WorldWideScience

Sample records for aboveground roofed design

  1. Aboveground roofed design for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J.A. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The conceptual designs proposed in this report resulted from a study for the Maine Low-level Radioactive Waste Authority to develop conceptual designs for a safe and reliable disposal facility for Maine`s low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Freezing temperatures, heavy rainfall, high groundwater tables, and very complex and shallow glaciated soils found in Maine place severe constraints on the design. The fundamental idea behind the study was to consider Maine`s climatic and geological conditions at the beginning of conceptual design rather than starting with a design for another location and adapting it for Maine`s conditions. The conceptual designs recommended are entirely above ground and consist of an inner vault designed to provide shielding and protection against inadvertent intrusion and an outer building to protect the inner vault from water. The air dry conditions within the outer building should lead to almost indefinite service life for the concrete inner vault and the waste containers. This concept differs sharply from the usual aboveground vault in its reliance on at least two independent, but more or less conventional, roofing systems for primary and secondary protection against leakage of radioisotopes from the facility. Features include disposal of waste in air dry environment, waste loading and visual inspection by remote-controlled overhead cranes, and reliance on engineered soils for tertiary protection against release of radioactive materials.

  2. Probabilistic economic analysis of green roof benefits for policy design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The installation costs of green roofs continue to deter widespread use of green roof technology. Analyses of the boundary conditions for the cost differential between a green roof and a conventional roof are usually compared to environmental benefits such as storm water reduction and building energy savings. However, evidence is emerging that green roofs may play a role in urban air quality improvement. This paper discussed a methodology for developing probabilistic ranges of benefits and cost analyses. A probabilistic analysis was conducted to prepare a generalized cost-benefit analysis for application to a range of green roof projects. Environmental benefits of roof greening were quantified on a per unit surface area to assess environmental impact at the building scale. Parameters included conventional and green roof installation costs; storm water fees and fee reductions for green roofs; energy costs due to heat flux and the resultant savings through the installation of a green roof and the additional economic valuation of the public health benefits due to air pollution mitigation. Results were then integrated into an economic model to determine the length of time required for a return on investment in a green roof, assuming that a traditional roof would require replacement after 20 years. A net present value analysis was performed for an average-sized university roof. Results of the study showed that a valuation of environmental benefits can reduce the time required for a return on investment in a moderately priced green roof. While reduced installation costs reduced the time required for a return on investment, optimizing the green roof system for maximum environmental benefit had a greater potential to provide a higher return. It was concluded that the benefit of improved air quality should not be ignored by green roof policy-makers as a valuation tool. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  3. Reviewing Green roof design approaches: Case study of residential buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Özarısoy, Bertuğ

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: High density of the residential areas and steep land value in the cities have driven people to maximize liveable and productive spaces in urban settings. This includes the reinvention of roof functions extending merely as a protection from the elements to a platform of housing green building technologies such as green roofs. Increased interest in green roofs have led to advances in technology. An entire industry has sprung up which specializes in lightweight growing materials, ro...

  4. Field Evaluation of Four Novel Roof Designs for Energy-Efficient Manufactured Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [Levy Partnership Inc., New York, NY (United States); Dentz, J. [Levy Partnership Inc., New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, E. [Levy Partnership Inc., New York, NY (United States); Barker, G. [Levy Partnership Inc., New York, NY (United States); Rath, P. [Levy Partnership Inc., New York, NY (United States); Dadia, D. [Levy Partnership Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A five-bay roof test structure was built, instrumented and monitored in an effort to determine through field testing and analysis the relative contributions of select technologies toward reducing energy use in new manufactured homes. The roof structure in Jamestown, California was designed to examine how differences in roof construction impact space conditioning loads, wood moisture content and attic humidity levels. Conclusions are drawn from the data on the relative energy and moisture performance of various configurations of vented and sealed attics.

  5. Towards a reliable design of facade and roof elements against wind loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Staalduinen, P.C. van; Wit, M.S. de

    2004-01-01

    The most vulnerable parts of buildings with respect to wind loading are facades and roofs. Current standards on wind loading provide data to determine design loads for the elements in facades and roofs. These data are available for a limited number of simple building shapes. Up to now there is no co

  6. A Mass Balance Model for Designing Green Roof Systems that Incorporate a Cistern for Re-Use

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj Chopra; Martin Wanielista; Mike Hardin

    2012-01-01

    Green roofs, which have been used for several decades in many parts of the world, offer a unique and sustainable approach to stormwater management. Within this paper, evidence is presented on water retention for an irrigated green roof system. The presented green roof design results in a water retention volume on site. A first principle mass balance computer model is introduced to assist with the design of these green roof systems which incorporate a cistern to capture and reuse runoff waters...

  7. Hot trends in design : chic sustainability, unique driving factors and boutique green roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, L.S. [American Society of Landscape Architects, Washington, DC (United States)]|[Greenroofs.com, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Kiers, K. [Greenroofs.com, Alpharetta, GA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Green roofs are well known for their ecological benefits but less for their architectural usage. Green roofs offer more to the urban landscape than simply ecological, economic and aesthetic attributes of storm water management, temperature and energy reduction, and provision of additional green space. This paper focused on the top ten architectural trends in vegetated rooftop design. It addressed issues regarding client demands for green roofs and questioned if green roofs should be defined solely by their function as an ecological cover. The top ten trends revealed out-of-the ordinary applications, specialty designs and unusual projects on the boards. The paper looked beyond storm water and heat islands, and explored plans for innovative recreation, including a rooftop ski slope in Delft, the Netherlands, and a converted helipad turned into temporary grass tennis court in Dubai. The paper also presented less typical green roof market drivers, such as a doggie green space for a 10-year old, 9-pound Yorkie and a rooftop garden with plants from the Bible as a teaching laboratory for ministers. Other proposed projects that were discussed included plans for rice paddies on rooftop farms in China and the Vancouver Olympic Village with 50 per cent green roof coverage. The top ten list was organized under the following topics: boutique green roofs; sports and recreation; living roofs and living walls; eco resorts, hotels and therapeutic gardens; food on the roof; cutting edge applications; government and big box applications, cool green residences; mega green roofs; and, visionary proposed projects. 77 refs., 77 figs.

  8. Discussion on the design of roof greening%屋顶绿化设计探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    和晓艳

    2012-01-01

    This paper researched the design of roof greening,explained that the roof greening was the effective method to use city roof space,pointed out its key design was how to reduce the roof load,plants plant select etc..In the design should follow the design principles.Point out the design elements used in land greening could also be used in roof greening,the roof greening design elements had no restrictions.%对屋顶绿化的设计进行了研究,说明屋顶绿化是利用城市屋面空间的有效方法,指出其设计关键在于如何减轻屋顶荷载,植物种植选择等,在设计时要遵循设计原则,提出地面绿化中可以使用的设计要素也可以用于屋顶绿化,屋顶绿化设计要素种类没有限制。

  9. Design and performance of a novel innovative roofing system for tropical landed houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Constructing a new design of sustainable roofing systems. • An innovative roofing system (IRS) for tropical landed houses is proposed. • Separate solar heat from useful natural light by physical form. • The IRS can maintain an illuminance level of approximately 86–100% below 2000 lux. • The IRS can reduce the attic air temperature by 5.4 °C and the indoor air temperature by 2.1 °C. - Abstract: An innovative roofing system (IRS) is designed to deliver an abundant and uniform amount of cool natural light from the roof with reduced heat gain effect for tropical residential buildings (3 m height) in Malaysia. Studies revealed that several passive and active solar techniques can be integrated to form a roofing system to separate solar heat from useful natural light at the attic zone before heat reaches the occupied space. The IRS design is specified and proposed by using glazing technology (polycarbonate), pigment technique (reflective and radiative), as well as ventilation process (hybrid turbine ventilator) applied at the attic zone to represent a new model of sustainable roofing design. The aim of this research is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the design concept without the need for any chemical, complex, or expensive solar design techniques. The methodology was conducted on a series of field studies in a standard room model at Universiti Sains Malaysia. Three different roofing systems are investigated to identify the IRS performance in both dark and daylight conditions to determine the effect of natural light on the indoor environment. The outcomes of the design show that the IRS was able to reduce the indoor air temperature compared with conventional roofing system by approximately 2.1 °C under daylight condition. Results showed that the difference in the IRS (daylight–dark) condition was 0.31 °C compared to that in the conventional roofing system at 0.8 °C. Furthermore, the level of mean radiant temperature compared with

  10. Sustainable green roof design : optimizing water budgets through wastes-into-resources technologies in the Bronx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankiewicz, P.S.; McDonnell, T. [Gaia Institute, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Sustainability in green roof design can be explained in ecological terms as an optimization of the flow of matter and energy to increase biodiversity, ecological productivity, and environmental quality. The achievement of such goals should be measurable in terms of water, energy, and material budgets of rooftops, buildings, and municipalities. Such efforts can be characterized according to three basic measures: water capture and treatment, biomass production-ecological productivity, and biodiversity. This paper presented the results of a study to evaluate the green roof and soil medium installed at St. Simon Stock Grammar School in the Bronx in June of 2005. The study involved sustainability through cost benefit calculations, modeling, and instrumentation to measure contributions of the roof to local environmental quality. The objective of the study was to optimize the water-holding capacity and recycling in green roof design and construction by integrating waste products in a closed loop urban ecosystem on a green roof built to serve education and scientific goals at the school. A 3,500 square foot green roof was created using lightweight soil consisting almost entirely of recycled materials by diverting approximately 25 cubic yards of waste material from the waste stream. It was concluded that the green roof created for this study serves as a model for how products from the waste stream can be used to enhance urban environmental quality, while also functioning as an educational platform for the students of the school and interested community members. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Field Evaluation of Four Novel Roof Designs for Energy-Efficient Manufactured Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Dentz, J. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, E. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Barker, G. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Rath, P. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Dadia, D. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-12-03

    "9A five-bay roof test structure was built, instrumented and monitored in an effort to determine through field testing and analysis the relative contributions of select technologies toward reducing energy use in new manufactured homes. The roof structure in Jamestown, California was designed to examine how differences in roof construction impact space conditioning loads, wood moisture content and attic humidity levels. Conclusions are drawn from the data on the relative energy and moisture performance of various configurations of vented and sealed attics.

  12. Investigating Appropriate Sampling Design for Estimating Above-Ground Biomass in Bruneian Lowland Mixed Dipterocarp Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Lee, D.; Abu Salim, K.; Yun, H. M.; Han, S.; Lee, W. K.; Davies, S. J.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mixed tropical forest structure is highly heterogeneous unlike plantation or mixed temperate forest structure, and therefore, different sampling approaches are required. However, the appropriate sampling design for estimating the above-ground biomass (AGB) in Bruneian lowland mixed dipterocarp forest (MDF) has not yet been fully clarified. The aim of this study was to provide supportive information in sampling design for Bruneian forest carbon inventory. The study site was located at Kuala Belalong lowland MDF, which is part of the Ulu Tembulong National Park, Brunei Darussalam. Six 60 m × 60 m quadrats were established, separated by a distance of approximately 100 m and each was subdivided into quadrats of 10 m × 10 m, at an elevation between 200 and 300 m above sea level. At each plot all free-standing trees with diameter at breast height (dbh) ≥ 1 cm were measured. The AGB for all trees with dbh ≥ 10 cm was estimated by allometric models. In order to analyze changes in the diameter-dependent parameters used for estimating the AGB, different quadrat areas, ranging from 10 m × 10 m to 60 m × 60 m, were used across the study area, starting at the South-West end and moving towards the North-East end. The derived result was as follows: (a) Big trees (dbh ≥ 70 cm) with sparse distribution have remarkable contribution to the total AGB in Bruneian lowland MDF, and therefore, special consideration is required when estimating the AGB of big trees. Stem number of trees with dbh ≥ 70 cm comprised only 2.7% of all trees with dbh ≥ 10 cm, but 38.5% of the total AGB. (b) For estimating the AGB of big trees at the given acceptable limit of precision (p), it is more efficient to use large quadrats than to use small quadrats, because the total sampling area decreases with the former. Our result showed that 239 20 m × 20 m quadrats (9.6 ha in total) were required, while 15 60 m × 60 m quadrats (5.4 ha in total) were required when estimating the AGB of the trees

  13. 屋顶花园的设计%The Design of Roof Garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭帅

