blaster at 517 kPa pressure and aimed at seedlings of common lambsquarters and corn...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.303 Abrasive wheels and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain...

  9. Innovative decontamination technology by abrasion in vibratory vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The possibility of using conventional vibratory vessel technology as a decontamination technique is the motivation for the development of this project. The objective is to explore the feasibility of applying the vibratory vessel technology for decontamination of radioactively-contaminated materials such as pipes and metal structures. The research and development of this technology was granted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Abrasion processes in vibratory vessels are widely used in the manufacture of metals, ceramics, and plastics. Samples to be treated, solid abrasive media and liquid media are set up into a vessel. Erosion results from the repeated impact of the abrasive particles on the surface of the body being treated. A liquid media, generally detergents or surfactants aid the abrasive action. The amount of material removed increases with the time of treatment. The design and construction of the machine were provided by Vibro, Argentina private company. Tests with radioactively-contaminated aluminum tubes and a stainless steel bar, were performed at laboratory level. Tests showed that it is possible to clean both the external and the internal surface of contaminated tubes. Results show a decontamination factor around 10 after the first 30 minutes of the cleaning time. (authors)

  10. Review of Artificial Abrasion Test Methods for PV Module Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Muller, Matt T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simpson, Lin J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This review is intended to identify the method or methods--and the basic details of those methods--that might be used to develop an artificial abrasion test. Methods used in the PV literature were compared with their closest implementation in existing standards. Also, meetings of the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force Task Group 12-3 (TG12-3, which is concerned with coated glass) were used to identify established test methods. Feedback from the group, which included many of the authors from the PV literature, included insights not explored within the literature itself. The combined experience and examples from the literature are intended to provide an assessment of the present industry practices and an informed path forward. Recommendations toward artificial abrasion test methods are then identified based on the experiences in the literature and feedback from the PV community. The review here is strictly focused on abrasion. Assessment methods, including optical performance (e.g., transmittance or reflectance), surface energy, and verification of chemical composition were not examined. Methods of artificially soiling PV modules or other specimens were not examined. The weathering of artificial or naturally soiled specimens (which may ultimately include combined temperature and humidity, thermal cycling and ultraviolet light) were also not examined. A sense of the purpose or application of an abrasion test method within the PV industry should, however, be evident from the literature.

  11. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  12. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  13. Dust Interactions on Small Solar System Bodies and Technology Considerations for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrick, Ryan,; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Pavone, Marco; Street, Kenneth; Rickman, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Small-bodies such as asteroids and Mars' moons Phobos and Deimos have relatively unknown regolith environments. It is hypothesized that dust preserved in the regolith on the surfaces will have similar mechanical properties to lunar dust because of similar formation processes from micrometeorite bombardment, low relative gravity for slow settling times, and virtually no weathering because there is no atmosphere. This combination of processes infers that small-body dust particles will be highly angular and retain abrasive properties. The focus of this paper uses the mission architecture and engineering design for an asteroid hopper known as Hedgehog, a spherical spacecraft with several symmetric spikes used to aid with tumbling mobility in a low gravity environment. Dust abrasion considerations are highlighted throughout the paper relating to the lead authors' previous work, but act as an example of one of many important dust or regolith physical properties that need to be considered for future exploration. Measurable regolith properties are summarized in order to identify technologies that may be useful for exploration in terms of scientific return and spacecraft design. Previous instruments are summarized in this paper that could be used on the Hedgehog. Opportunities for hardware payloads are highlighted that include low mass solutions or dualpurpose instruments that can measure regolith or dust properties. Finally, dust mitigation suggestions are made for vehicles of this mobility profile.

  14. Study on abrasive mixing chamber of pre-mixed water jet

    OpenAIRE

    Junqing, Meng; Baisheng, Nie; Yechao, Ma; Bi, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    In order to reveal the flow law of isothermal, incompressible, steady, liquid-solid turbulent flow in mixing chamber of premixed abrasive water jet, the FLUENT software is used. The flow law of liquid-solid two phase flow is obtained. Abrasive mixing chamber models with four different sizes are used in this simulation, key design parameters of mine abrasive mixing chamber are determined. The flow laws of liquid-solid two phase flow in abrasive mixing chamber model with 7 different abrasive vo...

  15. MECHANISM AND PREDICTION OF MATERIAL ABRASION IN HIGH-VELOCITY SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xi-bin; YUAN Yin-zhong

    2006-01-01

    The wall surface of material is prone to silt abrasion by high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The silt abrasion is different form cavitation erosion. In this article, the characteristics of silt abrasion were discussed. The mechanism of silt abrasion was analyzed and the formation and development of ripple shape on wall surface of material were explained thereafter. Based on turbulence theory and test data, some formulas were derived for predicting the abrasion rate of concrete wall surface in high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Optimization of Abrasive Water Jet Cutting of Ductile Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asif IQBAL; Naeem U DAR; Ghulam HUSSAIN

    2011-01-01

    Full factorial design of experiments was developed in order to investigate the effects of jet pressure, abrasive mixing rate, cutting feed, and plate thickness upon three response variables, surface finish of cutting wear zone, percentage proportion of striation free area, and maximum width of cut. The set of sixteen experiments was performed on each of the following two ductile materials: AISI 4340 (high strength low alloy steel, hardened to 49HRc) and Aluminum 2219. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was performed on experimental data in order to determine the significance of effects of different parameters on the performance measures. It was found that cutting feed and thickness were highly influential parameters, while abrasive mixing rate is influential upon surface roughness only. Strong interaction was found between jet pressure and workpiece material.Multi-criteria numerical optimization was performed in order to simultaneously maximize/minimize different combinations of performance measures.

  17. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  18. Nanometric Finishing on Biomedical Implants by Abrasive Flow Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kavithaa Thirumalai; Balashanmugam, Natchimuthu; Shashi Kumar, Panaghra Veeraiah

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is a non-conventional finishing technique that offers better accuracy, efficiency, consistency, economy in finishing of complex/difficult to machine materials/components and provides the possibility of effective automation as aspired by the manufacturing sector. The present study describes the finishing of a hip joint made of ASTM grade Co-Cr alloy by Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) process. The major input parameters of the AFF process were optimized for achieving nanometric finishing of the component. The roughness average (Ra) values were recorded during experimentation using surface roughness tester and the results are discussed in detail. The surface finished hip joints were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and residual stress analysis using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The discussion lays emphasis on the significance, efficacy and versatile nature of the AFF process in finishing of bio-medical implants.

  19. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  20. Analysis of striation formation mechanism in abrasive water jet cutting

    OpenAIRE

    Junkar, Mihael; Orbanić, Henri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the macro-mechanism of abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting is studied from the point of cutting front and striation formation analysis. The striation on the surface cut with AWJ is a characteristic phenomena which is strongly present when cutting with high traverse velocities for particular material type and thickness of workpiece. The connection between the cutting front step formation and striation formation is explained through series of experiments, which include visual observa...

  1. Simulation of abrasive water jet cutting process - Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Lebar, Andrej; Junkar, Mihael

    2015-01-01

    Abrasive water jet (AWJ) machined surfaces exhibit the texture typical of machining with high energy density beam processing technologies. It has a superior surface quality in the upper region and rough surface in the lower zone with pronounced texture marks called striations. The nature of the mechanisms involved in the domain of AWJ machining is still not well understood but is essential for AWJ control improvement. In this paper, the development of an AWJ machining simulation is reported o...

  2. Abrasive water-jet: controlled depth milling of titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Abrasive waterjet (AWJ) technology is used in a routine manner in manufacturing industry to cut materials that are difficult to cut by other methods. Whilst the technology for through cutting of materials is mature, the process is also being developed for controlled depth milling (CDM) of materials. The aerospace industry have a requirement to remove redundant material from components manufactured from difficult to machine Ti6Al4V and titanium aluminide alloys and thus reduce component w...

  3. Is bovine dentine an appropriate substitute in abrasion studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wegehaupt, F J; Widmer, R.; Attin, T.

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the wear behaviour of human and bovine dentine due to toothbrushing with different relative dentin abrasivity (RDA) toothpastes. Forty human and 40 bovine dentine samples were prepared from bovine lower incisors or human premolars roots, and baseline surface profiles were recorded. The samples were distributed to four groups (each group n = 10 human and 10 bovine samples) and brushed with fluoridated experimental toothpastes with different RDAs (group A: RDA 10, B: ...

  4. Polyurethanes from the crystalline prepolymers resistant to abrasive wear

    OpenAIRE

    Domańska Agata; Boczkowska Anna; Izydorzak-Woźniak Marta; Jaegermann Zbigniew; Grądzka-Dahlke Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The research aimed at the selection of polyurethanes synthesized from poly(tetramethylene ether) glycol (PTMEG), as well as from two different isocyanates 4,4′-methylenebis(cyclohexyl)isocyanate (HMDI) and 4.4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) in order to obtain polyurethane with increased resistance to abrasive wear and degradation for bio-medical application. Polyurethanes were fabricated from crystalline prepolymers extended by water. The paper presents preliminary results on polyuret...

  5. Abrasion of abutment screw coated with TiN

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Seok-Won; Son, Mee-Kyoung; Chung, Chae-Heon; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Screw loosening has been a common complication and still reported frequently. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate abrasion of the implant fixture and TiN coated abutment screw after repeated delivery and removal with universal measuring microscope. MATERIAL AND METHODS Implant systems used for this study were Osstem and 3i. Seven pairs of implant fixtures, abutments and abutment screws for each system were selected and all the fixtures were perpendicularly m...

  6. Shotcup petal abrasions in close range .410-caliber shotgun injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, G P; Dickinson, J A; Cooke, C T

    1988-01-01

    Shotcup petal abrasions centered around a shotgun wound of entrance are generally thought to occur at a range of 30 to 90 cm. A suicidal .410-caliber shotgun injury of the right eye is described in which typical petal abrasions were noted around the entrance wound. However, significant soot deposition around the wound suggested that the range of fire was less than 30 cm and perhaps closer to 15 cm. Test-firing of the weapon and ammunition used by the decedent showed some spread of the shotcup petals at a range of 7.5 cm, progressing to maximum spread at 30 to 52.5 cm. Further testing with other .410 ammunition, containing shotcups, confirmed the spread of shotcup petals at ranges less than 30 cm, irrespective of manufacturer, shotshell length, and birdshot size. When a variety of shotguns were tested, it was found that one weapon with a very short barrel and cylinder bore did not exhibit petal spread until a range of 30 cm was reached. The remaining shotguns, with longer barrels and full choke, all demonstrated definite petal spread at a range of 12.5 cm. The long, narrow configuration of .410 shotcup petals may explain their early spread and the production of petal abrasions at ranges of less than 30 cm.

  7. [Precancerous conditions of the larynx in workers exposed to dust and their prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podol'skaia, E V

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of examinations of 522 workers exposed to various industrial dusts and 361 workers exposed to different concentrations of carcinogenic asbestos dust. The examinations showed a significantly higher incidence of total processes in the upper respiratory tract which manifested as chronic subatrophic nasopharingitis and hyperplastic laryngitis. Also, they demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of local processes that manifested as hyperplasia of the laryngeal mucosa and contact fibromas. These laryngeal lesions can be viewed as etiologically associated with the effect of industrial dusts having traumatic (abrasive and glass dust) and carcinogenic (asbestos) properties. Patients with the above laryngeal pathologies should be removed from the dust environment and sent to physical examinations with emphasis on occupational diseases.

  8. Comparing the Air Abrasion Cutting Efficacy of Dentine Using a Fluoride-Containing Bioactive Glass versus an Alumina Abrasive: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H. X. Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Air abrasion as a caries removal technique is less aggressive than conventional techniques and is compatible for use with adhesive restorative materials. Alumina, while being currently the most common abrasive used for cutting, has controversial health and safety issues and no remineralisation properties. The alternative, a bioactive glass, 45S5, has the advantage of promoting hard tissue remineralisation. However, 45S5 is slow as a cutting abrasive and lacks fluoride in its formulation. The aim of this study was to compare the cutting efficacy of dentine using a customised fluoride-containing bioactive glass Na0SR (38–80 μm versus the conventional alumina abrasive (29 μm in an air abrasion set-up. Fluoride was incorporated into Na0SR to enhance its remineralisation properties while strontium was included to increase its radiopacity. Powder outflow rate was recorded prior to the cutting tests. Principal air abrasion cutting tests were carried out on pristine ivory dentine. The abrasion depths were quantified and compared using X-ray microtomography. Na0SR was found to create deeper cavities than alumina (p<0.05 despite its lower powder outflow rate and predictably reduced hardness. The sharper edges of the Na0SR glass particles might improve the cutting efficiency. In conclusion, Na0SR was more efficacious than alumina for air abrasion cutting of dentine.

  9. HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul W. Humrickhouse

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

  10. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  11. Mass transfer of PBDEs from plastic TV casing to indoor dust via three migration pathways — A test chamber investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauert, C.; Harrad, S., E-mail: S.J.Harrad@bham.ac.uk

    2015-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely detected in humans with substantial exposure thought to occur in indoor environments and particularly via contact with indoor dust. Despite this, knowledge of how PBDEs migrate to indoor dust from products within which they are incorporated is scarce. This study utilises an in-house designed and built test chamber to investigate the relative significance of different mechanisms via which PBDEs transfer from source materials to dust, using a plastic TV casing treated with the Deca-BDE formulation as a model source. Experiments at both room temperature and 60 °C revealed no detectable transfer of PBDEs from the TV casing to dust via volatilisation and subsequent partitioning. In contrast, substantial transfer of PBDEs to dust was detected when the TV casing was abraded using a magnetic stirrer bar. Rapid and substantial PBDE transfer to dust was also observed in experiments in which dust was placed in direct contact with the source. Based on these experiments, we suggest that for higher molecular weight PBDEs like BDE-209; direct dust:source contact is the principal pathway via which source-to-dust transfer occurs. - Highlights: • Transfer from a TV casing to dust of high molecular weight PBDEs examined. • Direct source:dust contact effected rapid and most substantial transfer. • Substantial source:dust transfer also occurred via abrasion of source.

  12. RESEARCH ON ABRASION OF DEBRIS FLOW TO HIGH-SPEED DRAINAGE STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪凯; 唐红梅; 吴四飞

    2004-01-01

    As one weak topic in research of debris flow, abrasion of debris flow shortens obviously application life of control structure composed of concrete. High-speed drainage structure, one of the most effective techniques to control giant debris flow disaster, has shortened one-third application life due to abrasion by debris flow. Based on velocity calculation method founded by two-phase theory, research of abrasion mechanism of debris flow to high-speed drainage structure was made. The mechanism includes both abrasion mechanism of homogeneous sizing and shearing mechanism of particle of debris flow to high-speed drainage trough structure. Further abrasion equations of both sizing and particle were established by Newton movement theory of debris flow. And abrasion amount formula of the high-speed drainage trough structure is set up by dimensional analysis. Amount to calculating in the formula is consistent with testing data in-situ, which is valuable in design of high-speed drainage structure.

  13. Impact–abrasion wear characteristics of in-situ VC-reinforced austenitic steel matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, E.G., E-mail: emad_g_moghaddam@alum.sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad Branch, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Varahram, N.; Davami, P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    In this investigation, in-situ precipitation of vanadium carbides was employed to reinforce Fe–13Mn and Fe–13Mn–3W alloys by means of conventional melting and casting route. Microstructures were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties of the materials were determined by hardness, impact toughness and tension tests. It was observed that tungsten improved the strength of the matrix and the reinforcements as well as tensile properties and work hardening rate of the VC-reinforced composite. Ball mill abrasion test was utilized to simulate impact–abrasion wear condition using two types of abrasive minerals. The results showed that the degree of benefit to be gained by the use of in-situ VC-reinforced composite materials depends strongly on crush strength of the abrasives. It was found that the studied particle-reinforced composite materials were only advantageous when the abrasives were relatively soft, providing low-stress abrasion condition.

  14. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on polishing removal rate in CMP with various abrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, R.; Ramanathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide in chemical mechanical planarization slurries for shallow trench isolation was investigated. The various abrasives used in this study were ceria, silica, alumina, zirconia, titania, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride. Hydrogen peroxide suppresses the polishing of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces by ceria abrasives. The polishing performances of other abrasives were either unaffected or enhanced slightly with the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The ceria abrasives were treated with hydrogen peroxide, and the polishing of the work surfaces with the treated abrasive shows that the inhibiting action of hydrogen peroxide is reversible. It was found that the effect of hydrogen peroxide as an additive is a strong function of the nature of the abrasive particle.

  15. A Profilometric Study to Assess the Role of Toothbrush and Toothpaste in Abrasion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Despite of many studies conducted on toothbrushes and toothpaste to find out the culprit for abrasion, there is no clear cut evidence to pin point the real cause for abrasion. Purpose: An in vitro assessment of the role of different types of toothbrushes (soft/ medium/hard in abrasion process when used in conjunction with and without a dentifrice. Materials and Method: Forty five freshly extracted, sound, human incisor teeth were collected for this study. Enamel specimens of approximately 9 mm2 were prepared by gross trimming of extracted teeth using a lathe machine (Baldor 340 Dental lathe; Ohio, USA. They were mounted on separate acrylic bases. The specimens were divided into three groups, each group containing 15 mounted specimens. Group 1 specimens were brushed with soft toothbrush; Group 2 brushed with medium toothbrush and Group 3 with hard toothbrush. Initially, all the mounted specimens in each group were brushed using dentifrice and then the same procedure was repeated with water as control. Profilometric readings were recorded pre and post to tooth brushing and the differences in readings served as proxy measure to assess surface abrasion. These values were then compared to each other. Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test were performed. Results: The results showed that brushing, with water alone, caused less abrasion than when toothpaste was added (p< 0.008. When brushed with water, the harder toothbrush caused more abrasion (higher Ra-value, but when toothpaste was added, the softer toothbrush caused more abrasion (p< 0.001. Conclusion: Besides supporting the fact that toothpaste is needed to create a significant abrasion, this study also showed that a softer toothbrush can cause more abrasion than harder ones. The flexibility of bristles is only secondary to abrasion process and abrasivity of dentifrice has an important role in abrasion process.

  16. Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie E.

    2015-01-01

    Crew members can be directly exposed to celestial dust in several ways. After crew members perform extravehicular activities (EVAs), they may introduce into the habitat dust that will have collected on spacesuits and boots. Cleaning of the suits between EVAs and changing of the Environmental Control Life Support System filters are other operations that could result in direct exposure to celestial dusts. In addition, if the spacesuits used in exploration missions abrade the skin, as current EVA suits have, then contact with these wounds would provide a source of exposure. Further, if celestial dusts gain access to a suit's interior, as was the case during the Apollo missions, the dust could serve as an additional source of abrasions or enhance suit-induced injuries. When a crew leaves the surface of a celestial body and returns to microgravity, the dust that is introduced into the return vehicle will "float," thus increasing the opportunity for ocular and respiratory injury. Because the features of the respirable fraction of lunar dusts indicate they could be toxic to humans, NASA conducted several studies utilizing lunar dust simulants and authentic lunar dust to determine the unique properties of lunar dust that affect physiology, assess the dermal and ocular irritancy of the dust, and establish a permissible exposure limit for episodic exposure to airborne lunar dust during missions that would involve no more than 6 months stay on the lunar surface. Studies, with authentic lunar soils from both highland (Apollo 16) and mare (Apollo17) regions demonstrated that the lunar soil is highly abrasive to a high fidelity model of human skin. Studies of lunar dust returned during the Apollo 14 mission from an area of the moon in which the soils were comprised of mineral constituents from both major geological regions (highlands and mares regions) demonstrated only minimal ocular irritancy, and pulmonary toxicity that was less than the highly toxic terrestrial crystalline

  17. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi ISHIKIRIAMA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10: Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC; RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100; and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2. Initial roughness (Ra, µm was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles, and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05. The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm/wear (µm were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175; ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263; U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952; and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876. Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  18. Development of spent-control rod cutting equipment by abrasive water jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Shinichi; Komiya, Toshihiro [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. developed the cutting apparatus for spent-control rods and channel boxes, which utilized Abrasive Water Jet, and delivered them to Japan Atomic Power Company, Ltd. An abrasive water jet cutting is cutting method by abrasive ejecting with very high pressurized water (300 Mpa) and has merit not affecting to the objects thermally. The cutting operation carries out remotely in underwater and ejected abrasives are collected and reused in order to decrease secondary wastes. The spent-control rods and channel boxes are divided into two or three pieces and stored in the can in layers. (author)

  19. RESEARCH ABOUT RESULTS REPRODUTIBILITY AND ABRASIVE PARTICLES FRAGMENTATION IN BALL-CRATERING TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Câmara Cozza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The micro-abrasive wear tests by rotating ball (crater wear have played an important role in abrasive wear researches. In this type of test, the contact between a specimen and a ball on rotating motion and abrasive particles supplied between these two elements, results in a crater on the specimen, based on which the abrasive wear behaviour is analysed. The purpose of this work is to study results the reprodutibility and the silicon carbide (SiC abrasive particles fragmentation during micro-abrasive wear tests. Tests were conducted with carburized AISI 1010 steel balls and high speed steel specimens, “with” and “without” titanium nitride (TiN coatings. The abrasive slurry was prepared with black silicon carbide (average particle size of 5 µm and distilled water. Grooving abrasion is related with lower reprodutibility results. For the test conditions of this work, no abrasive particles fragmentation was observed, independently of the sliding distance, what is justified, among others factors, by the low normal force applied.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON VELOCITY PROFILE OF SUBMERGED ABRASIVE SUSPENSION JET FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Abrasive jet cutting, as a more efficient machining or cutting method, has emerged in recent years in mining and machining industries, but the knowledge about velocity profile of abrasive jet flow lacks in general. In practice, the Polyacrylamide (PAM) is generally applied to jet fluid to increase the suspension of the abrasive particles. Also, the effects of PAM on jet flow are not very clear. In this paper, velocity fields of both the abrasive particles and the fluid were systematically studied with the PIV technology. The slip velocity between the abrasive particle and the surrounding fluid was subtracted out to give a further description of abrasive suspension jet. The effects of polymer PAM on both the fluid flow and the movement of the suspending abrasive particles were also measured. And it is found that the PAM is a proper type of additive to improve velocity fields for both the abrasive particles and the fluid in a jet. The results of the PIV measurement can help give a better understanding about the basic physics of abrasive suspension jet flow, and a good guidance to validate and develop reliable computational models to describe the jet.

  1. Radioactive labeling in the study of abrasion of hard tooth tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeling the surface of hard tooth tissue samples by the nuclear recoil effect in radioactive decay was applied to study abrasion caused by abrasive components of tooth-pastes. 222Rn and its short-lived decay products were implanted into the surface in vacuum. For this purpose irradiation was applied to sample placed very close to thin 226Ra source. Measuring the activity before and after abrasion was used to evaluate abrasion in the system toothbrush - various suspensions of the tooth-pastes - hard tooth tissue (enamel or dentine) in a specially designed device, dentoabrasionmeter VUS 2. (author)

  2. Standard Test Method for Abrasive Wear Resistance of Cemented

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of abrasive wear resistance of cemented carbides. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The SI equivalents of inch-pound units are in parentheses and may be approximate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Simulation of abrasive water jet cutting process - Part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Junkar, Mihael; Orbanić, Henri

    2015-01-01

    A new two-dimensional cellular automata (CA) model for the simulation of the abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting process is presented. The CA calculates the shape of the cutting front, which can be used as an estimation of the surface quality. The cutting front is formed based on material removal rules and AWJ propagation rules. The material removal rule calculates when a particular partof the material will be removed with regard to the energy of AWJ. The AWJ propagation rule calculates the dist...

  4. A mathematical model for electrochemical abrasive magnetic polishing operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most reactions and metallurgical machining processes, it is essential on economic grounds to conserve energy requirements. The most important part of this energy is by hybrid conservation systems. Recently, for example as Magnetic- Abrasive - Electrolytic turning (MEAT) processes in the production of high surface quality by ultra precision machining. This technology combines many kinds of energy named hybrid processes, which satisfy both the metal removal efficiency and surface finishing for difficult-to-cut materials at the same time. In the present work, three stages of this process are studied and assessed. In the first stage, the metal removal by the electrochemical turning (ECT) is performed based on Faraday's laws. In this particular case, the different parameters that can affect ECT process such as the applied voltage and gap between the tool and the work-piece, the revolution speed, and the used type of electrolyte and flow rate, are studied and assessed. The author deduced a formula interpreting the relation between the electric conductivity and the process efficiency. Moreover, the relation between the above-mentioned parameter is correlated to the process efficiency. Unfortunately, an oxide membrane appears after some time which degrades the process efficiency. Therefore, in the second stage nonwoven abrasive pads can remove the oxide membrane. Two pad types are evaluated in this concern namely Aluminum oxide and Silicon carbide with different mesh cells are investigated in the abrasive-electrochemical process (AECT). In the third stage, applying a magnetic field can contribute in the oxide film destructions, leading to improving the magneto abrasive electrochemical process (MEAT) efficiency. The comparisons between ECM, AECM and MEAT processes show that average specific metal removal (Wm), are 0.5, 1.9, and 2.5 g/min.mm2.Amp, respectively. Meanwhile the process efficiencies are 1.18, 2.19, and 2.74, respectively. Therefore, the results of the present

  5. Diffuse corneal abrasion after ocular exposure to laundry detergent pod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Rachel E; Baum, Carl R; Aronson, Paul L

    2015-02-01

    Although ocular injury from alkaline household cleaning products is well described, there is less known about the significance and extent of injury with ocular exposure to detergent pods. We report a 12-month-old with diffuse corneal abrasion caused by ocular contact with a laundry detergent pod. In addition to the known risks with aspiration with detergent pods, the potential for severe ocular injury is important for parents and clinicians to recognize. Children with ocular exposure to detergent pods should seek immediate medical care.

  6. Characteristics and mechanism of abrasive wear for thermoplastic polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Jia; Xiaomei Ling

    2003-01-01

    Abrasive wear characteristics of polyethylene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, nylon 1010 and polyvinyl chloride were investigated. The volume relative wear resistance coefficients of these thermoplastic polymers are 18%-35 % (hardened and low temperature tempered steel 45 was used as a comparing material), and have a linear correlation with square roots of their cohesive energy densities. The coefficients of linear correlation is 0.949. Wear morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Main wear mechanism of the thermoplastic polymers includes brittle breaking for the hard and brittle polymers & plowing and fatiguing for the soft and tough ones.

  7. Mars Environmental Chamber for Dynamic Dust Deposition and Statics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, L. E.; Tuller, M.; Islam, M. R.; Baker, L.; Kuhlman, K.

    2004-01-01

    Recent observations of the 2001 dust storms encircling Mars confirm predictions of environmental challenges for exploration. Martian dust has been found to completely mantle the Martian surface over thousands of square kilometers and the opacity of airborne dust has been shown to be capable of modifying atmospheric temperature, radiative transfer and albedo. Planetary dust cycling dynamics are suggested to be a key factor in the evolution of the Martian surface. Long-term robotic and manned exploration of Mars will be confronted by dust deposition in periods of atmospheric calm and violent wind storms. Aeolian dust deposition recorded during the Mars Pathfinder mission was estimated to fall at rates of 20-45 microns per Earth year. Although many tools of exploration will be challenged by coating, adhesion, abrasion and possible chemical reaction of deposited, wind blown and actively disturbed Martian dust, solar cells are thought to be of primary concern. Recent modeling work of power output by gallium arsenide/germanium solar cells was validated by the Pathfinder Lander data and showed power output decreases of 0.1 to 0.5% per Martian day. A major determinant for the optimal positioning angle of solar panels employed in future missions is the angle of repose of the settling dust particles that is dependent on a variety of physical and chemical properties of the particles, the panel surface, and the environmental conditions on the Mars surface. While the effects of many of these factors are well understood qualitatively, quantitative analyses, especially under physical and chemical conditions prevailing on the Mars surface are lacking.

  8. New decontamination techniques: chemical gels, electropolishing and abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations requires decontamination techniques that are efficient, simple to apply and producing a small amount of wastes, which are easy to process. With a view to this, three decontamination methods, which appear to be particularly suited to decommissioning, have been studied. These three methods are: - spraying of gels carrying chemical decontaminating agents, - electropolishing with a swab device, - abrasives blasting. After parametric tests on non-radioactive and active samples, the industrial application of these methods in the dismantling of installations was studied. These industrial applications concern: - decontamination of pieces coming from the German BWR ISAR by immersion and gel spraying, - decontamination, mainly by gel spraying, and dismantling of the BRENNILIS bituminisation plant, - decontamination of part of the cooling circuit of the graphite gas reactor G2 by gel spraying, - decontamination of a component of the FBR SuperPhenix, using dry abrasives blasting. During the first three applications, generated secondary wastes volume and form were determined. 33 tabs., 16 figs., 12 refs

  9. Study on mineral processing technology for abrasive minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Woong; Yang, Jung Il; Hwang, Seon Kook; Choi, Yeon Ho; Cho, Ken Joon; Shin, Hee Young [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Buyeo Materials in Buyeogun, Choongnam province is a company producing feldspar concentrate, but does not yet utilize the garnet as abrasive material and other useful heavy minerals wasted out from the process of feldspar ore. The purpose of this study is to develop technology and process for the recovery of garnet concentrate. As results, the garnet is defined as ferro manganese garnet. The optimum process for recovery of garnet concentrate is to primarily concentrate heavy minerals from tailings of feldspar processing. And secondly the heavy minerals concentrated is dried and separated garnet concentrate from other heavy minerals. At this time, the garnet concentrate is yield by 0.176%wt from 0.31%wt of heavy minerals in head ore. The garnet concentrate contains 33.35% SiO{sub 2}, 12.20% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 28.47% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.96% MnO. As for utilization of abrasive materials, a fundamental data was established on technology of grinding and classification. (author). 13 refs., 47 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. Polyurethanes from the crystalline prepolymers resistant to abrasive wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domańska Agata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed at the selection of polyurethanes synthesized from poly(tetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG, as well as from two different isocyanates 4,4′-methylenebis(cyclohexylisocyanate (HMDI and 4.4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate (MDI in order to obtain polyurethane with increased resistance to abrasive wear and degradation for bio-medical application. Polyurethanes were fabricated from crystalline prepolymers extended by water. The paper presents preliminary results on polyurethane surface wettability, friction coefficient for different couples of the co-working materials such as polyurethane-polyurethane, polyurethane-titanium alloy, polyurethane-alumina, in comparison to commonly used polyethylene-titanium alloy. Shear strength of polyurethane-alumina joint, as well as viscosity of prepolymers were also measured. The values of friction coefficient were compared to literature data on commercially available polyurethane with the trade name Pellethane. Polyurethanes obtained are characterized by low abrasive wear and low friction coefficient in couple with the titanium alloy, what makes them attractive as possible components of ceramic-polymer endoprosthesis joints.

  11. Shrinkage, abrasion, erosion and sorption of clay plasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minke, G.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available At the Buildung Research Institute (FEB, Faculty of Architecture, University of Kassel, Germany, in the last years several hundred tests were made to study the characteristics of different loam mortars in respect of their linear shrinkage, absorption of humidity and their resistance against abrasion and erosion. In order to get data about abrasion and erosion new test methods and special apparatusses were developed. The mortars tested, chosen from the market, showed extremely varying test results.

    En el Laboratorio de Construcciones Experimentales (FEB de la Facultad de Arquitectura, Universidad de Kassel, Alemania, fueron testeados cientos de diferentes pruebas de revoque de barro para estudiar su contracción durante el secado, su absorción de humedad y su resistencia contra abrasión, erosión y absorción. Para recibir datos sobre abrasión y erosión, nuevas aparatos y metodos fueron desarrollados. Los resultados de los revoques comprados en el mercado muestran gran diferencias en los valores.

  12. On Dust Charging Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.; Tsintsadze, Levan N.

    2008-01-01

    A general derivation of the charging equation of a dust grain is presented, and indicated where and when it can be used. A problem of linear fluctuations of charges on the surface of the dust grain is discussed.

  13. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  14. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  15. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL...—Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device EC03OC91.074...

  16. Potential Use of Abrasive Air-Propelled Agricultural Residues for Weed Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new postemergence weed control tactic is proposed for organic production systems that results in plant abrasion and death upon assault from abrasive grits propelled by compressed air. Grit derived from granulated walnut shells was delivered by a sand blaster at 517 kPa at distances of 30 to 60 cm ...

  17. A novel cleaner for colloidal silica abrasive removal in post-Cu CMP cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel cleaning solution, named FA/O alkaline cleaner, was proposed and demonstrated in the removal of colloidal silica abrasives. In order to remove both the chemical and physical absorbed colloidal silica abrasives, an FA/OII chelating agent and non-ionic surfactant were added into the cleaner. By varying the concentration of chelating agent and non-ionic surfactant, a series of experiments were performed to determine the best cleaning results. This paper discusses the mechanism of the removal of colloidal silica abrasives with a FA/O alkaline cleaner. Based on the experiment results, it is concluded that both the FA/OII chelating and non-ionic surfactant could benefit the removal of colloidal silica abrasives. When the concentration of FA/OII chelating agent and FA/O non-ionic surfactant reached the optima value, it was demonstrated that silica abrasives could be removed efficiently by this novel cleaning solution. (paper)

  18. A review of engineering control technology for exposures generated during abrasive blasting operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael R; Susi, Pam

    2004-10-01

    This literature review presents information on measures for controlling worker exposure to toxic airborne contaminants generated during abrasive blasting operations occurring primarily in the construction industry. The exposures of concern include respirable crystalline silica, lead, chromates, and other toxic metals. Unfortunately, silica sand continues to be widely used in the United States as an abrasive blasting medium, resulting in high exposures to operators and surrounding personnel. Recently, several alternative abrasives have emerged as potential substitutes for sand, but they seem to be underused Some of these abrasives may pose additional metal exposure hazards. In addition, several new and improved technologies offer promise for reducing or eliminating exposures; these include wet abrasive blasting, high-pressure water jetting, vacuum blasting, and automated/robotic systems. More research, particularly field studies, is needed to evaluate control interventions in this important and hazardous operation.

  19. Two-Body Abrasive Wear of the Surfaces of Pangolin Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Tong; Tie-biao Lü; Yun-hai Ma; Heng-kun Wang; Lu-quan Ren; R. D. Arnell

    2007-01-01

    The Pangolin, a soil-burrowing animal, is covered with scales. These scales are often abraded by soil and rock and their surface is corrugated. The abrasive wear of the surface of the scales was examined. The scales were taken from a pangolin that had died of natural causes. The tests were run on a rotary disc abrasive wear tester. The abrasive material was quartz sand (96.5 wt.%) and bentonite (3.5 wt.%). The morphology of the abraded surfaces and the abrasion were examined by stereoscopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The concepts are proposed of "Guiding-Effect" and "Rolling-Effect" on the textured surfaces under free abrasive wear conditions and the critical dimensions of the "Rolling-Effect" are discussed.

  20. Dust emission from different sol types and geomorphic units in the Sahara - implications for modeling dust emission and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan; Enzel, Yehouda

    2014-05-01

    Mineral dust plays multiple roles in mediating physical and biogeochemical exchanges among the atmosphere, land and ocean, and thus is an active component of the global climate system. To estimate the past, current, and future impacts of dust on climate, sources of dust and their erodibility should be identified. The Sahara is the major source of dust on Earth. Based on qualitative analysis of remotely sensed data with low temporal resolution, the main sources of dust that have been identified are topographic depressions comprised of dry lake and playa deposits in hyprarid regions. Yet, recent studies cast doubts on these as the major sources and call for a search for others. Moreover, the susceptibility of soils to aeolian erosion (wind land erodibility) in the Sahara is still poorly known. In this study we identify and determine the soil types and geomorphic units most important as Saharan dust sources by correlating between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types/geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. Few dust storms originated from dry lake beds and playas. Land erodibility by wind for each soil type/geomorphic unit was estimated by a regression of the NDS and the number of days with high-speed wind events; the regression is relatively high for sand dunes and gypsisols. We use these regressions to differentiate between sources of dust that are supply-limited to those that are transport-limited. We propose that the fracturing of saltating sand and the removal of clay coatings from sand grains through eolian abrasion is the dominant dust-emission mechanism for the sand-rich areas covering large portion of the Sahara. Our results also explain the increased dustiness during the last glacial period, when sand dunes activity has been more common than during the Holocene

  1. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  2. A new method to test rock abrasiveness based on physico-mechanical and structural properties of rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.N. Oparin; A.S. Tanaino

    2015-01-01

    abstract A new method to test rock abrasiveness is proposed based upon the dependence of rock abrasiveness on their structural and physico-mechanical properties. The article describes the procedure of presentation of properties that govern rock abrasiveness on a canonical scale by dimensionless components, and the integrated estimation of the properties by a generalized index. The obtained results are compared with the known classifications of rock abrasiveness.

  3. Fatigue Testing of Abrasive Water Jet Cut Titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.; Williford, Ralph E.

