WorldWideScience

Sample records for abrasion dust particles

  1. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdsaar, H.

    1978-01-01

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  2. Lung scintigraphy evaluation in workers exposed to abrasive dusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra Filho, Mario

    1995-01-01

    The production process of abrasives use aluminium, or silicon carbide a synthetic material with a hardness only slightly less than that of a diamond. It is popularly known as carborundum since it was first manufactured as an abrasive in 1891, produced by the fusion of high grade silica and petroleum coke with sawdust. For many years silicon carbide was thought not to give rise to pulmonary lesions. Recently several researchers suggested the existence of a carborundum pneumoconiosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the pulmonary clearance of 99m Technetium chelated to diethylene-triamine penta-acetate ( 99m Tc DTPA), and 67 Gallium lung scanning in workers exposed to abrasive dusts. Thirty seven subjects, 13 smokers and 24 nonsmokers and ex smokers were studied. In 32 (86,48%) 67 Gallium lung scanning was positive including 13 (40,62%) retired workers. We conclude that non smoking workers of abrasives plants have a pulmonary alveolar epithelial permeability disturbance similar as observed in smoking workers and smoking controls. Most workers, ex-workers of these industries and in patients with carborundum pneumoconiosis there is an evidence of pulmonary inflammation measured with abnormal 67 Gallium lung scan. (author)

  3. Release of particles by abrasion of CNT composites using a belt sander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yasuto; Nobuyuki, Kato; Ishibashi, Tomonori; Nagaya, Taiki; Yoneda, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    There have been many reports on the effect of exposure to nanomaterials such as titanium dioxide, silver, and carbon nanotube (CNT) on human health. Several experiments have examined the abrasion of CNT composites, in which CNT nanoparticles are embedded within a resin or rubber matrix, yielding varying results. Separate study of free CNTs and CNT nanoparticles in relation to health is important due to the different physicochemical characteristics of the two types of material. This study investigated the abrasion of CNT composites using a belt sander inside an enclosed chamber, with variation in the applied load and belt sander speed. At lower speeds, the population of particles with diameters of ∼100 nm was observed to increase (cf. mode values of ∼10 nm), and we found a relationship between the amount of the raising dust and the abrasion conditions. From these results, we propose a robust and widely applicable method to create particles of nanomaterial-containing composite materials of various types in order to conduct accelerated exposure assessment studies. (paper)

  4. Synthesis CNTs Particle Based Abrasive Media for Abrasive Flow Machining Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sonu; Walia, R.S; Dhull, S.; Murtaza, Q.; Tyagi, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive flow machining (AFM) is a modem fine finishing process used for intricate and internal finishing of components or parts. It is based on flowing of viscoelastic abrasive media over the surface to be fine finished. The abrasive media is the important parameter in the AFM process because of its ability to accurately abrade the predefined area along it flow path. In this study, an attempt is made to develop a new abrasive, alumina with Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in viscoelastic medium. CNT s in house produced through chemical vapour deposition technique and characterize through TEM. Performance evaluation of the new abrasive media is carried out by increasing content of CNT s with fixed extrusion pressure, viscosity of media and media flow rate as process parameters and surface finish improvement and material removal as process responses in AFM setup. Significantly improvement has been observed in material removal and maximum improvement of 100% has been observed in the surface finish on the inner cylindrical surface of the cast iron work piece. (paper)

  5. Radio frequency discharge with dust particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chutov, Y. I.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kravchenko, O. Y.; Zuz, V. M.; Yan, M.; Martins, R.; Ferreira, I.; Fortunato, E.; Kroesen, G.

    2000-01-01

    A 1D PIC/MCC method has been developed for computer simulations of low-pressure RF discharges with dust particles using the method for dust-free discharges. A RF discharge in argon with dust particles distributed uniformly in the interelectrode gap is simulated at parameters providing a possibility

  6. Hardness and elasticity of abrasive particles measured by instrumented indentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hvizdoš, P.; Zeleňák, Michal; Hloch, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2016), s. 869-871 ISSN 1805-0476 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : abrasive * garnet * hardness * elasticity * instrumental indentation Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.mmscience.eu/content/file/archives/MM_Science_201601.pdf

  7. The relaxation of plasmas with dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutov, Yu.I.; Kravchenko, A.Yu.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Various parameters of relaxing plasmas with dust particles including the electron and ion energy distributions function are numerically simulated at various parameters of the dust particles using the PIC method and taking into account the dynamics of the dust particle charge without the assumption about the equilibrium of electrons and ions. Coulomb collisions are taken into account in the framework of the method of stochastic differential equations. The relaxation of bounded plasma clouds expanding into a vacuum as well as the relaxation of a uniform plasma, in which dust particles appear at some initial time, are investigated. The obtained results show that the relaxation of plasmas can be accompanied by a deviation of the ion distribution function from equilibrium as well as a change of the mean energy of electrons and ions because of the dependence of the collection of electrons and ions by dust particles on their energy. (author)

  8. Method of altering the friability of abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caveney, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The invention provides a method of decreasing the friability of diamond particles of the SD, MD or RD types or cubic boron nitride particles by subjecting the particles to an irradiation so as to cause internal defects in the particles. Higher impact resistance results from this decrease in friability

  9. Lung scintigraphy evaluation in workers exposed to abrasive dusts; Avaliacao cintilografica pulmonar em trabalhadores de industria de abrasivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra Filho, Mario

    1996-12-31

    The production process of abrasives use aluminium, or silicon carbide a synthetic material with a hardness only slightly less than that of a diamond. It is popularly known as carborundum since it was first manufactured as an abrasive in 1891, produced by the fusion of high grade silica and petroleum coke with sawdust. For many years silicon carbide was thought not to give rise to pulmonary lesions. Recently several researchers suggested the existence of a carborundum pneumoconiosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m} Technetium chelated to diethylene-triamine penta-acetate ({sup 99m} Tc DTPA), and {sup 67} Gallium lung scanning in workers exposed to abrasive dusts. Thirty seven subjects, 13 smokers and 24 nonsmokers and ex smokers were studied. In 32 (86,48%) {sup 67} Gallium lung scanning was positive including 13 (40,62%) retired workers. We conclude that non smoking workers of abrasives plants have a pulmonary alveolar epithelial permeability disturbance similar as observed in smoking workers and smoking controls. Most workers, ex-workers of these industries and in patients with carborundum pneumoconiosis there is an evidence of pulmonary inflammation measured with abnormal {sup 67} Gallium lung scan. (author) 101 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Lung scintigraphy evaluation in workers exposed to abrasive dusts; Avaliacao cintilografica pulmonar em trabalhadores de industria de abrasivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra Filho, Mario

    1995-12-31

    The production process of abrasives use aluminium, or silicon carbide a synthetic material with a hardness only slightly less than that of a diamond. It is popularly known as carborundum since it was first manufactured as an abrasive in 1891, produced by the fusion of high grade silica and petroleum coke with sawdust. For many years silicon carbide was thought not to give rise to pulmonary lesions. Recently several researchers suggested the existence of a carborundum pneumoconiosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m} Technetium chelated to diethylene-triamine penta-acetate ({sup 99m} Tc DTPA), and {sup 67} Gallium lung scanning in workers exposed to abrasive dusts. Thirty seven subjects, 13 smokers and 24 nonsmokers and ex smokers were studied. In 32 (86,48%) {sup 67} Gallium lung scanning was positive including 13 (40,62%) retired workers. We conclude that non smoking workers of abrasives plants have a pulmonary alveolar epithelial permeability disturbance similar as observed in smoking workers and smoking controls. Most workers, ex-workers of these industries and in patients with carborundum pneumoconiosis there is an evidence of pulmonary inflammation measured with abnormal {sup 67} Gallium lung scan. (author) 101 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  12. Evaluation of emery dust on the manufacture of abrasives by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados Correa, F.

    1992-01-01

    In this work it is presented an evaluation on the degree of contamination by emery dust in a working area where abrasives are manufactured, in a factory located in the industrial area of Toluca City by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The samples were collected on Whatman filters and attacked with hot concentrated HCl. The elements founded were: Al, Si, V, Mg, Br, Mn, Ni, Zn, Fe, Cr, Ca and Pb. They are a risk for the health of the workers. (Author)

  13. Exposure to dust and its particle size distribution in shoe manufacture and repair workplaces measured with GRIMM laser dust monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroszejn-Mrowca, Grazyna; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2003-01-01

    Owing to a diversified technological process and a great variety of products and materials used in shoe manufacture, workers may be exposed to dusts that contain different chemicals and particles of various shapes and sizes. The aim of this study was to assess the dust exposure, taking account of concentration of particular size fractions according to the European Standard Norm, and to analyze particle size distribution in inhalable dust at selected workplaces in a modern shoe manufacture plant and in a small shoe repair workshop in comparison with other industrial branches. In these two workplaces, the concentrations of dust, representing the inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions, were measured with the GRIMM 1.105 laser dust monitor. The particle size distribution in inhaled dust in the most characteristic workposts was analyzed. In the shoe manufacture plant, the concentrations ranged from 124 microg/m3 (leather cutting out) to 724 microg/m3 (scouring and milling of soles); concentrations of the thoracic and respirable fractions in the same workposts ranged from 74 microg/m3 to 412 microg/m3 and from 24 microg/m3 to 120 microg/m3, respectively. In the shoe repair workshop, the recorded concentrations were higher: the values ranged from 521 microg/m3 (gluing of shoes and soles, zipper exchange and heel abrasion) to 916 microg/m3 (uppers sewing and heel scouring) for the inhaled fraction; from 335 microg/m3 to 499 microg/m3 for the thoracic fraction; and from 88 microg/m3 to 120 microg/m3 for the respirable fraction. The mass median aerodynamic diameters of inhalable dust particles fell within the limits of 6.2-25.0 mm. Dust with the smallest particles (MMAD = 6.2 mm) was observed in shoe brushing and polishing, and with the largest particles (MMAD = 25.0 mm) in uppers sewing. The modern process of shoe manufacture is characterized by very low concentrations of inhalable dust and its fractions, they are considerably lower than occupational exposure limits

  14. Effects of different lasers and particle abrasion on surface characteristics of zirconia ceramics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Arami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the surface of yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP after surface treatment with lasers and airborne-particle abrasion.First, 77 samples of presintered zirconia blocks measuring 10 × 10 × 2 mm were made, sintered and polished. Then, they were randomly divided into 11 groups (n=7 and received surface treatments namely, Er:YAG laser irradiation with output power of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 W, Nd:YAG laser with output power of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 W, CO2 laser with output power of 3, 4 and 5 W, AL2O3 airborne-particle abrasion (50μ and no treatment (controls. Following treatment, the parameters of surface roughness such as Ra, Rku and Rsk were evaluated using a digital profilometer and surface examination was done by SEM.According to ANOVA and Tukey's test, the mean surface roughness (Ra after Nd:YAG laser irradiation at 2 and 2.5 W was significantly higher than other groups. Roughness increased with increasing output power of Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers. Treated surfaces by Er:YAG laser and air abrasion showed similar surface roughness. SEM micrographs showed small microcracks in specimens irradiated with Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers.Nd:YAG laser created a rough surface on the zirconia ceramic with many microcracks; therefore, its use is not recommended. Air abrasion method can be used with Er:YAG laser irradiation for the treatment of zirconia ceramic.

  15. To Evaluate Effect of Airborne Particle Abrasion using Different Abrasives Particles and Compare Two Commercial Available Zirconia on Flexural Strength on Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Hari A.; Pasha, Naveed; Hilal, Mohammed; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Anand, M; Singh, Sumeet

    2017-01-01

    specimens each. Heat treatment after airborne-particle abrasion using 50 µm Al2O3 particles and 50 µm silica coated Al2O3 are applied to the upper and lower surfaces of the specimens. Each specimen is held under a pressure of 30 psi for 15 seconds at a direction perpendicular to the surface and at a distance of 30mm with an airborne particle abrasion device for the specimens in the airborne particle abraded groups. Heat treatments were performed at a starting temperature of 500°C, heating rate of 100°c/ min, ending at a temperature of 1000°C and 15 minutes holding time without vacuum for the specimens in the group 4, 5, 9 and 10. Airborne-particle abrasion mimicking the preparation for cementation was applied to the lower surfaces with 50 µm alumina and silica coated alumina particles for the specimens in the groups 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The specimens were cleaned for 15 minutes in an ultrasonic bath containing distilled water. To determine the fracture strength, a disc of 10 mm diameter was used to place 3 hardened steel balls of 3 mm diameter separated each other by 120 degrees (described in the ISO standard 6872 for dental ceramics). Each specimen was centrally placed on this disc. The lower surface mimicking the internal surface of zirconia was the tension side, facing the supporting device testing, while the upper surface mimicking the external surface of the zirconia core was loaded with a flat punch (1 mm in diameter). A universal testing machine was used to perform the test at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The failure stress was calculated with the equation listed in ISO 6872. The results were then statistically analyzed. A post hoc test was used for pair wise comparisons. Result: The mean fracture strength of commercially available Zirconia Ceramill (AMANNGIRBACH) showed a significant higher value compared to the ZR-White (UPCERA) Zirconia (Pcementing surface (50 µm Al2O3) was significantly higher than the heat treated and the control group. Airborne particle

  16. Plasma particle lofting : experimental investigation of dust removal force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, L.C.J.; Nijdam, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dust is everywhere. Sometimes it's harmless, but sometimes it needs to be removed. Especially in modern optical machinery, dust control can be of vital importance. In this research we look at dust on a surface. We focus on the behaviour under influence of a plasma. The dust particles will stick to a

  17. Multi-Use Coating for Abrasion Prevention, Wear Protection, and Lunar Dust Removal, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The deleterious effects of lunar dust, typically less than 50 µm in diameter, have to be addressed prior to establishing a human base and long duration human...

  18. Multi-Use Coating for Abrasion Prevention, Wear Protection, and Lunar Dust Removal, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The deleterious effects of lunar dust, typically less than 50 µm in diameter, have to be addressed prior to establishing a human base and long duration human...

  19. Sandblasting as a surface modification technique on titanium alloys for biomedical applications: abrasive particle behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balza, J C; Zujur, D; Delvasto, P; Gil, L; Subero, R; Dominguez, E; Alvarez, J

    2013-01-01

    The present work shows the analysis of a sandblasting process using alumina abrasive particles on Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. The metallic samples were first characterized by optical microscopy (OM), revealing an α+β microstructure with a Widmanstätten morphology. Topography of the samples was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after sandblasting. The Al 2 O 3 particles used had a granulometric distribution between 420 and 850 μm, with a median particle size (d50) of 670 μm, which decreased to 420 μm after sandblasting for 10 seconds. This change in the size of the particles generated a loss on particle kinetic energy by a factor of 3.5. Such variation on processing conditions induced a progressive increase on average roughness (Ra) of the Ti-6Al-4V surfaces, until the first 7 seconds were reached. From that point on, a reverse process was observed, exerting a polishing effect on the surface of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  20. Dust particle formation in silane plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dust can be found anywhere: in the kitchen, in the car, in space… Not surprisingly we also see dust in commercial and laboratory plasmas. Dust can be introduced in the plasma, but it can also grow there by itself. In the microelectronics industry, contamination of the processing plasma by dust is an

  1. Development of a test method for sowing machines concerning the drift of dust abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahmer, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the seed treatment was regarded as the most effective and in terms of the impact of the natural environment as the safest form of plant protection. Since the serious damage of bees, caused by dust of abraded seed treatment in the Rhine Valley five years ago, the admission of seed treatment products containing insecticide is in the discussion. To evaluate the emission characteristics of sowing machines during sowing based on secure data, the technical basis for a test method for measuring the drift of abraded seed-dust in sowing machines were developed at the Centre for Agricultural Technology Augustenberg. An indoor test bench was created and a standardized test method by which it is possible to evaluate the drift behavior of sowing machines in comparison was developed. A granulate which is stained with a fluorescent Tracer is used as test seed. The „tracer technique“ allows a reproducible, rapid and inexpensive assessment of the drift behavior of the sowing technology, which is commonly used. To classify the obtained drift values in the test bench, measurements in the field were carried out for comparison. The determined drift volumes of those measurements were at a similar level as the measured values in the test stand. Therefore the standardized measurement of drift in the test stand is suitable for the calculation of exposure scenarios for the sowing of treated seeds.

  2. Experimental Determination of Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This technique is based on irradiating a single isolated charged dust particle suspended in balance by an electric field, and measuring the scattered radiation as a function of angle. The observed scattered intensity profile at a specific wavelength obtained for a dust particle of known composition is compared with Mie theory calculations, and the variable parameters relating to the particle size and complex refractive index are adjusted for a best fit between the two profiles. This leads to a simultaneous determination of the particle radius, the complex refractive index, and the scattering and extinction coefficients. The results of these experiments can be utilized to examine the IRAS and DIRBE (Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment) infrared data sets in order to determine the dust particle physical characteristics and distributions by using infrared models and inversion techniques. This technique may also be employed for investigation of the rotational bursting phenomena whereby large size cosmic and interplanetary particles are believed to fragment into smaller dust particles.

  3. Cleaning, abrasion, and polishing effect of novel perlite toothpaste abrasive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This study was intended to optimize perlite particle size and morphology for better tooth cleaning and lower tooth abrasion, and to evaluate the performance of a whitening toothpaste containing the optimized perlite abrasive for tooth cleaning, abrasion, and polishing. Perlite toothpaste abrasive samples were prepared by air classifying a commercial expanded perlite product. The tooth cleaning and abrasion properties for these classified perlite samples were reported via the pellicle cleaning ratio (PCR) and relative dentin abrasion (RDA). Performance of the whitening toothpaste containing the optimized perlite abrasive in tooth cleaning, polishing, and abrasion was evaluated against a widely used synthetic high-cleaning silica. Air classification removes large perlite particles and also physically changes perlite particle morphology from mostly three dimensional and angular particles to mainly two dimensional and platy particles. All the classified samples show good tooth cleaning effect, but tooth abrasion decreases significantly with decreasing particle size. Compared to high-cleaning silica whitening toothpaste, the whitening toothpaste containing the optimized perlite abrasive (PerlClean) is slightly better at tooth cleaning, lower in tooth abrasion, and significantly better at tooth polishing. Fine platy perlite particles are effective in tooth cleaning with low tooth abrasion. The enhanced performance of optimized perlite toothpaste abrasive compared to high-cleaning silica in a whitening toothpaste is attributed to the optimized particle size distribution and the unique platy particle geometry.

  4. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  5. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at 90 km altitude and settle to the Earths surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earths surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend 104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.

  6. Dust particle removal efficiency of a venturi scrubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Majid; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Zhongning; Gu, Haifeng; Mehboob, Khurram

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Experimental and theoretical study of dust removal efficiency in venturi scrubber. ► Dust removal efficiency 99.5% is achieved at throat gas velocity 220 m/s. ► Results obtained from mathematical model concur well with experimental results. - Abstract: The venturi scrubber is one of the most efficient gas cleaning devices to remove the contaminated particles from gaseous stream during severe accident in nuclear power plant. This study is focused on the dust particle removal efficiency of the venturi scrubber experimentally and theoretically. The venturi scrubber encapsulates the dust particles in petite water droplets flowing into it. The water injected into the scrubber is in the form of water film. The study investigates the removal efficiency of venturi scrubber for throat gas velocities of 130, 165 and 200 m/s and liquid flow rates 0.3–1 m 3 /h, whereas dust concentration ranges between 0.1 and 1 g/m 3 . The hydrophobic titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) particles having density 4.23 g/cm 3 and mean diameter of 1 μm are used as dust particles in this research. Filtration technique is used to measure the concentration of dust particles at inlet and outlet. Experimental results show that the removal efficiency is higher with the increase of throat gas velocity and liquid flow rate. A mathematical model is employed for the verification of experimental results. The model concurs well with the experimental results

  7. Kuiper Belt Dust Grains as a Source of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1996-01-01

    The recent discovery of the so-called Kuiper belt objects has prompted the idea that these objects produce dust grains that may contribute significantly to the interplanetary dust population. In this paper, the orbital evolution of dust grains, of diameters 1 to 9 microns, that originate in the region of the Kuiper belt is studied by means of direct numerical integration. Gravitational forces of the Sun and planets, solar radiation pressure, as well as Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag are included. The interactions between charged dust grains and solar magnetic field are not considered in the model. Because of the effects of drag forces, small dust grains will spiral toward the Sun once they are released from their large parent bodies. This motion leads dust grains to pass by planets as well as encounter numerous mean motion resonances associated with planets. Our results show that about 80% of the Kuiper belt grains are ejected from the Solar System by the giant planets, while the remaining 20% of the grains evolve all the way to the Sun. Surprisingly, the latter dust grains have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations when they cross the orbit of the Earth. This makes them behave more like asteroidal than cometary-type dust particles. This also enhances their chances of being captured by the Earth and makes them a possible source of the collected interplanetary dust particles; in particular, they represent a possible source that brings primitive/organic materials from the outer Solar System to the Earth. When collisions with interstellar dust grains are considered, however, Kuiper belt dust grains around 9 microns appear likely to be collisionally shattered before they can evolve toward the inner part of the Solar System. The collision destruction can be applied to Kuiper belt grains up to about 50 microns. Therefore, Kuiper belt dust grains within this range may not be a significant part of the interplanetary dust complex in the inner Solar

  8. Observation of Dust Particle Gyromotion in a Magnetized Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, C. S.; Amatucci, W. E.; Gatling, G.; Tejero, E.

    2008-11-01

    In dusty plasma research, gyromotion of the dust has been difficult to observe experimentally. Previous experiments by Amatucci et al. have shown gyromotion of a single dust particle [1]. This early work was performed with alumina dust that had a size distribution and non-uniformly shaped particles. In the current experiment, evidence of spherical, monodispersed, dust particles exhibiting gyromotion has been observed. Silica particles 0.97 micrometers in diameter are suspended in a DC glow discharge argon plasma. The experiment is performed in the Naval Research Laboratory's DUsty PLasma EXperiment (DUPLEX Jr.). DUPLEX is a 61-cm tall by 46-cm diameter acrylic chamber allowing full 360 degree optical access for diagnostics. The neutral pressure for the experiment is 230 mTorr with a 275 V bias between the circular electrodes. The electrodes have a separation of 4 cm. A strong magnetic field is created by 2 pairs of neodymium iron boride magnets placed above and below the anode and cathode respectively. The resulting field is 1.4 kG. The dust particles are illuminated with a 25 mW, 672 nm laser. Images are captured using an intensified CCD camera and a consumer digital video cassette recorder. Recent evidence of gyromotion of spherical, monodispersed, dust particles will be presented. [1] Amatucci, W.E., et al., Phys. Plasmas, 11, 2097 (2004)

  9. Update on Automated Classification of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroger, I.; Lasue, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2018-01-01

    Every year, the Earth accretes about 40,000 tons of extraterrestrial material less than 1 mm in size on its surface. These dust particles originate from active comets, from impacts between asteroids and may also be coming from interstellar space for the very small particles. Since 1981, NASA Jonhson Space Center (JSC) has been systematically collecting the dust from Earth's strastosphere by airborne collectors and gathered them into "Cosmic Dust Catalogs". In those catalogs, a preliminary analysis of the dust particles based on SEM images, some geological characteristics and X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) composition is compiled. Based on those properties, the IDPs are classified into four main groups: C (Cosmic), TCN (Natural Terrestrial Contaminant), TCA (Artificial Terrestrial Contaminant) and AOS (Aluminium Oxide Sphere). Nevertheless, 20% of those particles remain ambiguously classified. Lasue et al. presented a methodology to help automatically classify the particles published in the catalog 15 based on their EDS spectra and nonlinear multivariate projections (as shown in Fig. 1). This work allowed to relabel 155 particles out of the 467 particles in catalog 15 and reclassify some contaminants as potential cosmic dusts. Further analyses of three such particles indicated their probable cosmic origin. The current work aims to bring complementary information to the automatic classification of IDPs to improve identification criteria.

  10. Experiments on Alignment of Dust Particles in Plasma Sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarian, A.A.; Vladimirov, S.V.; James, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    Here, we report an experimental investigation of the stability of vertical and horizontal confinement of dust particles levitated in an rf sheath. The experiments were carried out in argon plasma with micron-sized dust particles. Changes of particle arrangement were triggered by changing the discharge parameters, applying an additional bias to the confining electrode and by laser beam. The region where the transition was triggered by changes of discharge parameters and the transition from horizontal to vertical alignment has been found to be more pronounced than for the reverse transition. A clear hysteretic effect was observed for transitions triggered by changes of the confining voltage. A vertical alignment occurs in a system of two dust horizontally arranged particles with the decrease of the particle separation. This disruption is attributed to the formation of the common ion wake in the system

  11. Plasma jet acceleration of dust particles to hypervelocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method to accelerate simultaneously hundreds of micron-size dust particles to a few km/s over a distance of about 1 m is based on plasma drag. Plasma jets which can deliver sufficient momentum to the dust particles need to have speeds of at least several tens of km/s, densities of the order of 10 22 m -3 or higher, and low temperature ∼1 eV, in order to prevent dust destruction. An experimental demonstration of dust particles acceleration to hypervelocities by plasma produced in a coaxial gun is presented here. The plasma flow speed is deduced from photodiode signals while the plasma density is measured by streaked spectroscopy. As a result of the interaction with the plasma jet, the dust grains are also heated to high temperatures and emit visible light. A hypervelocity dust shower is imaged in situ with a high speed video camera at some distance from the coaxial gun, where light emission from the plasma flow is less intense. The bright traces of the flying microparticles are used to infer their speed and acceleration by employing the time-of-flight technique. A simple model for plasma drag which accounts for ion collection on the grain surface gives predictions for dust accelerations which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  13. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  14. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  15. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M., E-mail: mwada@mail.doshisha.ac.jp [Graduate school of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  16. Air Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air ... will perform any procedures that use air-abrasion technology. Ask your dentist if he or she uses ...

  17. Dust particles investigation for future Russian lunar missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnikov, Gennady; Horanyi, Mihaly; Esposito, Francesca; Zakharov, Alexander; Popel, Sergey; Afonin, Valeri; Borisov, Nikolay; Seran, Elena; Godefroy, Michel; Shashkova, Inna; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Lyash, Andrey; Vorobyova, Elena; Petrov, Oleg; Lisin, Evgeny

    One of the complicating factors of the future robotic and human lunar landing missions is the influence of the dust. Meteorites bombardment has accompanied by shock-explosive phenomena, disintegration and mix of the lunar soil in depth and on area simultaneously. As a consequence, the lunar soil has undergone melting, physical and chemical transformations. Recently we have the some reemergence for interest of Moon investigation. The prospects in current century declare USA, China, India, and European Union. In Russia also prepare two missions: Luna-Glob and Luna-Resource. Not last part of investigation of Moon surface is reviewing the dust condition near the ground of landers. Studying the properties of lunar dust is important both for scientific purposes to investigation the lunar exosphere component and for the technical safety of lunar robotic and manned missions. The absence of an atmosphere on the Moon's surface is leading to greater compaction and sintering. Properties of regolith and dust particles (density, temperature, composition, etc.) as well as near-surface lunar exosphere depend on solar activity, lunar local time and position of the Moon relative to the Earth's magneto tail. Upper layers of regolith are an insulator, which is charging as a result of solar UV radiation and the constant bombardment of charged particles, creates a charge distribution on the surface of the moon: positive on the illuminated side and negative on the night side. Charge distribution depends on the local lunar time, latitude and the electrical properties of the regolith (the presence of water in the regolith can influence the local distribution of charge). On light side of Moon near surface layer there exists possibility formation dusty plasma system. Altitude of levitation is depending from size of dust particle and Moon latitude. The distribution dust particle by size and altitude has estimated with taking into account photoelectrons, electrons and ions of solar wind, solar

  18. Ice nucleation of ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salam

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation characteristics of montmorillonite mineral dust aerosols with and without exposure to ammonia gas were measured at different atmospheric temperatures and relative humidities with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. The montmorillonite particles were exposed to pure (100% and diluted ammonia gas (25 ppm at room temperature in a stainless steel chamber. There was no significant change in the mineral dust particle size distribution due to the ammonia gas exposure. 100% pure ammonia gas exposure enhanced the ice nucleating fraction of montmorillonite mineral dust particles 3 to 8 times at 90% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw and 5 to 8 times at 100% RHw for 120 min exposure time compared to unexposed montmorillonite within our experimental conditions. The percentages of active ice nuclei were 2 to 8 times higher at 90% RHw and 2 to 7 times higher at 100% RHw in 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite compared to unexposed montmorillonite. All montmorillonite particles are more efficient as ice nuclei with increasing relative humidities and decreasing temperatures. The activation temperature of montmorillonite exposed to 100% pure ammonia was 15°C higher than for unexposed montmorillonite particles at 90% RHw. In the 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite experiments, the activation temperature was 10°C warmer than unexposed montmorillonite at 90% RHw. Degassing does not reverse the ice nucleating ability of ammonia exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles suggesting that the ammonia is chemically bound to the montmorillonite particle. This is the first experimental evidence that ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles can enhance its activation as ice nuclei and that the activation can occur at temperatures warmer than –10°C where natural atmospheric ice nuclei are very scarce.

  19. Comet Dust: The Diversity of Primitive Particles and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Bradley; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples (IDPs and AMMs) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-­-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contentsof thesilicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The unifomity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properites of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  20. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Somik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  1. Studies on airborne dust particles by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Atsushi; Ishii, Taka; Tomiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Isao.

    1974-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was performed on the airborne dust particles collected at six places with different contaminating circumstances in Kyoto city and the suburbs of Okayama city, using an open type low volume air sampler with a membrance filter attached. Radioactivation by neutrons was performed with the reactor in the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. Short half-life nuclides activated by thermal neutrons were measured. The concentration of airborne dust was usually high in November and December, while Na, Mn, K, etc. probably owing to soil origin showed similar seasonal change to the dust particles, as expected. The concentrations Cl and Br were in proportion to traffic volume, and it was considered to be caused by the exhaust gas from cars. Zn, V. et. were thick in factory areas, which seemed to show the relationship with oil fuel consumption. (Kobatake, H.)

  2. Levitation and dynamics of a collection of dust particles in a fully ionized plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitter, T.; Aslaksen, T.K.; Melandsoe, F.; Havnes, O.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have examined the dynamics of a collection of charged dust particles in the plasma sheath above a large body in a fully ionized space plasma when the radius of the large body is much larger than the sheath thickness. The dust particles are charged by the plasma, and the forces on the dust particles are assumed to be from the electric field in the sheath and from gravitation only. These forces will often act in opposite direction and may balance, making dust suspension and collection possible. The dust particles are supplied by injection or by electrostatic levitation. The ability of the sheath to collect dust particles, will be optimal for a certain combination of gravitation and plasma and dust particle parameters. In a dense dust sheath, the charges on the dust particles contribute significantly to the total space charge, and collective effects become important. These effects will reduce the magnitude of the sheath electric field strength and the charge on the dust particles. As dust particles are collected, the dust sheath is stretched and the largest dust particles may drop out, because the sheath is no longer able to suspend them. In a tenuous dust sheath, the inner layer, from the surface and about one Debye length thick, will be unstable for dust particle motion, and dust will not collect there. In a dense dust sheath, collective effects will decrease the thickness of this inner dust-free layer, making dust collection closer to the surface possible. By linearization of the force and current equations, they find the necessary and sufficient conditions which resemble those of planetary system bodies, but the results may also be of relevance to some laboratory plasmas

  3. Urban particle size distributions during two contrasting dust events originating from Taklimakan and Gobi Deserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Suping; Yu, Ye; Xia, Dunsheng; Yin, Daiying; He, Jianjun; Liu, Na; Li, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The dust origins of the two events were identified using HYSPLIT trajectory model and MODIS and CALIPSO satellite data to understand the particle size distribution during two contrasting dust events originated from Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. The supermicron particles significantly increased during the dust events. The dust event from Gobi desert affected significantly on the particles larger than 2.5 μm, while that from Taklimakan desert impacted obviously on the particles in 1.0–2.5 μm. It is found that the particle size distributions and their modal parameters such as VMD (volume median diameter) have significant difference for varying dust origins. The dust from Taklimakan desert was finer than that from Gobi desert also probably due to other influencing factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions. Our findings illustrated the capacity of combining in situ, satellite data and trajectory model to characterize large-scale dust plumes with a variety of aerosol parameters. - Highlights: • Dust particle size distributions had large differences for varying origins. • Dust originating from Taklimakan Desert was finer than that from Gobi Desert. • Effect of dust on the supermicron particles was obvious. • PM_1_0 concentrations increased by a factor of 3.4–25.6 during the dust event. - Dust particle size distributions had large differences for varying origins, which may be also related to other factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions.

  4. The Diversity of Carbon in Cometary Refractory Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    When comparing the dark icy surfaces of outer solar system small bodies and the composition of carbonaceous chondrites derived from dark asteroids we find a significant discrepancy in the assessed amounts of elemental carbon: up to 80% amorphous carbon is used to model the dark surfaces of Kuiper Belt Objects and Centaurs whereas at most 5% of elemental carbon is found in carbonaceous chondrites. If we presume that regimes of comet nuclei formation are analogous to disk regimes where other outer solar system ice-rich bodies formed then we can turn to comet dust to gain insights into the diversity in the concentration and forms of carbon available in the outer disk. Comet dust offers important insights into the diversity in the amounts and forms of carbon that were incorporated into aggregate dust particles in the colder parts of the protoplanetary disk out of which comet nuclei accreted. Comet nuclei are amongst the most primitive bodies because they have remained cold and unequilibrated. Comet dust particles reveal the presence of forms of elemental carbon and of soluble and insoluble organic matter, and in a great diversity of concentrations from very little, e.g., Stardust samples of comet 81P/Wild 2, to 80% by volume for Ultra Carbonaceous Antarctic Micro Meteorites (UCAMMs). Cometary outbursts and/or jet activity also demonstrate variations in the concentration of carbon in the grains at different grain sizes within a single comet. We review the diversity of carbon-bearing dust grains in cometary samples, flyby measurements and deduced from remote-sensing to enrich the discussion about the diversity of carbonaceous matter available in the outer ice-rich disk at the time of comet nuclei formation.

  5. Physical and chemical characteristics of interplanetary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, E.

    1981-01-01

    For the first time, the micrometeoroid experiment on board of Helios allowed the measurement of physical and chemical characteristics of interplanetary dust particles between 0.3AU and 1AU solar distance. During the first 10 orbits of Helios 1,235 impacts of micrometeoroids have been detected. 83 particles have been registered by the ecliptic sensor and 152 by the south sensor. Most of the particles detected by the ecliptic sensor had masses 10 -13 g -10 g and impacted the sensor from the apex direction. The particles observed by the south sensor had masses 10 -15 g -9 g and impacted the sensor from all directions with a slightly enhanced flux from solar direction. The average impact speed of particles with masses 10 -13 g -10 g was 15km/s. From 1AU to.3AU, the observed paritcle flux increased by a factor 5-10. The orbits of the registered particles are highly eccentric, e approx. >= 0.6, and some are hyperbolic. The mass spectra measured upon impact allow the classification of chondritic and iron-rich particles. Approx. 20% of the particles had low densities rho 3 . On 4 particles, a positive electric charge has been observed. (orig.) [de

  6. Threshold separation distance for attractive interaction between dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabdaraghi, R. Najafi; Sobhanian, S.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between dust grains in a dusty plasma could be both repulsive and attractive. The Coulomb interaction between two negatively charged dust particulates and the electrostatic force between them are repulsive, while the shadowing force affecting them is attractive. We show in this paper that in some experimental conditions, there is some grain separation zone for which the attractive shadowing force is larger than the repulsive forces between them. In experimental conditions, for the grains separation distance r = 0.4 cm the shadowing force is almost equal to the electrostatic force between them and for r>0.4 cm the shadowing force exceeds the electrostatic force. So the resultant interaction force will be attractive. The possibility of dust crystal formation in this zone and also the motion of dust particles in the resultant potential of the form V = -(a/r)+(b/r 2 ) will be discussed. This form of potential comes from the combination electrostatic (F es (c/r 3 )) and shadowing (F shadow = -(d/r 2 )) forces.

  7. Sorption Coefficients for Iodine, Silver, and Cesium on Dust Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempniewicz, M.M.; Goede, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the work performed to find relevant experimental data and find the sorption coefficients that represent well the available data for cesium, iodine, and silver on dust particles. The purpose of this work is to generate a set of coefficients that may be recommended for the computer code users. The work was performed using the computer code SPECTRA. Calculations were performed for the following data: • I-131 on AVR dust; • Ag-110m on AVR dust; • Cs-13 and Cs-137 on AVR dust. Available data was matched using the SPECTRA Sorption Model. S = A(T) · C_V-B(T) · C_d. The results are summarized as follows: • The available data can be correlated. The data scatter is about 4 orders of magnitude. Therefore the coefficients of the Langmuir isotherms vary by 4 orders of magnitude. • Sorption rates are higher at low temperatures and lower at high temperatures. This tendency has been observed in the data compiled at Oak Ridge. It is therefore surmised that the highest value of the sorption coefficients are appropriate for the low temperatures and the lowest value of the sorption coefficients are appropriate for the high temperatures. The recommended sorption coefficients are presented in this paper. • The present set of coefficients is very rough and should be a subject for future verification against experimental data. (author)

  8. Effect of TiO2/Al2O3 film coated diamond abrasive particles by sol-gel technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weida; Wan, Long; Liu, Xiaopan; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhiqi

    2011-04-01

    The diamond abrasive particles were coated with the TiO2/Al2O3 film by the sol-gel technique. Compared with the uncoated diamonds, the TiO2/Al2O3 film was excellent material for the protection of the diamonds. The results showed that the incipient oxidation temperature of the TiO2/Al2O3 film coated diamonds in air atmosphere was 775 °C, which was higher 175 °C than that of the uncoated diamonds. And the coated diamonds also had better the diamond's single particle compressive strength and the impact toughness than that of uncoated diamonds after sintering at 750 °C. For the vitrified bond grinding wheels, replacing the uncoated diamonds with the TiO2/Al2O3 film coated diamonds, the volume expansion of the grinding wheels decreased from 6.2% to 3.4%, the porosity decreased from 35.7% to 25.7%, the hardness increased from 61.2HRC to 66.5HRC and the grinding ratio of the vitrified bond grinding wheels to carbide alloy (YG8) increased from 11.5 to 19.1.

  9. Carbon Raman Spectroscopy of 36 Inter-Planetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, H.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Franchi, I. A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool to determine the degree of order of organic material (OM) in extra-terrestrial matter. As shown for meteoritic OM [e.g., 2], peak parameters of D and G bands are a measure of thermal alteration, causing graphitization (order), and amorphization, e.g. during protoplanetary irradiation, causing disorder. Th e most pristine interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) may come from comets. However, their exact provenance is unknown. IDP collection during Earth?s passage through comet Grigg-Skjellerup?s dust stream ("GSC" collectors) may increase the probability of collecting fresh IDPs from a known, cometary source. We used Raman spectroscopy to compare 21 GSC-IDPs with 15 IDPs collected at different periods, and found that the variation among GSC-IDPs is larger than among non-GSC IDPs, with the most primitive IDPs being mostly GSC-IDPs.

  10. Multielement analysis of interplanetary dust particles using TOF-SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, T.; Kloeck, W.; Jessberger, E. K.; Rulle, H.; Zehnpfenning, J.

    1993-01-01

    Sections of three stratospheric particles (U2015G1, W7029*A27, and L2005P9) were analyzed with TOF-SIMS (Time Of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) continuing our efforts to investigate the element distribution in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) with high lateral resolution (approximately 0.2 micron), to examine possible atmospheric contamination effects, and to further explore the abilities of this technique for element analysis of small samples. The samples, previously investigated with SXRF (synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis), are highly enriched in Br (Br/Fe: 59 x CI, 9.2 x CI, and 116 x CI, respectively). U2015G1 is the IDP with the by far highest Zn/Fe-ratio (81 x CI) ever reported in chondritic particles.

  11. Morphological classification and microanalysis of tire tread particles worn by abrasion or corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.

    2011-06-01

    Two types of tread wear particles are investigated: tread wear particles from a steel brush abrader (TrBP) and particles produced during a steering pad run (TrSP). A leaching experiment in water at pH = 7.5 for 24 and 48h was carried out on TrBP to simulate environmental degradation. Images of all materials were collected by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) together with element microanalytical (EDX) data. Surface morphology is described by a function of wave number (the "enhanced spectrum") obtained from SEM image analysis and non-linear filtering. A surface roughness index, ρ, is derived from the enhanced spectrum. The innovative contribution of this work is the representation of morphology by means of ρ, which, together with EDX data, allows the quantitative characterization of the materials. In particular, the surface roughness of leached TrBP is shown to decay in time and is related to the corresponding microanalytical data for the first time. The morphology of steering pad TrSP, affected by included mineral particles, is shown to be more heterogeneous. Differences in morphology (enhanced spectra and ρ), elemental composition and surface chemistry of TrBP and TrSP are discussed. All methods described and implemented herewith can be immediately applied to other types of tread wear material. The arguments put forward herewith should help in the proper design of those experiments aimed at assessing the impact of tread wear materials on the environment and on human health.

  12. Effect of using nano and micro airborne abrasive particles on bond strength of implant abutment to prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Davoudi, Amin; Shadmehr, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Connecting prostheses to the implant abutments has become a concern and achieving a satisfactory retention has been focused in cement-retention prostheses recently. Sandblasting is a method to make a roughened surface for providing more retention. The aim of this study was to compare effects of nano and micro airborne abrasive particles (ABAP) in roughening surface of implant abutments and further retention of cemented copings. Thirty Xive abutments and analogues (4.5 D GH1) were mounted vertically in self-cured acrylic blocks. Full metal Ni-Cr copings with a loop on the top were fabricated with appropriate marginal adaptation for each abutment. All samples were divided into 3 groups: first group (MPS) was sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 micro ABAP, second group (NSP) was sandblasted with 80 nm Al2O3 nano ABAP, and the third group (C) was assumed as control. The samples were cemented with provisional cement (Temp Bond) and tensile bond strength of cemented copings was evaluated by a universal testing machine after thermic cycling. The t test for independent samples was used for statistical analysis by SPSS software (version 15) at the significant level of 0.05. Final result showed significant difference among all groups (pmicro ABAP is an efficient way for increasing bond strengths significantly, but it seems that micro ABAP was more effective.

  13. Hygroscopicity of mineral dust particles: Roles of chemical mixing state and hygroscopic conversion timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Moore, M. J.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Roberts, G. C.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2009-05-01

    Our laboratory investigations of mineral dust particle hygroscopicity are motivated by field observations of the atmospheric processing of dust. During ACE-Asia we observed sulphate and nitrate to be strongly segregated from each other in individual aged Asian dust particles. CCN activation curves of pure calcium minerals as proxies for fresh (calcium carbonate) and aged (calcium sulphate, nitrate, chloride) dust indicate that this mixing state would cause a large fraction of aged dust particles to remain poor warm cloud nucleation potential, contrary to previous assumptions. The enrichment of oxalic acid in calcium-rich dust particles could have similar effects due to the formation of insoluble calcium oxalate. Soluble calcium nitrate and chloride reaction products are hygroscopic and will transform mineral dust into excellent CCN. Generating insoluble mineral particles wet by atomization produced particles with much higher hygroscopicity then when resuspended dry. The atomized particles are likely composed of dissolved residuals and do not properly reflect the chemistry of dry mineral powders. Aerosol flow tube experiments were employed to study the conversion of calcium carbonate into calcium nitrate via heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, with simultaneous measurements of the reacted particles' chemistry and hygroscopicity. The timescale for this hygroscopic conversion was found to occur on the order of a few hours under tropospheric conditions. This implies that the conversion of non-hygroscopic calcite- containing dust into hygroscopic particles will be controlled by the availability of nitric acid, and not by the atmospheric residence time. Results from recent investigations of the effect of secondary coatings on the ice nucleation properties of dust particles will also be presented. The cloud formation potential of aged dust particles depends on both the quantity and form of the secondary species that have reacted or mixed with the dust. These results

  14. Investigating the size, shape and surface roughness dependence of polarization lidars with light-scattering computations on real mineral dust particles: Application to dust particles' external mixtures and dust mass concentration retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, Tahar; Kemppinen, Osku; David, Grégory; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Tyynelä, Jani; Nousiainen, Timo; Rairoux, Patrick; Miffre, Alain

    2018-05-01

    Our understanding of the contribution of mineral dust to the Earth's radiative budget is limited by the complexity of these particles, which present a wide range of sizes, are highly-irregularly shaped, and are present in the atmosphere in the form of particle mixtures. To address the spatial distribution of mineral dust and atmospheric dust mass concentrations, polarization lidars are nowadays frequently used, with partitioning algorithms allowing to discern the contribution of mineral dust in two or three-component particle external mixtures. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the retrieved dust backscattering (βd) vertical profiles with the dust particle size and shape. For that, new light-scattering numerical simulations are performed on real atmospheric mineral dust particles, having determined mineralogy (CAL, DOL, AGG, SIL), derived from stereogrammetry (stereo-particles), with potential surface roughness, which are compared to the widely-used spheroidal mathematical shape model. For each dust shape model (smooth stereo-particles, rough stereo-particles, spheroids), the dust depolarization, backscattering Ångström exponent, lidar ratio are computed for two size distributions representative of mineral dust after long-range transport. As an output, two Saharan dust outbreaks involving mineral dust in two, then three-component particle mixtures are studied with Lyon (France) UV-VIS polarization lidar. If the dust size matters most, under certain circumstances, βd can vary by approximately 67% when real dust stereo-particles are used instead of spheroids, corresponding to variations in the dust backscattering coefficient as large as 2 Mm- 1·sr- 1. Moreover, the influence of surface roughness in polarization lidar retrievals is for the first time discussed. Finally, dust mass-extinction conversion factors (ηd) are evaluated for each assigned shape model and dust mass concentrations are retrieved from polarization lidar measurements. From

  15. Nonstationary stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle in plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shotorban, B

    2011-06-01

    Stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle that are due to discreteness of electrons and ions in plasmas can be described by a one-step process master equation [T. Matsoukas and M. Russell, J. Appl. Phys. 77, 4285 (1995)] with no exact solution. In the present work, using the system size expansion method of Van Kampen along with the linear noise approximation, a Fokker-Planck equation with an exact Gaussian solution is developed by expanding the master equation. The Gaussian solution has time-dependent mean and variance governed by two ordinary differential equations modeling the nonstationary process of dust particle charging. The model is tested via the comparison of its results to the results obtained by solving the master equation numerically. The electron and ion currents are calculated through the orbital motion limited theory. At various times of the nonstationary process of charging, the model results are in a very good agreement with the master equation results. The deviation is more significant when the standard deviation of the charge is comparable to the mean charge in magnitude.

  16. Video tracking and post-mortem analysis of dust particles from all tungsten ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endstrasser, N., E-mail: Nikolaus.Endstrasser@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Brochard, F. [Institut Jean Lamour, Nancy-Universite, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Rohde, V., E-mail: Volker.Rohde@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lunt, T.; Bardin, S.; Briancon, J.-L. [Institut Jean Lamour, Nancy-Universite, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Neu, R. [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-08-01

    2D dust particle trajectories are extracted from fast framing camera videos of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) by a new time- and resource-efficient code and classified into stationary hot spots, single-frame events and real dust particle fly-bys. Using hybrid global and local intensity thresholding and linear trajectory extrapolation individual particles could be tracked up to 80 ms. Even under challenging conditions such as high particle density and strong vacuum vessel illumination all particles detected for more than 50 frames are tracked correctly. During campaign 2009 dust has been trapped on five silicon wafer dust collectors strategically positioned within the vacuum vessel of the full tungsten AUG. Characterisation of the outer morphology and determination of the elemental composition of 5 x 10{sup 4} particles were performed via automated SEM-EDX analysis. A dust classification scheme based on these parameters was defined with the goal to link the particles to their most probable production sites.

  17. Ice nucleation by surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust and mineral dust/sulfate particles at cirrus temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Archuleta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the potential role of some types of mineral dust and mineral dust with sulfuric acid coatings as heterogeneous ice nuclei at cirrus temperatures. Commercially-available nanoscale powder samples of aluminum oxide, alumina-silicate and iron oxide were used as surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust particles, with and without multilayer coverage of sulfuric acid. A sample of Asian dust aerosol particles was also studied. Measurements of ice nucleation were made using a continuous-flow ice-thermal diffusion chamber (CFDC operated to expose size-selected aerosol particles to temperatures between -45 and -60°C and a range of relative humidity above ice-saturated conditions. Pure metal oxide particles supported heterogeneous ice nucleation at lower relative humidities than those required to homogeneously freeze sulfuric acid solution particles at sizes larger than about 50 nm. The ice nucleation behavior of the same metal oxides coated with sulfuric acid indicate heterogeneous freezing at lower relative humidities than those calculated for homogeneous freezing of the diluted particle coatings. The effect of soluble coatings on the ice activation relative humidity varied with the respective uncoated core particle types, but for all types the heterogeneous freezing rates increased with particle size for the same thermodynamic conditions. For a selected size of 200 nm, the natural mineral dust particles were the most effective ice nuclei tested, supporting heterogeneous ice formation at an ice relative humidity of approximately 135%, irrespective of temperature. Modified homogeneous freezing parameterizations and theoretical formulations are shown to have application to the description of heterogeneous freezing of mineral dust-like particles with soluble coatings.

  18. Influence of Air Humidity and Water Particles on Dust Control Using Ultrasonic Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Nishi, Kentaro; Shindo, Dai; Kawamura, Youhei

    2012-07-01

    The influence of air humidity and water particles on dust control was examined using ultrasonic atomization at 2.4 MHz, an acrylic box (61 L), and four types of ore dust samples: green tuff (4 µm), green tuff (6 µm), kaolin, and silica. It was clearly demonstrated that ultrasonic atomization was effective in raising humidity rapidly. However, at high relative air humidity, the water particles remained stable in the box without changing to water vapor. Ultrasonic atomization was applied to suppress dust dispersion and 40-95% dust reduction was achieved at 83% relative air humidity. Dust dispersion was more effective with ultrasonic atomization than without.

  19. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawardena, Janaka, E-mail: j.gunawardena@qut.edu.au; Ziyath, Abdul M., E-mail: mohamed.ziyath@qut.edu.au; Bostrom, Thor E., E-mail: t.bostrom@qut.edu.au; Bekessy, Lambert K., E-mail: l.bekessy@qut.edu.au; Ayoko, Godwin A., E-mail: g.ayoko@qut.edu.au; Egodawatta, Prasanna, E-mail: p.egodawatta@qut.edu.au; Goonetilleke, Ashantha, E-mail: a.goonetilleke@qut.edu.au

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. - Highlights: • The dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to pollutant build-up. • The dust storm increased TSS, Al, Fe and Mn loads in build-up on ground surfaces. • Dust storm did not significantly increase TOC, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd loads in build-up. • Cr and Zn in dust storm deposition were contributed by local anthropogenic sources.

  20. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M.; Bostrom, Thor E.; Bekessy, Lambert K.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. - Highlights: • The dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to pollutant build-up. • The dust storm increased TSS, Al, Fe and Mn loads in build-up on ground surfaces. • Dust storm did not significantly increase TOC, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd loads in build-up. • Cr and Zn in dust storm deposition were contributed by local anthropogenic sources

  1. Orbital Evolution of Dust Particles in the Sublimation Zone near the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakova, L. I.; Demchenko, B. I.