    2014-01-01

    The history of roof garden can trace back to till around 2000 B.C.. Our country from just start studying roof garden and roof from 60's green turn of construct a technique. The programming of roof garden designs, making natural ecosystem environment and the city total ecosystem environment of roof merge into an integral whole, the city civilization always continues to blend with living environment culture. The space layout of roof garden is accepted a heavy check and supervision by restriction and building structure of constructing the proper flat surface, building a park with ground to compare, its design since complications again relate to related work to grow of be in conjunction with, building design, building structure, building structure and water give or get an electric shock etc. Work's growing the coordination of [with] match is the key of [with] roof garden success or failure. From this, the programming design of roof garden is greatly a difficulty and limits many park programming a design item.%屋顶花园的历史可以追溯到公元前2000年左右。我国自60年代起,才开始研究屋顶花园和屋顶绿化的建造技术。屋顶花园的规划设计,使屋顶的自然生态环境与城市总体生态环境融为一体,城市文明的延续与生活环境文化融合。屋顶花园的空间布局受到建筑固有平面的限制和建筑结构承重的制约,与露地造园相比,其设计既复杂又关系到相关工种的协同,建筑设计、建筑构造、建筑结构和水电等工种配合的协调是屋顶花园成败的关键。由此可见,屋顶花园的规划设计是一项难度大、限制多的园林规划设计项目。

  14. Stormwater runoff mitigation and nutrient leaching from a green roof designed to attract native pollinating insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, S.; Grogan, D. S.; Hale, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    A green roof is typically installed for one of two reasons: to mitigate the 'urban heat island' effect, reducing ambient temperatures and creating energy savings, or to reduce both the quantity and intensity of stormwater runoff, which is a major cause of river erosion and eutrophication. The study of green roofs in the United States has focused on commercial systems that use a proprietary expanded shale or clay substrate, along with succulent desert plants (mainly Sedum species). The green roof has the potential not only to provide thermal insulation and reduce storm runoff, but also to reclaim some of the natural habitat that has been lost to the built environment. Of special importance is the loss of habitat for pollinating insects, particularly native bees, which have been in decline for at least two decades. These pollinators are essential for crop production and for the reproduction of at least 65% of wild plants globally. Our study involves the installation of a small (4ft by 4ft), self-designed green roof system built with readily available components from a hardware store. The garden will be filled with a soilless potting mix, combined with 15% compost, and planted with grasses and wildflowers native to the Seacoast, New Hampshire region. Some of the plant species are used by bees for nesting materials, while others provide food in the form of nectar, pollen, and seeds for bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and granivorous birds. We monitor precipitation on the roof and runoff from the garden on a per storm basis, and test grab samples of runoff for dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorous. Runoff and nutrient concentration results are compared to a non-vegetated roof surface, and a proprietary Green Grid green roof system. This project is designed to address three main questions of interest: 1) Can these native plant species, which potentially provide greater ecosystem services than Sedum spp. in the form of food and habitat, survive in the conditions on

  15. Building a Roll-Off Roof Observatory A Complete Guide for Design and Construction

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, John

    2009-01-01

    Almost every practical astronomer who takes the pursuit to its second level aspires to a fixed, permanent housing for his telescope, permitting its rapid and comfortable use and avoiding hours of setting-up time for each observing session. A roll-off roof observatory is the simplest and by far the most popular observatory design for today’s practical astronomers. Building a Roll-off Roof Observatory will help you decide whether to embark on the venture and will certainly provoke your enthusiasm for the project. The author, both an amateur astronomer and professional landscape architect, answers many of the common questions asked around observatory construction covering the following topics: Site planning, zoning, and by-law requirements common to most states, towns and municipalities Opportunities for locating the observatory Tailoring the observatory for your particular use Tools and structural components required to build it Variations in footing design to suit your soil conditions Variations possible in ...

  16. Quality Control through Design and Process: Gambrel Roof Truss Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dell; Jones, James

    2011-01-01

    Customers determine whether a product fulfills their needs or satisfies them. "Quality control", then, is the process of finding out what the customer wants, along with designing, producing, delivering, and servicing the product--and ultimately satisfying the customer's expectations. For many years, people considered a product to be of good…

  17. The case for using a sacrificial layer of absorbent insulation in the design of flat and low-sloped roofing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Gregory R.

    2013-05-01

    Beginning about twenty-five years ago, there was a marked increase in the number of single-ply membrane roof designs used to cover and waterproof flat and low-sloped building roofs. Over the past ten years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of installations of white and more reflective single-ply roof systems, mostly using high density cellular foam insulation in the substrate for insulation. A major factor in the increase in the popularity of these highly insulated and more reflective roof systems is the fact that many governments began offering incentives for building owners to use reflective coverings and better insulated roofs. Now, owing to the energy efficient requirements for the design and construction of new buildings put forth in ASHRAE Standard 90.1, "Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings" and the world's apparent desire to be "green" (or at least appear to be), more and more roof designs will include these reflective single-ply membranes, which use the cellular foam insulation boards to meet these requirements. Using a lower density traditional insulation will mean that the roof will have to be very thick to comply, increasing the costs of installation. High density cellular foams do not absorb water until time, vapor pressure drive, UV and thermal shock break down the foam and it becomes more absorbent. This could be 5-7 years or longer, depending on the roof construction and other factors. This means that any water that enters the roof through a breach (leak) in the membrane goes straight into the building. This is not a good consequence since the failure mode of any roof is water entering the building. Keeping the water out of the building is the purpose of the waterproofing layer. This paper reviews the techniques of moisture testing on building roofs and infrared (IR) thermography, and puts forth the idea and reasoning behind having a sacrificial layer of very absorbent insulation installed in every

  18. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity.

  19. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity. PMID:24981747

  20. Interdisciplinary design study of a high-rise integrated roof wind energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, R. W. A.; Ferraro, R. M.; Suma, A. B.; Moonen, S. P. G.

    2012-10-01

    Today's market in micro-wind turbines is in constant development introducing more efficient solutions for the future. Besides the private use of tower supported turbines, opportunities to integrate wind turbines in the built environment arise. The Integrated Roof Wind Energy System (IRWES) presented in this work is a modular roof structure integrated on top of existing or new buildings. IRWES is build up by an axial array of skewed shaped funnels used for both wind inlet and outlet. This inventive use of shape and geometry leads to a converging air capturing inlet to create high wind mass flow and velocity toward a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in the center-top of the roof unit for the generation of a relatively high amount of energy. The scope of this research aims to make an optimized structural design of IRWES to be placed on top of the Vertigo building in Eindhoven; analysis of the structural performance; and impact to the existing structure by means of Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Results show that the obvious impact of wind pressure to the structural design is easily supported in different configurations of fairly simple lightweight structures. In particular, the weight addition to existing buildings remains minimal.

  1. Interdisciplinary design study of a high-rise integrated roof wind energy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen S.P.G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Today’s market in micro-wind turbines is in constant development introducing more efficient solutions for the future. Besides the private use of tower supported turbines, opportunities to integrate wind turbines in the built environment arise. The Integrated Roof Wind Energy System (IRWES presented in this work is a modular roof structure integrated on top of existing or new buildings. IRWES is build up by an axial array of skewed shaped funnels used for both wind inlet and outlet. This inventive use of shape and geometry leads to a converging air capturing inlet to create high wind mass flow and velocity toward a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT in the center-top of the roof unit for the generation of a relatively high amount of energy. The scope of this research aims to make an optimized structural design of IRWES to be placed on top of the Vertigo building in Eindhoven; analysis of the structural performance; and impact to the existing structure by means of Finite Element Modeling (FEM. Results show that the obvious impact of wind pressure to the structural design is easily supported in different configurations of fairly simple lightweight structures. In particular, the weight addition to existing buildings remains minimal.

  2. Study on determining of reinforced concrete false roof strength and design of reinforcement based on reliability theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Wenlu; Li Xibing; Hu Guohong

    2012-01-01

    Study on efficient mining of the steep incline and fractured ore-bodies in Yongshaba mine of Guizhou Kailin Group shows that ore-body is fractured and difficult to support the roadways in-vein. After research of the actual conditions about the ore-bodies, we have made the initial decision to adopt reconstruction of roof downward sublevel cut-andfill mining. The men work safely under the false roof supporting the top plate. However, the difficult problem is how to determine the strength of the false roof. In this case, the method based on reliability theory has been put forward. Combined with elastic mechanics and field practice, when practical value of reliable probability is 90 % , the value of the false roof strength has been calculated, and the study shows that stope span greatly influences the false roof strength. With the strength of artificial roof, the reasonable reinforcement design ensures the false roof which can supply the demand of strength under large span and load.

  3. Adaptable typologies for active roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quanjel, E.M.C.J.; Zeiler, W.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this part of the 6th framework Pan-European EUR-ACTIVE ROOF-er project is to improve the interaction between design participants of dynamic adaptable Active Roofs in product development and Active Roofs from an architects/ customers perspective. Improvements in Active Roof desi

  4. 绿色建筑的屋顶设计%The Roof Design of Green Building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      我们的一切能量最初都来自于太阳和天空,能量也会也会从天上反馈回来。所以屋顶,将会是我们绿色建筑设计中与自然互动最大的一块区域。%Al the energy we original y comes from the sun and sky, energy wil also come back from heaven. So the roof wil be the largest regional interaction with nature in our green building design.

  5. Law school design blends functionalism, energy conservation. [Earth-covered with ground-cover growing on roof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Construction is under way on a new University of Minnesota Law School Building, whose distinctive features include a stepped design on its southern elevation and an earth-covered roof to promote energy conservation. The design is described with emphasis on the library facilities. Energy conservation was a major design factor. The portion of the earth-covered roof will be 15 inches thick planted with low ground-cover vegetation. Overall ..mu.. value of the building envelope will be 0.11. (MCW)

  6. Building a roll-off roof or dome observatory a complete guide for design and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, John Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Almost every practical astronomer eventually aspires to have a fixed, permanent observatory for his or her telescope. A roll-off roof or dome observatory is the answer for the most popular home observatory design.  Almost every practical astronomer eventually aspires to have a fixed, permanent observatory for his or her telescope. A roll-off roof or dome observatory is the answer for the most popular home observatory design. Building a Roll-Off or Dome Observatory will help you decide whether to embark on the venture and will certainly increase your enthusiasm for the project. The author, both an amateur astronomer and a professional landscape architect, answers many of the common questions asked about observatory construction, covering the following topics: • Zoning, and by-law requirements common to most states, towns and municipalities • Where to locate the observatory • How to tailor the observatory for your particular needs • Tools and structural components required • Possible variations in de...

  7. Impacts of Sample Design on Estimation of Aboveground Biomass: Implications for the Assimilation of Lidar and Forest Inventory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, P.; Keller, M. M.; Morton, D. C.; Schimel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The availability of lidar data that can be used to characterize forest structure and estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) is rapidly increasing. When lidar data are considered in conjunction with forest inventory data to estimate AGB, the order of acquisition for these data products may impact the quality of the resulting estimates. In this work, we address this question in the context of uncertainty reduction with respect to estimation of AGB in a degraded forest in Paragominas, Brazil. We have developed a simulation framework that quantitatively assesses the uncertainty associated with estimation of AGB for different sampling strategies that combine forest inventory and lidar data. We utilize a Bayesian hierarchical modeling (BHM) data assimilation framework to combine information from the forest inventory and lidar data products into a higher order data product of AGB. Spatially explicit realizations of AGB are generated under different sampling strategies. Sampling strategies are assessed using the distributional properties of the assimilated higher order data product in the context of uncertainty reduction. We consider both spatially explicit maps of uncertainty as well as the standard deviation of the posterior predictive distributions of AGB as endpoints for the quantification of uncertainty. This framework allows for the explicit characterization of important sources of uncertainty. Our results show that a significant reduction in the uncertainty associated with estimation of AGB can be realized when design optimization is utilized in this context.

  8. Performance-based design of SolSt: A roof system integrating structural morphology and solar energy transmittance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turrin, M.; Von Buelow, P.; Kilian, A.; Sariyildiz, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the design of large roof structures by integrating interdisciplinary performance evaluations in the early stages of the design process. Specific focus is given to structural and solar energy related performances. Geometry is stressed as a key interface between the different

  9. Optimal Fuzzy and Dynamics Design of Ecological Sandwich Panel Vessel Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Martikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the basic engineering principles, goals, and constraints are all combined with fuzzy methodology and applied to optimally design sandwich panel circular plate roofs for large vessels loaded statically and dynamically. These panels are made up of two stiff, strong veneer skins separated by vertical and peripheral stiffener plates. Advantages are high strength, lightweight, and sustainability. In the present approach, first the goals and constraints of the end user are identified and expressed as decision variables which are formulated using the engineering variables for materials, geometry, and function. Then same consistent fuzzy satisfaction functions are formed over the desired ranges to suit the customer's desires. The risk of extreme dynamic loadings exciting resonance is studied by natural frequency and mode analysis by FEM and analytical models. The results show the most critical locations and give guidelines for innovative remedies of the concept before detailed FEM analyses to finalize the design.