    2009-06-08

    Battelle Memorial Institute as part of its U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 to operate the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provides technology assistance to qualifying small businesses in association with a Technology Assistance Program (TAP). Qualifying companies are eligible to receive a set quantity of labor associated with specific technical assistance. Having applied for a TAP agreement to assist with fatigue characterization of Abrasive Water Jet (AWJ) cut titanium specimens, the OMAX Corporation was awarded TAP agreement 09-02. This program was specified to cover dynamic testing and analysis of fatigue specimens cut from titanium alloy Ti-6%Al-4%V via AWJ technologies. In association with the TAP agreement, a best effort agreement was made to characterize fatigue specimens based on test conditions supplied by OMAX.

  4. Surface quality of marble machined by abrasive water jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted to examine the effect of cutting parameters, namely standoff distance, nozzle traverse speed (TS, abrasive flow rate (AFR, and material type on cutting performance for two types of marble workpieces, Carrara white and Indian green. Statistical analysis was undertaken to assess the influence of the cutting parameters on the process performances in terms of surface roughness, surface waviness, and Kerf taper ratio. The results showed that the TS and material type were the most significant factors that affected surface roughness and Kerf taper ratio. Also, although AFR was found to have significant effect on surface waviness, it had no noticeable influence on surface roughness nor Kerf taper ratio.

  5. Standard test method for jaw crusher gouging abrasion test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory procedure to determine the relative gouging abrasion resistance of materials. Materials homogeneous in structure and properties are the most appropriate test materials; however, surface-treated and composite materials can also be tested. The test involves a small laboratory jaw crusher that crushes presized hard rock materials, such as a hard morainal gravel, or some other crushable substance. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (See 8.1 on Safety Precautions.)

  6. Monitoring and control of fine abrasive finishing processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarev, Ruslan

    In engineering, surfaces with specified functional properties are of high demand in various applications. Desired surface finish can be obtained using several methods. Abrasive finishing is one of the most important processes in the manufacturing of mould and dies tools. It is a principal method...... to remove unwanted material, obtain desired geometry, surface quality and surface functional properties. The automation and computerization of finishing processes involves utilisation of robots, specialized machines with several degrees of freedom, sensors and data acquisition systems. The focus...... of this work was to investigate foundations for process monitoring and control methods in application to semi-automated polishing machine based on the industrial robot. The monitoring system was built on NI data acquisition system with two sensors, acoustic emission sensor and accelerometer. Acquired sensory...

  7. Modelling soil dust aerosol in the Bodélé depression during the BoDEx campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Washington

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We present regional model simulations of the dust emission events during the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx that was carried out in February and March 2005 in Chad. A box model version of the dust emission model is used to test different input parameters for the emission model, and to compare the dust emissions computed with observed wind speeds to those calculated with wind speeds from the regional model simulation. While field observations indicate that dust production occurs via self-abrasion of saltating diatomite flakes in the Bodélé, the emission model based on the assumption of dust production by saltation and using observed surface wind speeds as input parameters reproduces observed dust optical thicknesses well. Although the peak wind speeds in the regional model underestimate the highest wind speeds occurring on 10–12 March 2005, the spatio-temporal evolution of the dust cloud can be reasonably well reproduced by this model. Dust aerosol interacts with solar and thermal radiation in the regional model; it is responsible for a decrease in maximum daytime temperatures by about 5 K at the beginning the dust storm on 10 March 2005. This direct radiative effect of dust aerosol accounts for about half of the measured temperature decrease compared to conditions on 8 March. Results from a global dust model suggest that the dust from the Bodélé is an important contributor to dust crossing the African Savannah region towards the Gulf of Guinea and the equatorial Atlantic, where it can contribute up to 40% to the dust optical thickness.

  8. Cover and Erosion Asymmetry in Saltation-Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, C. P.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion in bedrock-floored rivers is both driven and limited by the amount of sediment transported along the bed. Some sediment boosts wear rates, whereas too much generates a protective cover. This phenomenon determines the shape of river channels in a variety of landscapes and limits how fast they evolve. Here we reevaluate data from a well-known bedrock wear experiment to throw new light on how the saltation-abrasion process. Instead of a symmetric form for erosion versus sediment flux relative to transport capacity, we find the erosion rate peak shifts towards lower sediment fluxes when blocking of oblique saltation trajectories is taken into account. The theoretical context for this reevaluation is a cover-saltation-abrasion model, based on queueing theory (QT), for bedload transport over a planar bedrock bed. The QT approach provides some clarity in the stochastic treatment of granular impacts and cover, and generates closed-form solutions for wear rate in terms of sediment flux and simplified saltation geometry. Applied to the Sklar & Dietrich (2001) experiments in a very small recirculating flume, the two-parameter QT model fits the observed relation between erosion rate and sediment load, infers sediment flux as a function of load, admits non-negligible wear rates for a mean sediment depth of one grain, i.e., for full cover on average, but also suggests that bedrock erosion is blocked at >=50% instantaneous cover. The QT model makes testable predictions for future laboratory experiments and highlights the need for specific improvements in more comprehensive treatments of bedrock erosion and cover.

  9. Development of Abrasive Selection Model/Chart for Palm Frond Broom Peeling Machine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwankwojike

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A model for predicting the friction required by a palm frond broom peeling machine for effective peeling of palm leaf to broom bristle and a chart for selecting the best abrasive material for this machine’s peeling operation were developed in this study using mechanistic modeling method. The model quantified the relationship between the coefficient of friction and other operational parameters of this machine while the abrasives selection chart constitutes a plot of this measured friction parameter against the abrasive materials used in palm frond broom peeling machine fabrication. The values of the coefficient of friction of palm leaf on different abrasive materials used in this plot were determined from experimental study of the effect of moisture content level of naturally withered palm leaves (uninfluenced by external forces on their coefficient of friction with the abrasives. Results revealed the average moisture content of palm leaf this machine can peel effectively as 6.96% and also that the roughest among the abrasives that approximate the coefficient of friction for a specific design of this peeling machine gives maximum peeling efficiency. Thus, the roughest among the abrasive materials that approximate the coefficient of friction for a specific design of this machine should be selected and used for its fabrication and operation.

  10. Influence of Corrosion on the Abrasion of Cutter Steels Used in TBM Tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espallargas, N.; Jakobsen, P. D.; Langmaack, L.; Macias, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abrasion on tunnel boring machine (TBM) cutters may be critical in terms of project duration and costs. Several researchers are currently studying the degradation of TBM cutter tools used for excavating hard rock, soft ground and loose soil. So far, the primary focus of this research has been directed towards abrasive wear. Abrasive wear is a very common process in TBM excavation, but with a view to the environment in which the tools are working, corrosion may also exert an influence. This paper presents a selection of techniques that can be used to evaluate the influence of corrosion on abrasion on TBM excavation tools. It also presents the influence of corrosion on abrasive wear for some initial tests, with constant steel and geomaterial and varying properties of the excavation fluids (soil conditioners, anti-abrasion additives and water). The results indicate that the chloride content in the water media greatly influences the amount of wear, providing evidence of the influence of corrosion on the abrasion of the cutting tools. The presence of conditioning additives tailored to specific rock or soil conditions reduces wear. However, when chloride is present in the water, the additives minimise wear rates but fail to suppress corrosion of the cutting tools.

  11. An Experimental investigation of sea sand as an Abrasive material in vibrating chamber by using Tungsten Carbide Nozzle in Abrasive Jet machining Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Pawar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A large number of investigation carried out in Abrasive jet machining and water jet machining process with different parameter but no detailed work have been found or carried out by using sea sand as an abrasive in AJM process by using different types of nozzles and variable parameters. The present work gives performance of sand having grain structure of 100-150 micron in the tungsten carbide nozzle. Theexperimentation in this study give characteristic of sea sand as abrasive material. The parameter like pressure, standoff distance of nozzle from work piece keeping constant and variable. It give the result of material removal rate , powder flow rate, similar to actually abrasive used like Aluminum oxide, silicon oxide etc. The R square value o.97 to 0.996 degree of polynomial equation. It is also notice that width of cut slightly increase with increase of feed rate .The taper cut slot was found to be a higher at greater stand of distance and work feed rate .Tungsten carbide is very hard. It maintain high cutting ability as abrasive strike on work piece

  12. Optical-model abrasion cross sections for high-energy heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Within the context of eikonal scattering theory, a generalized optical model potential approximation to the nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series is used in an abrasion-ablation collision model to predict abrasion cross sections for relativistic projectile heavy ions. Unlike the optical limit of Glauber theory, which cannot be used for very light nuclei, the abrasion formalism is valid for any projectile target combination at any incident kinetic energy for which eikonal scattering theory can be utilized. Results are compared with experimental results and predictions from Glauber theory.

  13. Influence of Impact Energy on Impact Corrosion-abrasion of High Manganese Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The impact corrosion-abrasion properties and mechanism of high manganese steel were investigated under different impact energies. The result shows that the wearability of the steel decreases with the increase of the impact energy. The dominant failure mechanism at a lower impact energy is the rupture of extrusion edge along root and a slight shallow-layer spalling. It transforms to shallow-layer fatigue flaking along with serious corrosion-abrasion when the impact energy is increased, and finally changes to bulk flaking of hardened layer caused by deep work-hardening and heavy corrosion-abrasion.

  14. The Increased Production Efficiency and Optimization Terms of Stationarity by Flat Grinding with Abrasive Circle Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husseinov Hassan Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This scientific work deals with the production area. The paper investigates the problems related to the uneven abrasive effect on the processed surface by flat grinding with the abrasive circle surface, and the analytical expression of pattern distribution of the working abrasive grain within the limits of various technological primitives and inaccuracy of geometric shape have been determined. The ways of stationary provision of the grinding surface have been suggested. This paper also focuses on the economic efficiency of the production.

  15. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  16. Temperature of cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Th.; Weidlich, U.

    1988-05-01

    The variation of dust temperature with heliocentric distance for a comet is calculated using the optical constants of an astronomically important silicate. The silicate, described by Drane (1985), is assumed to be similar to cometary dust. The temperatures of cometary dust grains are determined by the energy balance between the absorbed sunlight and emitted thermal radiation, and equilibrium temperatures of dust grains for different radii and heliocentric distances are compared. Deviations between computed and observed temperatures are attributed to variations in the chemical composition of the ablated grains.

  17. Surface assessment and modification of concrete using abrasive blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Lauren R.

    Composite systems are applied to concrete substrates to strengthen and extend the service life. Successful restoration or rehabilitation requires surface preparation prior to the application of the overlay. Surface coatings, waterproofing systems, and other external surface applications also require surface preparation prior to application. Abrasive blast media is often used to clean and uniformly roughen the substrate. The appropriate surface roughness is necessary to facilitate a strong bond between the existing substrate and overlay. Thus, surface modification using abrasive blast media (sand and dry ice), their respective environmental effects, surface roughness characterization prior to and after blasting, and the adhesion between the substrate and overlay are the focus of this dissertation. This dissertation is comprised of an introduction, a literature review, and four chapters, the first of which addresses the environmental effects due to abrasive blasting using sand, water, and dry ice. The assessment considered four response variables: carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, fuel and energy consumption, and project duration. The results indicated that for sand blasting and water jetting, the primary factor contributing to environmental detriment was CO22 emissions from vehicular traffic near the construction site. The second chapter is an analysis of the International Concrete Repair Institute's (ICRI) concrete surface profiles (CSPs) using 3-D optical profilometry. The primary objective was to evaluate the suitability of approximating the 3-D surface (areal) parameters with those extracted from 2-D (linear) profiles. Four profile directions were considered: two diagonals, and lines parallel and transverse to the longitudinal direction of the mold. For any CSP mold, the estimation of the 3-D surface roughness using a 2-D linear profile resulted in underestimation and overestimation errors exceeding 50%, demonstrating the inadequacy of 2-D linear profiles to

  18. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Ge2Sb2Te5 Using Abrasive-Free Solutions of Iron Trichloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Wei-Xia; WANG Liang-Yong; ZHANG Ze-Fang; HE Ao-Dong; ZHONG Min; LIU Wei-Li; WU Liang-Cai; SONG Zhi-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is studied using aqueous solutions of iron trichloride (FeCl3 ) as possible abrasive-free slurries.The polishing performance of abrasive-free solutions is compared with abrasive-containing (3wt%o colloidal silica) slurry in terms of polishing rate and surface quality.The experimental results indicate that the abrasive-free solutions have a higher polishing rate and better surface quality.In order to further investigate the polishing mechanism,post-CMP GST films using the abrasive-free solutions and abrasive-containing slurry are characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Finally,it is verified that the abrasive-free solutions have no influence on the electrical property of the post-CMP GST films through the resistivity test.

  19. Review of dust transport and mitigation technologies in lunar and Martian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Wu, Chang-Yu; Curtis, Jennifer Sinclair; Gaier, James R.

    2015-09-01

    Dust resuspension and deposition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in all lunar and Martian missions. The near-term plans to return to the Moon as a stepping stone to further exploration of Mars and beyond bring scientists' attention to development and evaluation of lunar and Martian dust mitigation technologies. In this paper, different lunar and Martian dust transport mechanisms are presented, followed by a review of previously developed dust mitigation technologies including fluidal, mechanical, electrical and passive self-cleaning methods for lunar/Martian installed surfaces along with filtration for dust control inside cabins. Key factors in choosing the most effective dust mitigation technology are recognized to be the dust transport mechanism, energy consumption, environment, type of surface materials, area of the surface and surface functionality. While electrical methods operating at higher voltages are identified to be suitable for small but light sensitive surfaces, pre-treatment of the surface is effective for cleaning thermal control surfaces, and mechanical methods are appropriate for surfaces with no concerns of light blockage, surface abrasion and 100% cleaning efficiency. Findings from this paper can help choose proper surface protection/cleaning for future space explorations. Hybrid techniques combining the advantages of different methods are recommended.

  20. Investigation of the selected properties of dusts from the reclamation of spent sands with bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kamińska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation results of the selected properties of dusts generated during the mechanical reclamation of spent sands with bentonite as well as dusts from the dedusting system of sand processing plant are presented in the hereby paper. Investigations were performed with regard to determination conditions allowing to pelletise dusts in the bowl granulator. The verified methods of testing physical and chemical dust properties such as: specific density, bulk density of loosely put materials and apparent density of compacted materials together with their corresponding porosity, ignition losses and pH values, were applied. Granular composition of dusts generated during abrasion of spent binding materials in mechanical dry reclamation processes of spent sands with bentonite and coal dusts were performed by the laser diffraction analysis, allowing to broaden the measuring range of particle diameters. The optimal wetting agent content (in this case water at which the dust-water mixture obtains the best strength properties – after compacting by means of the standard moulder’s rammer – was determined.

  1. Abrasive wear property of laser melting/deposited Ti2Ni/TiNi intermetallic alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A wear resistant intermetallic alloy consisting of TiNi primary dendrites and Ti2Ni matrix was fabricated by the laser melting deposition manufacturing process. Wear resistance of Ti2Ni/TiNi alloy was evaluated on an abrasive wear tester at room temperature under the different loads. The results show that the intermetallic alloy suffers more abrasive wear attack under low wear test load of 7, 13 and 25 N than high-chromium cast-iron. However, the intermetallic alloy exhibits better wear resistance under wear test load of 49 N. Abrasive wear of the laser melting deposition Ti2Ni/TiNi alloy is governed by micro-cutting and plowing.Pseudoelasticity of TiNi plays an active role in contributing to abrasive wear resistance.

  2. Machining of the Flat Surfaces with Abrasive-metallic Lapping Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Barylski

    2004-01-01

    The constructional principle of abrasion metal disc is that abrasive insertions are spread uniformly on the working surface of a metal base. During lapping by means of such tools only the machining fluid is dosed and that by drop.Abrasive elements of circular shape pellets are produced by mixing boron carbide BC400 micrograins with electrographite components, the pellets were pressed with a load of about 12 kN. Next they were heated in furnace at about 520K for hours,then cooled together with the furnace. Tests were carried out on the making of circular abrasive insertions of which the main components were born carbide and micrograins of electric copper mixed the epoxide resins.

  3. Machining of the Flat Surfaces with Abrasive-metallic Lapping Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AdamBarylski

    2004-01-01

    The constructional principle of abrasion metal disc is that abrasive insertions are spread uniformly on the working surface of a metal base. During lapping by means of such tools only the machining fluid is dosed and that by drop. Abrasive elements of circular shape pellets are produced by mixing boron carbide BC400 micrograins with electrographite components, the pellets were pressed with a load of about 12 kN. Next they were heated in furnace at about 520K for hours, then cooled together with the furnace. Tests were carried out on the making of circular abrasive insertions of which the main components were born carbide and micrograins of electric copper mixed the epoxide resins.

  4. RESIZING OF THE CRANIOMANDIBULAR RELATION IN THE REHABILITATION OF DENTAL ABRASION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia BAHRIM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental abrasion appears as a complex phenomenon among the multitude of clinical manifestations occurring in patients who require a complex oral rehabilitation. The therapeutical solutions for such cases are quite elaborate, involving interdisciplinary contributions from the part of various specialists.Obviously, elucidation of the complex cases of dental abrasion is possible when their standardized classification and, equally, a well-established therapeutical conduct, considering the class of dental abrasion, are available.Considering the advance of the adhesive techniques, the conservative treatment of dental abrasion is more indicated than the conventional method.Consequently, a 3-stage protocol of coronary reconstruction is recommended in cases of erosion with undersizing of the lower segment. The immediate aesthetic results are satisfacatory for the patient, as well as the functional ones, not requiring longer accomodation times. The reconstructions are resistant, due to the progress recorded by the adhesive techniques and composite resins (nano-hybrids, nano-composites.

  5. Clarification of abrasive jet precision finishing with wheel as restraint mechanisms and experimental verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    According to the critical size ratio for the characteristic particle size to film thickness between grinding wheel and work, the machining mechanisms in abrasive jet precision finishing with grinding wheel as restraint can be categorized into four states, namely, two-body lapping, three-body polishing, abrasive jet machining and fluid hydrodynamic shear stress machining. The critical transition condition of two-body lapping to three-body polishing was analyzed. The single abrasive material removal models of two-body lapping, three-body polishing, abrasive jet finishing and fluid hydrodynamic shear stress machining were proposed. Experiments were performed in the refited plane grinding machine for theoretical modes verification. It was found that experimental results agreed with academic modes and the modes validity was verified.

  6. Standard test method for conducting wet sand/rubber wheel abrasion tests

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of metallic materials to scratching abrasion by means of the wet sand/rubber wheel test. It is the intent of this procedure to provide data that will reproducibly rank materials in their resistance to scratching abrasion under a specified set of conditions. 1.2 Abrasion test results are reported as volume loss in cubic millimeters. Materials of higher abrasion resistance will have a lower volume loss. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. INVESTIGATION ON NEW TYPE OF DOUBLY BLENDING ABRASIVE WATER JET NOZZLE SYSTEM WITH HIGHER PERFORMANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Pailong; ZHOU Jinjin; TANG Dianbo

    2006-01-01

    Based on the two existing abrasive water-jet(AWJ) systems, the dia-jet (or pre-jet) and the post-jet, a new type of abrasive water-jet system is put forward, which combines the dia-jet's advantage, low operating system pressure, slender stream jet, and more concentrative abrasive in the blended stream, with merits of post-jet, the less sophisticate apparatus, successive supply of abrasives.The theoretic analysis is brought out in detail, and the nozzle system structure is concisely illustrated.Its relevant experiment results are demonstrated, proving that this new system is effective in various aspects, enlarging penetrating capability without raising system pressure, saving machining power supply, lessening energy loss, etc.

  8. Surface roughness and gloss of current CAD/CAM resin composites before and after toothbrush abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Saiki, Osamu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Okazaki, Tomoyo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gloss and surface roughness behaviors of newly developed CAD/CAM composite blocks with different filler contents and characteristics. The gloss and surface roughness were quantified before and after a toothbrush dentifrice abrasion test; the results were compared to the gloss and surface roughness of a ceramic CAD/CAM block. Knoop hardness was determined before abrasion test. The results were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey HSD, and Dunnett t test (pVita Enamic>Gradia block>Shofu Block HC, Lava Ultimate≥Katana Avencia block≥Cerasmart. After toothbrush abrasion, a significant difference in the gloss unit was detected between the Shofu Block HC material and the ceramic block. The Ra and Rz of the Cerasmart and Shofu Block HC materials were significantly larger than those of the ceramic block after toothbrush abrasion. PMID:26632238

  9. Abrasion resistance of biaxially oriented polypropylene films coated with nanocomposite hard coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Yaofeng; Fu, Yaqin

    2013-11-01

    KMnO4-treated, functionalized, biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) films coated with nano-silica hybrid material were synthesized. The abrasion resistance of the films was examined using a reciprocating fabric abrasion tester. Functional groups were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Contact angle measurements were performed on the BOPP film surface to quantify the effectiveness of the functionalization. Results indicate that the abrasion resistance and roughness of the composite film were significantly affected by the modification of the BOPP film. Water surface contact angle of the modified BOPP films decreased from 90.1° to 71.4°,when KMnO4 concentration increased from 0 M to 0.25 M. Wettability of the BOPP films clearly improved after KMnO4 treatment. Abrasion resistance of the functionalized films coated with hybrid materials improved by 27.4% compared with that of the original film.

  10. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  11. Abrasive blasting technology for decontamination of the inner surface of steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inner surfaces of bundled inconel tubes from steam generators in South Korean nuclear power plants are contaminated with cobalt and abrasive blasting equipment has been developed to efficiently remove the cobalt. The principal parameters related to the efficient removal using this equipment are the type of abrasive, the distance from the nozzle, and the blasting time. Preliminary tests were performed using oxidized inconel samples which enabled the simulation of cobalt removal from the radioactive inconel samples. The oxygen in the oxidized samples and the cobalt in the radioactive inconel were removed more effectively using the blasting distance, blasting time, and a silicon carbide abrasive. Using the developed abrasive blasting equipment, the optimum decontamination conditions for radioactive inconel samples were blasting for more than 6 minutes using silicon carbides under 5 atmospheric pressures

  12. MAGNETO-ABRASIVE MACHINING OF SURFACES FORMED BY ELECTROMAGNET SURFACING WITH PLASTIC DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh. A. Mrochek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigation results pertaining to magneto-abrasive machining of product surfaces formed by electromagnet surfacing with a plastic deformation of P6M5K5 powder. 

  13. Effect of cerium on abrasive wear behaviour of hardfacing alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Shule; YU Shengfu; DENG Yu; DAI Minghui; YU Lu

    2012-01-01

    Hardfacing alloys with different amounts of ceria were prepared by self-shielded flux cored arc welding.The abrasion tests were carried out using the dry sand-rubber wheel machine according to JB/T 7705-1995 standard.The hardness of hardfacing deposits was measured by means of HR-150AL Rockwell hardness test and the fracture toughness was measured by the indentation method.Microstructure characterization and surface analysis were made using optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy spectrum analysis.The results showed that the wear resistance was determined by the size and distribution of the carbides,as well as by the matrix microstructure.The main wear mechanisms observed at the surfaces included micro-cutting and micro-ploughing of the matrix.The addition of ceria improved the hardness and fracture toughness of hardfacing deposits,which would increase the resistance to plastic deformation and scratch,thus the wear resistance of hardfacing alloys was improved.

  14. Gingival abrasion and plaque removal with manual versus electric toothbrushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, M L; Ainamo, J; Etemadzadeh, H

    1986-08-01

    A clinical trial was designed to test the relative numbers of gingival lesions caused during standardized brushing of the teeth of 22 volunteer dental nurse students with a manual soft multitufted, a manual soft V-shaped, and an electric toothbrush. First, the left or the right side of the jaws of each subject was brushed by a dental hygienist using the manual V-shaped or the electric brush, and the other side using the manual multitufted brush. At the 2nd brushing 1 week later, the same hygienist used the multitufted brush for brushing the side contralateral to the one in which it was used the 1st week and the V-shaped manual brush instead of the electric and vice versa. After each brushing, the number of new gingival lesions was recorded and the cleansing effect evaluated by assessment of the amount of remaining plaque. This examiner was unaware of the type of brush used. The V-shaped manual toothbrush was found to have caused more gingival abrasion than the electric toothbrush (P less than 0.005) and a similar difference was found between the multitufted manual and the electric toothbrush (P less than 0.05). There was no clinically significant difference between the plaque removing effects of the 3 brushes tested. PMID:3463575

  15. Experimental Study on Abrasive Waterjet Polishing of Hydraulic Turbine Blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, an experimental investigation is implemented on the abrasive waterjet polishing technique to evaluate its capability in polishing of surfaces and edges of hydraulic turbine blades. For this, the properties of this method are studied and the main parameters affecting its performance are determined. Then, an experimental test-rig is designed, manufactured and tested to be used in this study. This test-rig can be used to polish linear and planar areas on the surface of the desired workpieces. Considering the number of parameters and their levels, the Taguchi method is used to design the preliminary experiments. All experiments are then implemented according to the Taguchi L18 orthogonal array. The signal-to-noise ratios obtained from the results of these experiments are used to determine the importance of the controlled polishing parameters on the final quality of the polished surface. The evaluations on these ratios reveal that the nozzle angle and the nozzle diameter have the most important impact on the results. The outcomes of these experiments can be used as a basis to design a more precise set of experiments in which the optimal values of each parameter can be estimated

  16. Optimization of tribological parameters in abrasive wear mode of carbon-epoxy hybrid composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Optimization of factors affecting abrasive wear of hybrid composite. • Experimental studies integrated with Taguchi based grey analysis and ANOVA. • Abrasive wear resistance improved with the addition of filler. • Wear rate depends on filler loading, grit of abrasive paper and type of filler. - Abstract: Abrasive wear performance of fabric reinforced composites filled with functional fillers is influenced by the properties of the constituents. This work is focused on identifying the factors such as filler type, filler loading, grit size of SiC paper, normal applied load and sliding distance on two-body abrasive wear behaviour of the hybrid composites. Abrasive wear tests were carried on carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composite (C-E) filled with filler alumina (Al2O3) and molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) separately in different proportions, using pin-on-disc apparatus. The experiments were planned according to Taguchi L18 orthogonal array by considering five factors, one at two levels and the remaining at three levels, affecting the abrasion process. Grey relational analysis (GRA) was employed to optimize the tribological parameters having multiple-response. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to determine the significance of factors influencing wear. Also, the comparative specific wear rates of all the composites under dry sliding and two-body abrasive wear were discussed. The analysis showed that the filler loading, grit size and filler type are the most significant factors in controlling the specific wear rate of the C-E composite. Optimal combination of the process parameters for multi performance characteristics of the composite under study is the set with filler type as MoS2, filler loading of 10 wt.%, grit size 320, load of 15 N and sliding distance of 30 m. Further, the optimal parameter setting for minimum specific wear rate, coefficient of friction and maximum hardness were corroborated with the help of scanning electron micrographs

  17. Turning of wood plastic composites by water jet and abrasive water jet

    OpenAIRE

    Hutyrová, Z.; Ščučka, J. (Jiří); S. Hloch; Hlaváček, P.; M. Zeleňák

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the verification of suitability of water jet and abrasive water jet application for the disintegration of rotating samples of wood plastic composites (WPCs) with diameter d=36 mm. The influence of selected technological factors (traverse speed of cutting head v [mm/ min] and size of abrasive particles [MESH]) on the topography of resulting surfaces has in particular been studied. Surface topography and quality have been assessed using the methods of optical and co...

  18. Measurement of Fine Grain Copper Surface Texture Created by Abrasive Water Jet Cutting

    OpenAIRE

    Hlaváček, Petr; Valíček, Jan; Hloch, Sergej; Greger, Miroslav; Foldyna, Josef; IVANDIĆ, Željko; Sitek, Libor; Kušnerová, Milena; ZELEŃÁK, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments performed on copper with commercial purity to determine the influence of material grain size on both mechanical properties and texture of surface machined by abrasive water jet. An Equal Channel Angular Extrusion technology was used for creation of fine-grain copper samples. Hardness and grain size of fine-grain copper were measured, and, subsequently, surface of prepared copper samples was machined by abrasive water jet technology. Surface irregul...

  19. An Investigation of Abrasive Water Jet Machining on Graphite/Glass/Epoxy Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Doreswamy; Basavanna Shivamurthy; Devineni Anjaiah; N. Yagnesh Sharma

    2015-01-01

    In the present research work, the effect of abrasive water jet (AWJ) machining parameters such as jet operating pressure, feed rate, standoff distance (SOD), and concentration of abrasive on kerf width produced on graphite filled glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite is investigated. Experiments were conducted based on Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal arrays and the process parameters were optimized to obtain small kerf. The main as well as interaction effects of the process parameters were analyzed...

  20. Examination of Wetting by Liquid Zinc of Steel Sheets Following Various Kinds of Abrasive Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecotka M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive blasting is one of the methods of surface working before hot-dip zinc-coating. It allows not only to remove products of corrosion from the surface, but it also affects the quality of the zinc coating applied later, thereby affecting wettability of surface being zinc-coated. The surface working can be done with different types of abrasive material.

  1. Is bovine dentine an appropriate substitute for human dentine in erosion/abrasion tests?

    OpenAIRE

    Wegehaupt, F; Gries, D.; A. Wiegand; Attin, T.

    2008-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the dentine wear of primary and permanent human and bovine teeth because of erosion/abrasion and evaluate if bovine dentine is an appropriate substitute for human dentine in further erosion/abrasions tests. Dentine samples from deciduous molars and human third molars as well as from calves' and cattle's lower incisors were prepared and baseline surface profiles were recorded. Each day all samples were demineralized in 1% citric acid, tooth brushed with 100 brushing ...

  2. Tensile and hydraulic properties of geosynthetics after mechanical damage and abrasion laboratory tests

    OpenAIRE

    Rosete, A.; Pinho-Lopes, M.; Lopes, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Installation damage of geosynthetics occurs during their handling, positioning on the ground and the placing and compacting of fill material. Abrasion is a common damage mechanism where there is cyclic relative motion (friction) between a geosynthetic and contact soil. This paper presents the laboratory test results of mechanical damage and abrasion performed on six geosynthetics. The in isolation and combined effects on mechanical, hydraulic and physical properties of the geosynthetics were ...

  3. The influence of mixing water and abrasives on the quality of machined surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stoić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the impact of mixing water and abrasives in water jet cutting process on the quality of the machined surface. The tests were done with polymer material SIPAS, where the influence of cutting parameters was researched (cutting pressure, cutting feed and abrasive mass flow. The surface roughness was measured on several zones, regarding the depth of materials, because the roughness is increased with the material thickness.

  4. RESIZING OF THE CRANIOMANDIBULAR RELATION IN THE REHABILITATION OF DENTAL ABRASION

    OpenAIRE

    Delia BAHRIM; Aurel APINTILIESEI; Alexandru Vasile BURLUI; Oana CUCOVEICĂ; Gîrbea, Cătălina; Carmen STADOLEANU

    2016-01-01

    Dental abrasion appears as a complex phenomenon among the multitude of clinical manifestations occurring in patients who require a complex oral rehabilitation. The therapeutical solutions for such cases are quite elaborate, involving interdisciplinary contributions from the part of various specialists.Obviously, elucidation of the complex cases of dental abrasion is possible when their standardized classification and, equally, a well-established therapeutical conduct, considering the class of...

  5. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Glass Substrate with α-Alumina-g-Polystyrene Sulfonic Acid Composite Abrasive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Hong; BU Naijing; ZHANG Zefang; CHEN Ruling

    2010-01-01

    Abrasive is the one of key influencing factors during chemical mechanical polishing(CMP) process. Currently, α-Alumina (α-Al2O3) particle, as a kind of abrasive, has been widely used in CMP slurries, but their high hardness and poor dispersion stability often lead to more surface defects. After being polished with composite particles, the surface defects of work pieces decrease obviously. So the composite particles as abrasives in slurry have been paid more attention. In order to reduce defect caused by pure α-Al2O3 abrasive, α-alumina-g-polystyrene sulfonic acid (α-Al2O3-g-PSS) composite abrasive was prepared by surface graft polymerization. The composition, structure and morphology of the product were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy(TOF-SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy(SEM), respectively. The results show that polystyrene sulfonic acid grafts onto α-Al2O3, and has well dispersibility. Then, the chemical mechanical polishing performances of the composite abrasive on glass substrate were investigated with a SPEEDFAM-16B-4M CMP machine. Atomic force microscopy(AFM) images indicate that the average roughness of the polished glass substrate surface can be decreased from 0.835 nm for pure α-Al2O3 abrasive to 0.583 nm for prepared α-Al2O3-g-PSS core-shell abrasive. The research provides a new and effect way to improve the surface qualities during CMP.

  6. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and Three-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Thermoplastic Copolyester Elastomer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanth Rajashekaraiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various amounts of short fibers (glass and carbon and particulate fillers like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, silicon carbide (SiC, and alumina (Al2O3 were systematically introduced into the thermoplastic copolyester elastomer (TCE matrix for reinforcement purpose. The mechanical properties such as storage modulus, loss modulus, and Tan δ by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and three-body abrasive wear performance on a dry sand rubber wheel abrasion tester have been investigated. For abrasive wear study, the experiments were planned according to L27 orthogonal array by considering three factors and three levels. The complex moduli for TCE hybrid composites were pushed to a higher level relative to the TCE filled PTFE composite. At lower temperatures (in the glassy region, the storage modulus increases with increase in wt.% of reinforcement (fiber + fillers and the value is maximum for the composite with 40 wt.% reinforcement. The loss modulus and damping peaks were also found to be higher by the incorporation of SiC and Al2O3 microfillers. The routine abrasive wear test results indicated that TCE filled PTFE composite exhibited better abrasion resistance. Improvements in the abrasion resistance, however, have not been achieved by short-fiber and particlaute filler reinforcements. From the Taguchi’s experimental findings, optimal combination of control factors were obtained for minimum wear volume and also predictive correlations were proposed. Further, the worn surface morphology of the samples was discussed.

  7. Dressing of diamond grinding wheels by abrasive water jet for freeform optical surface grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Peng; Li, Chengwu; Huang, Chuanzhen; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Hongtao; Liu, Zengwen

    2014-08-01

    During the ultra-precision grinding of a large aperture mirror made of RB-SiC, the grinding wheel becomes dull rapidly, which will lead to an increase of grinding force and a decrease of grinding ratio. In this paper, diamond grinding sticks were dressed with micro SiC abrasive water jet and water jet. Through single factorial experiments, the influence of jet pressure on the dressing performance was investigated. To analyze and evaluate the effect of dressing quantitatively, the 3D roughness and the wheel topography were measured and compared with laser scanning confocal microscope before and after dressing. The experimental results show that the abrasive grains are well protruded from binder and the distribution of the abrasive grains becomes uniform after dressing by abrasive water jet when the dressing parameters are properly selected. The dressing performance of abrasive water jet is much better than water jet. For dressing ultra-fine grit size wheels, the abrasive size of the jet should be smaller than the wheel grit size to achieve a better result. The jet pressure is an obvious influence factor of the surface topography.

  8. Microstructure and abrasion wear behavior of Ni-based laser cladding alloy layer at high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; LIU Su-qin; WANG Shun-xing

    2005-01-01

    Ni-based alloy coating on 21-4-N heat-resistant steel was prepared using CO2 laser, and the high-temperature abrasion wear was tested. The microstructure of this cladding layer and its abrasion wear behavior at high temperature by changing compositions and temperatures were investigated by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Among the three compositions of cladding layer, i.e. Ni21+20%WC+0.5%CeO2, Ni25+20%WC+0.5%CeO2 and Ni60+20%WC+0.5%CeO2, the experimental results show that Ni21+20%WC+0.5%CeO2 cladding layer is made up of finer grains, and presents the best abrasion wear behavior at high temperature. The wear pattern of laser cladding layer is mainly grain abrasion at lower temperature, and it would be changed to adhesive abrasion and oxide abrasion at higher temperature.

  9. Search for magnetic minerals in Martian rocks: Overview of the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) magnet investigation on Spirit and Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Walter; Leer, Kristoffer; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.; Bartlett, Paul; Basso, Brandon; Bell, Jim; Bertelsen, Preben; Binau, Charlotte S.; Chu, Phillip C.; Gorevan, S.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Kinch, Kjartan M.; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Kusack, Alastair; Madsen, Morten B.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Mumm, Erik; Myrick, Tom; Olsen, Malte; Squyres, Steven W.; Wilson, Jack; Yen, Albert

    2008-05-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is a grinding tool designed to remove dust coatings and/or weathering rinds from rocks and expose fresh rock material. Four magnets of different strengths that are built into the structure of the RAT have been attracting substantial amounts of magnetic material during RAT activities from rocks throughout both rover missions. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Spirit demonstrates the presence of a strongly ferrimagnetic phase in Gusev crater rocks, which based on Mössbauer and visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra is interpreted as magnetite. The amount of abraded rock material adhering to the magnets varied strongly during the mission and is correlated in a consistent way to the amount of magnetite inferred from Mössbauer spectra for the corresponding rock. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Opportunity also indicates the presence of a strongly ferrimagnetic phase in outcrops, such as magnetite or an altered version of magnetite. However, the evidence is weaker than in the case of Spirit. According to data from the α particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) and the Mössbauer spectrometer (MB), the Eagle crater outcrops should not contain magnetite and their magnetization should not exceed 0.03 A m2 kg-1. However, this assertion seems to be in contradiction with the results of the RAT magnet experiment. The evidence for a strongly ferrimagnetic phase at low abundance in the Meridiani outcrops is discussed.