    2018-03-01

    We have performed the calculations of the orbital evolution of dust particles from volcanic glass ( p-obsidian), basalt, astrosilicate, olivine, and pyroxene in the sublimation zone near the Sun. The sublimation (evaporation) rate is determined by the temperature of dust particles depending on their radius, material, and distance to the Sun. All practically important parameters that characterize the interaction of spherical dust particles with the radiation are calculated using the Mie theory. The influence of radiation and solar wind pressure, as well as the Poynting-Robertson drag force effects on the dust dynamics, are also taken into account. According to the observations (Shestakova and Demchenko, 2016), the boundary of the dust-free zone is 7.0-7.6 solar radii for standard particles of the zodiacal cloud and 9.1-9.2 solar radii for cometary particles. The closest agreement is obtained for basalt particles and certain kinds of olivine, pyroxene, and volcanic glass.

  2. Structures and dynamics in a two-dimensional dipolar dust particle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, X. N.; Liu, Y. H.; Kravchenko, O. V.; Lapushkina, T. A.; Azarova, O. A.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, F.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of electric dipole moment, the number of dipolar particles, and system temperature on the structures and dynamics of a dipolar dust particle system are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the larger electric dipole moment is favorable for the formation of a long-chain structure, the larger number of dipolar dust particles promotes the formation of the multi-chain structure, and the higher system temperature can cause higher rotation frequency. The trajectories, mean square displacement (MSD), and the corresponding spectrum functions of the MSDs are also calculated to illustrate the dynamics of the dipolar dust particle system, which is also closely related to the growth of dust particles. Some simulations are qualitatively in agreement with our experiments and can provide a guide for the study on dust growth, especially on the large-sized particles.

  3. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.L. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, F., E-mail: huangfeng@cau.edu.cn [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: chenzy@mail.buct.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Propulsion & Application, Beijing 101416 (China); Liu, Y.H. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Yu, M.Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-02-22

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results. - Highlights: • Self-organization and oscillation of a 2-dimensional dusty plasma is investigated. • Effect of the confinement potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is given. • Effect of the attraction potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is studied.

  4. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.L.; Huang, F.; Chen, Z.Y.; Liu, Y.H.; Yu, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results. - Highlights: • Self-organization and oscillation of a 2-dimensional dusty plasma is investigated. • Effect of the confinement potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is given. • Effect of the attraction potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is studied.

  5. Ice nuclei in marine air: biogenic particles or dust?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate-related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth's energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  6. Experimental study of the effect of wearing dust-proof mask on inhaled aerosol particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Shunguang; Mei Chongsheng; Wu Yuangqing; Ren Liuan.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for measuring particle size of inhaled aerosol with a phantom of human head wearing dust-proof mask and a cascade impactor. The results showed that AMAD of inhaled aerosol was degraded and the size distribution of particles changed when the dust-proof mask was wearing. The leak rate of mask increased as the size of dust particles decreased. The results are applicable to estimate internal exposure dose and to evaluate the dust-proof capacity of mask

  7. Charge-fluctuation-induced heating of dust particles in a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaulina, O S; Khrapak, S A; Nefedov, A P; Petrov, O F

    1999-11-01

    Random charge fluctuations are always present in dusty plasmas due to the discrete nature of currents charging the dust particle. These fluctuations can be a reason for the heating of the dust particle system. Such unexpected heating leading to the melting of the dust crystals was observed recently in several experiments. In this paper we show by analytical evaluations and numerical simulation that charge fluctuations provide an effective source of energy and can heat the dust particles up to several eV, in conditions close to experimental ones.

  8. Forecast errors in dust vertical distributions over Rome (Italy): Multiple particle size representation and cloud contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishcha, P.; Alpert, P.; Shtivelman, A.; Krichak, S. O.; Joseph, J. H.; Kallos, G.; Katsafados, P.; Spyrou, C.; Gobbi, G. P.; Barnaba, F.; Nickovic, S.; PéRez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    In this study, forecast errors in dust vertical distributions were analyzed. This was carried out by using quantitative comparisons between dust vertical profiles retrieved from lidar measurements over Rome, Italy, performed from 2001 to 2003, and those predicted by models. Three models were used: the four-particle-size Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM), the older one-particle-size version of the SKIRON model from the University of Athens (UOA), and the pre-2006 one-particle-size Tel Aviv University (TAU) model. SKIRON and DREAM are initialized on a daily basis using the dust concentration from the previous forecast cycle, while the TAU model initialization is based on the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer aerosol index (TOMS AI). The quantitative comparison shows that (1) the use of four-particle-size bins in the dust modeling instead of only one-particle-size bins improves dust forecasts; (2) cloud presence could contribute to noticeable dust forecast errors in SKIRON and DREAM; and (3) as far as the TAU model is concerned, its forecast errors were mainly caused by technical problems with TOMS measurements from the Earth Probe satellite. As a result, dust forecast errors in the TAU model could be significant even under cloudless conditions. The DREAM versus lidar quantitative comparisons at different altitudes show that the model predictions are more accurate in the middle part of dust layers than in the top and bottom parts of dust layers.

  9. Airborne dust and soil particles at the Phoenix landing site, Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Drube, L.; Goetz, W.

    . Because of the multiple background colors of the iSweeps the effect of the translucence of thin dust layers can be studied. This is used to estimate the rate of dust accumulation and will be used to evaluate light scattering properties of the particles. Some particles raised by the retro-rockets during...

  10. Partitioning of phthalates among the gas phase, airborne particles and settled dust in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Salthammer, Tunga; Fromme, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    (s)) or the octanol/air partition coefficient (K-OA). For each phthalate in each apartment, the ratio of its particle concentration to its dust concentration (C-particle/C-Dust) was calculated, The median values of this ratio were within an order of magnitude of one another for five of the phthalate esters despite...

  11. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Dust Particle Trajectories in the NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeglin, W.U.; Roquemore, A.L.; Maqueda, R.

    2009-01-01

    Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed

  12. In Situ Sampling of Relative Dust Devil Particle Loads and Their Vertical Grain Size Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raack, Jan; Reiss, Dennis; Balme, Matthew R; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Ori, Gian Gabriele

    2017-04-19

    During a field campaign in the Sahara Desert in southern Morocco, spring 2012, we sampled the vertical grain size distribution of two active dust devils that exhibited different dimensions and intensities. With these in situ samples of grains in the vortices, it was possible to derive detailed vertical grain size distributions and measurements of the lifted relative particle load. Measurements of the two dust devils show that the majority of all lifted particles were only lifted within the first meter (∼46.5% and ∼61% of all particles; ∼76.5 wt % and ∼89 wt % of the relative particle load). Furthermore, ∼69% and ∼82% of all lifted sand grains occurred in the first meter of the dust devils, indicating the occurrence of "sand skirts." Both sampled dust devils were relatively small (∼15 m and ∼4-5 m in diameter) compared to dust devils in surrounding regions; nevertheless, measurements show that ∼58.5% to 73.5% of all lifted particles were small enough to go into suspension (grain size classification). This relatively high amount represents only ∼0.05 to 0.15 wt % of the lifted particle load. Larger dust devils probably entrain larger amounts of fine-grained material into the atmosphere, which can have an influence on the climate. Furthermore, our results indicate that the composition of the surface, on which the dust devils evolved, also had an influence on the particle load composition of the dust devil vortices. The internal particle load structure of both sampled dust devils was comparable related to their vertical grain size distribution and relative particle load, although both dust devils differed in their dimensions and intensities. A general trend of decreasing grain sizes with height was also detected. Key Words: Mars-Dust devils-Planetary science-Desert soils-Atmosphere-Grain sizes. Astrobiology 17, xxx-xxx.

  13. Spatio-temporal evolution of the dust particle size distribution in dusty argon rf plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killer, Carsten; Mulsow, Matthias; Melzer, André

    2015-01-01

    An imaging Mie scattering technique has been developed to measure the spatially resolved size distribution of dust particles in extended dust clouds. For large dust clouds of micrometre-sized plastic particles confined in an radio frequency (rf) discharge, a segmentation of the dust cloud into populations of different sizes is observed, even though the size differences are very small. The dust size dispersion inside a population is much smaller than the difference between the populations. Furthermore, the dust size is found to be constantly decreasing over time while the particles are confined in an inert argon plasma. The processes responsible for the shrinking of the dust in the plasma have been addressed by mass spectrometry, ex situ microscopy of the dust size, dust resonance measurements, in situ determination of the dust surface temperature and Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR). It is concluded that both a reduction of dust size and its mass density due to outgassing of water and other volatile constituents as well as chemical etching by oxygen impurities are responsible for the observations. (paper)

  14. Effect of Nanosilica Particle Size on the Water Permeability, Abrasion Resistance, Drying Shrinkage, and Repair Work Properties of Cement Mortar Containing Nano-SiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattawat Haruehansapong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the effect of nanosilica particle sizes on durability properties and repair work properties of cement mortar containing nanosilica (NS. Three different NS particle sizes of 12, 20, and 40 nm were used and compared with those of cement mortar without NS and cement mortar with silica fume (SF. Interesting results were obtained in which the particle size of NS affected directly the abrasion resistance and water permeability. NS with particle size of 40 nm is the optimum size and gave the highest abrasion resistance and water permeability. For repair work properties, cement mortars containing NS (12 and 20 nm and SF experienced higher drying shrinkage than that of cement mortar without NS and then presented cracking behavior and debonding between the cement mortars and concrete substrate. Cement mortar containing 40 nm of NS gave the lowest drying shrinkage, the lowest crack number, and the highest adhesive strength. These results indicate that the particle size of NS affected not only the durability properties but also the repair work properties of cement mortar.

  15. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kassa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  16. Electromagnetic scattering by a polydispersion of small charged cosmic dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kocifaj

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Some recent studies on extended red emissions suggest the presence of very small dust particles in the Universe. The sizes of these particles vary from 1 nm to some tens of nanometers, thus situating them deeply in the Rayleigh region if computations are made for visible or near infrared. The optical response of such particles can be a function of the surface charge. In this study we analyse the effect of surface electric potential on the total optical thickness and scattering phase function of the cosmic dust particles. The results are compared with those obtained for electrically neutral dust.

  17. A review of airborne particle sampling with special reference to long-lived radioactive dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1990-03-01

    This report reviews some basic aspects related to the sampling of airborne particles with special reference to Long-Lived Radioactive Dust (LLRD). The report covers a number of areas of practical interest such as the production of aerosols, the dynamics of suspended particles, the physical and chemical characteristics and properties of dust clouds, and the inhalation and measurement of dust. It is followed with a brief review of dust sampling instrumentation, and with a short account of the work done on LLRD in Canada with a few references to work done outside this country. (34 figs., 7 tabs., 117 refs.)

  18. Kinetic-Monte-Carlo-Based Parallel Evolution Simulation Algorithm of Dust Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution simulation of dust particles provides an important way to analyze the impact of dust on the environment. KMC-based parallel algorithm is proposed to simulate the evolution of dust particles. In the parallel evolution simulation algorithm of dust particles, data distribution way and communication optimizing strategy are raised to balance the load of every process and reduce the communication expense among processes. The experimental results show that the simulation of diffusion, sediment, and resuspension of dust particles in virtual campus is realized and the simulation time is shortened by parallel algorithm, which makes up for the shortage of serial computing and makes the simulation of large-scale virtual environment possible.

  19. Contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets on collision with mineral dust particles: effect of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Duft, Denis; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets is one of the potentially important and the least investigated heterogeneous mechanism of ice formation in the tropospheric clouds [1]. On the time scales of cloud lifetime the freezing of supercooled water droplets via contact mechanism may occur at higher temperature compared to the same IN immersed in the droplet. However, the laboratory experiments of contact freezing are very challenging due to the number of factors affecting the probability of ice formation. In our experiment we study single water droplets freely levitated in the laminar flow of mineral dust particles acting as the contact freezing nuclei. By repeating the freezing experiment sufficient number of times we are able to reproduce statistical freezing behavior of large ensembles of supercooled droplets and measure the average rate of freezing events. We show that the rate of freezing at given temperature is governed only by the rate of droplet -particle collision and by the properties of the contact ice nuclei. In this contribution we investigate the relationship between the freezing probability and the size of mineral dust particle (represented by illite) and show that their IN efficiency scales with the particle size. Based on this observation, we discuss the similarity between the freezing of supercooled water droplets in immersion and contact modes and possible mechanisms of apparent enhancement of the contact freezing efficiency. [1] - K.C. Young, The role of contact nucleation in ice phase initiation in clouds, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 31, 1974

  20. The nature of (sub-)micrometre cometary dust particles detected with MIDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannel, T.; Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.; Schmied, R.

    2015-10-01

    The MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) onboard Rosetta collects dust particles and produces three-dimensional images with nano- to micrometre resolution. To date, several tens of particles have been detected, allowing determination of their properties at the smallest scale. The key features will be presented, including the particle size, their fragile character, and their morphology. These findings will be compared with the results of other Rosetta dust experiments.

  1. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  2. Evolution of Cometary Dust Particles to the Orbit of the Earth: Particle Size, Shape, and Mutual Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongu; Ishiguro, Masateru

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we numerically investigated the orbital evolution of cometary dust particles, with special consideration of the initial size–frequency distribution (SFD) and different evolutionary tracks according to the initial orbit and particle shape. We found that close encounters with planets (mostly Jupiter) are the dominating factor determining the orbital evolution of dust particles. Therefore, the lifetimes of cometary dust particles (∼250,000 yr) are shorter than the Poynting–Robertson lifetime, and only a small fraction of large cometary dust particles can be transferred into orbits with small semimajor axes. The exceptions are dust particles from 2P/Encke and, potentially, active asteroids that have little interaction with Jupiter. We also found that the effects of dust shape, mass density, and SFD were not critical in the total mass supply rate to the interplanetary dust particle (IDP) cloud complex when these quantities are confined by observations of zodiacal light brightness and SFD around the Earth’s orbit. When we incorporate a population of fluffy aggregates discovered in the Earth’s stratosphere and the coma of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko within the initial ejection, the initial SFD measured at the comae of comets (67P and 81P/Wild 2) can produce the observed SFD around the Earth’s orbit. Considering the above effects, we derived the probability of mutual collisions among dust particles within the IDP cloud for the first time in a direct manner via numerical simulation and concluded that mutual collisions can mostly be ignored.

  3. Particle size distribution of brominated flame retardants in house dust from Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Kajiwara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to examine the concentrations, profiles, and mass distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs, and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PBDD/Fs based on the particle sizes of house dust samples from five homes in Japan. After removal of impurities from house dust from vacuum cleaner bags, selected indoor dust samples were size fractionated (>2 mm, 1–2 mm, 0.5–1 mm, 250–500 μm, 106–250 μm, 53–106 μm, and 250 μm in size and fluffy dust were included. The conclusion is that particulate dust <250 μm in size without fluffy dust should be used to analyze dust for brominated flame retardants.

  4. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; D’yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M., E-mail: mixxy@mail.ru; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O. [Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia, ul. Lenina 4A (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number (~10{sup 4}) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100–400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  5. Ice Nucleating Particle Properties in the Saharan Air Layer Close to the Dust Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boose, Y.; Garcia, I. M.; Rodríguez, S.; Linke, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Nickovic, S.; Lohmann, U.; Kanji, Z. A.; Sierau, B.

    2015-12-01

    In August 2013 and 2014 measurements of ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations, aerosol particle size distributions, chemistry and fluorescence were conducted at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory located at 2373 m asl on Tenerife, west off the African shore. During summer, the observatory is frequently within the Saharan Air Layer and thus often exposed to dust. Absolute INP concentrations and activated fractions at T=-40 to -15°C and RHi=100-150 % were measured. In this study, we discuss the in-situ measured INP properties with respect to changes in the chemical composition, the biological content, the source regions as well as transport pathways and thus aging processes of the dust aerosol. For the first time, ice crystal residues were also analyzed with regard to biological content by means of their autofluorescence signal close to a major dust source region. Airborne dust samples were collected with a cyclone for additional offline analysis in the laboratory under similar conditions as in the field. Both, in-situ and offline dust samples were chemically characterized using single-particle mass spectrometry. The DREAM8 dust model extended with dust mineral fractions was run to simulate meteorological and dust aerosol conditions for ice nucleation. Results show that the background aerosol at Izaña was dominated by carbonaceous particles, which were hardly ice-active under the investigated conditions. When Saharan dust was present, INP concentrations increased by up to two orders of magnitude even at water subsaturated conditions at T≤-25°C. Differences in the ice-activated fraction were found between different dust periods which seem to be linked to variations in the aerosol chemical composition (dust mixed with changing fractions of sea salt and differences in the dust aerosol itself). Furthermore, two biomass burning events in 2014 were identified which led to very low INP concentrations under the investigated temperature and relative humidity

  6. Effect of non-Maxwellian particle trapping and dust grain charging on dust acoustic solitary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubab, N.; Murtaza, G.; Mushtaq, A.

    2006-01-01

    The role of adiabatic trapped ions on a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic wave, including the effect of adiabatic dust charge variation, is investigated in an unmagnetized three-component dusty plasma consisting of electrons, ions and massive micron sized negatively charged dust particulates. We have assumed that electrons and ions obey (r,q) velocity distribution while the dust species is treated fluid dynamically. It is found that the dynamics of dust acoustic waves is governed by a modified r dependent Korteweg-de Vries equation. Further, the spectral indices (r,q) affect the charge fluctuation as well as the trapping of electrons and ions and consequently modify the dust acoustic solitary wave

  7. DC Glow Discharge Plasma, Containing Dust Particles: Self Organization and Peculiarities of Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, V.I.; Pustyl'nik, M.Y.; Torchinskij, V.M.; Fortov, V.E.

    2003-01-01

    Dust particles, immersed in a plasma, acquire charge due to which they may be electrostatically trapped in a plasma. The energy of the interaction of the dust particles may be enough to transfer the dust component to nonideal and even crystalline state. This phenomenon is observed in various plasmas. In the present work a review of the investigations of strongly nonideal dusty plasma of the dc glow discharge striations is given. The formation of plasma crystals, liquids and plasma liquid crystals is considered. Typical phenomenon a for the dc discharge dusty plasma, such as coexistence of different phases in a single structure, convective motions, dust acoustic instability, are underlined. Results of the experiments on different external influences on dusty plasma structures are stated. It is shown that external influences may be used for measuring of the particle charge and field of forces acting on a dust grain levitating in a plasma. (author)

  8. Primary particles and their agglomerate formation as modifying risk factors of nonfibrous nanosized dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J; Walter, D; Brückel, B; Rödelsperger, K

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of certain cancers correlates with the number of dust particles in the air. Nanosized particles differ from coarser particles by their increasing tendency to form agglomerates. The dissociation of biodurable agglomerates after deposition in the alveolar region resulted in a higher toxic potential. Biodurable dusts in the urban and workplace environment were analyzed to determine an effect-relevant exposure parameter. The characterization of the dusts relating to their number of primary particles (P(p)) and agglomerates and aggregates (A + A) was performed by electron microscopy. Diesel soot, toner material, and seven further dust samples in the workplace environment are composed of high numbers of nanosized primary particles (agglomerates. Primary particles of rock, kaoline, and seven further dusts sampled in the workplace are not nanosized. In a multivariate analysis that predicted lung tumor risk, the mass, volume, and numbers of A + A and P(p) per milligram dust were shown to be relevant parameters. Dose-response relationships revealed an increased tumor risk in rats with higher numbers of P(p) in nanosized dust, which occurs unintentionally in the environment.

  9. Light scattering and absorption properties of dust particles retrieved from satellite measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, R.-M.; Sokhi, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    We use the radiative transfer model and chemistry transport model to improve our retrievals of dust optical properties from satellite measurements. The optical depth and absorbing optical depth of mineral dust can be obtained from our improved retrieval algorithm. We find the nonsphericity and absorption of dust particles strongly affect the scattering signatures such as phase function and polarization at the ultraviolet wavelengths. From our retrieval results, we find the high levels of dust concentration occurred over most desert regions such as Saharan and Gobi deserts. The dust absorption is found to be sensitive to mineral chemical composition, particularly the fraction of strongly absorbing dust particles. The enhancement of polarization at the scattering angles exceeding 120 0 is found for the nonspherical dust particles. If the polarization is neglected in the radiative transfer calculation, a maximum 50 percent error is introduced for the case of forward scattering and 25 percent error for the case of backscattering. We suggest that the application of polarimeter at the ultraviolet wavelengths has the great potential to improve the satellite retrievals of dust properties. Using refined optical model and radiative transfer model to calculate the solar radiative forcing of dust aerosols can reduce the uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing assessment.

  10. Modeling the Interaction of Mineral Dust with Solar Radiation: Spherical versus Non-spherical Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshyaripour, A.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust, emitted from arid and semi-arid regions, is the most dominant atmospheric aerosol by mass. Beside detrimental effect on air quality, airborne dust also influences the atmospheric radiation by absorbing and scattering solar and terrestrial radiation. As a result, while the long-term radiative impacts of dust are important for climate, the short-term effects are significant for the photovoltaic energy production. Therefore, it is a vital requirement to accurately forecast the effects of dust on energy budget of the atmosphere and surface. To this end, a major issue is the fact that dust particles are non-spherical. Thus, the optical properties of such particles cannot be calculated precisely using the conventional methods like Mie theory that are often used in climate and numerical weather forecast models. In this study, T-Matrix method is employed, which is able to treat the non-sphericity of particles. Dust particles are assumed to be prolate spheroids with aspect ratio of 1.5 distributed in three lognormal modes. The wavelength-dependent refractive indices of dust are used in T-Matrix algorithm to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and backscattering ratio at different wavelengths. These parameters are then implemented in ICON-ART model (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic model with Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) to conduct a global simulation with 80 km horizontal resolution and 90 vertical levels. April 2014 is selected as the simulation period during which North African dust plumes reached central Europe and Germany. Results show that treatment of non-sphericity reduces the dust AOD in the range of 10 to 30%/. The impacts on diffuse and direct radiation at global, regional and local scales show strong dependency on the size distribution of the airborne dust. The implications for modeling and remote sensing the dust impacts on solar energy are also discussed.

  11. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  12. Ablation and chemical alteration of cosmic dust particles during entry into the earth`s atmosphere

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Dey, S.; Plane, J.M.C.; Feng, W.; Carrillo-Sanchez, J.D.; Fernandes, D.

    Most dust-sized cosmic particles undergo ablation and chemical alteration during atmospheric entry, which alters their original properties. A comprehensive understanding of this process is essential in order to decipher their pre...

  13. The origin of low mass particles within and beyond the dust coma envelopes of Comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Tuzzolino, A. J.; Ksanfomality, L. V.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements from the Dust Counter and Mass Analyzer (DUCMA) instruments on VEGA-1 and -2 revealed unexpected fluxes of low mass (up to 10 to the minus 13th power g) dust particles at very great distances from the nucleus (300,000 to 600,000 km). These particles are detected in clusters (10 sec duration), preceded and followed by relatively long time intervals during which no dust is detected. This cluster phenomenon also occurs inside the envelope boundaries. Clusters of low mass particles are intermixed with the overall dust distribution throughout the coma. The clusters account for many of the short-term small-scale intensity enhancements previously ascribed to microjets in the coma. The origin of these clusters appears to be emission from the nucleus of large conglomerates which disintegrate in the coma to yield clusters of discrete, small particles continuing outward to the distant coma.

  14. Ultrasonic Sorter for Handling and Collecting Dust or Soil Particles Separated by Size/Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, I.; Pinto, A.

    2018-04-01

    A new device is proposed consisting of an endless screw attached to a small sorter actuated by ultrasounds where particles collect from soil or dust to be separated and collected in different reservoirs for their return to the Earth.

  15. Dust particle charge and screening in the collisional RF plasma sheath

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Trienekens, D.J.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Sprouse, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    Once immersed in plasma, a dust particle gathers a highly negative charge due to the net collection of free electrons. In most plasma's on earth and with particle sizes is in the micrometer range, the gravitational force is dominant and consequently the particle ends up within the plasma sheath

  16. Does the source migration pathway of HBCDs to household dust influence their bio-accessibility?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Alcega, Sonia [Soil Research Centre, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AH (United Kingdom); Rauert, Cassie; Harrad, Stuart [School of Geography Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Collins, Chris D., E-mail: c.d.collins@reading.ac.uk [Soil Research Centre, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AH (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    A study was conducted to assess the human bioaccessibility of dust contaminated with hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) via two migration pathways a) volatilisation with subsequent partitioning to dust particles, and b) abrasion of treated textile fibres directly to the dust. This was achieved using previously developed experimental chamber designs to generate dust samples contaminated with HBCDs emitted from a HBCD treated textile curtain. The generated dust samples were exposed to an in vitro colon extended physiologically based extraction test (CE-PBET). The bioaccessibility of the HBCDs which were incorporated within dust as a result of volatilisation from the curtain material with subsequent partitioning to dust was higher than in dusts contaminated with HBCDs via abrasion of the curtain (35% and 15% respectively). We propose this occurs due to a stronger binding of HBCDs to treated fabric fibres than that experienced following volatilisation and sorption of HBCDs to dust particles. - Highlights: • Migration pathways via which HBCDs enter dust influences its bioaccessibility. • HBCDs more bioaccessible when incorporated to dust via volatilisation. • Contamination of dusts is more variable via abrasion than volatilisation.

  17. Does the source migration pathway of HBCDs to household dust influence their bio-accessibility?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Alcega, Sonia; Rauert, Cassie; Harrad, Stuart; Collins, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the human bioaccessibility of dust contaminated with hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) via two migration pathways a) volatilisation with subsequent partitioning to dust particles, and b) abrasion of treated textile fibres directly to the dust. This was achieved using previously developed experimental chamber designs to generate dust samples contaminated with HBCDs emitted from a HBCD treated textile curtain. The generated dust samples were exposed to an in vitro colon extended physiologically based extraction test (CE-PBET). The bioaccessibility of the HBCDs which were incorporated within dust as a result of volatilisation from the curtain material with subsequent partitioning to dust was higher than in dusts contaminated with HBCDs via abrasion of the curtain (35% and 15% respectively). We propose this occurs due to a stronger binding of HBCDs to treated fabric fibres than that experienced following volatilisation and sorption of HBCDs to dust particles. - Highlights: • Migration pathways via which HBCDs enter dust influences its bioaccessibility. • HBCDs more bioaccessible when incorporated to dust via volatilisation. • Contamination of dusts is more variable via abrasion than volatilisation.

  18. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  19. Efficiency of the deposition mode ice nucleation on mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition mode ice nucleation efficiency of various dust aerosols was investigated at cirrus cloud temperatures between 196 and 223 K using the aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere. Arizona test dust (ATD as a reference material and two dust samples from the Takla Makan desert in Asia (AD1 and the Sahara (SD2 were used for the experiments at simulated cloud conditions. The dust particle sizes were almost lognormally distributed with mode diameters between 0.3 and 0.5 μm and geometric standard deviations between 1.6 and 1.9. Deposition ice nucleation was most efficient on ATD particles with ice-active particle fractions of about 0.6 and 0.8 at an ice saturation ratio SiSiSi. This indicates that deposition ice nucleation on mineral particles may not be treated in the same stochastic sense as homogeneous freezing. The suggested formulation of ice activation spectra may be used to calculate the formation rate of ice crystals in models, if the number concentration of dust particles is known. More experimental work is needed to quantify the variability of the ice activation spectra as function of the temperature and dust particle properties.

  20. MIDAS - an atomic force microscope for in-situ imaging of cometary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, H.M.; Ruedenauer, F.G.; Steiger, W.

    1997-02-01

    Comets are interesting bodies, since they are considered to consist of matter remaining in essentially unchanged chemistry from the presolar nebula. Investigation of cometary matter therefore permits to draw conclusion s with respect to the composition of presolar matter. The atomic force microscope MIDAS will be the first instrument to analyze, within ESA's ROSETTA-mission priestine cometary matter in the form of dust particles emitted by comet WIRTANEN during its perihelion in 2013. Within this project, a dust model has been developed, permitting estimation of dust collection times required for statistically significant imaging of cometary particles. The dynamics of dust collection has been developed and experimental dust collection surfaces have been produced making use of modem nanostructuring techniques. Mechanical properties of 3-dimensional piezo-control elements, which are an essential part of the MIDAS microscope, have been determined. (author)

  1. Influence of large dust particles on plasma performance in the HL-2A tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.H., E-mail: huangzh@swip.ac.cn; Yan, L.W.; Feng, Z.; Cheng, J.; Tomita, Y.; Liu, L.; Gao, J.M.; Zhong, W.L.; Jiang, M.; Yang, Q.W.; Xu, Y.; Duan, X.R.

    2015-08-15

    Visible dust particles generated from plasma-facing components (PFCs) and the impact of the dusts on plasma performance as a source of impurities have been studied in the HL-2A tokamak by means of a fast framing camera together with other diagnostics. The camera images display that during a steady state discharge the dusts are accelerated toriodally by the ion drag force and radially by the centrifugal force. The first experimental evidence shows that dust particles originating from the high field side (HFS) lead to a significant reduction of central electron temperature and divertor heat flux, a considerable rise of total radiated power and effective charge, and a slight growth of local electron density. The results reveal that the dusts at the HFS have much stronger effects on plasma performance than those at the low field side (LFS)

  2. Note: Electrostatic detection of stainless steel dust particles for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landy, P. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Skinner, C. H.; Schneider, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Dust accumulation inside next-step fusion devices poses a significant safety concern and dust diagnostics will be needed to assure safe operations. An electrostatic dust detection device has been successfully demonstrated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, Tore Supra, and the Large Helical Device, and the detector's response to carbon particles was previously characterized in laboratory experiments. This paper presents laboratory results showing that detection of stainless steel particles at levels as low as several μg/cm{sup 2} is also possible.

  3. Electrical time resolved metrology of dust particles growing in low pressure cold plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattieaux, Gaeetan [PRISME, Orleans University, 12 rue de Blois BP 6744, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Mezeghrane, Abdelaziz [LPCQ, Mouloud Mammeri University, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Boufendi, Laiefa [GREMI, Orleans University, 14 rue d' Issoudun BP 6744, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France)

    2011-09-15

    The electrical parameters of a capacitively coupled radiofrequency (CCRF) discharge change significantly when dust arises in the discharge. This work demonstrates the ability to follow in real time the evolution of the size and of the concentration of dust particles forming in a CCRF discharge from the variation of the electron density and of the self-bias voltage of the active electrode. According to experimental findings, it appears that the variation of this self-bias voltage depends on the surface of the dust particles. This trend is confirmed by an analytical modelling considering the low frequency behaviour of the phenomenon.

  4. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmora, Adilson C. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Institute for Environmental Assessment and Water Studies (IDÆA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Teixeira, Elba C. [Fundação Estadual de Proteção Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500. Bairro Agronomia. CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle

  5. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmora, Adilson C.; Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S.; Teixeira, Elba C.; Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R.; Brum, Irineu A.S. de

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , and Fe 2 O 3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical

  6. Particle size fractionation and human exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in indoor dust from Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua; Turyk, Mary; Cali, Salvatore; Dorevitch, Samuel; Erdal, Serap; Li, An

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the concentration level, the mass distribution based on dust particle size, and the associated human exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in indoor dust. The total concentration of 13 PBDEs Sigma(13)(BDEs) was found to be 500-6,944 ng/g in indoor dusts, 4,000 ng/g in car interior dust, 260-300 ng/g in outdoor ambient air particles, 30 ng/g in carpet fibers, and as high as 0.5% in carpet padding. Selected dust samples were fractionated based on particle size, and over 80% of the Sigma(13)BDEs were associated with particles exposure of Americans to PBDEs via hand-to-mouth transfer of house dust was estimated under the central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure scenarios. The results suggest that ingestion of PBDE-laden house dust via hand-to-mouth contact is likely a significant exposure pathway, especially for children.

  7. Particle size traces modern Saharan dust transport and deposition across the equatorial North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van der Does

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust has a large impact on regional and global climate, depending on its particle size. Especially in the Atlantic Ocean downwind of the Sahara, the largest dust source on earth, the effects can be substantial but are poorly understood. This study focuses on seasonal and spatial variations in particle size of Saharan dust deposition across the Atlantic Ocean, using an array of submarine sediment traps moored along a transect at 12° N. We show that the particle size decreases downwind with increased distance from the Saharan source, due to higher gravitational settling velocities of coarse particles in the atmosphere. Modal grain sizes vary between 4 and 32 µm throughout the different seasons and at five locations along the transect. This is much coarser than previously suggested and incorporated into climate models. In addition, seasonal changes are prominent, with coarser dust in summer and finer dust in winter and spring. Such seasonal changes are caused by transport at higher altitudes and at greater wind velocities during summer than in winter. Also, the latitudinal migration of the dust cloud, associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, causes seasonal differences in deposition as the summer dust cloud is located more to the north and more directly above the sampled transect. Furthermore, increased precipitation and more frequent dust storms in summer coincide with coarser dust deposition. Our findings contribute to understanding Saharan dust transport and deposition relevant for the interpretation of sedimentary records for climate reconstructions, as well as for global and regional models for improved prediction of future climate.

  8. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  9. Evaluating Ice Nucleating Particle Concentrations From Prognostic Dust Minerals in an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Knopf, D. A.; Fridlind, A. M.; Miller, R. L.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; DeMott, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of aerosol particles on the radiative properties of clouds, the so-called, indirect effect of aerosols, is recognized as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate prediction. The distribution of water vapor, precipitation, and ice cloud formation are influenced by the atmospheric ice formation, thereby modulating cloud albedo and thus climate. It is well known that different particle types possess different ice formation propensities with mineral dust being a superior ice nucleating particle (INP) compared to soot particles. Furthermore, some dust mineral types are more proficient INP than others, depending on temperature and relative humidity.In recent work, we have presented an improved dust aerosol module in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE2 with prognostic mineral composition of the dust aerosols. Thus, there are regional variations in dust composition. We evaluated the predicted mineral fractions of dust aerosols by comparing them to measurements from a compilation of about 60 published literature references. Additionally, the capability of the model to reproduce the elemental composition of the simulated dusthas been tested at Izana Observatory at Tenerife, Canary Islands, which is located off-shore of Africa and where frequent dust events are observed. We have been able to show that the new approach delivers a robust improvement of the predicted mineral fractions and elemental composition of dust.In the current study, we use three-dimensional dust mineral fields and thermodynamic conditions, which are simulated using GISS ModelE, to calculate offline the INP concentrations derived using different ice nucleation parameterizations that are currently discussed. We evaluate the calculated INP concentrations from the different parameterizations by comparing them to INP concentrations from field measurements.

  10. On the sizes and observable effects of dust particles in polar mesospheric winter echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnes, O.; Kassa, M.

    2009-05-01

    In the present paper, recent radar and heating experiments on the polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are analyzed with the radar overshoot model. The PMWE dust particles that influence the radar backscatter most likely have sizes around 3 nm. For dust to influence the electrons in the PMWE layers, it must be charged; therefore, we have discussed the charging of nanometer-sized particles and found that the photodetachment effect, where photons of energy less than the work function of the dust material can remove excess electrons, probably is dominant at sunlit conditions. For moderate and low electron densities, very few of the dust smaller than ˜3 nm will be charged. We suggest that the normal requirement that disturbed magnetospheric conditions with ionizing precipitation must be present to create observable PMWE is needed mainly to create sufficiently high electron densities to overcome the photodetachment effect and charge the PMWE dust particles. We have also suggested other possible effects of the photodetachment on the occurrence rate of the PMWE. We attribute the lack of PMWE-like radar scattering layers in the lower mesosphere during the summer not only to a lower level of turbulence than in winter but also to that dust particles are removed from these layers due to the upward wind draught in the summer mesospheric circulation system. It is likely that this last effect will completely shut off the PMWE-like radar layers in the lower parts of the mesosphere.

  11. Aerosol Particles from Dried Salt-Lakes and Saline Soils Carried on Dust Storms over Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of individual particles from a super dust storm (DS on 20 March 2002, and those of non dust storm aero sols for Beijing (NDS and Duolun (DL (a desert area are determined using a variety of methods. In China, typically the source of aero sols in dust storms is thought to be deserts with alumino silicates being the main constituent particles; how ever, this does not reflect a complete analysis with our evidence indicating potential alternate dust sources along the storm's trans port path. Individual particle anal y sis of aero sols collected from a super dust storm on 20 March 2002 in Beijing shows that among all the 14 elements measured, only S and Cl have re mark able positive correlation. 82.5% of all particles measured contained both S and Cl, and the relative mass per cent age of S and Cl in these particles is much higher than the average of all particles. 62.0% of all particles contained S, Cl, and Na, in which the concentration of Na is 1.4 times higher than average. PMF (Positive Matrix Factorization anal y sis indicates that NaCl and Na2SO4 are major components of these particles with S and Cl showing significant positive correlation. More over, SO4 2- and Cl- also show significant positive correlation in bulk aero sol analysis. XPS (X-ray Pho to electron Spectros copy analysis of the surface of aero sols demonstrates that concentrations of Na and S on particles from the dust storm are higher than those from non-dust storm particles in Beijing and also for particles from. It is very likely that particles enriched with S, Cl, and Na is from the surface soils of dried salt-lakes and saline soils enriched with chloride and sulfate. This evidence demonstrates that be sides deserts, surface soils from dry salt-lakes and saline soils of arid and semi-arid areas are also sources of particulates in dust storms over Beijing.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  13. Influence of the RF electrode cleanliness on plasma characteristics and dust-particle generation in methane dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géraud-Grenier, I.; Desdions, W.; Faubert, F.; Mikikian, M.; Massereau-Guilbaud, V.

    2018-01-01

    The methane decomposition in a planar RF discharge (13.56 MHz) leads both to a dust-particle generation in the plasma bulk and to a coating growth on the electrodes. Growing dust-particles fall onto the grounded electrode when they are too heavy. Thus, at the end of the experiment, the grounded electrode is covered by a coating and by fallen dust-particles. During the dust-particle growth, the negative DC self-bias voltage (VDC) increases because fewer electrons reach the RF electrode, leading to a more resistive plasma and to changes in the plasma chemical composition. In this paper, the cleanliness influence of the RF electrode on the dust-particle growth, on the plasma characteristics and composition is investigated. A cleanliness electrode is an electrode without coating and dust-particles on its surface at the beginning of the experiment.

  14. Corneal Abrasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your eyes. When particles get through and land on your cornea, tears help to wash the ... or removing your contacts. Around the house, be extra careful when you use cleaning products, especially drain ...

  15. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Craven, Paul D.; Spann, James F.; Tankosic, Dragana; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for levitating single isolated dust particles in an electrodynamics balance has been developing at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for conducting a variety of experimental, of astrophysical interest. The objective of this research is to employ this innovative experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of the analogs of cosmic grains of 0.2-10 micron size in a chamber with controlled pressure/temperatures simulating astrophysical environments. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to investigate the microphysics of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. These measurements will provide the much-needed photoelectric emission data relating to individual particles as opposed to that for the bulk materials available so far. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles obtained by irradiating the particles with radiation from tunable infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. Specifically, the complex refractive indices, the extinction coefficients, the scattering phase functions, and the polarization properties of single dust grains of interest in interstellar environments, in the 1-25 micron spectral region will be determined. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the deposition of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The increase in the mass or m/q ratio due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data wild permit determination of the sticking efficiencies of volatile gases of astrophysical interest. Preliminary results based on photoelectric emission experiments on 0.2-6.6 micron

  16. Metastable carbon in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietmeijer, F.J.M.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.

    1986-01-01

    An understanding of carbonaceous matter in primitive extraterrestrial materials is an essential component of studies on dust evolution in the interstellar medium and the early history of the Solar System. Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) on carbonaceous material in two Chondritic Porous (CP) aggregrates is presented. The study suggests that a record of hydrocarbon carbonization may also be preserved in these materials

  17. The Effect of Dust Particles on Cellulose Degradation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartl, B.; Mašková, Ludmila; Paulusová, H.; Smolík, Jiří; Bartlová, L.; Vodička, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2016), s. 203-208 ISSN 0039-3630 R&D Projects: GA MK DF11P01OVV020 Keywords : cellulose * paper * dust Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.578, year: 2016

  18. Particle size: a missing factor in risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals in settled indoor dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhi-Guo; Yu, Gang; Chen, Yong-Shan; Cao, Qi-Ming; Fiedler, Heidelore; Deng, Shu-Bo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2012-11-15

    For researches on toxic chemicals in settled indoor dust, selection of dust fraction is a critical influencing factor to the accuracy of human exposure risk assessment results. However, analysis of the selection of dust fraction in recent studies revealed that there is no consensus. This study classified and presented researches on distribution of toxic chemicals according to dust particle size and on relationship between dust particle size and human exposure possibility. According to the literature, beyond the fact that there were no consistent conclusions on particle size distribution of adherent fraction, dust with particle size less than 100 μm should be paid more attention and that larger than 250 μm is neither adherent nor proper for human exposure risk assessment. Calculation results based on literature data show that with different selections of dust fractions, analytical results of toxic chemicals would vary up to 10-fold, which means that selecting dust fractions arbitrarily will lead to large errors in risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals in settled dust. Taking into account the influence of dust particle size on risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals, a new methodology for risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals in settled indoor dust is proposed and human exposure parameter systems to settled indoor dust are advised to be established at national and regional scales all over the world. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On the secondary charging effects and structure of mesospheric dust particles impacting on rocket probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Havnes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The dust probe DUSTY, first launched during the summer of 1994 (flights ECT–02 and ECT–07 from Andøya Rocket Range, northern Norway, was the first probe to unambiguously detect heavy charged mesospheric aerosols, from hereon referred to as dust. In ECT–02 the probe detected negatively charged dust particles in the height interval of 83 to 88.5 km. In this flight, the lower grid in the detector (Grid 2 measures both positive and negative currents in various regions, and we find that the relationship between the current measurements of Grid 2 and the bottom plate can only be explained by influence from secondary charge production on Grid 2. In ECT–07, which had a large coning, positive currents reaching the top grid of the probe were interpreted as due to the impact of positively charged dust particles. We have now reanalyzed the data from ECT–07 and arrived at the conclusion that the measured positive currents to this grid must have been mainly due to secondary charging effects from the impacting dust particles. The grid consists of a set of parallel wires crossed with an identical set of wires on top of it, and we find that if the observed currents were created from the direct impact of charged dust particles, then they should be very weakly modulated at four times the rocket spin rate ωR. Observations show, however, that the observed currents are strongly modulated at 2ωR. We cannot reproduce the observed large modulations of the impact currents in the dust layer if the currents are due only to the transfer of the charges on the impacted dust particles. Based on the results of recent ice cluster impact secondary charging experiments by Tomsic (2003, which found that a small fraction of the ice clusters, when impacting with nearly grazing incidence, carried away one negative charge −1e, we have arrived at the conclusion that similar, but significantly more effective, charging effects must be predominantly responsible for the

  20. On the secondary charging effects and structure of mesospheric dust particles impacting on rocket probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Havnes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The dust probe DUSTY, first launched during the summer of 1994 (flights ECT–02 and ECT–07 from Andøya Rocket Range, northern Norway, was the first probe to unambiguously detect heavy charged mesospheric aerosols, from hereon referred to as dust. In ECT–02 the probe detected negatively charged dust particles in the height interval of 83 to 88.5 km. In this flight, the lower grid in the detector (Grid 2 measures both positive and negative currents in various regions, and we find that the relationship between the current measurements of Grid 2 and the bottom plate can only be explained by influence from secondary charge production on Grid 2. In ECT–07, which had a large coning, positive currents reaching the top grid of the probe were interpreted as due to the impact of positively charged dust particles. We have now reanalyzed the data from ECT–07 and arrived at the conclusion that the measured positive currents to this grid must have been mainly due to secondary charging effects from the impacting dust particles. The grid consists of a set of parallel wires crossed with an identical set of wires on top of it, and we find that if the observed currents were created from the direct impact of charged dust particles, then they should be very weakly modulated at four times the rocket spin rate ωR. Observations show, however, that the observed currents are strongly modulated at 2ωR. We cannot reproduce the observed large modulations of the impact currents in the dust layer if the currents are due only to the transfer of the charges on the impacted dust particles. Based on the results of recent ice cluster impact secondary charging experiments by Tomsic (2003, which found that a small fraction of the ice clusters, when impacting with nearly grazing incidence, carried away one negative charge −1e, we have arrived at the conclusion that similar, but significantly more effective, charging effects must

  1. Scattering Properties of Large Irregular Cosmic Dust Particles at Visible Wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Palmer, C.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Penttilä, A.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of internal inhomogeneities and surface roughness on the scattering behavior of large cosmic dust particles is studied by comparing model simulations with laboratory measurements. The present work shows the results of an attempt to model a dust sample measured in the laboratory with simulations performed by a ray-optics model code. We consider this dust sample as a good analogue for interplanetary and interstellar dust as it shares its refractive index with known materials in these media. Several sensitivity tests have been performed for both structural cases (internal inclusions and surface roughness). Three different samples have been selected to mimic inclusion/coating inhomogeneities: two measured scattering matrices of hematite and white clay, and a simulated matrix for water ice. These three matrices are selected to cover a wide range of imaginary refractive indices. The selection of these materials also seeks to study astrophysical environments of interest such as Mars, where hematite and clays have been detected, and comets. Based on the results of the sensitivity tests shown in this work, we perform calculations for a size distribution of a silicate-type host particle model with inclusions and surface roughness to reproduce the experimental measurements of a dust sample. The model fits the measurements quite well, proving that surface roughness and internal structure play a role in the scattering pattern of irregular cosmic dust particles.

  2. A kinetic model for low pressure glow discharges in the presence of dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dezhen; Dong, J.Q.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    A kinetic model for electrons in dusty plasmas is developed. The Boltzmann and the dust charging balance equations are solved self-consistently. The dependence of the dust particle surface potential on plasma parameters and the effects of particulate contamination on electron energy distribution are investigated for direct-current argon glow discharges. It is shown that the dust particle surface potential obtained from this model is higher than that obtained for a Maxwellian electron distribution, and that the higher energy portion of the electron distribution is reduced in the presence of dust particles. Electron-dust collection and electron-atom inelastic collision are the main electron energy loss processes, and the electron energy loss due to electron-dust elastic collision is negligibly small for 10 -16 V cm 2 -15 V cm 2 under the discharge conditions considered in this work, where E is the externally applied electric field and N is the argon atom density. (author). 16 refs, 8 figs

  3. Scattering Properties of Large Irregular Cosmic Dust Particles at Visible Wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Palmer, C.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F. [Instituto de Astrofìsica de Andalucìa, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomìa s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Penttilä, A.; Muinonen, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-03-20

    The effect of internal inhomogeneities and surface roughness on the scattering behavior of large cosmic dust particles is studied by comparing model simulations with laboratory measurements. The present work shows the results of an attempt to model a dust sample measured in the laboratory with simulations performed by a ray-optics model code. We consider this dust sample as a good analogue for interplanetary and interstellar dust as it shares its refractive index with known materials in these media. Several sensitivity tests have been performed for both structural cases (internal inclusions and surface roughness). Three different samples have been selected to mimic inclusion/coating inhomogeneities: two measured scattering matrices of hematite and white clay, and a simulated matrix for water ice. These three matrices are selected to cover a wide range of imaginary refractive indices. The selection of these materials also seeks to study astrophysical environments of interest such as Mars, where hematite and clays have been detected, and comets. Based on the results of the sensitivity tests shown in this work, we perform calculations for a size distribution of a silicate-type host particle model with inclusions and surface roughness to reproduce the experimental measurements of a dust sample. The model fits the measurements quite well, proving that surface roughness and internal structure play a role in the scattering pattern of irregular cosmic dust particles.

  4. The case study on elemental analyses of Asian dust particles by using an analytical scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Jo; Masaki, Kazushige; Emoto, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    The individual particle analyses of suspended particulate matter (SPM: particles less than 10 μm in size) collected on tape filters during April 17-18, 2006, in Kawasaki, Japan, were carried out. The chemical elements present in aerosol particles were investigated by using a scanning electron microscope with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The fraction of chemical elements detected in the particles collected on April 18, 2006, except for S, was in good agreement with that in Asian dust particles from the Loess Plateau, China. S was not detected in Asian dust particles but was detected in the particles collected on April 18, 2006. Therefore, it was concluded that the particles collected in April 18, 2006, in Kawasaki were Asian dust particles transported from the Asian continent, and the absorption of SO 2 or the coagulation of sulfate occurred during the transportation of Asian dust particles. (author)

  5. Characterization of abrasion-induced nanoparticle release from paints into liquids and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanski, L.; Gaborieau, A.; Guiot, A.; Uzu, G.; Chatenet, J.; Tardif, F.

    2011-07-01

    Two standard methods for the characterization of the abrasion nanoparticle release into air and liquid from coatings containing nanoparticles were developed. Details of the abrasion processes and the measurement methods are shown. Paints were formulated in an industrial facility. Standard abrasion conditions in wet environments were simulated. The size distribution of the particles abraded into liquid was analyzed by a laser granulometer: submicrometric and micrometric particles were observed, but no nanometric particles. The nanoparticles released in liquid were deposited on filters for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. No free or agglomerated nanoparticles were observed by SEM: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix. The same coatings were abraded in the air using another standard method. The ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor) was used to determine the number size distribution of the dust generated. Abrasion is found to produce submicrometric and micrometric particles in the air but no nanoparticles. Further characterizations by SEM confirmed that no free or agglomerated nanoparticles were emitted: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix.

  6. Characterization of abrasion-induced nanoparticle release from paints into liquids and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golanski, L; Guiot, A; Uzu, G; Tardif, F; Gaborieau, A; Chatenet, J

    2011-01-01

    Two standard methods for the characterization of the abrasion nanoparticle release into air and liquid from coatings containing nanoparticles were developed. Details of the abrasion processes and the measurement methods are shown. Paints were formulated in an industrial facility. Standard abrasion conditions in wet environments were simulated. The size distribution of the particles abraded into liquid was analyzed by a laser granulometer: submicrometric and micrometric particles were observed, but no nanometric particles. The nanoparticles released in liquid were deposited on filters for SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis. No free or agglomerated nanoparticles were observed by SEM: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix. The same coatings were abraded in the air using another standard method. The ELPI (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor) was used to determine the number size distribution of the dust generated. Abrasion is found to produce submicrometric and micrometric particles in the air but no nanoparticles. Further characterizations by SEM confirmed that no free or agglomerated nanoparticles were emitted: nanoparticles seem to remain embedded in the paint matrix.

  7. Detection of cometary dust particles by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedenauer, F.G.; Fehringer, H.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report contains a collection of manuscripts written by ARCS personnell which have been used in the formulation of the instrument proposal 'Micro - Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS)' for the comet orbiter of the ESA - mission ROSETTA. Since in the proposal itself the scientific problems can only be expounded in a very compressed form, this collection of manuscripts is intended to serve as a basis for extended investigations necessary in the course of the MIDAS project. (author)

  8. Asian Dust particles impacts on air quality and radiative forcing over Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y J; Noh, Y M; Song, C H; Yoon, S C; Han, J S

    2009-01-01

    Asian Dust particles originated from the deserts and loess areas of the Asian continent are often transported over Korea, Japan, and the North Pacific Ocean during spring season. Major air mass pathway of Asian dust storm to Korea is from either north-western Chinese desert regions or north-eastern Chinese sandy areas. The local atmospheric environment condition in Korea is greatly impacted by Asian dust particles transported by prevailing westerly wind. Since these Asian dust particles pass through heavily populated urban and industrial areas in China before it reach Korean peninsular, their physical, chemical and optical properties vary depending on the atmospheric conditions and air mass pathway characteristics. An integrated system approach has been adopted at the Advanced Environment Monitoring Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosols utilizing various in-situ and optical remote sensing methods, which include a multi-channel Raman LIDAR system, sunphotometer, satellite, and in-situ instruments. Results from recent studies on impacts of Asian dust particles on local air quality and radiative forcing over Korea are summarized here.