  10. A Mass Balance Model for Designing Green Roof Systems that Incorporate a Cistern for Re-Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Chopra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs, which have been used for several decades in many parts of the world, offer a unique and sustainable approach to stormwater management. Within this paper, evidence is presented on water retention for an irrigated green roof system. The presented green roof design results in a water retention volume on site. A first principle mass balance computer model is introduced to assist with the design of these green roof systems which incorporate a cistern to capture and reuse runoff waters for irrigation of the green roof. The model is used to estimate yearly stormwater retention volume for different cistern storage volumes. Additionally, the Blaney and Criddle equation is evaluated for estimation of monthly evapotranspiration rates for irrigated systems and incorporated into the model. This is done so evapotranspiration rates can be calculated for regions where historical data does not exist, allowing the model to be used anywhere historical weather data are available. This model is developed and discussed within this paper as well as compared to experimental results.

  11. ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF THE ROOFING DESIGN ON HEAT STRESS IN DAIRY COW HOUSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Liberati

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A simulation model determining the heat flow exchange between housed animals and the roofing was developed considering various relevant factors: constructive materials, slope, height, orientation, latitude, external air temperature, solar load, animal position. Results show that the most important factor to reduce heat load is the insulation. For non-insulated roofing the slope and the orientation are the most relevant factors. Considering the total exchanged energy, the non insulated roof has a good nocturnal global behaviour.

  12. Discuss the Urban Green Roof Design%城市屋顶绿化设计探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俐

    2014-01-01

    本文论述了屋顶绿化的特点及设计方式,通过推广屋顶绿化,可使生态景观建设从地面向空中拓展。既美化了人居环境,又节约了土地。%This article discusses the characteristics and design method of roof greening. Through the promotion of roof gree-ning, people can make the ecological landscape construction expand from the ground up to the sky, which not only beautify the environment, but also save the land.

  13. Discussion on Design of Planting Green on Roofs%屋顶绿化设计探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静

    2014-01-01

    从实际工作出发,就目前比较热门的屋顶绿化做了一些介绍,尤其是屋顶绿化的种植形式、类型以及屋顶绿化应该注意的问题,提出了屋顶绿化植物的选择方法和种植设计要点,为绿化工作者提供了参考。%Starting from the actual work, some items which should be noted especially in the form of planting green roofs were introduced, especially green roof types and other cases. This article also put forward the roof greening plant selection methods and planting design points, to provide some references for green workers.

  14. Design of self-cleaning TiO2 coating on clay roofing tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadnadjev, Milica; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Petrovic, Snezana; Markov, Sinisa; Ducman, Vilma; Marinkovic-Neducin, Radmila

    2010-07-01

    The phenomenon of heterogeneous photocatalysis takes place in the degradation process of many organic contaminants on solid surfaces. Photocatalysis is based on the excitation of the semiconductor by irradiation with supraband gap photons and the migration of electron-hole pairs to the surface of the photocatalysts, leading to the reaction of the holes with adsorbed H2O and OH- to form hydroxyl radicals. Due to the stability and photosensitivity of TiO2 semiconductors, this system is well studied and is of great interest from an ecological and industrial point of view for use in the field of building materials. Clay roofing tiles, due to their long-term exploitation, are subject to physical, chemical and biological degradation that leads to deterioration. Ceramic systems have a high percentage of total porosity and considering their non-tolerance of organic coating, the use of surface active materials (SAM) that induce porosity in TiO2 coatings is of vital significance. Photocatalytic coatings applied on clay roofing tiles under industrial conditions were designed by varying the quantity of TiO2 (mass/cm2) on the tile surface (thin and thick TiO2 layer). The positive changes in specific surface area and mesopore structure of the designed coatings were made by the addition of PEG 600 as a surface active material. It was shown that a thin photocatalytic layer (0.399 mg suspension/cm2 tile surface), applied onto ceramic tiles under industrial conditions, had better photocatalytic activity in methylene blue decomposition, hydrophilicity and antimicrobial activity than a thick photocatalytic coating (0.885 mg suspension/cm2).

  15. Roof drainage with pressurized-water systems. Part 2. Correct dimensioning and design; Dachentwaesserung mit Druckstroemung. Teil 2. Richtig dimensionieren und bemessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurich, H.

    2006-02-15

    This two-installment article discusses roof drainage with partial vacuum. Correct planning, design, construction and installation of flat roof drainage systems are gone into. The last part of the seris discusses the hydraulic dimensioning of pressurized-water pipes and provides information on the fastening of excess-pressure and partial-vacuum pipelines. (orig.)

  16. Performance Assessment Strategies: A computational framework for conceptual design of large roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Turrin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Using engineering performance evaluations to explore design alternatives during the conceptual phase of architectural design helps to understand the relationships between form and performance; and is crucial for developing well-performing final designs. Computer aided conceptual design has the potential to aid the design team in discovering and highlighting these relationships; especially by means of procedural and parametric geometry to support the generation of geometric design, and building performance simulation tools to support performance assessments. However, current tools and methods for computer aided conceptual design in architecture do not explicitly reveal nor allow for backtracking the relationships between performance and geometry of the design. They currently support post-engineering, rather than the early design decisions and the design exploration process.Focusing on large roofs, this research aims at developing a computational design approach to support designers in performance driven explorations. The approach is meant to facilitate the multidisciplinary integration and the learning process of the designer; and not to constrain the process in precompiled procedures or in hard engineering formulations, nor to automatize it by delegating the design creativity to computational procedures. PAS (Performance Assessment Strategies as a method is the main output of the research. It consists of a framework including guidelines and an extensible library of procedures for parametric modelling. It is structured on three parts.Pre-PAS provides guidelines for a design strategy-definition, toward the parameterization process. Model-PAS provides guidelines, procedures and scripts for building the parametric models. Explore-PAS supports the solutions-assessment based on numeric evaluations and performance simulations, until the identification of a suitable design solution. PAS has been developed based on action research. Several case studies

  17. Design Principles and Case Study Analysis for Low Impact Development Practices - Green Roofs, Rainwater Harvesting and Vegetated Swales

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    This thesis on Low Impact Development (LID) Practices provides design guidelines and principles for three important LID practices: green roofs, rainwater harvesting and bioswales. The most important component of the thesis is the qualitative analysis of various case studies based on the LID objectives drawn from the literature review for each LID practice. Through the course of my research, I found that there was no one single source which provided information on the design guidelines acc...

  18. Floating-roof steel tanks under harmonic settlement: FE parametric study and design criterion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Large vertical steel tanks for fluid storage are usually constructed on soft foundations, so it is not surprising that the tank wall will settle unevenly with the settlement of the foundation, thus inducing deformations and stresses in the tank. This work investigates the linear static behavior of floating-roof tanks under harmonic settlement through finite element (FE) analyses. The influences of the radius-to-thickness ratio, the height-to-radius ratio and the wind girder stiffness on the structural behavior are first analyzed. Comparisons between the circumferential stresses in the wind girder and the vertical stresses in the tank bottom are then made. The displacement and the stress along the tank height are also discussed, and the concept of tank division along its height is presented. Finally, a design approximation for the radial displacement at the tank top is developed based on FE results, and a settlement criterion based on the top radial displacement is proposed which can be used in practical design.

  19. Case study: design, operation, maintenance and water quality management of sustainable storm water ponds for roof runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Miklas

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this case study was to optimise design, operation and maintenance guidelines, and to assess the water treatment potential of a storm water pond system after 15 months of operation. The system was based on a combined silt trap, attenuation pond and vegetated infiltration basin. This combination was used as the basis for construction of a roof water runoff system from a single domestic property. United Kingdom Building Research Establishment and Construction Industry Research and Information Association, and German Association for Water, Wastewater and Waste design guidelines were tested. These design guidelines failed because they did not consider local conditions. The infiltration function for the infiltration basin was logarithmic. Algal control techniques were successfully applied, and treatment of rainwater runoff from roofs was found to be largely unnecessary for recycling (e.g., watering plants). However, seasonal and diurnal variations of biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen and pH were recorded. PMID:15288269

  20. 7 CFR 2902.11 - Roof coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... roofing material containing recycled material as items for which Federal agencies must give preference in... Roof coatings. (a) Definition. Coatings formulated for use in commercial roof deck systems to provide a... the following EPA-designated recovered content product: Roofing Materials. USDA is requesting...

  1. Roof control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woof, M.

    1999-10-01

    Joy has produced a roof support with a new shape and which offers both high productivity and good operator safety. It features high levels of ambient lighting, low working noise levels, a simple control layout, a wide operating platform, and good all-round visibility. The first underground tests with the trial machine at Capcoal's Central Colliery in Australia set production records, with 304 of the 1.8 m bolts in 3 hours 45 minutes. This was broken by Arch Coal's Sufco mine in Utah, USA when a unit installed 304 of 1.8 m fully encapsulated bolts in 3 hr 20 mins. The article gives detail on design features. 1 photo.

  2. Sustainable roofs with real energy savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper addresses the general concept of sustainability and relates it to the building owner`s selection of a low-slope roof. It offers a list of performance features of sustainable roofs. Experiences and data relevant to these features for four unique roofs are then presented which include: self-drying systems, low total equivalent warming foam insulation, roof coatings and green roofs. The paper concludes with a list of sustainable roofing features worth considering for a low-slope roof investment. Building owners and community developers are showing more interest in investing in sustainability. The potential exists to design, construct, and maintain roofs that last twice as long and reduce the building space heating and cooling energy loads resulting from the roof by 50% (based on the current predominant design of a 10-year life and a single layer of 1 to 2 in. (2.5 to 5.1 cm) of insulation). The opportunity to provide better low-slope roofs and sell more roof maintenance service is escalating. The general trend of outsourcing services could lead to roofing companies` owning the roofs they install while the traditional building owner owns the rest of the building. Such a situation would have a very desirable potential to internalize the costs of poor roof maintenance practices and high roof waste disposal costs, and to offer a profit for installing roofs that are more sustainable. 14 refs., 12 figs.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF DESIGNING AND APPLICATION OF GREEN ROOFS%国内外屋顶的绿化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖敏; 张国强

    2015-01-01

    屋顶绿化是建筑节能的一种有效措施,具有显著的生态效益和景观价值,已越来越多地引起了建筑领域及相关人员的广泛关注。通过系统分析屋顶绿化在促进建筑节能、改善环境和蓄积雨水等方面的作用和效果,研究总结了国内外屋顶绿化设计的方法及其主要影响因素,包括配置模式、植被材料和栽培基质等方面的研究成果,对国内外屋顶绿化政策和实践的发展进行了回顾和比较。%As an effective measure for improvement of building energy efficiency , green roof has obvious biobenefit and landscape value , which is attracting more and more attention both in China and internationally .Through a systematic research on the effects of green roof in improving building energy saving , environment and rain accumulation , it was studied the design methods of green roof and its major influencing factors , including vegetation materials, allocation modes and cultivation substratum; and it was also reviews the progress of governmental policy and practice of green roofs in China and other countries .

  4. Carbon sequestration potential of extensive green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getter, Kristin L; Rowe, D Bradley; Robertson, G Philip; Cregg, Bert M; Andresen, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    Two studies were conducted with the objective of quantifying the carbon storage potential of extensive green roofs. The first was performed on eight roofs in Michigan and four roofs in Maryland, ranging from 1 to 6 years in age. All 12 green roofs were composed primarily of Sedum species, and substrate depths ranged from 2.5 to 12.7 cm. Aboveground plant material was harvested in the fall of 2006. On average, these roofs stored 162 g C x m(-2) in aboveground biomass. The second study was conducted on a roof in East Lansing, MI. Twenty plots were established on 21 April 2007 with a substrate depth of 6.0 cm. In addition to a substrate only control, the other plots were sown with a single species of Sedum (S. acre, S. album, S. kamtshaticum, or S. spurium). Species and substrate depth represent typical extensive green roofs in the United States. Plant material and substrate were harvested seven times across two growing seasons. Results at the end of the second year showed that aboveground plant material storage varied by species, ranging from 64 g C x m(-2) (S. acre) to 239 g C x m(-2) (S. album), with an average of 168 g C x m(-2). Belowground biomass ranged from 37 g C x m(-2) (S. acre) to 185 g C x m(-2) (S. kamtschaticum) and averaged 107 g C x m(-2). Substrate carbon content averaged 913 g C x m(-2), with no species effect, which represents a sequestration rate of 100 g C x m(-2) over the 2 years of this study. The entire extensive green roof system sequestered 375 g C x m(-2) in above- and belowground biomass and substrate organic matter.