  10. From Desert to Dessert: Why Australian Dust Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K. A.; Mackie, D. S.; Boyd, P. W.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2006-12-01

    The growth of some types of phytoplankton in several parts of the world ocean, including much of the Southern Ocean, is limited by the supply of iron. Large Australian dust storms uplift, transport and abrade soils, to produce aeolian dust that is a significant source iron to the Southern Ocean. Atmospheric processes that enhance the dissolution of iron from aeolian dusts are of interest and have been studied for material from major dust producing regions like the Sahara, Gobi and Australian deserts; the reported solubility of iron from aeolian dusts ranges from <0.01% to 80%. The characteristic red soils, sands and dusts from Australia are generally believed to consist of quartz grains with a coating of fine grains and crystals of iron oxides, primarily hematite and goethite. The precise mineralogy of soil and dust grain coatings is poorly understood and it also not well known how the coatings are altered during uplift and transport to the ocean. Current models to understand the processes operating during the transport and atmospheric processing of dust include some generalisations and simplifications that are not always warranted and our work has shown the overlooked complexity of the system. Models for aeolian-iron dissolution based on Northern Hemisphere data commonly include the pollutants SOx and NOx. The modern Southern Hemisphere is less polluted and thus resembles past environmental systems. The dissolution of iron from soils of the Saharan, Gobi and Australian deserts in the presence of protons only (i.e. without SOx and NOx) occurs in two phases. The first, faster phase, representing up to 20% of total iron is via a surface-controlled mechanism. The rate determining variable is the exposed surface area of the iron oxides and not the size of the underlying quartz grain. The second, slower, phase of dissolution occurs via the transport-controlled formation of a leached layer. During the simulated aeolian abrasion of Australian soils from dust producing

  11. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español Why are dust storms a concern? A dust storm is a moving ... on Human Health (US Geological Survey) Chemicals in Dust Storms Are these chemicals in MY community? Particulate Matter ...

  12. Radioactive dust sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report is the second of a five part series on the technical evaluation of a number of dust monitoring instruments and the characterization of Long-Lived Radioactive Dust (LLRD). The data reported here pertain to an experimental study conducted under laboratory controlled conditions in a Long-Lived Radioactive Dust Test Facility (LLRDTF) designed for this purpose. This study was carried out with a twofold purpose in mind, namely, for the characterization of dust and LLRD, and for the evaluation of a variety of monitoring instruments, including cascade impactors, optical particle counters, nylon cyclones, open face filter samplers, and α-particle personal dosimeters, the latter normally used for α-particle radiation exposure purposes. Several non-radioactive and radioactive dusts were characterized. The non-radioactive dusts were SiC, Al2O3, talcum powder, corn starch and flour, while uranium tailings were used as a radioactive dust. Clear differences in instrument performance were observed for the various measurements made

  13. Effects of Lunar Dust Simulant (JSC-1A-vf) on WI-38 Human Embryonic Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Stephen; Hammond, Dianne; Jeevarajan, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop appropriate countermeasures for NASA's return mission to the moon, the potential toxicity of lunar dust needs to be examined. Due to its abrasiveness, reactivity, composition and small size, lunar dust may pose a serious health risk to astronauts who inhale it. This project focuses on the toxicity of lunar dust simulant (JSC-1A-vf) using WI-38 human embryonic lung cells. Past results show that the simulant has toxic effects on small animals using intratracheal instillation. Earlier studies in this lab suggest that the dust remaining in media after low speed centrifugation is toxic. In order to better assess its toxicity, the simulant has been diluted in media, filtered with a 5 micron filter before combining it with media. This filtered dust is compared with dust centrifuged in media. Whole dust toxicity is also tested. Toxicity is estimated using a 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) toxicity test which measures the activity of reducing enzymes in the mitochondria of viable cells. Preliminary results suggest that simulant which is diluted in media at different concentrations is slightly toxic. Interestingly, the cells appear to sweep up and collect the simulant. Whether this contributes to its toxicity is unclear. This project provides possible toxicity testing protocols for lunar dust and contributes to the knowledge of nanosize particle toxicity.

  14. Investigating selective transport and abrasion on an alluvial fan using quantitative grain size and shape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Selective sorting and abrasion are the two major fluvial processes that are attributed to the downstream fining of sediments in rivers and alluvial fans. Selective transport is the process by which smaller grains are preferentially transported downstream while larger grains are deposited closer to the source. Abrasion is defined by the production of fine sediments and sand that occurs by saltation of gravel, where particle-to-particle collisions supply the energy required to break apart grains. We hypothesize that abrasion results in the gradual fining of large grains and the production of fine sands and silts, while sorting accounts for the differences in transport of these two grain-size fractions produced from abrasion, thereby creating the abrupt gravel-sand transition observed in many channel systems. In this research, we explore both selective transport and abrasion processes on the Dog Canyon alluvial fan near Alamogordo, New Mexico. We complete an extensive grain size analysis down the main channel of the fan employing an image-based technique that utilizes an autocorrelation process. We also characterize changes in grain shape using standard shape parameters, as well as Fourier analysis, which allows the study of contributions of grain roughness on a variety of length scales. Sorting appears to dominate the upper portion of the fan; the grain-size distribution narrows moving downstream until reaching a point of equal mobility, at which point sorting ceases. Abrasion exerts a subtle but persistent effect on grains during transport down the fan. Shape analysis reveals that particles become more rounded by the removal of small-scale textural features, a process that is expected to only modestly influence grain size of gravel, but should produce significant quantities of sand. This study provides a better understanding of the importance of grain abrasion and sorting on the downstream fining of channel grains in an alluvial fan, as well as an improved knowledge

  15. Analytical method for softness abrasive flow field based on discrete phase model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at the problem of difficult contact finishing for mini structural surface in course of mould manufacturing,a new no-tool precision machining method based on soft abrasive flow machining (SAFM) was proposed. It allocated restrained component near surface machined,constituted restrained abrasive flow passage,and made the surface become a segment of passage wall. It could control turbulence abrasive flow in restrained passage,realize micro cutting for passage wall,and utilize the irregular motion of abrasive flow to eliminate the mono-directional marks on machined surfaces,and the precision could reach the specular level. A two-phase dynamic model of abrasive flow oriented to SAFM combined with discrete phase model (DPM) was established,the law of two-phase flow motion and the related physical parameters was obtained by corresponding numerical simulation method,and the mechanism of precision machining in SAFM was discussed. Simulation results show that the abrasive flow machining process mainly appears as translation of ablating location with the influence by granular pressure,and as the variation of machining efficiency with the influence by near-wall particle velocity. Thus via control of the inlet velocity and its corresponding machining time,it is supposed to work out the machining process according to the machining requirements by using the Preston equation to seek the relationship among velocity,pressure and material removing rate. By tracking near-wall particles,it can be confirmed that the movement of near-wall abrasive particles is similar to stream-wise vortices. The cutting traces on workpiece surfaces assume disorderly arrangement,so the feasibility of the SAFM method can be reaffirmed.

  16. Multiphase Flow and Wear in the Cutting Head of Ultra-high Pressure Abrasive Water Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Minguan; WANG Yuli; KANG Can; YU Feng

    2009-01-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting technology is widely applied in the materials processing today and attracts great attention from scholars, but many phenomena concerned are not well understood, especially in the internal jet flow of the cutting head at the condition of ultra-high pressure. The multiphase flow in the cutting head is numerically simulated to study the abrasive motion mechanism and wear inside the cutting head at the pressure beyond 300 Mpa. Visible predictions of the particles trajectories and wear rate in the cutting head are presented. The influences of the abrasive physical properties, size of the jewel orifice and the operating pressure on the trajectories are discussed. Based on the simulation, a wear experiment is carried out under the corresponding pressures. The simulation and experimental results show that the flow in the mixing chamber is composed of the jet core zone and the disturbance zone, both affect the particles trajectories. The mixing efficiency drops with the increase of the abrasive granularity. The abrasive density determines the response of particles to the effects of different flow zones, the abrasive with medium density gives the best general performance. Increasing the operating pressure or using the jewel with a smaller orifice improves the coherency of particles trajectories but increases the wear rate of the jewel holder at the same time. Walls of the jewel holder, the entrance of the mixing chamber and the convergence part of the mixing tube are subject to wear out. The computational and experimental results give a qualitative consistency which proves that this numerical method can provide a reliable and visible cognition of the flow characteristics of ultra-high pressure abrasive water jet. The investigation is benefit for improving the machining properties of water jet cutting systems and the optimization design of the cutting head.

  17. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  18. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  19. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  20. Dust mite (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease ...

  1. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  2. Optimization MRR Of Stainless Steel 403 In Abrasive Water Jet Machining UsingAnova And Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramprasad,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stainlesssteel 403 is high-alloysteelwith good corrosion resistance and it’svery hard material. Abrasive water jet is an effective method for machining, cutting and drilling of stainlesssteel 403. In thispaperweoptimize the metalremoval rate of stainlesssteel 403 in abrasive water jet machining. The MRRisoptimize by usingthreeparameters water pressure, abrasive flow rate and stand-off distance and L9 orthogonal array of Taguchimethod use to analyse the result. 9 experimentalrunsbased on L9 orthogonal array of Taguchimethod.

  3. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves

  4. The effect of heat treatment on the gouging abrasion resistance of alloy white cast irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are, I. R. S.; Arnold, B. K.

    1995-02-01

    A series of heat treatments was employed to vary the microstructure of four commercially important alloy white cast irons, the wear resistance of which was then assessed by the ASTM jaw-crusher gouging abrasion test. Compared with the as-cast condition, standard austenitizing treatments produced a substantial increase in hardness, a marked decrease in the retained aus-tenite content in the matrix, and, in general, a significant improvement in gouging abrasion resistance. The gouging abrasion resistance tended to decline with increasing austenitizing tem-perature, although the changes in hardness and retained austenite content varied, depending on alloy composition. Subcritical heat treatment at 500 ° following hardening reduced the retained austenite content to values less than 10 pct, and in three of the alloys it caused a significant fall in both hardness and gouging abrasion resistance. The net result of the heat treatments was the development of optimal gouging abrasion resistance at intermediate levels of retained aus-tenite. The differing responses of the alloys to both high-temperature austenitizing treatments and to subcritical heat treatments at 500 ° were related to the effects of the differing carbon and alloying-element concentrations on changes in the M s temperature and secondary carbide precipitation.

  5. Abrasive Performance of Chromium Carbide Reinforced Ni3Al Matrix Composite Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shang-ping; LUO He-li; FENG Di; CAO Xu; ZHANG Xi-e

    2009-01-01

    The Microstructure and room temperature abrasive wear resistance of chromium carbide reinforced NiM3Al matrix composite cladding at different depth on nickel base alloy were investigated. The results showed that there is a great difference in microstructure and wear resistance of the Ni3 Al matrix composite at different depth. Three kinds of tests, designed for different load and abrasive size, were used to understand the wear behaviour of this material. Under all three wear conditions, the abrasion resistance of the composite cladding at the depth of 6 mm, namely NC-M2, was much higher than that of the composite cladding at the depth of 2 mm, namely NC-M1. In addition, the wear-resistant advantage of NC-M2 was more obvious when the size of the abrasive was small. The relative wear resistance of NC-M2 increased from 1.63 times to 2.05 times when the size of the abrasive decreased from 180 μm to 50μm. The mierostructure of the composite cladding showed that the size of chromium carbide particles, which was mainly influenced by cooling rate of melting pool, was a function of distance from the interface between the coating and substrate varied gradually. The chromium carbide particles near the interface were finer than that far from inter-face, which was the main reason for the different wear resistance of the composite cladding at different depth.

  6. Abrasive wear characteristics and mechanisms of Al2O3/PA1010 composite coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xian; LING Xiaomei

    2004-01-01

    The abrasive wear characteristics of Al2O3/PA1010 composite coatings on the surface of quenched and low-temperature temper steel 45 were tested on the mmplate abrasive wear testing machine and the same uncoated steel 45 was used as a reference material. Experimental results showed that the abrasive wear resistance of Al2O3//PAl010 composite coatings has a good linear relationship with the volume fraction of Al2O3 particles in Al2O3/PAl010 composite coatings, and the linear correlative coefficient is 0.979. Under the experimental conditions, the size of Al2O3 particles (40.5-161.0 μm) has little influence on the abrasive wear resistance of Al2O3/PA l010 composite coatings. By treating the surface of Al2O3 particles with a suitable bonding agent, the distribution of Al2O3 particles in matrix PAl010 is more homogeneous and the bonding state between Al2O3 particles and matrix PAl010 is better. Therefore, the ml2O3 particles in Al2O3/PA1010 composite coatings make the Al2O3/PAl010 composite coatings have better abrasive wear resistance than PA1010 coatings. The wear resistance of Al2O3/PA 1010 composite coatings is about 45% compared with that of steel 45.

  7. Sliding and Abrasive Wear Behavior of WC-CoCr Coatings with Different Carbide Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the sliding and abrasive wear behaviors of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings with different WC grain sizes. The HVOF coating deposition was assisted by in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system. The powder feedstocks and their corresponding coatings were characterized by means of XRD and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope analysis. Hardness, porosity, and indentation fracture toughness of these coatings were calculated and compared with each other. Sliding wear resistance of these coatings was calculated using pin-on-disk tribometer (ASTM G99-90). The two-body abrasion was quantified by sliding the samples over silicon carbide (SiC) abrasive paper bonded to a rotating flat disk of auto-polisher. The mechanism of materials' removal in both the sliding and abrasive wears was studied and discussed on microstructural investigations. It was observed that fine grain WC-CoCr cermet coating exhibits higher sliding and abrasive wear resistances as compared with conventional cermet coating.

  8. Hybrid layer thickness and morphology: Influence of cavity preparation with air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceleiro, Marcos Oliveira; de Mello, Jose Benedicto; Porto, Celso Luis de Angelis; Dias, Katia Regina Hostilio Cervantes; de Miranda, Mauro Sayao

    2011-01-01

    Dentinal surfaces prepared with air abrasion have considerably different characteristics from those prepared with conventional instruments. Different hybrid layer morphology and thickness occur, which can result in differences in the quality of restorations placed on dentinal surfaces prepared with a diamond bur compared to surfaces prepared using air abrasion. The objective of this study was to compare the hybrid layer thickness and morphology formed utilizing Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (SBMP) on dentin prepared with a diamond bur in a high-speed handpiece and on dentin prepared using air abrasion. Flat dentin surfaces obtained from five human teeth were prepared using each method, then treated with the dentin adhesive system according to manufacturer's instructions. After a layer of composite was applied, specimens were sectioned, flattened, polished, and prepared for scanning electron microscopy. Ten different measurements of hybrid layer thickness were obtained along the bonded surface in each specimen. SBMP produced a 3.43 ± 0.75 µm hybrid layer in dentin prepared with diamond bur. This hybrid layer was regular and found consistently. In the air abrasion group, SBMP produced a 4.94 ± 1.28 µm hybrid layer, which was regular and found consistently. Statistical ANOVA (P = 0.05) indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between the groups. These data indicate that the air abrasion, within the parameters used in this study, provides a thick hybrid layer formation.

  9. Effect of carbonitride precipitates on the abrasive wear behaviour of hardfacing alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Yu, Shengfu; Li, Yingbin; Li, Chenglin

    2008-06-01

    Hardfacing alloy of martensitic stainless steel expect higher abradability to be achieved through the addition of nitrogen being provided by the fine scale precipitation of complex carbonitride particles. Niobium and titanium as the most effective carbonitride alloying elements were added in the Fe-Cr13-Mn-N hardfacing alloy to get carbonitride precipitates. Carbonitride was systematically studied by optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and energy spectrum analysis. Abrasive wear resistance of hardfacing alloy in as-welded and heat-treated conditions was tested by using the belt abrasion test apparatus where the samples slide against the abrasive belt. It is found that carbonitride particles in the hardfacing alloy are complex of Cr, Ti and Nb distributing on the grain boundary or matrix of the hardfacing alloy with different number and size in as-welded and heat-treated conditions. A large number of carbonitrides can be precipitated with very fine size (nanoscale) after heat treatment. As a result, the homogeneous distribution of very fine carbonitride particles can significantly improve the grain-abrasion wear-resisting property of the hardfacing alloy, and the mass loss is plastic deformation with minimum depth of grooving by abrasive particles and fine delamination.

  10. Generation of urban road dust from anti-skid and asphalt concrete aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervahattu, Heikki; Kupiainen, Kaarle J; Räisänen, Mika; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto

    2006-04-30

    Road dust forms an important component of airborne particulate matter in urban areas. In many winter cities the use of anti-skid aggregates and studded tires enhance the generation of mineral particles. The abrasion particles dominate the PM10 during springtime when the material deposited in snow is resuspended. This paper summarizes the results from three test series performed in a test facility to assess the factors that affect the generation of abrasion components of road dust. Concentrations, mass size distribution and composition of the particles were studied. Over 90% of the particles were aluminosilicates from either anti-skid or asphalt concrete aggregates. Mineral particles were observed mainly in the PM10 fraction, the fine fraction being 12% and submicron size being 6% of PM10 mass. The PM10 concentrations increased as a function of the amount of anti-skid aggregate dispersed. The use of anti-skid aggregate increased substantially the amount of PM10 originated from the asphalt concrete. It was concluded that anti-skid aggregate grains contribute to pavement wear. The particle size distribution of the anti-skid aggregates had great impact on PM10 emissions which were additionally enhanced by studded tires, modal composition, and texture of anti-skid aggregates. The results emphasize the interaction of tires, anti-skid aggregate, and asphalt concrete pavement in the production of dust emissions. They all must be taken into account when measures to reduce road dust are considered. The winter maintenance and springtime cleaning must be performed properly with methods which are efficient in reducing PM10 dust. PMID:16426748

  11. Characteristics of tyre dust in polluted air: Studies by single particle mass spectrometry (ATOFMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C. S.; Gietl, Johanna K.; Olatunbosun, Oluremi A.; Yang, Xiaoguang; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-09-01

    There is a paucity of quantitative knowledge on the contributions of non-exhaust (abrasion and re-suspension) sources to traffic emissions. Abrasive emissions can be broadly categorised as tyre wear, brake wear and road dust/road surface wear. Current research often considers road dust and tyre dust as externally mixed particles, the former mainly composed of mineral matter and the latter solely composed of mainly organic matter and some trace elements. The aim of this work was to characterise tyre wear from both laboratory and field studies by using Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS). Real-time single particle chemical composition was obtained from a set of rubber tyres rotating on a metal surface. Bimodal particle number size distributions peaking at 35 nm and 85 nm were obtained from SMPS/APS measurements over the range 6-20,000 nm. ATOFMS mass spectra of tyre wear in the particle size range 200-3000 nm diameter show peaks due to exo-sulphur compounds, nitrate, Zn and ions of high molecular weight (m/z > 100) attributed to organic polymers. Two large ATOFMS datasets collected from a number of outdoor studies were examined. The former was constituted of 48 road dust samples collected on the roads of London. The latter consisted of ATOFMS ambient air field studies from Europe, overall composed of more than 2,000,000 single particle mass spectra. The majority (95%) of tyre wear particles present in the road dust samples and atmospheric samples are internally mixed with metals (Li, Na, Ca, Fe, Ti), as well as phosphate. It is concluded that the interaction of tyres with the road surface creates particles internally mixed from two sources: tyre rubber and road surface materials. Measurements of the tyre rubber component alone may underestimate the contribution of tyre wear to concentrations of airborne particulate matter. The results presented are especially relevant for urban aerosol source apportionment and PM2.5 exposure assessment.

  12. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Peng, R. D. [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Y. H. [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ye, M. F.; Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  13. Abrasive wear: The efects of fibres size on oil palm empty fruit bunch polyester composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasolang, S.; Kalam, A.; Ahmad, M. A.; Rahman, N. A.; Suhadah, W. N.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation carried out to determine the effect of palm oil empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre size in dry sliding testing of polyester composite. These composite samples were produced by mixing raw OPEFB fibre with resin. The samples were prepared at different sizes of fibre (100, 125, 180 and 250μm). Abrasion Resistance Tester (TR-600) was used to carried out abrasive wear tests in dry sliding conditions. These tests were performed at room temperature for two different loads (10 and 30N) and at a constant sliding velocity of 1.4m/s. The specific wear rates of OPEFB polyester composites were obtained. The morphology of composite surface before and after tests was also examined using 3D microscope imaging. Preliminary work on thermal distribution at the abrasive wheel point was also conducted for selected samples.

  14. Predicting Los Angeles abrasion loss of rock aggregates from crushability index

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kahraman; O Y Toraman

    2008-04-01

    Predicting Los Angeles abrasion loss of aggregate material from some simpler tests will be useful for especially preliminary studies. For this reason, to investigate the possibility of predicting the Los Angeles abrasion loss from the crushability index, Los Angeles abrasion, crushability, density and porosity tests were performed on 11 different rock types collected from different areas of Turkey. The results of the tests were analysed using simple and multiple regression analyses. Generally significant correlations were obtained from both simple and multiple regression analyses. The correlation coefficients and estimation capabilities of the two multiple regression equations are slightly higher than that of the simple regression equation. It was concluded that the simple regression equation is practical and reliable enough for estimation purposes. However, the two multiple regression equations can be used for a more accurate estimation.

  15. Influence of alumina and titanium dioxide coatings on abrasive wear resistance of AISI 1045 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Remolina, A.; Marulanda, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to compare the behaviour of an AISI 1045 steel's abrasive wear resistance when is covered with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) or Titanium dioxide (TiO2), of nanometric size, using the technique of thermal hot spray, which allows to directly project the suspension particles on the used substrate. The tests are performed based on the ASTM G65-04 standard (Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Using the Dry Sand/Rubber Apparatus). The results show that the amount of, lost material increases linearly with the travelled distance; also determined that the thermal treatment of hardening-tempering and the alumina and titanium dioxide coatings decrease in average a 12.9, 39.6 and 29.3% respectively the volume of released material during abrasive wear test.

  16. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.T.; Calef, F.J.; Hallett, B.W.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Lanza, N.L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C.E.; Blaney, D.L.; de Pablo, M.A.; Kocurek, G.A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N.O.; Rice, CM.S.; Richardson, M.E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R.S.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from “Bradbury Landing” to “Rocknest,” they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  17. Energy Consumption in Comminution of Mica with Cavitation Abrasive Water Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chu-wen; DONG Lu

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the efficiency of energy consumption in the comminution of mica powder with cavitation abrasive water jet technology. The energy required to create new surfaces in the comminution of mica powder with cavitation abrasive water jet was calculated, in order to estimate its efficiency of energy consumption. The particle size distribution and the specific surface area were measured by applying a JEM-200CX transmission electron microscope and an Autosorb-1 automatic surface area analyzer. The study results show that the efficiency of energy consumed in creating new surface areas is as high as 2.92%, or 4.94% with the aid of cavitation in the comminution of mica powder. This efficiency will decrease with an increase in the number of comminutions. After three comminutions, the efficiencies will become 1.91% and 2.29% for comminution without cavitation and with cavitation, respectively. The abrasive water jet technology is an effective way for comminution of mica powder.

  18. An Investigation on a Tin Fixed Abrasive Polishing Pad with Phyllotactic Pattern for Polishing Wafer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕玉山; 刘电飞; 寇智慧

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the polishing ability of polishing pads, a kind of polishing pad with the tin fixed abrasive blocks, which are arranged based on the phyllotaxis theory of biology, was designed and fabricated by the use of electroplating technology, and also its polishing ability for JGS-2 wafer was investigated by polishing experiments. The research resuits show that the phyllotactic parameters of the polishing pad influence the arrangement density of the tin fixed abrasive blocks, the polishing pad with phyllotactic pattern is feasibly fabricated by the use of electroplating technology, and the good polishing result can be obtained by using the polishing pad with pbyllotactic pattern to polish a wafer when the diameter D of the tin fixed abrasive block is between Φ. 3 mm and Φ1. 4 mm, and the phyllotactic coefficient k between 1.0 and 1.1, respectively.

  19. Evaluation of subsurface damage in GaN substrate induced by mechanical polishing with diamond abrasives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aida, Hideo, E-mail: h-aida@namiki.net [NJC Institute of Technology, Namiki Precision Jewel Co., Ltd., 3-8-22 Shinden, Adachi, Tokyo 123-8511 (Japan); KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Takeda, Hidetoshi; Kim, Seong-Woo; Aota, Natsuko; Koyama, Koji [NJC Institute of Technology, Namiki Precision Jewel Co., Ltd., 3-8-22 Shinden, Adachi, Tokyo 123-8511 (Japan); Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Doi, Toshiro [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The relationship between the depth of the subsurface damage (SSD) and the size of the diamond abrasive used for mechanical polishing (MP) of GaN substrates was investigated in detail. GaN is categorized as a hard, brittle material, and material removal in MP proceeds principally to the fracture of GaN crystals. Atomic force microscopy and cathodoluminescence imaging revealed that the mechanical processing generated surface scratches and SSD. The SSD depth reduced as the diamond abrasive size reduced. A comparison of the relationship between the SSD depth and the diamond abrasive size used in the MP of GaN with the same relationship for typical brittle materials such as glass substrates suggests that the MP of GaN substrates proceeds via the same mechanism as glass.

  20. Abrasion, erosion and scuffing resistance of carbide and oxide ceramic thermal sprayed coatings for different applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbezat, G.; Nicoll, A. R.; Sickinger, A.

    1993-04-01

    In the area of antiwear coatings, carbide-containing coatings and oxide ceramic coatings are applied using different thermal spray processes in the form of individual layers. In many industries these coatings have become technically significant on components where wear and friction can cause critical damage in the form of abrasion, erosion and scuffing together with corrosion. Carbide-containing and ceramic coatings have been produced with different thermal spray processes for the determination of abrasive, adhesive and erosive wear resistance. Two types of abrasion test, namely an adhesion wear test and an erosion test in water at a high velocity, were used for the characterization of wear resistance under different conditions. The coatings were also characterized with regard to microstructure, composition and fracture toughness. The influence of the thermal spraying process parameters on the microstructure is presented together with the influence of the microstructure on the behavior of the coatings under simulated service conditions.

  1. Micro-scale Abrasion and Medium Load Multiple Scratch Tests of PVD Coatings.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Poulat; H. Sun & D.G. Teer

    2004-01-01

    Micro-scale abrasion testing is widely used to determine the abrasion resistance of thin film coatings; it is a simple technique that can easily be used as part of a quality control procedure, but it has got the disadvantage of not allowing an easy study of the wear mechanisms involved: it is difficult to estimate the load applied on each abrasive particles in the contact between the loaded ball and the specimen. The possibility of using progressive loading scratch testing, a method widely used to assess the adhesion of thin film coatings, to model the abrasive wear of coatings has been studied in the past; the use of multiple scratch tests to study the wear mechanisms corresponding to a single abrasion scratch event has also been studied in the case of bulk materials (ceramics and hard metals). Two coatings, deposited by Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputter Ion Plating (CFUBMSIP) on ASP23 powder metallurgy steel substrate are chosen to be representative of the use of protective coatings in industry: titanium nitride, which is widely used to prevent tool wear, and TCL Graphit-iCTM, which is widely used as a wear resistant solid lubricant coating. The two coatings are first characterised by using a standard quality control procedure: their thickness is determined by the cap grinding method, their adhesion by progressive loading scratch. Then micro-scale abrasion tests performed with a slurry at a concentration which promotes grooving wear, and medium load multiple scratch tests performed with diamond indenters are completed; the results of these tests are analysed and compared to determine if there is any correlation between the two sets of results; the multiple scratch tests wear tracks are also observed to determine the wear mechanisms involved.

  2. Comparison of methods for quantifying dental wear caused by erosion and abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Vanara F; Melo, Mary A S; Vasconcellos, Andréa Araújo; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A; Santiago, Sérgio L

    2013-02-01

    Various methods have been applied to evaluate the effect of erosion and abrasion. So, the aim of this study was to check the applicability of stylus profilometry (SP), surface hardness (SH) and focus-variation 3D microscopy (FVM) to the analysis of human enamel and dentin subjected to erosion/abrasion. The samples were randomly allocated into four groups (n = 10): G1-enamel/erosion, G2-enamel/erosion plus abrasion, G3-dentin/erosion, and G4-dentin/erosion plus abrasion. The specimens were selected by their surface hardness, and they were subjected to cycles of demineralization (Coca-Cola®-60 s) and remineralization (artificial saliva-60 min). For groups G2 and G4, the remineralization procedures were followed by toothbrushing (150 strokes). The above cycle was repeated 3×/day during 5 days. The samples were assessed using SH, SP, and FVM. For each substrate, the groups were compared using an unpaired t-test, and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated (α = 5%). For enamel, both profilometry technique showed greater surface loss when the erosion and abrasion processes were combined (P <0.05). The correlation analysis did not reveal any relationships among SH, SP, and FVM to G2 and G4. There were significant correlation coefficients (-0.70 and -0.67) for the comparisons between the FVM and SH methods in enamel and dentin, respectively, in G1 and G3. Choosing the ideal technique for the analysis of erosion depends on the type of dental substrate. SP was not sufficiently sensitive to measure the effects on dentin of erosion or erosion/abrasion. However, SP, FVM and SH were adequate for the detection of tissue loss and demineralization in enamel. PMID:23129538

  3. A theoretical investigation on the abrasive wear prevention mechanism of ZDDP and ZP tribofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Tasuku; Morita, Yusuke [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Suzuki, Ai [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sahnoun, Riadh; Koyama, Michihisa; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Minfray, Clotilde; Martin, Jean-Michel [Laboratory of Tribology and Dynamical Systems, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36, avenue Guy de Collongue 69134, ECULLY Cedex (France); Miyamoto, Akira [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: miyamoto@aki.che.tohoku.ac.jp

    2008-09-30

    We investigated wear prevention mechanism of tribofilms generated from zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) and zinc dialkylphosphate (ZP) anti-wear additive using molecular dynamics simulations. The friction behavior of two model materials, zinc metathiophosphate and zinc metaphosphate, was studied. The results indicated that zinc metathiophosphate prevents the abrasive wear due to the atomistic digestion of the wear particles in the tribofilm. We also investigated wear prevention mechanism of zinc metaphosphate and found that it has a better wear prevention performance than zinc metathiophosphate as far as abrasive wear is concerned. Our study showed that zinc metaphosphate can achieve good wear prevention and reduce the environmental load since it does not contain sulfur.

  4. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  5. Abrasive Wear Behavior of High Chromium Cast Iron and Hadfield Steel-- A Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Mazar Atabaki; Sajjad Jafari; Hassan Abdollah-pour

    2012-01-01

    Wear properties of two different crushers used for grinding raw materials of cement industry are compared using pin-on-disk wear test.The wear test was carried out with different loads on a pin.Abrasive wear behavior of two alloys was evaluated by comparing mass loss,wear resistance,microhardness and friction coefficient.The microstructure of the specimens was detected using optical microscope.The results showed that abrasive wear of high chromium cast iron is lower than that of Hadfield steel.Due to the presence of M7C3 carbides on the high chromium cast iron matrix,impact crushers exhibited higher friction coefficient

  6. High Speed Lapping of SiC Ceramic Material with Solid (Fixed) Abrasives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; YANG Xin-hong; SHANG Chun-min; HU Xiao-yong; HU Zhong-hui

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to machine SiC ceramic material through the method of high speed plane lapping with solid(fixed) abrasives after the critical condition of brittle-ductile transition is theoretically analyzed. The results show that the material removal mechanism and the surface roughness are chiefly related to the granularity of abrasives for brittle materials such as SiC ceramic. It is easily realized to machine SiC ceramic in the ductile mode using W3.5 grit and a high efficiency, low cost and smooth surface with a surface roughness of Ra 2.4nm can be achieved.

  7. Abrasive wear response of aluminium alloy-sillimanite particle reinforced composite under low stress condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M. [Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Hoshangabad Road, Near Habibganj Naka, Bhopal 462 026 (India)]. E-mail: mulayam_singh@hotmail.com; Mondal, D.P. [Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Hoshangabad Road, Near Habibganj Naka, Bhopal 462 026 (India); Das, S. [Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Hoshangabad Road, Near Habibganj Naka, Bhopal 462 026 (India)

    2006-03-15

    The abrasive wear behaviour of aluminium alloy-sillimanite particle reinforced composite under low stress condition has been reported and the results have been compared with the corresponding matrix alloy which was produced and cast under similar conditions. The study showed that wear resistance (inverse of wear rate) of the composite was higher than the matrix alloy. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance and increased with applied load irrespective of materials. The worn surfaces and subsurfaces of the tested samples were examined in the scanning electron microscope in order to understand the material removal mechanism during low stress abrasive wear process.

  8. ANN & ANFIS Models for Prediction of Abrasive Wear of 3105 Aluminium Alloy with Polyurethane Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Alimam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The quest for safety and reliability has increased significantly after Industrial revolution, so is the case for coating industries. In this paper 3105 Aluminium alloy sheet is coated with organic polyurethane coating. After the implementation of coating, various processes are undergone to check its reliability under elevated conditions. ANN & ANFIS model were developed and trained with an objective to find abrasive wear during the process. ANN & ANFIS model were compared with the experimental results. It is observed that the abrasive wear of a coated specimen can be predicted accurately and precisely using ANN and ANFIS models.

  9. Effects of enamel abrasion, salivary pellicle, and measurement angle on the optical assessment of dental erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Lussi, Adrian; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Beyeler, Barbara; Megert, Brigitte; Meier, Christoph; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the effects of abrasion, salivary proteins, and measurement angle on the quantification of early dental erosion by the analysis of reflection intensities from enamel. Enamel from 184 caries-free human molars was used for in vitro erosion in citric acid (pH 3.6). Abrasion of the eroded enamel resulted in a 6% to 14% increase in the specular reflection intensity compared to only eroded enamel, and the reflection increase depended on the erosion degree. Nevertheless, m...

  10. Chlorhexidine and green tea extract reduce dentin erosion and abrasion in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, A C; Wiegand, A.; Rios, D.; Hannas, A; Attin, T.; Buzalaf, M.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This in situ/ex vivo study aimed to analyse the impact of possible MMP-inhibitors (chlorhexidine and green tea extract) on dentin wear induced by erosion or erosion plus abrasion. METHODS: Twelve volunteers took part in this cross-over and double-blind study performed in 4 phases of each 5 days. Bovine dentin samples were worn in palatal appliances and subjected to extraoral erosion (4 times/day, Coca-Cola, 5 min) or erosion plus abrasion (2 times/day, fluoride-free toothpaste and...

  11. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered.

  12. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered. PMID:184524

  13. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  14. Preparation of composite abrasives by electrostatic self-assembly method and its polishing properties in Cu CMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yishen; Xu Xuefeng; Yao Chunyan; Hu Jiande; Peng Wei

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of cationic polyelectrolyte poly dimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride (PDADMAC) and anionic polyelectrolyte poly (sodium-p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) on benzoguanamine formal-dehyde (BGF) particles are investigated. The charging characteristics of BGF particles are changed and con-trolled using electrostatic self-assembly method. A variety of PEi-BGF/SiO2 composite abrasives are obtained. The as-prepared samples are analyzed by zeta potential analysis,transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composite abrasive slurries are prepared for copper polishing. The poli-shing results indicate that it is SiO2 abrasives,not only coated SiO2 abrasive on polymer particles but also free SiO2 abrasive in slurry ,that offer the polishing action. The material removal rates of copper polishing are 264 nm/min,348 nm/min and 476 nm/min using single SiO2 abrasive slurry,PE0-BGF/SiO2 mixed abrasive slur-ry and PE3-BGF/SiO2 composite abrasive slurry,respectively. The surface roughness Ra of copper wafer (with 5μm× 5μm district) is decreased from 0.166μm to 3.7 nm,2.6 nm and 1.5 nm,and the surface peak-valley values Rpv are less than 20 nm,14 nm and 10 nm using these kinds of slurries,respectively.

  15. Synergetic effect of organic cores and inorganic shells for core/shell structured composite abrasives for chemical mechanical planarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The damage-free polishing mechanism of core/shell composite abrasive was explored. • The organic core is help to decrease surface roughness and mechanical damages. • The inorganic shell is in favor of improving material removal rate. • The enhanced CMP behavior is due to the synergistic effect between core and shell. - Abstract: Core/shell structured organic/inorganic composite microspheres has an important potential application in efficient and damage-free chemical mechanical planarization/polishing (CMP) as a kind of novel abrasive due to its uniform non-rigid mechanical property. However, the synergistic effect of material removal between organic cores and inorganic shells of composite abrasives is ambiguous. In this work, oxide-CMP performances of various slurries, containing polystyrene (PS) spheres, solid abrasives (SiO2 or CeO2), mixed abrasives ((PS + SiO2) or (PS + CeO2)), core/shell composites (PS/SiO2 or PS/CeO2), were investigated by atomic force microscopy. Experiment results indicated that the surfaces polished by composite abrasives exhibited lower surface roughness, fewer scratches as well as lower topographical variations than those by other type of abrasives. The core/shell structure of composite abrasives plays an important role in improving CMP behavior. Moreover, the organic cores are mainly beneficial to decrease surface roughness and mechanical damages, and the inorganic shells are in favor of improving material removal rate

  16. Influence of mechanical abrasion of carbon adsorbents on aerodynamic resistance of filters of system of ventilation of NPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of mechanical abrasion of granules on aerodynamic resistance of different carbon adsorbents at conditions similar to work of filters AU-1500 is studied. The change of fractional composition of the probed adsorbents by abrasion is determined. The obtained experimental data allow making conclusion about practicability using mixture of adsorbent Norit with different fractional composition for renewal of adsorbers of ventilation system of NPS.