  9. Investigation of dust particle removal efficiency of self-priming venturi scrubber using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarim Ahmed

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A venturi scrubber is an important element of Filtered Containment Venting System (FCVS for the removal of aerosols in contaminated air. The present work involves computational fluid dynamics (CFD study of dust particle removal efficiency of a venturi scrubber operating in self-priming mode using ANSYS CFX. Titanium oxide (TiO2 particles having sizes of 1 micron have been taken as dust particles. CFD methodology to simulate the venturi scrubber has been first developed. The cascade atomization and breakup (CAB model has been used to predict deformation of water droplets, whereas the Eulerian–Lagrangian approach has been used to handle multiphase flow involving air, dust, and water. The developed methodology has been applied to simulate venturi scrubber geometry taken from the literature. Dust particle removal efficiency has been calculated for forced feed operation of venturi scrubber and found to be in good agreement with the results available in the literature. In the second part, venturi scrubber along with a tank has been modeled in CFX, and transient simulations have been performed to study self-priming phenomenon. Self-priming has been observed by plotting the velocity vector fields of water. Suction of water in the venturi scrubber occurred due to the difference between static pressure in the venturi scrubber and the hydrostatic pressure of water inside the tank. Dust particle removal efficiency has been calculated for inlet air velocities of 1 m/s and 3 m/s. It has been observed that removal efficiency is higher in case of higher inlet air velocity. Keywords: Computational Fluid Dynamics, Dust Particles, Filtered Containment Venting System, Self-priming Venturi Scrubber, Venturi Scrubber

  10. Experimental and modeling researches of dust particles in the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Hui; Yan, Long-Wen; Tomita, Yukihiro; Feng, Zhen; Cheng, Jun; Hong, Wen-Yu; Pan, Yu-Dong; Yang, Qing-Wei; Duan, Xu-Ru

    2015-02-01

    The investigation of dust particle characteristics in fusion devices has become more and more imperative. In the HL-2A tokamak, the morphologies and compositions of dust particles are analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) with mapping. The results indicate that the sizes of dust particles are in a range from 1 μm to 1 mm. Surprisingly, stainless steel spheres with a diameter of 2.5 μm-30 μm are obtained. The production mechanisms of dust particles include flaking, disintegration, agglomeration, and arcing. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the flaking dust particles are observed by a CMOS fast framing camera and simulated by a computer program. Both of the results display that the ion friction force is dominant in the toroidal direction, while the centrifugal force is crucial in the radial direction. Therefore, the visible dust particles are accelerated toriodally by the ion friction force and migrated radially by the centrifugal force. The averaged velocity of the grain is on the order of ˜ 100 m/s. These results provide an additional supplement for one of critical plasma-wall interaction (PWI) issues in the framework of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB107000 and 2013GB112008), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11320101005, 11175060, 11375054, and 11075046), and the China-Korean Joint Foundation (Grant No. 2012DFG02230).

  11. Efficiency of coherent vortices to trap dust particles in the solar nebula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavanis Pierre-Henri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop the idea proposed by Barge & Sommeria (1995 that large-scale vortices present in the solar nebula can concentrate dust particles and facilitate the formation of planetesimals and planets. We introduce an exact vortex solution of the incompressible 2D Euler equation (Kida vortex and study the motion of dust particles in that vortex. In particular, we derive an analytical expression of the capture time as a function of the friction coefficient and determine the parameters leading to an optimal capture.

  12. Analysis of the dust particles distribution and ventilation as a way to improve indoor air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovtseva, E. Yu; Azarov, V. N.; Stefanenko, I. V.

    2017-10-01

    The indoor air pollution is analyzed in the article. The subject of the research is the presence and composition of the dust particles taken into “traps” in the working space of the public building (Volgograd State Technical University, Volgograd, the Russian Federation). The research has established the range of sizes of the particulate matter (fractional composition) for the dust in the air of the working space in the form of integral curves for the mass distribution of particles with to their diameters, it also provides the scheme of the air flows movement in the ventilation system of the room.

  13. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  14. In-situ detection of micron-sized dust particles in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, E.; Zook, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    In situ detectors for micron sized dust particles based on the measurement of impact ionization have been flown on several space missions (Pioneer 8/9, HEOS-2 and Helios 1/2). Previous measurements of small dust particles in near-Earth space are reviewed. An instrument is proposed for the measurement of micron sized meteoroids and space debris such as solid rocket exhaust particles from on board an Earth orbiting satellite. The instrument will measure the mass, speed, flight direction and electrical charge of individually impacting debris and meteoritic particles. It is a multicoincidence detector of 1000 sq cm sensitive area and measures particle masses in the range from 10 to the -14th power g to 10 to the -8th power g at an impact speed of 10 km/s. The instrument is lightweight (5 kg), consumes little power (4 watts), and requires a data sampling rate of about 100 bits per second.

  15. Machining with abrasives

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    Abrasive machining is key to obtaining the desired geometry and surface quality in manufacturing. This book discusses the fundamentals and advances in the abrasive machining processes. It provides a complete overview of developing areas in the field.

  16. DUST PRODUCTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SUPERNOVA 1987A REVEALED WITH ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indebetouw, R.; Chevalier, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, PO Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Matsuura, M.; Barlow, M. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Dwek, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zanardo, G. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bouchet, P. [CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Burrows, D. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Clayton, G. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Fransson, C.; Lundqvist, P. [Department of Astronomy and the Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gaensler, B. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) (Australia); Kirshner, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lakićević, M. [Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Long, K. S.; Meixner, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Martí-Vidal, I. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Marcaide, J. [Universidad de Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); McCray, R., E-mail: remy@virginia.edu [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, UCB 391, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); and others

    2014-02-10

    Supernova (SN) explosions are crucial engines driving the evolution of galaxies by shock heating gas, increasing the metallicity, creating dust, and accelerating energetic particles. In 2012 we used the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array to observe SN 1987A, one of the best-observed supernovae since the invention of the telescope. We present spatially resolved images at 450 μm, 870 μm, 1.4 mm, and 2.8 mm, an important transition wavelength range. Longer wavelength emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation from shock-accelerated particles, shorter wavelengths by emission from the largest mass of dust measured in a supernova remnant (>0.2 M {sub ☉}). For the first time we show unambiguously that this dust has formed in the inner ejecta (the cold remnants of the exploded star's core). The dust emission is concentrated at the center of the remnant, so the dust has not yet been affected by the shocks. If a significant fraction survives, and if SN 1987A is typical, supernovae are important cosmological dust producers.

  17. Metastable carbon in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietmeijer, F.J.M.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope study is presented on carbonaceous material in two chondritic porous aggregates, W7029* A and W7010* A2, from the Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection. The finding of well-ordered carbon-2H (lonsdaleite) in the two aggregates suggests that a record of hydrocarbon carbonization may be preserved in these materials. This carbon is a metastable phase resulting from hydrous pyrolysis below 300-350 0 C and may be a precursor to poorly graphitized carbons in primitive extra terrestrial materials. (UK)

  18. [Are inhaled dust particles harmful for our lungs?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändli, O

    1996-12-14

    Particles with diameters ranging from less than 0.02 to more than 100 microns and in concentration up to 120 micrograms/m3 daily average TSP (total suspended particles) are measurable in the air of Swiss cities and responsible for the decrease of visibility on the Swiss Plateau and south of the Alps. The particle size shows a typical distribution: the coarse particles (> 2.5 microns mass median diameter) are mostly of natural origin (plants, pollen, earth particles) and are deposited in the upper airways. The fine particles (PM2.5 annual concentrations of 14-53 micrograms/m3 TSP or 10-33 micrograms/m3 PM10, well below the national standard (annual mean TSP 70 micrograms/m3) have been measured in rural and urban areas. Even at these concentrations an increase in respiratory symptoms and a decrease in lung function, without evidence for a "safe" threshold, have been observed in the Swiss study of air pollution and lung diseases in adults (SAPALDIA). Although the noxious effects of the particles cannot be clearly separated from the effect of other pollutants (e.g. NOx, SO2, ozone) in complex pollutant mixtures, the emission standards and national standards for ambient air should be revised, in particular by adding a standard for fine particles (e.g. PM10 or PM2.5).

  19. Hypervelocity dust particle impacts observed by the Giotto magnetometer and plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, F.M.; Glassmeier, K.H.; Goldstein, R.; Acuna, M.H.; Musmann, G.; Coates, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report thirteen very short events in the magnetic field of the inner magnetic pile-up region of comet Halley observed by the Giotto magnetometer experiment together with simultaneous plasma data obtained by the Johnstone plasma analyzer and the ion mass spectrometer experiments. The events are due to dust impacts in the milligram range on the spacecraft at the relative velocity between the cometary dust and the spacecraft of 68 km/sec. They are generally consistent with dust impact events derived from spacecraft attitude perturbations by the Giotto camera [Curdt and Keller, private communication]. Their characteristic shape generally involves a sudden decrease in magnetic field magnitude, a subsequent overshoot beyond initial field values and an asymptotic approach to the initial field somewhat reminiscent of the magnetic field signature after the AMPTE releases in the solar wind. These observations give a new way of analyzing ultra-fast dust particles incident on a spacecraft

  20. Hypervelocity dust particle impacts observed by the Giotto magnetometer and plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Coates, A. J.; Goldstein, R.; Acuna, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes 13 very short events in the magnetic field of the inner magnetic pile-up region of Comet Halley observed by the Giotto magnetometer experiment together with simultaneous plasma data obtained by the Johnstone plasma analyzer and the ion mass spectrometer experiments. The events are due to dust impacts in the milligram range on the spacecraft at the relative velocity between the cometary dust and the spacecraft of 68 km/sec. They are generally consistent with dust impact events derived from spacecraft attitude perturbations by the Giotto camera. Their characteristic shape generally involves a sudden decrease in magnetic-field magnitude, a subsequent overshoot beyond initial field values, and an asymptotic approach to the initial field (somewhat reminiscent of the magnetic-field signature after the AMPTE releases in the solar wind). These observations give a new way of analyzing ultra-fast dust particles incident on a spacecraft.

  1. Inhalation risk and particle size in dust and mist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, C N

    1949-01-01

    This paper presents a critical overview of particle uptake and retention from literature through 1949. Particles > 6-..mu..m are retained in nose, or by secondary bronchi with mouth breathing. Few > 2-..mu..m particles are exhaled, trapped mostly in bronchioles (some by alveoli) by sedimentation. Maximal deposition is 0.4- to 0.8-..mu..m size in bronchioles and alveoli. Minimim retention is at 0.1 to 0.15 ..mu..m; approx. 80% are exhaled. Brownian settling of smaller particles in alveoli occurs. Particles of low density penetrate farther. Slow breathing enhances retention. Soluble toxins may be absorbed at any point along respiratory tract, so deep penetration percentage is moot in most cases.

  2. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  3. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  4. Design of new dusty plasma apparatus to view 3D particle dynamics of fluorescent dust clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Kathreen; Fontanetta, Alexandra; Zwicker, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Particles suspended in dusty plasmas represent both contamination in industrial plasmas and a primary interstellar medium component. Typically, dusty plasma behavior is studied by laser scattering techniques that provide 2D dust cloud images. However, the 3D structure of the dust cloud is essential to understand the waves, group dynamics, and stabilities of the cloud. Techniques used to study this structure include stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and rapid laser scanning. Our UV illumination technique reveals translational and rotational velocities of fluorescent dust particles as a function of UV intensity. The new argon DC glow discharge experiment designed to study the 3D aspects of fluorescent dust consists of a 13.25'' diameter chamber, two 8'' window ports for CCD cameras, one along the plasma and another transverse to it, two additional 8'' window ports transverse to the plasma for laser or UV light illumination of the dust cloud, and a diagnostic probe port. Results from different electrodes--including mesh and ring--observations and imaging will be presented.

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  6. A two-dimensional analytical model of laminar flame in lycopodium dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbari, Alireza [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibi, Ashkan [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bidabadi, Mehdi [Combustion Research Laboratory, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    A two-dimensional analytical model is presented to determine the flame speed and temperature distribution of micro-sized lycopodium dust particles. This model is based on the assumptions that the particle burning rate in the flame front is controlled by the process of oxygen diffusion and the flame structure consists of preheat, reaction and post flame zones. In the first step, the energy conservation equations for fuel-lean condition are expressed in two dimensions, and then these differential equations are solved using the required boundary condition and matching the temperature and heat flux at the interfacial boundaries. Consequently, the obtained flame temperature and flame speed distributions in terms of different particle diameters and equivalence ratio for lean mixture are compared with the corresponding experimental data for lycopodium dust particles. Consequently, it is shown that this two-dimensional model demonstrates better agreement with the experimental results compared to the previous models.

  7. A two-dimensional analytical model of laminar flame in lycopodium dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahbari, Alireza; Shakibi, Ashkan; Bidabadi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional analytical model is presented to determine the flame speed and temperature distribution of micro-sized lycopodium dust particles. This model is based on the assumptions that the particle burning rate in the flame front is controlled by the process of oxygen diffusion and the flame structure consists of preheat, reaction and post flame zones. In the first step, the energy conservation equations for fuel-lean condition are expressed in two dimensions, and then these differential equations are solved using the required boundary condition and matching the temperature and heat flux at the interfacial boundaries. Consequently, the obtained flame temperature and flame speed distributions in terms of different particle diameters and equivalence ratio for lean mixture are compared with the corresponding experimental data for lycopodium dust particles. Consequently, it is shown that this two-dimensional model demonstrates better agreement with the experimental results compared to the previous models.

  8. Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balden, M.; Endstrasser, N.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Rohde, V.; Rasinski, M.; von Toussaint, U.; Elgeti, S.; Neu, R.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-07-01

    The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007-2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ˜50 000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B-C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG.

  9. Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balden, M.; Endstrasser, N.; Rohde, V.; Rasinski, M.; Von Toussaint, U.; Elgeti, S.; Neu, R.; Humrickhouse, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007–2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ∼50 000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B–C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG. (paper)

  10. Real-time mass measurement of dust particles deposited on vessel wall in a divertor simulator using quartz crystal microbalances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Mizuki; Koga, Kazunori; Katayama, Ryu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a dust monitoring method using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) equipped with a dust eliminating filter. Here we report a dust eliminating ratio of the filter and first measurement results of the QCMs in a divertor simulator. The volume of spherical dust in unit area on the filter and QCM under the filter were 2.09 × 10 −9 and 1.22 × 10 −10 m 3 m −2 , respectively. Thus, the dust eliminating ratio of the filter is 94.2%. The QCM without the filter gives deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles, whereas the QCM with the filter gives deposition rate predominantly due to radicals. From the results, we deduce information of mass fraction of dust particles in deposits

  11. On the secondary charging effects and structure of mesospheric dust particles impacting on rocket probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havnes, O.; Naesheim, L.I. [Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Tromso (Norway)

    2007-07-01

    The dust probe DUSTY, first launched during the summer of 1994 (flights ECT-02 and ECT-07) from Andoeya Rocket Range, northern Norway, was the first probe to unambiguously detect heavy charged mesospheric aerosols, from hereon referred to as dust. In ECT-02 the probe detected negatively charged dust particles in the height interval of 83 to 88.5 km. In this flight, the lower grid in the detector (Grid 2) measures both positive and negative currents in various regions, and we find that the relationship between the current measurements of Grid 2 and the bottom plate can only be explained by influence from secondary charge production on Grid 2. In ECT-07, which had a large coning, positive currents reaching the top grid of the probe were interpreted as due to the impact of positively charged dust particles. We have now reanalyzed the data from ECT-07 and arrived at the conclusion that the measured positive currents to this grid must have been mainly due to secondary charging effects from the impacting dust particles. The grid consists of a set of parallel wires crossed with an identical set of wires on top of it, and we find that if the observed currents were created from the direct impact of charged dust particles, then they should be very weakly modulated at four times the rocket spin rate {omega}{sub R}. Observations show, however, that the observed currents are strongly modulated at 2{omega}{sub R}. We cannot reproduce the observed large modulations of the impact currents in the dust layer if the currents are due only to the transfer of the charges on the impacted dust particles. Based on the results of recent ice cluster impact secondary charging experiments by Tomsic (2003), which found that a small fraction of the ice clusters, when impacting with nearly grazing incidence, carried away one negative charge - 1e, we have arrived at the conclusion that similar, but significantly more effective, charging effects must be predominantly responsible for the positive

  12. Abrasive Particle Trajectories and Material Removal Non-Uniformity during CMP and Filtration Characteristics of CMP Slurries - A Simulation and Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, Vahid

    Nanoscale finishing and planarization are integral process steps in multilevel metallization designs for integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing since it is necessary to ensure local and global surface planarization at each metal layer before depositing the next layer. Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) has been widely recognized as the most promising technology to eliminate topographic variation and has allowed the construction of multilevel interconnection structures with a more regularly stacked sequence, resulting in better device performance [1]. Understanding fundamental of the CMP mechanisms can offer guidance to the control and optimization of the polishing processes. CMP kinematics based on slurry distribution and particle trajectories have a significant impact on MRR profiles. In this work a mathematical model to describe particle trajectories during chemical mechanical polishing was developed and extended to account for the effect of larger particles, particle location changes due to slurry dispensing and in-situ conditioning. Material removal rate (MRR) and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) were determined based on the calculated particle trajectory densities. Rotary dynamics and reciprocating motion were optimized to obtain best MRR uniformity. Edge-fast MRR profile was discussed based on mechanical aspect of CMP. Using the model, we also investigated the effect of variable rotational speeds of wafer and pad, and of large particles on WIWNU and scratch growth. It was shown that the presence of even a small portion of large particles can deteriorate the WIWNU significantly and also lead to more scratches. Furthermore, it was shown that the in-situ conditioning improves the uniformity of the polished wafers. Furthermore, a combined experimental and computational study of fibrous filters for removal of larger abrasive particles from aqueous dispersions, essential to minimize defects during chemical mechanical polishing, was performed. Dilute aqueous

  13. Using NASA EOS in the Arabian and Saharan Deserts to Examine Dust Particle Size and Spectral Signature of Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, J. C.; Keeton, T.; Barrick, B.; Cowart, K.; Cooksey, K.; Florence, V.; Herdy, C.; Luvall, J. C.; Vasquez, S.

    2012-12-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of airborne particulate matter can have adverse effects on the human respiratory system. Ground-based studies conducted in Iraq have revealed the presence of potential human pathogens in airborne dust. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), airborne particulate matter below 2.5μm (PM2.5) can cause long-term damage to the human respiratory system. Given the relatively high incidence of new-onset respiratory disorders experienced by US service members deployed to Iraq, this research offers a new glimpse into how satellite remote sensing can be applied to questions related to human health. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) can be used to determine spectral characteristics of dust particles, the depth of dust plumes, as well as dust particle sizes. Comparing dust particle size from the Sahara and Arabian Deserts gives insight into the composition and atmospheric transport characteristics of dust from each desert. With the use of NASA SeaWiFS DeepBlue Aerosol, dust particle sizes were estimated using Angström exponent. Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) equation was used to determine the distribution of particle sizes, the area of the dust storm, and whether silicate minerals were present in the dust. The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra satellite was utilized in calculating BTD. Minimal research has been conducted on the spectral characteristics of airborne dust in the Arabian and Sahara Deserts. Mineral composition of a dust storm that occurred 17 April 2008 near Baghdad was determined using imaging spectrometer data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spectral Library and EO-1 Hyperion data. Mineralogy of this dust storm was subsequently compared to that of a dust storm that occurred over the Bodélé Depression in the Sahara Desert on 7 June 2003.

  14. Particle shape accounts for instrumental discrepancy in ice core dust size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folden Simonsen, Marius; Cremonesi, Llorenç; Baccolo, Giovanni; Bosch, Samuel; Delmonte, Barbara; Erhardt, Tobias; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Potenza, Marco; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2018-05-01

    The Klotz Abakus laser sensor and the Coulter counter are both used for measuring the size distribution of insoluble mineral dust particles in ice cores. While the Coulter counter measures particle volume accurately, the equivalent Abakus instrument measurement deviates substantially from the Coulter counter. We show that the difference between the Abakus and the Coulter counter measurements is mainly caused by the irregular shape of dust particles in ice core samples. The irregular shape means that a new calibration routine based on standard spheres is necessary for obtaining fully comparable data. This new calibration routine gives an increased accuracy to Abakus measurements, which may improve future ice core record intercomparisons. We derived an analytical model for extracting the aspect ratio of dust particles from the difference between Abakus and Coulter counter data. For verification, we measured the aspect ratio of the same samples directly using a single-particle extinction and scattering instrument. The results demonstrate that the model is accurate enough to discern between samples of aspect ratio 0.3 and 0.4 using only the comparison of Abakus and Coulter counter data.

  15. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  16. Significant impacts of heterogeneous reactions on the chemical composition and mixing state of dust particles: A case study during dust events over northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Pan, Xiaole; Uno, Itsushi; Li, Jie; Wang, Zifa; Chen, Xueshun; Fu, Pingqing; Yang, Ting; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Shigekazu

    2017-06-01

    The impact of heterogeneous reactions on the chemical components and mixing state of dust particles are investigated by observations and an air quality model over northern China between March 27, 2015 and April 2, 2015. Synergetic observations were conducted using a polarization optical particle counter (POPC), a depolarized two-wavelength Lidar and filter samples in Beijing. During this period, dust plume passed through Beijing on March 28, and flew back on March 29 because of synoptic weather changes. Mineral dust mixed with anthropogenic pollutants was simulated using the Nested Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (NAQPMS) to examine the role of heterogeneous processes on the dust. A comparison of observations shows that the NAQPMS successfully reproduces the time series of the vertical profile, particulate matter concentration, and chemical components of fine mode (diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) and coarse mode (2.5 μm mixed with dust particles. The significant alterations of the chemical composition and mixing state of particles due to heterogeneous reactions are important for the direct and indirect climate effects of dust and anthropogenic aerosols.

  17. The intact capture of hypervelocity dust particles using underdense foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, Carl R.; Borg, J.; Tanner, William G.; Stevenson, T. J.; Bibring, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The impact of a hypervelocity projectile (greater than 3 km/s) is a process that subjects both the impactor and the impacted material to a large transient pressure distribution. The resultant stresses cause a large degree of fragmentation, melting, vaporization, and ionization (for normal densities). The pressure regime magnitude, however, is directly related to the density relationship between the projectile and target materials. As a consequence, a high-density impactor on a low-density target will experience the lowest level of damage. Historically, there have been three different approaches toward achieving the lowest possible target density. The first employs a projectile impinging on a foil or film of moderate density, but whose thickness is much less than the particle diameter. This results in the particle experiencing a pressure transient with both a short duration and a greatly reduced destructive effect. A succession of these films, spaced to allow nondestructive energy dissipation between impacts, will reduce the impactor's kinetic energy without allowing its internal energy to rise to the point where destruction of the projectile mass will occur. An added advantage to this method is that it yields the possibility of regions within the captured particle where a minimum of thermal modification has taken place. Polymer foams have been employed as the primary method of capturing particles with minimum degradation. The manufacture of extremely low bulk density materials is usually achieved by the introduction of voids into the material base. It must be noted, however, that a foam structure only has a true bulk density of the mixture at sizes much larger than the cell size, since for impact processes this is of paramount importance. The scale at which the bulk density must still be close to that of the mixture is approximately equal to the impactor. When this density criterion is met, shock pressures during impact are minimized, which in turn maximizes the

  18. Method of forming an abrasive compact of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, F.R.

    1976-01-01

    This patent concerns an abrasive compact comprising diamond or cubic boron nitride or mixtures thereof held in a matrix of a refractory substance and a substance which dissolves the abrasive particle to at least a limited extent. The compact may be made by subjecting a powdered mixture of the ingredients to conditions of temperature and pressure at which the abrasive particle is crystallographically stable and the solvent substance acts to dissolve the abrasive particle. The refractory substance and solvent substance are preferably so chosen that during compact manufacture there is interaction resulting in the formation of a hard material

  19. Cleaning power and abrasivity of European toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wülknitz, P

    1997-11-01

    For 41 toothpastes available to European consumers in 1995, the cleaning efficacy was evaluated in comparison with abrasivity on dentin (RDA value). For cleaning power assessment, a modified pellicle cleaning ratio (PCR) measurement method was developed. The method is characterized by a five-day tea-staining procedure on bovine front teeth slabs on a rotating wheel, standardized brushing of the slabs in a V8 cross-brushing machine, and brightness measurement by a chromametric technique. All tested products were in accordance with the new DIN/ISO standard 11,609 for toothpastes in terms of dentin abrasivity. Not a single product exceeded an RDA value of 200. The majority of toothpastes (80%) had an RDA value below 100. Only three products surpassed the reference in cleaning power. Most products (73%) had a cleaning power (PCR value) between 20 and 80. The correlation between cleaning power and dentin abrasion was low (r = 0.66), which can be explained with the different influence on dentin and stains by factors like abrasive type, particle surface and size, as well as the chemical influence of other toothpaste ingredients. Some major trends could be shown on the basis of abrasive types. The ratio PCR to RDA was rather good in most silica-based toothpastes. A lower ratio was found in some products containing calcium carbonate or aluminum trihydrate as the only abrasive. The addition of other abrasives, such as polishing alumina, showed improved cleaning power. Some active ingredients, especially sequenstrants such as sodium tripolyphosphate or AHBP, also improve the PCR/RDA ratio by stain-dissolving action without being abrasive. The data for some special anti-stain products did not differ significantly from standard products. Compared with data measured in 1988, a general trend toward reduced abrasivity without loss of cleaning efficacy could be noticed on the European toothpaste market. This may be mostly due to the increased use of high-performance abrasives such

  20. The origin of the 3.4 micron feature in Wild 2 cometary particles and in ultracarbonaceous interplanetary dust particles

    OpenAIRE

    Matrajt, Graciela; Flynn, George; Brownlee, Don; Joswiak, Dave; Bajt, Sasa

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed 2 ultra-carbonaceous interplanetary dust particles and 2 cometary Wild 2 particles with infrared spectroscopy. We characterized the carrier of the 3.4 micron band in these samples and compared its profile and the CH2/CH3 ratios to the 3.4 micron band in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM), in the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from 3 primitive meteorites, in asteroid 24 Themis and in the coma of comet 103P/Hartley 2. We found that the 3.4 micron band in both Wild 2 and IDPs is ...

  1. Comet Dust: The Story of Planet Formation as Told by the Tiniest of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2005-01-01

    Our planetary system formed out of a gas-rich disk-shaped nebula with the early Sun at its center. Many small icy bodies were consumed by the formation of the giant planets. However, many km-size icy bodies were tossed out of the giant-planet region to the cold, distant reaches of our solar system. Comets remained in their places of cold storage until perturbed into orbits that carry them into the inner solar system where they pass relatively close to the Sun. Comets are warmed by the Sun and shed material from their outer layers. The ices and gases shed by comets reveal simple and complex organic molecules were present at the time and in the region of the formation of the giant planets. Where the Earth was forming was too hot and had too intense sunlight for many of these ices and molecules to survive. The dust shed by comets tells us that some stardust survived unaltered but much of the dust was heated and crystallized before becoming part of the comet. Therefore, comet dust grains tell of large radial migrations from the cold outer reaches near Neptune into the hot regions near the forming Sun, and then back out to the cold regions where icy comets were accreting and forming. On 2005 July 4, the NASA Deep Impact Mission hit a comet and ejected primitive materials fiom its interior. These materials were not released into the comet s coma during normal activity. Despite the many passages of this comet close to the Sun, these primitive volatile gases and dust grains survived in its interior. Comet dust grains show that cold and hot materials were mixed into the same tiny particle very early in the formation of the solar system, and these aggregate dust grains never saw high temperatures again. The survival of primitive materials in comet nuclei suggests comets could have delivered organic molecules and primitive dust grains to early Earth.

  2. The influence of mineral dust particles on the energy output of photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, C.; Eltahir, E. A. B.; Al-awwad, Z.; Alqatari, S.; Cziczo, D. J.; Roesch, M.

    2016-12-01

    The city of Al Khafji in Saudi Arabia plans to provide a regular supply of desalinated water from the Persian Gulf while simultaneously cutting back on the usage of fossil fuels. The power for the high energy-consuming reverse osmosis (RO) process will be derived from photovoltaic (PV) cells as a cleaner and resource-conserving means of energy production. Numerous sun hours (yearly 3000) makes the Persian Gulf region's geographical location appropriate for applying PV techniques at this scale. A major concern for PV power generation is mineral dust from desert regions accumulating on surfaces and thereby reducing the energy output. This study aims to show the impact of dust particles on the PV energy reduction by examining dust samples from various Persian Gulf regions. Bulk samples were collected at the surface. The experimental setup involved a sealed container with a solar panel unit (SPU), including an adjustable mounting plate, solar cells (amorphous and monocrystalline), and a pyranometer (SMP3, Kipp & Zonen Inc.). A Tungsten Halogen lamp was used as the light source. Dust particles were aerosolized with a shaker (Multi-Wrist shaker, Lab line). Different techniques were applied to characterize each sample: the particle size distributions were measured using an Optical Particle Sizer (OPS, TSI Inc.), the chemical composition was analyzed using the Particle Analysis by Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument, and Transmission Electron Microscope Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX) was used to define morphology, size and structure. Preliminary results show that the energy output is affected by aerosol morphology (monodisperse, polydisperse), composition and solar cell type.

  3. Properties, structure and machnining capabilities sintered corundum abrasives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cz.J. Niżankowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of sintered corundum abrasives used in both bonded and in the embankment of abrasive tools currently poses substantialproblems for their choice of technology to specific tasks. Therefore performed a comparative study of ownership structures and capacitiesof elected representatives machnining sintered corundum abrasives of different generations, and this is normal sintered alumina,submicrocrystalline alumina sintered and nanocrystalline alumina sintered. Were studied some properties of a set of abrasive particles,physicochemical properties and structural and mechanical and technological properties. The studies used the method of microscopicmeasurement to determine the shape of abrasive particles, the pycnometer to determine the density of abrasive, a spectrometer todetermine the chemical composition of the magnetic analyzer for determining the magnetic fraction, scanning electron microscope toanalysis of abrasive grains and a special position to designate the machining capacity abrasive grains. The results showed a significantincrease in machining capacity sintered corundum abrasives with increasing degree of fragmentation of the crystallites sintered corundum abrasives and distinctive bands in the emerging microchip. The originality of the development provides a comparative summary ofproperties of sintered corundum abrasives of different generations and functions obtained by the author making the change in value indexof machininhcapacity grit from cutting speeds for different generations of sintered corundum.

  4. Properties and effects of dust particles suspended in the martian atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, J.B.; Colburn, D.S.; Flasar, M.; Kahn, R.; Carlston, C.E.; Pidek, D.

    1979-01-01

    Direct measurements of the optical depth above the two Viking landers are reported for a period of covering the summer, fall, and winter seasons in the northern hemisphere, a time period during which two global dust storms occurred. The optical depth had a value of about 1 just before the onset of each storm; it increased very rapidly, on a time scale of a few days, to peak values of about 3 and 6 with the arrival of the first and second storms, respectively; and its steadily decreased shortly thereafter (> or approx. = few days to few weeks) for both storms, with the decay occurring more rapidly during the initial period of decay. We have also carried out further analyses of observations of the sky brightness made with the lander cameras during the summer season to obtain improved estimates of other dust particle parameters, including the cross section weighted mean particle radius, several shape factors, and the imaginary indices of refraction. These results have been used to define the radiative properties of the suspended dust particles at solar wavelenths. The derived radiative properties of the dust were incorporated into a 1D radiative convective model. Satisfactory agreement with the temperature structure determined during the descent of the landers to the surface. Is achieved when allowance is made for the effects of vertical motions induced by large scale atmospheric dynamics. The diurnal temperature variations predicted by the 1D calculations for the observed optical depths are also in crude agreement with values inferred from orbiter and lander measurements. The 1D model predicts that the diurnal temperature change and daily mean temperature, averaged over the entire atmospheric vertical column, steadily increase as the optical depth of the dust increases to a value of several, and then subsequently change little

  5. Gone to Dust: Building and Deploying a Particle Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibiger, D. L.; Wiley, C.

    2015-12-01

    Using an Arduino microcontroller board and a commercially available optical particle sensor, we built particulate sensors and walked them around the school to evaluate where the highest levels of particulate matter (PM) were. As part of the Earth Explorers outreach program in Boulder, Colorado, we worked with a group of middle school students to build and use these sensors. The students were in 6th and 7th grade, and we met three times. Once to introduce the scientist and science they will be working on, the second time to actually do the hand-on project and, finally, to review what they learned in the experiment. Arduino is an open-source electronics platform that is simple to program, using the Arduino programming language. There are example codes available for the particle sensors and they are easy to adapt to different uses. The sensor setup is straightforward and was built into a small footprint on a plastic toy brick with a handle for easy use. We pre-loaded the Arduino board with the necessary software, but had the students wire the sensor, Arduino, indicator lights and battery together and attached them to the brick. This gave the students an opportunity to learn about electricity and wiring, in addition to air pollution. The sensor is not calibrated or quantitative, so only qualitative data was obtained. The qualitative data, however, was sufficient to allow the students to make predictions and test their hypotheses. While most of the students predicted outside, near the parking lot would have the highest PM levels, they learned that indoor pollution can be much higher, particularly in carpeted areas.

  6. Single-particle characterization of 'Asian Dust' certified reference materials using low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hee Jin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2006-01-01

    In order to clearly elucidate whether Asian Dust particles experience chemical modification during long-range transport, it is necessary to characterize soil particles where Asian Dust particles originate. If chemical compositions of source soil particles are well characterized, then chemical compositions of Asian Dust particles collected outside source regions can be compared with those of source soil particles in order to find out the occurrence of chemical modification. Asian Dust particles are chemically and morphologically heterogeneous, and thus the average composition and the average aerodynamic diameter (obtainable by bulk analysis) are not much relevant if the chemical modifications of the particles must be followed. The major elemental composition and abundance of the particle types that are potential subjects of chemical modification can only be obtained using single-particle analysis. A single particle analytical technique, named low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA), was applied to characterize two certified reference materials (CRMs) for Asian Dust particles, which were collected from a loess plateau area and a desert of China. The CRMs were defined by bulk analyses to provide certified concentrations for 13 chemical elements. Using the low-Z particle EPMA technique, the concentrations of major chemical species such as aluminosilicates, SiO 2 , CaCO 3 , and carbonaceous species were obtained. Elemental concentrations obtained by the low-Z particle EPMA are close to the certified values, with considering that the single particle and bulk analyses employ very different approaches. There are still some discrepancies between those concentration values, resulting from analyses of particles with different sizes, different sample amounts analyzed, and uncertainties involved in the single particle analysis

  7. Distance determination method of dust particles using Rosetta OSIRIS NAC and WAC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolshagen, E.; Ott, T.; Koschny, D.; Güttler, C.; Tubiana, C.; Agarwal, J.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. I.; Rodrigo, R.; Rickman, H.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Cremonese, G.; da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; de Cecco, M.; Deller, J.; Feller, C.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Gicquel, A.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Hofmann, M.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, J. R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    The ESA Rosetta spacecraft has been tracking its target, the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, in close vicinity for over two years. It hosts the OSIRIS instruments: the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System composed of two cameras, see e.g. Keller et al. (2007). In some imaging sequences dedicated to observe dust particles in the comet's coma, the two cameras took images at the same time. The aim of this work is to use these simultaneous double camera observations to calculate the dust particles' distance to the spacecraft. As the two cameras are mounted on the spacecraft with an offset of 70 cm, the distance of particles observed by both cameras can be determined by a shift of the particles' apparent trails on the images. This paper presents first results of the ongoing work, introducing the distance determination method for the OSIRIS instrument and the analysis of an example particle. We note that this method works for particles in the range of about 500-6000 m from the spacecraft.

  8. Effect of chemical mixing state on the hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation properties of calcium mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral dust particles can alter cloud properties and thus climate by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN that form cloud droplets. The CCN activation properties of various calcium mineral dust particles were studied experimentally to investigate the consequences of field observations showing the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride between individual aged Asian dust particles, and the enrichment of oxalic acid in Asian dust. Each mineral's observed apparent hygroscopicity was primarily controlled by its solubility, which determines the degree to which the mineral's intrinsic hygroscopicity can be expressed. The significant increase in hygroscopicity caused by mixing soluble hygroscopic material with insoluble mineral particles is also presented. Insoluble minerals including calcium carbonate, representing fresh unprocessed dust, and calcium sulphate, representing atmospherically processed dust, had similarly small apparent hygroscopicities. Their activation is accurately described by a deliquescence limit following the Kelvin effect and corresponded to an apparent single-hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of ~0.001. Soluble calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, representing atmospherically processed mineral dust particles, were much more hygroscopic, activating similar to ammonium sulphate with κ~0.5. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (κ=0.05 was significantly less CCN-active than oxalic acid (κ=0.3, but not as inactive as its low solubility would predict. These results indicate that the common assumption that all mineral dust particles become more hygroscopic and CCN-active after atmospheric processing should be revisited. Calcium sulphate and calcium oxalate are two realistic proxies for aged mineral dust that remain non-hygroscopic. The dust's apparent hygroscopicity will be controlled by its chemical mixing state, which is determined by its mineralogy and the chemical reaction pathways it experiences

  9. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    OpenAIRE

    G. Helas; M. O. Andreae

    2008-01-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly...

  10. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kanji

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T and relative humidity (RH, as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulfate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long-range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 T ns are reported and observed to increase as a function of decreasing temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. We also present the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation activity without the condensation of a coating of (inorganic material. In immersion mode, low ozone exposed Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low exposure Ka had ice active fractions of an order of magnitude higher than untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD had ice active fractions up to a factor of 4 lower than untreated ATD. From our results, we derive and present parameterizations in terms of ns(T that can be used in models to predict ice nuclei concentrations based on available aerosol surface area.

  11. Environmental factors controlling the seasonal variability in particle sizedistribution of modern Saharan dust deposited off Cape Blanc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friese, C.A.; van der Does, M.; Merkel, U.; Iversen, M.H.; Fischer, G.; Stuut, J-B W.

    2016-01-01

    The particle sizes of Saharan dust in marine sediment core records have been used frequently as a proxyfor trade-wind speed. However, there are still large uncertainties with respect to the seasonality of theparticle sizes of deposited Saharan dust off northwestern Africa and the factors influencing

  12. Regularities of dust formation during stone cutting for construction works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Lebedev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available When cutting stone, a large amount of dust release, which is a mixture of small, mostly sharp, mineral particles. Shallow dry dust with inhalation causes the pathological changes in organs that are a consequence of infiltration of acute and solids particles. Despite the importance of this problem, the questions of dust generation during the various working processes and its fractions distribution are practically not considered. This determines the time of dust standing in the air and its negative impact on a person. Aim: The aim of this research is to study the process of dusting during stones cutting and dust distribution on fractions regularities and quantification of dust formation process in order to improve the production equipment, staff individual and collective safety equipment. Materials and Methods: Many types of cutting can be divided into two types - a “dry” cutting and cutting with fluid. During “dry” cutting a dust represents a set of micro-chips which are cut off by the abrasive grains. The size of such chips very small: from a micrometer to a few micrometers fraction. Thus, the size of chips causes the possibility of creating dust slurry with low fall velocity, and which is located in the working space in large concentrations. Results: The following characteristic dependences were obtained as a result of research: dependence of the dust fall from the size of the dust particles, size of dust particles from minute feeding and grain range wheel, the specific amount of dust from the number of grit abrasive wheel and the temperature of the dust particles from the feeding at wheel turnover. It was shown that the distribution of chips (dust by size will request of a normal distribution low. Dimensions of chips during cut are in the range of 0.4...6 μm. Thus, dust slurry is formed with time of particles fall of several hours. This creates considerable minute dust concentration - within 0.28∙10^8...1.68∙10^8 units/m3.

  13. On the height variation of the E-region cowling conductivity – effect of charged dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Muralikrishna

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Height profiles of the Cowling conductivity in the electrojet region, estimated using the atmospheric parameters given by the existing models like CIRA or MSIS and measured electron density profiles, consistently show the heights of the electrojet current intensity peak to be more than 3 km below those estimated from in-situ measurements using magnetometers on board sounding rockets. Kulkarni and Muralikrishna (2005 attempted to explain this to be due to the effect of neutral dust particles. They reported that neutral dust particles, when they exist in sufficient numbers, can modify the collision parameters, especially in the lower E-region, where dust particles of meteoric origin are known to exist in large numbers, and thereby can modify the Cowling conductivity profile in the electrojet region. This work is extended here to include the effect of charged dust particles. Dust particles can become charged negatively by the attachment of ambient free electrons, and can thus reduce the number density of free electrons especially below the electrojet peak. This can alter the vertical profile of the east-west Hall current driven by the vertical Hall polarization field, thereby causing a net reduction in the electrojet current. Such a decrease in the electrojet current may be observed on the ground magnetograms. This mechanism, as proposed here, can operate only during periods of strong meteor shower activity, when the dust particle density at the assumed deposit height of 103 km can reach extreme values (for example, 5×104 cm−3 of 1-µm diameter dust particles. Such a dense dust layer may even cause a reversal in the normally upward vertical Hall polarization field, within the dust layer, causing a reversal of the electrojet currents below the current peak.

  14. Emission from small dust particles in diffuse and molecular cloud medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.P.; Desert, X.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) observations of the whole galaxy has shown that long wavelength emission (100 and 60 micron bands) can be explained by thermal emission from big grains (approx 0.1 micron) radiating at their equilibrium temperature when heated by the InterStellar Radiation Field (ISRF). This conclusion has been confirmed by continuum sub-millimeter observations of the galactic plane made by the EMILIE experiment at 870 microns (Pajot et al. 1986). Nevertheless, shorter wavelength observations like 12 and 25 micron IRAS bands, show an emission from the galactic plane in excess with the long wavelength measurements which can only be explained by a much hotter particles population. Because dust at equilibrium cannot easily reach high temperatures required to explain this excess, this component is thought to be composed of very small dust grains or big molecules encompassing thermal fluctuations. Researchers present here a numerical model that computes emission, from Near Infrared Radiation (NIR) to Sub-mm wavelengths, from a non-homogeneous spherical cloud heated by the ISRF. This model fully takes into account the heating of dust by multi-photon processes and back-heating of dust in the Visual/Infrared Radiation (VIS-IR) so that it is likely to describe correctly emission from molecular clouds up to large A sub v and emission from dust experiencing temperature fluctuations. The dust is a three component mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, very small grains, and classical big grains with independent size distributions (cut-off and power law index) and abundances

  15. Feature of Dust Particles in the Spring Free Troposphere over Dunhuang in Northwestern China: Electron Microscopic Experiments on Individual Particles Collected with a Balloon-borne Impactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, M.; Iwasaka, Y.; Matsuki, A.; Trochkine, D.; Kim, Y. S.; Zhang, D.; Nagatani, T.; Shi, G.-Y.; Nagatani, M.; Nakata, H.; Shen, Z.; Chen, B.; Li, G.

    2005-01-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol particles were collected using a balloon-borne particle impactor in August of 2002 and March of 2003 at Dunhuang in northwestern China (40 o 00'N, 94 o 30'E), and the morphology and elemental composition of the aerosol particles were analyzed in order to understand the mixing state of coarse dust particles (diameter >1 μm) over the desert areas in the Asian continent in spring. Electron microscopic experiments on the particles revealed that dust particles were major constituents of coarse mode particles in the free troposphere over the Taklamakan Desert in spring and summer.Si-rich or Ca-rich particles are major components of dust particles collected in the free troposphere over dunhuang and the values of [number of Ca-rich particles]/[number of Si-rich particles] differs markedly between spring and summer, being about 0.3 in the spring of 2003 and about 1.0 in the summer of 2002 at heights 3-5 km above sea level. It is likely that the condition of the ground surface and the strength of vertical mixing in source areas of Asian dust are potential factors causing the difference in the chemical types of dust particles.Comparison of the elemental compositions of these particles with those of particles collected over Japan strongly suggests that these particles were chemically modified during their long-range transport in the free troposphere. Analysis of wind systems shows that both the predominating westerly wind in the free troposphere and the surface wind strongly controlled by the geographical structure of the Tarim Basin are important in the long-range transport of KOSA particles originating in the Taklamakan Desert

  16. Risk Assessment of Cassini Sun Sensor Integrity Due to Hypervelocity Impact of Saturn Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2016-01-01

    A sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini is one of the heaviest and most sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft humans have ever built and launched. Since achieving orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for first and second extended missions through September 2017. In late 2016, the Cassini spacecraft will begin a daring set of ballistic orbits that will hop the rings and dive between the upper atmosphere of Saturn and its innermost D-ring twenty-two times. The "dusty" environment of the inner D-ring region the spacecraft must fly through is hazardous because of the possible damage that dust particles, travelling at speeds as high as 31.4 km/s, can do to spacecraft hardware. During hazardous proximal ring-plane crossings, the Cassini mission operation team plans to point the high-gain antenna to the RAM vector in order to protect most of spacecraft instruments from the incoming energetic ring dust particles. However, this particular spacecraft attitude will expose two Sun sensors (that are mounted on the antenna dish) to the incoming dust particles. High-velocity impacts on the Sun sensor cover glass might penetrate the 2.54-mm glass cover of the Sun sensor. Even without penetration damage, craters created by these impacts on the surface of the cover glass will degrade the transmissibility of light through it. Apart from being directly impacted by the dust particles, the Sun sensors are also threatened by some fraction of ricochet ejecta that are produced by dust particle impacts on the large antenna dish (made of graphite fiber epoxy composite material). Finally, the spacecraft attitude control system must cope with disturbances due to both the translational and angular impulses imparted on the large antenna dish and the long magnetometer boom by the incoming high-velocity projectiles. Analyses performed to quantify the risks the Sun sensors must contend

  17. An analytical force balance model for dust particles with size up to several Debye lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussems, D. U. B.; Khrapak, S. A.; Doǧan, I.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we developed a revised stationary force balance model for particles in the regime a / λ D < 10 . In contrast to other analytical models, the pressure and dipole force were included too, and for anisotropic plasmas, a novel contribution to the dipole moment was derived. Moreover, the Coulomb logarithm and collection cross-section were modified. The model was applied on a case study where carbon dust is formed near the plasma sheath in the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI. The pressure force and dipole force were found to be significant. By tracing the equilibrium position, the particle radius was determined at which the particle deposits. The obtained particle radius agrees well with the experimentally obtained size and suggests better agreement as compared to the unrevised model.

  18. Differences in particle size distributions collected by two wood dust samplers: preliminary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campopiano, A.; Olori, A.; Basili, F.; Ramires, D.; Zakrzewska, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of wood dust as carcinogenic to humans, and the threshold limit value (TLV) of 5 mg/m 3 weighted over an 8-hour work day as defined by Italian legislation, have raised the issue of dust risk assessments in all woodworking environments. The aim is to characterize the particle size distribution for wood particles collected by two samplers used for collecting the inhalable fraction: the IOM sampler (Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, Scotland) and the conical sampler also known in Italy as conetto. These two sampling heads were chosen mainly because the Italian conical sampler, used in the past for total dust sampling, is the most widely used by the Italian Prevention Services and analysis laboratories in general, whereas the IOM sampler was specifically designed to collect the inhalable fraction of airborne particles. The devices were placed side by side within the worker's breathing zone. In addition, another IOM sampler not connected to the personal sampling pump was placed on the same worker, thus functioning as a passive sampler capable of collecting projectile particles normally produced during processing. A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDAX) was used to count the number of particles collected on the sampling filters. The size of each particle identified by the SEM was determined by measuring its mean diameter. The SEM analysis revealed that the average size of the largest particles collected by the conetto sampler did not exceed 150 μm, whereas the size of particles collected by the IOM sampler was up to 350 μm. Indeed, the analysis of the filters of the passive IOM samplers showed that particles with mean diameters larger than 100 μm were collected, although the calculated percentage was very low (on average, approximately 1%). This does not mean that their gravimetric contribution is negligible; indeed, the weight of

  19. On Influence of Neutrals on Dust Particle Charging in Complex Plasmas in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopnin, S. I.; Morzhakova, A. A.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Effects associated with neutral component of complex (dusty) ionospheric plasmas which affect dust particle charging are studied. Microscopic ion currents on dust particles with taking into account ion-neutral interaction are presented. Calculations are performed both for the case of negative charges of dust particles, when the influence of Solar radiation on dust particle charging processes is negligible, and for the case of positive charges which is realized in the presence of sufficiently intensive UV or X-ray radiation. We also carry out investigation of the electron heating due to the photoelectric effect. We show that the efficiency of electron heating depends on the density of neutral component of the plasma. As result, we determine altitudes where the influence of the neutral plasma component on dust particle charging processes as well as the electron heating effect are significant and should be taken into account under consideration of the ionospheric complex plasmas. In particular, we show that the effects considered could be important for the description of noctilucent clouds, polar mesosphere summer echoes, and some other physical phenomena associated with dust particles in the ionosphere.

  20. Influence of Asian dust particles on immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation in asthma model mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kurai

    Full Text Available An Asian dust storm (ADS contains airborne particles that affect conditions such as asthma, but the mechanism of exacerbation is unclear. The objective of this study was to compare immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation induced by airborne particles collected on ADS days and the original ADS soil (CJ-1 soil in asthma model mice.Airborne particles were collected on ADS days in western Japan. NC/Nga mice were co-sensitized by intranasal instillation with ADS airborne particles and/or Dermatophagoides farinae (Df, and with CJ-1 soil and/or Df for 5 consecutive days. Df-sensitized mice were stimulated with Df challenge intranasally at 7 days after the last Df sensitization. At 24 hours after challenge, serum allergen specific antibody, differential leukocyte count and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were measured, and airway inflammation was examined histopathologically.Co-sensitization with ADS airborne particles and Df increased the neutrophil and eosinophil counts in BALF. Augmentation of airway inflammation was also observed in peribronchiolar and perivascular lung areas. Df-specific serum IgE was significantly elevated by ADS airborne particles, but not by CJ-1 soil. Levels of interleukin (IL-5, IL-13, IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 were higher in BALF in mice treated with ADS airborne particles.These results suggest that substances attached to ADS airborne particles that are not in the original ADS soil may play important roles in immune adjuvant effects and airway inflammation.

  1. Bioaccessibility of metals in soils and dusts contaminated by marine antifouling paint particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Andrew; Singh, Nimisha; Richards, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Fragments of antifouling paint and environmental geosolids have been sampled from the island of Malta and analysed for total and bioaccessible metals. Total concentrations of Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sn and Zn were two to three orders of magnitude higher in spent antifouling composites relative to respective values in background soils and road dusts. Paint fragments were visible in geosolids taken from the immediate vicinity of boat maintenance facilities and mass balance calculations, based on Ba as a paint tracer, suggested that the most contaminated soils, road dusts and boatyard dusts contained about 1%, 7% and 9%, respectively, of antifouling particles. Human bioaccessibilities of metals were evaluated in selected samples using a physiologically based extraction technique. Accessibilities of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the most contaminated solids were sufficient to be cause for concern for individuals working in the boat repair industry and to the wider, local community. - Geosolids near boat maintenance facilities are contaminated by antifouling paint particles containing high concentrations of bioaccessible metals.