  5. A Review of Thermal Analysis on Novel Roofing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yuanpei; Qu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we reviewed three types of novel roofing systems which can reduce building thermal loads: cool roof, green roof, and phase change material (PCM) roof. Cool roofs are designed to keep the roof cool by reflecting the incident solar radiation away from the building and radiating the stored heat away at night. Green roof, also called eco-roof, covered by vegetation, utilizes the thermal insulation provided by the soil and evapo-transpiration to keep the roof cool under the sun. PCM...

  6. Green Roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-08-01

    A New Technology Demonstration Publication Green roofs can improve the energy performance of federal buildings, help manage stormwater, reduce airborne emissions, and mitigate the effects of urban heat islands.

  7. Contributions to the design of rainwater harvesting systems in buildings with green roofs in a Mediterranean climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Cristina M; Calheiros, Cristina S C; Pimentel-Rodrigues, Carla; Silva-Afonso, Armando; Castro, Paula M L

    2016-01-01

    Green roofs (GRs) are becoming a trend in urban areas, favouring thermal performance of buildings, promoting removal of atmospheric pollutants, and acting as possible water collection spots. Rainwater harvesting systems in buildings can also contribute to the management of stormwater runoff reducing flood peaks. These technologies should be enhanced in Mediterranean countries where water scarcity is increasing and the occurrence of extreme events is becoming very significant, as a result of climate change. An extensive pilot GR with three aromatic plant species, Satureja montana, Thymus caespititius and Thymus pseudolanuginosus, designed to study several parameters affecting rainwater runoff, has been in operation for 12 months. Physico-chemical analyses of roof water runoff (turbidity, pH, conductivity, NH4(+), NO3(-), PO4(3-), chemical oxygen demand) have shown that water was of sufficient quality for non-potable uses in buildings, such as toilet flushing. An innovative approach allowed for the development of an expression to predict a 'monthly runoff coefficient' of the GR system. This parameter is essential when planning and designing GRs combined with rainwater harvesting systems in a Mediterranean climate. This study is a contribution to improving the basis for the design of rainwater harvesting systems in buildings with extensive GRs under a Mediterranean climate.

  8. Contributions to the design of rainwater harvesting systems in buildings with green roofs in a Mediterranean climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Cristina M; Calheiros, Cristina S C; Pimentel-Rodrigues, Carla; Silva-Afonso, Armando; Castro, Paula M L

    2016-01-01

    Green roofs (GRs) are becoming a trend in urban areas, favouring thermal performance of buildings, promoting removal of atmospheric pollutants, and acting as possible water collection spots. Rainwater harvesting systems in buildings can also contribute to the management of stormwater runoff reducing flood peaks. These technologies should be enhanced in Mediterranean countries where water scarcity is increasing and the occurrence of extreme events is becoming very significant, as a result of climate change. An extensive pilot GR with three aromatic plant species, Satureja montana, Thymus caespititius and Thymus pseudolanuginosus, designed to study several parameters affecting rainwater runoff, has been in operation for 12 months. Physico-chemical analyses of roof water runoff (turbidity, pH, conductivity, NH4(+), NO3(-), PO4(3-), chemical oxygen demand) have shown that water was of sufficient quality for non-potable uses in buildings, such as toilet flushing. An innovative approach allowed for the development of an expression to predict a 'monthly runoff coefficient' of the GR system. This parameter is essential when planning and designing GRs combined with rainwater harvesting systems in a Mediterranean climate. This study is a contribution to improving the basis for the design of rainwater harvesting systems in buildings with extensive GRs under a Mediterranean climate. PMID:27120638

  9. Evaluation of Roof Bolting Requirements Based on In-Mine Roof Bolter Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-10-01

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on this information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. For the prediction of roof geology and stability condition in real time, a micro processor was used and a program developed to monitor and record the drilling parameters of roof bolter. These parameters include feed pressure, feed flow (penetration rate), rotation pressure, rotation rate, vacuum pressure, oil temperature of hydraulic circuit, and signals for controlling machine. From the results of a series of laboratory and underground tests so far, feed pressure is found to be a good indicator for identifying the voids/fractures and estimating the roof rock strength. The method for determining quantitatively the location and the size of void/fracture and estimating the roof rock strength from the drilling parameters of roof bolter was developed. Also, a set of computational rules has been developed for in-mine roof using measured roof drilling parameters and implemented in MRGIS (Mine Roof Geology Information System), a software package developed to allow mine engineers to make use of the large amount of roof drilling parameters for predicting roof geology properties automatically. For the development of roof bolting criteria, finite element models were developed for tensioned and fully grouted bolting

  10. Roof Rockmass Characterization in an Illinois Underground Coal Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osouli, Abdolreza; Shafii, Iman

    2016-08-01

    Among all United States underground coal fields, those in Illinois have the highest rate of roof fall events due to their weak and severely moisture sensitive roof rock units. Rockmass characterization is the key initial step in designing safe and economical roof control measures in underground coal mines. In this study, a performance-based roof rockmass characterization is investigated. The geologic conditions as well as underground mine geographic specifications, roof fall analysis, mining method, utilized supplemental roof control measures, and geotechnical properties of roof rock units were considered to link the roof performance to rockmass characterization. The coal mine roof rating (CMRR) rockmass characterization method was used to evaluate the roof conditions and roof support design for an underground coal mine located in the Illinois Coal Basin. The results of several mine visit mappings, laboratory test results, and geotechnical issues and concerns are presented and discussed. The roof support designs are analyzed based on the rockmass characterization and are compared with the observed performance. This study shows that (1) CMRR index is a reasonable method for characterizing roof rockmass; (2) moisture sensitivity and bedding strengths in the horizontal direction are essential parameters for roof support design in mines with weak roof conditions; and (3) the applicability of the analysis of roof bolt system for roof support design of the studied mine is questionable.

  11. Evolution of Flat Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şt. Vasiliu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Roofs are constructive subassembles that are located at the top of buildings, which toghether with perimetral walls and some elements of the infrastructure belongs to the subsystem elements that close the building. Roofs must meet resistance requirements to mechanical action, thermal insulating, waterproofing and acoustic, fire resistance, durability, economy and aesthetics. The man saw the need to build roofs from the oldest ancient times. Even if the design of buildings has an empirical character, are known and are preserved until today constructions that are made in antiquity, by the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans with architectural achievements, worthy of admiration and in present time. General composition of civil construction has been influenced throughout the evolution of construction history by the level of production forces and properties of building materials available in every historical epoch. For over five millennia, building materials were stone, wood and ceramic products (concrete was used by theRomans only as filling material.

  12. 北京通惠家园小区屋顶绿化设计评析%The green roof design of Beijing Tonghuijiayuan village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙颖; 吴晖晗; 李爱芳; 韩丽霞; 车冠宇

    2015-01-01

    Taking Tonghuijiayuan community roof greening in Beijing as an example,the paper respectively carries out questionnaire for internal community residents,community managers and partial community surrounding residents,know about various users’demands for roof greening and design defects,and analyzes residential roof greening design concept,integral layout and greening design and other contents,with a view to explore new community roof greening design concepts in Beijing city.%以北京通惠家园小区屋顶绿化为实例,分别对小区内居民、小区管理者及小区周边居住区的部分居民进行了问卷访谈调研,了解了不同层面的使用者对于屋顶绿化的需求及其在设计上的不足,探析了居住区屋顶绿化的设计理念、整体布局、绿化设计等方面内容,旨在为北京市居住区屋顶绿化设计探索新思路。

  13. Detached family house with design studio

    OpenAIRE

    Dufek, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor thesis deals with the design of a detached house with a design office at a level of documentation for construction. The building has a partial basement with two above-ground floors, covered with a flat roof. The structural system of the basement is based on a hidden formwork while the constructions of above-ground floors are designed to be from polished bricks Porotherm 30 Profi with thin layer of mortar for binding. The ceilings are from monolithic reinforced concrete. The roofi...

  14. Planting Design of Urban Roof Garden Plants in China%我国城市屋顶花园植物种植设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈波

    2011-01-01

    The paper compares the research status on urban roof garden in various countries and areas, discusses the importance of planting design of urban roof garden plants, analyzes the greening characteristics and cautions as well as the design of planting area, planting area construction and water supply system of modern urban roof garden, and finally summarizes four principles in choosing the landscape plants for urban roof gardens.%比较了各国及地区城市屋顶花园的研究现状,论述了讨论屋顶花园植物种植设计的重要性.分析了屋顶花园绿化的特点及注意事项,以及现代城市屋顶花园的种植区、种植区构造层、供水系统的设计内容,最后总结出我国城市屋顶花园景观植物选择的“四适”原则.

  15. Green roofs: potential at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

  16. Performance assessment strategies; a computational framework for conceptual design of large roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turrin, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using engineering performance evaluations to explore design alternatives during the conceptual phase of architectural design helps to understand the relationships between form and performance; and is crucial for developing well-performing final designs. Computer aided conceptual design has the poten

  17. A novel method to design water spray cooling system to protect floating roof atmospheric storage tanks against fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Alimohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon bulk storage tank fires are not very common, but their protection is essential due to severe consequences of such fires. Water spray cooling system is one of the most effective ways to reduce damages to a tank from a fire. Many codes and standards set requirements and recommendations to maximize the efficiency of water spray cooling systems, but these are widely different and still various interpretations and methods are employed to design such systems. This article provides a brief introduction to some possible design methods of cooling systems for protection of storage tanks against external non-contacting fires and introduces a new method namely “Linear Density Method” and compares the results from this method to the “Average Method” which is currently in common practice. The average Method determines the flow rate for each spray nozzle by dividing the total water demand by the number of spray nozzles while the Linear Density Method determines the nozzle flow rate based on the actual flow over the surface to be protected. The configuration of the system includes a one million barrel crude oil floating roof tank to be protected and which is placed one half tank diameter from a similar adjacent tank with a full surface fire. Thermal radiation and hydraulics are modeled using DNV PHAST Version 6.53 and Sunrise PIPENET Version 1.5.0.2722 software respectively. Spray nozzles used in design are manufactured by Angus Fire and PNR Nozzles companies. Schedule 40 carbon steel pipe is used for piping. The results show that the cooling system using the Linear Density Method consumes 3.55% more water than the design using the average method assuming a uniform application rate of 4.1 liters per minute. Despite higher water consumption the design based on Linear Density Method alleviates the problems associated with the Average Method and provides better protection.

  18. A literature review on the improvement strategies of passive design for the roofing system of the modern house in a hot and humid climate region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qairuniza Roslan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increase of indoor temperature compared with outdoor temperature is a major concern in modern house design. Occupants suffer from this uncomfortable condition because of overheating indoor temperature. Poor passive design causes heat to be trapped, which influences the rise in indoor temperature. The upper part, which covers the area of the roof, is the most critical part of the house that is exposed to heat caused by high solar radiation and high emissivity levels. During daytime, the roof accumulates heat, which increases the indoor temperature and affects the comfort level of the occupants. To maintain the indoor temperature within the comfort level, most house designs usually depend on mechanical means by using fans or air conditioning systems. The dependence on a mechanical ventilation system could lead to additional costs for its installation, operation, and maintenance. Thus, this study concentrates on reviews on passive design and suggests recommendations for future developments. New proposals or strategies are proposed to improve the current passive design through ventilated and cool roof systems. It is possible to achieve the comfort level inside a house throughout the day by reducing the transmitted heat into the indoor environment and eliminating the internal hot air. These recommendations could become attractive strategies in providing a comfortable indoor temperature to the occupants as well as in minimizing energy consumption.