  17. Synergetic effect of organic cores and inorganic shells for core/shell structured composite abrasives for chemical mechanical planarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang, E-mail: cy.jpu@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Li, Zhina [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Miao, Naiming [School of Mechanical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213016 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The damage-free polishing mechanism of core/shell composite abrasive was explored. • The organic core is help to decrease surface roughness and mechanical damages. • The inorganic shell is in favor of improving material removal rate. • The enhanced CMP behavior is due to the synergistic effect between core and shell. - Abstract: Core/shell structured organic/inorganic composite microspheres has an important potential application in efficient and damage-free chemical mechanical planarization/polishing (CMP) as a kind of novel abrasive due to its uniform non-rigid mechanical property. However, the synergistic effect of material removal between organic cores and inorganic shells of composite abrasives is ambiguous. In this work, oxide-CMP performances of various slurries, containing polystyrene (PS) spheres, solid abrasives (SiO{sub 2} or CeO{sub 2}), mixed abrasives ((PS + SiO{sub 2}) or (PS + CeO{sub 2})), core/shell composites (PS/SiO{sub 2} or PS/CeO{sub 2}), were investigated by atomic force microscopy. Experiment results indicated that the surfaces polished by composite abrasives exhibited lower surface roughness, fewer scratches as well as lower topographical variations than those by other type of abrasives. The core/shell structure of composite abrasives plays an important role in improving CMP behavior. Moreover, the organic cores are mainly beneficial to decrease surface roughness and mechanical damages, and the inorganic shells are in favor of improving material removal rate.

  18. Preparation of Fe-doped colloidal SiO(2) abrasives and their chemical mechanical polishing behavior on sapphire substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong; Gu, Qian; Chen, Ruling; Wang, Zhanyong

    2015-08-20

    Abrasives are one of key influencing factors on surface quality during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Silica sol, a widely used abrasive in CMP slurries for sapphire substrates, often causes lower material removal rate (MRRs). In the present paper, Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 composite abrasives were prepared by a seed-induced growth method in order to improve the MRR of sapphire substrates. The CMP performance of Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 abrasives on sapphire substrates was investigated using UNIPOL-1502 CMP equipment. Experimental results indicate that the Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 composite abrasives exhibit lower surface roughness and higher MRR than pure colloidal SiO2 abrasives for sapphire substrates under the same testing conditions. Furthermore, the acting mechanism of Fe-doped colloidal SiO2 composite abrasives in sapphire CMP was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Analytical results show that the Fe in the composite abrasives can react with the sapphire substrates to form aluminum ferrite (AlFeO3) during CMP, which promotes the chemical effect in CMP and leads to improvement of MRR. PMID:26368752

  19. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

  20. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  1. Abrasive Wear Resistance of the Iron- and WC-based Hardfaced Coatings Evaluated with Scratch Test Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vencl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive wear is one of the most common types of wear, which makesabrasive wear resistance very important in many industries. Thehard facing is considered as useful and economical way to improve theperformance of components submitted to severe abrasive wear conditions, with wide range of applicable filler materials. The abrasive wear resistance of the three different hardfaced coatings (two iron‐based and one WC‐based, which were intended to be used for reparation of the impact plates of the ventilation mill, was investigated and compared. Abrasive wear tests were carried‐out by using the scratch tester under the dry conditions. Three normal loads of 10, 50 and 100 N and the constant sliding speed of 4 mm/s were used. Scratch test was chosen as a relatively easy and quick test method. Wear mechanism analysis showed significant influence of the hardfaced coatings structure, which, along with hardness, has determined coatings abrasive wear resistance.

  2. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  3. Liquid abrasive grit blasting literature search and decontamination scoping tests report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. With the curtailment of reprocessing at the ICPP, the focus of decontamination is shifting from maintenance for continued operation of the facilities to decommissioning. As decommissioning plans are developed, new decontamination methods must be used which result in higher decontamination factors and generate lower amounts of sodium-bearing secondary waste. The primary initiative of the WINCO Decontamination Development Program is the development of methods to eliminate/minimize the use of sodium-bearing decontamination chemicals. One method that was chosen for cold scoping studies during FY-93 was abrasive grit blasting. Abrasive grit blasting has been used in many industries and a vast amount of research and development has already been conducted. However, new grits, process improvements and ICPP applicability was investigated. This evaluation report is a summary of the research efforts and scoping tests using the liquid abrasive grit blasting decontamination technique. The purpose of these scoping tests was to determine the effectiveness of three different abrasive grits: plastic beads, glass beads and alumina oxide

  4. The Effect of Microstructure on the Abrasion Resistance of Low Alloyed Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, X.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis attempts to develop advanced high abrasion resistant steels with low hardness in combination with good toughness, processability and low alloying additions. For this purpose, a novel multi-pass dual-indenter (MPDI) scratch test approach has been developed to approach the real continuous a

  5. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  6. Methods of data analysis for the micro-scale abrasion test on coated substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Y.; Acker, K. Van; Hutchings, I.M.

    2004-01-01

    .15 mum, and a = 1 +/- 0.01 mm, the errors in kappa(c) and kappa(s) will be s) 10. A lower limit to the inner crater diameter is proposed, determined by the ball radius and the abrasive particle size, in order to achieve reasonable accuracy in the data. A new method...

  7. Abrasive wear based predictive maintenance for systems operating in sandy conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldman, M.; Tinga, T.; Heide, E. van der; Masen, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Machines operating in sandy environments are damaged by the abrasive action of sand particles that enter the machine and become entrapped between components and contacting surfaces. In the case of the military services the combination of a sandy environment and the wide range of tasks to be fulfille

  8. NK cells modulate the inflammatory response to corneal epithelial abrasion and thereby support wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural killer cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that have crucial cytotoxic and regulatory roles in adaptive immunity and inflammation. Herein, we consider a role for these cells in corneal wound healing. After a 2-mm central epithelial abrasion of the mouse cornea, a subset of clas...

  9. Platelet response to corneal abrasion is necessary for acute inflammation and efficient re-epithelialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Adhesion molecules play a critical role in leukocyte emigration to wound sites, but differences are evident in different vascular beds. This study investigates the contributions of P-selectin to neutrophil emigration into the cornea following central epithelial abrasion. Methods: Re-epithel...

  10. Abrasive Wear Behaviour of COPPER-SiC and COPPER-SiO2 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umale, Tejas; Singh, Amarjit; Reddy, Y.; Khatitrkar, R. K.; Sapate, S. G.

    The present paper reports abrasive wear behaviour of copper matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide and silica particles. Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites were prepared by powder metallurgical technique. Metallography, image analysis and hardness studies were carried out on copper composites. The abrasive wear experiments were carried out using pin on disc apparatus. The effect of sliding distance and load was studied on Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abrasive wear volume loss increased with sliding distance in both the composites although the magnitude of increase was different in each case. Copper - SiC (12%) composites exhibited relatively better abrasion resistance as compared to and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abraded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope to study the morphology of abraded surfaces and operating wear mechanism. The analysis of wear debris particles was also carried out to substantiate the findings of the investigation.

  11. PAGMan - propelled abrasive grit to manage weeds in soybean and corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean and corn production in organic systems or in systems in which weeds developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Here we report on two developments: (i) the safety to soybean seedlings of using air-propelled abrasive grit (PAG) for managing...

  12. Air-propelled abrasive grit for postemergence in-row weed control in field corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic growers need additional tools for weed control. A new technique involving abrasive grit propelled by compressed air was tested in field plots. Grit derived from corn cobs was directed at seedlings of summer annual weeds growing at the bases of corn plants when the corn was at differing early...

  13. Laser abrasion for cosmetic and medical treatment of facial actinic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, L.M.; Lask, G.P.; Glassberg, E.; Jacoby, R.; Abergel, R.P.

    1989-06-01

    Previous studies have shown the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser to be effective in the treatment of actinic cheilitis. After CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion, normal skin and marked cosmetic improvement of the lip were noted. In our study, twenty-three patients were treated with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasions for cosmetic improvement of facial lines and actinic changes. Pre- and postoperative histopathologic examinations were made on two patients. Preoperative examination of specimens from actinically damaged skin showed atypical keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, with overlying dense compact orthokeratosis and parakeratosis. Abundant solar elastosis was seen in the papillary dermis. Postoperative histologic specimens showed a normal-appearing epidermis with fibrosis in the papillary dermis and minimal solar elastosis (about four weeks after laser treatment). At present, various modalities are available for the regeneration of the aged skin, including chemical peels and dermabrasion. Significantly fewer complications were noted with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion than with these methods. Thus, CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion can be useful in the cosmetic and medical treatment of the aged skin. Marked clinical and histologic improvement has been demonstrated.

  14. CONTROL SYSTEM EVALUATION AND IMPLEMENTATION FOR THE ABRASIVE MACHINING PROCESS ON WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Jackson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuous process improvement and automation have proven to be powerful tools for the wood processing industries in order to obtain better final product quality and thus increase profits. Abrasive machining represents an important and relevant process in the manufacturing and processing of wood products, which also implies high cost of materials and labor; therefore, special attention to this process is necessary. The objective of this work was to evaluate and demonstrate a process control system for use in the abrasive machining of wood and wood-based products. A control system was created on LabView® to integrate the monitoring process and the actions required, depending on the abrasive machining process conditions. The system acquires information from the optical sensor to detect loading and activate the cleaning system. The system continuously monitors the condition of the abrasive belt (tool wear by using an acoustic emission sensor and alerts the operator of the status of the belt (green, yellow, and red lights indicating satisfactory, medium, and poor belt condition. The system also incorporates an additional safety device, which helps prevent permanent damage to the belt, equipment, or workpiece by alerting the operator when an excessive temperature has been reached. The process control system proved that automation permits enhancement in the consistency of the belt cleaning technique by the elimination of the human errors. Furthermore, this improvement also affects the cost by extending the life of the belt, which reduces setup time, belt cost, operation cost, as well as others.

  15. Adaptation of high pressure water jets with abrasives for nuclear installations dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the work realized for adjust the cutting technology with high pressure water jet with abrasives for nuclear installation dismantling. It has necessited the conception and the adjustement of a remote tool and the realization of cutting tests with waste produce analysis. This technic can be ameliorated with better viewing systems and better fog suction systems

  16. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  17. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  18. Sources of zodiacal dust

    CERN Document Server

    Ipatov, S I

    2007-01-01

    Fractions of asteroidal particles, particles originating beyond Jupiter's orbit (including trans-Neptunian particles), and cometary particles originating inside Jupiter's orbit among zodiacal dust are estimated to be about 1/3 each, with a possible deviation from 1/3 up to 0.1-0.2. These estimates were based on the comparison of our models of the zodiacal cloud that use results of numerical integration of the orbital evolution of dust particles produced by asteroids, comets, and trans-Neptunian objects with different observations (e.g., WHAM [Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper spectrometer] observations of spectra of zodiacal light, the number density at different distances from the Sun). The fraction of particles produced by Encke-type comets (with e~0.8-0.9) does not exceed 0.15 of the overall population. The estimated fraction of particles produced by long-period and Halley-type comets among zodiacal dust also does not exceed 0.1-0.15. Though trans-Neptunian particles fit different observations of dust inside Jupite...

  19. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  20. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our theoretical research on dust-plasma interactions has concentrated on three main areas: (a)studies of grain charging and applications; (b) waves and instabilities in weakly correlated dusty plasma with applications to space and laboratory plasmas; (c) waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

  1. Abrasive Wear Modes in Ball-Cratering Test Conducted on Fe73Si15 Ni10Cr2 Alloy Deposited Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Priyan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop a theoretical model and associated wear mode map to identify the regimes in which two body abrasion (grooving abrasion and three body abrasion (rolling abrasion dominate in the micro-abrasive wear test (also known as the ball cratering wear test. This test is generally considered to be a three body wear test. The wear mechanisms and wear rates were investigated using diamond abrasive over a range of loads (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 N, and slurry concentrations (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 volume fraction abrasive. It was found that during abrasion wear, a transition from grooving to rolling wear could be identified for a load with respect to time. The critical condition for the transition between two-body and three-body abrasion was determined from a continuum mechanics model for the penetration of the abrasive particles into the surfaces of the ball and the specimen, coupled with considerations of equilibrium. Two wear modes are usually observed in this type of test: ‘rolling abrasion’ results when the abrasive particles roll on the surface of the tested specimen, while ‘grooving abrasion’ is observed when the abrasive particles slide; the type of wear mode has a significant effect on the overall behaviour of a tribological system. Wear rates of metallic samples were determined and the worn surfaces were examined by optical microscopy, SEM and Talysurf profilometry.

  2. Hot Dust Acoustic Solitary Waves in Dust Plasma with Variable Dust Charge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段文山; 吕克朴; 赵金保

    2001-01-01

    Considering the variation of dust charges, we have analytically studied the governing equation for the system with the same model as that for cold dust acoustic waves in a demagnetized plasma but with the contribution of hot dust. The result indicates that the governing equation is also a Kortweg-de Vries equation, although its amplitude and width will be smaller compared with the cold dust case.

  3. Patient preference: conventional rotary handpieces or air abrasion for cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Hans S; Chaves, Yvette; Moss, Mark E

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that patients should accept the use of the air abrasion technique over the conventional handpiece due to the reduced need for anesthesia. Technologies for both air abrasion and the conventional rotary handpiece have, in recent decades, seen major improvements, but there are no recent scientific publications that evaluate the patient's preference for these two technologies when performing a cavity preparation. This study determined the patient's preference for air abrasion or the rotary handpiece for removing occlusal fissure carious lesions in mandibular premolars. Ten healthy subjects 18 years of age or older were recruited from the General Dentistry Clinic of the University of Rochester Eastman Dental Center, with fissure caries at a DEJ depth of similar size (determined by radiographs and clinical examination) in any two mandibular premolars in opposite quadrants. Within each subject, the two methods of caries removal were randomly assigned. In one premolar, air abrasion was used for cavity preparation, and in the other premolar, a conventional rotary handpiece was used. At each visit prior to treatment, the patients were instructed to complete the Emotional Status (ES) questionnaire (SUNY University at Buffalo Craniofacial Pain Clinic) to assess differences in their emotional status between appointments. At each appointment, when the restorative treatment was completed, patients were instructed to rate their pain on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A technique preference questionnaire was given after the second appointment. The subjects rated the perception of pain as significantly lower (p cavity preparation when removing fissural caries in mandibular premolars and most subjects did not experience any pain when air abrasion was used.

  4. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  5. Dust arising during steelmaking processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Popielska-Ostrowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper describes the dust arising during steelmaking processes.Design/methodology/approach: Steelmaking dusts may be a viable alternative for obtaining valuable and widely used metal which is zinc. On the other hand, heavy metals, it was as dangerous to the environment, and this in turn means that development of steelmaking dusts in the best possible way.Findings: The analysis of the formation of steelmaking dust.Research limitations/implications: Understanding the mechanism of steelmaking dusts will help to increase the participation of zinc recycling from wastes.Practical implications: Contained zinc in the dust can be recovered from the positive economic effect, and neutralization of hazardous waste to the desired environmental effect.Originality/value: Description of the mechanism of steelmaking dust, with particular emphasis on the distribution of zinc. The information is very important in the development of metal recovery technology from waste.

  6. WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings in Low- and High-Stress Abrasive Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kašparová, Michaela; Zahálka, František; Houdková, Šárka

    2011-03-01

    The article deals with the evaluation of abrasive wear resistance and adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coatings. The main attention was paid to differences between low- and high-stress abrasive conditions of the measuring. Conclusions include the evaluation of specific properties of the WC-Co and the Cr3C2-NiCr High Velocity Oxygen Fuel coatings and the evaluation of the changes in the behavior of the abrasive media. Mainly, the relationship between the low- and high-stress abrasion conditions and the wear mechanism in the tested materials was described. For the wear test, the abrasive media of Al2O3 and SiO2 sands were chosen. During wear tests, the volume loss of the tested materials and the surface roughness of the wear tracks were measured. The wear tracks on the tested materials and abrasive sands' morphologies were observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It was found that high-stress abrasive conditions change the coatings' behavior very significantly, particularly that of the Cr3C2-NiCr coating. Adhesive-cohesive properties of the coatings and relationships among individual structure particles were evaluated using tensile testing. It was found that the weak bond strength among the individual splats, structure particles, and phases plays a role in the poor wear resistance of the coatings.

  7. Comparison between PEEK and Ti6Al4V concerning micro-scale abrasion wear on dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, M; Buciumeanu, M; Henriques, B; Silva, F S; Souza, J C M; Gomes, J R

    2016-07-01

    In the oral cavity, abrasive wear is predictable at exposed tooth or restorative surfaces, during mastication and tooth brushing. Also, wear can occur at contacting surfaces between the Ti-based prosthetic structures and implants in presence of abrasive compounds from food or toothpaste. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare the abrasive wear resistance of PEEK and Ti6Al4V on three-body abrasion related to different hydrated silica content and loads. Surfaces of Ti6Al4V or PEEK cylinders (8mm diameter and 4mm height) were wet ground on SiC papers and then polished with 1µm diamond paste. After that, surfaces were ultrasonically cleaned in propyl alcohol for 15min and then in distilled water for 10min. Micro-scale abrasion tests were performed at 60rpm and on different normal loads (0.4, 0.8 or 1.2N) after 600 ball revolutions using suspensions with different weight contents of hydrated silica. After abrasive tests, wear scars on flat samples were measured to quantify the wear volume and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the dominant wear mechanisms. Results showed a higher volume loss rate on PEEK than that recorded on Ti6Al4V,, when subjected to three-body abrasion tests involving hydrated silica suspensions. An increase in volume loss was noted on both tested materials when the abrasive content or load was increased. PEEK was characterized by less wear resistance than that on Ti6Al4V after micro-scale abrasion wear in contact with hydrated silica particles, as commonly found in toothpastes. PMID:26849309

  8. Abrasive wear behaviour of conventional and large-particle tungsten carbide-based cermet coatings as a function of abrasive size and type

    OpenAIRE

    Kamdi, Z.; Shipway, P.H.; Voisey, K.T.; Sturgeon, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Abrasive wear behaviour of materials can be assessed using a wide variety of testing methods, and the relative performance of materials will tend to depend upon the testing procedure employed. In this work, two cermet type coatings have been examined, namely (i) a conventional tungsten carbide-cobalt thermally sprayed coating with a carbide size of between ∼0.3 – 5 μm and (ii) a tungsten carbide-nickel alloy weld overlay with large spherical carbides of the order of ∼50 – 140 μm in diameter (...

  9. Dust storm, northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    This large dust storm along the left side of the photo, covers a large portion of the state of Coahuila, Mexico (27.5N, 102.0E). The look angle of this oblique photo is from the south to the north. In the foreground is the Sierra Madre Oriental in the states Coahuila and Nuevo Leon with the Rio Grande River, Amistad Reservoir and Texas in the background.

  10. Transport of Dust Particles in Tokamak Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R D; Krasheninnikov, S I; Rognlien, T D; Rozenberg, M

    2006-06-06

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  11. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  12. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  13. Micro-abrasion-corrosion behaviour of a biomedical Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy in simulated physiological fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Yan; Huang, Weijiu; Chen, Xiaoli; He, Haoran

    2016-10-01

    The micro-abrasion-corrosion behaviour of the biomedical Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy in Hank׳s solution with protein has been investigated using electrochemical measurements, tribological tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. The potentiodynamic polarization tests showed that the corrosion potential (Ecorr) exhibits the maximum value at the abrasive concentration of 0.05gcm(-3) despite of the load level. The tribological results indicated that the total material loss of the Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy during micro-abrasion increased with the increasing abrasive concentration at a certain applied load. When the abrasive concentration is no more than 0.15gcm(-3), the total material loss increases with increasing load, while the total material loss exhibits the maximum value at a moderate load in case of higher abrasive concentration levels. This was ascribed to the three-body or two-body micro-abrasion-corrosion at different abrasive concentration levels. The wastage map, abrasion mode map and synergy map associated with the applied load and the abrasive concentration were constructed to evaluate the micro-abrasion-corrosion behaviour of the Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy in potential biomedical applications.

  14. Updates to the dust-agglomerate collision model and implications for planetesimal formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jürgen; Brisset, Julie; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Kothe, Stefan; Landeck, Alexander; Schräpler, Rainer; Weidling, René

    2016-10-01

    Since the publication of our first dust-agglomerate collision model in 2010, several new laboratory experiments have been performed, which have led to a refinement of the model. Substantial improvement of the model has been achieved in the low-velocity regime (where we investigated the abrasion in bouncing collisions), in the high-velocity regime (where we have studied the fragmentation behavior of colliding dust aggregates), in the erosion regime (in which we extended the experiments to impacts of small projectile agglomerates into large target agglomerates), and in the very-low velocity collision regime (where we studied further sticking collisions). We also have applied the new dust-agglomerate collision model to the solar nebula conditions and can constrain the potential growth of planetesimals by mass transfer to a very small parameter space, which makes this growth path very unlikely. Experimental examples, an outline of the new collision model, and applications to dust agglomerate growth in the solar nebula will be presented.

  15. Process parameters effect on material removal mechanism and cut quality of abrasive water jet machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of the abrasive water jet cutting of materials, supported by the theories of fluid mechanics, abrasive wear and damage mechanics, is a high-tech technologies that provides unique capabilities compared to conventional machining processes. This paper, along the theoretical derivations, provides original contributions in the form of mathematical models of the quantity of the cut surface damage, expressed by the values of cut surface roughness. The particular part of this paper deal with the results of the original experimental research. The research aim was connected with the demands of industry, i.e. the end user. Having in mind that the conventional machining processes are not only lagging behind in terms of quality of cut, or even some requests are not able to meet, but with the advent of composite materials were not able to machine them, because they occurred unacceptable damage (mechanical damage or delamination, fiber pull-out, burning, frayed edges.

  16. A New Method for Descaling Wool Fibres by Nano Abrasive Calcium Carbonate Particles in Ultrasonic Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali rezaghasemi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, the most conventional methods for descaling of wool fibre are based on chemical degradation and resin covering of scales or a combination of them. These methods are producing wastewater and can cover physical properties of the fibres beside scales orderly. In this study, a new and clean method is developed on the basis of abrasion effect of calcium carbonate Nano particles (CCNP in an ultrasonic bath. Woolen Samples (fibre and yarn were sonicated with different levels of CCNP. Tensile properties of the yarns, directional friction effect of the fibres and scanning electron microscope images of the fibres were studied. Test results showed that sonicated Nano treatment of woolyarn reduced its tenacity, extension and work of rupture and increased its coefficient of friction. Scanning electron microscope images of fibres and measurement of fibres directional displacement confirmed descaling of Nano abrasive treated wool samples in comparison to the raw wool.

  17. STUDYING THE ABRASION BEHAVIOR OF RUBBERY MATERIALS WITH COMBINED DESIGN OF EXPERIMENT-ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Shiva; Hossein Atashi; Mahtab Hassanpourfard

    2012-01-01

    In this study,an application of artificial neural network (ANN) has been presented in modeling and studying the effect of compounding variables on abrasion behavior of rubber formulations.Three case studies were carried out in which the experiment data were collected according to classical response surface designs.Besides developing the ANN models,we developed response surface methodology (RSM) to confirm the ANN predictions.A simple relation was employed for determination of relative importance of each variable according to ANN models.It was shown through these case studies that ANN models delivered very good data fitting and their simulating curves could help the researchers to better understand the abrasion behavior.

  18. M"ossbauer study of corrosion and abrasion products in oil transporting pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Raul W.; Perez Mazariego, Jose Luis; Marquina, Vivianne; Marquina, Ma. Luisa; Ridaura, Rosalia; Martinez, Lorenzo

    2012-02-01

    It is known that one of the main technological problems in carbon steel oleoducts is the corrosion produced by different substances, such as water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, and microorganisms. In addition, if in such mixture there is sand, aggressive sludge can be form that abrasions material from the oleoduct. A room temperature M"ossbauer study of corroded material taken from different sites of oleoducts is presented. Most of the M"ossbauer spectra reveal the presence of nanoparticles, indicating that in these pipes the abrasion problem is severe. A preliminary identification of the oxidized samples suggests the presence of magnetite, and some Iron hydroxides. Further studies are in course in order to identify unambiguously the products present in the corroded materials.

  19. Utilizing a Magnetic Abrasive Finishing Technique (MAF Via Adaptive Nero Fuzzy(ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Moosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted for measuring the quality of surface finishing roughness using magnetic abrasive finishing technique (MAF on brass plate which is very difficult to be polish by a conventional machining process where the cost is high and much more susceptible to surface damage as compared to other materials. Four operation parameters were studied, the gap between the work piece and the electromagnetic inductor, the current that generate the flux, the rotational Spindale speed and amount of abrasive powder size considering constant linear feed movement between machine head and workpiece. Adaptive Neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS was implemented for evaluation of a series of experiments and a verification with respect to specimen roughness change has been optimized and usefully achieved by obtained results were an average of the error between the surface roughness predicted by model simulation and that of direct measure is 2.0222 %.

  20. Effects of ion implantation on the abrasive wear of WC-Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An explanation of the improved abrasive wear resistance of ion-implanted WC-Co components has been sought. X-ray analysis is reported of scratches produced on polished implanted and non-implanted WC-Co surfaces by a single pass scratch test. It can be inferred from the results that extrusion of cobalt from a WC-Co surface under the stress of an abrading diamond is easier in the non-implanted than in the implanted case; this is the first stage of the abrasion wear process. Transmission electron diffraction of a WC-Co foil, before and after implantation by nitrogen ions, indicated the formation of Co2N microprecipitates during implantation. Precipitation hardening, hindering cobalt extrusion, is offered therefore as the explanation of the improved service life of the components. (U.K.)

  1. Study on comprehensive properties of duplex austenitic surfacing alloys for impacting abrasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, comprehensive property crack resistance, work hardening and abrasion resistance of a series of double-phases austenitic alloys(FAW) has been studied by means of SEM, TEM and type MD-10 impacting wear test machine. FAW alloys are of middle chromium and low manganese, including Fe-Cr-Mo-C alloy,Fe-Cr-Mn-C alloy and Fe-Cr-Mn-Ni-C alloy, that are designed for working in condition of impacting abrasion resistance hardfacing.Study results show that the work hardening mechanism of FAW alloys are mainly deformation high dislocation density and dynamic carbide aging, the form of wearing is plastic chisel cutting. Adjusting the amount of carbon, nickel, manganese and other elements in austenitic phase area, the FAW alloy could fit different engineering conditions of high impacting, high temperature and so on.

  2. The effectiveness of the air-powder abrasive device on the tooth and periodontium: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, A; Soldinger, M; Sperling, I

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of the air-powder abrasive device (APAD) was reviewed from the current dental literature and found to be an excellent alternative to traditional methods for stain and plaque removal. Access to crowded teeth, grooves and involved furcation areas are easily obtainable with less operator fatigue. The APAD slurry produces different root surface abrasiveness, depending on the method of use. Extended maintenance periods of exposed root surface using the APAD can result in an enormous loss of root structure. To avoid permanent damage of the root, the device should be used with overlapping strokes and root exposure to the APAD slurry should be minimized. The device can be used for total cementum removal with less operator fatigue and more reproducibility than with hand instruments, leaving smooth and clean surfaces. In addition, the device may be a valuable tool in the detoxification of root surfaces during periodontal surgery.

  3. Kerf modelling in abrasive waterjet milling using evolutionary computation and ANOVA techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, A.; Rivero, A.; Carrascal, A.; Lamikiz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Many researchers demonstrated the capability of Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) technology for precision milling operations. However, the concurrence of several input parameters along with the stochastic nature of this technology leads to a complex process control, which requires a work focused in process modelling. This research work introduces a model to predict the kerf shape in AWJ slot milling in Aluminium 7075-T651 in terms of four important process parameters: the pressure, the abrasive flow rate, the stand-off distance and the traverse feed rate. A hybrid evolutionary approach was employed for kerf shape modelling. This technique allowed characterizing the profile through two parameters: the maximum cutting depth and the full width at half maximum. On the other hand, based on ANOVA and regression techniques, these two parameters were also modelled as a function of process parameters. Combination of both models resulted in an adequate strategy to predict the kerf shape for different machining conditions.

  4. Abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramics containing apatite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Sevim; M K Kulekci

    2006-06-01

    In this study, abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramic materials produced with two different processes is studied. Hot pressing process and conventional casting and controlled crystallization process were used to produce bio-active ceramics. Fracture toughness of studied material was calculated by fracture toughness equations using experimental hardness results of the bio-active glass ceramic material. Two fracture toughness equations in the literature were used to identify the wear behaviour of studied ceramics. Wear resistance results that identified with both of the equations were similar. The results showed that the abrasive wear resistance of the bio-active glass ceramics produced with hot pressing process was found to be higher than that of the ceramics produced by conventional casting and controlled crystallization process.

  5. Self-healing of the superhydrophobicity by ironing for the abrasion durable superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingxia; Li, Jingye; Deng, Bo; Jiang, Haiqing; Wang, Ziqiang; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Xing, Chenyang; Li, Yongjin

    2013-01-01

    Self-healing of the superhydrophobic cotton fabric (SCF) obtained by the radiation-induced graft polymerization of lauryl methacrylate (LMA) and n-hexyl methacrylate (HMA), can be achieved by ironing. Through the steam ironing process, the superhydrophobicity of the SCFs will be regenerated even after the yarns are ruptured during the abrasion test under a load pressure of 44.8 kPa. SCFs made from LMA grafted cotton fabric can ultimately withstand at least 24,000 cycles of abrasion with periodic steam ironing. The FT-IR microscope results show that the migration of the polymethacrylates graft chains from the interior to the surface is responsible for the self-healing effect. PMID:24135813

  6. Two-body, dry abrasive wear of Fe/Cr/C experimental alloys - relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study of abrasive wear resistance of Fe/Cr/Mn based alloys has been carried out using a two body pin-on-disc wear machine. Abrasives used were silicon carbide, alumina and quartz. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance and to investigate the relationships between microstructure, mechanical properties, and abrasive wear resistance for these experimental alloys. Several commercial alloys were also tested to provide a basis for comparison. The goal of this study was to develop information so as to improve wear resistance of these experimental alloys by means of thermal treatments. Grain-refinement by double heat treatment was carried out in this research

  7. Numerical Simulation Study of Influence of Nozzle Entrance Diameter on Jet Performance of Pre-mixed Abrasive Water Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jinfa; Deng, Songsheng; Jiao, Guangwei; Chen, Ming; Hua, Weixing

    Physical model of cone-cylinder nozzle was established. Based on the CFD software of FLUENT, the flow field about abrasive water jet in cone-cylinder nozzle was simulated by use of standard k-ɛ turbulent model, Lagrange Discrete Phase Model and SIMPLE algorithm. The simulation results show that axial velocity of abrasive particle is always smaller than axial velocity of abrasive particle and increases gradually with the increase of axial distance. Axial static pressure of water decreases gradually with the increase of axial distance. Axial velocity of abrasive particle at the exit of cone-cylinder nozzle decreases with the increase of nozzle entrance diameter. And axial static pressure of water at the entrance of cone-cylinder nozzle decreases with the increase of nozzle entrance diameter. 8mm is selected as an optimal nozzle entrance diameter.

  8. Relationship among wear-resistance of three-body abrasion,substructure and property in martensite steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of subsurface hardness on wear-resistance of martensitic steel 20Cr, 40CrSi, 60Mn, T8 and T10 in three-body abrasion under static load was investigated. It shows that the characteristic ofthe subsurface hardness distribution and the abrasive wear resistanceis related to the substructure near the worn surface. The substructure of the tested martensite steel has an apparent relationship with thecarbon content and steels with moderate carbon content and hardness exhibit good resistance to abrasive wear. The competition of the work-hardening effect and the temper softening effect, which resulted from deformation and friction heat generating during abrasive wear is considered to be a main reason for the relation among wear-resistance, hardness and substructure. At the test conditions, the wear-resistance of 40CrSi is the best.

  9. Relations of abrasion resistance and hardness of 16Cr-3C white irons with retained austenite content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiping Sun; Rulin Zuo; Cong Li; Baoluo Shen; Shengji Gao; Sijiu Huang

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the retained austenite content of the matrix in 16Cr-3C white irons and the abrasion resistance was investigated. The results show that: (1) the abrasion resistance can be improved by sub-critical heat treatment, which could be attributed to the decrease of the retained austenite content; (2) both the abrasion resistance and hardness can be improved by controlling the retained austenite content below 20%-30% and arrive at the maximum when the retained austenite content is reduced to about 10%; (3) the abrasion resistance decreases abruptly once the retained austenite content is lower than 10%, which stems from both the in situ transformation of (Fe, Cr)23C6 to M3C carbides and the formation of pearlitic matrix.

  10. Chemical mechanical polishing of hard disk substrate with {alpha}-alumina-g-polystyrene sulfonic acid composite abrasive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Hong, E-mail: hong_lei2005@yahoo.com.c [Research Center of Nano-science and Nano-technology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Bu Naijing; Chen Ruling; Hao Ping [Research Center of Nano-science and Nano-technology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Neng Sima; Tu Xifu; Yuen Kwok [Shenzhen Kaifa Magnetic Recording Co., LTD, Shenzhen, 518035 (China)

    2010-05-03

    {alpha}-Alumina-g-polystyrene sulfonic acid ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-PSS) composite abrasive was prepared by surface activation, graft polymerization and sulfonation, successively. The composition, dispersibility and morphology of the product were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, laser particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) performances of the composite abrasive on hard disk substrate with nickel-phosphorous plating were investigated. The microscopy images of the polished surfaces show that {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-PSS composite abrasive results in improved CMP and post-CMP cleaning performances than pure {alpha}-alumina abrasive under the same testing conditions.

  11. Formation of Cosmic Dust Bunnies

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hayes, Ryan L.; Freed, Michael S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2007-01-01

    Planetary formation is an efficient process now thought to take place on a relatively short astronomical time scale. Recent observations have shown that the dust surrounding a protostar emits more efficiently at longer wavelengths as the protoplanetary disk evolves, suggesting that the dust particles are coagulating into fluffy aggregates, "much as dust bunnies form under a bed." One poorly understood problem in this coagulation process is the manner in which micron-sized, charged grains form...

  12. Abrasive Wear Performance of Aluminium Modified Epoxy-Glass Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Vikram G.; Mishra, Punyapriya; Al Dabbas, Hassan A.; Panda, H. S.; Fernandez, Johnathan Bruce

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, Aluminum filled epoxies molds have been used in rapid tooling process. These molds are very economical when applied in manufacturing of low volume of plastic parts. To improve the thermal conductivity of the material, the metallic filler material is added to it and the glass fiber improves the wear resistance of the material. These two important parameters establish the life of composites. The present work reports on abrasive wear behavior of Aluminum modified epoxy and glass fiber composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of aluminum particles. Through pin on disc wear testing machine, we studied the wear behaviors of composites, and all these samples were fabricated by using hand layup process. Epoxy resin was used as matrix material which was reinforced with Glass fiber and Aluminum as filler. The composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of Al was cast with dimensions 100 × 100 × 6 mm. The specimens were machined to a size of 6 × 6 × 4 mm for abrasive testing. Abrasive tests were carried out for different grit paper sizes, i.e., 150, 320, 600 at different sliding distance, i.e., 20, 40, 60 m at different loads of 5, 10 and 15 N and at constant speed. The weight loss due to wear was calculated along with coefficient of friction. Hardness was found using Rockwell hardness machine. The SEM morphology of the worn out surface wear was analyzed to understand the wear mechanism. Results showed that the addition of Aluminum particles was beneficial for low abrasive conditions.

  13. Experimental Investigations into Abrasive Waterjet Machining of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad D. Unde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive waterjet machining (AWJM is an emerging machining process in which the material removal takes place due to abrasion. A stream of abrasive particles mixed with filtered water is subjected to the work surface with high velocity. The present study is focused on the experimental research and evaluation of the abrasive waterjet machining process in order to evaluate the technological factors affecting the machining quality of CFRP laminate using response surface methodology. The standoff distance, feed rate, and jet pressure were found to affect kerf taper, delamination, material removal rate, and surface roughness. The material related parameter, orientation of fiber, has been also found to affect the machining performance. The kerf taper was found to be 0.029 for 45° fiber orientation whereas it was 0.036 and 0.038 for 60° and 90°, respectively. The material removal rate is 18.95 mm3/sec for 45° fiber orientation compared to 18.26 mm3/sec for 60° and 17.4 mm3/sec for 90° fiber orientation. The Ra value for 45° fiber orientation is 4.911 µm and for 60° and 90° fiber orientation it is 4.927 µm and 4.974 µm, respectively. Delamination factor is found to be more for 45° fiber orientation, that is, 2.238, but for 60° and 90° it is 2.029 and 2.196, respectively.