  2. Bioaccessibility of metals in soils and dusts contaminated by marine antifouling paint particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Andrew, E-mail: aturner@plymouth.ac.u [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Singh, Nimisha; Richards, Jonathan P. [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    Fragments of antifouling paint and environmental geosolids have been sampled from the island of Malta and analysed for total and bioaccessible metals. Total concentrations of Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sn and Zn were two to three orders of magnitude higher in spent antifouling composites relative to respective values in background soils and road dusts. Paint fragments were visible in geosolids taken from the immediate vicinity of boat maintenance facilities and mass balance calculations, based on Ba as a paint tracer, suggested that the most contaminated soils, road dusts and boatyard dusts contained about 1%, 7% and 9%, respectively, of antifouling particles. Human bioaccessibilities of metals were evaluated in selected samples using a physiologically based extraction technique. Accessibilities of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the most contaminated solids were sufficient to be cause for concern for individuals working in the boat repair industry and to the wider, local community. - Geosolids near boat maintenance facilities are contaminated by antifouling paint particles containing high concentrations of bioaccessible metals.

  3. Neutron activation analysis of size-separated airborne dust particles, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Atsushi; Ishii, Taka; Tomiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Isao.

    1976-01-01

    The size distribution of the component element concentration in particle floating matters contained in the atmosphere is related closely to atmospheric pollution. In this paper, the results of the neutron activation analysis and the measurement of size distribution of component element concentration are reported, which were carried out in Minami-ku, Kyoto, in May and November, 1975, by collecting airbone dust with Andersen air samples. The activation of samples was carried out with the research reactor in Kyoto University. The gamma-ray spectra of the samples were measured with a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector. The size distributions of Al, Sc, Th and Ti showed the similar pattern. The concentration of Zn was abnormally high as compared with that in other districts, and it is related to the local industry in this district. The size distribution of airborne dust usually follows the logarithmic normal distribution when it is not affected by atmospheric pollution. Accordingly, the size distribution of the concentration also follows the same distribution. The accumulated percentages of the concentrations of Al, Sc and Th fall on the same straight line, and it means that these elements were contained in the same particles as the components. Also it was decided that the particles of Al, Sc, Th, Fe and Ti were soil particles. (Kako, I.)

  4. Helical structures in vertically aligned dust particle chains in a complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Truell W.; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin S.

    2013-05-01

    Self-assembly of structures from vertically aligned, charged dust particle bundles within a glass box placed on the lower, powered electrode of a Gaseous Electronics Conference rf reference cell were produced and examined experimentally. Self-organized formation of one-dimensional vertical chains, two-dimensional zigzag structures, and three-dimensional helical structures of triangular, quadrangular, pentagonal, hexagonal, and heptagonal symmetries are shown to occur. System evolution is shown to progress from a one-dimensional chain structure, through a zigzag transition to a two-dimensional, spindlelike structure, and then to various three-dimensional, helical structures exhibiting multiple symmetries. Stable configurations are found to be dependent upon the system confinement, γ2=ω0h/ω0v2 (where ω0h,v are the horizontal and vertical dust resonance frequencies), the total number of particles within a bundle, and the rf power. For clusters having fixed numbers of particles, the rf power at which structural phase transitions occur is repeatable and exhibits no observable hysteresis. The critical conditions for these structural phase transitions as well as the basic symmetry exhibited by the one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures that subsequently develop are in good agreement with the theoretically predicted configurations of minimum energy determined employing molecular dynamics simulations for charged dust particles confined in a prolate, spheroidal potential as presented theoretically by Kamimura and Ishihara [Kamimura and Ishihara, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.85.016406 85, 016406 (2012)].

  5. Application of the Garrlic Algorithm for the Characterization of Dust and Marine Particles Utilizing the Lidar-Sunphotometer Synergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsekeri Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of studying the vertical distribution of aerosol plumes is prominent in regional and climate studies. The new Generalized Aerosol Retrieval from Radiometer and Lidar Combined data algorithm (GARRLiC provides this opportunity combining active and passive ground-based remote sensing from lidar and sunphotometer measurements. Here, we utilize GARRLiC capabilities for the characterization of Saharan dust and marine particles at the Eastern Mediterranean region during the Characterization of Aerosol mixtures of Dust And Marine origin Experiment (CHARADMExp. Two different case studies are presented, a dust-dominated case which we managed to characterize successfully in terms of the particle microphysical properties and their vertical distribution and a case of two separate layers of marine and dust particles for which the characterization proved to be more challenging.

  6. Elaboration, organisation and optical properties of carbon nano-particles as interstellar dust models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, Aymeric

    1999-01-01

    Astrophysical and space observations from ultraviolet to infrared (IR) wavelengths provide the only signatures of carbon cosmic dust which is formed in the vicinity of old stars by molecular species condensation around 1000 K. Despite numerous models developed, a fundamental question concerns the exact nature of these grains in space. Their sampling being impossible, a better knowledge of these objects requires earth analogues obtained in conditions as close as possible of those met in space. Implying synthesis mechanism similar to those postulated for carbon cosmic dust, infrared laser pyrolysis (IRLP) appears as a versatile method in order to produce a wide variety of nanoparticles able to reproduce the main signatures characteristics of the interstellar carbon dust. We checked that the synthesised particles by this method showed strong analogies with carbon dust from the point of view of their infrared spectroscopy. The majority of the bands observed by the astrophysicists are present in spectra. Nevertheless defects exist and can be connected to the too small size of the poly-aromatic units present in such deposits. In order to confirm this size effect and to refine the spectroscopic agreement, we chose two different way by acting either directly on the synthesis by modifying the most relevant experimental parameters (temperature of flame, residence time of the reagent in the reactional zone) or indirectly by the means of post-processing (annealing, irradiation). In order to follow the optical, structural and micro-textural evolutions, the deposits thus formed or treated were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, Transmission electron Microscopy (TeM) and by image analysis of the TeM patterns in order to correlate, their organisation multi-scales and in particular the diameter of the aromatic units, with their aptitude to reproduce the spectral characteristics of interstellar carbonaceous dust. (author) [fr

  7. Sulphation reactions of oxidic dust particles in waste heat boiler environment. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranki, T.

    1999-09-01

    Sulphation of metal oxides has an important role in many industrial processes. In different applications sulphation reactions have different aims and characteristics. In the flash smelting process sulphation of oxidic flue dust is a spontaneous and inevitable phenomena, which takes place in the waste heat boiler (WHB) when cooling down hot dust laden off-gases from sulphide smelters. Oxidic dust particles (size 0 - 50 {mu}m) react with O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} or SO{sub 3} in a certain temperature range (500 - 800 deg C). Sulphation reactions are highly exothermic releasing large amount of heat, which affects the gas cooling and thermal performance of the boiler. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the system have to be known to improve the process and WHB operation. The rate of sulphation is affected by the prevailing conditions (temperature, gas composition) and particle size and microstructure (porosity, surface area). Some metal oxides (CuO) can react readily with SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and act as self-catalysts, but others (NiO) require the presence of an external catalyst to enhance the SO{sub 3} formation and sulphation to proceed. Some oxides (NiO) sulphate directly, some (CuO) may form first intermediate phases (basic sulphates) depending on the reaction conditions. Thus, the reaction mechanisms are very complex. The aim of this report was to search information about the factors affecting the dust sulphation reactions and suggested reaction mechanisms and kinetics. Many investigators have studied sulphation thermodynamics and reaction kinetics and mechanisms of macroscopical metal oxide pieces, but only few articles have been published about sulphation of microscopical particles, like dust. All the found microscale studies dealt with sulphation reactions of calcium oxide, which is not present in the flash smelting process, but used as an SO{sub 2} absorbent in the combustion processes. However, also these investigations may give some hints about the sulphation

  8. Optical properties of non-spherical desert dust particles in the terrestrial infrared – An asymptotic approximation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klüser, Lars; Di Biagio, Claudia; Kleiber, Paul D.; Formenti, Paola; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2016-01-01

    Optical properties (extinction efficiency, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and scattering phase function) of five different desert dust minerals have been calculated with an asymptotic approximation approach (AAA) for non-spherical particles. The AAA method combines Rayleigh-limit approximations with an asymptotic geometric optics solution in a simple and straightforward formulation. The simulated extinction spectra have been compared with classical Lorenz–Mie calculations as well as with laboratory measurements of dust extinction. This comparison has been done for single minerals and with bulk dust samples collected from desert environments. It is shown that the non-spherical asymptotic approximation improves the spectral extinction pattern, including position of the extinction peaks, compared to the Lorenz–Mie calculations for spherical particles. Squared correlation coefficients from the asymptotic approach range from 0.84 to 0.96 for the mineral components whereas the corresponding numbers for Lorenz–Mie simulations range from 0.54 to 0.85. Moreover the blue shift typically found in Lorenz–Mie results is not present in the AAA simulations. The comparison of spectra simulated with the AAA for different shape assumptions suggests that the differences mainly stem from the assumption of the particle shape and not from the formulation of the method itself. It has been shown that the choice of particle shape strongly impacts the quality of the simulations. Additionally, the comparison of simulated extinction spectra with bulk dust measurements indicates that within airborne dust the composition may be inhomogeneous over the range of dust particle sizes, making the calculation of reliable radiative properties of desert dust even more complex. - Highlights: • A fast and simple method for estimating optical properties of dust. • Can be used with non-spherical particles of arbitrary size distributions. • Comparison with Mie simulations and

  9. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascaretti-Grizon, Florence; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Chappard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials.

  10. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  11. Laboratory-generated mixtures of mineral dust particles with biological substances: characterization of the particle mixing state and immersion freezing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Wex, Heike; Denjean, Cyrielle; Hartmann, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Schmidt, Susann; Ebert, Martin; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Biological particles such as bacteria, fungal spores or pollen are known to be efficient ice nucleating particles. Their ability to nucleate ice is due to ice nucleation active macromolecules (INMs). It has been suggested that these INMs maintain their nucleating ability even when they are separated from their original carriers. This opens the possibility of an accumulation of such INMs in soils, resulting in an internal mixture of mineral dust and INMs. If particles from such soils which contain biological INMs are then dispersed into the atmosphere due to wind erosion or agricultural processes, they could induce ice nucleation at temperatures typical for biological substances, i.e., above -20 up to almost 0 °C, while they might be characterized as mineral dust particles due to a possibly low content of biological material. We conducted a study within the research unit INUIT (Ice Nucleation research UnIT), where we investigated the ice nucleation behavior of mineral dust particles internally mixed with INM. Specifically, we mixed a pure mineral dust sample (illite-NX) with ice active biological material (birch pollen washing water) and quantified the immersion freezing behavior of the resulting particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). A very important topic concerning the investigations presented here as well as for atmospheric application is the characterization of the mixing state of aerosol particles. In the present study we used different methods like single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and a Volatility-Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (VH-TDMA) to investigate the mixing state of our generated aerosol. Not all applied methods performed similarly well in detecting small amounts of biological material on the mineral dust particles. Measuring the hygroscopicity/volatility of the mixed particles with the VH-TDMA was the most

  12. Laboratory-generated mixtures of mineral dust particles with biological substances: characterization of the particle mixing state and immersion freezing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Augustin-Bauditz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biological particles such as bacteria, fungal spores or pollen are known to be efficient ice nucleating particles. Their ability to nucleate ice is due to ice nucleation active macromolecules (INMs. It has been suggested that these INMs maintain their nucleating ability even when they are separated from their original carriers. This opens the possibility of an accumulation of such INMs in soils, resulting in an internal mixture of mineral dust and INMs. If particles from such soils which contain biological INMs are then dispersed into the atmosphere due to wind erosion or agricultural processes, they could induce ice nucleation at temperatures typical for biological substances, i.e., above −20 up to almost 0 °C, while they might be characterized as mineral dust particles due to a possibly low content of biological material. We conducted a study within the research unit INUIT (Ice Nucleation research UnIT, where we investigated the ice nucleation behavior of mineral dust particles internally mixed with INM. Specifically, we mixed a pure mineral dust sample (illite-NX with ice active biological material (birch pollen washing water and quantified the immersion freezing behavior of the resulting particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS. A very important topic concerning the investigations presented here as well as for atmospheric application is the characterization of the mixing state of aerosol particles. In the present study we used different methods like single-particle aerosol mass spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX, and a Volatility–Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (VH-TDMA to investigate the mixing state of our generated aerosol. Not all applied methods performed similarly well in detecting small amounts of biological material on the mineral dust particles. Measuring the hygroscopicity/volatility of the mixed particles with the VH

  13. Automated thin-film analyses of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles in the analytical electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. P.; Germani, M. S.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    An AEM apparatus equipped with digital beam control has obtained quantitative point-count analyses of thin sections taken from eight anhydrous chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs); between 200 and 500 X-ray analyses were collected from each thin section and analyzed for Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni. Two types of anhydrous chondritic aggregates were observed in the eight IDPs: one highly porous, the other less so. The eight anhydrous IDPs are characterizable as mixtures of fine- and coarse-grained aggregates, large mineral grains, glass, and carbonaceous materials. Their elemental concentrations follow those of solar abundances, suggesting that they are unperturbed by aqueous alteration.

  14. Effects of Asian sand dust particles on the respiratory and immune system.

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Akiko; Matsuda, Yugo; Murayama, Rumiko; Tsuji, Kenshi; Nishikawa, Masataka; Koike, Eiko; Yoshida, Seiichi; Ichinose, Takamichi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported that Asian sand dust (ASD) particles can affect respiratory health; however, the mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the effects of ASD on airway epithelial cells and immune cells, and their contributing factors to the effects. Human airway epithelial cells were exposed to ASD collected on 1-3 May (ASD1) and on 12-14 May (ASD2) 2011 in Japan and heat-treated ASD1 for excluding heat-sensitive substances (H-ASD) at a concentration of 0, 3, 30 or 90 µg ...

  15. Particle-size distribution of fission products in airborne dust collected at Tsukuba from April to June 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooe, Hiroko; Seki, Riki; Ikeda, Nagao

    1988-01-01

    The radioactivity released by the reactor accident at Chernobyl was detected in surface air at Tsukuba, Japan. Gamma-spectrometry of airborne dust collected using aerodynamic separation showed higher concentrations of radionuclides in fine particles. The particle-size distribution of radionuclides changed with time. (author)

  16. Preparation and pigmented polyester coating of saw dust particle board using ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsono; Sugiarto Danu; Anik Sunarni

    2010-01-01

    Experiments on the preparation and pigmented polyester coating of saw dust particle board have been conducted using ultra-violet (UV) radiation curing. The adhesive used for preparation of particle board was the mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol residue as by product of clover oil distillation. Dry saw dust (20 – 40 mesh) was mixed with adhesive at concentration of 16 % b.w. The mixture then was hot pressed at 160, 170, and 180 kg/cm 2 , temperature of 160 °C for 30 minutes. Particle boards obtained have the density of 0.85 - 92 g/cm 3 , water content of 5.4 – 6.8 % and thickness swelling 45 – 62 % ( 2 hr immersion) and unmeasurable for 24 hr immersion due to brittle condition. It was found that particle boards have properties of modulus of rupture = 64 – 71 kgf/cm 2 , modulus of elasticity = 402 – 447 kgf/ cm 2 , and internal bond of 0.52 – 0.57 kgf/cm 2 . Cured coating made of the mixture of polyester resin, photoinitiator (2 and 3 % b.w) and pigment (1 and 2 % b.w) on particle board and irradiated at 1 – 4 m/min have pendulum hardness = 25.0 – 63.9 sec, pencil hardness = HB – 2H, % remaining = 92 – 100 %, glossy = 42.3 – 58.8 %, and color value of L = 54.3 – 73.9, a = -1.3 – 1.9, and b = 0.4 – 3.3. The cured coatings resist to chemical, solvent and stain, except against 10 % NaOH solution and red permanent marker stain. (author)

  17. Characterization of dust particles produced in an all-tungsten wall tokamak and potentially mobilized by airflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondeau, A., E-mail: anthony.rondeau@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES, SCA, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Peillon, S.; Roynette, A.; Sabroux, J.-C.; Gelain, T.; Gensdarmes, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES, SCA, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rohde, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chassefière, E. [Laboratoire Géosciences Paris Sud (GEOPS), UMR 8148, Université Paris Sud, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    At the starting of the shutdown of the AUG (ASDEX Upgrade: Axially Symmetric Divertor EXperiment) German tokamak, we collected particles deposited on the divertor surfaces by means of a dedicated device called “Duster Box”. This device allows to collect the particles using a controlled airflow with a defined shear stress. Consequently, the particles collected correspond to a potentially mobilizable fraction, by an airflow, of deposited dust. A total of more than 70,000 tungsten particles was, analysed showing a bimodal particle size distribution with a mode composed of flakes at 0.6 μm and a mode composed of spherical particles at 1.8 μm.

  18. Modification of Asian-dust particles transported by different routes - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaizen, Yuji; Naoe, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okada, Kikuo

    2014-11-01

    Two separate Asian dust events occurred before and after the passage of a cold front over Japan on 21 March 2010. According to back trajectories and a model simulation, the two dusty air-masses originated from the same region in Mongoria or northern China and were transported over different routes to Japan. Samples of aerosol particles from both airmasses were collected at Tsukuba and Mt. Haruna and examined by single-particle analysis using a transmission electron microscope and an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The mixing properties of mineral aerosol were quite different in the two airmasses and size ranges. In the prefrontal airmass, which were associated with pollution, most of fine (mixed with sulfate. On the contrary, mineral aerosols in the postfront airmass, which were relatively natural, were mostly externally mixed. In the latter case, the internal mixing was associated with Ca, however in the former case, mixing processes not concerning mineralogy was suggested.

  19. Automated thin-film analyses of hydrated interplanetary dust particles in the analytical electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germani, M. S.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    A 200 keV electron microscope was used to obtain elemental analyses from over 4000 points on thin sections of eight 'layer silicate' class interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Major and minor element abundances from a volume approaching that of a cylinder 50 nm in diameter were observed. Mineral phases and their relative abundances in the thin sections were identified and petrographic characteristics were determined. Three of the particles contained smectite (1.0-1.2 nm basal spacing) and two contained serpentine (0.7 nm basal spacing). The point count analyses and Mg-Si-Fe ternary diagrams show that one of the serpentine-containing IDPs is similar to CI and CM chondritic meteorites. The IDPs exhibit evidence of aqueous processing, but they have typically experienced only short range, submicrometer scale alteration. The IDPs may provide a broad sampling of the asteroid belt.

  20. Simulation of dust particles in dual-frequency capacitively coupled silane discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiangmei; Song Yuanhong; Xu Xiang; Wang Younian

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of nanoparticles in dual-frequency capacitively coupled silane discharges is investigated by employing a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model. The numerical simulation tries to trace the formation, charging, growth, and transport of dust particles during the discharge, under the influences of the high- and low-frequency electric sources, as well as the gas pressure. The effects of the presence of the nanoparticles and larger anions on the plasma properties are also discussed, especially, for the bulk potential, electron temperature, and densities of various particles. The calculation results show that the nanoparticle density and charge distribution are mainly influenced by the voltage and frequency of the high-frequency source, while the voltage of the low-frequency source can also exert an effect on the nanoparticle formation, compared with the frequency. As the discharge lasts, the electric potential and electron density keep decreasing, while the electron temperature gets increasing after a sudden drop.

  1. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster

  2. The thermal history of interplanetary dust particles collected in the Earth's stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Fragments of 24 individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth's stratosphere were obtained from NASA's Johnson Space Center collection and subjected to pulse-heating sequences to extract He and Ne and to learn about the thermal history of the particles. A motivation for the investigation was to see if the procedure would help distinguish between IDPs of asteroidal and cometary origin. The use of a sequence of short-duration heat pulses to perform the extractions is an improvement over the employment of a step-heating sequence, as was used in a previous investigation. The particles studied were fragments of larger parent IDPs, other fragments of which, in coordinated experiments, are undergoing studies of elemental and mineralogical composition in other laboratories. While the present investigation will provide useful temperature history data for the particles, the relatively large size of the parent IDPs (approximately 40 micrometers in diameter) resulted in high entry deceleration temperatures. This limited the usefulness of the study for distinguishing between particles of asteroidal and cometary origin.

  3. ABLATION AND CHEMICAL ALTERATION OF COSMIC DUST PARTICLES DURING ENTRY INTO THE EARTH’S ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudraswami, N. G.; Prasad, M. Shyam; Dey, S.; Fernandes, D. [National Institute of Oceanography (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dona Paula, Goa 403004 (India); Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D., E-mail: rudra@nio.org [School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    Most dust-sized cosmic particles undergo ablation and chemical alteration during atmospheric entry, which alters their original properties. A comprehensive understanding of this process is essential in order to decipher their pre-entry characteristics. The purpose of the study is to illustrate the process of vaporization of different elements for various entry parameters. The numerical results for particles of various sizes and various zenith angles are treated in order to understand the changes in chemical composition that the particles undergo as they enter the atmosphere. Particles with large sizes (> few hundred μ m) and high entry velocities (>16 km s{sup −1}) experience less time at peak temperatures compared to those that have lower velocities. Model calculations suggest that particles can survive with an entry velocity of 11 km s{sup −1} and zenith angles (ZA) of 30°–90°, which accounts for ∼66% of the region where particles retain their identities. Our results suggest that the changes in chemical composition of MgO, SiO{sub 2}, and FeO are not significant for an entry velocity of 11 km s{sup −1} and sizes <300 μ m, but the changes in these compositions become significant beyond this size, where FeO is lost to a major extent. However, at 16 km s{sup −1} the changes in MgO, SiO{sub 2}, and FeO are very intense, which is also reflected in Mg/Si, Fe/Si, Ca/Si, and Al/Si ratios, even for particles with a size of 100 μ m. Beyond 400 μ m particle sizes at 16 km s{sup −1}, most of the major elements are vaporized, leaving the refractory elements, Al and Ca, suspended in the troposphere.

  4. ABLATION AND CHEMICAL ALTERATION OF COSMIC DUST PARTICLES DURING ENTRY INTO THE EARTH’S ATMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudraswami, N. G.; Prasad, M. Shyam; Dey, S.; Fernandes, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Most dust-sized cosmic particles undergo ablation and chemical alteration during atmospheric entry, which alters their original properties. A comprehensive understanding of this process is essential in order to decipher their pre-entry characteristics. The purpose of the study is to illustrate the process of vaporization of different elements for various entry parameters. The numerical results for particles of various sizes and various zenith angles are treated in order to understand the changes in chemical composition that the particles undergo as they enter the atmosphere. Particles with large sizes (> few hundred μ m) and high entry velocities (>16 km s −1 ) experience less time at peak temperatures compared to those that have lower velocities. Model calculations suggest that particles can survive with an entry velocity of 11 km s −1 and zenith angles (ZA) of 30°–90°, which accounts for ∼66% of the region where particles retain their identities. Our results suggest that the changes in chemical composition of MgO, SiO 2 , and FeO are not significant for an entry velocity of 11 km s −1 and sizes <300 μ m, but the changes in these compositions become significant beyond this size, where FeO is lost to a major extent. However, at 16 km s −1 the changes in MgO, SiO 2 , and FeO are very intense, which is also reflected in Mg/Si, Fe/Si, Ca/Si, and Al/Si ratios, even for particles with a size of 100 μ m. Beyond 400 μ m particle sizes at 16 km s −1 , most of the major elements are vaporized, leaving the refractory elements, Al and Ca, suspended in the troposphere.

  5. Pluto's interaction with its space environment: Solar wind, energetic particles, and dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, F; Horányi, M; McComas, D J; McNutt, R L; Elliott, H A; Hill, M E; Brown, L E; Delamere, P A; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusterer, M; Lisse, C M; Mitchell, D G; Piquette, M; Poppe, A R; Strobel, D F; Szalay, J R; Valek, P; Vandegriff, J; Weidner, S; Zirnstein, E J; Stern, S A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2016-03-18

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The region's surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate, as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. Observations from the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument suggest that ions are accelerated and/or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region, PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes equal to about 1/10 of the flux in the interplanetary medium and increasing with distance downstream. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter, which measures grains with radii larger than 1.4 micrometers, detected one candidate impact in ±5 days around New Horizons' closest approach, indicating an upper limit of <4.6 kilometers(-3) for the dust density in the Pluto system. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Particle size distribution of dust collected from Alcator C-MOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, S.V.; Carmack, W.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    There are important safety issues associated with tokamak dust, accumulated primarily from sputtering and disruptions. The dust may contain tritium, it may be activated, chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The purpose of this paper is to present results from analyses of particulate collected from the Alcator C-MOD tokamak located at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The sample obtained from C-MOD was not originally intended for examination outside of MIT. The sample was collected with the intent of performing only a composition analysis. However, MIT provided the INEEL with this sample for particle analysis. The sample was collected by vacuuming a section of the machine (covering approximately 1/3 of the machine surface) with a coarse fiber filter as the collection surface. The sample was then analyzed using an optical microscope, SEM microscope, Microtrac FRA particle size analyzer. The data fit a log-normal distribution. The count median diameter (CMD) of the samples ranged from 0.3 microm to 1.1 microm with geometric standard deviations (GSD) ranging from 2.8 to 5.2 and a mass median diameter (MMD) ranging from 7.22 to 176 microm

  7. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Solar Panels on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Mantovani, J. G.; Clements S.; Chen, A.; Mazumder, M. K.; Biris, A. S.; Nowicki, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    The Materials Adherence Experiment on the Mars Pathfinder mission measured an obscuration of the solar arrays due to dust deposition at a rate of about 0.2 8% per day. It was estimated that settling dust may cause degradation in performance of a solar panel of between 22% and 89% over the course of two years [1, 2]. These results were obtained without the presence of a global dust storm. Several types of adherence forces keep dust particles attached to surfaces. The most widely discussed adherence force is the electrostatic force. Laboratory experiments [3] as well as indirect evidence from the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on Pathfinder [4] indicate that it is very likely that the particles suspended in the Martian atmosphere are electrostatically charged.

  8. GARRLiC and LIRIC: strengths and limitations for the characterization of dust and marine particles along with their mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tsekeri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Generalized Aerosol Retrieval from Radiometer and Lidar Combined data algorithm (GARRLiC and the LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC provide the opportunity to study the aerosol vertical distribution by combining ground-based lidar and sun-photometric measurements. Here, we utilize the capabilities of both algorithms for the characterization of Saharan dust and marine particles, along with their mixtures, in the south-eastern Mediterranean during the CHARacterization of Aerosol mixtures of Dust and Marine origin Experiment (CHARADMExp. Three case studies are presented, focusing on dust-dominated, marine-dominated and dust–marine mixing conditions. GARRLiC and LIRIC achieve a satisfactory characterization for the dust-dominated case in terms of particle microphysical properties and concentration profiles. The marine-dominated and the mixture cases are more challenging for both algorithms, although GARRLiC manages to provide more detailed microphysical retrievals compared to AERONET, while LIRIC effectively discriminates dust and marine particles in its concentration profile retrievals. The results are also compared with modelled dust and marine concentration profiles and surface in situ measurements.

  9. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Otto

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006, dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10 %. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal forcing by 55/5 % at the TOA over ocean/land and 15 % at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20 %. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported. They strongly enhance the absorbing properties and forward scattering in the solar and increase predominantly, e.g., the total TOA forcing of the dust over land.

  10. Plasma inhomogeneities near the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge containing dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawidian, H; Mikikian, M.; Couedel, L.; Lecas, T.

    2011-01-01

    Dusty plasmas can be found in fusion devices. In this paper we analyse a new phenomenon occurring during dust particle growth instabilities and consisting of the appearance of small plasma spheroids in the vicinity of discharge electrodes. Small plasma spheroids are evidenced and analyzed in front of the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge in which dust particles are growing. These regions are characterized by a spherical shape, a slightly enhanced luminosity and are related to instabilities induced by the presence of dust particles. Several types of behaviors are identified and particularly their chaotic appearance or disappearance and their rotational motion along the electrode periphery. Correlations with the unstable behavior of the global plasma glow are performed. These analyses are obtained thanks to high-speed imaging which is the only diagnostics able to evidence these plasma spheroids

  11. Sustainability of abrasive processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aurich, J.C.; Linke, B.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2013-01-01

    , the content of technical presentations in STC G, and the results of a comprehensive literature study. The approach to sustainability includes environmental, social, and economic sustainability in accordance with the definition proposed in the Brundtland Report of the United Nations [156]. The main focus......This paper presents an overview of research on sustainability of abrasive processes. It incorporates results from a round robin study on ‘‘energy-efficiency of abrasive processes’’ which has been carried out within the scientific technical committee ‘‘abrasive processes’’ (STC G) of CIRP...... is on environmental and social sustainability. Economic sustainability will be considered as manufacturing productivity. © 2013 CIRP....

  12. Spot Ignition of Natural Fuels by Hot Metal Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, James Linwood

    2017-01-01

    The spot ignition of combustible material by hot metal particles is an important pathway by which wildland and urban spot fires and smolders are started. Upon impact with a fuel, such as dry grass, duff, or saw dust, these particles can initiate spot fires by direct flaming or smoldering which can transition to a flame. These particles can be produced by processes such as welding, powerline interactions, fragments from bullet impacts, abrasive cutting, and pyrotechnics. There is little publi...

  13. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size.

  14. Dirt-binding particles consisting of hydrogenated castor oil beads constitute a nonirritating alternative for abrasive cleaning of recalcitrant oily skin contamination in a three-step programme of occupational skin protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, V; Erfurt-Berge, C; Schiemann, S; Michael, S; Egloffstein, A; Kuss, O

    2010-04-01

    In occupational fields with exposure to grease, oil, metal particles, coal, black lead or soot, cleansing formulations containing abrasive bodies (e.g. refined walnut shell, corn, wood, plastic or pumice) are used. These may constitute an irritant per se. As an alternative, hydrogenated castor oil (also known as castor wax) beads have been developed as dirt-binding particles. A polar surface contributes to their mechanical cleaning effects in removal of oily grime. Standardized examination of the in vivo effects upon the skin barrier of castor wax beads in comparison with abrasive bodies and pure detergent. Three cleansing preparations - (i) detergent, (ii) detergent containing castor wax beads, (iii) detergent containing walnut shell powder - were each repetitively applied in vivo (four times daily for 3 weeks), mimicking workplace conditions, in 30 healthy volunteers (15 with and 15 without an atopic skin diathesis) and compared vs. (iv) no treatment. The treatment effects upon the skin barrier were monitored by repeated measurements of functional parameters [transepidermal water loss (TEWL), redness] and surface topography. After a 3-week treatment, a significant global treatment effect (P dirt and use of skin protection and skin care measures under real workplace conditions, this component may now be used and examined further in different occupations.

  15. Abrasive wear of intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E.; Wilson, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines is investigating the wear behavior of a variety of advanced materials. Among the many materials under evaluation are intermetallic alloys based on the compounds: Fe 3 Al, Ti 3 Al, TiAl, Al 3 Ti, NiAl and MoSi 2 . The high hardness, high modulus, low density, and superior environmental stability of these compounds make them attractive for wear materials. This paper reports on the abrasive wear of alloys and composites based on the above compounds. The abrasive wear behavior of these alloys and composites are compared to other engineering materials used in wear applications

  16. Exposure to dust and particle-associated 1-nitropyrene of drivers of diesel-powered equipment in underground mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, P T J; Micka, V; Muzyka, V; Anzion, R; Dahmann, D; Poole, J; Bos, R P

    2003-07-01

    A field study was conducted in two mines in order to determine the most suitable strategy for ambient exposure assessment in the framework of a European study aimed at validation of biological monitoring approaches for diesel exhaust (BIOMODEM). Exposure to dust and particle-associated 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) was studied in 20 miners of black coal by the long wall method (Czech Republic) and in 20 workers in oil shale mining by the room and pillar method (Estonia). The study in the oil shale mine was extended to include 100 workers in a second phase (main study). In each mine half of the study population worked underground as drivers of diesel-powered trains (black coal) and excavators (oil shale). The other half consisted of workers occupied in various non-diesel production assignments. Exposure to diesel exhaust was studied by measurement of inhalable and respirable dust at fixed locations and by personal air sampling of respirable dust. The ratio of geometric mean inhalable to respirable dust concentration was approximately two to one. The underground/surface ratio of respirable dust concentrations measured at fixed locations and in the breathing zones of the workers was 2-fold or greater. Respirable dust was 2- to 3-fold higher in the breathing zone than at fixed sampling locations. The 1-NP content in these dust fractions was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and ranged from 0.003 to 42.2 ng/m(3) in the breathing zones of the workers. In mine dust no 1-NP was detected. In both mines 1-NP was observed to be primarily associated with respirable particles. The 1-NP concentrations were also higher underground than on the surface (2- to 3-fold in the coal mine and 10-fold or more in the oil shale mine). Concentrations of 1-NP in the breathing zones were also higher than at fixed sites (2.5-fold in the coal mine and 10-fold in the oil shale mine). For individual exposure assessment personal air sampling is preferred over air sampling

  17. Plasma inhomogeneities near the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge containing dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawidian, H.; Mikikian, M.; Couëdel, L.; Lecas, T.

    2011-11-01

    Small plasma spheroids are evidenced and analyzed in front of the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge in which dust particles are growing. These regions are characterized by a spherical shape, a slightly enhanced luminosity and are related to instabilities induced by the presence of dust particles. Several types of behaviors are identified and particularly their chaotic appearance or disappearance and their rotational motion along the electrode periphery. Correlations with the unstable behavior of the global plasma glow are performed. These analyses are obtained thanks to high-speed imaging which is the only diagnostics able to evidence these plasma spheroids.

  18. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Jason C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m−3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m−3 in 2009, 113 µg m−3 in 2010, and 134 µg m−3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5–10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m−3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m−3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  19. Identification of platinum nanoparticles in road dust leachate by single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folens, Karel; Van Acker, Thibaut; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Cornelis, Geert; Vanhaecke, Frank; Du Laing, Gijs; Rauch, Sebastien

    2018-02-15

    Elevated platinum (Pt) concentrations are found in road dust as a result of emissions from catalytic converters in vehicles. This study investigates the occurrence of Pt in road dust collected in Ghent (Belgium) and Gothenburg (Sweden). Total Pt contents, determined by tandem ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS), were in the range of 5 to 79ngg -1 , comparable to the Pt content in road dust of other medium-sized cities. Further sample characterization was performed by single particle (sp) ICP-MS following an ultrasonic extraction procedure using stormwater runoff for leaching. The method was found to be suitable for the characterization of Pt nanoparticles in road dust leachates. The extraction was optimized using road dust reference material BCR-723, for which an extraction efficiency of 2.7% was obtained by applying 144kJ of ultrasonic energy. Using this method, between 0.2% and 18% of the Pt present was extracted from road dust samples. spICP-MS analysis revealed that Pt in the leachate is entirely present as nanoparticles of sizes between 9 and 21nm. Although representing only a minor fraction of the total content in road dust, the nanoparticulate Pt leachate is most susceptible to biological uptake and hence most relevant in terms of bioavailability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Filtration of Oil-furnace Carbon Black Dust Particles from the Tail Gases by Filter Bags With PTFE Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čuzela, D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the industrial production of oil furnace carbon black, tail gases containing oil-furnace carbon black dust particles are emitted to the atmosphere. In the carbon black plant, Petrokemija d. d., there are six exhaust stacks for tail gases. Each of them has installed process equipment for cleaning tail gases. Efficiency of cleaning mainly depends on equipment construction and cleaning technology. The vicinity of the town, quality of the air in the region of Kutina, regarding floating particles PM10, and corporate responsibility for further enviromental improvement, imposes development of new methods that will decrease the emmision of oil-furnace carbon black dust particles in the air. Combining centrifugal percipitator and filter, special construction of cyclofilter for filtration of oil-furnace carbon black dust particles from tail gases by using PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene membrane filter bags, was designed. Developed filtration technique provides η = 99.9 % efficiency of filtration. Construction part of the filter contains the newest generation of PTFE membrane filter bags with the ability of jet pulse cleaning. Using the PTFE membrane filter bags technology, filtration efficiency for oil-furnace carbon black dust particles in tail gases of maximum γ=5mgm-3can be achieved. The filtration efficiency was monitored continuously measuring the concentration of the oil-furnace carbon black dust particles in the tail gases with the help of in situ electronic probe. The accomplished filtration technology is the base for the installation of the PTFE membrane filter bags in the main operation filters which will provide better protection of the air in the town of Kutina against floating particles PM10.

  1. Abrasive water jet cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.; Funnell, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the process of selecting a failed equipment cut-up tool for the process facility modifications (PFM) project, a system using an abrasive water jet (AWJ) was developed and tested for remote disassembly of failed equipment. It is presented in this paper

  2. Mitigation of soiling losses in solar collectors: Removal of surface-adhered dust particles using an electrodynamic screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah, Arash

    Particulate contamination of the optical surfaces of solar collectors, often called "soiling", can have a significant deteriorating impact on energy yield due to the absorption and scattering of incident light. Soiling has more destructive effect on concentrated solar systems than on flat-plate photovoltaic panels, as the former are incapable of converting scattered sunlight. The first part of this thesis deals with the soiling losses of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP), and concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) systems in operation in several regions of the world. Influential parameters in dust accumulation losses, as well as different cleaning mechanisms in pursuit of restoring the efficiency of soiled systems, have been thoroughly investigated. In lieu of the most commonly-practiced manual cleaning method of using high-pressure water jets, the concept of automatic dust removal using the electrostatic forces of electrodynamic screen (EDS) technology is in a developmental stage and on its way toward commercialization. This thesis provides comprehensive analytical solutions for the electric potential and electric field distribution in EDS devices having different configurations. Numerical simulations developed using finite element analysis (FEA) software have corroborated the analytical solutions which can easily be embedded into software programs for particle trajectory simulations while also providing flexibility and generality in the study on the effect of different parameters of the EDS on the electric field and ensuing dust-removal performance. Evaluation and comparison of different repelling and attracting forces exerted on dust particles is of utmost importance to a detailed analysis of EDS performance in dust removal. Hence, the balance of electrostatic and adhesion forces, including van der Waals and capillary forces, have received significant attention in this dissertation. Furthermore, different numerical analyses have been

  3. Coordinates Analyses of Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles: Samples of Primitive Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere fall into two major groups: an anhydrous group termed the "chondritic-porous (CP) IDPs and a hydrated group, the "chondritic-smooth (CS) IDPs, although rare IDPs with mineralogies intermediate between these two groups are known [1]. The CP-IDPs are widely believed to be derived from cometary sources [e.g. 2]. The hydrated CS-IDPs show mineralogical similarities to heavily aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites (e.g. CI chondrites), but only a few have been directly linked to carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies [e.g. 3, 4]. Most CS-IDPs show distinct chemical [5] and oxygen isotopic composition differences [6-8] from primitive carbonaceous chondrites. Here, we report on our coordinated analyses of a suite of carbon-rich CS-IDPs focusing on their bulk compositions, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and isotopic compositions.

  4. THERMODYNAMIC REASONS OF AGGLOMERATION OF DUST PARTICLES IN THE THERMAL DUSTY PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I.Vishnyakov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic equilibrium of thermal dusty plasmas consisting of ionized gas (plasma and solid particles (dust grains, which interact with each other, is studied. The tendency of grains in dusty plasmas to agglomerate corresponds to the tendency of dusty plasmas to balanced states. When grains agglomerate, electrical perturbations generated by each grain concentrate inside the agglomerate. The plasma is perturbed only by the agglomerate's exterior surface. The greater number of possible states for electrons and ions in plasma depends on the volume of perturbation of grains. The fewer are the perturbations the greater is the amount of possible states for electrons and ions in plasma. If the grains collected from a distance smaller than 8 Debye lengths, the total volume of perturbations is minimized; the free energy of the plasma is also minimized.

  5. Acute respiratory effects of the inhalation of coal-dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, M

    1962-01-01

    Volunteers were exposed to 8 to 50 mg/m/sup 3/ (< 7 ..mu..m) coal dust clouds from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Controls showed a 10% decrease in airway resistance (R/sub a/) during this time. Those exposed to 8 or 9 mg/m/sup 3/ showed no change in R/sub a/, whereas those exposed to 19, 33, or 50 mg/m/sup 3/ showed increases in R/sub a/ that were correlated with the weight of particles between 3.6 and 7 ..mu..m. There was large individual variation. Increased respiratory rate and dyspnea were measured at heaviest loading. R/sub a/ decreased, but not to normal values, 1 hr after the exposure.

  6. Analysis and differentiation of mineral dust by single particle laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential of single particle laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of atmospherically relevant mineral dusts. Samples of hematite, goethite, calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, silica, quartz, montmorrillonite, kaolinite, illite, hectorite, wollastonite and nephelinsyenit were investigated in positive and negative ion mode with a monopolar time-of-flight mass spectrometer where the desorption/ionization step was performed with a 193 nm excimer laser (∼10 9 W/cm 2 ). Particle size ranged from 500 nm to 3 (micro)m. Positive mass spectra mainly provide elemental composition whereas negative ion spectra provide information on element speciation and of a structural nature. The iron oxide, calcium-rich and aluminosilicate nature of particles is established in positive ion mode. The differentiation of calcium materials strongly relies on the calcium counter-ions in negative mass spectra. Aluminosilicates can be differentiated in both positive and negative ion mode using the relative abundance of various aluminum and silicon ions

  7. Stochastic heating of dust particles in complex plasmas as an energetic instability of a harmonic oscillator with random frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmolino, Ciro [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie dell' Ambiente e del Territorio-DiSTAT, Universita del Molise, Contrada Fonte Lappone, I-86090 Pesche (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The paper describes the occurrence of stochastic heating of dust particles in dusty plasmas as an energy instability due to the correlations between dust grain charge and electric field fluctuations. The possibility that the mean energy (''temperature'') of dust particles can grow in time has been found both from the self-consistent kinetic description of dusty plasmas taking into account charge fluctuations [U. de Angelis, A. V. Ivlev, V. N. Tsytovich, and G. E. Morfill, Phys. Plasmas 12(5), 052301 (2005)] and from a Fokker-Planck approach to systems with variable charge [A. V. Ivlev, S. K. Zhdanov, B. A. Klumov, and G. E. Morfill, Phys. Plasmas 12(9), 092104 (2005)]. Here, a different derivation is given by using the mathematical techniques of the so called multiplicative stochastic differential equations. Both cases of ''fast'' and ''slow'' fluctuations are discussed.

  8. Retrieving simulated volcanic, desert dust and sea-salt particle properties from two/three-component particle mixtures using UV-VIS polarization lidar and T matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. David

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During transport by advection, atmospheric nonspherical particles, such as volcanic ash, desert dust or sea-salt particles experience several chemical and physical processes, leading to a complex vertical atmospheric layering at remote sites where intrusion episodes occur. In this paper, a new methodology is proposed to analyse this complex vertical layering in the case of a two/three-component particle external mixtures. This methodology relies on an analysis of the spectral and polarization properties of the light backscattered by atmospheric particles. It is based on combining a sensitive and accurate UV-VIS polarization lidar experiment with T-matrix numerical simulations and air mass back trajectories. The Lyon UV-VIS polarization lidar is used to efficiently partition the particle mixture into its nonspherical components, while the T-matrix method is used for simulating the backscattering and depolarization properties of nonspherical volcanic ash, desert dust and sea-salt particles. It is shown that the particle mixtures' depolarization ratio δ p differs from the nonspherical particles' depolarization ratio δns due to the presence of spherical particles in the mixture. Hence, after identifying a tracer for nonspherical particles, particle backscattering coefficients specific to each nonspherical component can be retrieved in a two-component external mixture. For three-component mixtures, the spectral properties of light must in addition be exploited by using a dual-wavelength polarization lidar. Hence, for the first time, in a three-component external mixture, the nonsphericity of each particle is taken into account in a so-called 2β + 2δ formalism. Applications of this new methodology are then demonstrated in two case studies carried out in Lyon, France, related to the mixing of Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash with sulfate particles (case of a two-component mixture and to the mixing of dust with sea-salt and water-soluble particles

  9. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon [Department of Physics, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Youn-Suk [Department of Advanced Technology Fusion, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jo-Chun [Department of Advanced Technology Fusion, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, HyeKyoung [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Ro, Chul-Un, E-mail: curo@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined chemical species of floor dusts and airborne magnetic subway particles collected at underground subway stations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD, SEM/EDX, and VSM measurements provided information on their major iron species, which is relatively harmless iron metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. - Abstract: Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail-wheel-brake and catenaries-pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the <25 {mu}m size fractions with minor fractions of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, S, and C. From SEM analysis, the floor dusts of the <25 {mu}m size fractions collected on railroad ties appeared to be smaller than 10 {mu}m, indicating that their characteristics should somewhat reflect the characteristics of airborne particles in the tunnel and the platform. As most floor dusts are magnetic, PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 {mu}m, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi

  10. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul; Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined chemical species of floor dusts and airborne magnetic subway particles collected at underground subway stations. ► XRD, SEM/EDX, and VSM measurements provided information on their major iron species, which is relatively harmless iron metal. ► PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. - Abstract: Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail–wheel–brake and catenaries–pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions with minor fractions of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, S, and C. From SEM analysis, the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions collected on railroad ties appeared to be smaller than 10 μm, indicating that their characteristics should somewhat reflect the characteristics of airborne particles in the tunnel and the platform. As most floor dusts are magnetic, PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 μm, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi station was iron metal, whereas those at Yangjae station contained a small amount

  11. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul; Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-04-30

    Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail-wheel-brake and catenaries-pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 μm, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi station was iron metal, whereas those at Yangjae station contained a small amount of Fe mixed with Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and C. The difference in composition of the Fe-containing particles between the two subway stations was attributed to the different ballast tracks used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Review on Parametric Analysis of Magnetic Abrasive Machining Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattri, Krishna; Choudhary, Gulshan; Bhuyan, B. K.; Selokar, Ashish

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic abrasive machining (MAM) process is a highly developed unconventional machining process. It is frequently used in manufacturing industries for nanometer range surface finishing of workpiece with the help of Magnetic abrasive particles (MAPs) and magnetic force applied in the machining zone. It is precise and faster than conventional methods and able to produce defect free finished components. This paper provides a comprehensive review on the recent advancement of MAM process carried out by different researcher till date. The effect of different input parameters such as rotational speed of electromagnet, voltage, magnetic flux density, abrasive particles size and working gap on the performances of Material Removal Rate (MRR) and surface roughness (Ra) have been discussed. On the basis of review, it is observed that the rotational speed of electromagnet, voltage and mesh size of abrasive particles have significant impact on MAM process.

  13. Wear of dentine in vitro by toothpaste abrasives and detergents alone and combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C; Addy, M

    2005-12-01

    To measure in vitro the abrasion of dentine by toothpaste detergents and abrasives alone and combined. Detergents used were tego betain, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), adinol and pluronic diluted to 1% w/v. Abrasives were three artificial silicas, tixosil 73 and 123 and Zeodent 113, and calcium carbonate used at 2.5% w/v. Flat human dentine specimens were brushed with aqueous detergent solutions or abrasive slurries, detergent abrasive slurries and water for 20,000 brush strokes. Dentine loss was measured by non-contacting profilometry at 10,000 and 20,000 strokes. Silica particle size distribution was measured by laser deflection. Loss of dentine occurred with all detergents, abrasives and detergent abrasion combinations, but was not linear with number of brush strokes. Water appeared to remove the smear layer only, but all detergents exceeded the predicted smear layer thickness. The silica abrasives differed in abrasion properties despite similar particle size distribution. Different detergents modulated the abrasives actions in mainly positive or mainly negative directions. Detergents appear able to attack the dentine surface to produce wear. Abrasives vary considerably in wear produced under similar conditions. Detergents modulate the effect of abrasives in a way that may reflect the rheological properties of the mixture.

  14. Limited production of sulfate and nitrate on front-associated dust storm particles moving from desert to distant populated areas in northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng; Zhang, Daizhou; Cao, Junji; Guo, Xiao; Xia, Yao; Zhang, Ting; Lu, Hui; Cheng, Yan

    2017-12-01

    Sulfate and nitrate compounds can greatly increase the hygroscopicity of mineral particles in the atmosphere and consequently alter the particles' physical and chemical properties. Their uptake on long-distance-transported Asian dust particles within mainland China has been reported to be substantial in previous studies, but the production was very inefficient in other studies. We compared these two salts in particles collected from a synoptic-scale, mid-latitude, cyclone-induced dust storm plume at the Tengger Desert (38.79° N, 105.38° E) and in particles collected in a postfrontal dust plume at an urban site in Xi'an (34.22° N, 108.87° E) when a front-associated dust storm from the Tengger Desert arrived there approximately 700 km downwind. The results showed that the sulfate concentration was not considerably different at the two sites, while the nitrate concentration was slightly larger at the urban site than that at the desert site. The estimated nitrate production rate was 4-5 ng µg-1 of mineral dust per day, which was much less than that in polluted urban air. The adiabatic process of the dust-loading air was suggested to be the reason for the absence of sulfate formation, and the uptake of background HNO3 was suggested to be the reason for the small nitrate production. According to our investigation of the published literature, the significant sulfate and nitrate in dust-storm-associated samples within the continental atmosphere reported in previous studies cannot be confirmed as actually produced on desert dust particles; the contribution from locally emitted and urban mineral particles or from soil-derived sulfate was likely substantial because the weather conditions in those studies indicated that the collection of the samples was started before dust arrival, or the air from which the samples were collected was a mixture of desert dust and locally emitted mineral particles. These results suggest that the production of nitrate and sulfate on dust

  15. Limited production of sulfate and nitrate on front-associated dust storm particles moving from desert to distant populated areas in northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate and nitrate compounds can greatly increase the hygroscopicity of mineral particles in the atmosphere and consequently alter the particles' physical and chemical properties. Their uptake on long-distance-transported Asian dust particles within mainland China has been reported to be substantial in previous studies, but the production was very inefficient in other studies. We compared these two salts in particles collected from a synoptic-scale, mid-latitude, cyclone-induced dust storm plume at the Tengger Desert (38.79° N, 105.38° E and in particles collected in a postfrontal dust plume at an urban site in Xi'an (34.22° N, 108.87° E when a front-associated dust storm from the Tengger Desert arrived there approximately 700 km downwind. The results showed that the sulfate concentration was not considerably different at the two sites, while the nitrate concentration was slightly larger at the urban site than that at the desert site. The estimated nitrate production rate was 4–5 ng µg−1 of mineral dust per day, which was much less than that in polluted urban air. The adiabatic process of the dust-loading air was suggested to be the reason for the absence of sulfate formation, and the uptake of background HNO3 was suggested to be the reason for the small nitrate production. According to our investigation of the published literature, the significant sulfate and nitrate in dust-storm-associated samples within the continental atmosphere reported in previous studies cannot be confirmed as actually produced on desert dust particles; the contribution from locally emitted and urban mineral particles or from soil-derived sulfate was likely substantial because the weather conditions in those studies indicated that the collection of the samples was started before dust arrival, or the air from which the samples were collected was a mixture of desert dust and locally emitted mineral particles. These results suggest that the

  16. Detecting Interplanetary Dust Particles with Radars to Study the Dynamics at the Edge of the Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's mesosphere is the region of the atmosphere between approximately 60-120 km altitude, where the transition from hydrodynamic flow to molecular diffusion occurs. It is highly dynamic region where turbulence by wave braking is produced and energy is deposited from sources from both, below and above this altitude range. Because aircraft and nearly all balloons reach altitudes below approximately 50 km and orbital spacecrafts are well above approximately 400 km, the mesosphere has only been accessed through the use of sounding rockets or remote sensing techniques, and as a result, it is the most poorly understood part of the atmosphere. In addition, millions of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) enter the atmosphere. Within the mesosphere most of these IDPs melt or vaporize as a result of collisions with the air particles producing meteors that can be detected with radars. This provides a mean to study the dynamics of this region. In this lecture the basic principles of the utilization of meteor radars to study the dynamics of the mesosphere will be presented. A system overview of these systems will be provided as well as discuss the advantages/disadvantages of these systems, provide details of the data processing methodology and give a brief overview of the current status of the field as well as the vision for the next decade.