  19. Linking aboveground and belowground diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyn, de G.B.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2005-01-01

    Aboveground and belowground species interactions drive ecosystem properties at the local scale, but it is unclear how these relationships scale-up to regional and global scales. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of aboveground and belowground diversity links from a global to a local scale. Glob

  20. 屋顶花园雨水利用系统设计与实践%Design and practice of rainwater utilization system for roof garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹传生; 刘慧民; 王南

    2013-01-01

      该文意在探讨利用屋面雨水对屋顶花园进行灌溉的可行性。以北大荒集团某酒店屋顶花园为例,从植物需水量、雨水可收集量、蓄水池容量及雨水收集系统等方面进行屋面雨水回收利用设计,利用彭曼-蒙特斯公式计算屋顶花园植物需水量,结果表明:5-10月屋顶花园植物需水总量为3521.78 m3,各月份间差异较大,10月份量最小仅为361.8 m3,6月份量最大为729.6 m3;同期可收集屋面雨水总量为2179.3 m3,并据雨水径流总量与初期弃流量产生的径流量设计蓄水池容量为131 m3;将收集雨水全部用于屋顶花园绿地灌溉,能节省61.88%灌溉用水;据此,采用工程技术为屋顶花园设计雨水收集系统及自动灌溉系统,对屋顶花园雨水收集量与灌溉量的水量平衡分析结果表明:利用该自动灌溉系统可节约灌溉用水67.20%,雨水利用率可达54.55%,该设计对北方干旱地区屋顶花园雨水回用技术设计具一定的实用价值和应用前景。%In recent years, urban landscape has changed from ground greening to the roof three-dimensional greening with the rapid development of landscaping in China, and a lot of roof gardens have been built to open up the new development space for the landscape in cities. Shortage of water exists in many cities, and the city water stress will turn out because of the increasing roof gardens. To solve these problem, taking the roof garden of Beidahuang group hotel as an example, we would intend to discuss the feasibility of using roof rainwater for irrigating roof garden, and design the collection and utilization of the roof rainwater following the plant evapotranspiration (ET), the rainwater collection quantity, the reservoir capacity and rainwater collection systems. Firstly, the plant water requirement in roof garden was calculated using Penman-Monteith formula and garden coefficient methods. The results showed that the

  1. Design, Development, and Performance Evaluation of Solar Heating System for Disinfection of Domestic Roof-Harvested Rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintola, O A; Sangodoyin, A Y

    2015-01-01

    A box-type solar heater was designed, constructed, and used to determine the effect of solar heating on quality of domestic roof-harvested rainwater (DRHRW). During testing, naturally contaminated DRHRW was harvested in Ibadan, Nigeria, and released into the system at 93.96 Lh(-1) (2.61 × 10(-5) m(3) s(-1)) in a continuous flow process. Water temperatures at inlet, within the heating chamber, and at outlet from the heating chamber and solar radiation were monitored at 10 min interval. Samples were collected at both inlet to and outlet from the heating chamber at 10 min interval for microbiological analysis. The highest plate stagnation temperature, under no-load condition, was 100°C. The solar water heater attained a maximum operational temperature of 75°C with 89.6 and 94.4% reduction in total viable count and total coliform count, respectively, while Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were completely eradicated at this temperature. The solar heater developed proved to be effective in enhancing potability of DRHRW in Ibadan, Nigeria. This may be an appropriate household water treatment technology for developing countries, hence, a way of resolving problem of low quality water for potable uses.

  2. 屋顶绿化工程防渗漏的优化设计探讨%On exploration for optimized design for anti-leakage of roof green project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向欣

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyzes the reasons for the roof leakage caused by the roof green project, points out the optimized design scheme in the construction according to the results caused by various reasons, solves the safety and roof anti-leakage problems of the roof structure, so it pro- vides direction for the development of the roof green projects.%对屋面绿化工程所造成的屋顶渗漏产生的原因进行了分析,并针对不同原因造成的后果提出在构造过程中可进行优化设计的方案,解决了屋顶构造安全问题、屋顶防漏问题,为屋顶绿化工程的发展提供指导。

  3. Research methodology for integral design in the context of collaborative engineering for active roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quanjel, E.M.C.J.

    2007-01-01

    In the world of design and engineering, gaps of knowledge between these disciplines are recognized [1, 2, 3, 4]. The learning capacity of the building industry – as well as in other industries – is becoming a main issue, also within Architect-organizations [5, 6]. A model for structuring knowledge o

  4. RP{sub P}erformance, a design tool to simulate the thermal performance of high-latitude roof pond buildings (Skytherm North roof ponds); Programa de computo para la simulacion termica de sistemas de techo con estanque para latitudes altas (Skytherm North Roofponds)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A. G.

    2004-07-01

    This article introduces RP{sub P}erformance, a design tool to simulate the thermal performance of high-latitude roof pond buildings (also known as Skytherm North roof ponds). RP{sub P}erformance is an interactive Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that allows users to modify all the parameters that influence the thermal performance of a Skytherm North roof pond building giving as outputs the heating and cooling costs, as well as a series of indoor temperature charts for a roof pond, a highly-insulated reference building, and a conventionally insulated reference building. This article also presents the calibration study of RP{sub P}erformance using experimental results obtained over a nine-month period in an 11.9 m2 test-room located in Muncie, Indiana. (Author)

  5. Green-roof thermal effects in the context of climate change and sustainable urban design

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Lihua; 彭立华.

    2012-01-01

    With the growing urbanized population, cities have become a major contributor to global energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The urbanization processes also cause local climate change through excessive anthropogenic heat emission and modification of the land biophysical properties. The resultant urban heat island (UHI) effects and aggravating human heat stress have become key environmental issues in city management. Cities can be designed to be climate-conscious and energy-e...

  6. Vegetation development on extensive vegetated green roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Emilsson, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Technology for establishment of vegetated roofs (green roofs) has developed rapidly over recent years but knowledge about how these systems will develop over time is still limited. This study investigates vegetation development on unfertilised thin extensive vegetated roofs during a 3-year period. The vegetation systems investigated were designed to be low maintenance and had a saturated weight of 50 kg/m2, a thickness of 4 cm and drought-resistant succulent and bryophyte vegetation. Vegetati...

  7. 试论屋顶花园设计中景观效果的营造%Discussion on Creating a Landscape Effect on Roof Garden in Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯超意

    2014-01-01

    At present, the roof garden has become a major form of garden greening. This paper, based on the work pr- actice, summarized the methods for creating various landscape effects in the design of Roof garden and put forward some ma- ters needing attention in the process of creating the landscape effect.%目前,屋顶花园已成为一种主要的园林绿化形式。本文在实践工作基础上,总结了屋顶花园设计中各种景观效果的营造手法,并提出了营造景观效果过程中应注意的事项。

  8. 屋顶水箱TMD对加固结构的减震控制研究%Application of roof tank TMD in structural reinforcement design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王磊; 谭平; 方创杰; 莫艳丽; 李文彦

    2013-01-01

    Roof tank TMD is employed in structural reinforcement design of an existed international hotel in Guangdong.This paper proposes two TMD schemes.Numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the control performance of two TMDs for the hotel under various earthquake records.Results show that roof tank TMDs in structure reinforcement is feasible,effective and economic.%对某国际大酒店进行了加固改造和楼顶水箱TMD装置设计,提出了两种TMD方案,并对结构在地震激励下的控制效果进行了仿真分析,验证了屋顶水箱TMD系统对于结构改造加固的可行性与有效性.

  9. 民用建筑坡屋顶设计原则与方法浅析%Analysis of Residence Pitched Roof Design Principle and Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵忠颖

    2011-01-01

    屋顶是决定建筑轮廓的重要部分,对建筑形象起着非常重要的作用.坡屋顶住宅既能美化城市环境、丰富建筑立面.又能抗渗防漏、隔热保温,改善顸层居住环境,提高空间利用率.因此,应深入分析建筑坡屋顶设计的原则与方法,以有效提升建筑整体设计质量.%Roof is the important part decides the building contour which plays an important role for the construction image.Pitched roof could beautifies urban environment, enrich building elevation, leakage proof, heat insulation, improve the living environment of top layer and improve space utilization rate.Therefore, we should analyze in deepth the principle and method of building pitched roof design to effectively improve the overall design quality of the building.

  10. Demonstration of energy savings of cool roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Gartland, L.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.; Rainer, L. [Davis Energy Group, Davis, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Dark roofs raise the summertime air-conditioning demand of buildings. For highly-absorptive roofs, the difference between the surface and ambient air temperatures can be as high as 90 F, while for highly-reflective roofs with similar insulative properties, the difference is only about 20 F. For this reason, cool roofs are effective in reducing cooling energy use. Several experiments on individual residential buildings in California and Florida show that coating roofs white reduces summertime average daily air-conditioning electricity use from 2--63%. This demonstration project was carried out to address some of the practical issues regarding the implementation of reflective roofs in a few commercial buildings. The authors monitored air-conditioning electricity use, roof surface temperature, plenum, indoor, and outdoor air temperatures, and other environmental variables in three buildings in California: two medical office buildings in Gilroy and Davis and a retail store in San Jose. Coating the roofs of these buildings with a reflective coating increased the roof albedo from an average of 0.20--0.60. The roof surface temperature on hot sunny summer afternoons fell from 175 F--120 F after the coating was applied. Summertime average daily air-conditioning electricity use was reduced by 18% (6.3 kWh/1000ft{sup 2}) in the Davis building, 13% (3.6 kWh/1000ft{sup 2}) in the Gilroy building, and 2% (0.4 kWh/1000ft{sup 2}) in the San Jose store. In each building, a kiosk was installed to display information from the project in order to educate and inform the general public about the environmental and energy-saving benefits of cool roofs. They were designed to explain cool-roof coating theory and to display real-time measurements of weather conditions, roof surface temperature, and air-conditioning electricity use. 55 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30

    options considered to date are not ideal. One approach is to insulate between the trusses at the roof plane. The construction process is time consuming and costs more than conventional attic construction. Moreover, the problems of air infiltration and thermal bridges across the insulation remain. Another approach is to use structurally insulated panels (SIPs), but conventional SIPs are unlikely to be the ultimate solution because an additional underlying support structure is required except for short spans. In addition, wood spline and metal locking joints can result in thermal bridges and gaps in the foam. This study undertook a more innovative approach to roof construction. The goal was to design and evaluate a modular energy efficient panelized roof system with the following attributes: (1) a conditioned and clear attic space for HVAC equipment and additional finished area in the attic; (2) manufactured panels that provide structure, insulation, and accommodate a variety of roofing materials; (3) panels that require support only at the ends; (4) optimal energy performance by minimizing thermal bridging and air infiltration; (5) minimal risk of moisture problems; (6) minimum 50-year life; (7) applicable to a range of house styles, climates and conditions; (8) easy erection in the field; (9) the option to incorporate factory-installed solar systems into the panel; and (10) lowest possible cost. A nationwide market study shows there is a defined market opportunity for such a panelized roof system with production and semi-custom builders in the United States. Senior personnel at top builders expressed interest in the performance attributes and indicate long-term opportunity exists if the system can deliver a clear value proposition. Specifically, builders are interested in (1) reducing construction cycle time (cost) and (2) offering increased energy efficiency to the homebuyer. Additional living space under the roof panels is another low-cost asset identified as part of

  12. The green roof design of residential underground garage%住宅小区地下车库屋顶绿化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦云祥; 殷慧

    2015-01-01

    Taking the roof greening of Taiyuan“Lake View One”residential area underground garage for example,combining with the relevant theoretical basis,this paper discussed the planning and design,technology,ways and methods,construction planting of residential underground garage roof greening,pointed out that the rise of roof greening this building form provided new construction space for increasing the amount of greening green,beautifying the urban.%以太原市“湖景壹号”住宅区地下车库屋顶绿化为例,结合相关理论基础,对住宅区地下车库屋顶绿化的规划设计、技术、方式方法、施工种植进行了探讨,指出屋顶花园这一建设形式的兴起,为增加城市绿化,美化城市提供了新的建设空间。

  13. Green roof systems: a study of public attitudes and preferences in southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cañero, Rafael; Emilsson, Tobias; Fernandez-Barba, Carolina; Herrera Machuca, Miguel Ángel

    2013-10-15

    This study investigates people's preconceptions of green roofs and their visual preference for different green roof design alternatives in relation to behavioral, social and demographical variables. The investigation was performed as a visual preference study using digital images created to represent eight different alternatives: gravel roof, extensive green roof with Sedums not in flower, extensive green roof with sedums in bloom, semi-intensive green roof with sedums and ornamental grasses, semi-intensive green roof with shrubs, intensive green roof planted with a lawn, intensive green roof with succulent and trees and intensive green roof with shrubs and trees. Using a Likert-type scale, 450 respondents were asked to indicate their preference for each digital image. Results indicated that respondents' sociodemographic characteristics and childhood environmental background influenced their preferences toward different green roof types. Results also showed that green roofs with a more careful design, greater variety of vegetation structure, and more variety of colors were preferred over alternatives.