  14. Effect of filler type on 3-body abrasion of dental composite

    OpenAIRE

    Yasini E.; Ataei M; Amini M

    2005-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The relatively poor wear resistance of dental composite in stress bearing posterior situations has restricted wider clinical application of this restorative material. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the three body abrasive wear of a dental composite based on a new filler (leucite: KAl Si2O6) and to compare it with the wear resistance of a composite based on commonly used Aluminium – Barium Silicate filler. Materials and Methods: This research was an interv...

  15. Optimization of Cutting Process of Medium Density Fibreboards by the Abrasive Water-Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Barcík

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the process of MDF cutting by the abrasive water-jet (WJC and shows how is kerf width infl uenced by process parameters. It presents the results of monitoring the kerf width related to technical and technological parameters, material parameters and cutting method. At the end of this paper, there is a detailed presentation of the possibilities of impacting kerf width by the change of the above mentioned parameters of the cutting process.

  16. Monitoring of abrasive water jet(AWJ) cutting using sound detection

    OpenAIRE

    Juriševič, Boštjan; Brissaud, Daniel; Junkar, Mihael

    2015-01-01

    Our main objective in the present work is to develop a methodology and create a system for the abrasive water jet (AWJ) machining process control. In the case of AWJ cutting, besides the cutting head traverse rate, the distance between the mixing tube and the workpiece, designated as the stand-off distance, has a predominant influence on the workpiece quality. The control ofthe traverse rate is performed by the machine controller. The stand off-distance control during the machining represents...

  17. Abrasive wear of railway sections of steel with a different pearlite morphology in railroad switches

    OpenAIRE

    J. Herian; K. Aniołek

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The analyse of pearlite morphology changes as a result of hot rolling process and isothermal annealing.Design/methodology/approach: Physical modelling of isothermal annealing for a transition point of 520-620°C was carried out using a Gleeble simulator. A scanning electron microscope was used for a quantitative evaluation of the microstructure. Tests of resistance to abrasive wear were carried out at the Amsler stand.Findings: The obtained test results confirm that these methods can ...

  18. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width as currently defined by the ASTM G 171 Standard. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement, in some cases considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for detailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness parameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Data are presented to show that different combinations of scratch tips and abraded materials can actually yield the same scratch width, but result in different volume displacement or removal measurements and therefore, the ZOI method is more discriminating than the ASTM method scratch width. Furthermore, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for our specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized manner, and not just by scratch width alone, is reinforced. This benefit is made apparent when a tip creates an intricate contour having multiple peaks and valleys within a single scratch. This work lays the foundation for updating scratch measurement standards to improve modeling and characterization of three-body abrasion test results.

  19. Effects of different lasers and particle abrasion on surface characteristics of zirconia ceramics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Arami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the surface of yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP after surface treatment with lasers and airborne-particle abrasion.First, 77 samples of presintered zirconia blocks measuring 10 × 10 × 2 mm were made, sintered and polished. Then, they were randomly divided into 11 groups (n=7 and received surface treatments namely, Er:YAG laser irradiation with output power of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 W, Nd:YAG laser with output power of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 W, CO2 laser with output power of 3, 4 and 5 W, AL2O3 airborne-particle abrasion (50μ and no treatment (controls. Following treatment, the parameters of surface roughness such as Ra, Rku and Rsk were evaluated using a digital profilometer and surface examination was done by SEM.According to ANOVA and Tukey's test, the mean surface roughness (Ra after Nd:YAG laser irradiation at 2 and 2.5 W was significantly higher than other groups. Roughness increased with increasing output power of Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers. Treated surfaces by Er:YAG laser and air abrasion showed similar surface roughness. SEM micrographs showed small microcracks in specimens irradiated with Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers.Nd:YAG laser created a rough surface on the zirconia ceramic with many microcracks; therefore, its use is not recommended. Air abrasion method can be used with Er:YAG laser irradiation for the treatment of zirconia ceramic.

  20. The effect of air abrasion on the retention of metallic brackets bonded to fluorosed enamel surface

    OpenAIRE

    S Suma; Anita, G; B R Chandra Shekar; Amitabh Kallury

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bonding brackets to fluorosed enamel remains a clinical challenge and bracket failure at the compromised enamel interface is common. Objective: To check the effect of air abrasion on the retention of metallic brackets bonded to fluorosed enamel surface. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human premolar teeth having moderate to severe dental fluorosis as per Dean′s criteria were collected and divided into three groups of 20 each. The groups were treated as follo...

  1. Modeling of the number of stubble stuck elements after abrasive jet machining-processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pietnicki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sticking of abrasive grains into the surface is the effect of abrasive jet machining processing. For prosthetic works burnt the clay, it may deteriorate the quality of metal-clay connection. Parameters of sandblasting have the significant influence on the amount of stubble elements stuck into the base. The aim of the research is examining possibilities of applying neuron networks for modeling this process. Examples were sandblasted using alternating parameters (pressure of working factor, angle of sandblasting, size of grains. As a next the amount of stubble elements stuck into the base were calculated. Study results allowed to work out a set of 180 standardized teaching patterns. Next, a group of 150 randomly selected neuron networks was submitted to teaching process. The aim was to select net architecture with the highest adjustment for discussed issue. Finally, a MLP (Multi Layer Perception was chosen. Training process of the net involved presentation of process entrance parameters to the net, followed by presentation of researched proportional partaking of stuck elements. In following training cycles the error was decreasing systematically. After finishing the training, the average medium error between the real measurement and the one anticipated by the net was about 5 per cent. Additional number of abrasive jet machining processing was done to verification experiments. As the study shows, designed artificial neuron net stimulates real dependencies appearing during abrasive jet machining-processing in a proper way and can be used for estimating proportional part of grains stuck into base after this processing. It turns out that this phenomenon can be modeled, and its model can be used in a practical way without using mathematical or physical equations.

  2. Micro-scale abrasion behaviour of electroless Ni-P-SiC coating on aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, M.; Sha, Wei; Malinov, Savko

    2014-01-01

    Electroless nickel (EN) and electroless nickel composite (ENC) coatings were deposited on aluminium alloy substrate, LM24. The micro abrasion test was conducted to study the wear behaviour of the coatings with the effect of SiC concentration. Microhardness of the coatings was tested also. The wear scars were analysed using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The wear resistance was found to be improved in composite coating that has higher microhardness as compared to pa...

  3. Characterization of bronzes by abrasive stripping voltammetry and thin layer chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Komorsky-Lovrić, Šebojka; Horvat, Alka J.M.; Ivanković, Danijela

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion potentials of five samples of bronzes having different compositions and the stripping peak potentials of their main components were determined by abrasive stripping voltammetry. Using thin-layer chromatography in combination with electrochemical dissolution of bronzes in the two electrode sampler, the ions of tin, copper, lead and nickel were detected as the products of electro-oxidation of bronzes. It is shown that the dissolution of tin is preferential at low potential differences...

  4. 3D Imaging of mammalian cells with ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, Jurgen A. W.; Shi, Dan; Kim, Sang; Bliss, Donald; Milne, Jacqueline L. S.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organization of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. We are using ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM) to visualize this hierarchical organization in an approach that combines focused ion-beam milling with scanning electron microscopy. Here, we extend our previous studies on imaging yeast cells to image subcellular architecture in human melanoma cells and mela...

  5. Investigation of sandwich material surface created by abrasive water jet (AWJ via vibration emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hreha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research a of abrasive waterjet cutting of heterogeneous “sandwich“ material with different Young modulus of elasticity of the cutted surface geometry by means of vibration emission. In order to confirm hypothetical assumptions about direct relation between vibration emission and surface quality an experiment in heterogeneous material consisting of stainless steel (DIN 1.4006 / AISI 410 and alloy AlCuMg2 has been provided.

  6. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  7. Portable mixed abrasive water jet equipment for rescue in high gas mine shaft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rui; DU Chang-long; XU Rui; ZHAO Jing

    2011-01-01

    In order to rescue a trapped miner and clean out roadways quickly in a high gas mine shaft after a mining mishap, a special portable cold-cutting equipment is needed, the main technology parameters were calculated according to the advanced cold-cutting technology of high pressure abrasive water jet and the portable mixed abrasive water jet equipment (PAWE) was designed to meet the needs of emergency rescue in high gas mine shafts. Tested the PAWE in a high gas environment, and the result shows that the maximum cutting depth of solid iron pipe is 18 mm and the recoilforce of the sprayer is 28.9 N under the conditions that actual cutting pressure is 29 MPa, starting target distance is 10 mm, cutting speed is 180 mm/min and concentration of abrasive is 32%. The course of the experiment in the high gas environment was smooth and continuous, without any explosion. The PAWE is easy to move and operate, but the nozzle which was worn badly in the sprayer should be changed every 8 minutes.

  8. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces

  9. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  10. Abrasive wear of railway sections of steel with a different pearlite morphology in railroad switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The analyse of pearlite morphology changes as a result of hot rolling process and isothermal annealing.Design/methodology/approach: Physical modelling of isothermal annealing for a transition point of 520-620°C was carried out using a Gleeble simulator. A scanning electron microscope was used for a quantitative evaluation of the microstructure. Tests of resistance to abrasive wear were carried out at the Amsler stand.Findings: The obtained test results confirm that these methods can be effectively used in shaping the pearlitic structure and properties of the steel.Practical implications: In physical modelling of tests of resistance to abrasive wear for the steel grade R260 after hot rolling and isothermal annealing it has been proved that this feature is a function of the steel structure and properties in the given operation conditions. The resistance to abrasive wear of steel R260 with a pearlitic structure and different pearlite morphology decreases with the increase of load and slide.Originality/value: An advantageous pearlitic morphology of steel (block sections with interlamellar distance in the order of 0.12-0.13 μm, ensuring hardness of about 340-350 HB, is facilitated by a hot rolling process combined with isothermal annealing.

  11. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Imran; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2-Na2O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na2O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na2O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization. PMID:24287337

  12. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarquinio SBC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Flávio Fernando Demarco1, Sônia Saeger Meireles2, Hugo Ramalho Sarmento1, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes Dantas1, Tatiana Botero3, Sandra Beatriz Chaves Tarquinio11Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil; 2Department of Operative Dentistry, Federal University of Paraíba, Brazil; 3Cariology, Restorative Science, and Endodontics Department, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, MI, USAAbstract: This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled.Keywords: peroxide, tooth bleaching, enamel, dentin, erosion, abrasion

  13. Evaluation of the effects of enameloplasty and air abrasion on sealant micro-leakage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Soleymani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Micro-leakage, one of the major reasons for recurrent decays, may lead to uncontrollable flow of liquids, pulp inflammation and peri-apical pathology. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate micro-leakage of pit and fissure sealants after using three different pit and fissure preparation techniques: 1 acid etching, 2 fissure enameloplasty and acid etching, and 3 air abrasion and acid etching.Sixty-nine extracted sound molars and premolars were randomly divided into three groups (23 samples in each group. Teeth were prepared using one of three occlusal surface treatments. Then the sealant was applied on the occlusal fissures of all teeth. The teeth were thermocycled and stored in normal saline. All teeth were sealed apically and coated with nail varnish and then were immersed in a 2% solution of methylen blue. Two buccolingual sections were made. The surfaces were scored 0 to 3 for the extent of micro-leakage using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by Kruskal- wallis and Dunn procedure.Enameloplasty and acid etching were significantly different regarding micro-leakage (P= 0.016, but no significant difference in micro-leakage was observed between air abrasion and the other methods.Enameloplasty followed by acid etching produced significantly less micro-leakage than the acid etching technique. Air abrasion acid etching was better than the acid etching technique in reducing micro-leakage too.

  14. The evaluation of tribo-corrosion synergy for WC-Co hardmetals in low stress abrasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, A.J.; Gee, M.G.; May, A.T. [National Physics Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2004-03-01

    WC-based hardmetals are materials that are widely used in applications where abrasion resistance is required. This paper describes the results of tests that were performed using a modified ASTM G65 rubber wheel test system incorporating an abrasive (silica sand) and media (sulphuric acid, deionised water, and calcium hydroxide solution). The first of these media was used in order to simulate conditions found in ash disposal equipment found in coal-fired power stations. The calcium hydroxide solution was intended to simulate conditions found in forming tools used in the manufacture of ceramic roofing tiles. Under very acidic conditions (pH 1.1), undermining of WC grains by binder dissolution appeared to be the rate-governing step in determining volume loss. Under mildly acidic conditions (pH 2.6 and 6.3) there was more evidence of WC grain fracture and correspondingly less of binder dissolution. Exposure to the alkali (pH 13 Ca(OH){sub 2} solution) caused the least wear. Results were correlated with physical and microstructural and parameters commonly used for quality assurance in the hardmetal industry. Corrosion-abrasion synergies were also evaluated using the same test rig in conjunction with the respective acidic solutions, but omitting the silica sand. These results are complemented by SEM examination of wear surfaces and of metallographically polished cross-sections of wear surfaces, and by bend strength evaluation of samples after simultaneous exposure to the various media and silica sand and the media in isolation.

  15. The structure and properties of steel with different pearlite morphology and its resistance to abrasive wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The analyse of pearlite morphology changes as a result of hot rolling process and isothermal annealing.Design/methodology/approach: Physical modelling of isothermal annealing for a transition point of520-620°C was carried out using a Gleeble simulator. A scanning electron microscope was used for a quantitativeevaluation of the microstructure.Findings: The obtained test results confirm that these methods can be effectively used in shaping the pearliticstructure and properties of the steel. During numerical simulation of a ride of a rail-vehicle through a switch, theload acting on a block section being part of the vehicle structure was determined. The load values were used insimulation of the resistance to abrasive wear, which was carried out in physical simulation.Practical implications: In physical modelling of tests of resistance to abrasive wear for the steel grade R260after hot rolling and isothermal annealing it has been proved that this feature is a function of the steel structure andproperties in the given operation conditions (load and slide magnitude. Abrasive wear of the rail steel is the moreintensive, the larger the load at a constant slide is.Originality/value: An advantageous pearlitic morphology of steel (block sections with interlamellar distance inthe order of 0.12-0.13 μm, ensuring hardness of about 340-350 HB, is facilitated by a hot rolling process combinedwith isothermal annealing.

  16. Experimental Study on Layered Ice Bonded Abrasive Polishing of Glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli SUN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Layered ice bonded abrasive tools (LIBAT is a new kind of one which not only has the ability of lapping and polishing but also has the effect of self-dressing. In this paper, two kinds of layered ice bonded abrasive tools were designed and manufactured. Experimental studies on layered ice bonded abrasive (LIBA polishing of glass-ceramics were conducted. The results show that the surface topography of glass-ceramics polished by micro α-Al2O3-nano α-Al2O3 LIBAT is better than that of polished by micro α-Al2O3-nano SiO2 LIBAT. The surface roughness Sa of glass-ceramics polished by the two kinds of LIBAT is at the nanometer scale. The reasons of this phenomenon were analyzed. The experimental results illustrate that the LIBAT shows good effect and can be used in production practice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6149

  17. Effect of Pearlite Interlamellar Spacing on Predominant Abrasive Wear Mechanism of Fully Pearlitic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Ahmadi; M. Monirvaghefi; M. Salehi; B. Niroumand

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was the determination of the predominant wear mechanism on three-body abrasion of fully pearlitic low alloy steel. Furthermore, the effect of pearlite interlamellar spacing on wear behavior was investigated.For this purpose, the samples were subjected to the different heat treating to attaining different interlamellar spacing.Mechanical properties such as hardness, yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, and impact toughness were evaluated.Three body abrasion tests were conducted under ASTM standard condition using a rubber wheel abrasion test apparatus.Abraded surface and wear debris were investigated by light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.The results showed that wear resistance of fully pearlitic steel depended to pearlite interlamellar spacing the and lower spacing has the greater wear resistance, so it may be due to subsurface work hardening and interlamellar spacing and cementite in fine and/or coarse pearlite, that influence on surface destruction during wear. Although during wear process the several mechanisms play roles, but study of surface and debris shows that with decreasing interlamellar spacing, the predominant mechanism wear changed from ploughing to cutting mode.

  18. Modeling of Tool Wear in Vibration Assisted Nano Impact-Machining by Loose Abrasives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagil James

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration assisted nano impact-machining by loose abrasives (VANILA is a novel nanomachining process that combines the principles of vibration assisted abrasive machining and tip-based nanomachining, to perform target specific nanoabrasive machining of hard and brittle materials. An atomic force microscope (AFM is used as a platform in this process wherein nanoabrasives, injected in slurry between the workpiece and the vibrating AFM probe which is the tool, impact the workpiece and cause nanoscale material removal. The VANILA process are conducted such that the tool tip does not directly contact the workpiece. The level of precision and quality of the machined features in a nanomachining process is contingent on the tool wear which is inevitable. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated reduced tool wear in the VANILA process as compared to indentation process in which the tool directly contacts the workpiece surface. In this study, the tool wear rate during the VANILA process is analytically modeled considering impacts of abrasive grains on the tool tip surface. Experiments are conducted using several tools in order to validate the predictions of the theoretical model. It is seen that the model is capable of accurately predicting the tool wear rate within 10% deviation.

  19. Coupling behavior between adhesive and abrasive wear mechanism of aero-hydraulic spool valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yunxia; Gong Wenjun; Kang Rui

    2016-01-01

    Leakage due to wear is one of the main failure modes of aero-hydraulic spool valves. This paper established a practical coupling wear model for aero-hydraulic spool valves based on dynamic system modelling theory. Firstly, the experiment for wear mechanism verification proved that adhesive wear and abrasive wear did coexist during the working process of spool valves. Sec-ondly coupling behavior of each wear mechanism was characterized by analyzing actual time-variation of model parameters during wear evolution process. Meanwhile, Archard model and three-body abrasive wear model were utilized for adhesive wear and abrasive wear, respectively. Furthermore, their coupling wear model was established by calculating the actual wear volume. Finally, from the result of formal test, all the required parameters for our model were obtained. The relative error between model prediction and data of pre-test was also presented to verify the accuracy of model, which demonstrated that our model was useful for providing accurate prediction of spool valve’s wear life.

  20. Effects of hybrid composition of LCP and glass fibres on abrasive wear of reinforced LLDPE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S A R Hashmi; Ajay Naik; Navin Chand

    2006-02-01

    The hybrid of liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) fibres and glass fibres (GF) provide a combination of modulus and toughness to semi-crystalline linear-low-density-polyethylene (LLDPE). LCP and GF fibres reinforced composites were studied using two-body abrasion tester under different applied loads. Two sets of fibre reinforced LLDPE, 10 and 20 vol%, were investigated. The contents of LCP and glass fibres were varied as 25, 50, 75 and 100 vol% of overall volume of fibres in LLDPE. The effect of replacing glass fibre with LCP fibre on wear is reported. Wear loss increased with the applied loads and glass fibre contents in LLDPE. The replacements of glass fibres with LCP fibres improved abrasive wear resistance of composite. The composite containing 20 vol% of glass fibres in LLDPE showed the specific wear rate nearly double to that of LCP fibre reinforced LLDPE. Incorporation of LCP fibre improved wear resistance of glass fibre reinforced LLDPE. Worn surfaces were studied using SEM. Glass fibres were broken in small debris and removed easily whereas LCP fibres yielded to fibrillation during abrasive action. The overall wear rate was governed by the composition and test conditions.

  1. Nuclear-chemical methods in a hard tooth tissue abrasion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced method consists in implantation-labelling of the thin surface layers of the solid objects, e.g. hard tooth tissue, by atoms of suitable natural or artificial radionuclides. Nuclides from the uranium series were implanted into the surface by using nuclear recoil effect at alpha decay of 226Ra to 222Rn, alpha decay of 222Rn to RaA, alpha decay of RaA to RaB (beta-emitter) and further alpha or beta emitters. With regard to chosen alpha detection and to the half-lives of the radionuclides, there was actually measured the activity of 222Rn, RaA and RaC' in the thin surface layer. This was followed by the laboratory simulation of the abrasion in the system of 'toothbrush - various suspensions of the tooth-pastes - hard tooth tissue (or material standard - ivory)' in specially designed device - the dentoabrasion meter. The activities of the tissue surface measured before and after abrasion were used for calculations of the relative drop of the surface activity. On this basis the influence of various tooth-pastes containing various abrasive substances was determined. (author)

  2. Development and Testing of Abrasion Resistant Hard Coats For Polymer Film Reflectors: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G.; Gee, R.; DiGrazia, M.

    2010-10-01

    Reflective polymer film technology can significantly reduce the cost of solar reflectors and installed Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants by both reduced material cost and lower weight. One challenge of polymer reflectors in the CSP environment pertains to contact cleaning methods typically used with glass mirrors. Such contact cleaning methods can scratch the surface of polymer reflectors and thereby reduce specular reflectance. ReflecTech, Inc. (a subsidiary of SkyFuel, Inc.) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to devise and develop an abrasion resistant coating (ARC) suitable for deposition onto polymer based mirror film. A number of candidate ARC products were identified as candidate formulations. Industrial collaborators prepared samples having their ARCs deposited onto ReflecTech Mirror Film pre-laminated to aluminum sheet substrates. Samples were provided for evaluation and subjected to baseline (unweathered) and accelerated exposure conditions and subsequently characterized for abrasion resistance and adhesion. An advanced ARC product has been identified that exhibits outstanding initial abrasion resistance and adhesion to ReflecTech Mirror Film. These properties were also retained after exposure to the various accelerated stress conditions. This material has been successfully manufactured as a 1.5 m wide roll-to-roll construction in a production environment.

  3. Mechanical and Abrasive Wear Properties of Anodic Oxide Layers Formed on Aluminium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Bensalah; K.Elleuch; M.Feki; M.Wery; H.F.Ayedi

    2009-01-01

    Aluminium oxide coatings were formed on aluminium substrates in oxalic acid-sulphuric acid bath. Abrasion tests of the obtained anodic layers were carried out on a pin-on-disc machine in accordance with the ISO/DP 825 specifications. The Vickers microhardness, D (HV0.2). and the abrasion weight loss, Wa (mg) were measured. Influence of oxalic acid concentration (Cox), bath temperature (T) and anodic current density (J) on D and Wa has been examined, and the sulphuric acid concentration (Caul) was maintained at 160 g.L-1. It was found that high microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of oxide layers were produced under low temperatures and high current densities with the addition of oxalic acid. The morphology and the composition of the anodic oxide layer were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical microscopy and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). It was found that the chemistry of the anodizing electrolyte, temperature, and current density are the controlling factors of the mechanical properties of the anodic oxide layer.

  4. An investigation on surface roughness of granite machined by abrasive waterjet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gokhan Aydin; Izzet Karakurt; Kerim Aydiner

    2011-07-01

    Abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting is an emerging technology which enables the shaping of practically all engineering materials. However, AWJ cutting may cause roughness and waviness on the cut surface. This significantly affects the dimensional accuracy of the machined part and the quality of surface finish. In this study, the surface roughness of three granites is experimentally investigated for varying process parameters in abrasive waterjet. The philosophy of the Taguchi design is followed in the experimental study. Effects of the control (process) factors on the surface roughness are presented in terms of the mean of means responses. Additionally, the data obtained are evaluated statistically using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine significant process parameters affecting the surface roughness. Furthermore, effects of the material properties on the surface roughness are assessed. It was statistically found that the water pressure and the abrasive flow rate are the most significant factors influencing the surface roughness of granites. Additionally, a consistent relationship between the material grain size and surface roughness of the granites was observed.

  5. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO2–P2O5–CaO–CaF2–Na2O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na2O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na2O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization. (paper)

  6. An Research on Abrasion Resistance of Muzzle Shunt Rail Gun Rail Boronized with Self-protecting B4C Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jin-suo; CHENG Shu-kang; ZHENG Zhen-zhong; MA Yuan; LI Zhi-yuan

    2004-01-01

    Based on large numbers of experiments, together with some theoretic support such as equations related to the experiment, thermodynamic principles and so on, one useful and reasonable self-protecting boron formulation is got to reinforce the muzzle shunt rail gun rail. The preliminary friction and abrasion test results show that the formulation is acceptable and the abrasion resistance of the steel rail enhances to some extent after the surface reinforcement.

  7. An Research on Abrasion Resistance of Muzzle Shunt Rail Gun Rail Boronized with Self-protecting B4C Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUJin-suo; CHENGShu-kang; ZHENGZhen-zhong; MAYuan; LIZhi-yuan

    2004-01-01

    Based on large numbers of experiments, together with some theoretic support such as equations related to the experiment, thermodynamic principles and so on, one useful and reasonable self-protecting boron formulation is got to reintorce the muzzle shunt rail gun rail. The preliminary friction and abrasion test results show that the formulation is acceptable and the abrasion resistance of the steel rail enhances to some extent after the surface reinforcement.

  8. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  9. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  10. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  11. Minimal alterations on the enamel surface by micro-abrasion: in vitro roughness and wear assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Charantola Rodrigues

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vitro changes on the enamel surface after a micro-abrasion treatment promoted by different products. Material and Methods: Fifty (50 fragments of bovine enamel (15 mm × 5 mm were randomly assigned to five groups (n=10 according to the product utilized: G1 (control= silicone polisher (TDV, G2= 37% phosphoric acid (3M/ESPE + pumice stone (SS White, G3= Micropol (DMC Equipment, G4= Opalustre (Ultradent and G5= Whiteness RM (FGM Dental Products. Roughness and wear were the responsible variables used to analyze these surfaces in four stages: baseline, 60 s and 120 s after the micro-abrasion and after polishing, using a Hommel Tester T1000 device. After the tests, a normal distribution of data was verified, with repeated ANOVA analyses (p≤0.05 which were used to compare each product in different stages. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied for individual comparisons between the products in each stage (p≤0.05. Results: Means and standard deviations of roughness and wear (µm after all the promoted stages were: G1=7.26(1.81/13.16(2.67, G2=2.02(0.62/37.44(3.33, G3=1.81(0.91/34.93(6.92, G4=1.92(0.29/38.42(0.65 and G5=1.98(0.53/33.45(2.66. At 60 seconds, all products tended to produce less surface roughness with a variable gradual decrease over time. After polishing, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups, except for G1. Independent of the product utilized, the enamel wear occurred after the micro-abrasion. Conclusions: In this in vitro study, enamel micro-abrasion presented itself as a conservative approach, regardless of the type of the paste compound utilized. These products promoted minor roughness alterations and minimal wear. The use of phosphoric acid and pumice stone showed similar results to commercial products for the micro-abrasion with regard to the surface roughness and wear.

  12. Pallene dust torus observations by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiß, M.; Srama, R.; Sun, K.-L.; Seiler, M.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Kempf, S.; Spahn, F.

    2014-04-01

    The ISS cameras on-board the Cassini spacecraft have detected a faint dust torus along the orbit of Pallene [1]. It is believed that the source of the torus is the moon Pallene itself, where dust particles are ejected from its surface by micrometeoroid bombardment. Here, we present in-situ dust measurements of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on-board of the spacecraft Cassini which confirm the existence of a dust torus of micrometer-sized particles along the orbit of Pallene. The cross-section of the torus has been modeled by a double-Gaussian distribution, resulting in a radial and vertical full width at half maximum of 2300 km and 270 km, respectively, and a maximum particle density of n = 2.7 · 10-3m-3.

  13. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  14. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  15. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  16. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan;

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  17. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  18. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  19. Implementation of road and soil dust emission parameterizations in the aerosol model CAMx: Applications over the greater Athens urban area affected by natural sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulou, E.; Tombrou, M.; Russell, A. G.; Karanasiou, A.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Dandou, A.

    2010-09-01

    A detailed dust emission parameterization was developed for aerosol production by human and natural activity. The road dust scheme includes tire wear, break wear, road abrasion and vehicle-induced re-suspension. The natural dust scheme includes wind (Aeolian) erosion from soil surfaces and land disturbances, and considers the effects of soil and atmospheric parameters on dust productivity. Emission rates are chemically and size-resolved and are incorporated in the CAMx aerosol model coupled with the ISORROPIA II inorganic module. Emissions and concentrations are predicted for five simulation periods, using a domain covering Greece with a fine mesh over the greater Athens area. Re-suspended mass is the main dust component, calculated 4-5 times higher than exhaust emissions. Soil dust emissions are much greater than road dust during high winds but are of less importance inside the city with maximums located at the periphery of the urban core. Comparison with observations suggests that the road dust component seems adequately estimated in traffic-affected areas and accounts for 15-40% of the total PM10. Calcium, regarded as a soil dust tracer, is calculated to be 2-4 μg m-3 in areas with high Aeolian emission rates, similar to measured values. Sodium and magnesium predictions show their marine origin, and reasonably replicate the observed mass and size distribution during well-established onshore flows. Nitrates are predicted as measured during lower winds, but are underestimated when stronger winds prevail from the west. This is caused by an overestimated industrial influence of Athens. As a result, ammonia is bound to the excess of sulfate, rather than reacting with nitric acid. Secondary species are influenced slightly by heterogeneous chemistry on dust particles.

  20. The Martian Dust Cycle: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for Mars' current climate system. Suspended atmospheric dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, and thus greatly influences the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Evidence for the presence of dust in the Martian atmosphere can be traced back to yellow clouds telescopically observed as early as the early 19th century. The Mariner 9 orbiter arrived at Mars in November of 1971 to find a planet completely enshrouded in airborne dust. Since that time, the exchange of dust between the planet's surface and atmosphere and the role of airborne dust on Mars' weather and climate has been studied using observations and numerical models. The goal of this talk is to give an overview of the observations and to discuss the successes and challenges associated with modeling the dust cycle. Dust raising events on Mars range in size from meters to hundreds of kilometers. During some years, regional storms merge to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by tens of kelvin. The interannual variability of planet encircling dust storms is poorly understood. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. A low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading are generally observed: one peak occurs before northern winter solstice and one peak occurs after northern winter solstice. Numerical modeling studies attempting to interactively simulate the Martian dust cycle with general circulation models (GCMs) include the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Two dust lifting processes are commonly represented in

  1. Using stream sediment lithology to explore the roles of abrasion and channel network structure in shaping downstream sediment yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, E. R.; Smith, M. E.; Pitlick, J.

    2012-12-01

    Both the flux and characteristics of stream sediment evolve downstream in response to variations in sediment supply, abrasion rate, and channel network structure. We use a simple erosion-abrasion mass balance to model the downstream evolution of sediment flux in two adjacent watersheds draining differing mixtures of soft and resistant rock types in the northern Rocky Mountains. Measurements of bed sediment grain size and lithology are used in conjunction with measured bed load and suspended load sediment fluxes to constrain the model. The results show that the downstream evolution in bed load flux and composition can be strongly influenced by subtle differences in underlying geology, which shapes both the abrasion characteristics and travel path lengths of individual rock types. In the Big Wood basin, abrasion rapidly reduces the size of soft sedimentary and volcanic rocks exposed in headwater areas, concentrating resistant granitic rocks in the stream bed and depressing bed load in favor of suspended load. Alternatively, in the North Fork Big Lost basin, volcanic and sedimentary lithologies are exposed throughout the catchment, and the bed material becomes dominated by erodible but resistant quartzitic sandstones. The result is a much higher bed load flux best modeled with modest abrasion rates. In both cases, the best-fit model can reproduce within 5% the composition of the stream bed substrate using realistic erosion and abrasion parameters. The results also demonstrate a strong linkage between modern hillslopes and channel systems even in these formerly glaciated landscapes, as the sediment signature of the primary streams reflects the systematic tapping of distinct source areas. While this work shows promise, measurement of the spatial patterns in the size and composition of bed and suspended load fluxes at locations throughout a channel network would better elucidate that relative importance of supply, sorting, and abrasion processes.

  2. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.

  3. Regular spherical dust spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Humphreys, N; Matravers, D R; Humphreys, Neil; Maartens, Roy; Matravers, David

    1998-01-01

    Physical (and weak) regularity conditions are used to determine and classify all the possible types of spherically symmetric dust spacetimes in general relativity. This work unifies and completes various earlier results. The junction conditions are described for general non-comoving (and non-null) surfaces, and the limits of kinematical quantities are given on all comoving surfaces where there is Darmois matching. We show that an inhomogeneous generalisation of the Kantowski-Sachs metric may be joined to the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. All the possible spacetimes are explicitly divided into four groups according to topology, including a group in which the spatial sections have the topology of a 3-torus. The recollapse conjecture (for these spacetimes) follows naturally in this approach.

  4. Lunar Dust Effects on Spacesuit Systems: Insights from the Apollo Spacesuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Roy; Lindsay, John R.; Noble, Sarah K.; Meador, Mary Ann; Kosmo, Joseph J.; Lawrence, J. Anneliese; Brostoff, Lynn; Young, Amanda; McCue, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Systems and components of selected Apollo A7L/A7LB flight-article spacesuits that were worn on the lunar surface have been studied to determine the degree to which they suffered contamination, abrasion and wear or loss of function due to effects from lunar soil particles. Filter materials from the lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters from the Apollo Command Module were also studied to determine the amount and type of any lunar dust particles they may have captured from the spacecraft atmosphere. The specific spacesuit study materials include the outermost soft fabric layers on Apollo 12 and 17 integrated thermal micrometeorite garment assemblies and outermost fabrics on Apollo 17 extravehicular pressure gloves. In addition, the degree of surface wear in the sealed wrist rotation bearing from Apollo 16 extravehicular and intravehicular pressure gloves was evaluated and compared. Scanning electron microscope examination of the Apollo 12 T-164 woven TeflonO fabric confirms the presence of lunar soil particles and the ability of these particles to cause separation and fraying of the Teflon fibers. Optical imaging, chemical analysis and particle sampling applied to the outer fabric of the Apollo 17 spacesuit has identified Ti as a potentially useful chemical marker for comparing the amount of lunar soil retained on different areas of the spacesuit outer fabric. High-yield particle sampling from the Apollo 17 fabric surfaces using adhesive tape found 80% of particles on the fabric are lunar soil particles averaging 10.5 m in diameter, with the rest being intrinsic fabric materials or environmental contaminants. Analysis of the mineralogical composition of the lunar particles found that on a grain-count basis the particle population is dominated by plagioclase feldspar and various types of glassy particles derived mostly from soil agglutinates, with a subordinate amount of pyroxene. On a grain size basis, however, the pyroxene grains are generally a factor of 2 larger than

  5. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  6. Hydrothermal treatment for TiN as abrasion resistant dental implant coating and its fibroblast response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xingling, E-mail: shixingling1985@hotmail.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Xu, Lingli [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Munar, Melvin L.; Ishikawa, Kunio [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Dental implant made of pure titanium (Ti) is prone to scratch and abrasion during routine oral hygiene procedures. This results an increase in surface roughness and therefore, facilitates the adhesion of bacteria. In severe cases, this could lead to peri-implantitis. To overcome this problem, surface modification of Ti is necessary to improve its abrasion resistance. Besides, a strong implant–gingiva interface should also be guaranteed to prevent the adhesion of bacteria. In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) coating was first prepared with gas nitriding to increase surface hardness of pure the substrate. Then, the TiN was hydrothermally treated in CaCl{sub 2} solution in order to improve its soft tissue biocompatibility. The effect of hydrothermal treatment temperature on surface properties of TiN was investigated and its biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using NIH3T3 fibroblast cell. It was determined that 120 °C was the critical temperature for the hydrothermal treatment condition. Treatment below 120 °C could incorporate Ca into TiN surface, oxidize TiN surface partially and then improve the wettability while preserving its morphology and hardness. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were improved and cell spreading was enhanced on hydrothermally treated specimens compared with untreated ones. Improved wettability, Ca incorporation and negative surface due to interstitial N were believed to be the main reasons. Hydrothermal treatment is expected to make TiN a promising dental implant coating with excellent abrasion resistance and good soft tissue affinity. - Highlights: • Ca was incorporated into TiN surface while not sacrificing its hardness. • Interstitial N due to oxidation promoted Ca adsorption and cell adhesion. • Hydrothermal treatment makes TiN a promising coating for dental implant.