  17. Impact of Sahara dust transport on Cape Verde atmospheric element particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Silva, M; Almeida, S M; Freitas, M C; Pio, C A; Nunes, T; Cardoso, J

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) conduct an elemental characterization of airborne particles sampled in Cape Verde and (2) assess the influence of Sahara desert on local suspended particles. Particulate matter (PM(10)) was collected in Praia city (14°94'N; 23°49'W) with a low-volume sampler in order to characterize its chemical composition by k0-INAA. The filter samples were first weighed and subsequently irradiated at the Portuguese Research Reactor. Results showed that PM(10) concentrations in Cape Verde markedly exceeded the health-based air quality standards defined by the European Union (EU), World Health Organization (WHO), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in part due to the influence of Sahara dust transport. The PM(10) composition was characterized essentially by high concentrations of elements originating from the soil (K, Sm, Co, Fe, Sc, Rb, Cr, Ce, and Ba) and sea (Na), and low concentrations of anthropogenic elements (As, Zn, and Sb). In addition, the high concentrations of PM measured in Cape Verde suggest that health of the population may be less affected compared with other sites where PM(10) concentrations are lower but more enriched with toxic elements.

  18. Induced charge of spherical dust particle on plasma-facing wall in non-uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.; Smirnov, R.; Zhu, S.

    2005-01-01

    Induced charge of a spherical dust particle on a plasma-facing wall is investigated analytically, where non-uniform electric field is applied externally. The one-dimensional non-uniform electrostatic potential is approximated by the polynomial of the normal coordinate toward the wall. The bipolar coordinate is introduced to solve the Laplace equation of the induced electrostatic potential. The boundary condition at the dust surface determines the unknown coefficients of the general solution of the Laplace equation for the induced potential. From the obtained potential the surface induced charge can be calculated. This result allows estimating the effect of the surrounding plasma, which shields the induced charge. (author)

  19. Statistical analysis of temporal and spatial evolution of in-vessel dust particles in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Rae; Hong, Suk-Ho; Nam, Yong-Un; Jung, Jinil; Kim, Woong-Chae

    2013-01-01

    Images of wide-angle visible standard CCD cameras contain information on in-vessel dusts such as dust creation events (DCEs) that occur during plasma operations, and their velocity. Analyzing the straight line-like dust traces in the shallow cylindrical shell-structured scrape-off layer along the vacuum vessel, a database on the short/long term temporal evolutions, spatial locations of DCEs caused by plasma–dust interaction, and the dust velocity distribution are built. We have studied DCEs of 2010 and 2011 KSTAR campaign

  20. Simulation analysis of dust-particle transport in the peripheral plasma in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Mamoru; Masuzaki, Suguru; Kawamura, Gakushi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Pigarov, Alexander Yu.; Smirnov, Roman D.

    2014-01-01

    The function of the peripheral plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) on transport of dusts is investigated using a dust transport simulation code (DUSTT) in a non-axisymmetric geometry. The simulation shows that the transport of the dusts is dominated by the plasma flow (mainly by ion drag force) formed in the peripheral plasma. The trajectories of dusts are investigated in two probable situations: release of spherical iron dusts from the inboard side of the torus, and drop of spherical carbon dusts from a divertor plate installed near an edge of an upper port. The trajectories in these two situations are calculated in various sized dust cases. From a viewpoint of protection of the main plasma from dust penetration, it proves that there are two functions in the LHD peripheral plasma. One is sweeping of dusts by the effect of the plasma flow in the divertor legs, and another one is evaporation/sublimation of dusts by heat load onto the dusts in the ergodic layer. (author)

  1. Effects of Asian dust event particles on inflammation markers in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage in pulmonary hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Y.-C.; Chan, C.-C.; Wang, P.-Y.; Lee, C.-T.; Cheng, T.-J.

    2004-01-01

    The health impact of dust events from China has become a concern within China and in its neighboring countries. Previous epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between particulate matter exposure and cardiopulmonary mortality. Here, we use pulmonary hypertensive rat models to examine inflammation markers in the lung and in peripheral blood after exposure to Asian dust storm particles. Using a nose-only inhalation system, eight pulmonary hypertensive rats were exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from an actual Asian dust storm that took place between March 18 and 19, 2002; four control rats were also exposed to room air. Four rats exposed to CAPs of 315.6 μg/m 3 for 6 h were classified as the low-exposure group, and another four rats exposed to CAPs of 684.5 μg/m 3 for 4.5 h were classified as the high-exposure group. The animals were sacrificed 36 h after exposure. Inflammation markers in the peripheral blood and in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were analyzed, and IL-6 in BAL was also determined using ELISA. White blood cell counts in peripheral blood increased with increased CAP exposure levels (P<0.001, test for trend). In BAL analysis, total cell numbers and the proportion of neutrophil also increased with increased CAP levels (P<0.001, test for trend for both markers). Positive dose-response relationships between CAP exposure and total protein (P<0.05) and between CAPs and LDH activity (P<0.05) were also observed. Moreover, IL-6 protein in BAL increasing with CAP levels (P<0.05, test for trend) was demonstrated. Our results revealed that exposure to particulate matters during an Asian dust storm could increase lung inflammation and injury in pulmonary hypertensive rats. Further studies are needed to determine the components of dust storm particles that may contribute to the particle toxicity

  2. Experimental study of the role of physicochemical surface processing on the IN ability of mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Niedermeier

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available During the measurement campaign FROST 2 (FReezing Of duST 2, the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS was used to investigate the influence of various surface modifications on the ice nucleating ability of Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles in the immersion freezing mode. The dust particles were exposed to sulfuric acid vapor, to water vapor with and without the addition of ammonia gas, and heat using a thermodenuder operating at 250 °C. Size selected, quasi monodisperse particles with a mobility diameter of 300 nm were fed into LACIS and droplets grew on these particles such that each droplet contained a single particle. Temperature dependent frozen fractions of these droplets were determined in a temperature range between −40 °C ≤T≤−28 °C. The pure ATD particles nucleated ice over a broad temperature range with their freezing behavior being separated into two freezing branches characterized through different slopes in the frozen fraction vs. temperature curves. Coating the ATD particles with sulfuric acid resulted in the particles' IN potential significantly decreasing in the first freezing branch (T>−35 °C and a slight increase in the second branch (T≤−35 °C. The addition of water vapor after the sulfuric acid coating caused the disappearance of the first freezing branch and a strong reduction of the IN ability in the second freezing branch. The presence of ammonia gas during water vapor exposure had a negligible effect on the particles' IN ability compared to the effect of water vapor. Heating in the thermodenuder led to a decreased IN ability of the sulfuric acid coated particles for both branches but the additional heat did not or only slightly change the IN ability of the pure ATD and the water vapor exposed sulfuric acid coated particles. In other words, the combination of both sulfuric acid and water vapor being present is a main cause for the ice active surface features of the ATD

  3. Saharan dust particles in snow samples of Alps and Apennines during an exceptional event of transboundary air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telloli, Chiara; Chicca, Milvia; Pepi, Salvatore; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2017-12-21

    Southern European countries are often affected in summer by transboundary air pollution from Saharan dust. However, very few studies deal with Saharan dust pollution at high altitudes in winter. In Italy, the exceptional event occurred on February 19, 2014, colored in red the entire mountain range (Alps and Apennines) and allowed to characterize the particulate matter deposited on snow from a morphological and chemical point of view. Snow samples were collected after this event in four areas in the Alps and one in the Apennines. The particulate matter of the melted snow samples was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These analyses confirmed the presence of Saharan dust particle components in all areas with similar percentages, supported also by the positive correlations between Mg-Ca, Al-Ca, Al-Mg, and Al-K in all samples.

  4. Control technology for crystalline silica exposures in construction: wet abrasive blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golla, Vijay; Heitbrink, William

    2004-03-01

    This study was designed to document the effect that wet abrasive blasting has on reducing worker exposure to crystalline silica, which has been associated with silicosis and premature death. In this study, worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica was monitored during wet abrasive blasting on the exterior walls of a parking garage to remove surface concrete and expose the underlying aggregate. In this process a wet sand mix comprised of 80% dry sand and 20% water was used. Sampling and analysis revealed that the geometric mean respirable quartz concentration was 0.2 mg/m(3) for workers conducting abrasive blasting and 0.06 mg/m(3) for helpers. When abrasive blasting was conducted in areas that apparently had reduced natural ventilation, dust exposures appeared to increase. When compared with other published data, this case study suggests that wet abrasive blasting causes less exposure to crystalline silica than dry abrasive blasting.

  5. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  6. Accounting for particle non-sphericity in modeling of mineral dust radiative properties in the thermal infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, M.; Dubovik, O.; Lapyonok, T.; Derimian, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral radiative parameters (extinction optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor) of spheroids of mineral dust composed of quartz and clays have been simulated at wavelengths between 7.0 and 10.2 µm using a T-matrix code. In spectral intervals with high values of complex index of refraction and for large particles, the parameters cannot be fully calculated with the code. Practically, the calculations are stopped at a truncation radius over which the particles contribution cannot thus be taken into account. To deal with this issue, we have developed and applied an accurate corrective technique of T-matrix Size Truncation Compensation (TSTC). For a mineral dust described by its AERONET standard aspect ratio (AR) distribution, the full error margin when applying the TSTC is within 0.3% (or ±0.15%), whatever the radiative parameter and the wavelength considered, for quartz (the most difficult case). Large AR values limit also the possibilities of calculation with the code. The TSTC has been able to complete the calculations of the T-matrix code for a modified AERONET AR distribution with a maximum AR of 4.7 instead of 3 for the standard distribution. Comparison between the simulated properties of spheroids and of spheres of same volume confirms, in agreement with the literature, that significant differences are observed in the vicinity of the mineral resonant peaks (λ ca. 8.3–8.7 µm for quartz, ca. 9.3–9.5 µm for clays) and that they are due to absorption by the small particles. This is a favorable circumstance for the TSTC, which is concerned with the contribution of the largest particles. This technique of numerical calculation improves the accuracy of the simulated radiative parameters of mineral dust, which must lead to a progress in view of applications such as remote sensing or determination of energy balance of dust in the thermal infrared (TIR), incompletely investigated so far. - Highlights: • Completion of computation of mineral

  7. Abrasive wear of enamel by bioactive glass-based toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asad; Mneimne, Mohammed; Zou, Li Fong; Hill, Robert G; Gillam, David G

    2014-10-01

    To determine the abrasivity of a 45S5 bioactive glass based toothpaste on enamel as a function of the particle size and shape of the glass. 45S5 glass was synthesized ground and sieved to give various particle sized fractions toothpastes and their tooth brush abrasivity measured according to BS EN ISO11609 methodology. Enamel loss increased with increasing particle size. The percussion milled powder exhibited particles that had sharp edges and the pastes were significantly more abrasive than the pastes made with round ball milled powders. One interesting observation made during the present study was that there was preferential wear of the enamel at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ), particularly with the coarse particle sized pastes.

  8. Effect of environmental dust particles on laser textured yttria-stabilized zirconia surface in humid air ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Al-Sharafi, A.; Al-Sulaiman, F.; Karatas, C.

    2018-05-01

    Zirconium nitride is used as a selective surface for concentrated solar heating applications and one of the methods to form a zirconium nitride is texturing of zirconia surface by a high intensity laser beam under high pressure nitrogen gas environment. Laser texturing also provides hydrophobic surface characteristics via forming micro/nano pillars at the surface; however, environmental dust settlement on textured surface influences the surface characteristics significantly. In the present study, laser texturing of zirconia surface and effects of the dust particles on the textured surface in a humid air ambient are investigated. Analytical tools are used to assess the morphological changes on the laser textured surface prior and after the dust settlement in the humid air ambient. It is found that laser textured surface has hydrophobic characteristics. The mud formed during condensate of water on the dust particles alters the characteristics of the laser textured surface. The tangential force required to remove the dry mud from the textured surface remains high; in which case, the dried liquid solution at the mud-textured surface interface is responsible for the strong adhesion of the dry mud on the textured surface. The textured surface becomes hydrophilic after the dry mud was removed from the surface by a desalinated water jet.

  9. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  10. Hypervelocity dust particle impacts observed by the Giotto Magnetometer and Plasma Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Coates, A. J.; Goldstein, R.; Acuña, M. H.; Musmann, G.

    1990-01-01

    We report thirteen very short events in the magnetic field of the inner magnetic pile‐up region of comet Halley observed by the Giotto magnetometer experiment together with simultaneous plasma data obtained by the Johnstone plasma analyzer and the ion mass spectrometer experiments. The events are due to dust impacts in the milligram range on the spacecraft at the relative velocity between the cemetery dust and the spacecraft of 68 km/sec. They are generally consistent with dust impact events ...

  11. MULTIGRAIN: a smoothed particle hydrodynamic algorithm for multiple small dust grains and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Mark; Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2018-05-01

    We present a new algorithm, MULTIGRAIN, for modelling the dynamics of an entire population of small dust grains immersed in gas, typical of conditions that are found in molecular clouds and protoplanetary discs. The MULTIGRAIN method is more accurate than single-phase simulations because the gas experiences a backreaction from each dust phase and communicates this change to the other phases, thereby indirectly coupling the dust phases together. The MULTIGRAIN method is fast, explicit and low storage, requiring only an array of dust fractions and their derivatives defined for each resolution element.

  12. A Raman spectroscopic study of organic matter in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites using multiple wavelength laser excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate insoluble organic matter (IOM) from a range of chondritic meteorites, and a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Three monochromatic excitation wavelengths (473 nm, 514 nm, 632 nm) were applied sequentially to assess variations in meteorite and IDP Raman peak parameters (carbon D and G bands) as a function of excitation wavelength (i.e., dispersion). Greatest dispersion occurs in CVs > OCs > CMs > CRs with type 3 chondrites compared at diff...

  13. Dust Interactions on Small Solar System Bodies and Technology Considerations for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrick, Ryan,; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Pavone, Marco; Street, Kenneth; Rickman, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Small-bodies such as asteroids and Mars' moons Phobos and Deimos have relatively unknown regolith environments. It is hypothesized that dust preserved in the regolith on the surfaces will have similar mechanical properties to lunar dust because of similar formation processes from micrometeorite bombardment, low relative gravity for slow settling times, and virtually no weathering because there is no atmosphere. This combination of processes infers that small-body dust particles will be highly angular and retain abrasive properties. The focus of this paper uses the mission architecture and engineering design for an asteroid hopper known as Hedgehog, a spherical spacecraft with several symmetric spikes used to aid with tumbling mobility in a low gravity environment. Dust abrasion considerations are highlighted throughout the paper relating to the lead authors' previous work, but act as an example of one of many important dust or regolith physical properties that need to be considered for future exploration. Measurable regolith properties are summarized in order to identify technologies that may be useful for exploration in terms of scientific return and spacecraft design. Previous instruments are summarized in this paper that could be used on the Hedgehog. Opportunities for hardware payloads are highlighted that include low mass solutions or dualpurpose instruments that can measure regolith or dust properties. Finally, dust mitigation suggestions are made for vehicles of this mobility profile.

  14. Comet 81p/Wild 2: The Updated Stardust Coma Dust Fluence Measurement for Smaller (Sub 10-Micrometre) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. C.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, Friedrich; Cole, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Micrometre and smaller scale dust within cometary comae can be observed by telescopic remote sensing spectroscopy [1] and the particle size and abundance can be measured by in situ spacecraft impact detectors [2]. Initial interpretation of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft [3] appears to show that very fine dust contributes not only a small fraction of the solid mass, but is also relatively sparse [4], with a low negative power function describing grain size distribution, contrasting with an apparent abundance indicated by the on-board Dust Flux Monitor Instrument (DFMI) [5] operational during the encounter. For particles above 10 m diameter there is good correspondence between results from the DFMI and the particle size inferred from experimental calibration [6] of measured aerogel track and aluminium foil crater dimensions (as seen in Figure 4 of [4]). However, divergence between data-sets becomes apparent at smaller sizes, especially submicrometre, where the returned sample data are based upon location and measurement of tiny craters found by electron microscopy of Al foils. Here effects of detection efficiency tail-off at each search magnification can be seen in the down-scale flattening of each scale component, but are reliably compensated by sensible extrapolation between segments. There is also no evidence of malfunction in the operation of DFMI during passage through the coma (S. Green, personal comm.), so can the two data sets be reconciled?

  15. Effect of airborne particle abrasion protocols on surface topography of Y-TZP ceramic Efeito do protocolo de jateamento com partículas na topografia da superfície de uma cerâmica Y-TZP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. C. Queiroz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate Y-TZP surface after different airborne particle abrasion protocols. Seventy-six Y-TZP ceramic blocks (5×4×4 mm³ were sintered and polished. Specimens were randomly divided into 19 groups (n=4 according to control group and 3 factors: a protocol duration (2 and 4 s; b particle size (30 µm, alumina coated silica particle; 45 µm, alumina particle; and 145 µm, alumina particle and; c pressure (1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 bar. Airborne particle abrasion was performed following a strict protocol. For qualitative and quantitative results, topography surfaces were analyzed in a digital optical profilometer (Interference Microscopic, using different roughness parameters (Ra, Rq, Rz, X-crossing, Mr1, Mr2 and Sdr and 3D images. Surface roughness also was analyzed following the primer and silane applications on Y-TZP surfaces. One-way ANOVA revealed that treatments (application period, particle size and pressure of particle blasting provided significant difference for all roughness parameters. The Tukey test determined that the significant differences between groups were different among roughness parameters. In qualitative analysis, the bonding agent application reduced roughness, filing the valleys in the surface. The protocols performed in this study verified that application period, particle size and pressure influenced the topographic pattern and amplitude of roughness.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a superfície de uma cerâmica à base de zircônia tetragonal estabilizada por ítria (Y-TZP após diferentes protocolos de jateamento com partículas. Setenta e seis blocos cerâmicos de Y-TZP (5 x 4 x 4 mm³ foram sinterizados e polidos. As amostras foram randomicamente divididas em 19 grupos (n=4 sendo um controle e 18 grupos utilizando 3 fatores: a tempo (2 e 4 s; b tamanho de partícula (30 µm - partículas de alumina revestida por sílica; 45 µm - partículas de alumina; 145 µm - partículas de alumina e; c pressão (1

  16. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sis of the TNO color index–orbital inclinations. We also .... In our view, during these two processes, their complementarities lead to a certain balance due to the .... dust will form a multi-mineral complex of the hardly detectable dust matter of the.

  17. Size-Resolved Characterization of Particles and Fibers Released during Abrasion of Fiber-Reinforced Composite in a Workplace Influenced by Ambient Background Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Kirsten I.; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Alexander C. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of high-to low-resolution microscopy and particle chemical analysis during normal vacuum and cryo-conditions to identify the nature and relative abundances of process-generated particles and fibers from sanding of a glass and carbon fiber epoxy layer-composite in a workplace...... influenced by both indoor and ambient background sources. The study suggests that a proper exposure characterization requires multiple techniques covering wide size ranges to reach a conclusion. Besides a rise in number concentration due to release of particles during the sanding, a significant contribution...

  18. Influence of Non-Maxwellian Particles on Dust Acoustic Waves in a Dusty Magnetized Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri Kadijani, M.; Zareamoghaddam, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an investigation into dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) in the presence of superthermal electrons and ions in a magnetized plasma with cold dust grains and trapped electrons is discussed. The dynamic of both electrons and ions is simulated by the generalized Lorentzian (κ) distribution function (DF). The dust grains are cold and their dynamics are studied by hydrodynamic equations. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation using Reductive Perturbation Theory (RPT). Two types of solitary waves, fast and slow dust acoustic soliton (DAS) exist in this plasma. Calculations reveal that compressive solitary structures are possibly propagated in the plasma where dust grains are negatively (or positively) charged. The properties of DASs are also investigated numerically. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  19. Characterization of individual ice residual particles by the single droplet freezing method: a case study in the Asian dust outflow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Ayumi; Matsuki, Atsushi

    2018-02-01

    In order to better characterize ice nucleating (IN) aerosol particles in the atmosphere, we investigated the chemical composition, mixing state, and morphology of atmospheric aerosols that nucleate ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase clouds. Five standard mineral dust samples (quartz, K-feldspar, Na-feldspar, Arizona test dust, and Asian dust source particles) were compared with actual aerosol particles collected from the west coast of Japan (the city of Kanazawa) during Asian dust events in February and April 2016. Following droplet activation by particles deposited on a hydrophobic Si (silicon) wafer substrate under supersaturated air, individual IN particles were located using an optical microscope by gradually cooling the temperature to -30 °C. For the aerosol samples, both the IN active particles and non-active particles were analyzed individually by atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Heterogeneous ice nucleation in all standard mineral dust samples tested in this study was observed at consistently higher temperatures (e.g., -22.2 to -24.2 °C with K-feldspar) than the homogeneous freezing temperature (-36.5 °C). Meanwhile, most of the IN active atmospheric particles formed ice below -28 °C, i.e., at lower temperatures than the standard mineral dust samples of pure components. The most abundant IN active particles above -30 °C were predominantly irregular solid particles that showed clay mineral characteristics (or mixtures of several mineral components). Other than clay, Ca-rich particles internally mixed with other components, such as sulfate, were also regarded as IN active particle types. Moreover, sea salt particles were predominantly found in the non-active fraction, and internal mixing with sea salt clearly acted as a significant inhibiting agent for the ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles. Also, relatively

  20. Characterization of individual ice residual particles by the single droplet freezing method: a case study in the Asian dust outflow region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iwata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to better characterize ice nucleating (IN aerosol particles in the atmosphere, we investigated the chemical composition, mixing state, and morphology of atmospheric aerosols that nucleate ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase clouds. Five standard mineral dust samples (quartz, K-feldspar, Na-feldspar, Arizona test dust, and Asian dust source particles were compared with actual aerosol particles collected from the west coast of Japan (the city of Kanazawa during Asian dust events in February and April 2016. Following droplet activation by particles deposited on a hydrophobic Si (silicon wafer substrate under supersaturated air, individual IN particles were located using an optical microscope by gradually cooling the temperature to −30 °C. For the aerosol samples, both the IN active particles and non-active particles were analyzed individually by atomic force microscopy (AFM, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Heterogeneous ice nucleation in all standard mineral dust samples tested in this study was observed at consistently higher temperatures (e.g., −22.2 to −24.2 °C with K-feldspar than the homogeneous freezing temperature (−36.5 °C. Meanwhile, most of the IN active atmospheric particles formed ice below −28 °C, i.e., at lower temperatures than the standard mineral dust samples of pure components. The most abundant IN active particles above −30 °C were predominantly irregular solid particles that showed clay mineral characteristics (or mixtures of several mineral components. Other than clay, Ca-rich particles internally mixed with other components, such as sulfate, were also regarded as IN active particle types. Moreover, sea salt particles were predominantly found in the non-active fraction, and internal mixing with sea salt clearly acted as a significant inhibiting agent for the ice nucleation activity of mineral

  1. Investigation of dust particles with future Russian lunar missions: achievements of further development of PmL instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Ilya; Zakharov, Alexander; Afonin, Valeri; Seran, Elena; Godefroy, Michel; Shashkova, Inna; Lyash, Andrey; Dolnikov, Gennady; Popel, Sergey; Lisin, Evgeny

    2016-07-01

    One of the complicating factors of the future robotic and human lunar landing missions is the influence of the dust. Meteorites bombardment has accompanied by shock-explosive phenomena, disintegration and mix of the lunar soil in depth and on area simultaneously. As a consequence, the lunar soil has undergone melting, physical and chemical transformations. Recently we have the some reemergence for interest of Moon investigation. The prospects in current century declare USA, China, India, and European Union. In Russia also prepare two missions: Luna-Glob and Luna-Resource. Not last part of investigation of Moon surface is reviewing the dust condition near the ground of landers. Studying the properties of lunar dust is important both for scientific purposes to investigation the lunar exosphere component and for the technical safety of lunar robotic and manned missions. The absence of an atmosphere on the Moon's surface is leading to greater compaction and sintering. Properties of regolith and dust particles (density, temperature, composition, etc.) as well as near-surface lunar exosphere depend on solar activity, lunar local time and position of the Moon relative to the Earth's magneto tail. Upper layers of regolith are an insulator, which is charging as a result of solar UV radiation and the constant bombardment of charged particles, creates a charge distribution on the surface of the moon: positive on the illuminated side and negative on the night side. Charge distribution depends on the local lunar time, latitude and the electrical properties of the regolith (the presence of water in the regolith can influence the local distribution of charge). On the day side of Moon near surface layer there exists possibility formation dusty plasma system. Altitude of levitation is depending from size of dust particle and Moon latitude. The distribution of dust particles by size and altitude has estimated with taking into account photoelectrons, electrons and ions of solar wind

  2. Endotoxin and dust at respirable and nonrespirable particle sizes are not consistent between cage- and floor-housed poultry operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirychuk, Shelley P; Reynolds, Stephen J; Koehncke, Niels K; Lawson, Joshua; Willson, Philip; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Marciniuk, Darcy; Classen, Henry L; Crowe, Trever; Just, Natasha; Schneberger, David; Dosman, James A

    2010-10-01

    Individuals engaged in work in intensive animal houses experience some of the highest rates of occupationally related respiratory symptoms. Organic dust and in particular endotoxin has been most closely associated with respiratory symptoms and lung function changes in workers. It has previously been shown that for intensive poultry operations, type of poultry housing [cage-housed (CH) versus floor-housed (FH)] can influence the levels of environmental contaminants. The goal of the study was to determine the differences in endotoxin and dust levels at different size fractions between CH and FH poultry operations. Fifteen CH and 15 FH poultry operations were sampled for stationary measurements (area) of dust and associated endotoxin. Fractioned samples were collected utilizing Marple cascade impactors. Gravimetric and endotoxin analysis were conducted on each of the filters. When assessed by individual Marple stage, there was significantly greater airborne endotoxin concentration (endotoxin units per cubic meter) in the size fraction >9.8 μm for the FH operations whereas at the size fraction 1.6-3.5 μm, the CH operations had significantly greater airborne endotoxin concentration than the FH operations. Endotoxin concentration in the dust mass (endotoxin units per milligram) was significantly greater in the CH operations as compared to the FH operations for all size fractions >1.6 μm. As such, endotoxin in the respirable fraction accounted for 24% of the total endotoxin in the CH operations whereas it accounted for only 11% in the FH operations. There was significantly more dust in all size fractions in the FH operations as compared to the CH poultry operations. There is more endotoxin in the presence of significantly lower dust levels in the respirable particle size fractions in CH poultry operations as compared to the FH poultry operations. This difference in respirable endotoxin may be important in relation to the differential respiratory response experienced by

  3. The Distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 Dust Particles Diameter in Airborne at the Cement Factory Neighboring Area, Citeureup - Bogor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatot Suhariyono; Muji Wiyono

    2003-01-01

    The distribution analysis in PM 10 and PM 2.5 dust particle diameter has been carried out at residence area around the cement factory, Citeureup - Bogor to estimate deposition of dust particles that is accepted by public. The dust particles were sampled at the dwellings by using a cascade impactor on four wind directions and 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius from the Plant one as the center of the cement factory at Citeureup - Bogor. Measurements at the north direction were the Gunung Putri, Kranggan, Bojong Nangka villages, and Gunung Putri dwellings. The south directions were Tarikolot and Pasir Mukti villages. The west directions were guest house, Puspanegara, Puspasari, and Citatah villages. The northwest directions were Puspanegara, Gunung Putri, Puspasari, and Kranggan villages. The analysis result showed that the diameter distribution of PM 10 dust particles at outdoor is ranging from 0.4 to 4.7 μm, and has the weight percentage is high in average approximate 17.91 % of total dust weight on 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius. The distributions of indoor PM 2.5 dust particles diameter show a stable 12.27 % weight percentage of total dust weight from 0.4 to 2.1 μm. (author)

  4. Relationship between mortality and fine particles during Asian dust, smog-Asian dust, and smog days in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ho; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between all-cause/cardiovascular mortality and PM(2.5) as related to Asian dust (AD), smog-AD, smog, and nonevent days and evaluated the differential risks according to specific events for mortality. The daily records of all-cause/cardiovascular mortality and PM(2.5) from March to May 2003-2006 in Seoul, Korea, were used as independent and dependent variables. Differences in the event effects were assessed using a time-series analysis. Both all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities were significantly associated with PM(2.5) during smog-AD and AD days only. Differences in chemical composition emerging during long-range transport to Korea may explain these observations, especially as regards secondary aerosol, metal-sulfate/or nitrate, and metallic components. These results suggest that exposure to PM(2.5) during specific events is differentially associated with human mortality and that changes in the chemical composition of PM(2.5), occurring during long-range transport, represent important factors in such differential effects on health.

  5. Cryogenically assisted abrasive jet micromachining of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getu, H; Papini, M; Spelt, J K

    2008-01-01

    The abrasive jet micromachining (AJM) of elastomers and polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for use in micro-fluidic devices was found to be very slow or impossible at room temperature. To enhance the material removal rate in such materials, a stream of liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) was injected into the abrasive jet, cooling the target to cryogenic temperatures. Erosion rate measurements on the three polymeric materials (PDMS, ABS and PTFE) with and without the use of LN 2 were compared along with the profiles of micromachined channels and holes. It was found that the use of LN 2 cooling caused brittle erosion in PDMS, allowing it to be micromachined successfully. An erosion rate increase was also observed in PTFE and ABS at high and intermediate impact angles. The use of LN 2 also was found to reduce particle embedding

  6. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VI. EROSION OF LARGE AGGREGATES AS A SOURCE OF MICROMETER-SIZED PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Observed protoplanetary disks consist of a large amount of micrometer-sized particles. Dullemond and Dominik pointed out for the first time the difficulty in explaining the strong mid-infrared excess of classical T Tauri stars without any dust-retention mechanisms. Because high relative velocities in between micrometer-sized and macroscopic particles exist in protoplanetary disks, we present experimental results on the erosion of macroscopic agglomerates consisting of micrometer-sized spherical particles via the impact of micrometer-sized particles. We find that after an initial phase, in which an impacting particle erodes up to 10 particles of an agglomerate, the impacting particles compress the agglomerate's surface, which partly passivates the agglomerates against erosion. Due to this effect, the erosion halts for impact velocities up to ∼30 m s -1 within our error bars. For higher velocities, the erosion is reduced by an order of magnitude. This outcome is explained and confirmed by a numerical model. In a next step, we build an analytical disk model and implement the experimentally found erosive effect. The model shows that erosion is a strong source of micrometer-sized particles in a protoplanetary disk. Finally, we use the stationary solution of this model to explain the amount of micrometer-sized particles in the observational infrared data of Furlan et al.

  7. Cutting concrete with abrasion jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yie, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fluidyne Corporation has developed a unique process and apparatus that allow selected abrasives to be introduced into high-speed waterjet to produce abrasive-entrained waterjet that has high material-cutting capabilities, which is termed by Fluidyne as the Abrasion Jet. Such Abrasion Jet has demonstrated capability in cutting hard rock and concrete at a modest pressure of less than 1360 bars (20,000 psi) and a power input of less than 45 kW (60 horsepower). Abrasion Jet cutting of concrete is characterized by its high rate of cutting, flexible operation, good cut quality, and relatively low costs. This paper presents a general description of this technology together with discussions of recent test results and how it could be applied to nuclear decontamination and decommissioning work. 8 references

  8. Dust Explosion Characteristics of Agglomerated 35 nm and 100 nm Aluminum Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chun Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, nanoparticles of 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders, respectively, formed particles with average sizes of 161 nm and 167 nm in agglomeration. The characteristics of dust cloud explosions with the two powder sizes, 35 nm and 100 nm, revealed considerable differences, as shown here: (dp/dtmax-35 nm = 1254 bar/s, (dp/dtmax-100 nm = 1105 bar/s; Pmax-35 nm = 7.5 bar, Pmax-100 nm = 12.3 bar, and MEC-35 nm = 40 g/m3, MEC-100 nm = 50 g/m3. The reason of Pmax-35 nm value is smaller than Pmax-100 nm may be due to agglomeration. From an analysis of the explosive residue, the study found that nanoparticles of 35 nm Al powder became filamentous strands after an explosion, where most of 100 nm Al nanoparticles maintained a spherical structure, This may be because the initial melting temperature of 35 nm Al is 435.71°C, while that for 100 nm Al is 523.58°C, higher by 87.87°C. This study discovered that explosive property between the 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders after agglomeration were different.

  9. Fouling of heat exchanger surfaces by dust particles from flue gases of glass furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutsaers, P.L.M.; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Waal, H. de (Nederlandse Centrale Organisatie voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek, Delft. Inst. of Applied Physics)

    1989-08-01

    Fouling by dust particles generally leads to a reduction of the heat transfer and causes corrosion of secondary heat exchangers. A deposition model, including thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, has been derived and applied to describe the deposition (i.e. fouling) process and the nature of the deposition products in a secondary heat exchanger. The deposition model has been verified by means of laboratory experiments, for the case of flue gases from soda-lime glass furnaces. Corrosion of iron-containing metallic materials, caused by the deposition products, has been briefly investigated with the same equipment. There is a close similarity between the experimental results and model calculations. The largest deposition rates from flue gases on cylindrical tubes in cross-flow configuration, are predicted and measured at the upstream stagnation point. The lowest deposition rates are determined at downstream stagnation point locations. At tube surface temperatures of approximately 520 to 550 K, the fouling rate on the tube reaches a maximum. In this temperature region NaHSO{sub 4} is the most important deposition product. This component is mainly formed at temperatures from 470 up to 540 K. The compound Na{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} seems to be stable up to 570 K, for even higher temperatures Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} has been found. These deposition products react with iron, SO{sub 3}, oxygen and water vapour forming the complex corrosion product Na{sub 3}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. NaHSO{sub 4}, which is formed at tube surface temperatures below 540 K, causes more severe corrosion of iron-containing materials than Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Maintaining temperatures of the heat exchanger surfaces above 550 to 600 K reduces the fouling tendency and corrosion in case of flue gases from oil-fired soda-lime glass furnaces. (orig.).

  10. Structural, chemical and isotopic examinations of interstellar organic matter extracted from meteorites and interstellar dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Henner; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Nittler, Larry R.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Zega, Tom J.; Cody, George D.; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kilcoyne, A. L. David

    2008-10-01

    Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are supposed to originate from asteroids and comets, sampling the most primitive bodies in the Solar System. They contain abundant carbonaceous material. Some of this, mostly insoluble organic matter (IOM), likely originated in the protosolar molecular cloud, based on spectral properties and H and N isotope characteristics. Together with cometary material returned with the Stardust mission, these samples provide a benchmark for models aiming to understand organic chemistry in the interstellar medium, as well as for mechanisms that secured the survival of these fragile molecules during Solar System formation. The carrier molecules of the isotope anomalies are largely unknown, although amorphous carbonaceous spheres, so-called nanoglobules, have been identified as carriers. We are using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry to identify isotopically anomalous material in meteoritic IOM and IDPs at a ~100-200 nm scale. Organics of most likely interstellar origin are then extracted with the Focused-Ion-Beam technique and prepared for synchrotron X-ray and Transmission Electron Microscopy. These experiments yield information on the character of the H- and N-bearing interstellar molecules: While the association of H and N isotope anomalies with nanoglobules could be confirmed, we have also identified amorphous, micron-sized monolithic grains. D-enrichments in meteoritic IOM appear not to be systematically associated with any specific functional groups, whereas 15N-rich material can be related to imine and nitrile functionality. The large 15N- enrichments observed here (δ15N > 1000 ‰) cannot be reconciled with models using interstellar ammonia ice reactions, and hence, provide new constraints for understanding the chemistry in cold interstellar clouds.

  11. Nitrogen isotopic composition of macromolecular organic matter in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aléon, Jérôme; Robert, François; Chaussidon, Marc; Marty, Bernard

    2003-10-01

    Nitrogen concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured by ion microprobe scanning imaging in two interplanetary dust particles L2021 K1 and L2036 E22, in which imaging of D/H and C/H ratios has previously evidenced the presence of D-rich macromolecular organic components. High nitrogen concentrations of 10-20 wt% and δ 15N values up to +400‰ are observed in these D-rich macromolecular components. The previous study of D/H and C/H ratios has revealed three different D-rich macromolecular phases. The one previously ascribed to macromolecular organic matter akin the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from carbonaceous chondrites is enriched in nitrogen by one order of magnitude compared to the carbonaceous chondrite IOM, although its isotopic composition is still similar to what is known from Renazzo (δ 15N = +208‰). The correlation observed in macromolecular organic material between the D- and 15N-excesses suggests that the latter originate probably from chemical reactions typical of the cold interstellar medium. These interstellar materials preserved to some extent in IDPs are therefore macromolecular organic components with various aliphaticity and aromaticity. They are heavily N-heterosubstituted as shown by their high nitrogen concentrations >10 wt%. They have high D/H ratios >10 -3 and δ 15N values ≥ +400‰. In L2021 K1 a mixture is observed at the micron scale between interstellar and chondritic-like organic phases. This indicates that some IDPs contain organic materials processed at various heliocentric distances in a turbulent nebula. Comparison with observation in comets suggests that these molecules may be cometary macromolecules. A correlation is observed between the D/H ratios and δ 15N values of macromolecular organic matter from IDPs, meteorites, the Earth and of major nebular reservoirs. This suggests that most macromolecular organic matter in the inner solar system was probably issued from interstellar precursors and further processed

  12. Testing of abrasion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummert, G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of abrasion testing according to ASTM C 704-76 a is presented for steel fibre concrete mortar, fusion-cast basalt and a surface coating material and results of practical interest are mentioned. Due to the high technical demands on these materials and their specific fields of application, the very first test already supplied interesting findings. From the user's point of view, the method is an interesting alternative to the common test methods, e.g. according to DIN 52 108 (wheel test according to Boehme). In English-speaking countries, testing according to ASTM is often mandatory in the refractory industry in order to assure constant quality of refractory materials after setting. The method is characterized by good comparability and high accuracy of measurement. Only the test piece is exchanged while the test conditions remain constant, so that accurate information on the material studied is obtained. (orig.) [de

  13. Particulate matter mass concentrations produced from pavement surface abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fullova Dasa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the latest findings particulate matter belong to the most significant pollutants in Europe together with ground-level ozone O3 and nitrogen dioxide NO2. Road traffic is one of the main sources of particulate matter. Traffic volume has unpleasant impact on longevity of the pavements and also on the environment. Vehicle motions cause mechanical wearing of the asphalt pavement surface - wearing course by vehicle tyres. The paper deals with abrasion of bituminous wearing courses of pavements. The asphalt mixtures are compared in terms of mechanically separated particulate matter. The samples of asphalt mixtures were rutted in wheel tracking machine. The particulate matter measurements were performed in laboratory conditions. The experimental laboratory measurements make it possible to sample particulates without contamination from exhaust emissions, abraded particles from vehicles, resuspension of road dust and climate affects. The paper offers partial results of measurements on six trial samples of asphalt mixtures with different composition. It presents particulate matter morphology and the comparison of rutted asphalt samples in terms of PM mass concentrations and chemical composition.

  14. Laboratory Measurements of Particulate Matter Concentrations from Asphalt Pavement Abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fullová Daša

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of emissions from road traffic is compounded by the fact that the number of vehicles and driven kilometres increase each year. Road traffic is one of the main sources of particulate matter and traffic volume is still increasing and has unpleasant impact on longevity of the pavements and the environment. Vehicle motions cause mechanical wearing of the asphalt pavement surface - wearing course by vehicle tyres. The contribution deals with abrasion of bituminous wearing courses of pavements. The asphalt mixtures of wearing courses are compared in terms of mechanically separated particulate matter. The samples of asphalt mixtures were rutted in wheel tracking machine. The particulate matter measurements were performed in laboratory conditions. The experimental laboratory measurements make it possible to sample particulates without contamination from exhaust emissions, abraded particles from vehicles, resuspension of road dust and climate affects. The contribution offers partial results of measurements on six trial samples of asphalt mixtures with different composition. It presents particulate matter morphology and the comparison of rutted asphalt samples in terms of PM mass concentrations and chemical composition.

  15. Correction for the absorption of plutonium alpha particles in filter paper used for dust sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, J G

    1956-01-01

    This sample of air-borne dust collected on a filter paper when laboratory air is monitored for plutonium with the 1195 portable dust sampling unit may be regarded, for counting purposes, as a thick source with a non-uniform distribution of alpha-active plutonium. Experiments have been carried out to determine a correction factor to be applied to the observed count on the filter paper sample to correct for internal absorption in the paper and on the dust layer. From the results obtained it is recommended that a correction factor of 2 be used.

  16. Experimental Rock-on-Rock Abrasive Wear Under Aqueous Conditions: its Role in Subglacial Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, E. H.; Lee, A. G.

    2003-12-01

    We have determined experimentally the rate of abrasive wear of rock on rock for a range of rock types as a function of normal stress and shear displacement. Unlike abrasive wear in fault zones, where wear products accumulate as a thickening gouge zone, in our experiments wear particles were removed by flowing water. The experiments are thus directly pertinent to one of the most important processes in subglacial erosion, and to some extent in river incision. Wear was produced between rotating discs machined from rock samples and measured from the progressive approach of the disc axes towards each other under various levels of normal load. Shear displacements of several km were produced. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the worn rock surfaces, and particle size distributions in wear products were characterized using a laser particle size analyzer. Rock types studied were sandstones of various porosities and cement characteristics, schists and a granite. In all cases abrasion rate decreased logarithmically with displacement by up to 2 orders of magnitude until a steady state was approached, but only after at least 1 km displacement. The more porous, less-well cemented rocks wore fastest. Amount of abrasion could be characterized quantitatively using an exponentially decaying plus a steady-state term. Wear rate increased non-linearly with normal contact stress, apparently to an asymptote defined by the unconfined compressive strength. Microstructural study showed that the well-cemented and/or lowest porosity rocks wore by progressive abrasion of grains without plucking, whereas whole grains were plucked out of weakly-cemented and/or more porous rocks. This difference in behavior was reflected in wear-product particle size distributions. Where whole-grain plucking was possible, wear products were dominated by particles of the original grain size rather than finer rock flour. Comparison of our results to glacier basal abrasive wear estimated

  17. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-01-01

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 (micro)m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics

  18. Initial Considerations of a Dust Dispenser for Injecting Tungsten Particles in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    approved for toxic dusts and fumes  May combust at high temperature  Keep away from ignition sources  Material in powder form, capable of...creating a dust explosion with ignition source Toxicity  None  None  Inert  Not available Handling and Storage  Maintain good...on oxidation: Tungsten  Does not react with air, oxygen, and water at room temperature [6]  Strongly attacked by fluorine at room temperature [6

  19. In-situ characterisation of the dynamics of a growing dust particle cloud in a direct-current argon glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, S; Onofri, F R A; Couëdel, L; Arnas, C; Kumar, K Kishor; Pardanaud, C

    2016-01-01

    The growth and the dynamics of a tungsten nanoparticle cloud were investigated in a direct-current low pressure argon glow discharge. Real-time analyses of the dust particle size and number concentration were performed in-situ by light extinction spectrometry, while spatial dynamics of the cloud was investigated with the laser light-sheet scattering method. Additional off-line electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements were also performed for comparison purpose. This experimental work reveals the existence of an agglomeration phase followed by the appearance of a new dust particle generation. While growing, the dust cloud is pushed towards the anode and the discharge edge. Afterwards, a new dust particle generation can grow in the space freed by the first generation of nanoparticles. The continuous growth, below the light extinction spectrometry scanning positions, explains the apparent dissimilarities observed between the in-line optical and the off-line electron microscopy analyses. (paper)

  20. Demonstration experience with an abrasive blasting technique for decontaminating concrete pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.; Land, R.R.; Doane, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    A demonstration was performed for decontaminating a radioactivity contaminated concrete pad with a portable abrasive blasting system. The system utilizes a rotating blast wheel that scours the concrete surface with metal abrasive. The metal abrasive, pulverized concrete dust, and contaminants rebound into a separator chamber. The reusable metal abrasive is recycled, and the pulverized media are removed to an integral dust collection system. The exhaust is HEPA filtered to minimize release of airborne contaminants. However, the technique had limited success in reducing contamination around the cracks and seams in the concrete where the higher activity levels of contamination were detected during the radiological survey before the cleanup. The technique can be successful and cost-effective in decontaminating large areas of low contamination; however, careful characterization and planning are necessary. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs

  1. Abrasives and possibilities of increase in efficiency of abrasive waterjets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sitek, Libor; Martinec, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, March 2016 (2016), s. 877-881 ISSN 1805-0476 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : high-speed waterjets * abrasive waterjets * abrasives * garnet * zirconia Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.mmscience.eu/content/file/archives/MM_Science_201603.pdf

  2. Sub-micrometer scale minor element mapping in interplanetary dust particles: a test for stratospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, G.J.; Keller, L.P.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    We mapped the spatial distribution of minor elements including K, Mn, and Zn in 3 IDPs and found no evidence for the surface coatings (rims) of these elements that would be expected if the enrichments previously reported were due to contamination. Combined X-ray microprobe (XRM), energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), and electron microprobe measurements have determined that the average bulk chemical composition of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere is enriched relative to the CI meteorite composition by a factor of 2 to 4 for carbon and for the moderately volatile elements Na, K, P, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and Se, and enriched to ∼30 times CI for Br. However, Jessberger et al., who have reported similar bulk enrichments using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), attribute the enrichments to contamination by meteor-derived atmospheric aerosols during the several weeks these IDPs reside in the Earth's atmosphere prior to collection. Using scanning Auger spectroscopy, a very sensitive surface analysis technique, Mackinnon and Mogk have observed S contamination on the surface of IDPs, presumably due to the accretion of sulfate aerosols during stratospheric residence. But the S-rich layer they detected was so thin (∼100 angstroms thick) that the total amount of S on the surface was too small to significantly perturb the bulk S-content of a chondritic IDP. Stephan et al. provide support for the contamination hypothesis by reporting the enrichment of Br on the edges of the IDPs using Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass-Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), but TOF-SIMS is notorious for producing false edge-effects, particularly on irregularly-shaped samples like IDPs. Sutton et al. mapped the spatial distribution of Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, and Sr, at the ∼2 (micro)m scale, in four IDPs using element-specific x-ray fluorescence (XRF) computed microtomography. They found the moderately volatile

  3. Sandstone Turning by Abrasive Waterjet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Petr; Cárach, J.; Hloch, Sergej; Vasilko, K.; Klichová, Dagmar; Klich, Jiří; Lehocká, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2015), s. 2489-2493 ISSN 0723-2632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : turning away from the jet * conventional turning towards the jet * sandstone * abrasive water jet Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.386, year: 2015 http://www.springerprofessional.de/sandstone-turning-by-abrasive-waterjet/6038028.html

  4. Effect of nanofillers' size on surface properties after toothbrush abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Larissa M; Masouras, Konstantinos; Watts, David C; Pimenta, Luiz A; Silikas, Nick

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effect of filler-particle size of experimental and commercial resin composites, undergoing toothbrush abrasion, on three surface properties: surface roughness (SR), surface gloss (G) and color stability (CS). Four model (Ivoclar/Vivadent) and one commercial resin composite (Tokuyama) with varying filler-size from 100-1000 nm were examined. Six discs (10 mm x 2 mm) from each product were prepared and mechanically polished. The samples were then submitted to 20,000 brushing strokes in a toothbrush abrasion machine. SR parameters (Ra, Rt and RSm), G, and CS were measured before and after toothbrush abrasion. Changes in SR and G were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, with Bonferroni post hoc test. CS values were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test (alpha=0.05). Initial G values ranged between 73-87 gloss units (GU) and were reduced after toothbrush abrasion to a range of 8-64 GU. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in significant modifications in SR and G amongst the materials tested, attributed to filler sizes. There was statistically significant difference in color (delta E* ranged from 0.38-0.88). Filler size did not affect color stability. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in rougher and matte surfaces for all materials tested. Although the individual differences in surface roughness among filler sizes were not always significant, the correlation showed a trend that larger filler sizes resulted in higher surface roughness after abrasion for the SR parameters Ra and Rt (r = 0.95; r = 0.93, respectively). RSm showed an increase after toothbrush abrasion for all resin composites, however no significant correlation was detected (r = 0.21).There was a significant correlation between G and Ra ratios (r = - 0.95).

  5. Relaxing the Small Particle Approximation for Dust-grain opacities in Carbon-star Wind Models

    OpenAIRE

    Mattsson, Lars; Höfner, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    We have computed wind models with time-dependent dust formation and grain-size dependent opacities, where (1) the problem is simplified by assuming a fixed dust-grain size, and where (2) the radiation pressure efficiency is approximated using grain sizes based on various means of the actual grain size distribution. It is shown that in critical cases, the effect of grain sizes can be significant. For well-developed winds, however, the effects on the mass-loss rate and the wind speed are small.

  6. Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Agarwal, Jessica; Cottin, Hervé; Engrand, Cécile; Flynn, George; Fulle, Marco; Gombosi, Tamas; Langevin, Yves; Lasue, Jérémie; Mannel, Thurid; Merouane, Sihane; Poch, Olivier; Thomas, Nicolas; Westphal, Andrew

    2018-04-01

    This review presents our understanding of cometary dust at the end of 2017. For decades, insight about the dust ejected by nuclei of comets had stemmed from remote observations from Earth or Earth's orbit, and from flybys, including the samples of dust returned to Earth for laboratory studies by the Stardust return capsule. The long-duration Rosetta mission has recently provided a huge and unique amount of data, obtained using numerous instruments, including innovative dust instruments, over a wide range of distances from the Sun and from the nucleus. The diverse approaches available to study dust in comets, together with the related theoretical and experimental studies, provide evidence of the composition and physical properties of dust particles, e.g., the presence of a large fraction of carbon in macromolecules, and of aggregates on a wide range of scales. The results have opened vivid discussions on the variety of dust-release processes and on the diversity of dust properties in comets, as well as on the formation of cometary dust, and on its presence in the near-Earth interplanetary medium. These discussions stress the significance of future explorations as a way to decipher the formation and evolution of our Solar System.