  14. Green roof systems: a study of public attitudes and preferences in southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cañero, Rafael; Emilsson, Tobias; Fernandez-Barba, Carolina; Herrera Machuca, Miguel Ángel

    2013-10-15

    This study investigates people's preconceptions of green roofs and their visual preference for different green roof design alternatives in relation to behavioral, social and demographical variables. The investigation was performed as a visual preference study using digital images created to represent eight different alternatives: gravel roof, extensive green roof with Sedums not in flower, extensive green roof with sedums in bloom, semi-intensive green roof with sedums and ornamental grasses, semi-intensive green roof with shrubs, intensive green roof planted with a lawn, intensive green roof with succulent and trees and intensive green roof with shrubs and trees. Using a Likert-type scale, 450 respondents were asked to indicate their preference for each digital image. Results indicated that respondents' sociodemographic characteristics and childhood environmental background influenced their preferences toward different green roof types. Results also showed that green roofs with a more careful design, greater variety of vegetation structure, and more variety of colors were preferred over alternatives. PMID:23722180

  15. Metal Roofing in a "Class" by Itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimtz, Paul D.

    1990-01-01

    The structural standing seam roof has the advantages of ease of application, low maintenance, and low life-cycle costs. Explains and illustrates how the system's concealed clip attachments are designed so that the roof panels can expand and contract independently of the insulation. (MLF)

  16. LIGHTWEIGHT GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applying a Lightweight Green Roof System to a building can achieve in managing storm water runoff, decreasing heat gain, yielding energy savings, and mitigating the heat island effect. Currently, Most green roof systems are considerably heavy and require structural reinforceme...

  17. 某体育中心屋顶光伏系统的设计探讨%Discussion on the design of a sports center roof photovoltaic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴军; 宋占强

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzed and researched the design standards,design features and design methods of solar photovoltaic system,combining with the actual case of grid connected photovoltaic system project of a gymnasium roof,elaborated the influence of photovoltaic component,inverter selection,photovoltaic array azimuth,inclination angle,installation distance of roof grid connected photovoltaic system to photovoltaic power generation system,provided reference for future similar design.%分析研究了太阳能光伏系统的设计标准、设计特点及设计方法,结合某体育馆屋顶并网光伏系统项目的实际案例,阐述了屋顶并网光伏系统光伏组件、逆变器的选择;光伏阵列方位角、倾斜角、安装间距对光伏发电系统的影响,为今后的类似设计提供参考依据。

  18. Renovation of Roof Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    1997-01-01

    A 30 year old not-watertight roof based on wooden boards with roofing felt have been changed to a pitched structure with cementos plates. At the same time more thermal insulation has been placed.......A 30 year old not-watertight roof based on wooden boards with roofing felt have been changed to a pitched structure with cementos plates. At the same time more thermal insulation has been placed....

  19. New roof element system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev, Jesper; Rudbeck, Claus Christian

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the project has been to develop an element system for warm deck roofs which, from a thermal and economical point of view, can deal with the future demands for heat loss coefficients for low slope roofs.......The aim of the project has been to develop an element system for warm deck roofs which, from a thermal and economical point of view, can deal with the future demands for heat loss coefficients for low slope roofs....

  20. Economic and environmental evaluation model for selecting the optimum design of green roof systems in elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JiMin; Hong, TaeHoon; Koo, Choong-Wan

    2012-08-01

    Green-roof systems offer various benefits to man and nature, such as establishing ecological environments, improving landscape and air quality, and offering pleasant living environments. This study aimed to develop an optimal-scenario selection model that considers both the economic and the environmental effect in applying GRSs to educational facilities. The following process was carried out: (i) 15 GRSs scenarios were established by combining three soil and five plant types and (ii) the results of the life cycle CO(2) analyses with the GRSs scenarios were converted to an economic value using certified emission reductions (CERs) carbon credits. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed based on these results. The results showed that when considering only the currently realized economic value, the conventional roof system is superior to the GRSs. However, the LCC analysis that included the environmental value, revealed that compared to the conventional roof system, the following six GRSs scenarios are superior (cost reduction; reduction ratio; in descending order): scenarios 13 ($195,229; 11.0%), 3 ($188,178; 10.6%), 8 ($181,558; 10.3%), 12 ($130,464; 7.4%), 2 ($124,566; 7.0%), and 7 ($113,931; 6.4%). Although the effect is relatively small in terms of cost reduction, environmental value attributes cannot be ignored in terms of the reduction ratio.

  1. Economic and environmental evaluation model for selecting the optimum design of green roof systems in elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JiMin; Hong, TaeHoon; Koo, Choong-Wan

    2012-08-01

    Green-roof systems offer various benefits to man and nature, such as establishing ecological environments, improving landscape and air quality, and offering pleasant living environments. This study aimed to develop an optimal-scenario selection model that considers both the economic and the environmental effect in applying GRSs to educational facilities. The following process was carried out: (i) 15 GRSs scenarios were established by combining three soil and five plant types and (ii) the results of the life cycle CO(2) analyses with the GRSs scenarios were converted to an economic value using certified emission reductions (CERs) carbon credits. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed based on these results. The results showed that when considering only the currently realized economic value, the conventional roof system is superior to the GRSs. However, the LCC analysis that included the environmental value, revealed that compared to the conventional roof system, the following six GRSs scenarios are superior (cost reduction; reduction ratio; in descending order): scenarios 13 ($195,229; 11.0%), 3 ($188,178; 10.6%), 8 ($181,558; 10.3%), 12 ($130,464; 7.4%), 2 ($124,566; 7.0%), and 7 ($113,931; 6.4%). Although the effect is relatively small in terms of cost reduction, environmental value attributes cannot be ignored in terms of the reduction ratio. PMID:22775303

  2. EPA's Green Roof Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation on the basics of green roof technology. The presentation highlights some of the recent ORD research projects on green roofs and provices insight for the end user as to the benefits for green roof technology. It provides links to currently available EPA re...

  3. Green roof Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Gatt, Antoine; Duca, Edward

    2015-01-01

    In Malta, buildings cover one third of the Island, leaving greenery in the dirt track. Green roofs are one way to bring plants back to urban areas with loads of benefits. Antoine Gatt, who manages the LifeMedGreenRoof project at the University of Malta, tells us more. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/green-roof-malta/

  4. Thermal characterization of green roofs through dynamic simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gorrino, Alice; Corrado, Vincenzo; Capozzoli, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate a simplified parameter to characterize green roofs summer dynamic thermal performance through a mathematical approach. The inside face surface conduction in a green roof component is calculated through the Fast all-season soil strength (FASST) model. A parametric analysis is carried out to evaluate which roof design options have the greatest effect on the green roof Thermal behavior during the summer period. The results show the relevance of the leaf area ...

  5. 东北地区城市屋顶花园设计与应用——以沈阳市金杯大厦屋顶花园设计为例%The Urban Roof Garden Design and Application in the Northeast Region ---Taking the Roof Garden Design of the Shenyang Jinbei Mansion as a Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛

    2012-01-01

    以沈阳市金杯大厦屋顶花园为案例,探讨了城市建筑营造屋顶花园的功能作用和设计原则,旨在提高城市的绿化覆盖率,改善城市生态环境,美化城市景观,调节城市气候,提高城市环境质量。城市建筑屋顶营造空中花园,能够充分利用屋顶增加城市绿地面积,让城市建筑屋顶生机盎然。屋项花园能够以等面积的绿化偿还建筑物所占据的地面。屋顶花园对于家庭或办公建筑而言,除具有绿化景观效益外,它还是一种集活动、游乐为一体的公共场所,在设计上应考虑其公共性和共享性。%The Shenyang Jinbei mansion is taken as a case to explore the functions and design principles of urban roof gardens, to enlarge the urban green coverage, improve the urban ecological environment, beautify the urban landscape, regulate the urban climate, and better the urban environmental quality. Building gardens on the urban building roofs helps increase the urban green area and make urban building roofs full of life. Roof gardens can effectively compensate for the green land occupied by urban buildings. Besides, an urban roof garden is a public facility where such activities as amusement, leisure and exercise are carried out. Therefore, serving the public and being shared by the public should be taken into consideration in designing urban roof gardens.

  6. 开合式屋盖结构的防火设计%Fireproofing design of retractable roof structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林湘祁

    2011-01-01

    针对黄龙体育中心网球中心钢结构开合式屋盖进行火灾危险性分析,首先分析开合式屋盖结构的机械/控制系统,分析其耐火薄弱部位,然后设定火灾场景A、B,基于普通热辐射理论的火焰动力学,分析钢结构屋盖的温度变化.结果表明,在火灾场景A下,结构基本处于安全状态;在火灾场景B下,需要采取措施进行耐火保护,如在机械/控制系统的电动机和电路上方布置喷淋,在主拱桁架中的构件上喷涂防火涂料等.%Fire risk analysis was made on steet structure retractable roof of tennis center, Huanglong Sports Center. Firstly, a-nalysis was made on mechanical/control system and its weakest part. Then, setting fire scenarios A and B, according to flame dynamic theory, temperature change of steel structure roof was analyzed. The results showed that in fire scenario A, roof structure is safe; while in fire scenario B, countermeasures for fire protection must be took such as installing sprinkler system above electrical motor and circuit of mechanical/electrical control system, spraying fireproof coating on the main arch truss component.

  7. Roof Structure Design for the Cultural and Sports Center of Urumqi Petrochemical Company%乌石化文体中心屋盖结构设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建国; 张照明

    2015-01-01

    Urumqi Petrochemical Company Cultural and Sports Center is the place for the staff and their family member and the masses around to organize recreational and sports activities. This project is a complex sports building. Its roof is steel grid structure, which is 50m from east to west and 60m from north to south. The frame is supported by 22 reinforced concrete columns. This article analyzes the structure selection, stress characteristics and the key problems in structure design of the roof structure. The key problems and measures for roof structure are summarized, which can provide reference for similar projects.%乌石化文体中心为乌石化公司职工、家属及周边群众锻炼身体,组织文体活动的主要场所,该工程为一复杂体育建筑,其上部屋盖为钢网架结构,网架东西跨度50m,南北跨度60m,网架支承于22根钢筋混凝土柱上。本文围绕屋盖结构选型、受力特点及结构设计中的关键性问题,进行了分析研究,归纳、总结了钢网架屋盖结构设计中应注意的关键问题及应采取的结构措施,可供同类工程参考。

  8. Composite hollow core vaults: An analysis of the Fusée Céramic System and the design of form-active environmental friendly roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Kamerling

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Just after World-War II building materials were scarce, architects and engineers had to design buildings using not much cement and steel. In French an architect, Jacques Couëlle, had invented a system with céramique infill elements to reduce for structures of concrete the self-weight and need of cement and steel. In the fifties and sixties of the twentieth century these céramique elements, known as Fusée Céramique elements, were used widely in France, North Africa and the Netherlands, mostly for barrel vaults and shells. Nowadays most of these structures are pulled down and the remaining buildings do not meet the demands of the present concerning climate comfort, insulation and safety.This thesis analyses the structural design of cylindrical Fusée Céramique roofs in the context of those days. The effect of the céramique infill elements for the time dependent deformations, stiffness and load bearing capacity, including second order, is studied. To save the few remaining buildings for the coming generations the possibilities to strengthen these structures with slender light elements of steel are explored. The effect of the strengthening is described for a Fusée Céramique vault, designed and constructed in the past.Reinforced concrete is a widely used building material with many advantages. Unfortunately the production of both reinforcement and cement is quite energy intensive and causes the emission of greenhouse gasses as NO2, NO and CO2. Reducing the need of cement is a relative simple way to reduce the emission of these greenhouse gasses.In practice roofs are seldom really flat but curved or at least slightly inclined, to drain rainwater and snow. Structurally curved structures, transferring loads as a surface-active or form-active structural system, are very efficient. The need of material and the self-weight is pretty low. This can be very useful if in the future the potentials of roofs for producing food and energy are used more

  9. Cost Comparative Study On Steel Frame Folded Plate Roofing System Vs Conventional Truss Roofing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to ever-increasing of construction materials, it becomes the foremost duty of a civil engineer to design economical and durable structures. In this project an attempt has been made to compare the cost of two types of roofing systems viz. conventional truss roofing system and steel frame folded plate roofing system. The steel frame folded plate roofing system, though found to be economical, is not widely practiced in India due to lack of knowledge regarding its analysis and design. On contrary to it, the conventional truss roofing system still remains as the widely adopted method of roofing for different types of buildings due to the available literature on its analysis, design and construction. The analysis and design of conventional truss roofing system and folded plate roofing system have been carried out for various spans. The analysis is carried out in STAAD.Pro 2004, which is based on stiffness method. Load calculations and design done manually, based on IS:875-1987, IS:800- 1984 & SP:38(1987

  10. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30

    options considered to date are not ideal. One approach is to insulate between the trusses at the roof plane. The construction process is time consuming and costs more than conventional attic construction. Moreover, the problems of air infiltration and thermal bridges across the insulation remain. Another approach is to use structurally insulated panels (SIPs), but conventional SIPs are unlikely to be the ultimate solution because an additional underlying support structure is required except for short spans. In addition, wood spline and metal locking joints can result in thermal bridges and gaps in the foam. This study undertook a more innovative approach to roof construction. The goal was to design and evaluate a modular energy efficient panelized roof system with the following attributes: (1) a conditioned and clear attic space for HVAC equipment and additional finished area in the attic; (2) manufactured panels that provide structure, insulation, and accommodate a variety of roofing materials; (3) panels that require support only at the ends; (4) optimal energy performance by minimizing thermal bridging and air infiltration; (5) minimal risk of moisture problems; (6) minimum 50-year life; (7) applicable to a range of house styles, climates and conditions; (8) easy erection in the field; (9) the option to incorporate factory-installed solar systems into the panel; and (10) lowest possible cost. A nationwide market study shows there is a defined market opportunity for such a panelized roof system with production and semi-custom builders in the United States. Senior personnel at top builders expressed interest in the performance attributes and indicate long-term opportunity exists if the system can deliver a clear value proposition. Specifically, builders are interested in (1) reducing construction cycle time (cost) and (2) offering increased energy efficiency to the homebuyer. Additional living space under the roof panels is another low-cost asset identified as part of

  11. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner

  12. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.