  7. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, K. W. Jr.; Kobrick, R. L.; Klaus, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume- displacement metrics was systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to denote statistically the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction. From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the plowed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof-of-concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. When reviewing existing data analysis techniques for conducting two-body abrasive scratch tests, it was found that the ASTM International Standard G 171 specified a generic metric based only on visually determined scratch width as a way to compare abraded materials. A limitation to this method was identified in that the scratch width is based on optical surface measurements, manually defined by approximating the boundaries, but does not consider the three-dimensional volume of material that was displaced. With large, potentially irregular deformations occurring on softer materials, it becomes unclear where to systematically determine the scratch width. Specifically, surface scratches on different samples may look the same from a top view, resulting in an identical scratch width measurement, but may vary in actual penetration depth and/or plowing deformation. Therefore, two different scratch profiles would be measured as having identical abrasion properties, although they differ

  8. Study on ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing process using low frequency alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinzhong, E-mail: wjz.0926@163.com; Zou, Yanhua, E-mail: yanhua@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Sugiyama, Hitoshi, E-mail: sugiyama@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-15

    We proposed a new ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) process using low frequency alternating magnetic field in this paper. Magnetic cluster themselves may produce the up and down movement change under alternating magnetic force. The movement may not only promote the dispersion of micro-magnetic particles, but also improve stirring effect and cross-cutting effects of the abrasives, achieving circulation and update to ensure the stability of grinding tools. This process is considered to be able to efficiently apply in ultra-precision finishing of plane and complicated micro-surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effects of alternating magnetic field on magnetic field distribution, finishing force and abrasive behavior. Furthermore, a set of experimental devices have been designed for finishing SUS304 stainless steel plate. The present work is aimed at understanding finishing particularity of this process and studying impacts of important process parameters namely grinding fluid, rotational speed of magnetic pole, current frequency on change in finish surface and material removal. Experimental results indicate that the process can realize ultra-precision finishing of plane by using oily grinding fluid. In the present research, the surface roughness of SUS304 stainless steel plate was improved from 240.24 nm to 4.38 nm by this process. - Highlights: • We investigated magnetic field distribution in processing region. • Magnetic cluster can produce a fluctuating finishing force in alternating magnetic field. • Oily grinding fluid is more applicable to this process. • Few nanometer finish surface can be obtained by this process.

  9. Hydrothermal treatment for TiN as abrasion resistant dental implant coating and its fibroblast response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental implant made of pure titanium (Ti) is prone to scratch and abrasion during routine oral hygiene procedures. This results an increase in surface roughness and therefore, facilitates the adhesion of bacteria. In severe cases, this could lead to peri-implantitis. To overcome this problem, surface modification of Ti is necessary to improve its abrasion resistance. Besides, a strong implant–gingiva interface should also be guaranteed to prevent the adhesion of bacteria. In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) coating was first prepared with gas nitriding to increase surface hardness of pure the substrate. Then, the TiN was hydrothermally treated in CaCl2 solution in order to improve its soft tissue biocompatibility. The effect of hydrothermal treatment temperature on surface properties of TiN was investigated and its biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using NIH3T3 fibroblast cell. It was determined that 120 °C was the critical temperature for the hydrothermal treatment condition. Treatment below 120 °C could incorporate Ca into TiN surface, oxidize TiN surface partially and then improve the wettability while preserving its morphology and hardness. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were improved and cell spreading was enhanced on hydrothermally treated specimens compared with untreated ones. Improved wettability, Ca incorporation and negative surface due to interstitial N were believed to be the main reasons. Hydrothermal treatment is expected to make TiN a promising dental implant coating with excellent abrasion resistance and good soft tissue affinity. - Highlights: • Ca was incorporated into TiN surface while not sacrificing its hardness. • Interstitial N due to oxidation promoted Ca adsorption and cell adhesion. • Hydrothermal treatment makes TiN a promising coating for dental implant

  10. Study on ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing process using low frequency alternating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We proposed a new ultra-precision magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) process using low frequency alternating magnetic field in this paper. Magnetic cluster themselves may produce the up and down movement change under alternating magnetic force. The movement may not only promote the dispersion of micro-magnetic particles, but also improve stirring effect and cross-cutting effects of the abrasives, achieving circulation and update to ensure the stability of grinding tools. This process is considered to be able to efficiently apply in ultra-precision finishing of plane and complicated micro-surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effects of alternating magnetic field on magnetic field distribution, finishing force and abrasive behavior. Furthermore, a set of experimental devices have been designed for finishing SUS304 stainless steel plate. The present work is aimed at understanding finishing particularity of this process and studying impacts of important process parameters namely grinding fluid, rotational speed of magnetic pole, current frequency on change in finish surface and material removal. Experimental results indicate that the process can realize ultra-precision finishing of plane by using oily grinding fluid. In the present research, the surface roughness of SUS304 stainless steel plate was improved from 240.24 nm to 4.38 nm by this process. - Highlights: • We investigated magnetic field distribution in processing region. • Magnetic cluster can produce a fluctuating finishing force in alternating magnetic field. • Oily grinding fluid is more applicable to this process. • Few nanometer finish surface can be obtained by this process

  11. The unsteady nature of sea cliff retreat due to mechanical abrasion, failure and comminution feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Shaun W.; Adams, Peter N.; Limber, Patrick W.

    2014-08-01

    Sea cliff retreat is often linked to large waves, heavy precipitation and seismic events, but the specific operative mechanics have not been well constrained. In particular, what is the role of mechanical abrasion by beach sediments in cliff/platform evolution and how does it relate to the episodic nature of cliff retreat observed at certain locations? Here we present a simple, numerical model of sea cliff retreat that incorporates mechanical abrasion of a basal notch, threshold-controlled failure of the cantilevered block, and a feedback mechanism wherein retreat is dependent on the rate of sediment comminution within the surf zone. Using shore platform and cliff characteristics found in two coastal settings (the central California coast and the English North Sea coast), the model produces retreat rates comparable to those observed via field measurements. The highest retreat rates coincide with the steepest shore platforms and increasing wave height. Steeper platforms promote wave access to the cliff toe and, correspondingly, the receding cliff face produces additional accommodation space for the platform beach, preserving the erosive efficacy of the beach sediments. When exposed to energetic wave forcing, the slope of the inner platform segment controls retreat rates for concave platforms, whereas the slope of the outer platform segment exerts greater control for convex platforms. Platform beaches approached a long-term dynamic equilibrium on the concave profiles, leading to more consistent and steady retreat. Platform beaches were ephemeral on convex profiles, mirroring observed sand wave (Ord) migration on the Holderness coast, UK. These findings agree with previous field observations and support mechanical abrasion as a viable cause of temporal heterogeneity in cliff retreat rate for both coastlines.

  12. Erosion and abrasion-inhibiting in situ effect of the Euclea natalensis plant of African regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Xavier, Cheila Nilza Hamina; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Silva, Maria de Fatima; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of Euclea natalensis gel on the reduction of erosive wear with or without abrasion, in enamel and dentin. During two five-day experimental crossover phases, volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing human enamel and dentin blocks (E = 8 and D = 8). The gel was applied in a thin layer in the experimental group, and was not applied in the control group. In the intraoral phase, volunteers used the palatal appliance for 12 h before the gel treatment, and were instructed to start the erosive challenges 6 h after the gel application. Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola® (for 5 min) 4 times/day. The appliance was then put back into the mouth and was brushed after 30 minutes. After intraoral exposure, the appliances were removed and the specimens were analyzed using profilometry (mean ± SD, μm). The Euclea natalensis gel caused less wear in enamel in the experimental group (EROS = 12.86 ± 1.75 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 12.13 ± 2.12 µm) than in the control group (EROS = 14.12 ± 7.66 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 16.29 ± 10.72 µm); however, the groups did not differ from each other significantly. A statistically significant value was found for erosion and eros + abrasion in dentin (p = 0.001). Euclea natalensis may play a role in the prevention of dentin loss under mild erosive and abrasive conditions. A clinical trial is required to confirm these promising results in a clinical situation. PMID:27305512

  13. Hydrothermal treatment for TiN as abrasion resistant dental implant coating and its fibroblast response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xingling; Xu, Lingli; Munar, Melvin L; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-04-01

    Dental implant made of pure titanium (Ti) is prone to scratch and abrasion during routine oral hygiene procedures. This results an increase in surface roughness and therefore, facilitates the adhesion of bacteria. In severe cases, this could lead to peri-implantitis. To overcome this problem, surface modification of Ti is necessary to improve its abrasion resistance. Besides, a strong implant-gingiva interface should also be guaranteed to prevent the adhesion of bacteria. In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) coating was first prepared with gas nitriding to increase surface hardness of pure the substrate. Then, the TiN was hydrothermally treated in CaCl2 solution in order to improve its soft tissue biocompatibility. The effect of hydrothermal treatment temperature on surface properties of TiN was investigated and its biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using NIH3T3 fibroblast cell. It was determined that 120°C was the critical temperature for the hydrothermal treatment condition. Treatment below 120°C could incorporate Ca into TiN surface, oxidize TiN surface partially and then improve the wettability while preserving its morphology and hardness. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were improved and cell spreading was enhanced on hydrothermally treated specimens compared with untreated ones. Improved wettability, Ca incorporation and negative surface due to interstitial N were believed to be the main reasons. Hydrothermal treatment is expected to make TiN a promising dental implant coating with excellent abrasion resistance and good soft tissue affinity. PMID:25686920

  14. Evaluation of planarization performance for a novel alkaline copper slurry under a low abrasive concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Mengting; Liu Yuling; Yuan Haobo; Chen Guodong; Liu Weijuan

    2014-01-01

    A novel alkaline copper slurry that possesses a relatively high planarization performance is investigated under a low abrasive concentration.Based on the action mechanism of CMP,the feasibility of using one type of slurry in copper bulk elimination process and residual copper elimination process,with different process parameters,was analyzed.In addition,we investigated the regular change of abrasive concentration effect on copper and tantalum removal rate and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) in CMP process.When the abrasive concentration is 3 wt%,in bulk elimination process,the copper removal rate achieves 6125 (A)/min,while WIWNU is 3.5%,simultaneously.In residual copper elimination process,the copper removal rate is approximately 2700 (A)/min,while WIWNU is 2.8%.Nevertheless,the tantalum removal rate is 0 (A)/min,which indicates that barrier layer isn't eliminated in residual copper elimination process.The planarization experimental results show that an excellent planarization performance is obtained with a relatively high copper removal rate in bulk elimination process.Meanwhile,after residual copper elimination process,the dishing value increased inconspicuously,in a controllable range,and the wafer surface roughness is only 0.326 nm (sq < 1 nm) after polishing.By comparison,the planarization performance and surface quality of alkaline slurry show almost no major differences with two kinds of commercial acid slurries after polishing.All experimental results are conducive to research and improvement of alkaline slurry in the future.

  15. The influence of aluminum and carbon on the abrasion resistance of high manganese steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckholz, Samuel August

    Abrasive wear testing of lightweight, austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C cast steel has been performed in accordance with ASTM G65 using a dry sand, rubber wheel, abrasion testing apparatus. Testing was conducted on a series of Fe-30Mn-XAl-YC-1Si-0.5Mo chemistries containing aluminum levels from 2.9 to 9.5 wt.% and carbon levels from 0.9 to 1.83 wt.%. Solution treated materials having an austenitic microstructure produced the highest wear resistance. Wear resistance decreased with higher aluminum, lower carbon, and higher hardness after age hardening. In the solution treated condition the wear rate was a strong function of the aluminum to carbon ratio and the wear rate increased with a parabolic dependence on the Al/C ratio, which ranged from 1.8 to 10.2. Examination of the surface wear scar revealed a mechanism of plowing during abrasion testing and this method of material removal is sensitive to work hardening rate. Work hardening behavior was determined from tensile tests and also decreased with increasing Al/C ratio and after aging hardening. The loss of wear resistance is related to short range ordering of Al and C in the solution treated materials and kappa-carbide precipitation in age hardened materials and both contribute to planar slip and lower work hardening rates. A high carbon tool steel (W1) and a bainitic low alloy steel (SAE 8620) were also tested for comparison. A lightweight steel containing 6.5 wt.% Al and 1.2 wt.% C has wear resistance comparable to within 5% of the bainitic SAE 8620 steel forging currently used for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle track shoe and this cast Fe-Mn-Al-C steel, at equivalent tensile properties, would be 10% lighter.

  16. Nonlinear theory of dust lattice mode coupling in dust crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kourakis, I; Kourakis, Ioannis; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2004-01-01

    Quasi-crystals formed by charged mesoscopic dust grains (dust lattices), observed since hardly a decade ago, are an exciting paradigm of a nonlinear chain. In laboratory discharge experiments, these quasi-lattices are formed spontaneously in the sheath region near a negative electrode, usually at a levitated horizontal equilibrium configuration where gravity is balanced by an electric field. It is long known (and experimentally confirmed) that dust-lattices support linear oscillations, in the longitudinal (acoustic mode) as well as in the transverse, in plane (acoustic-) or off-plane (optic-like mode) directions. Either due to the (typically Yukawa type) electrostatic inter-grain interaction forces or to the (intrinsically nonlinear) sheath environment, nonlinearity is expected to play an important role in the dynamics of these lattices. Furthermore, the coupling between the different modes may induce coupled nonlinear modes. Despite this evidence, the elucidation of the nonlinear mechanisms governing dust cr...

  17. Development of a fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) for reducing the cost of photovoltaic wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, F. (Crystal Systems, Inc., Salem, MA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    This report examines a wafer slicing technique developed by Crystal Systems, Inc. that reduces the cost of photovoltaic wafers. This fixed, abrasive slicing technique (FAST) uses a multiwire bladepack and a diamond-plated wirepack; water is the coolant. FAST is in the prototype production stage and reduces expendable material costs while retaining the advantages of a multiwire slurry technique. The cost analysis revealed that costs can be decreased by making more cuts per bladepack and slicing more wafers per linear inch. Researchers studied the degradation of bladepacks and increased wirepack life. 21 refs.

  18. HYDRO-ABRASIVE JET CLEANING TECHNOLOGY OF STEEL SHEETS DESIGNED FOR LASER CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kachanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations executed by the BNTU “Shipbuilding and hydraulics” department have shown that rather efficient implementation of the requirements to the metal sheet surface designed for laser cutting can be achieved by using hydro-abrasive jet cleaning while applying water pump equipment with the range of pressure – 20–40 MPa. Type of working fluid plays a significant role for obtaining surface of the required quality. The conducted experiments have demonstrated that the efficient solution of the assigned problems can be ensured by using a working fluid containing bentonite clay, surface-active agent polyacrylamide, soda ash and the rest water.

  19. CFD model of multiphase flow in the abrasive water jet tool

    OpenAIRE

    Říha, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using CFD fluid flow modeling in area of tools with abrasive water jet is described in the paper. The correct function of such tool is based on proper setting of multiphase flow of water, air and solid particles in the inner space of the tool. The multiphase fluid flow numerical simulation can provide information which show relation between the geometry and the flow field. Then, this stable CFD model of multiphase flow creates key to design of the tool able to work wi...

  20. Methods for the determination of platinum group elements originating from the abrasion of automotive catalytic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Ravindra, Khaiwal; Van Grieken, René

    2003-10-01

    Anthropogenic emission of platinum group elements (PGEs) from the abrasion of automotive catalytic converters into the environment has significantly increased. However, the concentration level of these PGEs (i.e. Pd, Pt, Rh) is still very low in the nature. Accordingly, their determination and speciation in various environmental compartments appears to be a challenging task for analytical chemists. The present review gives an overview of the analytical procedures documented in this particular field of analytical chemistry with a distinctive emphasis on spectrochemical methodology, it being the most sensitive and robust for accomplishing the above analytical task.

  1. Experimental Study of Bedrock Incision Processes by Both Suspended Load and Bedload Abrasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatanantavet, P.; Whipple, K. X.; Adams, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Channel incision into bedrock by both suspended load and bedload abrasions plays an important role in mountain landscape evolution. The study of erosion processes in both sediment transport regimes and their competition is therefore critical. Here we explored the dependence of experimental bedrock erosion rate on channel bed slope, water discharge, sediment flux, grain size, alluvial bed cover, and evolving channel morphology by slowly abrading weak concrete “bedrock.” In our flume, we are able to independently control bedload, suspended load, and water fluxes as well as channel slope. In the case of bedload, we also used a high-speed camera to track the saltation trajectories of coarse gravels on a smooth bed in another set of experiments and proposed new scaling relationships by including bed roughness and channel slope (separately from shear stress) for grain saltation velocity, height and length. In the case of bedload abrasion, we found that (1) all else held constant, erosion rate can (but not always) increase with channel slope in both smooth and rough bed conditions, (2) erosion rate increases with increasing grain size, and (3) erosion rate is insensitive to increasing water discharge. Thus shear stress is an inadequate metric for saltation dynamics and abrasion. In the case of suspended load abrasion, we found that (1) all else held constant, erosion occurred more in the planar bed condition than in the rough bed condition (deep grooves/slot canyons) because the erosion rate is strongly dependent on the near-bed flow (particle) velocity, (2) erosion rate increases with increasing sediment flux, and (3) perturbations (e.g., boulders) to the flow (thus creating turbulence/eddy) can greatly enhance the erosional efficiency. All else held constant (including bed morphology), the erosion rates by suspended load can account for 1.0 - 20 % (excluding the effect of flow perturbations) of those found in bedload erosion for the same sediment flux. Furthermore

  2. Studies on the Structure and Properties of Multiphase Al2O3 Abrasion-resistant Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-Ping; YU Yan; RUAN Yu-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The Al2O3 abrasion-resistant ceramics is successfully prepared by using waste aluminum sludge as the main raw material with the addition of a little clay, talc and barium carbonate. The crystal structure and microstructure of ceramic are characterized by means of XRD,SEM, etc., and the physical and mechanical properties are also tested. The results show that besides the phase of corundum, a little mullite, Mg-Al spinel and hyalophane phases also exist in the product. These phases are produced via reaction in-situ, which can inhibit the overgrowth of Al2O3grain in grain boundary, and improve the integral property of the material.

  3. Influence of traverse speed on surface irregularities created by the abrasive waterjet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Valíček

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the calculation of the optimal traverse speed for diff erent types of materials, which is very important for predication, imaginings and dimensioning of technological factors and selection of the materials with the aim to increase of surface quality at abrasive waterjet cutting (AWJ technology. The surface irregularities of the experimental used materials AISI 304, AISI 309 have been measured by non-contact shadow method. New empirically compiled equations of the infl uence of the traverse speed on tensometrical state of cut, deformation resistance of material and surface roughness Ra are at AWJ cutting available.

  4. The grain-size distribution of pyroclasts: Primary fragmentation, conduit sorting or abrasion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, U.; Schauroth, J.; Taddeucci, J.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions expel a mixture of pyroclasts and lithics. Pyroclasts, fragments of the juvenile magma, record the state of the magma at fragmentation in terms of porosity and crystallinity. The grain size distribution of pyroclasts is generally considered to be a direct consequence of the conditions at magma fragmentation that is mainly driven by gas overpressure in bubbles, high shear rates, contact with external water or a combination of these factors. Stress exerted by any of these processes will lead to brittle fragmentation by overcoming the magma's relaxation timescale. As a consequence, most pyroclasts exhibit angular shapes. Upon magma fragmentation, the gas pyroclast mixture is accelerated upwards and eventually ejected from the vent. The total grain size distribution deposited is a function of fragmentation conditions and transport related sorting. Porous pyroclasts are very susceptible to abrasion by particle-particle or particle-conduit wall interaction. Accordingly, pyroclastic fall deposits with angular clasts should proof a low particle abrasion upon contact to other surfaces. In an attempt to constrain the degree of particle interaction during conduit flow, monomodal batches of washed pyroclasts have been accelerated upwards by rapid decompression and subsequently investigated for their grain size distribution. In our set-up, we used a vertical cylindrical tube without surface roughness as conduit. We varied grain size (0.125-0.25; 0.5-1; 1-2 mm), porosity (0; 10; 30 %), gas-particle ratio (10 and 40%), conduit length (10 and 28 cm) and conduit diameter (2.5 and 6 cm). All ejected particles were collected after settling at the base of a 3.3 m high tank and sieved at one sieve size below starting size (half-Φ). Grain size reduction showed a positive correlation with starting grain size, porosity and overpressure at the vent. Although milling in a volcanic conduit may take place, porous pyroclasts are very likely to be a primary product

  5. Effect of Load on Dry Abrasive Wear in Blades of Hand Hacksaw.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Saad Saleem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the abrasive wear is calculated in the High Carbon Steel (HCS blades of Hand Hacksaw at different Loads. The wear is calculated by Mass Loss of blade before and after cutting the prepared specimen of Mild steel. The Wear is calculated for different specimen of blades at different Loads ie. 5N,10N,15N and 20N with the help of the experimental Setup prepared. The result indicates that the wear in the blades increases with the increase in load.

  6. Effect of Load on Dry Abrasive Wear in Blades of Hand Hacksaw.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Saad Saleem; Mohd Shadab Khan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the abrasive wear is calculated in the High Carbon Steel (HCS) blades of Hand Hacksaw at different Loads. The wear is calculated by Mass Loss of blade before and after cutting the prepared specimen of Mild steel. The Wear is calculated for different specimen of blades at different Loads ie. 5N,10N,15N and 20N with the help of the experimental Setup prepared. The result indicates that the wear in the blades increases with the increase in load.

  7. Influence of Utilization of High-Volumes of Class F Fly Ash on the Abrasion Resistance of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William PRINCE

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of large volumes of fly ash in various concrete applications is a becoming a more general practice in an efforts towards using large quantities of fly ash. Around the world, Class C or Class F or both as available have been used in high volumes in cement-based materials. In India, majority of fly generated is of Class F type as per ASTM C 618. Yearly fly ash generation in India is approximately 95 million tonnes. Out of which around 15-20% is utilized in cement production and cement/concrete related activities. In order to increase its percentage utilization, an investigation was carried out to use it in concrete.In this paper, abrasion resistance of high volume fly ash (HVFA concretes made with 35, 45, 55, and 65% of cement replacement was evaluated in terms of its relation with compressive strength. Comparison was made between ordinary Portland cement and fly ash concrete. Test results indicated that abrasion resistance of concrete having cement replacement up to 35 percent was comparable to the normal concrete mix with out fly ash. Beyond 35% cement replacement, fly ash concretes exhibited slightly lower resistance to abrasion relative to non-fly ash concretes. Test results further indicated that abrasion resistance of concrete is closely related with compressive strength, and had a very good correlation between abrasion resistance and compressive strength (R2 value between 0.9018 and 0.9859 depending upon age.

  8. Simulations of Mineral Dust Content With CHIMERE-Dust Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmechtig, C.; Marticorena, B.; Menut, L.; Bergametti, G.

    2006-12-01

    Simulations of the mineral dust cycle have been performed whith CHIMERE-Dust model over a domain that includes North Africa, the Mediterranean basin and the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean (10S-60N and 90W-90E) with a 1°x1° resolution using the ECMWF (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) meteorological fields for two years, 2000 and 2001. As a validation, we compare the simulated dust concentration fields with photometric data from the AERONET network. From the comparisons between the simulated and measured aerosol optical depth for several stations of the Mediterranean basin, the model appears to reproduce correctly the intensity and occurrences of the dust events. Over Western Africa, the results are not as satisfying since some of the most intense dust events observed on the continent and downwind are not captured by the model. In addition, the simulated events are generally underestimated compared to the measured ones. It appears that these differences in the model performances are connected to the origin of the dust plumes. For example, dust plumes coming from Libya are well simulated while dust plumes originating from the Bodélé depression not as frequent as intense as the observations suggest. Soil properties in these two regions are comparable and typical of very erodible surfaces. We thus focused on the comparison between the ECMWF 10m wind speed fields and 10m wind speed measured at the meteorological stations located in both areas. We noticed that over Libya, the measured and ECMWF 10m wind speed are in very good agreement, while the meteorological model does not reproduce the extrema of the measured wind speed in the Bodélé depression. We found that a crude empirical correction of the 10m wind field in the Bodélé Depression significantly improve the simulations in terms of occurrence and of intensity.

  9. Sealing Technologies for Repetitive Use in Abrasive, Electrostatic, High Vacuum Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clearly, the presence of lunar dust has the propensity for major adverse impacts on dynamic mechanical systems required for future lunar operations such as Rovers,...

  10. A numerical study on dust devils with implications to global dust budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimates of the contribution of dust devils (DDs) to the global dust budget have large uncertainties because the dust emission mechanisms in DDs are not yet well understood. In this study, a large-eddy simulation model coupled with a dust scheme is used to investigate DD dust entrainment. DDs a...

  11. Metals and dust in high redshift AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Maiolino, R; Marconi, A; Schneider, R; Bianchi, S; Pedani, M; Pipino, A; Matteucci, F; Cox, P; Caselli, P

    2006-01-01

    We summarize some recent results on the metallicity and dust properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at high redshift (110). The properties of dust in high-z QSOs are discussed within the context of the dust production mechanisms in the early universe. The dust extinction curve is observed to evolve beyond z>4, and by z~6 it is well described by the properties expected for dust produced by SNe, suggesting that the latter is the main mechanism of dust production in the early universe. We also show that the huge dust masses observed in distant QSOs can be accounted for by SN dust within the observational constraints currently available. Finally, we show that QSO winds, which have been proposed as an alternative mechanism of dust production, may also contribute significantly to the total dust budget at high redshift.

  12. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  13. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  14. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  15. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  16. Saharan Dust Pollution: Implications for the Sahel?

    OpenAIRE

    De Longueville, Florence; Henry, Sabine; Ozer, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The main source of atmospheric mineral dust is the Sahara desert, which produces about half of the yearly global mineral dust.1 About 12% of the Saharan dust moves northwards to Europe, 28% westwards to the Americas, and 60% southwards to the Gulf of Guinea. Saharan dust storms can lead to particulate matter (PM) levels that exceed internationally recommended levels. Recently, special attention has been paid to the mineral PM air pollution of dust storms, which may be a serious health threat....

  17. AN ALTERNATE METHOD TO PREVENT SAND ABRASIVE EROSION IN PIPELINES FOR TRANSPORTING HIGH-SPEED NATURAL GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an alternate method to re-move the sand carried by natural gas in the upstream pipelinestherefore preventing sand abrasive erosion in pipelines used intransporting high-speed natural gas. Conventionally, most ex-perts pay much attention to improving the anti-erosion charac-teristics of the pipeline materials to solve the problem of seri-ous abrasive erosion, but without significant success. Basedon the theory of multiphase flow and analysis of the character-istics of sandy jets, a new equipment named "Sand Catcher" isintroduced in this article. Experimental results show that theSand Catcher effectively removes most of the sand in the natu-ral gas and significantly reduces the abrasive erosion of thepipelines. The Sand Catcher can be widely applied in practicein the near future.

  18. Development of the white cast iron with niobium alloy, heat treating, to wear of the abrasive resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the heat treatment and abrasion tests results of a white cast iron with niobium alloy. The hardening heat treatment were made 950, 1000, 1050 e 110 deg C temperatures cooled by forced air. The tempering treatment were made at 450, 500 e 550 deg C temperatures. The heat treating alloy were compared, in the abrasive tests, with commercial alloys used as hardfacing by welding process in wear pieces. The abrasion tests was realized in pin on disk test. Additional tests were carried out for microstructural characterization to identify the different phases presents in the alloys. In a general way, the alloy studies showed the best wear rate for the heat treatments that results in higher hardness. It performance was superior than that of the commercial alloys. (author)

  19. Effects of enamel abrasion, salivary pellicle, and measurement angle on the optical assessment of dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Adrian; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Beyeler, Barbara; Megert, Brigitte; Meier, Christoph; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina

    2012-09-01

    The present study assessed the effects of abrasion, salivary proteins, and measurement angle on the quantification of early dental erosion by the analysis of reflection intensities from enamel. Enamel from 184 caries-free human molars was used for in vitro erosion in citric acid (pH 3.6). Abrasion of the eroded enamel resulted in a 6% to 14% increase in the specular reflection intensity compared to only eroded enamel, and the reflection increase depended on the erosion degree. Nevertheless, monitoring of early erosion by reflection analysis was possible even in the abraded eroded teeth. The presence of the salivary pellicle induced up to 22% higher reflection intensities due to the smoothing of the eroded enamel by the adhered proteins. However, this measurement artifact could be significantly minimized (pmeasurement angles from 45 to 60 deg did not improve the sensitivity of the analysis at late erosion stages. The applicability of the method for monitoring the remineralization of eroded enamel remained unclear in a demineralization/remineralization cycling model of early dental erosion in vitro.

  20. An Investigation of Abrasive Water Jet Machining on Graphite/Glass/Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Doreswamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present research work, the effect of abrasive water jet (AWJ machining parameters such as jet operating pressure, feed rate, standoff distance (SOD, and concentration of abrasive on kerf width produced on graphite filled glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite is investigated. Experiments were conducted based on Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal arrays and the process parameters were optimized to obtain small kerf. The main as well as interaction effects of the process parameters were analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA and regression models were developed to predict kerf width. The results show that the operating pressure, the SOD, and the feed rate are found to be significantly affecting the top kerf width and their contribution to kerf width is 24.72%, 12.38%, and 52.16%, respectively. Further, morphological study is made using scanning electron microscope (SEM on the samples that were machined at optimized process parameters. It was observed that AWJ machined surfaces were free from delamination at optimized process parameters.

  1. An experiment system for testing synergetic erosion caused by sand abrasion and cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced comprehensive test system, designed for testing synergetic erosion due to cavitation and sand abrasion in hydraulic machinery, is presented in this paper. This system includes an integrated test rig, control platform, and state-of-the-art measurement etc. For the integrated test system, there are three test modes, Venturi-section water tunnel, rotating disc and rotating disc with jet nozzle. The maximum velocity is 45 m/s for Venturi-section water tunnel test mode, and 85 m/s for rotating disc test mode. The pressure range for those two test modes can be regulated within -0.09 MPa∼0.6 MPa. The highest flow relative velocity is 120 m/s for rotating disc with jet nozzle test mode. All key parameters measured from the test rig, such as flow discharge, pressure, sand concentration, temperature etc, can be displayed online and processed in the control platform. This new test system provides researchers with the possibility to measure cavitation erosion, sand abrasion and the synergetic damage in hydraulic machinery. Further, flow visualization analysis, weight loss measurements and erosion outline measurements are available using the system

  2. Analysis of abrasive wear behavior of PTFE composite using Taguchi’s technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Şahin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites are widely used for structural, aerospace, and automobile sectors due to their good combination of high specific strength and specific modulus. These two main characteristics make these materials attractive, compared to conventional materials like metal or alloy ones. Some of their typical benefits include easy processing, corrosion resistance, low friction, and damping of noise and vibrations. Wear behavior of Polytetrafluoroethylenes (PTFE and its composites including glass-filled composites and carbon-filled composites are investigated using a pin-on-disc configuration. A plan of experiments in terms of Taguchi technique is carried out to acquire data in controlled way. An orthogonal array (L9 and the analysis of variance are employed to investigate the influence of process parameters on the wear of these composites. Volume loss increased with abrasive size, load, and distance. Furthermore, specific wear rate decreased with increasing grit size, load, sliding distance, whereas, slightly with compressive strength. Optimal process parameters, which minimize the volume loss, were the factor combinations of L1, G3, D1, and C3. Confirmation experiments were conducted to verify the optimal testing parameters. It was found that in terms of volume loss, there was a good agreement between the estimated and the experimental value of S/N ratio with an error of 1.604%. Moreover, abrasive size, load, and sliding distance exerted a great effect on the specific wear rate, at 51.14, 27.77, and 14.70%, respectively.

  3. Improvement of finishing antifriction treatment without abrasive of the rubbing parts surfaces of agricultural machineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Shepelenk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The wear of machines and mechanisms after rubbing is a major concern. The costs of manufacturing and restoration parts for agricultural machinery are enormous such as the trunnions pinions of hydraulic pumps. Finishing treatment antifriction without abrasive (FTAA is the existing method of manufacturing and restoration, but it has disadvantages like low work efficiency and the frequent replacement of the instrument. That is why a new method of FTAA parts type ''tree'' has been developed called vibratory finishing treatment antifriction without abrasive, (VFTAA method. The study was conducted at the laboratory of the State Technical University of Kirovograd (Ukraine where turn 16K20, the profilograph-profilometer "Talysurf-5", the scanning electron microscope REM-106I, friction machine MI-1M and the stand KI-28097-02M were used respectively for machining, study of micro relief before and after the VFTAA, microstructure, wear resistance and the determination of the break-in period of parts. The results showed that the VFTAA helped reduce the roughness Ra of the samples studied by half compared to the samples processed by polishing and 1.3 times compared to those treated with the FTAA, the break-in period has been reduced four times , this leads to an increase in the life of the hydraulic pump. This technology can be recommended for manufacturing and repair of hydraulic units of agricultural machineries.

  4. Influence of Zn (II) ion on abrasive-free polishing of hard disk substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Hong, E-mail: hong_lei2005@163.com; Zhao, Rong, E-mail: zr890804@163.com; Chen, Ruling, E-mail: chen_ruling@163.com

    2014-07-01

    With higher requirement setting for hard disk substrate to minimize roughness and defects of the polished surface, abrasive-free polishing (AFP) of hard disk substrate has been put forward in this paper. The effect of Zn (II) ion on the AFP of hard disk substrate in the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} based slurry was investigated by AFP tests. The results indicate that the material removal rate of hard disk substrate polished in slurry with Zn (II) ion is obviously higher than that without Zn (II) ion. And surface polished by slurry containing Zn (II) ion exhibits lower surface roughness and fewer nano-asperity peaks than that without Zn (II) ion. Furthermore, the acting mechanism of Zn (II) ion in AFP of hard disk substrate was analyzed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that metal Zn appears on the polished surface, implying the tribochemistry reaction occurs during AFP. The electrochemical reaction between metal Zn and oxide film Ni{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the surface of hard disk substrate during AFP can promote the chemical effect in AFP and lead to the increasing of material removal rate. - Highlights: • Zn (II) ion improves surface quality in abrasive-free polishing (AFP). • The removal rate increases with the increasing of Zn (II) ion content. • Tribo-chemistry reaction exists during AFP. • Zn (II) ion accelerates the electrochemistry reaction during AFP.

  5. Antibacterial photodynamic therapy with 808-nm laser and indocyanine green on abrasion wound models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Güney, Melike; Yuksel, Sahru; Gülsoy, Murat

    2015-02-01

    Infections with pathogens could cause serious health problems, such as septicemia and subsequent death. Some of these deaths are caused by nosocomial, chronic, or burn-related wound infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be useful for the treatment of these infections. Our aim was to investigate the antibacterial effect of indocyanine green (ICG) and 808-nm laser on a rat abrasion wound model infected with the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. Abrasion wounds were infected with a multidrug resistant clinical isolate of S. aureus. ICG concentrations of 500, 1000, and 2000 μg/ml were applied with a 450 J/cm2 energy dose. Temperature change was monitored by a thermocouple system. The remaining bacterial burden was determined by the serial dilution method after each application. Wounds were observed for 11 days posttreatment. The recovery process was assessed macroscopically. Tissue samples were also examined histologically by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Around a 90% reduction in bacterial burden was observed after PDT applications. In positive control groups (ICG-only and laser-only groups), there was no significant reduction. The applied energy dose did not cause any thermal damage to the target tissue or host environment. Results showed that ICG together with a 808-nm laser might be a promising antibacterial method to eliminate infections in animals and accelerate the wound-healing process.

  6. Comparative study for surface topography of bone drilling using conventional drilling and loose abrasive machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Jain, Vivek; Gupta, Dheeraj

    2015-03-01

    Drilling through the bone is a complicated process in orthopaedic surgery. It involves human as a part of the work so it needs better perfection and quality which leads to the sustainability. Different studies were carried out on this curious topic and some interesting results were obtained, which help the orthopaedic surgeon on the operation table. Major problems faced during bone drilling were crack initiation, thermal necrosis and burr formation. The surface topography of the bone is an indirect indication for the sustainability of bone joint. In this study, a comparison is made between conventional and a loose abrasive unconventional drilling technique for the surface characterization of the bone. The attempt has been made to show the feasibility of bone drilling with non-conventional technique and its aftereffect on the bone structure. The burr formation during conventional bone drilling was found to be more which leads to problems such as crack initiation and thermal necrosis. Scanning electrode microscope and surface roughness tester were used to characterize the surface of the fine drilled bone specimen and the results testified quite better surface finish and least crack formation while drilling with loose abrasive unconventional technique.

  7. Ultra-precision ductile grinding of BK7 using super abrasive diamond wheel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qingliang; Brinksmeier Ekkard; Riemer Oltmann; Rickens Kai

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,a novel conditioning technique using copper bonded diamond grinding wheels of 91 μm grain size and electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) is first developed to precisely and effectively condition a nickelelectroplated monolayer coarse-grained diamond grinding wheel of 151 μm grain size.Under optimised conditioning parameters,the super abrasive diamond wheel was well conditioned in terms of a minimized run-out error and flattened diamond grain surfaces of constant peripheral envelope.The conditioning force was monitored by a force transducer,while the modified wheel surface status was in-situ monitored by a coaxial optical distance measurement system.Finally,the grinding experiment on BK7 was conducted using the well-conditioned wheel with the corresponding surface morphology and subsurface damage measured by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electric microscope (SEM),respectively.The experimental result shows that the newly developed conditioning technique is applicable and feasible to ductile grinding optical glass featuring nano scale surface roughness,indicating the potential of super abrasive diamond wheels in ductile machining brittle materials.