  7. Investigating the Heterogeneous Interaction of VOCs with Natural Atmospheric Particles: Adsorption of Limonene and Toluene on Saharan Mineral Dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanías, Manolis N; Ourrad, Habib; Thévenet, Frédéric; Riffault, Véronique

    2016-03-03

    The heterogeneous interaction of limonene and toluene with Saharan dusts was investigated under dark conditions, pressure of 1 atm, and temperature 293 K. The mineral dust samples were collected from six different regions along the Sahara desert, extending from Tunisia to the western Atlantic coastal areas of Morocco, and experiments were carried out with the smallest sieved fractions, that is, inferior to 100 μm. N2 sorption measurements, granulometric analysis, and X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (XRF and XRD) measurements were conducted to determine the physicochemical properties of the particles. The chemical characterization showed that dust originating from mideastern Sahara has a significantly higher SiO2 content (∼ 82%) than dust collected from the western coastal regions where the SiO2 relative abundance was ∼ 50%. A novel experimental setup combining diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), selected-ion flow-tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS), and long path transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) allowed us to follow both the adsorbed and gas phases. The kinetic adsorption/desorption measurements were performed using purified dry air as bath gas, exposing each dust surface to 10 ppm of the selective volatile organic compound (VOC). The adsorption of limonene was independent of the SiO2 content, given the experimental uncertainties, and the coverage measurements ranged between (10 and 18) × 10(13) molecules cm(-2). Experimental results suggest that other metal oxides that could possibly influence dust acidity may enhance the adsorption of limonene. On the contrary, in the case of toluene, the adsorption capacities of the Saharan samples increased with decreasing SiO2 content; however, the coverage measurements were significantly lower than those of limonene and ranged between (2 and 12) × 10(13) molecules cm(-2). Flushing the surface with purified dry air showed that VOC desorption is not a

  8. Study of Effect of Impacting Direction on Abrasive Nanometric Cutting Process with Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junye; Meng, Wenqing; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Xinming; Zhao, Weihong

    2018-01-11

    Abrasive flow polishing plays an important part in modern ultra-precision machining. Ultrafine particles suspended in the medium of abrasive flow removes the material in nanoscale. In this paper, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the effect of impacting direction on abrasive cutting process during abrasive flow polishing. The molecular dynamics simulation software Lammps was used to simulate the cutting of single crystal copper with SiC abrasive grains at different cutting angles (0 o -45 o ). At a constant friction coefficient, we found a direct relation between cutting angle and cutting force, which ultimately increases the number of dislocation during abrasive flow machining. Our theoretical study reveal that a small cutting angle is beneficial for improving surface quality and reducing internal defects in the workpiece. However, there is no obvious relationship between cutting angle and friction coefficient.

  9. The concentration, source and deposition flux of ammonium and nitrate in atmospheric particles during dust events at a coastal site in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jianhua; Liu, Xiaohuan; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ruifeng; Chen, Xiaojing; Lin, Xuehui; Gao, Huiwang; Liu, Ruhai

    2018-01-01

    Asian dust has been reported to carry anthropogenic reactive nitrogen during transport from source areas to the oceans. In this study, we attempted to characterize NH4+ and NO3- in atmospheric particles collected at a coastal site in northern China during spring dust events from 2008 to 2011. Based on the mass concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- in each total suspended particle (TSP) sample, the samples can be classified into increasing or decreasing types. In Category 1, the concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- were 20-440 % higher in dust day samples relative to samples collected immediately before or after a dust event. These concentrations decreased by 10-75 % in the dust day samples in Categories 2 and 3. Back trajectory analysis suggested that multiple factors, such as the transport distance prior to the reception site, the mixing layer depth on the transport route and the residence time across highly polluted regions, might affect the concentrations of NH4+ and NO3-. NH4+ in the dust day samples was likely either in the form of ammonium salts existing separately to dust aerosols or as the residual of incomplete reactions between ammonium salts and carbonate salts. NO3- in the dust day samples was attributed to various formation processes during the long-range transport. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model results showed that the contribution of soil dust increased from 23 to 36 % on dust days, with decreasing contributions from local anthropogenic inputs and associated secondary aerosols. The estimated deposition flux of NNH4++NO3- varied greatly from event to event; e.g., the dry deposition flux of NNH4++NO3- increased by 9-285 % in Category 1 but decreased by 46-73 % in Category 2. In Category 3, the average dry deposition fluxes of particulate nitrate and ammonium decreased by 46 % and increased by 10 %, respectively, leading to 11-48 % decrease in the fluxes of NNH4++NO3-.

  10. The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE): studying the collision behavior of submillimeter-sized dust aggregates on the suborbital rocket flight REXUS 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Julie; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built, and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass containers which are being agitated by a shaker to induce the desired collisions at chosen velocities. The dust aggregates are being observed by a high-speed camera, allowing for the determination of the collision properties of the protoplanetary dust analog material. The data obtained from the suborbital flight with the REXUS (Rocket Experiments for University Students) 12 rocket will be directly implemented into a state-of-the-art dust growth and collision model.

  11. [Particle numbers in classified sizes of roadside dust caused by studded tires in the air at different heights from the pavement surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Niioka, T; Kurasaki, M; Kojima, Y

    1996-07-01

    Increased use of motor vehicles has produced various risks to human health due to air pollution by noxious gases, heavy metals and roadside dust. Since the late 1970s, the wide spread use of studded tires for cars has caused pavement wear, resulting in not only economic losses, but also roadside air pollution in cold and snowy regions in Japan. The most serious environmental problem in Sapporo, a city with heavy snowfall, in the 1980s, was roadside dust derived from studded tires. The inhabitants suffered from this dust in the early winter and in the early spring when the streets were not covered with snow. To investigate the influence of such roadside dust upon human health, particle numbers in classified sizes of roadside dust were counted after the roadside dust in the air was collected with a device we constructed at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 cm above the pavement surface. The results indicated that the concentration of roadside dust in the air did not greatly vary according to the height from the pavement surface. The results also suggested that xenogranuloma, reported in lungs of stray dogs, under roadside dust-pollution conditions such as those examined here, may occur in humans in the future.

  12. The heavy metal partition in size-fractions of the fine particles in agricultural soils contaminated by waste water and smelter dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haibo; Luo, Yongming; Makino, Tomoyuki; Wu, Longhua; Nanzyo, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A continuous flow ultra-centrifugation method has been developed to obtain fine particles from polluted agricultural soil. ► Pollution source affected the heavy metal fractionation in size-fractions by changing soil particle properties. ► The iron oxides affected the distribution of lead species more than other metals in the smelter dust polluted particles. -- Abstract: The partitioning of pollutant in the size-fractions of fine particles is particularly important to its migration and bioavailability in soil environment. However, the impact of pollution sources on the partitioning was seldom addressed in the previous studies. In this study, the method of continuous flow ultra-centrifugation was developed to separate three size fractions (<1 μm, <0.6 μm and <0.2 μm) of the submicron particles from the soil polluted by wastewater and smelter dust respectively. The mineralogy and physicochemical properties of each size-fraction were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope etc. Total content of the polluted metals and their chemical speciation were measured. A higher enrichment factor of the metals in the fractions of <1 μm or less were observed in the soil contaminated by wastewater than by smelter dust. The organic substance in the wastewater and calcite from lime application were assumed to play an important role in the metal accumulation in the fine particles of the wastewater polluted soil. While the metal accumulation in the fine particles of the smelter dust polluted soil is mainly associated with Mn oxides. Cadmium speciation in both soils is dominated by dilute acid soluble form and lead speciation in the smelter dust polluted soil is dominated by reducible form in all particles. This implied that the polluted soils might be a high risk to human health and ecosystem due to the high bioaccessblity of the metals as well as the mobility of the fine particles in soil

  13. The heavy metal partition in size-fractions of the fine particles in agricultural soils contaminated by waste water and smelter dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haibo, E-mail: hbzhang@yic.ac.cn [Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Luo, Yongming, E-mail: ymluo@yic.ac.cn [Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Makino, Tomoyuki [National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba 3058604 (Japan); Wu, Longhua [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Nanzyo, Masami [Tohoku University, Sendai 9808576 (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► A continuous flow ultra-centrifugation method has been developed to obtain fine particles from polluted agricultural soil. ► Pollution source affected the heavy metal fractionation in size-fractions by changing soil particle properties. ► The iron oxides affected the distribution of lead species more than other metals in the smelter dust polluted particles. -- Abstract: The partitioning of pollutant in the size-fractions of fine particles is particularly important to its migration and bioavailability in soil environment. However, the impact of pollution sources on the partitioning was seldom addressed in the previous studies. In this study, the method of continuous flow ultra-centrifugation was developed to separate three size fractions (<1 μm, <0.6 μm and <0.2 μm) of the submicron particles from the soil polluted by wastewater and smelter dust respectively. The mineralogy and physicochemical properties of each size-fraction were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope etc. Total content of the polluted metals and their chemical speciation were measured. A higher enrichment factor of the metals in the fractions of <1 μm or less were observed in the soil contaminated by wastewater than by smelter dust. The organic substance in the wastewater and calcite from lime application were assumed to play an important role in the metal accumulation in the fine particles of the wastewater polluted soil. While the metal accumulation in the fine particles of the smelter dust polluted soil is mainly associated with Mn oxides. Cadmium speciation in both soils is dominated by dilute acid soluble form and lead speciation in the smelter dust polluted soil is dominated by reducible form in all particles. This implied that the polluted soils might be a high risk to human health and ecosystem due to the high bioaccessblity of the metals as well as the mobility of the fine particles in soil.

  14. Numerical study of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh Nguyen, [No Value; Willemsz, Tofan; Frijlink, Henderik; Maarschalk, Kees van der Voort

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) was performed to investigate the phenomena concerning the abrasion and breakage of agglomerates in a diffusion powder mixer. Agglomerates were created by defining a single structure of particles with bonds of different strengths using

  15. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  16. Pulmonary exposure to particles from diesel exhaust, urban dust or single-walled carbon nanotubes and oxidatively damaged DNA and vascular function in apoE(-/-)mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lise K; Jantzen, Kim; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study compared the oxidative stress level and vasomotor dysfunction after exposure to urban dust, diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). DEP and SWCNT increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured endothelial cells and acell......Abstract This study compared the oxidative stress level and vasomotor dysfunction after exposure to urban dust, diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). DEP and SWCNT increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured endothelial cells...... and acellullarly, whereas the exposure to urban dust did not generate ROS. ApoE(-/-) mice, which were exposed twice to 0.5 mg/kg of the particles by intratracheal instillation, had unaltered acetylcholine-elicited vasorelaxation in aorta segments. There was unaltered pulmonary expression level of Vcam-1, Icam-1...

  17. Toxicity of Depleted Uranium Dust Particles: Results of a New Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is mostly composed of U-238, a naturally radioactive isotope. Concerning chemical toxicity, uranium, being a heavy metal, is known to have toxic effects on specific organs in the body, the kidneys in particular. Its effects are similar to those of other heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. Scientific evidence resulting both from in vitro and in vivo analyses shows that current models of the mechanisms of toxicity of uranium dust are not fully satisfactory. They should be refined in order to obtain more effective responses and predictions regarding health effects. In particular, radiotoxicity potential of Depleted Uranium dust originated by military use of this material for ammunition must be re-evaluated taking into account the bystander effect, the dose enhancing effect and other minor phenomena. Uranium dust has both chemical and radiological toxicity: the synergistic aspect of the two effects has to be accounted for, in order to arrive to a complete description of the phenomenon. The combination of the two different toxicities (chemical and radiological) of depleted uranium is attempted here for the first time, approaching the long-term effects of Depleted Uranium, and in particular the carcinogenetic effects. A case study (Balkan war, 1999) is discussed. (Author)

  18. Heavy metals characteristics of settled particles of streets dust from Diwaniyah City- Qadisiyah Governorate - Southern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbas, Moutaz A.; Mahdi, Khalid H.; Al-Khafaji, Raad; Obayes, Kawthar H.

    2018-05-01

    Road-side dust samples were collected from selected areas of Diwaniyah city-Qadisiyah Governorate - Southern Iraq. The heavy metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) in these streets dust samples were studied and used as indicator for pollution by using three of main indices (I-geo, CF, and PLI). Determination of heavy metal in the roadside dust is with XRD and XRF methods. I-geo for Co, Zn, Pb, and Ni in the studied sites shows relative values of class 1, which indicated the slightly polluted, while I-geo for Fe and Cu shows relative values of class 0, which indicated no pollution. The contamination factor for Co, Zn, Pb, and Ni classified as class 2, which indicate moderately contamination, while the contamination factor for Fe and Cu classified as class 1, which indicate low contamination. PLI values in the all of studied sites classified as class 2 (Deterioration on site quality) indicating local pollution, as well as denote perfection with (class 0) of no pollution. The distribution pattern of metals percentages was affected by gases emitted from transportation vehicles as well as the prevailing wind direction.

  19. Composite Preparation of Wood Dust-Polyester-Coconut Choir Fiber Mixture for Particle Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danu, Sugiarto; Darsono; Padmono; Betty, Angesti

    2002-01-01

    Experiment on the use of γ-ray of Co 60 radiation has been used for curing of composite which made of wood dust, unsaturated polyester resin and coconut coir mixture. Composite was prepared by mixing of wood dust, polyester and coconut coir at a various mixture composition. Concentration of polyesters were 50, 55 and 60 % by weight based on saw dust and polyester mixture. Irradiation was conducted using 27,6 kCi acti vity Co 60 at a dose rate of 5 kGy/hrs and dose of 8, 10 and 12 kGy. Composite was also prepared conventionally by using peroxide catalyst. Parameters observed were density, pencil hardness and compression strength Experimental results showed that optimum condition wus achieved at irradiation dose of 12 kGy, polyester concentration of 60 % and coconut coir fiber of 4 %. In this condition, the density, hardness and compression strength were 1,115 g/cm 3, 5 Hand 6,815 kN/cm2 respectively. Density, hardness of composite prepared by radiation were almost the same whereas the compression strength was higher than that of composite prepared by conventional method

  20. Bubbles and Dust: Dissolution Rates of Unhydrated Volcanic Ash as a Function of Morphology, Composition, and Particle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wygel, C. M.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are natural hazards due to their explosive nature and widespread transportation and deposition of ash particles. After deposition and subsequent leaching in soils or water bodies, ash deposition positively (nutrients) and negatively (contaminants) impacts the health of flora and fauna, including humans. The effects of ash leachates have been difficult to replicate in field and laboratory studies due to the many complexities and differences between ash particles. Ash morphology is characteristic for each eruption, dependent upon eruption energy, and should play a critical role in determining leaching rates. Morphology reflects overall particle surface area, which is strongly influenced by the presence of surface dust. In addition, ash composition, which in part controls morphology and particle size, may also affect leaching rates. This study determines the extent to which ash morphology, surface area, composition, and particle size control ash dissolution rates. Further, it is necessary to determine whether compound vesicular ash particles permit water into their interior structures to understand if both the internal and external surface areas are available for leaching. To address this, six fresh, unhydrated ash samples from diverse volcanic environments and a large range in morphology, from Pele's spheres to vesicular compound ash, are tested in the laboratory. Ash morphology was characterized on the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) before and after leaching and surface area was quantified by Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) analysis and with geometric calculations. Column Leachate Tests (CLT) were conducted to compare leaching rates over a range of basaltic to silicic ashes as a function of time and surface area, to recreate the effects of ash deposition in diverse volcanic environments. After the CLT, post-leaching water analyses were conducted by Ion Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Ion Chromatography (IC). We find that leaching

  1. Generation of urban road dust from anti-skid and asphalt concrete aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervahattu, Heikki; Kupiainen, Kaarle J; Räisänen, Mika; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto

    2006-04-30

    Road dust forms an important component of airborne particulate matter in urban areas. In many winter cities the use of anti-skid aggregates and studded tires enhance the generation of mineral particles. The abrasion particles dominate the PM10 during springtime when the material deposited in snow is resuspended. This paper summarizes the results from three test series performed in a test facility to assess the factors that affect the generation of abrasion components of road dust. Concentrations, mass size distribution and composition of the particles were studied. Over 90% of the particles were aluminosilicates from either anti-skid or asphalt concrete aggregates. Mineral particles were observed mainly in the PM10 fraction, the fine fraction being 12% and submicron size being 6% of PM10 mass. The PM10 concentrations increased as a function of the amount of anti-skid aggregate dispersed. The use of anti-skid aggregate increased substantially the amount of PM10 originated from the asphalt concrete. It was concluded that anti-skid aggregate grains contribute to pavement wear. The particle size distribution of the anti-skid aggregates had great impact on PM10 emissions which were additionally enhanced by studded tires, modal composition, and texture of anti-skid aggregates. The results emphasize the interaction of tires, anti-skid aggregate, and asphalt concrete pavement in the production of dust emissions. They all must be taken into account when measures to reduce road dust are considered. The winter maintenance and springtime cleaning must be performed properly with methods which are efficient in reducing PM10 dust.

  2. Evidence for Reduced, Carbon-rich Regions in the Solar Nebula from an Unusual Cometary Dust Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Gregorio, Bradley T.; Stroud, Rhonda M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6366, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Nittler, Larry R. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Kilcoyne, A. L. David, E-mail: bradley.degregorio@nrl.navy.mil [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 7R0222, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-10-20

    Geochemical indicators in meteorites imply that most formed under relatively oxidizing conditions. However, some planetary materials, such as the enstatite chondrites, aubrite achondrites, and Mercury, were produced in reduced nebular environments. Because of large-scale radial nebular mixing, comets and other Kuiper Belt objects likely contain some primitive material related to these reduced planetary bodies. Here, we describe an unusual assemblage in a dust particle from comet 81P/Wild 2 captured in silica aerogel by the NASA Stardust spacecraft. The bulk of this ∼20 μ m particle is comprised of an aggregate of nanoparticulate Cr-rich magnetite, containing opaque sub-domains composed of poorly graphitized carbon (PGC). The PGC forms conformal shells around tiny 5–15 nm core grains of Fe carbide. The C, N, and O isotopic compositions of these components are identical within errors to terrestrial standards, indicating a formation inside the solar system. Magnetite compositions are consistent with oxidation of reduced metal, similar to that seen in enstatite chondrites. Similarly, the core–shell structure of the carbide + PGC inclusions suggests a formation via FTT reactions on the surface of metal or carbide grains in warm, reduced regions of the solar nebula. Together, the nanoscale assemblage in the cometary particle is most consistent with the alteration of primary solids condensed from a C-rich, reduced nebular gas. The nanoparticulate components in the cometary particle provide the first direct evidence from comets of reduced, carbon-rich regions that were present in the solar nebula.

  3. Particle creation in a universe filled with radiation and dust-like matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    In this article the particle creation process of scalar and spin 1/2 particles in a spatially open cosmological model associated with a universe filled with radiation and dustlike matter is analyzed. The Klein-Gordon and the Dirac equations are solved via separation of variables. After comparing the in and out vacua, we obtain that the number of created particles corresponds to Planckian and Fermi-Dirac distributions for the scalar and Dirac cases respectively. (author)

  4. Release of carbon nanotubes from an epoxy-based nanocomposite during an abrasion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Chu, Bryan T T; Buha, Jelena; Nüesch, Frank; Wang, Jing

    2012-07-03

    The abrasion behavior of an epoxy/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite was investigated. An experimental setup has been established to perform abrasion, particle measurement, and collection all in one. The abraded particles were characterized by particle size distribution and by electron microscopy. The abrasion process was carried out with a Taber Abraser, and the released particles were collected by a tube for further investigation. The particle size distributions were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and revealed four size modes for all measured samples. The mode corresponding to the smallest particle sizes of 300-400 nm was measured with the SMPS and showed a trend of increasing size with increasing nanofiller content. The three measured modes with particle sizes from 0.6 to 2.5 μm, measured with the APS, were similar for all samples. The measured particle concentrations were between 8000 and 20,000 particles/cm(3) for measurements with the SMPS and between 1000 and 3000 particles/cm(3) for measurements with the APS. Imaging by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that free-standing individual CNTs and agglomerates were emitted during abrasion.

  5. Comparing the Air Abrasion Cutting Efficacy of Dentine Using a Fluoride-Containing Bioactive Glass versus an Alumina Abrasive: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H. X. Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Air abrasion as a caries removal technique is less aggressive than conventional techniques and is compatible for use with adhesive restorative materials. Alumina, while being currently the most common abrasive used for cutting, has controversial health and safety issues and no remineralisation properties. The alternative, a bioactive glass, 45S5, has the advantage of promoting hard tissue remineralisation. However, 45S5 is slow as a cutting abrasive and lacks fluoride in its formulation. The aim of this study was to compare the cutting efficacy of dentine using a customised fluoride-containing bioactive glass Na0SR (38–80 μm versus the conventional alumina abrasive (29 μm in an air abrasion set-up. Fluoride was incorporated into Na0SR to enhance its remineralisation properties while strontium was included to increase its radiopacity. Powder outflow rate was recorded prior to the cutting tests. Principal air abrasion cutting tests were carried out on pristine ivory dentine. The abrasion depths were quantified and compared using X-ray microtomography. Na0SR was found to create deeper cavities than alumina (p<0.05 despite its lower powder outflow rate and predictably reduced hardness. The sharper edges of the Na0SR glass particles might improve the cutting efficiency. In conclusion, Na0SR was more efficacious than alumina for air abrasion cutting of dentine.

  6. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dust particles: determination of onset RHi, IN active fraction, nucleation time-lag, and the effect of active sites on contact angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dobbie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed ice nucleation experimental set up was used to investigate the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of three Saharan and one Spanish dust particle samples. It was observed that the spread in the onset relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi for Saharan dust particles varied from 104% to 110%, whereas for the Spanish dust from 106% to 110%. The elemental composition analysis shows a prominent Ca feature in the Spanish dust sample which could potentially explain the differences in nucleation threshold. Although the spread in the onset RHi for the three Saharan dust samples were in agreement, the active fractions and nucleation time-lags calculated at various temperature and RHi conditions were found to differ. This could be due to the subtle variation in the elemental composition of the dust samples, and surface irregularities like steps, cracks, cavities etc. A combination of classical nucleation theory and active site theory is used to understand the importance of these surface irregularities on the nucleability parameter, contact angle that is widely used in ice cloud modeling. These calculations show that the surface irregularities can reduce the contact angle by approximately 10 degrees.

  7. Micrometer sized dust particles in a fr plasma under varying gravity conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H.

    2009-01-01

    For diagnostic purposes micrometer-sized particles can be used as floating electrostatic probes. Once injected into a complex rf plasma, these particles will become negatively charged and can be trapped in the plasma sheath due to an equilibrium of several forces working on them, e.g. the

  8. Abrasive water jet cutting technique for biological shield concrete dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, T.; Narazaki, T.; Yokota, M.; Yoshida, H.; Miura, M.; Miyazaki, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is developing the abrasive-water jet cutting system to be applied to dismantling the biological shield walls of the JPDR as a part of the reactor dismantling technology development project. This is a total system for dismantling highly activated concrete. The concrete biological shield wall is cut into blocks by driving the abrasive-water jet nozzle, which is operated with a remote, automated control system. In this system, the concrete blocks are removed to a container, while the slurry and dust/mist which are generated during cutting are collected and treated, both automatically. It is a very practical method and will quite probably by used for actual dismantling of commercial power reactors in the future because it can minimize workers' exposure to radioactivity during dismantling, contributes to preventing diffusion of radiation, and reduces the volume of contaminated secondary waste

  9. In situ extraction and analysis of volatiles and simple molecules in interplanetary dust particles, contaminants, and silica aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for the analyses of eight interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) for the volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S and their molecular species, as well as of the volatiles associated with contaminants (i.e., the compounds used during the collection and curation of IDPs), which were carried out using a laser microprobe interfaced with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was found that the volatile species from contaminants were always present in the spectra of IDPs. Despite the contamination problems, several indigenous molecular species could be identified, including OH, CO2 or C2H4, C and CS2, CO2 along with CO (possibly indicating the presence of carbonate), H2S, SO, COS, SO2, and CS2. In some cases, the sulfur components can be attributed to aerosols; however, in one of the IDPs, the presence of H2S, SO, COS, and SO2 indicates the possible presence of elemental sulfur.

  10. The measurement of trace elements in interplanetary dust and cometary particles by ultra-high sensitivity INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolensky, M.E.; Lindstrom, D.J.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Lindstrom, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Today the major elemental composition of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) is routinely determined in many laboratories. These and mineralogical studies have revealed the presence of at least two major types of IDPs, chondritic and refractory. Preliminary results of a successful attempt to determine abundances of a large suite of trace elements from both chondritic and refractory IDPs are reported. The analytical procedure can be used in the grain-by-grain analysis of returned cometary samples. Chondritic and refractory IDPs are characterized by standard scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) techniques. With this system, detection limits for many elements are well below picogram levels, and some approach femtogram levels. This technique is non-destructive, although some sample handling is required, so particles can be analyzed by other techniques after instrument neutron activation analysis (INAA) is completed. Data is presently being reduced from the analyses of 7 IDPs. These are U2015E10, U2015F1, W7029-A2, W7029-A3, W7013A8, LACl (all chondritic) and 705 (refractory). So far, 17 different major and trace elements were detected and measured in these particles, including rare earths and some very volatile elements (Br and Zn)

  11. Comparison of Carbon XANES Spectra from an Iron Sulfide from Comet Wild 2 with an Iron Sulfide Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Sanford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, Nakamura K.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among one of the first particles removed from the aerogel collector from the Stardust sample return mission was an approx. 5 micron sized iron sulfide. The majority of the spectra from 5 different sections of this particle suggests the presence of aliphatic compounds. Due to the heat of capture in the aerogel we initially assumed these aliphatic compounds were not cometary but after comparing these results to a heated iron sulfide interplanetary dust particle (IDP) we believe our initial interpretation of these spectra was not correct. It has been suggested that ice coating on iron sulfides leads to aqueous alteration in IDP clusters which can then lead to the formation of complex organic compounds from unprocessed organics in the IDPs similar to unprocessed organics found in comets [1]. Iron sulfides have been demonstrated to not only transform halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons but also enhance the bonding of rubber to steel [2,3]. Bromfield and Coville (1997) demonstrated using Xray photoelectron spectroscopy that "the surface enhancement of segregated sulfur to the surface of sulfided precipitated iron catalysts facilitates the formation of a low-dimensional structure of extraordinary properties" [4]. It may be that the iron sulfide acts in some way to protect aliphatic compounds from alteration due to heat.

  12. RESIDENCE TIMES OF PARTICLES IN DIFFUSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISK ENVIRONMENTS. II. RADIAL MOTIONS AND APPLICATIONS TO DUST ANNEALING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesla, F. J.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of crystalline grains in comets and the outer regions of protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. It has been suggested that such grains form via annealing of amorphous precursors in the hot, inner region of a protoplanetary disk, where the temperatures needed for such transformations were found, and were then transported outward by some dynamical means. Here we develop a means of tracking the paths that dust grains would have taken through a diffusive protoplanetary disk and examine the types and ranges of environments that particles would have seen over a 10 6 yr time period in the dynamic disk. We then combine this model with three annealing laws to examine how the dynamic evolution of amorphous grains would have led to their physical restructuring and their delivery to various regions of the disk. It is found that 'sibling particles' - those particles that reside at the same location at a given period of time-take a wide range of unique and independent paths through the disk to arrive there. While high temperatures can persist in the disk for very long time periods, we find that those grains that are delivered to the cold outer regions of the disk are largely annealed in the first few x10 5 yr of disk history. This suggests that the crystallinity of grains in the outer disk would be determined early and remain unchanged for much of disk history, in agreement with recent astronomical observations.

  13. Damage to the edge of steel stampings and abrasive during ultrasonic hydroabrasive machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokuchaeva, V.A.; Chernov, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Principles have been established explaining the fracture of abrasive material in the process of ultrasonic hydroabrasive treatment, and a method is proposed suitable for the calculation of steel barb erosion in the hydroabrasive flux. It is assumed that fracture occurs along the entire edge surface and that the losses caused by plastic deformation are small. Conclusion has been made as to the governing the change of the abrasive particle size in the time of treatment. It is shown that the most serious fracture takes place at initial stage of the treatment, terminating practically after 60 minutes of operation. Curves showing the distribution of boron carbide abrasive particles are presented

  14. Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

    2007-01-01

    The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself

  15. Study of the rheological properties and the finishing behavior of abrasive gels in abrasive flow machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, A. C.; Liu, C. H.; Liang, K. Z.; Pai, S. H. [Ching Yun University, Taipei (China)

    2007-10-15

    Abrasive flow machining (AFM) is an effective method to finish the smooth surface in the complex holes. Abrasive media are key elements which dominate the polished results in AFM. But it is hard to develop the machining model of these abrasive gels because of its complicated mechanism. In this research, a non-Newtonian flow is used to set up the abrasive mechanism of the abrasive media in AFM. Power law is a main equation of the non-Newtonian flow to describe the motion of the abrasive media. Viscosities vs. shear rates of different abrasive gels are used to establish the power law in CFD-ACE{sup +} software first. And the working parameters of AFM were applied as input to study the properties of the abrasive gels in AFM. Finally, the relationships between the simulations and the experiments were found. And the abrasive mechanism of the abrasive gels was set up in AFM. The simulated results show that the abrasive gel with high viscosity can entirely deform in the complex hole than the abrasive gel with low viscosity. And the abrasive gel with high viscosity generates a larger shear force than the abrasive gel with low viscosity in the same area. Moreover, the strain rate is seriously changed when the abrasive gel cross over the narrow cross-section of the complex hole. It also means that abrasive gel will produce large finish force in that area. And these results indeed consist with the experiments in AFM.

  16. The model of the dependence of the abrasive wear value on the maximal linear wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Вишневський

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  The relation of the contact area of the rubber roll with a sample and the maximal linear wear value is found. The mathematical model of the dependence of the wear volume weight value on the maximal dimple depth is presented with the friction on abrasive particles fixed nonrigidly. The relation of volume weight wear with the rubber roll contact surface area with a sample with the friction on abrasive particles fixed nonrigidly is established.

  17. Measurement of the ion drag force on falling dust particles and its relation to the void formation in complex (dusty) plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafiu, C.; Melzer, A.; Piel, A.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on the quantitative determination of the weaker forces (ion drag, thermophoresis, and electric field force) on free-falling dust particles in a rf discharge tube are presented. The strongest force, gravity, is balanced by gas friction and the weaker forces are investigated in the radial (horizontal) plane. Under most discharge conditions, the particles are found to be expelled from the central plasma region. A transition to a situation where the falling particles are focused into the plasma center is observed at low gas pressures using small particles. These investigations allow a quantitative understanding of the mechanism of unwanted dust-free areas (so-called voids) in dusty plasmas under microgravity. Good quantitative agreement with standard models of the ion drag is found

  18. Comparison of the Oxidation State of Fe in Comet 81P/Wild 2 and Chondritic-Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ogliore, R. C.; Butterworth, A. L.; Fakra, S. C.; Gainsforth, Z.; Marcus, M. A.; Westphal, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP- IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alteration have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured th...

  19. Characterization of Conventional and High-Translucency Y-TZP Dental Ceramics Submitted to Air Abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Guimarães, Renato Bastos; Noronha-Filho, Jaime Dutra; Botelho, Glauco Dos Santos; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air-abrasion on t®m phase transformation, roughness, topography and the elemental composition of three Y-TZP (Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal) dental ceramics: two conventional (Lava Frame and IPS ZirCad) and one with high-translucency (Lava Plus). Plates obtained from sintered blocks of each ceramic were divided into four groups: AS (as-sintered); 30 (air-abrasion with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles); 50 (air-abrasion with 50 mm Al2O3 particles) and 150 (air-abrasion with 150 mm Al2O3 particles). After the treatments, the plates were submitted to X-ray diffractometry; 3-D profilometry and SEM/EDS. The AS surfaces were composed of Zr and t phases. All treatments produced t®m phase transformation in the ceramics. The diameter of air-abrasion particles influenced the roughness (150>50>30>AS) and the topography. SEM analysis showed that the three treatments produced groove-shaped microretentions on the ceramic surfaces, which increased with the diameter of air-abrasion particles. EDS showed a decrease in Zr content along with the emergence of O and Al elements after air-abrasion. Presence of Si was also detected on the plates air-abraded with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles. It was concluded that irrespective of the type and diameter of the particles, air-abrasion produced t®m phase transformation, increased the roughness and changed the elemental composition of the three Y-TZP dental ceramics. Lava Plus also behaved similarly to the conventional Y-TZP ceramics, indicating that this high translucency ceramic could be more suitable to build monolithic ceramic restorations in the aesthetic restorative dentistry field.

  20. Characterizing and controlling industrial dust: a case study in small particle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Richard S; Warren, D Alan

    2005-07-01

    Instrumentation used to measure characteristics of fine particles entrained in gas or suspended in aerosols provides information needed to develop valid regulations for emission sources and to support the design of control technologies. This case study offers a brief history of "micromeritics," a term used by early researchers to describe the science of small particles, and the related invention of laboratory instruments for characterizing very fine particles. The historical view provides insights into the role that Progressive Era government agencies played in advancing esoteric science and applying this knowledge to the regulation of workplace air pollution. Micromeritics instrumentation developed in conjunction with federal research now has many commercial applications worldwide, with characterizing airborne pollutants only a minor one. However, the continuing advances in the micromeritics field provide important laboratory measurement capabilities to environmental research organizations, such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

  1. A study of the effect of non-spherical dust particles on Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) aerosol optical properties retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Choi, M.; Lim, H.

    2017-12-01

    Non-spherical assumption of particle shape has been used to replace the spherical assumption in the Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) aerosol optical properties retrievals for dust particles. GEMS aerosol retrieval algorithms are based on optimal estimation method to provide aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) at 443nm, and aerosol loading height (ALH) simultaneously as products. Considering computing time efficiency, the algorithm takes Look-Up Table (LUT) approach using Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer code (VLIDORT), and aerosol optical properties for three aerosol types of absorbing fine aerosol (BC), dust and non-absorbing aerosol (NA) are integrated from AERONET inversion data, and fed into the LUT calculation. In this study, by applying the present algorithm to OMI top-of the atmosphere normalized radiance, retrieved AOD, SSA with both spherical and non-spherical assumptions have been compared to the surface AERONET observations at East Asia sites for 3 years from 2005 to 2007 to evaluate and quantify the effect of non-spherical dust particles on the satellite aerosol retrievals. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) in the satellite retrieved AOD have been slightly reduced as a result of adopting the non-spherical assumption in the GEMS aerosol retrieval algorithm. For SSA, algorithm tested with spheroid models on dust particle shows promising results for the improved SSA. In terms of ALH, the results are qualitatively compared with CALIOP products, and shows consistent variation. This result suggests the importance of taking into account the effects of non-sphericity in the retrieval of dust particles from GEMS measurements.

  2. DYNAMICS OF DUST PARTICLES RELEASED FROM OORT CLOUD COMETS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO RADAR METEORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Pokorný, Petr; Janches, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The Oort Cloud Comets (OCCs), exemplified by the Great Comet of 1997 (Hale-Bopp), are occasional visitors from the heatless periphery of the solar system. Previous works hypothesized that a great majority of OCCs must physically disrupt after one or two passages through the inner solar system, where strong thermal gradients can cause phase transitions or volatile pressure buildup. Here we study the fate of small debris particles produced by OCC disruptions to determine whether the imprints of a hypothetical population of OCC meteoroids can be found in the existing meteor radar data. We find that OCC particles with diameters D ∼ 1 mm have a very low Earth-impact probability. The intermediate particle sizes, D ∼ 100 μm, represent a sweet spot. About 1% of these particles orbitally evolve by Poynting-Robertson drag to reach orbits with semimajor axis a ∼ 1 AU. They are expected to produce meteors with radiants near the apex of Earth's orbital motion. We find that the model distributions of their impact speeds and orbits provide a good match to radar observations of apex meteors, except for the eccentricity distribution, which is more skewed toward e ∼ 1 in our model. Finally, we propose an explanation for the long-standing problem in meteor science related to the relative strength of apex and helion/antihelion sources. As we show in detail, the observed trend, with the apex meteors being more prominent in observations of highly sensitive radars, can be related to orbital dynamics of particles released on the long-period orbits.

  3. Keratinophilic fungi and other moulds associated with air-dust particles from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hafez, S I; Moubasher, A H; Barakat, A

    1990-01-01

    One-hundred and eleven species and three species varieties belonging to 39 genera were collected from 50 dust samples on the five media used at 28 degrees C. Using the hair-baiting technique with horse hair, 10 species of Chrysosporium were isolated: C. asperatum, C. state of Arthroderma tuberculatum, C. indicum, C. inops, C. keratinophilum, C. merdarium, C. pannorum, C. queenslandicum, C. tropicum and C. xerophilum. True dermatophytes were isolated: Trichophyton verrucosum and Trichophyton sp. Also, numerous fungi tolerating high levels of cycloheximide were encountered, such as members of Acremonium, Aspergillus and Penicillium. On plates of glucose or cellulose Czapek-Dox agar (free from sucrose) the most frequent fungi were: Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, A. flavus var. columnaris, A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. ochraceus, A. sydowii, A. terreus, Chaetomium globosum, Cladosporium herbarum, Emericella nidulans, Fusarium oxysporum, Mucor hiemalis, Penicillium chrysogenum, P. oxalicum, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis and Ulocladium atrum. On plates of 50% sucrose or 10 and 20% NaCl-Czapek's agar, some interesting species were frequently encountered: Eurotium amstelodami, E. chevalieri, E. halophilicum, E. montevidensis, E. repens, E. rubrum and Scopulariopsis halophilica. The isolated fungi have been tested for osmophilicity and halophilicity, they showed different rates of growth on sucrose and sodium chloride-Czapek's medium of various osmotic potential.

  4. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinati, E.; Diebold, S.; Kendziorra, E.

    2012-01-01

    and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage...... or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper...

  5. Physico-mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Irradiated Particle boards Based on Wood flour/ Polyethylene/Cement Kiln Dust Impregnated with Unsaturated Polyester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, H.A.; Khattab, M.M.; Ismail, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Particle boards were fabricated by mixing wood flour (WF), low density polyethylene (LDPE) and cement kiln dust (CKD) under hot pressure; and then impregnated in unsaturated polyester resin. These impregnated particle boards were subjected to various doses of electron beam irradiation up to 50 kGy. The physico-mechanical properties were characterized in terms of flexural strength, impact strength, water absorption, thickness swelling, and the thermal stability. The results showed that the partial replacement of wood flour with cement kiln dust up to 20% by weight improved the values of flexural strength, and impact strength. However, the water absorption percentage and thickness swelling values decreased with increasing the CKD ratio up to 40%. Furthermore, the treatment with electron beam irradiation doses improved the physico-mechanical properties of the impregnated particle boards up to 50 kGy. The improved results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  6. Correlational approach to study interactions between dust Brownian particles in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, E. A.; Vaulina, O. S.; Petrov, O. F.

    2018-01-01

    A general approach to the correlational analysis of Brownian motion of strongly coupled particles in open dissipative systems is described. This approach can be applied to the theoretical description of various non-ideal statistically equilibrium systems (including non-Hamiltonian systems), as well as for the analysis of experimental data. In this paper, we consider an application of the correlational approach to the problem of experimental exploring the wake-mediated nonreciprocal interactions in complex plasmas. We derive simple analytic equations, which allows one to calculate the gradients of forces acting on a microparticle due to each of other particles as well as the gradients of external field, knowing only the information on time-averaged correlations of particles displacements and velocities. We show the importance of taking dissipative and random processes into account, without which consideration of a system with a nonreciprocal interparticle interaction as linearly coupled oscillators leads to significant errors in determining the characteristic frequencies in a system. In the examples of numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed original approach could be an effective instrument in exploring the longitudinal wake structure of a microparticle in a plasma. Unlike the previous attempts to study the wake-mediated interactions in complex plasmas, our method does not require any external perturbations and is based on Brownian motion analysis only.

  7. Analysis of PM2.5 particles in atmospheric dust of the MZVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldape U, F.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives and scopes of this report are: to determine the places more representative for the installation of four stations of monitoring of small particles to 2.5 micrometers (PM 2.5 ) guided to protect the population's health in the regions indicated by the General Address of Environmental Administration of the Air (DGGM) of the Government of the Federal District (GDF). To select the places to collect PM 2.5 in each one of the regions under study placing each place inside a contiguous cell of 2 x 2 km. To determine the concentration of PM 2.5 in the selected places. To determine the temporary and space behavior of the fine particles in each one of the regions designated in this study. To determine the elementary concentration of some samples of PM 2.5 in the four regions. The execution of this project will contribute to that the installation of the net of monitoring of particles of PM 2.5 is carried out with scientific foundation. (Author)

  8. Investigation of the selected properties of dusts from the reclamation of spent sands with bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kamińska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation results of the selected properties of dusts generated during the mechanical reclamation of spent sands with bentonite as well as dusts from the dedusting system of sand processing plant are presented in the hereby paper. Investigations were performed with regard to determination conditions allowing to pelletise dusts in the bowl granulator. The verified methods of testing physical and chemical dust properties such as: specific density, bulk density of loosely put materials and apparent density of compacted materials together with their corresponding porosity, ignition losses and pH values, were applied. Granular composition of dusts generated during abrasion of spent binding materials in mechanical dry reclamation processes of spent sands with bentonite and coal dusts were performed by the laser diffraction analysis, allowing to broaden the measuring range of particle diameters. The optimal wetting agent content (in this case water at which the dust-water mixture obtains the best strength properties – after compacting by means of the standard moulder’s rammer – was determined.

  9. Screening of a dust particle charge in a humid air plasma created by an electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.; Derbenev, I. N.; Kurkin, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for charged particle reactions in a humid air plasma produced by a fast electron beam. The model includes over 550 reactions with electrons, 33 positive ion species and 14 negative ion species. The model has been tested by solving 48 non-steady state equations for number densities of charged particles in humid air electron beam plasma, and by comparing with the available experimental data. The system of 48 steady state equations has been solved by iterative method in order to define the main ion species of the humid air plasma. A reduced kinetic model has been developed to describe the processes with the main ions and electrons. Screening constants have been calculated on the basis of the reduced system by means of Leverrier-Fadeev method. The dependencies of screening constants on gas ionization rates have been found for the rates from 10 to 1018 cm-3s-1 and the fraction of water molecules from 0 to 2%. The analysis of the constants has revealed that one of them is close to the inverse Debye length, and the other constants are defined by the inverse diffusion lengths passed by ions in the characteristic times of the attachment, recombination, and ion conversion. Pure imaginary screening constants appear at low rates of gas ionization.

  10. Innovative decontamination technology by abrasion in vibratory vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, Silvio; Ilarri, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The possibility of using conventional vibratory vessel technology as a decontamination technique is the motivation for the development of this project. The objective is to explore the feasibility of applying the vibratory vessel technology for decontamination of radioactively-contaminated materials such as pipes and metal structures. The research and development of this technology was granted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Abrasion processes in vibratory vessels are widely used in the manufacture of metals, ceramics, and plastics. Samples to be treated, solid abrasive media and liquid media are set up into a vessel. Erosion results from the repeated impact of the abrasive particles on the surface of the body being treated. A liquid media, generally detergents or surfactants aid the abrasive action. The amount of material removed increases with the time of treatment. The design and construction of the machine were provided by Vibro, Argentina private company. Tests with radioactively-contaminated aluminum tubes and a stainless steel bar, were performed at laboratory level. Tests showed that it is possible to clean both the external and the internal surface of contaminated tubes. Results show a decontamination factor around 10 after the first 30 minutes of the cleaning time. (authors)

  11. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  12. An integrated modeling study on the effects of mineral dust and sea salt particles on clouds and precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Solomos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report addresses the effects of pollution on the development of precipitation in clean ("pristine" and polluted ("hazy" environments in the Eastern Mediterranean by using the Integrated Community Limited Area Modeling System (ICLAMS (an extended version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System, RAMS. The use of this model allows one to investigate the interactions of the aerosols with cloud development. The simulations show that the onset of precipitation in hazy clouds is delayed compared to pristine conditions. Adding small concentrations of GCCN to polluted clouds promotes early-stage rain. The addition of GCCN to pristine clouds has no effect on precipitation amounts. Topography was found to be more important for the distribution of precipitation than aerosol properties. Increasing by 15% the concentration of hygroscopic dust particles for a case study over the Eastern Mediterranean resulted in more vigorous convection and more intense updrafts. The clouds that were formed extended about three kilometers higher, delaying the initiation of precipitation by one hour. Prognostic treatment of the aerosol concentrations in the explicit cloud droplet nucleation scheme of the model, improved the model performance for the twenty-four hour accumulated precipitation. The spatial distribution and the amounts of precipitation were found to vary greatly between the different aerosol scenarios. These results indicate the large uncertainty that remains and the need for more accurate description of aerosol feedbacks in atmospheric models and climate change predictions.

  13. Recent Developments in Abrasive Hybrid Manufacturing Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruszaj Adam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent dynamic development of abrasive hybrid manufacturing processes results from application of a new difficult for machining materials and improvement of technological indicators of manufacturing processes already applied in practice. This tendency also occurs in abrasive machining processes which are often supported by ultrasonic vibrations, electrochemical dissolution or by electrical discharges. In the paper we present the review of new results of investigations and new practical applications of Abrasive Electrodischarge (AEDM and Electrochemical (AECM Machining.

  14. Turning of wood plastic composites by water jet and abrasive water jet

    OpenAIRE

    Hutyrová, Z.; Ščučka, J. (Jiří); Hloch, S. (Sergej); Hlaváček, P. (Petr); Zeleňák, M. (Michal)

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the verification of suitability of water jet and abrasive water jet application for the disintegration of rotating samples of wood plastic composites (WPCs) with diameter d=36 mm. The influence of selected technological factors (traverse speed of cutting head v [mm/ min] and size of abrasive particles [MESH]) on the topography of resulting surfaces has in particular been studied. Surface topography and quality have been assessed using the methods of optical and co...

  15. Refractory, Abrasive and Other Industrial Mineral Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes refractory, abrasive, and other industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals...

  16. Progress in abrasive and grinding technology

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xipeng

    2009-01-01

    The grinding and abrasive processing of materials are machining techniques which use bonded or loose abrasives to remove material from workpieces. Due to the well-known advantages of grinding and abrasive processes, advances in abrasive and grinding technology are always of great import in enhancing both productivity and component quality. In order to highlight the recent progress made in this field, the editor invited 21 world-wide contributions with the aim of gathering together all of the achievements of leading researchers into a single publication. The authors of the 21 invited papers, of

  17. Bounded dust-acoustic waves in a cylindrically bounded collisional dusty plasma with dust charge variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Nanxia; Xue Jukui

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account the boundary, particle collisions, and dust charging effects, dust-acoustic waves in a uniform cylindrically bounded dusty plasma is investigated analytically, and the dispersion relation for the dust-acoustic wave is obtained. The effects of boundary, dust charge variation, particle collision, and dust size on the dust-acoustic wave are discussed in detail. Due to the bounded cylindrical boundary effects, the radial wave number is discrete, i.e., the spectrum is discrete. It is shown that the discrete spectrum, the adiabatic dust charge variation, dust grain size, and the particle collision have significant effects on the dust-acoustic wave

  18. Diffusion of dust particles from a point-source above ground level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.; Eltayeb, I.A.

    1998-10-01

    A pollutant of small particles is emitted by a point source at a height h above ground level in an atmosphere in which a uni-directional wind speed, U, is prevailing. The pollutant is subjected to diffusion in all directions in the presence of advection and settling due to gravity. The equation governing the concentration of the pollutant is studied with the wind speed and the different components of diffusion tensor are proportional to the distance above ground level and the source has a uniform strength. Adopting a Cartesian system of coordinates in which the x-axis lies along the direction of the wind velocity, the z-axis is vertically upwards and the y-axis completes the right-hand triad, the solution for the concentration c(x,y,z) is obtained in closed form. The relative importance of the components of diffusion along the three axes is discussed. It is found that for any plane y=constant (=A), c(x,y,z) is concentrated along a curve of ''extensive pollution''. In the plane A=0, the concentration decreases along the line of extensive pollution as we move away from the source. However, for planes A≅0, the line of extensive pollution possesses a point of accumulation, which lies at a nonzero value of x. As we move away from the plane A=0, the point of accumulation moves laterally away from the plane x=0 and towards the plane z=0. The presence of the point of accumulation is entirely due to the presence of lateral diffusion. (author)

  19. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE FORMATION OCCURRING AT RADICAL SURFACES OF WATER-ICE DUST PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH . radical and H 3 O + surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH . radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH . radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol –1 and –22 kcal mol –1 , respectively. The COOH . radicals couple with incoming NH=CH 2 molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH 2 COOH . radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol –1 , exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H 3 O + is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH 2 to give NH 2 =CH 2 + . This latter may react with the COOH . radical to give the NH 2 CH 2 COOH +. glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH 2 CHC(OH) 2 +. species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH 2 CHCOOH . neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh-physical conditions of the ISM may trigger reactions of cosmochemical interest. The relevance of surface H 3 O

  20. Computational Study of Interstellar Glycine Formation Occurring at Radical Surfaces of Water-ice Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2012-07-01

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH• radical and H3O+ surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH• radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH• radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol-1 and -22 kcal mol-1, respectively. The COOH• radicals couple with incoming NH=CH2 molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH2COOH• radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol-1, exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H3O+ is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH2 to give NH2=CH2 +. This latter may react with the COOH• radical to give the NH2CH2COOH+• glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH2CHC(OH)2 +• species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH2CHCOOH• neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh-physical conditions of the ISM may trigger reactions of cosmochemical interest. The relevance of surface H3O+ ions to facilitate chemical

  1. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE FORMATION OCCURRING AT RADICAL SURFACES OF WATER-ICE DUST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona [Departament de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ugliengo, Piero, E-mail: albert.rimola@uab.cat [Dipartimento di Chimica, NIS Centre of Excellence and INSTM (Materials and Technology National Consortium), UdR Torino, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH{sup .} radical and H{sub 3}O{sup +} surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH{sup .} radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH{sup .} radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol{sup -1} and -22 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively. The COOH{sup .} radicals couple with incoming NH=CH{sub 2} molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH{sub 2}COOH{sup .} radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol{sup -1}, exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H{sub 3}O{sup +} is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH{sub 2} to give NH{sub 2}=CH{sub 2}{sup +}. This latter may react with the COOH{sup .} radical to give the NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH{sup +.} glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH{sub 2}CHC(OH){sub 2}{sup +.} species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH{sub 2}CHCOOH{sup .} neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh

  2. First experimental results of particle re-suspension in a low pressure wind tunnel applied to the issue of dust in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondeau, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.rondeau@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SCA, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Merrison, Jonathan; Iversen, Jens Jacob [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Institute for Storage Ring Facilities, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Peillon, Samuel; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Lemaitre, Pascal; Gensdarmes, François [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SCA, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Chassefière, Eric [Laboratoire Géosciences Paris Sud (GEOPS), UMR 8148, Université Paris Sud, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The first experimental data of dust re-suspension performed by controlled airflow (in terms of airflow velocity and fluid density). • The effect of the surrounding pressure in the re-suspension mechanism. • The friction (shear velocity) reduction at low pressure in the transient regime (Knudsen number close to one). • The importance of the adhesion forces between particles in dust mobilization by clustering. • The fact that the existing re-suspension models of the relevant literature do not take into account this clustering phenomenon. - Abstract: During the normal operating condition of the future ITER tokamak, a massive production of dust in the toroidal vacuum vessel is expected. This dust, originating from the erosion of tungsten and beryllium internal walls of the torus by the plasma, would be mobilized to some extent during a loss of vacuum accident (LOVA). For safety reasons, it is essential to quantify the re-suspended dust fraction during such an event. Here, we provide preliminary experimental data of dust re-suspension obtained in the wind tunnel of the European Space Agency (ESA) at low pressures (300, 130 and 10 mbar). The experimentations were performed with multilayer deposits. We used two powders with a median diameter at 15.5 μm and 21.8 μm. A negative influence of the low pressure in the re-suspension mechanism is observed. For example, given a re-suspension fraction of 10%, increasing friction shear velocities are derived for decreasing absolute pressures: 300 mbar/0.66 m s{sup −1}; 130 mbar/1.08 m s{sup −1}; and 10 mbar/1.84 m s{sup −1}. In addition, we highlight the friction reduction for Kundsen numbers greater than 0.1 by an analysis of the airflow forces.