  13. Energy Saving Design Method in Design of Roof Garden%屋顶花园设计中的节能设计方法研究与仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕

    2015-01-01

    提出一种基于多参量自回归分析的屋顶花园节能设计方法.对屋顶花园节能设计中影响因素如光照、温度、湿度、绿化植被释氧量和二氧化碳吸收量等进行数学建模,充分利用的南向采光和立体采光,使得居住区的光照强度增加,采用多参量自回归分析方法,合理调度屋顶花园的空间格局,实现节能设计.仿真分析表明,采用该屋顶花园节能设计方案,能有效改善居住区的小气候环境,提高了二氧化碳吸收率,增大居住区的释氧量,实现节能环保的宜居生活.%This paper put forward a kind of regression analysis based on multi parameter design method of energy saving in Roof garden. First analysis of the overall planning and design principles of roof garden design, such as light, temperature, humidity, oxygen and carbon dioxide absorption of green vegetation quantity of mathematical modeling of roof garden ener-gy conservation design factors, make full use of lighting and three-dimensional lighting, the residential area of the light in-tensity increases, a multi parameter regression method for analysis of spatial pattern, reasonable scheduling of roof garden, to achieve energy saving design. Simulation results show that, the energy saving design of the Roof garden, can effectively improve the microclimate environment of residential area, improve the absorption rate of carbon dioxide, oxygen release in-creased residential area, to achieve energy saving and environmental protection of the livable life.

  14. Decision Guide for Roof Slope Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings.

  15. Horizontal roof gap of backfill hydraulic support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 张吉雄; 邰阳; 方坤; 殷伟

    2015-01-01

    For the backfill hydraulic support as the key equipment for achieving integration of backfilling and coal mining simultaneously in the practical process, its characteristics will directly influence the backfill body’s compression ratio. Horizontal roof gap, as a key parameter of backfilling characteristics, may impact the backfilling effect from the aspects of control of roof subsidence in advance, support stress, backfilling process and the support design. Firstly, the reason why horizontal roof gap exists was analyzed and its definition, causes and connotation were introduced, then adopting the Pro/E 3D simulation software, three typical 3D entity models of backfill hydraulic supports were built, based on the influence of horizontal roof gap on backfilling effect, and influence rules of four factors, i.e. support height, suspension height, suspension angle and tamping angle, were emphatically analyzed on horizontal roof gap. The results indicate that, the four factors all have significant impacts on horizontal roof gap, but show differences in influence trend and degree, showing negative linear correlation, positive linear correlation, positive semi-parabolic correlation and negative semi-parabolic correlation, respectively. Four legs type is the most adaptive to the four factors, while six legs (II) type has the poorest adaptability, and the horizontal roof gap is small under large support height, small suspension height, small suspension angle and large tamping angle situation. By means of optimizing structure components and their positional relation and suspension height of backfill scrape conveyor in the process of support design and through controlling working face deployment, roof subsidence in advance, mining height and backfilling during engineering application, the horizontal roof gap is optimized. The research results can be served as theoretical basis for support design and guidance for backfill support to have better performance in backfilling.

  16. STUDIES ON THE LAW OF ROOF-COAL MOVEMENT BY USING THE ROOF-COAL CAVING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海戈; 徐秉业; 沈新普; 王志勤

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the law of roof-coal movement has been investigated through the fieldmeasurement, theoretical analysis and numerical calculation. Several results, which are of im-portant values for caving process, design of the supports, controlling end-face stability, raisingrecovery rate, realizing working face high output and other related aspects in practice, havebeen obtained. These results mainly include the following: roof-coal breaking curve of soft-coalseam, roof-coal movement curve of soft-coal and medium-hard coal seam, and roof-coal move-ment equation. The roof-coal caveability has been analyzed.

  17. Solution for Flat Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şt. Vasiliu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Roofs are constructive subassemblies that are located at the top of buildings, which toghether with perimetral walls and some elements of the infrastructure belongs to the subsystem elements that close the building. An important share in the roofing is represented by the flat roofs. Flat roofs must meet the requirements of resistance to mechanical action, thermal insulation, acoustic and waterproof, fire resistance, durability and aesthetics. To meet these requirements is necessary an analysis of the component layers and materials properties that determine the durability of structural assembly.

  18. British green roof history : barriers and opportunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, M. [Peabody Trust, Portland, OR (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Most green roof development in Britain has focused on the commercial sector, where economies of scale make green roofs more viable. However, in response to the Government's Sustainable Communities program launched in 2003, there has been a recent increase in construction of smaller scale green roofs for residential housing. The program addresses several basic infra-structural issues in housing supply. It includes major reforms in housing and planning policy, and a new approach to how and what is built. Some recent housing developments have shown that green roofs can make a significant contribution towards sustainability in building design and construction. It was suggested that in the next few years, green roofs should be encouraged to a broad audience, in a way that promotes their benefits, and highlights their costs and constraints in a transparent manner. As such, all players within this growing sector would participate, including designers, planners, drainage engineers, growers, aggregate suppliers, ecologists, landscape Architects, Architects and campaigners. It was also suggested that a framework is needed to increase capacity; develop policies, principles and standards; and, generate innovation, rigour and best practice. This paper addressed issues regarding sustainable housing and national planning policy guidance; local planning guidance; the London example of the role of new regional government; progress towards sustainability; and, innovation from the social housing sector. Some examples of green roofs on new housing were presented, including the Integer house by the Building Research Establishment; East Thames Eco-House; Diggers and Hedgehog; BedZED; rolling green Green roofs; Beaufort Court and Homer Road; grass roofs for Gold Lane; and, urban roof gardens. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-07-11

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

  20. Solar thermal roofs; Zonthermische daken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Waerdt, J. [DWA installatie- en energieadvies, Bodegraven (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of the brochure is to increase the effective application of solar thermal roofs. The target group includes consultants, installers, architects and contractors. Attention is paid to the design, parameters for comparison, yield simulations and experiences gained in projects [Dutch] Het doel van de brochure is het vergroten van de effectieve toepassing van zonthermische daken. Tot de doelgroep behoren installatieadviseurs, installateurs, architecten en opdrachtgevers in de bouw. Aandacht wordt besteed aan het ontwerp, parameters voor vergelijking, opbrengstsimulaties en ervaringen opgedaan in projecten.

  1. Improved roof stabilization technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities require that personnel have access to all areas of structures, some of which are more than 40 years old. In many cases, these structures have remained in a standby condition for up to 10 years; few preventative maintenance activities have been performed on them because of lack of funding or a defined future plan of action. This situation has led to deteriorated building conditions, resulting in potential personnel safety hazards. In addition, leaky roofs allow water to enter the buildings, which can cause the spread of contamination and increase building deterioration, worsening the already unsafe working conditions. To ensure worker safety and facilitate building dismantlement, the assessment of roof stabilization techniques applicable to US Department of Energy (DOE) structures has become an important issue. During Fiscal year 1997 (FY97), a comprehensive reliability-based model for the structural stabilization analysis of roof system in complex structures was developed. The model consists of three major components: a material testing method, a deterministic structural computer model, and a reliability-based optimization, and probabilistic analyses of roof structures can be implemented. Given site-specific needs, this model recommends the most appropriate roof stabilization system. This model will give not only an accurate evaluation of the existing roof system in complex structures, but it will also be a reliable method to aid the decision-making process. This final report includes in its appendix a Users' Manual for the Program of Deterministic and Reliability Analysis of Roof Structures

  2. Green Roofs for Stormwater Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated green roofs as a stormwater management tool. Results indicate that the green roofs are capable of removing 40% of the annual rainfall volume from a roof through retention and evapotranspiration. Rainfall not retained by green roofs is detained, effectively...

  3. Research on hydraulic-powered roof supports test problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hong-bo; JIANG Jin-qiu; MA Qiang

    2011-01-01

    The load-bearing characters of hydraulic-powered roof support with dual telescopic legs were analyzed. With a specific type hydraulic-powered roof support with dual telescopic legs for research object, the inside load test problems in factories was analyzed, and the correct test methods were given, which can enhance the test efficiency and make the factories away from the error design of hydraulic-powered roof supports and legs.

  4. National construction, Denmark. Flat roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rode, C.

    1995-04-01

    The Paris meeting of IEA Annex 24 (held in the spring of 1991) declared a set of typical building constructions, the Heat, Air and Moisture characteristics of which should be dealt with as part of the Annex work. Each type of construction was assigned to one or more countries as their National Construction, and it has been the responsibility of each country to prepare a report on what may be regarded as common knowledge in the country on the hygrothermal behaviour of their construction. This knowledge is in part due to experimental work carried out by research bodies in the countries, and due to experience form practice. This report has two main sections: Section 2 gives a general overview of the design of the most common variants of flat roofs and common knowledge reported for such roofs. Section 3 gives an account of research projects carried out in Denmark on flat roofs to analyze their hygrothermal performance. Whenever possible, an emphasis will be put on the hygrothermal consequences of thermally insulating such constructions. (EG) 19 refs.

  5. Creating a marketplace for green roofs in Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2003, the Chicago Department of Planning and Development has been encouraging city developers to consider installing green roofs on buildings in Chicago, with the belief that this practice results in mitigation of the urban heat island effect, cleaner runoff leaving green roofs, sound attenuation, aesthetic value, oxygen production, and mitigation of carbon dioxide emissions. However, the benefits to developers, which include reduced stormwater runoff, extended roof life and energy savings, in total do not offset the first cost premium of a green roof. Despite this, and with no mandate requiring green roofs, the marketplace is growing. After seeing green roofs on a tour in Europe, the mayor of Chicago encouraged the first design and installation of a 20,300 square foot demonstration green roof in Chicago, and other city-sponsored pilot projects followed shortly after. Since then, the number of green roofs in Chicago has grown to over one million square feet. A map of Chicago showing locations of most of the projects was presented. It was suggested that lower prices for green roofs, higher energy costs and an inclination to invest in long-term strategies would accelerate the market. In an effort to engage the public in dialogue, the Department of Planning and Development held seminars to promote the benefits of green roofs . Participants had many questions about the applicability of green roofs to Chicago, expressing skepticism that Chicago's climate would provide the same benefits as in Europe. Other concerns were expressed regarding the devaluation of property values resulting from placing green roofs on buildings; doubts about roof leaks; maintenance practices; and, bugs and mold. Since the first cost premium of the system remains a question, most participants expressed interest in some kind of incentive program, but remained open-minded if benefits could be proved. 6 figs

  6. 浅析重庆山地建筑屋顶设计%Analysis of the Chongqing Mountain Building Roof Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓学华

    2014-01-01

    Roof form may have great differences in different regions, different area, each has its diferent characteristics. Based on the analysis of Chongqing topography and the chara- cteristics of climate, this paper introduces the green roof of Ch- ongqing, and puts forward the importance of rich roof mould, hopes can provide some reference to the roof of building.%房屋屋顶的造型在不同地区、不同的地域会有很大的差异,各有其不同特色。本文在分析重庆的地形和气候特点的基础上,介绍了重庆的绿色屋顶,并提出了丰富屋顶造型的重要性,希望可以给屋顶的建设提供一些参考。

  7. TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE PLANNING OF ROOF GARDENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizamettin KOÇ

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Increases in population, buildings, traffic density and air pollution is the most specific characteristics of metropol cities. These conditions effect the living quality negatively. That is why architectures and planners should find both aesthetic and functional planning approach in urban areas. Roof gardens, which affect positively urban ecology in many ways, have an important place in this approach. Planning aproach of roof gardens are rather different compare to ground level design. Structural elements under the roof gardens againist the infiltration of water. That is why it is important that roof garden plannings should have some layers shuclh as drainage, insulation, waterproofing, filter layers and irrigation andf drainage systems.