  8. Analysis of silt abrasion of the impeller ring in a centrifugal pump with J-grooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Z. D.; Wang, Z. Y.; Guo, Z. W.; Dong, J.; Lu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The water flow and movement of silt in a prototype double-suction centrifugal pump was simulated using an Euler-Lagrange multiphase flow model. J-Grooves were adopted to protect the impeller ring from silt abrasion. The influence of J-grooves on the silt concentration and pump efficiency was analyzed. The results show that the radial component of the relative velocity around the impeller ring is too low to move the silt out of the spacing between the impeller plate and the casing. The high silt concentration around the impeller ring is the major contributor to silt abrasion of the impeller ring. The J-grooves induce two strong vortices, which increase the radial component of the relative velocity of water and reduce the silt concentration around the impeller ring, but additional friction losses are introduced and the pump efficiency is decreased. Optimization of the number and shape of J-grooves decreases losses in the efficiency of the pump, and effectively protects the impeller ring. Case 4 was found the most effective configuration in this study.

  9. Solutionizing temperature and abrasive wear behaviour of cast Al-Si-Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rajesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, N.I.T. Hamirpur, HP 177 005 (India); Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, I.I.T., Roorkee 247 667 (India); Anesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, N.I.T. Hamirpur, HP 177 005 (India); Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, I.I.T., Roorkee 247 667 (India); Dwivedi, D.K. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, I.I.T., Roorkee 247 667 (India)]. E-mail: dkd04fme@iitr.ernet.in

    2007-07-01

    In the present paper, the influence of solutionizing temperature during artificial age hardening treatment (T{sub 6}) of cast Al-(8, 12, 16%)Si-0.3%Mg on abrasive wear behaviour has been reported. Alloys were prepared by controlled melting and casting. Cast alloys were given artificial age hardening treatment having a sequence of solutionizing, quenching and artificial aging. All the alloys were solutionized at 450 deg. C, 480 deg. C, 510 deg. C, and 550 deg. C for 8 h followed by water quenching (30 deg. C) and aging hardening at 170 deg. C for 12 h. Abrasive wear tests were conducted against 320 grade SiC polishing papers at 5 N and 10 N normal loads. It was observed that the silicon content and solution temperature affected the wear resistance significantly. Increase in solution temperature improved the wear resistance. Hypereutectic alloy showed better wear resistance than the eutectic and hypoeutectic alloys under identical conditions. Optical microstructure study of alloys revealed that the increase in solutionizing temperature improved distribution of silicon grains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of wear surface was carried out to analyze the wear mechanism.

  10. Experimental investigation of abrasive electrodischarge grinding of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Święcik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work is focused on determination of effects of grinding conditions on effectiveness of abrasive electrodischarge grinding (AEDG process applied for removal of machining allowance and forming of surface geometrical texture (SGT. These results were compared with one obtained for conventional grinding.Design/methodology/approach: The experimental investigations of deep-seated surface grinding of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy using CBN grinding wheel with metal bond were the ground for this elaboration. The effectiveness of AEDG process was assessed based on specific tangential grinding force and energy of spark electric discharge and machining results were estimated on geometrical structure parameters.Findings: The effectiveness of machining allowance removal depended on conditions of AEDG process. Significant differences in SGT formed by AEDG process and conventional grinding were revealed.Practical implications: Abrasive electrodischarge grinding is useful to be particularly suitable for efficient and effective grinding of very hard structural materials such as high-alloy steel, sintered carbides, metal-based composite materials etc.Originality/value: AEDG experiments were carried out using the typical surface finishing grinder and especially adapted generator of spark discharge pulses. The majority of such experiments in the world were performed with the electrodischarge machine tool equipped with extra grinding wheel mounted on the grinding pin and functioning as one of the electrodes put into operation via pneumatic drive.

  11. Experimental Study on the Effects of Alumina Abrasive Particle Behavior in MR Polishing for MEMS Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Shin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the magnetorheological (MR polishing process has been examined asa new ultra-precision polishing technology for micro parts in MEMS applications. In theMR polishing process, the magnetic force plays a dominant role. This method uses MRfluids which contains micro abrasives as a polishing media. The objective of the presentresearch is to shed light onto the material removal mechanism under various slurryconditions for polishing and to investigate surface characteristics, including shape analysisand surface roughness measurement, of spots obtained from the MR polishing process usingalumina abrasives. A series of basic experiments were first performed to determine theoptimum polishing conditions for BK7 glass using prepared slurries by changing the processparameters, such as wheel rotating speed and electric current. Using the obtained results,groove polishing was then performed and the results are investigated. Outstanding surfaceroughness of Ra=3.8nm was obtained on the BK7 glass specimen. The present resultshighlight the possibility of applying this polishing method to ultra-precision micro partsproduction, especially in MEMS applications.

  12. An Assessment on the Production of Abrasive Sandpaper from Locally Sourced Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.U. Obot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of abrasive sandpaper made from two locally sourced and easily available materials, periwinkle and palm kernel shells was carried out to evaluate their viability as replacements for foreign imported abrasives sandpaper. Composites of crushed shells with polyester resin bond were developed separately for the periwinkle and palm kernel shell samples using mould compression, and the sandpaper prototype was produced using hand-spray method. A study on the physico-mechanical properties of the produced composite carried out was found that at 12 wt.% content of resin, periwinkle shell (PWS/resin composites had higher physico-mechanical properties such as density with 77.74 % difference, hardness with 17.13 % difference and compressive strength with 182.42 % difference over the palm kernel shell-resin composites. Water absorption for palm kernel (PKS shell/resin composite was a 186.59 % difference over the PWS/resin composite. Surface morphology using SEM revealed PWS/resin composite to have less distortional effects on the grains from compressive force of 15.7 N/mm2 applied compared to the palm kernel shell grains, and also shows PWS grains held together in close packing by the resin bond. The concentration used for sandpaper production was 87 wt.% of periwinkle shell grains to 12 wt.% of resin. The obtained physical and mechanical properties were compared to garnet sandpaper and found to be close to acceptable standards.

  13. The importance of extractives and abrasives in wood materials on the wearing of cutting tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayan Darmawan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available For many wood cutting processes, the interest of high-speed tool steels and tungsten carbides remains very important because of their good tool edge accuracy and easy grinding. The wear of high-speed steel and tungsten carbide is an important economic parameter. Wood extractives and silica have a potential adverse effect on tool wear. Rapid chemical wearing due to corrosion and mechanical wearing has been attributed to the presence of extractives and silica in wood and wood composites. This paper presents the wear characteristics of SKH51 high-speed steel and K10 tungsten carbide caused by extractive and abrasive materials present in the lesser-known Tapi-Tapi wood and wood composites of wood cement board, particleboard, MDF, and oriented strand board (OSB. Experimental results showed that wearing of the cutting tools tested was determined by extractives and silica contained in the wood and wood composites. Wood cement board, which is high in silica content, caused severe damage to the cutting edge of the high-speed steel. A corrosion/oxidation mechanism was found to contribute to the wear of SKH51 and K10 when cutting the Tapi-Tapi wood, MDF, particleboard, wood cement board, and OSB. The silica and extractives determined the abrasion and corrosion wear mechanism to a varying degree.

  14. U-Pb dating by zircon dissolution method using chemical abrasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takehara, Lucy, E-mail: lucytakehara@gmail.com.br [Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM), Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Chemale Junior, Farid [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Lab. de Geocronologia; Hartmann, Leo A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Dussin, Ivo A.; Kawashita, Koji [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP, (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Geocronologicas

    2012-06-15

    Chemical abrasion was carried out on zircons grains of the Temora II standard for U-Pb dating prior to analyses using in situ Laser Ablation-Multi Collector Ion Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (LA-ICPMS) followed by the Isotope Dissolution Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (ID-TIMS) method. The proposed methodology was herein applied in order to reduce primarily the effects of secondary Pb loss, the presence of common lead and/or silicate impurities. Nine Temora II zircon grains were analyzed by the laser ablation method yielding an age of 418.3 +- 4.3 Ma. Zircon grains of a same population were separated for chemical abrasion before dissolution and mass spectrometry analyses. Six fractions of them were separated for isotope dissolution using {sup 235}U-{sup 205}Pb mixed spike after we have checked and assured the laboratory conditions of low blank values for total Pb of less than 2 pg/g. The obtained U-Pb zircon age by the ID-TIMS method was 415.7 +- 1.8 Ma (error 0.43 %) based on four successful determinations. The results are consistent with the published ages for the Temora diorite (Temora I - 416.75 +- 1.3 Ma; Temora II - 416.78 +- 0.33 Ma) and established as 416 +- 0.33 Ma. The technique is thus recommended for high precision U-Pb zircon analyses (error < 1 %), mainly for high resolution stratigraphic studies of Phanerozoic sequences. (author)

  15. Effect of Heat Treatment of Wild Cherry Wood on Abrasion Resistance and Withdrawal Capacity of Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan Aytin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In its wise use, many properties of wood are important. Among these properties, wood abrasion resistance (AR and withdrawal capacity of screws (WCS are deemed to be relatively signifi cant. It is well know that heat treatment changes the resistance features of wooden materials by changing the structural characteristics of wood. Within the scope of this study, the effects were investigated of the temperature and duration of heat treatment of Wild Cherry (Cerasus avium (L. Monench on its AR and its WCS in the radial direction and tangential direction. The test results indicated that weight loss (WL and thickness reduction (TR remained almost the same in the radial direction specimen, but there was significant TR in the tangential direction specimen. As a result of these changes, the abrasion effect of the S-42 abrader diminished based on the increase in the number of cycles. However, in both the radial and tangential direction, the WCS decreased to a significantly greater extent in the heat-treated specimens than in the control specimens.

  16. Controlled wear of vitrified abrasive materials for precision grinding applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M J Jackson; B Mills; M P Hitchiner

    2003-10-01

    The study of bonding hard materials such as aluminium oxide and cubic boron nitride (BN) and the nature of interfacial cohesion between these materials and glass is very important from the perspective of high precision grinding. Vitrified grinding wheels are typically used to remove large volumes of metal and to produce components with very high tolerances. It is expected that the same grinding wheel is used for both rough and finish machining operations. Therefore, the grinding wheel, and in particular its bonding system, is expected to react differently to a variety of machining operations. In order to maintain the integrity of the grinding wheel, the bonding system that is used to hold abrasive grains in place reacts differently to forces that are placed on individual bonding bridges. This paper examines the role of vitrification heat treatment on the development of strength between abrasive grains and bonding bridges, and the nature of fracture and wear in vitrified grinding wheels that are used for precision grinding applications.

  17. Suspended dust in Norwegian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to calculations, at least 80 000 people in Oslo and 8 000 in Trondheim were annoyed by too much suspended dust in 2000. The dust concentration is greatest in the spring, presumably because dust is swirling up from melting snow and ice on the streets. Car traffic is the main source of the dust, except for some of the most highly exposed regions where wood-firing from old stoves contributes up to 70 percent of the dust. National targets for air quality include suspended dust, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Calculations show that nitrogen dioxide emissions exceeding the limit affected 4 000 people in Oslo and 1 000 people in Trondheim. The sulphur dioxide emissions in the major cities did non exceed the national quality limit; they did exceed the limit in some of the smaller industrial centres. In Trondheim, measurements show that the national limit for benzene was exceeded. Most of the emission of nitrogen dioxide comes from the road traffic. Local air pollution at times causes considerable health- and well-being problems in the larger cities and industrial centres, where a great part of the population may be at risk of early death, infection of the respiratory passage, heart- and lung diseases and cancer

  18. The Student Dust Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Bagenal, F.; Finley, T.; Christensen, F.; Holland, G.; Bryant, C.; Bunch, N.; Neeland, M.; Chanthawanich, T.; Fernandez, A.; Hoxie, V.; Jenkins, A.; Vaudrin, C.; Krauss, E.; Krauss, O.; Crayton, J.; James, D.; Krauss, C.; Mitchell, C.; Colgan, M.; Grogan, B.; Christofferson, J.

    2005-12-01

    This talk will describe the scientific goals, the technical, and the human challenges of the Student Dust Counter (SDC) experiment for the New Horizons Mission to Pluto. CU's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) organized a team of students to design, fabricate, test, calibrate, and fly SDC, one of seven science instruments onboard New Horizons. The student team was responsible for all phases of this development under the supervision of LASP professionals. Both undergraduate and graduate students worked on this project, representing a variety of disciplines, including Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Journalism, and Business. The SDC project is part of the EPO effort of the New Horizons mission. Though it is a student project, the requirements for passing all standard NASA milestones for reviews were identical to other experiments. The students performed at a professional level and SDC was delivered on time and within budget. It is now integrated to the spacecraft awaiting the scheduled launch in January of 2006. To date, SDC provided a group of about 20 students an opportunity to learn first hand how to build instruments, and graduate with years of experience in space exploration.

  19. Rock Abrasion and Ventifact Formation on Mars from Field Analog, Theoretical, and Experimental Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N. T.; Laity, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks observed by the Viking Landers and Pathfinder Lander/Sojourner rover exhibit a suite of perplexing rock textures. Among these are pits, spongy textures, penetrative flutes, lineaments, crusts, and knobs Fluvial, impact, chemical alteration, and aeolian mechanisms have been proposed for many of these. In an effort to better understand the origin and characteristics of Martian rock textures, abraded rocks in the Mojave Desert and other regions have been studied. We find that most Martian rock textures, as opposed to just a few, bear close resemblance to terrestrial aeolian textures and can most easily be explained by wind, not other, processes. Flutes, grooves, and some pits on Mars are consistent with abrasion by saltating particles, as described previously. However, many other rock textures probably also have an aeolian origin. Sills at the base of rocks that generally lie at high elevations, such as Half Dome, are consistent with such features on Earth that are related to moats or soil ramps that shield the basal part of the rock from erosion. Crusts consisting of fluted fabrics, such as those on Stimpy and Chimp, are similar to fluted crusts on Earth that spall off over time. Knobby and lineated rocks are similar to terrestrial examples of heterogeneous rocks that differentially erode. The location of specific rock textures on Mars also gives insight into their origin. Many of the most diagnostic ventifacts found at the Pathfinder site are located on rocks that lie near the crests or the upper slopes of ridges. On Earth, the most active ventifact formation occurs on sloped or elevated topography, where windflow is accelerated and particle kinetic energy and flux are increased. Integrated 0 together, these observations point to significant aeolian 0 modification of rocks on Mars and cast doubt on whether many primary textures resulting from other processes are preserved. Experimental simulations of abrasion in the presence of abundant sand indicate that

  20. Microleakage of compomer restorations in primary teeth after preparation with bur or air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysegül, Olmez; Nurhan, Oztas; Haluk, Bodur; Dilek, Tüfekçioglu

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the degree of marginal leakage of a compomer in Class V cavities of human primary molars prepared by a conventional dental bur and air abrasion with or without acid etching. Fifty-six non-carious extracted primary molars were randomly divided into four groups (n=14) to be prepared by four techniques: Group-1: Bur followed by acid etching: Class V cavity preparations were placed on the buccal surfaces of each tooth using a high-speed handpiece. The preparations were 1.5-mm deep, 3-mm long and 2-mm wide, with the occlusal margin in enamel and the cervical margin extending 0.5 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The preparations were acid etched with 37% phosphoric acid starting at the enamel margins for 30 seconds and rinsed with water for 20 seconds. The preparations were then restored with Compoglass F. 2-Group 2: Bur: The preparations and the treatment procedures were the same as in Group 1, with the exception of 37% phosphoric acid application. Group 3: Air abrasion followed by acid etching: Class V cavity preparations were placed on the buccal surfaces of each tooth using a handpiece of an air-abrasive system (PrepStart, Danville Engineering). The system was supplied with dry compressed air at 80 psi. In all tests, the air-abrasion system was operated with an 80 degrees-angle handpiece tip and 50-mm aluminum oxide particles. A tip with a 0.38-mm inner diameter was used at a 2-mm distance. The treatment procedures were the same as in Groups 1 and 2. Group 4: Air abrasion: The preparations and treatment procedures were the same as in Group 3, with the exception of 37% phosphoric acid. After finishing the restorations, the teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The samples were thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with a dwell time of 30 seconds. The samples were then immersed in 0.5 percent basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. The surface-adhered dye was then rinsed in tap

  1. Modeling effects of abrasive particle size and concentration on material removal at molecular scale in chemical mechanical polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel material removal model as a function of abrasive particle size and concentration was established in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) based on molecular scale mechanism, micro-contact mechanics and probability statistics. A close-form equation was firstly developed to calculate the number of effective particles. It found nonlinear dependences of removal rate on the particle size and concentration, being qualitatively agreement with the published experimental data. The nonlinear relation results from the couple relationship among abrasive number, slurry concentration and surface atoms' binding energy with the particle size. Finally, the system parameters such as the operational conditions and materials properties were incorporated into the model as well.

  2. Studies on parametric optimization for abrasive water jet machining of Al7075-TiB2 in-situ composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavya, J. T.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Pradeep Kumar, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on optimization and determination of significant process parameter for Abrasive Water Jet Machining of Al7075-TiB2metal matrix composite. Al-TiB2 metal matrix composite is synthesized by stir casting using in-situ technique. Optimization of machining parameters is done using Taguchi's L25orthogonal array for the experimental trials, with cutting speed, stand-off distance and Abrasive Flow rate as input parameters at five different levels. Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA) method is used for identifying the effect of machining parameters on volumetric material removal rate, surface roughness and dimensional accuracy. Then the results are validated by conducting verification experiments.

  3. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  4. Dust Particle Size Distributions during Spring in Yinchuan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangfeng Shao; Jiandong Mao

    2016-01-01

    Dust particle size distributions in Yinchuan, China, were measured during March and April 2014, using APS-3321 sampler. The distributions were measured under different dust conditions (background, floating dust, blowing dust, and dust storm) and statistical analyses were performed. The results showed that, under different dust conditions, the instantaneous number concentrations of dust particles differed widely. For example, during blowing sand and dust storm conditions, instantaneous dust pa...

  5. Ice nucleation by soil dust compared to desert dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehler, O.; Steinke, I.; Ullrich, R.; Höhler, K.; Schiebel, T.; Hoose, C.; Funk, R.

    2015-12-01

    A minor fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles, so-called ice-nucleating particles (INPs), initiates the formation of the ice phase in tropospheric clouds and thereby markedly influences the Earth's weather and climate systems. Whether an aerosol particle acts as an INP depends on its size, morphology and chemical compositions. The INP fraction of certain aerosol types also strongly depends on the temperature and the relative humidity. Because both desert dust and soil dust aerosols typically comprise a variety of different particles, it is difficult to assess and predict their contribution to the atmospheric INP abundance. This requires both accurate modelling of the sources and atmospheric distribution of atmospheric dust components and detailed investigations of their ice nucleation activities. The latter can be achieved in laboratory experiments and parameterized for use in weather and climate models as a function of temperature and particle surface area, a parameter called ice-nucleation active site (INAS) density. Concerning ice nucleation activity studies, the soil dust is of particular interest because it contains a significant fraction of organics and biological components, both with the potential for contributing to the atmospheric INP abundance at relatively high temperatures compared to mineral components. First laboratory ice nucleation experiments with a few soil dust samples indicated their INP fraction to be comparable or slightly enhanced to that of desert dust. We have used the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud simulation chamber to study the immersion freezing ability of four different arable soil dusts, sampled in Germany, China and Argentina. For temperatures higher than about -20°C, we found the INP fraction of aerosols generated from these samples by a dry dispersion technique to be significantly higher compared to various desert dust aerosols also investigated in AIDA experiments. In this contribution, we

  6. Effect of Thermionic Emission on Dust-Acoustic Solitons in a Dust-Electron Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Li-Wen; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons with a very small but finite amplitude in a dustelectron plasma are studied using the reductive perturbation technique. The self-consistent variation of dust charge is taken into account. It is shown that the thermionic emission could significantly increase the dust positive charge. The dependences of the phase velocity, amplitude, and width of such solitons on the dust temperature and the dust work function of dust material are plotted and discussed.

  7. The abrasive wear dependence research on chemical constitution, hardness and resistance of alloy cast steel Cr-Mo-V-Cu-Ni type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the work there are research program elements, alloying elements contents influence on abrasive wear for hot work. The aim of research is to define the hardness influence, resistance and contents of Cr, Mo, V on alloy cast steel abrasive wear Cr-Mo-V-Cu-Ni. (author)

  8. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-10-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  9. Elemental tracers for Chinese source dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小曳; 张光宇; 朱光华; 张德二; 安芷生; 陈拓; 黄湘萍

    1996-01-01

    The mass-particle size distributions of 10 dust-carrying elements in aerosol particles were determined tor 12 sites in desert regions of northern China. The desert dust is proved to he of origin of eolian loess deposited on the Loess Plateau. Their transport to the loess was mainly attributable to the non-dust storm processes under the interglacial climate condition. The impact ot" dust storm on the accumulation of the loess increased in the glacial stage. On the basis of the signatures of 4 dust elements (Al. Fe, Mg and Sc). Chinese dust is believed to have 3 major desert sources (northwestern deserts, northern high dust deserts and northern low dust deserts). With a chemical element balance model, an elemental tracer system is established to proportion the export of China-source dust.

  10. 2002 Kuiper prize lecture: Dust Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Krüger, Harald; Kempf, Sascha; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg

    2005-03-01

    Dust particles, like photons, carry information from remote sites in space and time. From knowledge of the dust particles' birthplace and their bulk properties, we can learn about the remote environment out of which the particles were formed. This approach is called "Dust Astronomy" which is carried out by means of a dust telescope on a Dust Observatory in space. Targets for a dust telescope are the local interstellar medium and nearby star forming regions, as well as comets and asteroids. Dust from interstellar and interplanetary sources is distinguished by accurately sensing their trajectories. Trajectory sensors may use the electric charge signals that are induced when charged grains fly through the detector. Modern in-situ dust impact detectors are capable of providing mass, speed, physical and chemical information of dust grains in space. A Dust Observatory mission is feasible with state-of-the-art technology. It will (1) provide the distinction between interstellar dust and interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin, (2) determine the elemental composition of impacting dust particles, and (3) monitor the fluxes of various dust components as a function of direction and particle masses.

  11. Road dust from pavement wear and traction sanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.

    2007-07-01

    sanding and physical properties of the traction sand aggregate affect formation of road dust (ii) How do studded tires affect the formation of road dust when compared with friction tires (iii) What are the composition and sources of airborne road dust in a road simulator and during a springtime road dust episode in Finland (iv) What is the size distribution of abrasion particles from tire-road interaction. The studies were conducted both in a road simulator and in field conditions. The test results from the road simulator showed that traction sanding increased road dust emissions, and that the effect became more dominant with increasing sand load. A high percentage of fine-grained anti-skid aggregate of overall grading increased the PM10 concentrations. Anti-skid aggregate with poor resistance to fragmentation resulted in higher PM levels compared with the other aggregates, and the effect became more significant with higher aggregate loads. Glaciofluvial aggregates tended to cause higher particle concentrations than crushed rocks with good fragmentation resistance. Comparison of tire types showed that studded tires result in higher formation of PM emissions compared with friction tires. The same trend between the tires was present in the tests with and without anti-skid aggregate. This finding applies to test conditions of the road simulator with negligible resuspension. Source and composition analysis showed that the particles in the road simulator were mainly minerals and originated from both traction sand and pavement aggregates. A clear contribution of particles from anti-skid aggregate to ambient PM and dust deposition was also observed in urban conditions. The road simulator results showed that the interaction between tires, anti-skid aggregate and road surface is important in dust production and the relative contributions of these sources depend on their properties. Traction sand grains are fragmented into smaller particles under the tires, but they also wear the

  12. Four Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Fougeray, P.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Heck, P. R.; Jillier, J. K.; Hoppe, P.; Howard, L.; Hudson, B.; Huss, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approx. 0.1 sq m in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m/day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described . A summary of analytical techniques is described.

  13. Effect of filler type on 3-body abrasion of dental composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The relatively poor wear resistance of dental composite in stress bearing posterior situations has restricted wider clinical application of this restorative material. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the three body abrasive wear of a dental composite based on a new filler (leucite: KAl Si2O6 and to compare it with the wear resistance of a composite based on commonly used Aluminium – Barium Silicate filler. Materials and Methods: This research was an interventional study done in Iran polymer institute. Five specimens were considered in each group. All ceramic IPS Empress® (Ivoclar- Vivadent ingots based on leucite crystals were ball milled, passed through an 800 sieve and used as filler. Experimental composites were prepared by mixing the silane- treated fillers with monomers (BisGMA and TEGDMA. Camphorquinone and amine were used as photoinitiator system. Degree of conversion of the light-cured and post-cured composites was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. The prepared pastes were inserted into plexy-glass mold and light cured (700 mw/cm2, 40 s. Then for maximum degree of conversion specimens were post- cured (120ºC, 5 hours. Three body abrasion wear testing was performed using a wear machine with 50 rpm rotational movement. In this machine, pumice (150 meshes was used as the third body. Weight loss of specimens in each group was measured by balance after each 50 hours. After wear testing SEM examination was made specimens in each group. The data were analyzed and compared using ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P<0.05. Tetric Ceram was tested as commercial composite. Results: There were significantly differences between three body abrasive wear of composites. The ranking from lowest to highest was as follows: leucite composite (19% < Tetric Ceram (22% < glass composite (28%. leucite composite showed the highest wear resistance value, propably due to the crystalliniy and hardness of filler. Conclusion

  14. Abrasive wear of BA1055 bronze with additives of Si, Cr, Mo and/or W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Pisarek

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium bronzes belong to the high-grade constructional materials applied on the put under strongly load pieces of machines, aboutgood sliding, resistant properties on corrosion both in the cast state how and after the thermal processing. It moves to them Cr and Si in the aim of the improvement of their usable proprieties. The additions Mo and/or W were not applied so far. It was worked out therefore the new kind of bronzes casting including these elements. Make additions to the Cu-Al-Fe-Ni bronze of Si, Cr, Mo and/or W in the rise of these properties makes possible. The investigations of the surface distribution of the concentration of elements in the microstructure of the studied bronze on X-ray microanalyzer were conducted. It results from conducted investigations, that in the aluminium bronze BA1055 after makes additions Si, Cr, Mo and/or W the phases of the type κFe, κNi crystallize, probably as complex silicides. Elements such as: Fe and Si dissolve first of all in phases κ, in smaller stage in the matrix of the bronze; Mn, Ni and W they dissolve in matrix and phases κ. It dissolves Cr and Mo in the larger stage in phases κ than in the matrix. The sizes of the abrasive wear were compared in the state cast multicomponentnew casting Cu-Al-Fe-Ni bronzes with the additives Cr, Mo or W with the wear of the bronze CuAl10Fe5Ni5Si. The investigations of thewear were conducted on the standard device. It results from conducted investigations, that make additions to bronze BA1055 of the additives of Si, Cr, Mo, and/or W it influences the rise of the hardness (HB of the bronze in the cast state, in the result of the enlarged quantity separates of hard phases κ, and in the consequence the decrease of the abrasive wear. The addition of molybdenum made possible obtainment of the microhardness of the phase α and γ 2 on the comparable level. From the microstructure of the bronze CuAl10Fe5Ni5MoSi is characterizes the smallest abrasive wear among

  15. Abrasion and fatigue resistance of PDMS containing multiblock polyurethanes after accelerated water exposure at elevated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Kimberly A; Wilson, Charles L; Himes, Adam K; Dawson, James W; Haddad, Tarek D; Buckalew, Adam J; Miller, Jennifer P; Untereker, Darrel F; Simha, Narendra K

    2013-11-01

    Segmented polyurethane multiblock polymers containing polydimethylsiloxane and polyether soft segments form tough and easily processed thermoplastic elastomers (PDMS-urethanes). Two commercially available examples, PurSil 35 (denoted as P35) and Elast-Eon E2A (denoted as E2A), were evaluated for abrasion and fatigue resistance after immersion in 85 °C buffered water for up to 80 weeks. We previously reported that water exposure in these experiments resulted in a molar mass reduction, where the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction is supported by a straight forward Arrhenius analysis over a range of accelerated temperatures (37-85 °C). We also showed that the ultimate tensile properties of P35 and E2A were significantly compromised when the molar mass was reduced. Here, we show that the reduction in molar mass also correlated with a reduction in both the abrasion and fatigue resistance. The instantaneous wear rate of both P35 and E2A, when exposed to the reciprocating motion of an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) jacketed cable, increased with the inverse of the number averaged molar mass (1/Mn). Both materials showed a change in the wear surface when the number-averaged molar mass was reduced to ≈ 16 kg/mole, where a smooth wear surface transitioned to a 'spalling-like' pattern, leaving the wear surface with ≈ 0.3 mm cracks that propagated beyond the contact surface. The fatigue crack growth rate for P35 and E2A also increased in proportion to 1/Mn, after the molar mass was reduced below a critical value of ≈30 kg/mole. Interestingly, this critical molar mass coincided with that at which the single cycle stress-strain response changed from strain hardening to strain softening. The changes in both abrasion and fatigue resistance, key predictors for long term reliability of cardiac leads, after exposure of this class of PDMS-urethanes to water suggests that these materials are susceptible to mechanical compromise in vivo.

  16. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  17. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  18. Small-Scale Morphological Features on a Solid Surface Processed by High-Pressure Abrasive Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Kang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Being subjected to a high-pressure abrasive water jet, solid samples will experience an essential variation of both internal stress and physical characteristics, which is closely associated with the kinetic energy attached to the abrasive particles involved in the jet stream. Here, experiments were performed, with particular emphasis being placed on the kinetic energy attenuation and turbulent features in the jet stream. At jet pressure of 260 MPa, mean velocity and root-mean-square (RMS velocity on two jet-stream sections were acquired by utilizing the phase Doppler anemometry (PDA technique. A jet-cutting experiment was then carried out with Al-Mg alloy samples being cut by an abrasive water jet. Morphological features and roughness on the cut surface were quantitatively examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and optical profiling techniques. The results indicate that the high-pressure water jet is characterized by remarkably high mean flow velocities and distinct velocity fluctuations. Those irregular pits and grooves on the cut surfaces indicate both the energy attenuation and the development of radial velocity components in the jet stream. When the sample is positioned with different distances from the nozzle outlet, the obtained quantitative surface roughness varies accordingly. A descriptive model highlighting the behaviors of abrasive particles in jet-cutting process is established in light of the experimental results and correlation analysis.

  19. Abrasion-resistant solgel antireflective films with a high laser-induced damage threshold for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Dong; Sun, Yu Han; Huang, Zu Xing; Jiang, Xiao Dong; Wei, Xiao Feng; Li, Zhi Hong; Dong, Bao Zhong; Wu, Zhong Hua

    2005-09-01

    To prepare abrasion-resistant antireflective (AR) films for inertial confinement fusion, four solgel routes have been investigated on polysiloxane-modified and polyvinylalcohol- (PVA-) modified SiO2 sols. As confirmed with a transmissive electron microscope, different fractal structure characteristics of the modified SiO2 particles are disclosed by small-angle x-ray scattering technology. And it is these special fractal characteristics that determine the performance of AR films on the level of internal microstructure. A 29Si magic angle spinning and nuclear magnetic resonance study has been successfully applied in explaining the fractal microstructure and its relation to the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of AR films. The films modified by PVA120000 or acetic acid-catalyzed polysiloxane have higher LIDTs than those films modified by PVA16000 or hydrochloride acid-catalyzed polysiloxane. The films from PVA-modified SiO2 sols have a stronger abrasion resistance but lower antireflection than those films from polysiloxane-modified SiO2 sols. In addition, the films from polysiloxane-modified SiO2 sols can possess high transmittance and high LIDT if the polysiloxane synthesis condition is appropriately chosen, but the abrasion resistance is not as good as that from PVA modification. If strong abrasion resistance is necessary, a possible resolution may be to choose a more appropriate hydrophilic polymer than PVA. If not, polysiloxane-modified silica sol can also work when polysiloxane is synthesized under acetic acid catalysis.

  20. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Yuhe, E-mail: zyh1120@hotmail.co.jp [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Wang Wei; Jia Xingya [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Liao, Susan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Watari, Fumio [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl{sub 4} + CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 {mu}m thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.

  1. The influence of chemical constitution on abrasive wear of alloy cast steel Cr, Mo, V, Cu, Ni type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the work were presented some elements of a wide research programme of the influence of alloying element contents such as Cr, Mo, V on the abrasive wear of hot working cast steel. The dependence between the mass decrement quantity and the element contents on cast steel structure were shown. (author)

  2. Neutrophil (PMN) surface contact with keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse: a novel role for ICAM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneal epithelial abrasion is associated with an inflammatory response that involves PMN recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. Previously, in the injured mouse cornea, we showed that migrating PMNs not only make contact with collagen, but they also make extensive surface cont...

  3. Evaluation of Parameters Affecting Magnetic Abrasive Finishing on Concave Freeform Surface of Al Alloy via RSM Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Vahdati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The attempts of researchers in industries to obtain accurate and high quality surfaces led to the invention of new methods of finishing. Magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF is a relatively new type of finishing in which the magnetic field is used to control the abrasive tools. Applications such as the surface of molds are ones of the parts which require very high surface smoothness. Usually this type of parts has freeform surface. In this study, the effect of magnetic abrasive process parameters on freeform surfaces of parts made of aluminum is examined. This method is obtained through combination of magnetic abrasive process and Control Numerical Computer (CNC. The use of simple hemisphere for installation on the flat area of the magnets as well as magnets’ spark in curve form is a measure done during testing the experiments. The design of experiments is based on response surface methodology. The gap, the rotational speed of the spindle, and the feed rate are found influential and regression equations governing the process are also determined. The impact of intensity of the magnetic field is obtained using the finite element software of Maxwell. Results show that in concave areas of the surface, generally speaking, the surface roughness decreases to 0.2 μm from its initial 1.3 μm roughness. However, in some points the lowest surface roughness of 0.08 μm was measured.

  4. Clinical study on the removal of gingival melanin pigmentation: comparison between Nd:YAG laser ablation and mechanical abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanin pigmentation occurs as a result of excessive deposition of melanin, produced by the melanocytes present in the basal layer of the epithelium. This study compares clinical parameters such as inflammation and/or hemorrhage, healing process and re-pigmentation, caused by the Nd:YAG laser ablation and the mechanical abrasion of the melanin, by means of photographic images, taken during the first 30 days after the treatment. The patients comfort was monitored during the first ten days after the treatment using the method of the Visual Analog Scale to measure the pain. Six patients with gingival melanin pigmentation were selected. The left upper gingival quadrant was treated with the Nd:YAG laser using 125 mJ per pulse and 20 Hz, the right upper gingival quadrant received mechanical abrasion and the lower quadrants served for control. Both techniques did not result in inflammation and/or hemorrhage. The healing process was slower with the laser. Using mechanical abrasion, ali patients showed remaining pigmentation or re-pigmentation of varying intensity after a period of 30 days. With the laser 50 % of the patients did not show any re-pigmentation after this period. The pain analysis showed that the pain sensed 24 hours after the treatment with the laser is higher than using mechanical abrasion. (author)

  5. Fabrication of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools using a LIGA-like technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sheng-Yih; Yu, Tsung-Han; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2007-06-01

    A manufacturing process of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools using a LIGA-like technology is reported here. The thickness of JSR THB-151N resist coated on an aluminum alloy substrate for micro lithography can reach up to 110 µm. During the lithography, different geometrical photomasks were used to create specific design patterns of the resist mold on the substrate. Micro roots, made by electrolytic machining on the substrate with guidance of the resist mold, can improve the adhesion of micro nickel abrasive pellets electroplated on the substrate. During the composite electroforming, the desired hardness of the nickel matrix inside the micro diamond abrasive pellets can be obtained by the addition of leveling and stress reducing agents. At moderate blade agitation and ultrasonic oscillation, higher concentration and more uniform dispersion of diamond powders deposited in the nickel matrix can be achieved. With these optimal experiment conditions of this fabrication process, the production of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools is demonstrated.

  6. Effect of sodium bicarbonate air abrasive polishing on resistance to sliding during tooth alignment and leveling: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge C. B. L. Filho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the Resistance to Sliding (RS provided by metallic brackets and 3 types of orthodontic wires (TMA, SS and NiTi, before and after the use of sodium bicarbonate airborne particle abrasion, in an experimental model with 3 non leveled brackets. Materials and Methods: The bicarbonate airborne abrasion was applied perpendicularly to the bracket slots at a distance of 2 mm, for 5 seconds (T2 and 10 seconds (T3 on each bracket slot. In a universal testing machine, the wires were pulled through a set of 3 non leveled brackets at a cross head speed of 50 mm/min for a distance of 10 mm, and static and kinetic friction readings were registered at T1 (no airborne abrasion, T2 and T3. Results: For all tested wires, a significant RS increase between T1 and T3 (P<0.001 was seen. For SS and TMA wires, there was a statistically significant RS increase between T1 and T2 (P<0.001. Between T2 and T3, RS increase was significant for TMA (P<0.001 and NiTiwires (P<0.05. Conclusions: Sodium bicarbonate air abrasive polishing during orthodontic treatment is not recommended, once this procedure promoted a significant RS increase between the metallic brackets and all the three types of wires tested.