  3. Standard Practice for Continuous Sizing and Counting of Airborne Particles in Dust-Controlled Areas and Clean Rooms Using Instruments Capable of Detecting Single Sub-Micrometre and Larger Particles

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of the particle concentration, by number, and the size distribution of airborne particles in dust-controlled areas and clean rooms, for particles in the size range of approximately 0.01 to 5.0 m. Particle concentrations not exceeding 3.5 106 particles/m3 (100 000/ft 3) are covered for all particles equal to and larger than the minimum size measured. 1.2 This practice uses an airborne single particle counting device (SPC) whose operation is based on measuring the signal produced by an individual particle passing through the sensing zone. The signal must be directly or indirectly related to particle size. Note 1The SPC type is not specified here. The SPC can be a conventional optical particle counter (OPC), an aerodynamic particle sizer, a condensation nucleus counter (CNC) operating in conjunction with a diffusion battery or differential mobility analyzer, or any other device capable of counting and sizing single particles in the size range of concern and of sampling...

  4. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  5. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  6. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Abrasive Grinding Wheel Formulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a study on the formulation and manufacture of abrasive grinding wheel using locally formulated silicon carbide abrasive grains. Six local raw material substitutes were identified through pilot study and with the initial mix of the identified materials, a systematic search for an optimal formulation of silicon ...

  8. A Raman spectroscopic study of organic matter in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites using multiple wavelength laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Alexander, C. M. O'd.

    2013-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate insoluble organic matter (IOM) from a range of chondritic meteorites, and a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Three monochromatic excitation wavelengths (473 nm, 514 nm, 632 nm) were applied sequentially to assess variations in meteorite and IDP Raman peak parameters (carbon D and G bands) as a function of excitation wavelength (i.e., dispersion). Greatest dispersion occurs in CVs > OCs > CMs > CRs with type 3 chondrites compared at different excitation wavelengths displaying conformable relationships, in contrast to type 2 chondrites. These findings indicate homogeneity in the structural nature of type 3 chondrite IOM, while organic matter (OM) in type 2 chondrites appears to be inherently more heterogeneous. If type 2 and type 3 chondrite IOM shares a common source, then thermal metamorphism may have a homogenizing effect on the originally more heterogeneous OM. IDP Raman G bands fall on an extension of the trend displayed by chondrite IOM, with all IDPs having Raman parameters indicative of very disordered carbon, with almost no overlap with IOM. The dispersion effect displayed by IDPs is most similar to CMs for the G band, but intermediate between CMs and CRs for the D band. The existence of some overlapping Raman features in the IDPs and IOM indicates that their OM may share a common origin, but the IDPs preserve more pristine OM that may have been further disordered by ion irradiation. H, C, and N isotopic data for the IDPs reveal that the disordered carbon in IDPs corresponds with higher δ15N and lower δ13C.

  9. Controls on wind abrasion patterns through a fractured bedrock landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, J. P.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    Wind abrasion is an important geomorphic process for understanding arid landscape evolution on Earth and interpreting the post-fluvial history of Mars. Both the presence and orientation of wind-abraded landforms provide potentially important constraints on paleo-climatic conditions; however, such interpretations can be complicated by lithologic and structural heterogeneity. To explore the influence of pre-existing structure on wind abrasion, we exploit a natural experiment along the 10.2 Ma Lower Rio San Pedro ignimbrite in northern Chile. Here, a 3.2 Ma andesite flow erupted from Cerro de las Cuevas and deposited atop the ignimbrite, supplying wind-transportable sediment and initiating a phase of downwind abrasion. Additionally, the lava flow provides a continually varying degree of upwind topographic shielding along the ignimbrite that is reflected in a range of surface morphologies. Where fully shielded the ignimbrite surface is partially blanketed by sediment. However, as relief decreases the surface morphology shifts from large polygonal structures that emerge due to the concentration of wind abrasion along pre-existing fracture sets, to polygons that are bisected by wind-parallel grooves that cross-cut fracture sets, to linear sets of yardangs. We reconstruct the ignimbrite surface using a high-resolution digital elevation model, and calculate erosion rates ranging from 0.002 to 0.45 mm/kyr that vary strongly with degree of topographic shielding (R2 = 0.97). We use measured abrasion rates together with nearby weather station data to estimate the nondimensional Rouse number and Inertial Parameter for a range of particle sizes. From these calculations, we hypothesize that the change from fracture-controlled to flow-controlled morphology reflects increases in the grain size and inertia of particles in the suspension cloud. Where the ignimbrite experiences persistent high winds, large particles may travel in suspension and are largely insensitive to topographic

  10. The Lunar Dust Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, Jamey Robert

    Planetary bodies throughout the solar system are continually bombarded by dust particles, largely originating from cometary activities and asteroidal collisions. Surfaces of bodies with thick atmospheres, such as Venus, Earth, Mars and Titan are mostly protected from incoming dust impacts as these particles ablate in their atmospheres as 'shooting stars'. However, the majority of bodies in the solar system have no appreciable atmosphere and their surfaces are directly exposed to the flux of high speed dust grains. Impacts onto solid surfaces in space generate charged and neutral gas clouds, as well as solid secondary ejecta dust particles. Gravitationally bound ejecta clouds forming dust exospheres were recognized by in situ dust instruments around the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn, and had not yet been observed near bodies with refractory regolith surfaces before NASA's Lunar Dust and Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission. In this thesis, we first present the measurements taken by the Lunar Dust Explorer (LDEX), aboard LADEE, which discovered a permanently present, asymmetric dust cloud surrounding the Moon. The global characteristics of the lunar dust cloud are discussed as a function of a variety of variables such as altitude, solar longitude, local time, and lunar phase. These results are compared with models for lunar dust cloud generation. Second, we present an analysis of the groupings of impacts measured by LDEX, which represent detections of dense ejecta plumes above the lunar surface. These measurements are put in the context of understanding the response of the lunar surface to meteoroid bombardment and how to use other airless bodies in the solar system as detectors for their local meteoroid environment. Third, we present the first in-situ dust measurements taken over the lunar sunrise terminator. Having found no excess of small grains in this region, we discuss its implications for the putative population of electrostatically lofted dust.

  11. Dust collected in air filters - Possible source of volatile organic compounds and particles; Ger smutsiga luftfilter foersaemrad tilluft ? En studie av emissioner med ursprung i filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, J.H.P.; Rosell, Lars

    1998-06-01

    Emissions from dust collected in air filters have been investigated using in situ measurements. Two air filters of different classes (F6 and F8/9) have been exposed to outdoor air for a preconditioning period of six months. After this period measurements have been carried out using two operating conditions, continuous and intermittent. Air samples were taken both up- and downstream of the filters. The air samples were analysed regarding volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde and microbial VOCs (mVOC) and the samples of airborne dust were examined regarding the contents of colony forming units, ergosterol (marker of fungi), and endotoxin (marker of gram negative bacteria). Furthermore, a visual inspection of the airborne dust was conducted using SEM. Particles released when the fan was turned on and a short period after, were monitored using an optical particle counter, slitsamplers (fungus spores) and membrane filters for SEM analysis. After finishing the in situ measurements, the filters were placed in climate chambers for emission sampling. Finally, samples were cut out for analysis of microbial contents in the filter material, both on the dusty and `clean` side of the filters. No consistent change of VOC, aldehyde or mVOC concentrations across the filters could be measured. A significant ozone reduction was seen in one of the in situ measurements. The chamber experiments showed that the filters were a source of various VOCs, e.g. aldehydes and mVOCs. The emission of mVOCs in the chambers was significantly higher for the F8/9 filter, probably due to more and finer dust in that filter. Only a few colonization units (fungi) penetrate filters when running continuously but an increase was noted at the moment the fans were started. The same phenomenon was observed with the optical particle counter, but both the intensity and length of the increase, for colonization units and other particles, were moderate. Mycological examination of the filter

  12. Mathematical modeling and numerical study of a spray in a rarefied gas. Application to the simulation of dust particle transport in ITER in case of vacuum loss accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, F.

    2009-11-01

    The thesis deals with kinetic models describing a rarefied spray. These models rely on coupling two Partial Differential Equations which describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the distribution of molecules and dust particles. The model presented in the first part is described by two Boltzmann-type equations where collisions between molecules and particles are modeled by two collision operators. We suggest two models of this collision operators. In the first one, collisions between dust particles and molecules are supposed to be elastic. In the second one, we assume those collisions are inelastic and given by a diffuse reflexion mechanism on the surface of dust specks. This leads to establish non classical collision operators. We prove that in the case of elastic collisions, the spatially homogeneous system has weak solutions which preserve mass and energy, and which satisfy an entropy inequality. We then describe the numerical simulation of the inelastic model, which is based on a Direct Simulation Method. This brings to light that the numerical simulation of the system becomes too expensive because the typical size of a dust particle is too large. We therefore introduce in the second part of this work a model constituted of a coupling (by a drag force term) between a Boltzmann equation and a Vlasov equation. To this end, we perform a scaling of the Boltzmann/Boltzmann system and an asymptotic expansion of one of the dimensionless collision operators with respect to the ratio of mass between a molecule of gas and a particle. A rigorous proof of the passage to the limit is given in the spatially homogeneous setting, for the elastic model of collision operators. It includes a new variant of Povzner's inequality in which the vanishing mass ratio is taken into account. Moreover, we numerically compare the Boltzmann/Boltzmann and Vlasov/Boltzmann systems with the inelastic collision operators. The simulation of the Vlasov equation is performed with a Particle

  13. Whither Cometary Dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey M.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper I will discuss recent findings that have important implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of primitive solar system dust, including: - Nesvorny et al. (2010), following up on their dynamical analyses of the zodiacal dust bands as sourced by the breakup of the Karin (5Mya) and Veritas (8Mya) asteroid families, argue that over 90% of the interplanetary dust cloud at 1 AU comes from JFC comets with near-circularized, low inclination orbits. This implies that the noted IPD collections of anhydrous and hydrous dust particles are likely to be from Oort cloud and JFC comets, respectively, not from asteroids and comets as thought in the past. Hydrous dust particles from comets like 85P/Wild2 and 9P/Tempel 1 would be consistent with results from the STARDUST and Deep Impact experiments. - Estimates of the dust particle size distributions (PSDs) in the comae of 85P/Wild2 (Green et al. 2004, 2007) and 73P/SW-3 (Sitko et al. 2010, Vaubaillon & Reach 2010) and in the trails of comets (Reach et al. 2007) have broken power law structure, with a plateau enhancement of particles of 1 mm - 1 cm in size. This size is also the size of most chondritic inclusions, and the predicted size range of the "aggregational barrier", where collisions between dust particles become destructive. - Studies of the albedo and polarization properties of cometary dust (Kolokolova et al. 2007) suggest there are 2 major groupings, one with low scattering capability and one with high. While these families could possibly have been explained by systematics in the PSDs of the emitted dust, independent work by Lisse et al. (2008) on the mineralogy of a number of highly dusty comets has shown evidence for one family of comets with highly crystalline dust and another with highly amorphous dust.

  14. Walker occupancy has an impact on changing airborne bacterial communities in an underground pedestrian space, as small-dust particles increased with raising both temperature and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Torahiko; Osaki, Takako; Nozaki, Eriko; Uemura, Akira; Sakai, Kouhei; Matushita, Mizue; Matsuo, Junji; Nakamura, Shinji; Kamiya, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Although human occupancy is a source of airborne bacteria, the role of walkers on bacterial communities in built environments is poorly understood. Therefore, we visualized the impact of walker occupancy combined with other factors (temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, dust particles) on airborne bacterial features in the Sapporo underground pedestrian space in Sapporo, Japan. Air samples (n = 18; 4,800L/each sample) were collected at 8:00 h to 20:00 h on 3 days (regular sampling) and at early morning / late night (5:50 h to 7:50 h / 22:15 h to 24:45 h) on a day (baseline sampling), and the number of CFUs (colony forming units) OTUs (operational taxonomic units) and other factors were determined. The results revealed that temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure changed with weather. The number of walkers increased greatly in the morning and evening on each regular sampling day, although total walker numbers did not differ significantly among regular sampling days. A slight increase in small dust particles (0.3-0.5μm) was observed on the days with higher temperature regardless of regular or baseline sampling. At the period on regular sampling, CFU levels varied irregularly among days, and the OTUs of 22-phylum types were observed, with the majority being from Firmicutes or Proteobacteria (γ-), including Staphylococcus sp. derived from human individuals. The data obtained from regular samplings reveled that although no direct interaction of walker occupancy and airborne CFU and OTU features was observed upon Pearson's correlation analysis, cluster analysis indicated an obvious lineage consisting of walker occupancy, CFU numbers, OTU types, small dust particles, and seasonal factors (including temperature and humidity). Meanwhile, at the period on baseline sampling both walker and CFU numbers were similarly minimal. Taken together, the results revealed a positive correlation of walker occupancy with airborne bacteria that increased with increases in

  15. Life cycle and sustainability of abrasive tools

    CERN Document Server

    Linke, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This monograph focuses on abrasive tools for grinding, polishing, honing, and lapping operations. The book describes the life cycle of abrasive tools from raw material processing of abrasive grits and bonding, manufacturing of monolithic or multi-layered tools, tool use to tool end-of-life. Moreover, this work highlights sustainability challenges including economic, environmental, social and technological aspects. The target audience primarily comprises research and industry experts in the field of manufacturing, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  16. The Role of African Dust Particles on Cloud Chemistry and Microphysics in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Delgado, E.; Valle-Diaz, C. J.; Baumgardner, D.; McDowell, W. H.; Gonzalez, G.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Huge amounts of African dust travels thousands of kilometers from the Sahara and Sahel regions to the Caribbean, northern South America and southern North America. However, not much is understood about how the aging process that takes place during transport changes dust properties, and how it affects cloud's composition and microphysics. In order to improve our understanding of the role of long-range transported African dust (LRTAD) in cloud formation processes we had field campaigns measuring dust physical and chemical properties in summers of 2013, 2014 and 2015, as part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS), and of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO). Measurements were performed at the tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) of Pico del Este (PE, 1051 masl) and at the nature reserve of Cabezas de San Juan (CSJ, 60 masl). In both ground stations we monitored meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, wind direction). At CSJ, we measured light absorption and scattering at three wavelengths (467, 528 and 652 nm). At PE we collected cloud and rainwater for chemical analyses and monitored cloud microphysical properties (e.g., liquid water content, droplet size distribution, droplet number concentration, effective diameter and median volume diameter). Summer 2015 was the first attempt to characterize microphysical properties of the summer period (June to August) at PE, where dust is in its higher concentrations of the year. Samples were classified using data from models and satellites together with CSJ measurements as low or high dust influenced. Soluble ions, insoluble trace metals, pH, conductivity, total and dissolved organic carbon and total and dissolved nitrogen were measured for cloud and rainwater. Enrichment factor analysis was used to determine sea and crustal contribution of species by sample, as well as the neutralization factor and fractional acidity. Some preliminary results show cloud water conductivity for low

  17. Investigating selective transport and abrasion on an alluvial fan using quantitative grain size and shape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Selective sorting and abrasion are the two major fluvial processes that are attributed to the downstream fining of sediments in rivers and alluvial fans. Selective transport is the process by which smaller grains are preferentially transported downstream while larger grains are deposited closer to the source. Abrasion is defined by the production of fine sediments and sand that occurs by saltation of gravel, where particle-to-particle collisions supply the energy required to break apart grains. We hypothesize that abrasion results in the gradual fining of large grains and the production of fine sands and silts, while sorting accounts for the differences in transport of these two grain-size fractions produced from abrasion, thereby creating the abrupt gravel-sand transition observed in many channel systems. In this research, we explore both selective transport and abrasion processes on the Dog Canyon alluvial fan near Alamogordo, New Mexico. We complete an extensive grain size analysis down the main channel of the fan employing an image-based technique that utilizes an autocorrelation process. We also characterize changes in grain shape using standard shape parameters, as well as Fourier analysis, which allows the study of contributions of grain roughness on a variety of length scales. Sorting appears to dominate the upper portion of the fan; the grain-size distribution narrows moving downstream until reaching a point of equal mobility, at which point sorting ceases. Abrasion exerts a subtle but persistent effect on grains during transport down the fan. Shape analysis reveals that particles become more rounded by the removal of small-scale textural features, a process that is expected to only modestly influence grain size of gravel, but should produce significant quantities of sand. This study provides a better understanding of the importance of grain abrasion and sorting on the downstream fining of channel grains in an alluvial fan, as well as an improved knowledge

  18. Level and Contamination Assessment of Environmentally Sensitive Elements in Smaller than 100 μm Street Dust Particles from Xining, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of the environmentally sensitive elements (ESEs As, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles from Xining were measured using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and their contamination levels were assessed based on enrichment factor (EF, geoaccumulation index (Igeo and pollution load index (PLI. The concentrations of As, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles from Xining are 0.1–0.8, 2.7–10.9, 0.7–5.2, 0.3–1.1, 0.6–2.5, 1.2–11.1, 0.7–1.3 and 0.4–2.9 times the background values of Qinghai soil, respectively. The calculated EF and Igeo values reveal the order Co > Pb > Cu > Zn > V > Ni > Mn > As. The EF and Igeo values of Co, Cu, Pb and Zn are higher indicating that there is considerable pollution by these elements in smaller than 100 μm street dust particles, especially for Co. The EF and Igeo of Mn, Ni and V are lower and the assessment results indicate an absence of distinct Mn, Ni and V pollution in the studied samples. The mean value of PLIsite is 1.14, indicating a slightly pollution in the whole city of Xining. The order of PLIarea for the five tested districts is Center District (CD > East District (ED > West District (WD > North District (ND > South District (SD, showing that ESEs pollution in the South District is the lightest while it is the highest in the Central District.

  19. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 31; Issue 2. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance of rock aggregates ... It was seen that correlation coefficients were increased for the rock classes. In addition ...

  20. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Abrasive water jet: a complementary tool

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, J. P.; Peças, P.; Nunes, E.; Gouveia, H.

    1998-01-01

    The abrasive water jet is a powerful cutting tool, whose main advantages lie in the absence of thermal effects and the capability of cutting highly thick materials. Compared with Laser, the abrasive water jet allows the cutting of a larger range of thicknesses and a wider variety of materials such as: ornamental stones, metals, polymers, composites, wood, glass and ceramics. The application of this technology has suffered an extensive growth, with successful applications in varied industrial ...

  2. Third abrasive wear mode: is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Câmara Cozza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose an initial discussion on the characterization of a third abrasive wear mode. The results obtained in a previous work [1] under different test conditions revealed the occurrence of the superposition of the “rolling” and “grooving” abrasive wear modes. This phenomenon was denoted “micro-rolling abrasion” due to the observation that “rolling abrasion” was found to act on “grooving abrasion”.

  3. Effects of dust accumulation and removal on radiator surfaces on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaier, J.R.; Perez-Davis, M.E.; Rutledge, S.K.; Hotes, D.; Olle, R.

    1991-01-01

    Tests were carried out to assess the impact of wind blown dust accumulation and abrasion on radiator surfaces on Mars. High emittance arc-textured copper (Cu) and niobium-1%-zirconium (Nb-1%Zr) samples were subjected to basaltic dust laden wind at Martian pressure (1000 Pa) at speeds varying from 19 to 97 m/s in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The effect of accumulated dust was also observed by pre-dusting some of the samples before the test. Radiator degradation was determined by measuring the change in the emittance after dust was deposited and/or removed. The principal mode of degradation was abrasion. Arc-textured Nb-1%Zr proved to be more susceptible to degradation than Cu, and pre-dusting appeared to have lessened the abrasion

  4. Original deep convection in the atmosphere of Mars driven by the radiative impact of dust and water-ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, A.; Madeleine, J. B.; Hinson, D.; Millour, E.; Forget, F.; Navarro, T.; Määttänen, A.; Montmessin, F.

    2017-09-01

    We unveil two examples of deep convection on Mars - in dust storms and water-ice clouds - to demonstrate that the radiative effect of aerosols and clouds can lead to powerful convective motions just as much as the release of latent heat in moist convection

  5. Erosion wear of boron carbide ceramic nozzles by abrasive air-jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jianxin

    2005-01-01

    Boron carbide nozzles were produced by hot pressing. The erosion wear of this nozzle caused by abrasive particle impact was investigated by abrasive air-jets. Silica, silicon carbide and alumina powders with different hardness were used as the erodent abrasive particles. Results showed that the hardness of the erodent particles played an important role with respect to the erosion wear of the boron carbide nozzles. As the hardness of the erodent particles increases, there is a dramatic increase in erosion rate of the nozzles. The nozzle entrance area suffered from severe abrasive impact under large impact angles, and generated maximum tensile stresses. The wear mechanisms of boron carbide nozzle at this area appeared to be entirely brittle in nature with the evidence of large scale-chipping, and exhibited a brittle fracture induced removal process. While at the nozzle center wall section, most of the particles traveled parallel to the nozzle wall, and showed minimum tensile stresses. The wear mode in this area of the nozzle changed from impact to sliding erosion, and the wear mechanisms appeared to be the lateral cracking owing to a surface fatigue fracture mechanism

  6. From Desert to Dessert: Why Australian Dust Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K. A.; Mackie, D. S.; Boyd, P. W.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2006-12-01

    The growth of some types of phytoplankton in several parts of the world ocean, including much of the Southern Ocean, is limited by the supply of iron. Large Australian dust storms uplift, transport and abrade soils, to produce aeolian dust that is a significant source iron to the Southern Ocean. Atmospheric processes that enhance the dissolution of iron from aeolian dusts are of interest and have been studied for material from major dust producing regions like the Sahara, Gobi and Australian deserts; the reported solubility of iron from aeolian dusts ranges from <0.01% to 80%. The characteristic red soils, sands and dusts from Australia are generally believed to consist of quartz grains with a coating of fine grains and crystals of iron oxides, primarily hematite and goethite. The precise mineralogy of soil and dust grain coatings is poorly understood and it also not well known how the coatings are altered during uplift and transport to the ocean. Current models to understand the processes operating during the transport and atmospheric processing of dust include some generalisations and simplifications that are not always warranted and our work has shown the overlooked complexity of the system. Models for aeolian-iron dissolution based on Northern Hemisphere data commonly include the pollutants SOx and NOx. The modern Southern Hemisphere is less polluted and thus resembles past environmental systems. The dissolution of iron from soils of the Saharan, Gobi and Australian deserts in the presence of protons only (i.e. without SOx and NOx) occurs in two phases. The first, faster phase, representing up to 20% of total iron is via a surface-controlled mechanism. The rate determining variable is the exposed surface area of the iron oxides and not the size of the underlying quartz grain. The second, slower, phase of dissolution occurs via the transport-controlled formation of a leached layer. During the simulated aeolian abrasion of Australian soils from dust producing

  7. Large Aperture Electrostatic Dust Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Hensley, R.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 v has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5x5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles and review its applications to contemporary tokamaks and ITER.

  8. Determination of vibration frequency depending on abrasive mass flow rate during abrasive water jet cutting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hreha, P.; Radvanská, A.; Hloch, Sergej; Peržel, V.; Krolczyk, G.; Monková, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, 1-4 (2014), s. 763-774 ISSN 0268-3768 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Abrasive water jet * Abrasive mass flow rate * Vibration Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.458, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00170-014-6497-9#page-1

  9. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of diesel soot and oil shale dust, two markedly different particles with associated organic content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauderly, J.L.; Barr, E.B.; Bechtold, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Levels of DNA adducts in lungs of rats were measured by 32 P postlabeling techniques after 240-mo exposure to either diesel exhaust or oil shale dusts. Preliminary results suggest that whole-lung adduct levels from chronic inhalation exposures are not predictive for carcinogenicity. Lung tumors were observed in animals exposed to diesel exhaust. Carcinogenicity was correlated to the mutagenicity of extracts and severity of epithelial proliferation

  10. Environmental and traffic-related parameters affecting road dust composition: A multi-technique approach applied to Venice area (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valotto, Gabrio; Rampazzo, Giancarlo; Visin, Flavia; Gonella, Francesco; Cattaruzza, Elti; Glisenti, Antonella; Formenton, Gianni; Tieppo, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    Road dust is a non-exhaust source of atmospheric particulate by re-suspension. It is composed of particles originating from natural sources as well as other non-exhaust source such as tire, brake and asphalt wear. The discrimination between atmospheric particles directly emitted from abrasion process and those related to re-suspension is therefore an open issue, as far as the percentage contribution of non-exhaust emissions is becoming more considerable due also to the recent policy actions and the technological upgrades in the automotive field, focused on the reduction of exhaust emissions. In this paper, road dust collected along the bridge that connects Venice (Italy) to the mainland is characterized with a multi-technique approach in order to determine its composition depending on environmental as well as traffic-related conditions. Six pollutant sources of road dust particles were identified by cluster analysis: brake, railway, tire, asphalt, soil + marine, and mixed combustions. Considering the lack of information on this matrix in this area, this study is intended to provide useful information for future identification of road dust re-suspension source in atmospheric particulate.

  11. Performance estimation of a Venturi scrubber using a computational model for capturing dust particles with liquid spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, S.I. [National Fusion Research Center, 52 Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: paksunil@dreamwiz.com; Chang, K.S. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: kschang@kaist.ac.kr

    2006-12-01

    A Venturi scrubber has dispersed three-phase flow of gas, dust, and liquid. Atomization of a liquid jet and interaction between the phases has a large effect on the performance of Venturi scrubbers. In this study, a computational model for the interactive three-phase flow in a Venturi scrubber has been developed to estimate pressure drop and collection efficiency. The Eulerian-Lagrangian method is used to solve the model numerically. Gas flow is solved using the Eulerian approach by using the Navier-Stokes equations, and the motion of dust and liquid droplets, described by the Basset-Boussinesq-Oseen (B-B-O) equation, is solved using the Lagrangian approach. This model includes interaction between gas and droplets, atomization of a liquid jet, droplet deformation, breakup and collision of droplets, and capture of dust by droplets. A circular Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber was simulated numerically with this new model. The numerical results were compared with earlier experimental data for pressure drop and collection efficiency, and gave good agreements.

  12. Performance estimation of a Venturi scrubber using a computational model for capturing dust particles with liquid spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, S.I.; Chang, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    A Venturi scrubber has dispersed three-phase flow of gas, dust, and liquid. Atomization of a liquid jet and interaction between the phases has a large effect on the performance of Venturi scrubbers. In this study, a computational model for the interactive three-phase flow in a Venturi scrubber has been developed to estimate pressure drop and collection efficiency. The Eulerian-Lagrangian method is used to solve the model numerically. Gas flow is solved using the Eulerian approach by using the Navier-Stokes equations, and the motion of dust and liquid droplets, described by the Basset-Boussinesq-Oseen (B-B-O) equation, is solved using the Lagrangian approach. This model includes interaction between gas and droplets, atomization of a liquid jet, droplet deformation, breakup and collision of droplets, and capture of dust by droplets. A circular Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber was simulated numerically with this new model. The numerical results were compared with earlier experimental data for pressure drop and collection efficiency, and gave good agreements

  13. Performance estimation of a Venturi scrubber using a computational model for capturing dust particles with liquid spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, S I; Chang, K S

    2006-12-01

    A Venturi scrubber has dispersed three-phase flow of gas, dust, and liquid. Atomization of a liquid jet and interaction between the phases has a large effect on the performance of Venturi scrubbers. In this study, a computational model for the interactive three-phase flow in a Venturi scrubber has been developed to estimate pressure drop and collection efficiency. The Eulerian-Lagrangian method is used to solve the model numerically. Gas flow is solved using the Eulerian approach by using the Navier-Stokes equations, and the motion of dust and liquid droplets, described by the Basset-Boussinesq-Oseen (B-B-O) equation, is solved using the Lagrangian approach. This model includes interaction between gas and droplets, atomization of a liquid jet, droplet deformation, breakup and collision of droplets, and capture of dust by droplets. A circular Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber was simulated numerically with this new model. The numerical results were compared with earlier experimental data for pressure drop and collection efficiency, and gave good agreements.

  14. Abrasive wear based predictive maintenance for systems operating in sandy conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldman, M.; Tinga, T.; Heide, E. van der; Masen, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Machines operating in sandy environments are damaged by the abrasive action of sand particles that enter the machine and become entrapped between components and contacting surfaces. In the case of the military services the combination of a sandy environment and the wide range of tasks to be

  15. ChemCam Passive Sky Spectroscopy at Gale Crater, Mars: Interannual Variability in Dust Aerosol Particle Size, Missing Water Vapor, and the Molecular Oxygen Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.; Bender, S. C.; Lemmon, M. T.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Lasue, J.; Meslin, P. Y.; Harri, A. M.; Genzer, M.; Kemppinen, O.; Martinez, G.; DeFlores, L. P.; Blaney, D. L.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III; Trainer, M. G.; Lefèvre, F.; Atreya, S. K.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Wong, M. H.; Franz, H. B.; Guzewich, S.; Villanueva, G. L.; Khayat, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) ChemCam spectrometer measures atmospheric aerosol properties and gas abundances by operating in passive mode and observing scattered sky light at two different elevation angles. We have previously [e. g. 1, 2] presented the methodology and results of these ChemCam Passive Sky observations. Here we will focus on three of the more surprising results that we have obtained: (1) depletion of the column water vapor at Gale Crater relative to that of the surrounding region combined with a strong enhancement of the local column water vapor relative to pre-dawn in-situ measurements, (2) an interannual change in the effective particle size of dust aerosol during the aphelion season, and (3) apparent seasonal and interannual variability in molecular oxygen that differs significantly from the expected behavior of a non-condensable trace gas and differs significantly from global climate model expectations. The ChemCam passive sky water vapor measurements are quite robust but their interpretation depends on the details of measurements as well as on the types of water vapor vertical distributions that can be produced by climate models. We have a high degree of confidence in the dust particle size changes but since aerosol results in general are subject to a variety of potential systematic effects our particle size results would benefit from confirmation by other techniques [c.f. 3]. For the ChemCam passive sky molecular oxygen results we are still working to constrain the uncertainties well enough to confirm the observed surprising behavior, motivated by similarly surprising atmospheric molecular oxygen variability observed by MSL's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument [4]. REFERENCES: [1] McConnochie, et al. (2017), Icarus (submitted). [2] McConnochie, et al. (2017), abstract # 3201, The 6th International Workshop on the Mars Atmosphere: Granada, Spain. [3] Vicente-Retortillo et al. (2017), GRL, 44. [4] Trainer et al. (2017), 2017 AGU Fall

  16. Abrasive water jet: a complementary tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, J.P.; Pecas, P.; Nunes, E.; Gouveia, H.

    1998-01-01

    The abrasive water jet is a powerful cutting tool, whose main advantages lie in the absence of thermal effects and the capability of cutting highly thick materials. Compared with Laser, the abrasive water jet allows the cutting of a larger range of thicknesses and a wider variety of materials such as: ornamental stones, metals, polymers, composites, wood, glass ceramics. The application of this technology has suffered and extensive growth, with successful applications in varied industrial sectors like the automotive, aerospace, textile, metalworking, ornamental stones, etc. The present communication aims at introducing the abrasive water jet as a complementary tool to laser cutting, presenting its advantages by showing some documented examples of pieces cut for different industries. (Author) 5 refs

  17. Submerged cutting characteristics of abrasive suspension jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Seiji; Peng, Guoyi; Oguma, Yasuyuki; Nishikata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    An abrasive suspension jet (ASJ) formed by propelling abrasive suspension through a nozzle has a greater cutting capability than the conventional abrasive water jet. However the cutting capability of submerged ASJs decreases drastically with increasing the standoff distance and the pressure around the jet. A sheathed nozzle with ventilation for ASJs has been developed as a mean of extending the effective stand-off distance and improving the cutting capabilities under submerged condition. In the present investigation, cutting tests by ASJs in air and under submerged condition are conducted with specimens of aluminum alloy. Air coated ASJs are formed by using a sheathed nozzle with ventilation. The relative cutting depth is defined as the cutting depth under submerged condition divided by the cutting depth in air at the same standoff distance. The relative cutting depth is arranged effectually by the cavitation number based on the cavity pressure measured at the sheath. (author)

  18. Submerged cutting characteristics of abrasive suspension jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Seiji; Peng, Guoyi; Oguma, Yasuyuki; Nishikata, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    An abrasive suspension jet (ASJ) formed by propelling abrasive suspension through a nozzle has a greater cutting capability than the conventional abrasive water jet. However the cutting capability of submerged ASJs decreases drastically with increasing the standoff distance and the pressure around the jet. A sheathed nozzle nozzle with ventilation for ASJs has been developed as a mean of extending the effective stand-off distance and improving the cutting capabilities under submerged condition. In the present investigation, cutting tests by ASJs in air and under submerged condition are conducted with specimens of aluminum alloy. Air coated ASJs are formed by using a sheathed nozzle with ventilation. The relative cutting depth is defined as the cutting depth is arranged effectually by the cavitation number based on the cavity pressure measured at the sheath. (author)

  19. Basics of cutting and abrasive processes

    CERN Document Server

    Toenshoff, Hans Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing is the basic industrial activity generating real value. Cutting and abrasive technologies are the backbone of precision production in machine, automotive and aircraft building as well as of production of consumer goods. We present the knowledge of modern manufacturing in these technologies on the basis of scientific research. The theory of cutting and abrasive processes and the knowledge about their application in industrial practice are a prerequisite for the studies of manufacturing science and an important part of the curriculum of the master study in German mechanical engineering. The basis of this book is our lecture “Basics of cutting and abrasive processes” (4 semester hours/3 credit hours) at the Leibniz University Hannover, which we offer to the diploma and master students specializing in manufacturing science.

  20. The measurement of the velocity of abrasive particlesat the suction part of the cutting head

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foldyna, Josef; Zeleňák, Michal; Klich, Jiří; Hlaváček, Petr; Sitek, Libor; Říha, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2015), s. 1441-1446 ISSN 1330-3651. [Vodní paprsek 2013 - výzkum, vývoj, aplikace. Soláň, Karolinka, 22.10.2013-24.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : abrasive water jet * velocity of abrasive particles * shadowgraphy Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.464, year: 2015 http://www.tehnicki-vjesnik.com/web/public/archive

  1. Thymus-directed immunotoxicity of airborne dust particles from Upper Silesia (Poland) under acute extrapulmonary studies in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowska, E. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Krzystniak, K. [Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Drela, N. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland)] [and others

    1996-12-27

    Industrial air pollutants from Upper Silesia, Poland, contain over 250 polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, including mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals that have been shown to from DNA adducts. Over 4 million habitants of Silesia are permanently exposed to the industrial pollution by pulmonary and dermal routes and by contaminated food and water. These chemicals, when examined separately in animals models, were proven immunotoxic. We studied the extrapulmonary immunotoxic potential of a typical mixture of Silesian filter-suspended matter from a selected area, over a specific season and time period. Early changes in the immune system were analyzed in BALB/c mice exposed ip to acute doses of 20-330 mg dust mixture/kg body weight (0.06-1.0 LD50). No major changes were noted for weight and the cellularity of spleen, liver and kidneys. However, dramatic decrease in thymus weight index and thymocyte cell count were noted as early as 24-72 h postexposure, which correlated with almost complete depletion of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} thymocytes. Changes in spleen were less profound; however, increased depletion of B cells over T cells was noted at high doses of the suspended matter. Exposure to the airborne dust also decreased cytokine production by spleen cells, such as interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). Overall, a single exposure to Silesian dust, even at the relatively low 0.06 LD50 dose, affected lymphokine production, suppressed B-cell proliferative response, and depleted thymuses of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells. A chemical synergism is suspected. To our knowledge, none of the known components of Silesian suspended matter, when examined as a single chemical, was shown to exert such a profound biological effect. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Particle dispersion at road building using fly ash - model review, investigation of influence of humidity content for dust emission and fly ash particle characterisation; Partikelspriding vid byggnation av vaeg med aska - modelloeversikt, undersoekning av fuktighetsgradens betydelse foer damning och karaktaerisering av partiklar fraan flygaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Mats; Wik, Ola; Frogner-Kockum, Paul

    2009-03-15

    Ashes from incineration may have very good properties, such as building materials in roads. This use assumes that the ashes do not have serious environmental and health effects. Since ash might generate large amounts of dust in handling the issue on the extent of dusting and dust properties has proved to be important to assess the risks of environmental impacts during use. Inhalable particles in the ambient air are a problem that has attracted much attention and is regarded as one of the most serious health related air pollutants. The present project has aimed to: describe appropriate models for calculating the emission and dispersion of dust in the air during the construction of ash containing roads, evaluate a new method to examine the importance of moisture for dusting from fly ash and investigate the properties of fly ash, making it possible to identify ash in samples of airborne particles. The target audience is ash manufacturers, contractors and consultants with a need for knowledge of ash dusting. Project modules have included: a literature review to identify appropriate modelling tools to describe the emission and dispersion of dust from road building with ash a method study in which a piece of equipment called Duster, have been evaluated for assessing the significance of the ash humidity to dusting, and an electron microscope study where morphology and composition of some ashes, cement and Merit have been studied to find ways to identify ash particles in dust samples. The results show that there is a lack of overall model tools that can describe the emissions from all the management operations of ashes at road building and that existing models sometimes lack key variables. Also, because of high silt content of ashes, some models are deemed inferior compared to when used for ordinary mineral material. Furthermore, attempts with the Duster shows that the method works, but with limited precision, and that dusting from the ash samples was reduced significantly

  3. CFD Based Erosion Modelling of Abrasive Waterjet Nozzle using Discrete Phase Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarudin, Naqib Hakim; Prasada Rao, A K; Azhari, Azmir

    2016-01-01

    In Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) machining, the nozzle is the most critical component that influences the performance, precision and economy. Exposure to a high speed jet and abrasives makes it susceptible to wear erosion which requires for frequent replacement. The present works attempts to simulate the erosion of the nozzle wall using computational fluid dynamics. The erosion rate of the nozzle was simulated under different operating conditions. The simulation was carried out in several steps which is flow modelling, particle tracking and erosion rate calculation. Discrete Phase Method (DPM) and K-ε turbulence model was used for the simulation. Result shows that different operating conditions affect the erosion rate as well as the flow interaction of water, air and abrasives. The simulation results correlates well with past work. (paper)

  4. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analyses of stratospheric cosmic dust: New results for chondritic and nickel-depleted particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    Trace element abundance determinations were performed using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence on nine particles collected from the stratosphere and classified as ''cosmic''. Improvements to the Synchrotron Light Source allowed the detection of all elements between Cr and Mo, with the exceptions of Co and As, in our largest particle. The minor and trace element abundance patterns of three Ni-depleted particles were remarkably similar to those of extraterrestrial igneous rocks. Fe/Ni and Fe/Mn ratios suggest that one of these may be of lunar origin. All nine particles exhibited an enrichment in Br, ranging form 1.3 to 38 times the Cl concentration. Br concentrations were uncorrelated with particle size, as would be expected for a surface correlated component acquires from the stratosphere. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Micro-Abrasion Wear Resistance of Borided 316L Stainless Steel and AISI 1018 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reséndiz-Calderon, C. D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Campos-Silva, I. E.; Andraca-Adame, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M. E.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The 316L stainless steel has high corrosion resistance but low tribological performance. In different industrial sectors (biomedical, chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear engineering), improvement upon wear resistance of 316L stainless steel components using accessible and inexpensive methods is critical. The AISI 1018 steel is widely used in industry, but its tribological performance is not the best among steels. Therefore, in this study the behavior of the borided 316L stainless steel and 1018 steel is evaluated under micro-abrasion wear. The boriding was carried out at 1223 K over 6 h of exposure time, resulting in a biphase layer composed of FeB/Fe2B phases. In order to evaluate Fe2B phase with no influence from FeB phase, AISI 1018 steel samples were borided at 1273 K for over 20 min and then diffusion annealed at 1273 K over 2 h to obtain a Fe2B mono-phase layer. Micro-abrasion wear resistance was evaluated by a commercial micro-abrasion testing rig using a mix of F-1200 SiC particles with deionized water as abrasive slurry. The obtained wear rates for FeB and Fe2B phases and for the 316L stainless steel were compared. Wear resistance of 316L stainless steel increases after boriding. The wear mechanisms for both phases and for the stainless steel were identified. Also, transient conditions for rolling and grooving abrasion were determined for the FeB and Fe2B phases.

  6. Electric arc furnace dust utilization in iron ore sintering: influence of particle size; Utilizacao da poeira de aciaria eletrica na sinterizacao de minerio de ferro: influencia da granulometria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telles, V.B.; Junca, E.; Rodrigues, G.F.; Espinosa, D.C.R.; Tenorio, J.A.S., E-mail: victor_bridit@hotmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the utilization of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) generated in steelmaking by electric arc furnace (EAF) as raw material in iron ore sintering. The waste was characterized by size, chemical composition and X-ray diffraction. The physical characterization showed that 90% of the particles have a size less then 1,78 {mu}m and the material have the tendency to agglomerate. The waste were submitted to a pre-agglomeration prior to its incorporation in the sinter. The influence on the addition of the waste with different granulometry in the iron or sinter production were analyzed by sinter characterization and sintering parameters. (author)

  7. Physical properties of five grain dust types.

    OpenAIRE

    Parnell, C B; Jones, D D; Rutherford, R D; Goforth, K J

    1986-01-01

    Physical properties of grain dust derived from five grain types (soybean, rice, corn, wheat, and sorghum) were measured and reported. The grain dusts were obtained from dust collection systems of terminal grain handling facilities and were assumed to be representative of grain dust generated during the handling process. The physical properties reported were as follows: particle size distributions and surface area measurements using a Coulter Counter Model TAII; percent dust fractions less tha...

  8. Anisotropy abrasive wear behavior of bagasse fiber reinforced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    parallel orientation (APO) and normal orientation (NO) by using a two body abrasion wear tester. Three different types of abrasives wear behaviour have been observed in the composite in three orientations and follow the following trends: WNO ...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... wheels shall fit freely on the spindle and shall not be forced on. The spindle nut shall be tightened...

  10. Performance Enhancement of Abrasive Waterjet Cutting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) Machining is a recent non-traditional machining process. This technology is widely used in industry for cutting difficult-to-machine-materials, milling slots, polishing hard materials etc. AWJ machining has many advantages, e.g. it can cut net-shape parts, no heat is

  11. Robotic edge machining using elastic abrasive tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorova, A. V.; Semyonov, E. N.; Belomestnykh, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    The article describes a robotic center designed for automation of finishing operations, and analyzes technological aspects of an elastic abrasive tool applied for edge machining. Based on the experimental studies, practical recommendations on the application of the robotic center for finishing operations were developed.

  12. Chemical mechanical polishing of hard disk substrate with {alpha}-alumina-g-polystyrene sulfonic acid composite abrasive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Hong, E-mail: hong_lei2005@yahoo.com.c [Research Center of Nano-science and Nano-technology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Bu Naijing; Chen Ruling; Hao Ping [Research Center of Nano-science and Nano-technology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Neng Sima; Tu Xifu; Yuen Kwok [Shenzhen Kaifa Magnetic Recording Co., LTD, Shenzhen, 518035 (China)

    2010-05-03

    {alpha}-Alumina-g-polystyrene sulfonic acid ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-PSS) composite abrasive was prepared by surface activation, graft polymerization and sulfonation, successively. The composition, dispersibility and morphology of the product were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, laser particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) performances of the composite abrasive on hard disk substrate with nickel-phosphorous plating were investigated. The microscopy images of the polished surfaces show that {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-g-PSS composite abrasive results in improved CMP and post-CMP cleaning performances than pure {alpha}-alumina abrasive under the same testing conditions.

  13. Some Characteristics of Dust Particles in Atmosphere of Kemerovo City According to Pollution Data of Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golokhvast, K. S.; Manakov, Yu A.; Bykov, A. A.; Chayka, V. V.; Nikiforov, P. A.; Rogulin, R. S.; Romanova, T. Yu; Karabtsov, A. A.; Semenikhin, V. A.

    2017-10-01

    The given paper presents the study results of solid particles contained in snow samples, taken on 10 sites in Kemerovo city in spring 2013. The sites were chosen in such a way as to prevent particles flow into the snow cover in other ways, except with atmospheric precipitation. Kuzbass Botanical Garden was chosen as the check point. In 7 out of 10 sampling sites on the territory of Kemerovo city the presence of particles that are particularly dangerous for human health was found. In one of the areas the particles of 200-400 nm size and with a specific surface area of 14,813.34 cm2/cm3 were detected in ecologically significant quantity (8%).

  14. Manifestation of Crystal Lattice Distortions in the IR Reflection Spectra of Abrasion-Treated ZnSe Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, V. E.; Dunaev, A. A.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Pakhomov, P. M.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Chmel, A. E.

    2017-07-01

    The Fourier IR reflection spectra of ZnSe ceramics prepared by hot pressing (HP), physical vapor deposition (PVD), and PVD combined with hot isostatic pressing (HIP) are presented. The optical constants of polished and dry-ground specimens were used for comparison. The grinding treatment simulated the erosion of the outer surface of optical elements made of zinc selenide under the influence of solid dust particles and deposits. In the polished specimens residual stresses showed up in the IR reflection spectra of the ZnSePVD and ZnSeHIP ceramics, which had well-defined orientation of grains, but were not present in the spectra of the ZnSeHIP ceramics as a result of mutual compensation of the stresses in the randomly oriented grains of the material. The stresses, which appeared as a shift of the absorption bands calculated by the Kramers-Kronig method, increased significantly after abrasive treatment of the specimens. For all the treated ceramics the intensity of the absorption bands resulting from the anharmonicity of the vibrations in the distorted crystal lattice increased by several times. The last effect also depends on the production prehistory of the ceramics.

  15. Physical properties of five grain dust types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, C B; Jones, D D; Rutherford, R D; Goforth, K J

    1986-01-01

    Physical properties of grain dust derived from five grain types (soybean, rice, corn, wheat, and sorghum) were measured and reported. The grain dusts were obtained from dust collection systems of terminal grain handling facilities and were assumed to be representative of grain dust generated during the handling process. The physical properties reported were as follows: particle size distributions and surface area measurements using a Coulter Counter Model TAII; percent dust fractions less than 100 micron of whole dust; bulk density; particle density; and ash content. PMID:3709482

  16. A Sensitivity Study on the Effects of Particle Chemistry, Asphericity and Size on the Mass Extinction Efficiency of Mineral Dust in the Earth's Atmosphere: From the Near to Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, R. A., Jr.; Reid, J. S.; Tsay, S. C.; Roush, T. L.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    To determine a plausible range of mass extinction efficiencies (MEE) of terrestrial atmospheric dust from the near to thermal IR, sensitivity analyses are performed over an extended range of dust microphysical and chemistry perturbations. The IR values are subsequently compared to those in the near-IR, to evaluate spectral relationships in their optical properties. Synthesized size distributions consistent with measurements, model particle size, while composition is defined by the refractive indices of minerals routinely observed in dust, including the widely used OPAC/Hess parameterization. Single-scattering properties of representative dust particle shapes are calculated using the T-matrix, Discrete Dipole Approximation and Lorenz-Mie light-scattering codes. For the parameterizations examined, MEE ranges from nearly zero to 1.2 square meters per gram, with the higher values associated with non-spheres composed of quartz and gypsum. At near-IR wavelengths, MEE for non-spheres generally exceeds those for spheres, while in the thermal IR, shape-induced changes in MEE strongly depend on volume median diameter (VMD) and wavelength, particularly for MEE evaluated at the mineral resonant frequencies. MEE spectral distributions appear to follow particle geometry and are evidence for shape dependency in the optical properties. It is also shown that non-spheres best reproduce the positions of prominent absorption peaks found in silicates. Generally, angular particles exhibit wider and more symmetric MEE spectral distribution patterns from 8-10 micrometers than those with smooth surfaces, likely due to their edge-effects. Lastly, MEE ratios allow for inferring dust optical properties across the visible-IR spectrum. We conclude the MEE of dust aerosol are significant for the parameter space investigated, and are a key component for remote sensing applications and the study of direct aerosol radiative effects.

  17. A study on the abundance of quartz in thermal coals of India and its relation to abrasion index: Development of predictive model for abrasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandopadhyay, A.K. [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research Digwadih Campus, P.O.-FRI, Dhanbad-828108, Jharkhand (India)

    2010-10-01

    The quartz content of each of the 61 thermal coals used in power stations in India has been determined using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy. It has been observed that quartz is abundant in the thermal coals and its proportion varies from 5 to 20% by wt. The abrasion index (AI), a measure of abrasion caused by coals, has been determined for each coal according to the procedure laid down in Indian Standard IS: 9949-1986. The data generated on abrasion together with ash and quartz percentages of the coals studied have been subjected to regression and correlation analysis. Positive correlations have been found between AI and quartz content and between AI and ash yield, but the correlation between AI and ash (A) and quartz (Q) percentages has been observed to be the most significant (R{sup 2} = 0.86). The linear regression model AI = 1.00A + 1.35Q thus developed has the ability to predict AI of the thermal coals within {+-} 10 mg/kg at 95.5% confidence level. Results of application of the model to predicting abrasion of a limited number of foreign coals with different origins have been found to be encouraging. Integration of other variables like the size and the shape of the abrading particles along with other physical properties of coal, like the bulk density and the grindability, with the model, in addition to the variables already considered, has been suggested for improved prediction. (author)

  18. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder form...

  19. Assessment of mechanical and three-body abrasive wear peculiarity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The three-body abrasive wear characteristic of fabricated composites has been assessed under different operating conditions. For this, the three-body abrasion test is done on dry abrasion test rig (TR-50)and analysed using Taguchi's experimental design scheme and analysis of variance. The results obtained from these ...

  20. Road dust from pavement wear and traction sanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.

    2007-07-01

    sanding and physical properties of the traction sand aggregate affect formation of road dust (ii) How do studded tires affect the formation of road dust when compared with friction tires (iii) What are the composition and sources of airborne road dust in a road simulator and during a springtime road dust episode in Finland (iv) What is the size distribution of abrasion particles from tire-road interaction. The studies were conducted both in a road simulator and in field conditions. The test results from the road simulator showed that traction sanding increased road dust emissions, and that the effect became more dominant with increasing sand load. A high percentage of fine-grained anti-skid aggregate of overall grading increased the PM10 concentrations. Anti-skid aggregate with poor resistance to fragmentation resulted in higher PM levels compared with the other aggregates, and the effect became more significant with higher aggregate loads. Glaciofluvial aggregates tended to cause higher particle concentrations than crushed rocks with good fragmentation resistance. Comparison of tire types showed that studded tires result in higher formation of PM emissions compared with friction tires. The same trend between the tires was present in the tests with and without anti-skid aggregate. This finding applies to test conditions of the road simulator with negligible resuspension. Source and composition analysis showed that the particles in the road simulator were mainly minerals and originated from both traction sand and pavement aggregates. A clear contribution of particles from anti-skid aggregate to ambient PM and dust deposition was also observed in urban conditions. The road simulator results showed that the interaction between tires, anti-skid aggregate and road surface is important in dust production and the relative contributions of these sources depend on their properties. Traction sand grains are fragmented into smaller particles under the tires, but they also wear the

  1. Identification of magnetic particulates in road dust accumulated on roadside snow using magnetic, geochemical and micro-morphological analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucko, Michal S.; Magiera, Tadeusz; Johanson, Bo; Petrovsky, Eduard; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the applicability of snow surveying in the collection and detailed characterization of vehicle-derived magnetic particles. Road dust extracted from snow, collected near a busy urban highway and a low traffic road in a rural environment (southern Finland), was studied using magnetic, geochemical and micro-morphological analyses. Significant differences in horizontal distribution of mass specific magnetic susceptibility (χ) were noticed for both roads. Multi-domain (MD) magnetite was identified as the primary magnetic mineral. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of road dust from both roads revealed: (1) angular-shaped particles (diameter ∼1-300 μm) mostly composed of Fe, Cr and Ni, derived from circulation of motor vehicles and (2) iron-rich spherules (d ∼ 2-70 μm). Tungsten-rich particles (d < 2 μm), derived from tyre stud abrasion were also identified. Additionally, a decreasing trend in χ and selected trace elements was observed with increasing distance from the road edge. - Highlights: → Snow surveying is an effective method in studies of vehicle-derived particles. → Multi-domain (MD) magnetite was identified as the primary magnetic mineral. → Particles mostly composed of Fe, Cr and Ni were identified in the roadside snow. → Snow located near the road is contaminated by heavy metals. - Snow surveying is an effective method in detailed studies of vehicle-derived magnetic particles.