  7. In vitro evaluation of human dental enamel surface roughness bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide and submitted to abrasive dentifrice brushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worschech Claudia Cia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of human enamel bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide at different times and submitted to different superficial cleaning treatments: G1 - not brushed; G2 - brushed with fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G3 - brushed with a non-fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G4 - brushed without dentifrice. Sixty fragments of human molar teeth with 4 x 4 mm were obtained using a diamond disc. The specimens were polished with sandpaper and abrasive pastes. A perfilometer was used to measure roughness average (Ra values of the initial surface roughness and at each 7-day-interval after the beginning of treatment. The bleaching was performed on the surface of the fragments for 1 hour a week, and the surface cleaning treatment for 3 minutes daily. The samples were stored in individual receptacles with artificial saliva. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test revealed significant differences in surface roughness values for G2 and G3, which showed an increase in roughness over time; G1 and G4 showed no significant roughness differences. The bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide did not alter the enamel surface roughness, but when the bleaching treatment was performed combined with brushing with abrasive dentifrices, there was a significant increase in roughness values.

  8. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. ► The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. ► Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl4 + CH4 + H2 gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 μm thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.

  9. Evaluation of two soft manual toothbrushes with different filament designs in relation to gingival abrasion and plaque removing efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Versteeg; N.A.M. Rosema; M.F. Timmerman; U. van der Velden; G.A. van der Weijden

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of two soft manual toothbrushes with different filament and brush head designs in relation to gingival abrasion and plaque removing efficacy to the in relation flat trimmed manual reference toothbrush of the American Dental Association (ADA). Methods: The study had

  10. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  11. Evaluation of abrasive grit - high-pressure water decontamination. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is associated with a comprehensive review of various chemical and mechanical decontamination methods being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute. The primary goal of this review is to identify potential state-of-the-art methods for use in decontamination of fluid systems at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) facility. The particular method addressed in this study is an abrasive grit/high-pressure water technique developed primarily for decontamination of steam generator channel heads. Included in the report is a description of the system and summaries of field experience to date. Also included are general guidelines, criteria, and pertinent parameters which must be considered in the application of this decontamination method as well as a general assessment of the applicability of this process to various components and systems

  12. Magnetic force improvement and parameter optimization for magnetic abrasive polishing of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic force acting on workpieee to be machined plays a significantly important role in magnetic abrasive polishing process.But in a case of polishing nonferrous materials,the strength of magnetic force is very low and it leads lower polishing efficiency.The magnesium alloy that has superior mechanical properties for industrial application such as a lightweight and high specific strength is one of the most famous nonferrous materials.An improving strategy of the magnetic force for me AZ31 magnesium alloy installed with a permanent magnet was proposed and experimental verification Was carded out.For the proposed strategy,the effect of process parameters on the surface roughness of the AZ31 magnesium alloy Was evaluated by a design of experimental method.

  13. Evaluation of the Particle Aerosolization from n-TiO2 Photocatalytic Nanocoatings under Abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Shandilya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A parametric study on the release of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles from two commercial photocatalytic nanocoatings is carried out. For this, abrasion tests are performed on them. The formed aerosols are characterized by their number concentration, particle size distribution, individual particle shape, size, and chemical composition. The two nanocoatings appear to exhibit contrastingly opposite behavior with respect to the number concentration of the released particles. Having irregular shapes, the released particles are found to have unimodal size distributions with 1.5–3.5% (in mass of Ti content. However, no free nanoparticles of TiO2 were found. Distinct phases during the particle number concentration evolution with time are also discussed and evaluated. Two quantities—(ΔC/ΔtI and TII—are identified as the important indicators to qualitatively measure the resistance strength and hence the concentration of the released particles from a nanocoating during stress application.

  14. Corneal abrasion and alkali burn secondary to automobile air bag inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Angela; Gee, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A 59‐year‐old woman self presented to the emergency department with a painful right eye following a motor vehicle accident. She had reduced visual acuity and the eye had an alkaline pH with complete corneal uptake of fluorescein. Diagnosis of corneal abrasion and alkali burn to her right eye secondary to inflation of a driver's automobile airbag was made. The eye was irrigated with normal saline. Such injuries, although rare, can easily be identified within the emergency department by the history of exposure, evidence of facial injuries or burns, and an alkaline pH in the inferior cul‐de‐sac of the eye. Early detection and management with ophthalmology review is therefore imperative to prevent irreversible visual impairment. PMID:17901284

  15. Standard test method for abrasiveness of ink-impregnated fabric printer ribbons and other web materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the abrasiveness of ink-impregnated fabric printer ribbons and other web materials by means of a sliding wear test. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Surface topography of cylindrical gear wheels after smoothing in abrasive mass, honing and shot peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, J; Pawlus, P [Rzeszow University of Technology, W Pola 2, 35-935 Rzeszow (Poland); Zelasko, W, E-mail: jmichals@prz.edu.pl [Technical School Complex at Lezajsk, Mickiewicza 67, 37-300 Lezajsk (Poland)

    2011-08-19

    The present paper presents the analysis of surface topography of gear teeth as the result of final machining processes. Teeth of multiple cylindrical gears shaped by grinding were smoothed in abrasive mass, honed or shot peened. The measurement of gears were made using coordinate measuring machine and 3D surface topography stylus instrument. The following deviations were studied; pitch deviation, total pitches deviations, variation of teeth thickness and deviation of gear radial run-out. Changes in teeth surface topography during machining process were determined. 3D surface topography parameters, surface directionality as well as areal autocorrelation and power spectral density functions were taken into consideration. As the results of the analysis, the best surface topography with regard to gear operational properties was recommended.

  17. Surface topography of cylindrical gear wheels after smoothing in abrasive mass, honing and shot peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J.; Pawlus, P.; Żelasko, W.

    2011-08-01

    The present paper presents the analysis of surface topography of gear teeth as the result of final machining processes. Teeth of multiple cylindrical gears shaped by grinding were smoothed in abrasive mass, honed or shot peened. The measurement of gears were made using coordinate measuring machine and 3D surface topography stylus instrument. The following deviations were studied; pitch deviation, total pitches deviations, variation of teeth thickness and deviation of gear radial run-out. Changes in teeth surface topography during machining process were determined. 3D surface topography parameters, surface directionality as well as areal autocorrelation and power spectral density functions were taken into consideration. As the results of the analysis, the best surface topography with regard to gear operational properties was recommended.

  18. Mathematical modeling of surface roughness in magnetic abrasive finishing of BK7 optical glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashmforoush, Farzad; Rahimi, Abdolreza; Kazemi, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) is one of the advanced machining processes efficiently used to finish hard-to-machine materials. Simulation and modeling of the process is of particular importance to understand the mechanics of material removal and consequently achieve a high-quality surface with a minimum of surface defects. Hence, in this paper, we performed a numerical-experimental study to mathematically model the surface roughness during the MAF of BK7 optical glass. For this purpose, the initial roughness profile was estimated using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and a Gaussian filter. We obtained the final surface profile based on the material removal mechanisms and the corresponding chipping depth values evaluated by finite element analysis. We then validated experimentally the simulation results in terms of the arithmetic average surface roughness (R(a ). The comparison between the obtained results demonstrates that the theoretical and experimental findings are in good agreement when predicting the parameters' effect on surface roughness behavior. PMID:26479596

  19. Microstructure and Abrasive Mechanism of Surfacing Welding Based on TiC-VC Particle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShang-lei; LUXue-qin; ZOUZeng-da; LOUSong-nian

    2004-01-01

    Ultrahard titanium and vanadium carbides (TiC-VC) particles are combined among ferrotitanium (Fe-Ti), ferrovanadium (Pe-V), graphite, ruffle, etc. by means of high temperature arc metallurgic reaction in deposited metal. The mierostructure, properties and wear mechanism of surfacing metal were systemically studied. The results show carbides particles are embedded in Fe matrix, Microstructure of which is lath martensite. The carbides mixed in the lath martensite provide a combination of good hardness and toughness. The residual austenite transforms to martensite, which is caused by the press stress, strengthens the matrix and releases the stress. The surface layers have high abrasive resistance and cracking resistance. The integration of dispersedly distributed carbides, lath martensite and residual austenite of the surface layer results in satisfactory wear resistance.

  20. Abrasive blast cleaning method for the renewal of worn-out acceleration tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of the electrical properties of acceleration tubes emerging with performance time is known to be assigned mainly to impurities and surface breakdown tracks appearing on the inner surface of the insulators. Consequently, a radical treatment for removing the surface layer may result in a renewal of the tube. An abrasive blast cleaning procedure has been used on a set of worn-out acceleration tube units. The cleaned tube exhibited its original electrical characteristics and it has been used for more than 4000 h of operation up to the maximum rated voltage of our 5 MV electrostatic accelerator without any observable degradation. XRF and PIXE analytical measurements performed on used and blast-treated insulators as well as on electrode and pump oil samples reveal the contribution of elementary processes in the acceleration tube to the ageing of the tube and indicate the effectness of the blasting process used for the re-establishment of clean surface conditions. (orig.)

  1. The MECA Payload as a Dust Analysis Laboratory on the MSP 2001 Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Anderson, M.; Buehler, M.; Frant, M.; Fuerstenau, S.; Hecht, M.; Keller, U.; Markiewicz, W.; Meloy, T.; Pike, T.

    1999-01-01

    properties, (7) particle hardness, (8) particle magnetic properties, (9) bulk dust geochemistry (solubility, reactivity, ionic and mineral species). All of these quantities are needed in order for the human exploration program to make assessments of hazards on Mars, and to better enable the production on earth, of soil/dust simulants that can act as realistic test materials in terms of those properties that render dust a contaminant.Such properties include the small grain size that enables penetration of space-suit joints, mechanical interfaces and bearings, seals, etc., and presents difficulty for filtration systems. Size also plays a critical role in the potential for lung disease in long-term habitats. The properties of grain shape and hardness are important parameters in determining the abrasiveness of dust as it enters mechanical systems, or bombards helmet visors and habitat windows in dust-laden winds. Adhesive electrostatic and magnetic properties of dust will be prime causes of contamination of space suits and equipment. Contamination causes mechanical malfunction, tracking of dirt into habitats, "piggybacking" of toxins on dust into habitats, changes in albedo and efficiency of solar arrays and heat exchangers, and changes in electrical conductivity of suit surfaces and other materials that may have specific safety requirements regarding electrical conductivity. Other potentially hazardous properties of dust include the possibility of high solubility of some component grains (rendering them reactive), and toxicity of some materials --grains of superoxidants and heavy metals (there is always the slim, but not inconceivable possibility of biogenic components such as spores). Because Mars has no active surface aqueous regime, volcanic emissions, meteoritic debris, weathering products, and photochemical products of Mars have nowhere to go except reside in the surface; there are few mechanical or chemical (buffering) processes to remove the accumulation of eons. From a

  2. Bosonic string theory with dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a modified bosonic string theory that has a pressureless ‘dust’ field on the string worldsheet. The dust is a real scalar field with unit gradient which breaks conformal invariance. Hamiltonian analysis reveals a time reparametrization constraint linear in the dust field momentum and a spatial diffeomorphism constraint. This feature provides a natural ‘dust time’ gauge in analogy with the parametrized particle. In this gauge we give a Fock quantization of the theory, which is complete and self-consistent in d < 26. The Hamiltonian of the theory is not a constraint; as a consequence the Hilbert space and mass spectrum are characterized by an additional parameter, and includes the usual string spectrum as a special case. The other sectors provide new particle spectra, some of which do not have tachyons. (paper)

  3. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  4. Dust Devil Populations and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Jackson, Brian K.

    2016-08-01

    The highly-skewed diameter and pressure drop distributions of dust devils on Earth and Mars are noted, and challenges of presenting and comparing different types of observations are discussed. The widely-held view that Martian dust devils are larger than Earth's is critically assessed: the question is confounded somewhat by different observation techniques, but some indication of a {˜} 3x larger population on Mars is determined. The largest and most intense (in a relative pressure sense) devils recorded are on Mars, although the largest reported number density is on Earth. The difficulties of concepts used in the literature of `average' diameter, pressure cross section, and area fraction are noted in the context of estimating population-integral effects such as dust lifting.

  5. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  6. The role of the microfissuration of the rock matrix in the abrasion resistance of ornamental granitic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rey, Angel; Sanchez-Delgado, Nuria; Camino, Clara; Calleja, Lope; Ruiz de Argandoña, Vicente G.; Setien, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    The microcrack density and the abrasion resistance of five ornamental granites (Albero, Gris Alba, Mondariz, Rosa Porriño and Traspieles) from Galicia (NW Spain) have been quantified as part of a research aimed to interpret the cuttability of the rocks in relation to the petrophysical properties of the rock matrix. Large blocks from the quarries have been cut with an industrial saw and the microcrack density and the abrasion resistance have been measured in two surfaces: H, parallel to the cut surface; T, perpendicular both to the cut surface and the cutting direction. Both planes are perpendicular to the rift plane, as it is known in quarry works. The microcrack density has been quantified following an stereological procedure applied to polished sections imaged under scanning electron microscopy. The magnification of the images allowed the study of microcracks as narrow as 2 microns in aperture. The density has been quantified in terms of length of microcrack traces per surface unit so possible anisotropies of the microcrack network could be detected. The obtained values are in the typical range for this type of rocks although the Traspieles granite shows a higher value due to its weathering degree (H: 5.11, T: 5.37 mm/mm2). The values measured in the two surfaces (H and T) are quite similar in four of the rocks; only the Albero granite shows a marked anisotropy (H: 2.76 T: 3.53 mm/mm2). The abrasion resistance of the rocks has been measured following the european standard EN 14157:2004 using the capon method. The rocks can be classified in two groups according to their abrasion resistance. Rosa Porriño, Gris Alba and Mondariz granites are the more resistant to abrasion with values around 16-17 mm. Albero and Traspieles granites are less resistant with values higher than 19 mm. The results show a good correlation between the microcrack density and the abrasion resistance. As can be expected the rocks with high microcrack density show low abrasion resistance. The

  7. Incidence of lameness and abrasions in piglets in identical farrowing pens with four different types of floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Ebba

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lameness in piglets is a major animal welfare issue. Floor abrasiveness is a common cause of superficial injury in piglets in farrowing pens. The abrasion achieved may act as a gate for infections, which in turn may induce development of infectious arthritis. In this study, the influence of improvements of the floor quality and of increased ratios of straw in identical farrowing pens was measured. Methods The study was carried out at a herd with four identical farrowing units with solid concrete floor bedded with 1 kg chopped straw per sow and 1 hg per piglet and day. Nothing was changed in the management of the four identical farrowing units, but four experimental groups were created: Group I – control, Group II – the amount of bedding was doubled. The surface of the floor was repaired in two units, Group III – Piglet Floor®, Flowcrete Sweden AB, Perstorp, Sweden and Group IV – Thorocrete SL®, Växa Halland, Sweden. Three farrowing batches were studies in each unit. In total, 93 litters (1,073 piglets were examined for foot and skin lesions until the age of 3 weeks. The occurrence of lameness was registered until weaning at an average age of 4.5 weeks. Twenty seven lame piglets were culled instead of medicinally treated and subjected to necropsy including histopathological and microbiological examinations. Isolates of streptococci, staphylococci and E. coli were tested with respect to antimicrobial resistance. Results Piglet born on the repaired floors had the lowest prevalences of abrasions at carpus. Also the doubled straw ration decreased the abrasions. Skin lesions at carpus decreased significantly in magnitude in all four systems from day 10. At day 3, the sole bruising scores of the control unit were greater than the other three units (p Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (60%, Staphylococcus hyicus subsp. hyicus (35% and Escherichia coli (5%. These isolates were sensitive to all antibiotics

  8. Experimental Protocol to Investigate Particle Aerosolization of a Product Under Abrasion and Under Environmental Weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, Neeraj; Le Bihan, Olivier Louis; Bressot, Christophe; Morgeneyer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present article presents an experimental protocol to investigate particle aerosolization of a product under abrasion and under environmental weathering, which is a fundamental element to the approach of nanosafety-by-design of nanostructured products for their durable development. This approach is basically a preemptive one in which the focus is put on minimizing the emission of engineered nanomaterials' aerosols during the usage phase of the product's life cycle. This can be attained by altering its material properties during its design phase without compromising with any of its added benefits. In this article, an experimental protocol is presented to investigate the nanosafety-by-design of three commercial nanostructured products with respect to their mechanical solicitation and environmental weathering. The means chosen for applying the mechanical solicitation is an abrasion process and for the environmental weathering, it is an accelerated UV exposure in the presence of humidity and heat. The eventual emission of engineered nanomaterials is studied in terms of their number concentration, size distribution, morphology and chemical composition. The purpose of the protocol is to study the emission for test samples and experimental conditions which are corresponding to real life situations. It was found that the application of the mechanical stresses alone emits the engineered nanomaterials' aerosols in which the engineered nanomaterial is always embedded inside the product matrix, thus, a representative product element. In such a case, the emitted aerosols comprise of both nanoparticles as well as microparticles. But if the mechanical stresses are coupled with the environmental weathering, the experimental protocol reveals then the eventual deterioration of the product, after a certain weathering duration, may lead to the emission of the free engineered nanomaterial aerosols too.

  9. Assessment of the influence of vegetarian diet on the occurrence of erosive and abrasive cavities in hard tooth tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Herman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The aim of the study was to determine the potential relation between vegetarian diet and tooth erosion and abrasion.Material/Methods:The examination included 46 vegetarians and the same number in the control group. Clinical research was carried out in order to detect the presence of abrasive and erosive changes and the level of hygiene in oral cavities. The questionnaire survey concerned dietary and hygienic habits. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted with Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U test. The relations between following a vegetarian diet and the occurrence of non-carious cavities was tested with models of logistic regression.Results:Tooth erosion was present among 39.1�0of vegetarians and 23.9�0of controls, while abrasion appeared among 26.1�0and 10.9�20respectively, and the differences were statistically insignificant. The distribution of the changes was similar in both groups. Among vegetarians, significantly more frequent consumption of sour products (predominantly raw vegetables and fruit and tomatoes was observed. The level of oral hygiene and hygienic habits were similar in both groups. The analysis of statistical regression did not reveal any relations between following a vegetarian diet and the occurrence of tooth erosion and abrasion.Discussion:The results did not reveal any direct influence of vegetarian diet on the occurrence of erosive and abrasive changes. However, in the vegetarian group, more frequent consumption of some sour products and more commonly used horizontal brushing method were observed, with a slightly higher occurrence of non-carious cavities. Further research is required to obtain unambiguous conclusions.

  10. Do soil microbes and abrasion by soil particles influence persistence and loss of physical dormancy in seeds of tropical pioneers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalamea, Paul-Camilo; Sarmiento, Carolina; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Davis, Adam S; Dalling, James W

    2014-01-01

    Germination from the soil seed bank (SSB) is an important determinant of species composition in tropical forest gaps, with seed persistence in the SSB allowing trees to recruit even decades after dispersal. The capacity to form a persistent SSB is often associated with physical dormancy, where seed coats are impermeable at the time of dispersal. Germination literature often speculates, without empirical evidence, that dormancy-break in physically dormant seeds is the result of microbial action and/or abrasion by soil particles. We tested the microbial/soil abrasion hypothesis in four widely distributed neotropical pioneer tree species (Apeiba membranacea, Luehea seemannii, Ochroma pyramidale, and Cochlospermum vitifolium). Seeds were buried in five common gardens in a lowland tropical forest in Panama, and recovered at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after burial. Seed permeability, microbial infection, seed coat thickness, and germination were measured. Parallel experiments compared the germination fraction of fresh and aged seeds without soil contact, and in seeds as a function of seed permeability. Contrary to the microbial/soil abrasion hypothesis the proportion of permeable seeds, and of seeds infected by cultivable microbes, decreased as a function of burial duration. Furthermore, seeds stored in dark and dry conditions for 2 years showed a higher proportion of seed germination than fresh seeds in identical germination conditions. We determined that permeable seeds of A. membranacea and O. pyramidale had cracks in the chalazal area or lacked the chalazal plug, whereas all surfaces of impermeable seeds were intact. Our results are inconsistent with the microbial/soil abrasion hypothesis of dormancy loss and instead suggest the existence of multiple dormancy phenotypes, where a fraction of each seed cohort is dispersed in a permeable state and germinates immediately, while the impermeable seed fraction accounts for the persistent SSB. Thus, we conclude that fluctuations

  11. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans.

  12. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  13. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  14. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  15. The global distribution of mineral dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  16. Alkaline leaching of iron and steelmaking dust

    OpenAIRE

    Stafanova, Anna; Aromaa, Jari

    2012-01-01

    Steel production generates significant quantities of dust and sludge in blast furnaces (BF),basic oxygen furnaces (BOF), and electric arc furnaces (EAF). These dusts contain toxicelements, such as heavy metals, and are thus classified as harmful waste making the disposalof them expensive. In addition, direct recycling of dust back to steel production is hindered dueto the presence of zinc. In this literature survey the alkaline leaching of zinc from iron and steelmaking dusts isreviewed. T...

  17. Metal Dusting of Heat-Resistant Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Meshari, Abdulaziz I.

    2008-01-01

    Metal dusting leads to disintegration of such alloys as iron and nickel-based into a ?dust? of particulate metal, metal carbide, carbon, and/or oxide. It occurs in strongly carburising environments at 400-900?C. Literature survey has shown that alloys behave differently in metal dusting conditions based on their composition and the environment. Metal dusting mechanisms for iron and nickel-based alloys have been proposed but, nevertheless, have not been agreed upon and numerous modifications t...

  18. History and Applications of Dust Devil Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Balme, Matthew R.; Gu, Zhaolin; Kahanpää, Henrik; Klose, Martina; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Spiga, Aymeric; Takemi, Tetsuya; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Studies of dust devils, and their impact on society, are reviewed. Dust devils have been noted since antiquity, and have been documented in many countries, as well as on the planet Mars. As time-variable vortex entities, they have become a cultural motif. Three major stimuli of dust devil research are identified, nuclear testing, terrestrial climate studies, and perhaps most significantly, Mars research. Dust devils present an occasional safety hazard to light structures and have caused several deaths.

  19. Linear and nonlinear excitations in complex plasmas with nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and dust size distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Ping; Xue Ju-Kui; Li Yan-Long

    2011-01-01

    Both linear and nonlinear excitation in dusty plasmas have been investigated including the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and Gaussian size distribution dust particles.A linear dispersion relation and a Korteweg-de VriesBurgers equation governing the dust acoustic shock waves are obtained.The relevance of the instability of wave and the wave evolution to the dust size distribution and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation is illustrated both analytically and numerically.The numerical results show that the Gaussian size distribution of dust particles and the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong common influence on the propagation of both linear and nonlinear excitations.

  20. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the particles

  1. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  2. The dust debris around HR 4796

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M.

    1991-01-01

    The IRAS data strongly suggest that there is dust debris around the main-sequence A star HR 4796. The optical depth of the dust cloud around HR 4796 is probably twice that around Beta Pic, the main-sequence star in the Bright Star Catalog which was previously thought to have the most opaque dust debris cloud.

  3. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  4. Radio frequency discharge with dust particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chutov, Y. I.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kravchenko, O. Y.; Zuz, V. M.; Yan, M.; Martins, R.; Ferreira, I.; Fortunato, E.; Kroesen, G.

    2000-01-01

    A 1D PIC/MCC method has been developed for computer simulations of low-pressure RF discharges with dust particles using the method for dust-free discharges. A RF discharge in argon with dust particles distributed uniformly in the interelectrode gap is simulated at parameters providing a possibility

  5. Organic marker compounds in surface soils of crop fields from the San Joaquin Valley fugitive dust characterization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Wolfgang F.; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Fugitive dust from the erosion of arid and fallow land, after harvest and during agricultural activities, can at times be the dominant source of airborne particulate matter. In order to assess the source contributions to a given site, chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling is typically used together with source-specific profiles for organic and inorganic constituents. Yet, the mass balance closure can be achieved only if emission profiles for all major sources are considered. While a higher degree of mass balance closure has been achieved by adding individual organic marker compounds to elements, ions, EC, and organic carbon (OC), major source profiles for fugitive dust are not available. Consequently, neither the exposure of the population living near fugitive dust sources from farm land, nor its chemical composition is known. Surface soils from crop fields are enriched in plant detritus from both above and below ground plant parts; therefore, surface soil dust contains natural organic compounds from the crops and soil microbiota. Here, surface soils derived from fields growing cotton, safflower, tomato, almonds, and grapes have been analyzed for more than 180 organic compounds, including natural lipids, saccharides, pesticides, herbicides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The major result of this study is that selective biogenically derived organic compounds are suitable markers of fugitive dust from major agricultural crop fields in the San Joaquin Valley. Aliphatic homologs exhibit the typical biogenic signatures of epicuticular plant waxes and are therefore indicative of fugitive dust emissions and mechanical abrasion of wax protrusions from leaf surfaces. Saccharides, among which α- and β-glucose, sucrose, and mycose show the highest concentrations in surface soils, have been proposed to be generic markers for fugitive dust from cultivated land. Similarly, steroids are strongly indicative of fugitive dust. Yet, triterpenoids reveal the most

  6. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  7. Polarized Microwave Radiation from Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2001-01-01

    Observations of cosmic microwave background in the range 10-90 GHz have revealed an anomalous foreground component well correlated with 12 \\mum, 60 \\mum and 100 \\mum emission from interstellar dust. As the recent cross-correlation analysis of WHAM H\\alpha maps with the Tenerife 10 and 15 GHz maps supports an earlier conclusion that the emission does not arise from free-free radiation, the interstellar dust origin of it is left as the only suspect. Two competing models of this emission exist. The more favored at the moment is the spinning dust model, the other is the model that uses grains with strong magnetic response. In the spinning dust model the emission arises from rapid rotation of ultrasmall grains that have dipole moments, while in the other model magnetic grains emit due to thermal vibrations of magnetic dipoles. Both models predict the emission to be partially polarized and this emission can seriously interfere with the CMB polarization measurements. We discuss observational signatures that can be u...

  8. Chronic Lunar Dust Exposure on Rat Cornea: Evaluation by Gene Expression Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, C. A.; Glass, A.; Lam, C-W.; James, J.; Zanello, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Lunar dust is capable of entering habitats and vehicle compartments by sticking to spacesuits or other objects that are transferred into the spacecraft from the lunar surface and has been reported to cause irritation upon exposure. During the Apollo missions, crewmembers reported irritation specifically to the skin and eyes after contamination of the lunar and service modules. It has since been hypothesized that ocular irritation and abrasion might occur as a result of such exposure, impairing crew vision. Recent work has shown that both ultrafine and unground lunar dust exhibited minimal irritancy of the ocular surface (i.e., cornea); however, the assessment of the severity of ocular damage resulting from contact of lunar dust particles to the cornea has focused only on macroscopic signs of mechanical irritancy and cytotoxicity. Given the chemical reactive properties of lunar dust, exposure of the cornea may contribute to detrimental effects at the molecular level including but not limited to oxidative damage. Additionally, low level chronic exposures may confound any results obtained in previous acute studies. We report here preliminary results from a tissue sharing effort using 10-week-old Fischer 344 male rats chronically exposed to filtered air or jet milled lunar dust collected during Apollo 14 using a Jaeger-NYU nose-only chamber for a total of 120 hours (6 hours daily, 5 days a week) over a 4-week period. RNA was isolated from corneas collected from rats at 1 day and 7 days after being exposed to concentrations of 0, 20, and 60 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Microarray analysis was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array with Affymetrix Expression Console and Transcriptome Analysis Console used for normalization and secondary analysis. An Ingenuity iReport"TM" was then generated for canonical pathway identification. The number of differentially expressed genes identified increases with dose compared to controls suggesting a more severe

  9. Mars dust mineralogy and structure obtained by a simple Mars rover instrumentation development - suggestions for future missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørnberg, Per

    2016-04-01

    Selective spectroscopic observations of the dust on the surface of Mars have neither been possible from Earth nor from orbiters as ESA, Mars Express or NASA, MRO. Even in surface soil sampling detailed chemical or mineralogical information about Martian dust cannot be separated from the soil. Remote spectroscopic data contain a mixture of mineralogical components which do not provide any specific information on the dust. Information about chemical composition and mineralogy of the Martian airborne dust was derived from APXS and Mössbauer data from the MER rovers by Goetz et al. (2005). This paper concluded that magnetite and not maghemite is the magnetic phase of the dust, and also that the presence of olivine indicates that liquid water did not play a dominant role in the formation of atmospheric dust. The dust is most likely formed by mechanical comminution comparable to the fine fractions of dust in dune sand on Earth (Nørnberg, P. 2002). Our Mars dust model operates with particles (2-3 μm) that inside consists of primary minerals which are either oxidized down to tenths of nm below the surface or have captured electrically charged nanoparticles of hematite on the surface giving the dust its red colour. Experiments done by Merrison, J.P. et al. ( 2010) showed that mechanical tumbling (abrasion)of a mixture of 10g quartz and 1 g magnetite in a dry process in a Martian atmosphere transformed magnetite to hematite. This experiment supports the dry comminution process indicated by Goetz et al (2005). The XRD analyses on the NASA, MSL are done on a mixture of soil material in which the dust accounts for only a minor part. However, if dust could have been captured separately from the atmosphere e.g. by magnets on the MSL and taken off by e.g. tape or another mechanism that could be transferred into the target holder of the XRD diffractometer on the rover, it could by Rietveld analyses have provided valuable quantitative information on the mineral content of the

  10. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  11. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  12. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Greenberg, Richard; Dermott, Stanley F.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations.

  13. Magnetopause displacements: the possible role of dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Large compressions of the magnetopause are proposed to occasionally result from temporary encounters of the magnetosphere with dust streams in interplanetary space. Such streams may have their origin in cometary dust tails or asteroids which cross the inner heliosphere or in meteoroids in Earth's vicinity. Dust ejected from such objects when embedding the magnetosphere for their limited transition time should cause substantial global deformations of the magnetopause/magnetosphere due to the very large dust grain mass and momentum which compensates for the low dust density when contributing to the upstream pressure variation.

  14. Global amount of dust in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fukugita, Masataka

    2011-01-01

    It is pointed out that the total amount of dust in the Universe that is produced in stellar evolution in the entire cosmic time is consistent with the observed amount, if we add to the dust amount inferred for galactic discs the amount recently uncovered in galactic haloes and the surrounding of galaxies in reddening of the quasar light passing through the vicinity of galaxies. The inventory concerning the dust closes. This implies that dust produced from stars should survive effectively for the cosmic time, and that a substantial amount of dust is produced in the burning phase of evolved stars of intermedaite mass.

  15. Dust Measurements in the Outer Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Grün, E; Landgraf, M; Grün, Eberhard; Krüger, Harald; Landgraf, Markus

    1999-01-01

    Dust measurements in the outer solar system are reviewed. Only the plasma wave instrument on board Voyagers 1 and 2 recorded impacts in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt (EKB). Pioneers 10 and 11 measured a constant dust flux of 10-micron-sized particles out to 20 AU. Dust detectors on board Ulysses and Galileo uniquely identified micron-sized interstellar grains passing through the planetary system. Impacts of interstellar dust grains onto big EKB objects generate at least about a ton per second of micron-sized secondaries that are dispersed by Poynting-Robertson effect and Lorentz force. We conclude that impacts of interstellar particles are also responsible for the loss of dust grains at the inner edge of the EKB. While new dust measurements in the EKB are in an early planning stage, several missions (Cassini and STARDUST) are en route to analyze interstellar dust in much more detail.

  16. Lab-scale ash production by abrasion and collision experiments of porous volcanic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S. B.; Lane, S. J.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-09-01

    In the course of explosive eruptions, magma is fragmented into smaller pieces by a plethora of processes before and during deposition. Volcanic ash, fragments smaller than 2 mm, has near-volcano effects (e.g. increasing mobility of PDCs, threat to human infrastructure) but may also cause various problems over long duration and/or far away from the source (human health and aviation matters). We quantify the efficiency of ash generation during experimental fracturing of pumiceous and scoriaceous samples subjected to shear and normal stress fields. Experiments were designed to produce ash by overcoming the yield strength of samples from Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), Sicily and Lipari Islands (Italy), with this study having particular interest in the travel large distances (~ 1000s of km). This poses a threat to the aviation industry and human health. From the experiments we establish that abrasion produced the finest-grained material and up to 50% of the generated ash was smaller than 10 μm. In comparison, the collision experiments that applied mainly normal stress fields produced coarser grain sizes. Results were compared to established grain size distributions for natural fall and PDC deposits and good correlation was found. Energies involved in collision and abrasion experiments were calculated and showed an exponential correlation with ash production rate. Projecting these experimental results into the volcanic environment, the greatest amounts of ash are produced in the most energetic and turbulent regions of volcanic flows, which are proximal to the vent. Finest grain sizes are produced in PDCs and can be observed as co-ignimbrite clouds above density currents. Finally, a significant dependency was found between material density and the mass of fines produced, also observable in the total particle size distribution: higher values of open porosity promote the generation of finer-grained particles and overall greater ratios of ash. While this paper draws on

  17. Can Wet Rocky Granular Flows Become Debris Flows Due to Fine Sediment Production by Abrasion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabnia, O.; Sklar, L. S.; Bianchi, G.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows are rapid mass movements in which elevated pore pressures are sustained by a viscous fluid matrix with high concentrations of fine sediments. Debris flows may form from coarse-grained wet granular flows as fine sediments are entrained from hillslope and channel material. Here we investigate whether abrasion of the rocks within a granular flow can produce sufficient fine sediments to create debris flows. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we used a set of 4 rotating drums ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 m diameter. Each drum has vanes along the boundary ensure shearing within the flow. Shear rate was varied by changing drum rotational velocity to maintain a constant Froude Number across drums. Initial runs used angular clasts of granodiorite with a tensile strength of 7.6 MPa, with well-sorted coarse particle size distributions linearly scaled with drum radius. The fluid was initially clear water, which rapidly acquired fine-grained wear products. After each 250 m tangential distance, we measured the particle size distributions, and then returned all water and sediment to the drums for subsequent runs. We calculate particle wear rates using statistics of size and mass distributions, and by fitting the Sternberg equation to the rate of mass loss from the size fraction > 2mm. Abundant fine sediments were produced in the experiments, but very little change in the median grain size was detected. This appears to be due to clast rounding, as evidenced by a decrease in the number of stable equilibrium resting points. We find that the growth in the fine sediment concentration in the fluid scales with unit drum power. This relationship can be used to estimate fine sediment production rates in the field. We explore this approach at Inyo Creek, a steep catchment in the Sierra Nevada, California. There, a significant debris flow occurred in July 2013, which originated as a coarse-grained wet granular flow. We use surveys to estimate flow depth and velocity where super

  18. Regional characteristics of dust events in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShigong; WANGJinyan; ZHOUZijiang; SHANGKezheng; YANGDebao; ZHAO

    2003-01-01

    The regional characteristics of dust events in China has been mainly studied by using the data of dust storm,wind-blown sand and floating dust from 338 observation stations through China from 1954 to 2000.The results of this study are as follows:(1)In China,there are two high frequent areas of dust events,one is located in the area of Minfeng and Hotan in the South xinjiang Basin,the other is situated in the area of Minqin and Jilantai in the Hexi Region.Furthermore,the spatial distributions of the various types of dust events are different.The dust storms mainly occur in the arid and semiarid areas covering the deserts and the areas undergoing desertification in northern China.Wind-blown sand and floating-dust not only occur in the areas where dust storms occur,but also extend to the neighboring areas.The range of wind-blown sand extends northeastward and southeastward,but floating-dust mainly extends southeastward to the low-latitude region such as the East China Plain and the area of the middloe and lower reaches of the Yangtze River.Compared with wind-blown sand,the floating-dust seldom occurs in the high latitude areas such as North xinjiang and Northeast China.(2)The affected areas of dust storms can be divided into seven sub-regions,that is,North Xinjiang Region,South Xinjiang Region,Hexi Region,Qaidam Basin Region,Hetao Region.Northeastem China Region and Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Region.The area of the most frequent occurrence of dust storms and floating-dust is in South Xinjiang Region,and of wind-blown sang in the Hexi Region.In general,the frequency of dust events in all the seven regions shows a decreasing thendency from 1954 to 2000,but there are certain differences between various dust events in different regions.The maximum interannual change and ariance of dust events during this time happened in South Xinjiang Region and Hexi Region.The udst events generally occur most frequently in April in most parts of China.The spring occurred days of dust events

  19. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  20. Effect of Fe content on the friction and abrasion properties of copper base overlay on steel substrate by TIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Shixiong; Song Jianling; Liu Lei; Yang Shiqin

    2009-01-01

    Copper base alloy was overlaid onto 35CrMnSiA steel plate by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method. The heat transfer process was simulated, the microstructures of the copper base overlay were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and the friction and abrasion properties of the overlay were measured. The results show that the Fe content increases in the overlay with increasing the welding current. And with the increase of Fe content in the overlay, the friction coefficient increases and the wear mechanism changes from oxidation wear to abrasive wear and plough wear, which is related to the size and quantity of Fe grains in the overlay. While with the increase of Fe content in the overlay, the protection of oxidation layer against the oxidation wear on the melted metal decreases.