  2. A mathematical theorem on the onset of Couple-Stress fluid permeated with suspended dust particles saturating a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of suspended particles on thermal convection in Couple-Stress fluid saturating a porous medium is considered. By applying linear stability theory and normal mode analysis method, a mathematical theorem is derived which states that the viscoelastic thermal convection at marginal state, cannot manifest as stationary convection if the thermal Rayleigh number R, the medium permeability parameter Pl, the couple-stress parameter F and suspended particles parameter B, satisfy the inequality

  3. Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2010-07-16

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

  4. Usage of abrasion-resistant materials in agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Votava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soil-processing machines are subject to an extensive abrasive wear. This paper analyses technical materials and their fitness to exchangeable parts of plough bottoms, such as edge-tools and whole plough cutting edges. There were tested abrasion-resistant steels with different microstructures: austenite, martensite-bainite, and carbide. Steel with the pearlite-ferrite structure was used as an etalon. Abrasion resistance tests were processed in compliance with the norm CSN 01 5084, which is a test of abrasion wear on abrasive cloth.

  5. Wood Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about wood dust, which can raise the risk of cancers of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. High amounts of wood dust are produced in sawmills, and in the furniture-making, cabinet-making, and carpentry industries.

  6. Abrasive wear resistance and microstructure of Ni-Cr-B-Si hardfacing alloys with additions of Al, Nb, Mo, Fe, Mn and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, H.; Fischer, A.; Theisen, W.

    1987-01-01

    The development of new Ni-base hardfacing alloys for filler wire welding or metal spraying should result in materials with a good resistance against high temperature corrosion and abrasive wear. The first step is to design microstructures, which obtain a satisfactory abrasive wear behaviour at room temperature. Thus, different alloys are melted and scrutinized as to their microstructure and their abrasive wear resistance in laboratory. Compared to commercial Ni-base hardfacing alloys they show a higher volume fraction of coarse hard phases due to the additional, initial solidification of Nb-carbides and Cr-, and Mo-borides. Thus, the abrasive wear resistance is improved. For hard abrasive particles, such as corundum, the Ni-base alloys are more wear resistant than harder Fe-base alloys investigate earlier. This is due to the tougher Ni metal matrix that results in microcracking not to be the most significantly acting wear mechanism

  7. Paleo-dust insights onto dust-climate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust emissions are affected by changing climate conditions, and in turn dust impacts the atmospheric radiation budget, clouds and biogeochemical cycles. Climate and public health dust-related issues call for attention on the fate of the dust cycle in the future, and the representation of the dust cycle is now part of the strategy of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 4 and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 6 (PMIP4-CMIP6). Since mineral aerosols are one of the most important natural aerosols, understanding past dust responses to climate in the paleoclimate will allow us to better understand mineral aerosol feedbacks with climate and biogeochemistry in the Anthropocene. Modern observations and paleoclimate records offer the possibility of multiple, complementary views on the global dust cycle, and allow to validate and/or constrain the numerical representation of dust in climate and Earth system models. We present our results from a set of simulations with the Community Earth System Model for different climate states, including present and past climates such as the pre-industrial, the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum. A set of simulations including a prognostic dust cycle was thoroughly compared with a wide set of present day observations from different platforms and regions, in order to realistically constrain the magnitude of dust load, surface concentration, deposition, optical properties, and particle size distributions. The magnitude of emissions for past climate regimes was constrained based on compilations of paleodust mass accumulation rates and size distributions, as well as based on information on dust provenance. The comparison with a parallel set of simulations without dust allows estimating the impacts of dust on surface climate. We analyze impacts of dust on the mean and variability of surface temperature and precipitation in each climate state, as well as the impacts that changing dust emissions had

  8. Comparative evaluation of tooth substance loss and its correlation with the abrasivity and chemical composition of different dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Prakash; Sharma, Sidhartha; Logani, Ajay; Shah, Naseem; Singh, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    In India, teeth cleaning with tooth powder is common in rural and semi-urban areas. These dentifrices may contain low-quality abrasives, which may have a deleterious effect on dental hard tissues. This study aims to evaluate the tooth substance loss caused by different dentifrices and to correlate it with chemical composition, size, and shape of abrasives used. An indigenously made automated machine was used for brushing the specimens. Sixty-four freshly extracted premolars were allocated to eight groups (n = 8). Colgate toothpaste was used as the control group. Each specimen was brushed in a vertical motion for 2½ h at 200 strokes/min with a constant applied load of 200 g corresponding to 6-month brushing. The difference in weight (pre- and post-brushing) was determined by an analytical weighing machine. Chemical analysis was done to determine the presence of iron oxide by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry method. Shape and size of the abrasive particles was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One-way analysis of variance and Paired t-test were used to analyze the data. Tooth substance loss was maximum in the group brushed with red tooth powder, which was shown to contain the highest amount of iron oxide and also exhibited large, irregularly shaped abrasive particles under SEM. Tooth substance loss was documented to be correlated with chemical composition (iron oxide) and the size and shape of abrasive particles used in dentifrices.

  9. Measurement of nanoparticle removal by abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiot, Arnaud; Golanski, Luana; Tardif, Francois

    2009-01-01

    A strong release limitation of single nanoparticles from commercial manufactured 'nanoproducts' is necessary to decrease potential exposure risks of consumers and represents also a pragmatic way to facilitate acceptance for nanomaterial commercialization before obtaining definitive toxicological results. So, it is of prime importance to know how to characterize the release of small materials during usage solicitations such as mechanical, thermal, UV stress: are they single nanoparticles, aggregates or nanoparticles included in a bigger piece of the matrix? In the frame of NanoSafe2 project, CEA developed and qualified a specific bench test where the material to be tested is mechanically solicited by abrasion using a normalized Taber equipment. The first results show that nanofillers can be released in usage by abrasion for non optimised nanoproducts.

  10. Liquid abrasive pressure pot scoping tests report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The primary initiatives of the LITCO Decontamination Development group at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) are the development of methods to eliminate the use of sodium bearing decontamination chemicals and minimization of the amount of secondary waste generated during decontamination activities. In July of 1994, a Commerce Business Daily (CBD) announcement was issued by the INEL to determine commercial interest in the development of an in-situ liquid abrasive grit blasting system. As a result of the CBD announcement, Klieber ampersand Schulz issued an Expression of Interest letter which stated they would be interested in testing a prototype Liquid Abrasive Pressure Pot (LAPP). LITCO's Decontamination group and Kleiber ampersand Schulz entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in which the Decontamination Development group tested the prototype LAPP in a non-radioactive hot cell mockup. Test results are provided

  11. Metal segmenting using abrasive and reciprocating saws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Haun, F.E. Jr.

    1987-06-01

    This paper evaluates a light-weight, high-power abrasive saw for segmenting radioactively contaminated metal components. A unique application of a reciprocating mechanical saw for the remote disassembly of equipment in a hot cell also is described. The results of this work suggest that use of these techniques for selected remote sectioning applications could minimize operational and access problems and be very cost effective in comparison with other inherently faster sectioning methods. 2 refs., 7 figs

  12. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  13. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  14. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings.

  15. Experiments on Dust Grain Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. N.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    Dust particles in various astrophysical environments are charged by a variety of mechanisms generally involving collisional processes with other charged particles and photoelectric emission with UV radiation from nearby sources. The sign and the magnitude of the particle charge are determined by the competition between the charging processes by UV radiation and collisions with charged particles. Knowledge of the particle charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a number of physical processes. The charge of a dust grain is thus a fundamental parameter that influences the physics of dusty plasmas, processes in the interplanetary medium and interstellar medium, interstellar dust clouds, planetary rings, cometary and outer atmospheres of planets etc. In this paper we present some results of experiments on charging of dust grains carried out on a laboratory facility capable levitating micron size dust grains in an electrodynamic balance in simulated space environments. The charging/discharging experiments were carried out by exposing the dust grains to energetic electron beams and UV radiation. Photoelectric efficiencies and yields of micron size dust grains of SiO2, and lunar simulates obtained from NASA-JSC will be presented.

  16. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka E; Sapko, Michael J; Harris, Marcia L; Zlochower, Isaac A; Weiss, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that "… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …" However, a proper definition or quantification of "light blast of air" is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule.

  17. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the

  18. Radar detectability studies of slow and small zodiacal dust cloud particles. I. The case of Arecibo 430 MHz meteor head echo observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janches, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) argues that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper, we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization, and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when (1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (∼16 t d –1 ) and (2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high-speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones for low-speed meteors. However, even at this lower limit, the model overpredicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of three, suggesting that the model requires some revision.

  19. Radar detectability studies of slow and small zodiacal dust cloud particles. I. The case of Arecibo 430 MHz meteor head echo observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janches, D. [Space Weather Laboratory, Mail Code 674, GSFC/NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W. [School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Nesvorný, D. [SouthWest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlický, D. [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Nicolls, M. J., E-mail: diego.janches@nasa.gov, E-mail: j.m.c.plane@leeds.ac.uk, E-mail: w.feng@leeds.ac.uk, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: Michael.Nicolls@sri.com [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) argues that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper, we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization, and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when (1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (∼16 t d{sup –1}) and (2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high-speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones for low-speed meteors. However, even at this lower limit, the model overpredicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of three, suggesting that the model requires some revision.

  20. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: I. The Case of Arecibo 430 MHz Meteor Head Echo Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Nesvorny, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model (Nesvorny et al. 2010, 2011b) argue that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when: 1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (approximately 16 t/d) and 2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones (1997) for low speeds meteors. However, even at this lower limit the model over predicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of 3, suggesting the model requires some revision.

  1. Turning of wood plastic composites by water jet and abrasive water jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutyrová, Z.; Ščučka, Jiří; Hloch, Sergej; Hlaváček, Petr; Zeleňák, Michal

    -, September 2015 (2015), s. 1-9 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : wood plastic composite * water jet * size of abrasive particles * surface quality * traverse speed Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00170-015-7831-6

  2. Turning of wood plastic composites by water jet and abrasive water jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutyrová, Z.; Ščučka, Jiří; Hloch, Sergej; Hlaváček, Petr; Zeleňák, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 84, 5-8 (2016), s. 1615-1623 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : wood plastic composite * water jet * turning * traverse speed * size of abrasive particles Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00170-015-7831-6

  3. Ulysses dust measurements near Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, E; Zook, H A; Baguhl, M; Fechtig, H; Hanner, M S; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I B

    1992-09-11

    Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized particles were recorded by the Ulysses dust detector within 40 days of the Jupiter flyby. Nine impacts were recorded within 50 Jupiter radii with most of them recorded after closest approach. Three of these impacts are consistent with particles on prograde orbits around Jupiter and the rest are believed to have resulted from gravitationally focused interplanetary dust. From the ratio of the impact rate before the Jupiter flyby to the impact rate after the Jupiter flyby it is concluded that interplanetary dust particles at the distance of Jupiter move on mostly retrograde orbits. On 10 March 1992, Ulysses passed through an intense dust stream. The dust detector recorded 126 impacts within 26 hours. The stream particles were moving on highly inclined and apparently hyperbolic orbits with perihelion distances of >5 astronomical units. Interplanetary dust is lost rather quickly from the solar system through collisions and other mechanisms and must be almost continuously replenished to maintain observed abundances. Dust flux measurements, therefore, give evidence of the recent rates of production from sources such as comets, asteroids, and moons, as well as the possible presence of interstellar grains.

  4. Abrasion of Polymeric Composites on Basis of Machining Splinters from Hardfacing Alloys – Usable in Agrocomplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Valášek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A paper focuses on a description of two-body and three-body abrasion wear of polymeric particle composites with fillers on a basis of machining splinters from hardfacing alloys. The abrasive wear is typical for functional surfaces of agricultural machines processing the soil. One of possibilities of the functional surface renovation is an application of resistant layers in a form of composite systems. Just the inclusion of hard inorganic particles into a polymeric matrix significantly increases its wear resistance. So long as the primary filler is replaced by the waste – by particles from the material machining – the matrix in which the filler is dispersed is a bearer of a material recyclation. This way of the recyclation is inexpensive, economic and sensitive to environment. The paper focuses on the experimental description of the two-body and three-body abrasion and the composites hardness, it describes a production of a prototype for field tests with the functional surface on the basis of the investigated composite system at the same time.

  5. Artificial evolutionary approaches to produce smoother surface in magnetic abrasive finishing of hardened AISI 52100 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teimouri, Reza; Baseri, Hamid [Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    In this work, two models of feed forward back-propagation neural network (FFBP-NN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) have been developed to predict the performance of magnetic abrasive finishing process, based on experimental data of literature. Input parameters of process are electromagnet's voltage, mesh number of abrasive particles, poles rotational speed and weight percent of abrasive particles, and also the output is percentage of surface roughness variation. In order to select the best model, a comparison between developed models has been done based on their mean absolute error (MAE) and root mean square error (RMSE). Moreover, optimization methods based on simulated annealing (SA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithms were used to maximize the percent of surface roughness variation and select the optimal process parameters. Results indicated that the models based on artificial intelligence predict much more precise values with respect to predictive regression model developed in main literature. Also, the ANFIS model had a lowest value of MAE and RMSE with respect to others. So it was used as an objective function to maximize the surface roughness variation by using SA and PSO. Comparison between the obtained optimal solutions and analysis of results in main literature indicated that SA and PSO could find the optimal answers logically and precisely.

  6. Abrasive water jet: a complementary tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte, J. P.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The abrasive water jet is a powerful cutting tool, whose main advantages lie in the absence of thermal effects and the capability of cutting highly thick materials. Compared with Laser, the abrasive water jet allows the cutting of a larger range of thicknesses and a wider variety of materials such as: ornamental stones, metals, polymers, composites, wood, glass and ceramics. The application of this technology has suffered an extensive growth, with successful applications in varied industrial sectors like the automotive, aerospace, textile, metalworking, ornamental stones, etc. The present communication aims at introducing the abrasive water jet as a complementary tool to laser cutting, presenting its advantages by showing some documented examples of pieces cut for different industries.

    O jacto de água abrasivo é uma poderosa ferramenta de corte, tendo como principais vantagens a ausência de processo térmico e permitir o corte de elevadas espessuras. Comparativamente com o laser o jacto de água abrasivo permite cortar uma maior gama de espessuras, e uma maior diversidade de materiais: rochas ornamentais, metais, polimeros, compósitos, madeiras, vidro e cerâmicos. A aplicação desta tecnologia tem sofrido um crescimento acentuado, existindo aplicações de sucesso nos mais variados sectores industriáis como a indústria automóvel, aeroespacial, têxtil, metalomecânica e rochas ornamentáis. Esta comunição pretende apresentar o corte por jacto de agua abrasivo como uma ferramenta de corte complementar ao corte por laser, apresentando as suas vantagens documentadas através de alguns exemplos de peças executadas para as diferentes indústrias.

  7. Bridging a High School Science Fair Experience with First Year Undergraduate Research: Using the E-SPART Analyzer to Determine Electrostatic Charge Properties of Compositionally Varied Rock Dust Particles as Terrestrial Analogues to Mars Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A. G.; Williams, W. J. W.; Mazumder, M. K.; Biris, A.; Srirama, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    NASA missions to Mars confirm presence of surficial particles, as well as dramatic periods of aeolian reworking. Dust deposition on, or infiltration into, exploration equipment such as spacecraft, robotic explorers, solar panel power supplies, and even spacesuits, can pose significant problems such as diminished power collection, short circuits / discharges, and added weight. We report results conducted initially as a science fair project and a study now part of a first year University undergraduate research experience.

  8. A laser-abrasive method for the cutting of enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, G B; Belikov, A V; Sinelnik, Y A

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduced a new method for the removal of hard dental tissue based upon the use of particles accelerated by laser irradiation, which the authors have called the laser-abrasive method. The particles used were sapphire as powder or an aqueous suspension. The effect of the products of enamel ablation was also investigated. The particles were accelerated using submillisecond pulses of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers. A strobing CCD camera was used to measure the speed of the ejected particles. The additional contribution of these particles to the efficiency of laser ablation of enamel and dentin was also investigated. The results showed that the enamel particles produced by the beam-tissue interaction were also accelerated by this process of ablation and were effective in the removal of enamel and dentin. The use of an aqueous suspension of sapphire particles increased the efficiency of enamel removal threefold when compared with the use of an Er:YAG laser with water spray. The laser-abrasive method allowed for the removal of enamel and dentin at speeds approaching those of the high-speed turbine. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. FE simulation of the indentation deformation of SiC modified vinylester composites in respect to their abrasive wear performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The abrasive sliding friction and wear behaviours of silicon carbide (SiC filled vinylester (VE composites were investigated. The average grain size of the incorporated SiC particles was varied, holding the volume content of them in every case at 16 vol%. Mechanical properties (hardness, compression modulus, yield stress of the filled and neat VE were determined. The tribological properties were investigated in block (composite – on – ring (steel test configuration. The steel counter bodies were covered with abrasive papers of different graining. Coefficient of friction (COF and specific wear rate of the VE + SiC composites were determined. It was observed that the wear resistance increases with increasing average filler grain size and with decreasing abrasiveness of the counter surface. The COF of the VE + SiC composites is independent of the size of the incorporated particles, but it is strongly influenced by the abrasiveness of the counter body. The worn surfaces of the VE + SiC systems were analysed in scanning electron microscope (SEM to deduce the typical wear mechanisms. The size effect of the SiC filler particles onto the abrasive wear characteristics was investigated by assuming that the roughness peaks of the abrasive paper and the indenter of the microhardness test cause similar micro scaled contact deformations in the composites. Therefore FE method was used to simulate the micro scaled deformation process in the VE + SiC systems during microindentation tests. The FE results provided valuable information on how to explain the size effect of the incorporated SiC filler.

  10. The MECA Payload as a Dust Analysis Laboratory on the MSP 2001 Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Anderson, M.; Buehler, M.; Frant, M.; Fuerstenau, S.; Hecht, M.; Keller, U.; Markiewicz, W.; Meloy, T.; Pike, T.

    1999-09-01

    properties, (7) particle hardness, (8) particle magnetic properties, (9) bulk dust geochemistry (solubility, reactivity, ionic and mineral species). All of these quantities are needed in order for the human exploration program to make assessments of hazards on Mars, and to better enable the production on earth, of soil/dust simulants that can act as realistic test materials in terms of those properties that render dust a contaminant.Such properties include the small grain size that enables penetration of space-suit joints, mechanical interfaces and bearings, seals, etc., and presents difficulty for filtration systems. Size also plays a critical role in the potential for lung disease in long-term habitats. The properties of grain shape and hardness are important parameters in determining the abrasiveness of dust as it enters mechanical systems, or bombards helmet visors and habitat windows in dust-laden winds. Adhesive electrostatic and magnetic properties of dust will be prime causes of contamination of space suits and equipment. Contamination causes mechanical malfunction, tracking of dirt into habitats, "piggybacking" of toxins on dust into habitats, changes in albedo and efficiency of solar arrays and heat exchangers, and changes in electrical conductivity of suit surfaces and other materials that may have specific safety requirements regarding electrical conductivity. Other potentially hazardous properties of dust include the possibility of high solubility of some component grains (rendering them reactive), and toxicity of some materials --grains of superoxidants and heavy metals (there is always the slim, but not inconceivable possibility of biogenic components such as spores). Because Mars has no active surface aqueous regime, volcanic emissions, meteoritic debris, weathering products, and photochemical products of Mars have nowhere to go except reside in the surface; there are few mechanical or chemical (buffering) processes to remove the accumulation of eons. From a

  11. Generation of Graphite Particles by Abrasion and Their Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Raymond Steven

    Self-efficacy beliefs that relate to teachers' motivation and performance have been an important area of concern for preservice teacher education. This study used a mixed-methods approach to investigate the changes in preservice elementary teachers' science self-efficacy beliefs and the factors associated in a specialized elementary physics content course. In addition, the study is one of few to investigate the relationship between the changes in science self-efficacy beliefs and changes in physical science conceptual understanding. Participants included fifty-one preservice elementary teachers enrolled in two term of the physical science content course. Data collection and analysis procedures included both qualitative and quantitative measures. Data collection included implementation of Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument-B (STEBI-B) (Bleicher, 2004) and Physical Science Concept Test as pre- and post-test, two semi-structured interviews with 18 participants (nine each semester), classroom observations and artifacts. A pre-post, repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) design was used to test the significance of differences between the pre- and post-surveys across time. Results indicated statistically significant gains in participants' science self-efficacy beliefs on both scales of STEBI-B - personal science teaching beliefs and outcome expectancy beliefs. Additionally, a positive moderate relationship between science conceptual understandings and personal science teaching efficacy beliefs was found. Post-hoc analysis of the STEBI-B data was used to select 18 participants for interviews. The participants belonged to each group representing the low, medium and high initial levels of self-efficacy beliefs. Participants' responses indicated positive shifts in their science teacher self-image and confidence to teach science in future. Four categories that represented the course-related factors contributing towards science self-efficacy beliefs included: (1) enhanced science conceptual understandings, (2) active learning experiences, (3) teaching strategies, and (4) instructor as a role-model. Findings suggest that despite of the nature of prior science experiences preservice elementary teachers previously had, an exposure to a course that integrates relevant science content along with modeled instructional strategies can positively impact science self-efficacy beliefs. While some course elements such as active learning experiences and teaching models seemed to impact all groups positively, the low group participants were particularly influenced by the multiple representations of the content and the course instructor as a role model. These findings have important implications for preservice science teacher preparation programs.

  12. Measurement and analysis of abrasive particles velocities in AWSJ

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Linde, M.; Pude, F.; Rentsch, T.; Fernolendt, J.; Poort, H. U.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 149, July 2016 (2016), s. 77-86 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [International Conference on Manufacturing Engineering and Materials, ICMEM 2016. Nový Smokovec, 06.06.2016-10.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : AWSJ * PIV * LIF Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877705816311493

  13. Dust confinement and dust acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.

    2005-10-01

    Systematic laboratory experiments on dust acoustic waves require the confinement of dust particles. Here we report on new experiments in a magnetized plasma region in front of an additional positively biased disk electrode in a background plasma which is generated in argon at 27MHz between a disk and grid electrode. The plasma diffuses through the grid along the magnetic field. The three-dimensional dust distribution is measured with a horizontal sheet of laser light and a CCD camera, which are mounted on a vertical translation stage. Depending on magnetic field and discharge current, cigar or donut-shaped dust clouds are generated, which tend to rotate about the magnetic field direction. Measurements with emissive probes show that the axial confinement of dust particles with diameters between 0.7-2 μm is achieved by a balance of ion-drag force and electric field force. Dust levitation and radial confinement is due to a strong radial electric field. Dust acoustic waves are destabilized by the ion flow or can be stimulated by a periodic bias on the disk electrode. The observed wave dispersion is compared with fluid and kinetic models of the dust acoustic wave.

  14. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  15. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Abrasion of mechanical components and fabrics by soil on Earth is typically minimized by the effects of atmosphere and water. Potentially abrasive particles lose sharp and pointed geometrical features through erosion. In environments where such erosion does not exist, such as the vacuum of the Moon, particles retain sharp geometries associated with fracturing of their parent particles by micrometeorite impacts. The relationship between hardness of the abrasive and that of the material being abraded is well understood, such that the abrasive ability of a material can be estimated as a function of the ratio of the hardness of the two interacting materials. Knowing the abrasive nature of an environment (abrasive)/construction material is crucial to designing durable equipment for use in such surroundings. The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement; in some cases, considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for de tailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness par ameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Further - more, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized

  16. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  17. Dust Dynamics Near Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Joshua; Hughes, Anna; Grund, Chris

    Observations of a lunar "horizon glow" by several Surveyor spacecraft in the 1960s opened the study of the dynamics of charged dust particles near planetary surfaces. The surfaces of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies in the solar system (asteroids, and other moons) are directly exposed to the solar wind and ionizing solar ultraviolet radiation, resulting in a time-dependent electric surface potential. Because these same objects are also exposed to bombardment by micrometeoroids, the surfaces are usually characterized by a power-law size distribution of dust that extends to sub-micron-sized particles. Individual particles can acquire a charge different from their surroundings leading to electrostatic levitation. Once levitated, particles may simply return to the surface on nearly ballistic trajectories, escape entirely from the moon or asteroid if the initial velocity is large, or in some cases be stably levitated for extended periods of time. All three outcomes have observable consequences. Furthermore, the behavior of charged dust near the surface has practical implications for planned future manned and unmanned activities on the lunar surface. Charged dust particles also act as sensitive probes of the near-surface plasma environment. Recent numerical modeling of dust levitation and transport show that charged micron-sized dust is likely to accumulate in topographic lows such as craters, providing a mechanism for the creation of dust "ponds" observed on the asteroid 433 Eros. Such deposition can occur when particles are supported by the photoelectron sheath above the dayside and drift over shadowed regions of craters where the surface potential is much smaller. Earlier studies of the lunar horizon glow are consistent with those particles being on simple ballistic trajectories following electrostatic launching from the surface. Smaller particles may be accelerated from the lunar surface to high altitudes consistent with observations of high altitude

  18. Interstellar dust and extinction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    It is noted that the term interstellar dust refers to materials with rather different properties, and that the mean extinction law of Seaton (1979) or Savage and Mathis (1979) should be replaced by the expression given by Cardelli et al. (1989), using the appropriate value of total-to-selective extinction. The older laws were appropriate for the diffuse ISM but dust in clouds differs dramatically in its extinction law. Dust is heavily processed while in the ISM by being included within clouds and cycled back into the diffuse ISM many times during its lifetime. Hence, grains probably reflect only a trace of their origin, although meteoritic inclusions with isotopic anomalies demonstrate that some tiny particles survive intact from a supernova origin to the present. 186 refs

  19. Emissions of road dust by winter tyres and the contributions of different road dust sources in road side particle samples; Talvirenkaiden poelypaeaestoet ja eri katupoelylaehteiden osuudet kadunvarrella keraetyissae hiukkasnaeytteissae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.; Pirjola, L.; Ritola, R.; Stojiljkovic, A.; Malinen, A.

    2013-09-01

    Aim of this study was to determine: (1) the relative contributions from pavement wear and traction sanding in PM{sub 10} road side air and road dust resuspension samples; (2) PM{sub 10} dust emissions from studded and studless tyres in on-road conditions. The study was conducted as part of the NASTA research program during the winter season 2011/2012. The studies were carried out in Suurmetsaentie and Viikintie in Helsinki, Finland. The results showed that dust from pavement aggregates was the largest source during spring, accounting for 40- 50 percent of the particulate matter in the air and resuspension samples. Based on studies on formation of dust, major source of the dust from pavement aggregates is the wear by studded tyres. Traction sand and road salt were used frequently during the winter 2011/2012. Sanding material explained about 25 percent of the road dust in the air and resuspension samples. Traction sanding is estimated to account for approximately few percent of the pavement dust via the sandpaper effect. Effect of road salt was few percent in the samples. The source contributions from pavement and traction sanding observed in spring 2011/2012 at Suurmetsaentie are similar to what has been estimated in previous studies conducted in the early 2000s in Finland. In a study conducted in the city of Hanko, it was estimated the contribution from traction sanding to be in average of about 10 percent. In another study in the center of Helsinki the contribution was estimated to be about half of the PM{sub 10}. The general perception in Finland has been that traction sanding is the main source of airborne road dust. Studies conducted in 2000s and the results of this study, however, indicate that traction sanding has been an important but not the main source of PM10 road dust even in winters with extensive use of gravel for traction control. Emissions of road dust by a single tyre consist of direct emissions of wear products as well as resuspension emissions of

  20. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  1. 29 CFR 1910.215 - Abrasive wheel machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be securely fastened to the spindle and the bearing surface shall run true. When more than one wheel... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive wheel machinery. 1910.215 Section 1910.215 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.215 Abrasive wheel machinery. (a...

  2. Neuro - Fuzzy Analysis for Silicon Carbide Abrasive Grains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grinding wheels are made of very small, sharp and hard abrasive materials or grits held together by strong porous bond. Abrasive materials are materials of extreme hardness that are used to shape other materials by a grinding or abrading action and they are used either as loose grains, as grinding wheels, or as coatings ...

  3. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    increasing expansion of highway and other construction works and decreasing natural aggregate resources in the world, the demand for crushed stone aggregates has in- creased from day-to-day. One of the important properties of rock aggregates is abrasion resistance. The abrasion resistance of aggregates is generally ...

  4. An experimental modeling and acoustic emission monitoring of abrasive wear in a steel/diabase pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The earthmoving of permafrost soil is a critical task for excavation of minerals and construction on new territories. Failure by abrasive wear is the main reason for excavation parts of earthmoving and soil cutting machines. Therefore investigation of this type of wear is a challenge for developing efficient and wear resistant working parts. This paper is focused on conducting tribological experiments with sliding the steel samples over the surface of diabase stone sample where abrasive wear conditions of soil cutting are modeled experimentally. The worn surfaces of all samples have been examined and transfer of metal and stone particles revealed. The acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. he acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. As shown the wear intensity correlates to that of acoustic emission. Both acoustic emission signal median frequency and energy are found to be sensitive to the wear mode.

  5. Solidification structure and abrasion resistance of high chromium white irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Laird, G.

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  6. Active Dust Experiment in the Mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norberg, Carol; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta

    2008-01-01

    The mesosphere stretches from an altitude of about 50 to 90 km above the Earth's surface. Meteors entering the Earth's atmosphere are believed to ablate and hence give rise to a thin layer of dust particles in the upper part of the Earth's mesosphere. It seems that the dust is most dense in a layer that lies between 80 and 90 km. The dust particles are thought to have sizes of a few to tens of nanometers. Efforts have been made to measure these particles using rockets and radar techniques with limited success. We propose to release dust into the mesosphere over northern Sweden at a height of about 90 km and observe the released dust using the EISCAT radar system. The dust will be launched from the Swedish Space Corporation Esrange Space Centre on a single-stage Improved-Orion rocket that will be launched so that its flight path will be in the radar field of view.

  7. Electrostatic Dust Detector with Improved Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, D.P.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Methods to measure the inventory of dust particles and to remove dust if it approaches safety limits will be required in next-step tokamaks such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces, biased to 30 or 50 V, has been developed for the detection of dust on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Gaining operational experience of dust detection on surfaces in tokamaks is important, however the level of dust generated in contemporary short-pulse tokamaks is comparatively low and high sensitivity is necessary to measure dust on a shot-by-shot basis. We report on modifications in the detection electronics that have increased the sensitivity of the electrostatic dust detector by a factor of up to 120, - a level suitable for measurements on contemporary tokamaks.

  8. The global distribution of mineral dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegen, I; Schepanski, K

    2009-01-01

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  9. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar

  10. The grain-size distribution of pyroclasts: Primary fragmentation, conduit sorting or abrasion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, U.; Schauroth, J.; Taddeucci, J.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions expel a mixture of pyroclasts and lithics. Pyroclasts, fragments of the juvenile magma, record the state of the magma at fragmentation in terms of porosity and crystallinity. The grain size distribution of pyroclasts is generally considered to be a direct consequence of the conditions at magma fragmentation that is mainly driven by gas overpressure in bubbles, high shear rates, contact with external water or a combination of these factors. Stress exerted by any of these processes will lead to brittle fragmentation by overcoming the magma's relaxation timescale. As a consequence, most pyroclasts exhibit angular shapes. Upon magma fragmentation, the gas pyroclast mixture is accelerated upwards and eventually ejected from the vent. The total grain size distribution deposited is a function of fragmentation conditions and transport related sorting. Porous pyroclasts are very susceptible to abrasion by particle-particle or particle-conduit wall interaction. Accordingly, pyroclastic fall deposits with angular clasts should proof a low particle abrasion upon contact to other surfaces. In an attempt to constrain the degree of particle interaction during conduit flow, monomodal batches of washed pyroclasts have been accelerated upwards by rapid decompression and subsequently investigated for their grain size distribution. In our set-up, we used a vertical cylindrical tube without surface roughness as conduit. We varied grain size (0.125-0.25; 0.5-1; 1-2 mm), porosity (0; 10; 30 %), gas-particle ratio (10 and 40%), conduit length (10 and 28 cm) and conduit diameter (2.5 and 6 cm). All ejected particles were collected after settling at the base of a 3.3 m high tank and sieved at one sieve size below starting size (half-Φ). Grain size reduction showed a positive correlation with starting grain size, porosity and overpressure at the vent. Although milling in a volcanic conduit may take place, porous pyroclasts are very likely to be a primary product

  11. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard; Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  12. Carbohydrate and protein contents of grain dusts in relation to dust morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashek, W V; Olenchock, S A; Mayfield, J E; Wirtz, G H; Wolz, D E; Young, C A

    1986-01-01

    Grain dusts contain a variety of materials which are potentially hazardous to the health of workers in the grain industry. Because the characterization of grain dusts is incomplete, we are defining the botanical, chemical, and microbial contents of several grain dusts collected from grain elevators in the Duluth-Superior regions of the U.S. Here, we report certain of the carbohydrate and protein contents of dusts in relation to dust morphology. Examination of the gross morphologies of the dusts revealed that, except for corn, each dust contained either husk or pericarp (seed coat in the case of flax) fragments in addition to respirable particles. When viewed with the light microscope, the fragments appeared as elongated, pointed structures. The possibility that certain of the fragments within corn, settled, and spring wheat were derived from cell walls was suggested by the detection of pentoses following colorimetric assay of neutralized 2 N trifluoroacetic acid hydrolyzates of these dusts. The presence of pentoses together with the occurrence of proteins within water washings of grain dusts suggests that glycoproteins may be present within the dusts. With scanning electron microscopy, each dust was found to consist of a distinct assortment of particles in addition to respirable particles. Small husk fragments and "trichome-like" objects were common to all but corn dust. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. PMID:3709476

  13. Ozone Production by Colliding Dust in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Dukes, C. A.

    2012-03-01

    Laboratory studies show that ozone is produced by electrical discharges when rocks fracture. We propose that a similar process should occur in the collision of dust particles during dust storms in Mars and discuss implications.

  14. Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    KAUST Repository

    Prakash, P. Jish; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Tao, Weichun; Yapici, Tahir; Warsama, Bashir H.; Engelbrecht, Johann

    2016-01-01

    , because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably

  15. The Impact of Mars Atmospheric Dust on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.

    2017-06-01

    The martian dust impact can be considered as an exposure to ultra fine particles of martian dust. Direct nose to brain pathway of particulate matter can affect the fine motor skills and gross motor skills, cognition may be affected.

  16. Novel diagnostics for dust in space, Laboratory and fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaldo, C.

    2011-01-01

    In situ diagnostics for mobile dust, based on dust impact ionization phenomena, as well as silica aerogel dust collectors are discussed for applications to space and fusion plasmas. The feasibility of an electro-optical probe to detect hypervelocity (>1 km/s) dust particles in tokamaks is evaluated. For quiescent plasmas, a diagnostic of submicron dust based on measurements of plasma fluctuation spectra can be used (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Abrasive water jets for controlled demolition and dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudaka, M.; Crofton, P.S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Abrasive water jets offer an efficient high speed cutting tool for hard materials such as reinforced concrete, tool steel and armour plate. Cutting by abrasive water jets is often described as a cold cutting operation since no heat is developed and any increase in local temperature is immediately cooled by the water jet. Moreover no sparks are generated to ignite a potentially inflammable atmosphere. Mass flow rates of water and abrasive are small (typically 4 litres/min.water and 1 kg/min abrasive) and hence are easy to collect and to dispose of. For these reasons abrasive water jets offer certain advantages in cutting difficult materials in hazardous environments such as in the nuclear industry, offshore oil rigs and petrochemical plant. Available portable cutting systems are described and the advantages of using abrasive water jets are discussed as well as some of the parameters involved in the cutting operation. Finally a description is presented of some typical applications of abrasive water jet cutting. (author)

  18. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Valerie E; Garcìa, Hector D; Monds, Kathryn; Cooper, Bonnie L; James, John T

    2012-07-20

    Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind's limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm), reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance.

  19. Small-Scale Morphological Features on a Solid Surface Processed by High-Pressure Abrasive Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Kang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Being subjected to a high-pressure abrasive water jet, solid samples will experience an essential variation of both internal stress and physical characteristics, which is closely associated with the kinetic energy attached to the abrasive particles involved in the jet stream. Here, experiments were performed, with particular emphasis being placed on the kinetic energy attenuation and turbulent features in the jet stream. At jet pressure of 260 MPa, mean velocity and root-mean-square (RMS velocity on two jet-stream sections were acquired by utilizing the phase Doppler anemometry (PDA technique. A jet-cutting experiment was then carried out with Al-Mg alloy samples being cut by an abrasive water jet. Morphological features and roughness on the cut surface were quantitatively examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and optical profiling techniques. The results indicate that the high-pressure water jet is characterized by remarkably high mean flow velocities and distinct velocity fluctuations. Those irregular pits and grooves on the cut surfaces indicate both the energy attenuation and the development of radial velocity components in the jet stream. When the sample is positioned with different distances from the nozzle outlet, the obtained quantitative surface roughness varies accordingly. A descriptive model highlighting the behaviors of abrasive particles in jet-cutting process is established in light of the experimental results and correlation analysis.

  20. Small-Scale Morphological Features on a Solid Surface Processed by High-Pressure Abrasive Water Jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Can; Liu, Haixia

    2013-08-14

    Being subjected to a high-pressure abrasive water jet, solid samples will experience an essential variation of both internal stress and physical characteristics, which is closely associated with the kinetic energy attached to the abrasive particles involved in the jet stream. Here, experiments were performed, with particular emphasis being placed on the kinetic energy attenuation and turbulent features in the jet stream. At jet pressure of 260 MPa, mean velocity and root-mean-square (RMS) velocity on two jet-stream sections were acquired by utilizing the phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) technique. A jet-cutting experiment was then carried out with Al-Mg alloy samples being cut by an abrasive water jet. Morphological features and roughness on the cut surface were quantitatively examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profiling techniques. The results indicate that the high-pressure water jet is characterized by remarkably high mean flow velocities and distinct velocity fluctuations. Those irregular pits and grooves on the cut surfaces indicate both the energy attenuation and the development of radial velocity components in the jet stream. When the sample is positioned with different distances from the nozzle outlet, the obtained quantitative surface roughness varies accordingly. A descriptive model highlighting the behaviors of abrasive particles in jet-cutting process is established in light of the experimental results and correlation analysis.

  1. Ideas about the study of dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriesse, C.D.

    1974-01-01

    Agreement seems to exist about the general idea that a dust particle is a tiny piece of solid material, with some atomic lattice and bonding electrons. But questions like: how large are dust particles, what is their chemical composition, how do they scatter and absorb light, are answered differently when different spectral features are discussed. However, observations do give a number of keys for a reasonable particle model. (G.T.H.)

  2. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, Imran; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO 2 –P 2 O 5 –CaO–CaF 2 –Na 2 O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na 2 O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na 2 O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization. (paper)

  3. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Imran; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2-Na2O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na2O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na2O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization.

  4. Sahara Dust Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Dust Particles Click on the image for Quicktime movie from 7/15-7/24 A continent-sized cloud of hot air and dust originating from the Sahara Desert crossed the Atlantic Ocean and headed towards Florida and the Caribbean. A Saharan Air Layer, or SAL, forms when dry air and dust rise from Africa's west coast and ride the trade winds above the Atlantic Ocean. These dust clouds are not uncommon, especially during the months of July and August. They start when weather patterns called tropical waves pick up dust from the desert in North Africa, carry it a couple of miles into the atmosphere and drift westward. In a sequence of images created by data acquired by the Earth-orbiting Atmospheric Infrared Sounder ranging from July 15 through July 24, we see the distribution of the cloud in the atmosphere as it swirls off of Africa and heads across the ocean to the west. Using the unique silicate spectral signatures of dust in the thermal infrared, AIRS can detect the presence of dust in the atmosphere day or night. This detection works best if there are no clouds present on top of the dust; when clouds are present, they can interfere with the signal, making it much harder to detect dust as in the case of July 24, 2005. In the Quicktime movie, the scale at the bottom of the images shows +1 for dust definitely detected, and ranges down to -1 for no dust detected. The plots are averaged over a number of AIRS observations falling within grid boxes, and so it is possible to obtain fractional numbers. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Total Water Vapor in the Atmosphere Around the Dust Cloud Click on the image for Quicktime movie The dust cloud is contained within a dry adiabatic layer which originates over the Sahara Desert. This Saharan Air Layer (SAL) advances Westward over the Atlantic Ocean, overriding the cool, moist air nearer the surface. This burst of very dry air is visible in the AIRS retrieved total water

  5. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  6. Cosmic dust investigations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.A.; Tuzzolino, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments have been completed using accelerator dust particles in the mass range ≅ 10 -9 -10 -6 g and velocity range ≅ 2-12 km/s to measure the velocity loss and degree of fragmentation for dust particles penetrating 6 and 28 μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detectors. These measurements prove that even for a ratio of PVDF foil thickness to particle diameter as large as 0.6, the velocity loss and fragmentation is far less than expected from earlier reports in the literature. For 6 μm thick foils the velocity loss is ≤5%. These experiments are based on an extension of our earlier work which showed that two PVDF foils spaced a given distance apart could provide accurate time-of-flight (TOF) information due to the fast pulse rise time of PVDF detector response. We also report on our present state of development of PVDF position-sensing detectors which identify the x, y coordinates of particle impact, using detector and electronic pulse techniques adapted from our semiconductor position-sensing cosmic-ray detectors. Typical position errors of ≅ 1 mm are readily achieved. Finally, we have combined the above developments into a dust-particle telescope which accurately (≅ 1 0 angular accuracy) measures the trajectory of the incident particle as well as its mass and incident velocity, irrespective of whether it is a charged or neutral particle. We discuss how this practical dust telescope can be combined with dust capture cells for space flight and later recovery for laboratory determination of elemental and isotopic composition of captured dust. We also describe a simpler trajectory array based on discrete mosaics of thin detectors which would measure trajectories with a mean angular error of ≅ 4 0 . We discuss the application of these instruments for distinguishing between interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin, and for measurements on a space station, from near-Earth trapped dust of artificial origin. (orig.)

  7. Search for magnetic minerals in Martian rocks: Overview of the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) magnet investigation on Spirit and Opportunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, W.; Leer, K.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is a grinding tool designed to remove dust coatings and/or weathering rinds from rocks and expose fresh rock material. Four magnets of different strengths that are built into the structure of the RAT have been attracting...... is interpreted as magnetite. The amount of abraded rock material adhering to the magnets varied strongly during the mission and is correlated in a consistent way to the amount of magnetite inferred from Mossbauer spectra for the corresponding rock. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Opportunity also...

  8. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Ching CHENG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed that concrete with higher compressive strength in Los Angeles abrasion tests also had better abrasion resistance. The inclusion of steel fibers into test concrete with a water-binder ratio of 0.35 resulted in a significant increase in compressive strength. This concrete also displayed better abrasion resistance and splitting tensile strength than reference concrete; in the test sample with a water-binder ratio of 0.55, the added steel fibers was unable to effectively produce cementation with the concrete. The inclusion of silica fume improved the abrasion resistance of concretes. In water abrasion testing, the abrasion resistance of concrete containing steel fiber was worse than that of concrete without steel fibers. In the water abrasion testing, the surface of steel fiber reinforced concrete was eroded by water and steel balls, and the impact caused the steel fibers to separate from the concrete and led to higher wear loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6460

  9. Extracting lunar dust parameters from image charge signals produced by the Lunar Dust Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.; Szalay, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is an impact ionization dust detector used to characterize the lunar dust exosphere generated by the impacts of large interplanetary particles and meteor streams (Horanyi et al., 2015). In addition to the mass and speed of these lofted particles, LDEX is sensitive to their charge. The resulting signatures of impact events therefore provide valuable information about not only the ambient plasma environment, but also the speed vectors of these dust grains. Here, impact events produced from LDEX's calibration at the Dust Accelerator Laboratory are analyzed using an image charge model derived from the electrostatic simulation program, Coulomb. We show that parameters such as dust grain speed, size, charge, and position of entry into LDEX can be recovered and applied to data collected during LADEE's seven-month mission.

  10. In situ measurements of desert dust particles above the western Mediterranean Sea with the balloon-borne Light Optical Aerosol Counter/sizer (LOAC) during the ChArMEx campaign of summer 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Durand, Pierre; Bourgeois, Quentin; Denjean, Cyrielle; Vignelles, Damien; Couté, Benoit; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Mallet, Marc

    2018-03-01

    Mineral dust from arid areas is a major component of global aerosol and has strong interactions with climate and biogeochemistry. As part of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx) to investigate atmospheric chemistry and its impacts in the Mediterranean region, an intensive field campaign was performed from mid-June to early August 2013 in the western basin including in situ balloon-borne aerosol measurements with the light optical aerosol counter (LOAC). LOAC is a counter/sizer that provides the aerosol concentrations in 19 size classes between 0.2 and 100 µm, and an indication of the nature of the particles based on dual-angle scattering measurements. A total of 27 LOAC flights were conducted mainly from Minorca Island (Balearic Islands, Spain) but also from Ile du Levant off Hyères city (SE France) under 17 light dilatable balloons (meteorological sounding balloons) and 10 boundary layer pressurised balloons (quasi-Lagrangian balloons). The purpose was to document the vertical extent of the plume and the time evolution of the concentrations at constant altitude (air density) by in situ observations. LOAC measurements are in agreement with ground-based measurements (lidar, photometer), aircraft measurements (counters), and satellite measurements (CALIOP) in the case of fair spatial and temporal coincidences. LOAC has often detected three modes in the dust particle volume size distributions fitted by lognormal laws at roughly 0.2, 4 and 30 µm in modal diameter. Thanks to the high sensitivity of LOAC, particles larger than 40 µm were observed, with concentrations up to about 10-4 cm-3. Such large particles were lifted several days before and their persistence after transport over long distances is in conflict with calculations of dust sedimentation. We did not observe any significant evolution of the size distribution during the transport from quasi-Lagrangian flights, even for the longest ones ( ˜ 1 day). Finally, the presence of charged

  11. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ABRASION PROBLEM IN CHENILLE YARNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Kenan ÇEVEN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chenille yarns are traditionally used in the manufacture of furnishing fabrics, fashion knitwear, and as decorative threads in many types of broad and narrow fabrics. Chenille yarn has a very distinct weakness-it does not have very good inherent abrasion resistance. When the yarns are in use, clearly the abrasion resistance of the chenille yarn is crucially important. Either during further processing or during the eventual end-use, any removal of the effect yarn forming the beard will expose the ground yarns, which in turn will result in a bare appearance. To avoid this undesirable result, several options are available. Therefore, the studies on this area are about the investigation of the influences of some material types and machine parameters on the abrasion resistance of chenille yarns and fabrics produced with these yarns. In this paper, the experimental studies about the abrasion properties of chenille yarns in yarn, knitted and woven fabric forms are summarized.

  12. Assessment of mechanical and three-body abrasive wear peculiarity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    directional fabric reinforcement offers a unique solution for ... showed good performance to the three-body abrasive wear. .... plied by the Pioneer Chemical Company, Delhi, India. ..... Theoretical and measured densities of composites, along.

  13. Abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramics containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33480 Tarsus, Turkey. MS received 18 October 2005; revised 22 March 2006. Abstract. In this study, abrasive ... process were used to produce bio-active ceramics. Fracture toughness of studied ...

  14. Anti-abrasive nanocoatings current and future applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings. The connections among fabrication parameters, the characteristics of nanocoatings and the resulting properties (i.e. nanohardness, toughness, wear rate, load-bearing ability, friction coefficient, and scratch resistance) are discussed. Size-affected mechanical properties of nanocoatings are examined, including their uses. Anti-abrasive nanocoatings, including metallic-, ceramic-, and polymeric-based layers, as well as different kinds of nanostructures, such as multi-layered nanocomposites and thin films, are reviewed. * Provides a comprehensive overview of the fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings* Discusses the connections among fabrication parameters, the characteristics of nanocoatings and the resulting properties* Reviews advantages and drawbacks of fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings and clarifies the place of these nanocoatings in the world of nanotechnology

  15. Engineering-scale dust control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, M.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Jacobs, N.C.; Thompson, D.N.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the results of engineering scale dust-control experiments relating to contamination control during handling of transuranic waste. These experiments focused on controlling dust during retrieval operations of buried waste where waste and soil are intimately mixed. Sources of dust generation during retrieval operations include digging, dumping, and vehicle traffic. Because contaminants are expected to attach to soil particles and move with the generated dust, control of the dust spread may be the key to contamination control. Dust control techniques examined in these experiments include the use of misting systems, soil fixatives, and dust suppression agents. The Dryfog Ultrasonic Misting Head, manufactured by Sonics, Incorporated, and ENTAC, an organic resin derived from tree sap manufactured by ENTAC Corporation, were tested. The results of the experiments include product performance and recommended application methods. 19 figs., 7 refs., 6 tabs

  16. Epoxy composite dusts with and without carbon nanotubes cause similar pulmonary responses, but differences in liver histology in mice following pulmonary deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Background: The toxicity of dusts from mechanical abrasion of multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) epoxy nanocomposites is unknown. We compared the toxic effects of dusts generated by sanding of epoxy composites with and without CNT. The used CNT type was included for comparison.Methods: Mice recei...

  17. Diagnostics of mobile dust in scrape-off layer plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratynskaia, S; Castaldo, C; Bergsaaker, H; Rudakov, D

    2011-01-01

    Dust production and accumulation pose serious safety and operational implications for the next generation fusion devices. Mobile dust particles can result in core plasma contamination with impurities, and those with high velocities can significantly contribute to the wall erosion. Diagnostics for monitoring dust in tokamaks during plasma discharges are hence important as they can provide information on dust velocity and size, and-in some cases-on dust composition. Such measurements are also valuable as an input for theoretical models of dust dynamics in scrape-off layer plasmas. Existing in situ dust diagnostics, focusing on the range of dust parameters they can detect, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the diagnostics which allow us to detect tails of the dust velocity and size distributions, e.g. small and very fast particles. Some of the techniques discussed have been adopted from space-related research and have been shown to be feasible and useful for tokamak applications as well.

  18. Simulation of dust-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.; Murillo, M.S.; Rosenberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    The authors use molecular dynamics (MD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation methods to investigate the dispersion relation of dus