  8. Green Roofs for Stormwater Runoff Control - Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated green roofs as a stormwater management tool. Specifically, runoff quantity and quality from green and flat asphalt roofs were compared. Evapotranspiration from planted green roofs and evaporation from unplanted media roofs were also compared. The influence...

  9. Storm Water Retention on Three Green Roofs with Distinct Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breach, P. A.; Sims, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.; Smart, C. C.; Powers, B. S. C.

    2014-12-01

    As urbanization continues to increase the impact of cities on their surrounding environments, the feasibility of implementing low-impact development such as green roofs is of increasing interest. Green roofs retain and attenuate storm water thereby reducing the load on urban sewer systems. In addition, green roofs can provide insulation and lower roof surface temperature leading to a decrease in building energy load. Green roof technology in North American urban environments remains underused, in part due to a lack of climate appropriate green roof design guidelines. The capacity of a green roof to moderate runoff depends on the storage capacity of the growing medium at the start of a rainfall event. Storage capacity is finite, which makes rapid drainage and evapotranspiration loss critical for maximizing storage capacity between subsequent storms. Here the retention and attenuation of storm events are quantified for experimental green roof sites located in three representative Canadian climates corresponding to; semiarid conditions in Calgary, Alberta, moderate conditions in London, Ontario, and cool and humid conditions in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The storage recovery and storm water retention at each site is modelled using a modified water balance approach. Components of the water balance including evapotranspiration are predicted using climate data collected from 2012 to 2014 at each of the experimental sites. During the measurement period there were over 300 precipitation events ranging from small, frequent events (green roofs in their respective climates.

  10. Quantitative analysis on the urban flood mitigation effect by the extensive green roof system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Moon, H J; Kim, T I; Kim, H W; Han, M Y

    2013-10-01

    Extensive green-roof systems are expected to have a synergetic effect in mitigating urban runoff, decreasing temperature and supplying water to a building. Mitigation of runoff through rainwater retention requires the effective design of a green-roof catchment. This study identified how to improve building runoff mitigation through quantitative analysis of an extensive green-roof system. Quantitative analysis of green-roof runoff characteristics indicated that the extensive green roof has a high water-retaining capacity response to rainfall of less than 20 mm/h. As the rainfall intensity increased, the water-retaining capacity decreased. The catchment efficiency of an extensive green roof ranged from 0.44 to 0.52, indicating reduced runoff comparing with efficiency of 0.9 for a concrete roof. Therefore, extensive green roofs are an effective storm water best-management practice and the proposed parameters can be applied to an algorithm for rainwater-harvesting tank design.

  11. Quantitative analysis on the urban flood mitigation effect by the extensive green roof system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Moon, H J; Kim, T I; Kim, H W; Han, M Y

    2013-10-01

    Extensive green-roof systems are expected to have a synergetic effect in mitigating urban runoff, decreasing temperature and supplying water to a building. Mitigation of runoff through rainwater retention requires the effective design of a green-roof catchment. This study identified how to improve building runoff mitigation through quantitative analysis of an extensive green-roof system. Quantitative analysis of green-roof runoff characteristics indicated that the extensive green roof has a high water-retaining capacity response to rainfall of less than 20 mm/h. As the rainfall intensity increased, the water-retaining capacity decreased. The catchment efficiency of an extensive green roof ranged from 0.44 to 0.52, indicating reduced runoff comparing with efficiency of 0.9 for a concrete roof. Therefore, extensive green roofs are an effective storm water best-management practice and the proposed parameters can be applied to an algorithm for rainwater-harvesting tank design. PMID:23892044

  12. Integrated roof wind energy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen S.P.G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind is an attractive renewable source of energy. Recent innovations in research and design have reduced to a few alternatives with limited impact on residential construction. Cost effective solutions have been found at larger scale, but storage and delivery of energy to the actual location it is used, remain a critical issue. The Integrated Roof Wind Energy System is designed to overcome the current issues of urban and larger scale renewable energy system. The system is built up by an axial array of skewed shaped funnels that make use of the Venturi Effect to accelerate the wind flow. This inventive use of shape and geometry leads to a converging air capturing inlet to create high wind mass flow and velocity toward a vertical-axis wind turbine in the top of the roof for generation of a relatively high amount of energy. The methods used in this overview of studies include an array of tools from analytical modelling, PIV wind tunnel testing, and CFD simulation studies. The results define the main design parameters for an efficient system, and show the potential for the generation of high amounts of renewable energy with a novel and effective system suited for the built environment.

  13. Integrated roof wind energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, A. B.; Ferraro, R. M.; Dano, B.; Moonen, S. P. G.

    2012-10-01

    Wind is an attractive renewable source of energy. Recent innovations in research and design have reduced to a few alternatives with limited impact on residential construction. Cost effective solutions have been found at larger scale, but storage and delivery of energy to the actual location it is used, remain a critical issue. The Integrated Roof Wind Energy System is designed to overcome the current issues of urban and larger scale renewable energy system. The system is built up by an axial array of skewed shaped funnels that make use of the Venturi Effect to accelerate the wind flow. This inventive use of shape and geometry leads to a converging air capturing inlet to create high wind mass flow and velocity toward a vertical-axis wind turbine in the top of the roof for generation of a relatively high amount of energy. The methods used in this overview of studies include an array of tools from analytical modelling, PIV wind tunnel testing, and CFD simulation studies. The results define the main design parameters for an efficient system, and show the potential for the generation of high amounts of renewable energy with a novel and effective system suited for the built environment.

  14. The Design of Drainage System for External Floating Roof Tank in International Stockpile Project%浅谈国际储备库浮顶排水系统的设计选用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭可昕

    2012-01-01

    Large external floating roof storage tank is widely used in petroleum,chemical,civil construction,transportation,metallurgy,national defense and other important fields.Central drainage system is the main accessory for external floating roof tank,its analysis and comparison of structure and type are important for the tank design.The paper summarized the design of central drainage system for external floating roof tank in international stockpile project.%大型外浮顶储罐广泛应用于石油、化工、市政建设、交通、冶金、国防等领域。中央排水系统是外浮顶罐的主要附件,其结构类型的分析和比较是储罐设计中的重要问题。文章综述了在国内一国际储备库项目中,外浮顶罐中央排水系统的设计选用。

  15. Development of technical guidelines for green roof systems in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SCM

    2010-01-01

    Green roof systems are living vegetation installed on the roofs and can provide many environmental and social benefits for achieving low carbon high performance building. This paper describes the major findings of a research to develop technical guidelines for green roof systems in Hong Kong. The current knowledge and latest trends of green roof technology in the world have been studied. Useful information and experience were examined for assessing the potential benefits and key design factor...

  16. 鄂尔多斯东胜区植物园温室屋盖结构设计研究%Design research on greenhouse roof structure of botanical garden in Erdos Dongsheng District

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明; 钱基宏; 孔慧; 朱礼敏; 宋涛

    2013-01-01

    鄂尔多斯东胜区植物园温室屋盖结构采用大跨度空间结构,其屋盖曲面为有中心筒支撑的自由曲面.针对温室结构特点,在研究了国内外典型温室结构的基础上,对适用本项目的结构形式进行了研究.对单层、双层结构体系受力性能进行了对比,并结合建筑造型采用了单层空间结构体系;由于施工难度较大,针对钢结构、铝合金结构分别进行了结构受力性能、节点构造、施工难度、施工速度以及建造与使用成本等方面的对比研究,最终选用了铝合金结构;对ETFE气枕结构与玻璃屋面进行了技术经济性对比,最终确定采用玻璃屋面.最后对屋盖结构的设计情况进行了介绍.%Large span space structure is adopted in the greenhouse roof structure of botanical garden in Erdos Dongsheng District. Free form surface is used in the roof modeling. Considering the special feature of the greenhouse, and based on the analysis of some domestic and overseas representative structures, the structure style which is suitable for the greenhouse in Erdos Dongsheng District was studied. Mechanical behavior comparison between the single-layer structure system and double-layer structure system was performed, and the single layer roof structure system is finally adopted. Considering the construction difficulty, various comparisons between the steel structure and aluminum structure were performed, such as the comparisons on the mechanical behavior, joint construction, construction difficulty, construction speed and economical efficiency. Based on the results of the comparisons, aluminum structure is adopted for the greenhouse. Technique-economics comparisons were also performed between the ETFE cushion and glass roof, and glass roof is finally adopted. Design on the roof structure was introduced.

  17. Prediction of local snow loads on roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Meløysund, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    Large snow loads on roofs during the winter season of 2005 - 2006 led to the collapse of several buildings in Norway. In Central Europe, during the same winter season, there were several serious accidents related to heavy snow loads where many people were killed or injured. Hence, there is a need for evaluating the background for snow loads used in the design of buildings and an assessment of the reliability of buildings which are subjected to roof snow loads.The snow load represents one of t...

  18. Green Roofs and Green Building Rating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental benefits for green building from the Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED and Ecology, Energy, Waste, and Health (EEWH rating systems have been extensively investigated; however, the effect of green roofs on the credit-earning mechanisms is relatively unexplored. This study is concerned with the environmental benefits of green roofs with respect to sustainability, stormwater control, energy savings, and water resources. We focused on the relationship between green coverage and the credits of the rating systems, evaluated the credits efficiency, and performed cost analysis. As an example, we used a university building in Keelung, Northern Taiwan. The findings suggest that with EEWH, the proposed green coverage is 50–75%, whereas with LEED, the proposed green coverage is 100%. These findings have implications for the application of green roofs in green building.

  19. Ecological Impacts of Replacing Traditional Roofs with Green Roofs in Two Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Carter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban land cover is dominated by impervious surface that degrades both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems relative to predevelopment conditions. There are significant opportunities for designers of urban landscapes to use alternative land covers that have multiple functions, benefiting both human and nonhuman components of the urban ecosystem. Vegetated (green roofs are one form of alternative land cover that has shown the potential to provide a variety of ecological benefits in urban areas. We evaluated how stormwater retention, building energy and temperature, and rooftop habitat are influenced by the use of green roofs using test plots in Georgia and Massachusetts. Green roofs were shown to recreate part of the predevelopment hydrology through increasing interception, stormwater storage, evaporation, and transpiration on the rooftop and worked extremely well for small storm events. Temperature reductions were found on the green rooftop as compared to an asphalt surface, although other roof technologies that minimize temperatures, such as lighter colored membranes, provide similar benefits. Novel habitat was created on the rooftop, although the extent of this habitat was limited in part by plant survivability and the need for additional water inputs for diverse plant communities to survive. Despite the challenges, the green roof benefits reported here suggest that green roofs can be used effectively as a multifunctional land cover in urban areas.

  20. Green roof hydrologic performance and modeling: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanling; Babcock, Roger W

    2014-01-01

    Green roofs reduce runoff from impervious surfaces in urban development. This paper reviews the technical literature on green roof hydrology. Laboratory experiments and field measurements have shown that green roofs can reduce stormwater runoff volume by 30 to 86%, reduce peak flow rate by 22 to 93% and delay the peak flow by 0 to 30 min and thereby decrease pollution, flooding and erosion during precipitation events. However, the effectiveness can vary substantially due to design characteristics making performance predictions difficult. Evaluation of the most recently published study findings indicates that the major factors affecting green roof hydrology are precipitation volume, precipitation dynamics, antecedent conditions, growth medium, plant species, and roof slope. This paper also evaluates the computer models commonly used to simulate hydrologic processes for green roofs, including stormwater management model, soil water atmosphere and plant, SWMS-2D, HYDRUS, and other models that are shown to be effective for predicting precipitation response and economic benefits. The review findings indicate that green roofs are effective for reduction of runoff volume and peak flow, and delay of peak flow, however, no tool or model is available to predict expected performance for any given anticipated system based on design parameters that directly affect green roof hydrology.

  1. Green roof hydrologic performance and modeling: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanling; Babcock, Roger W

    2014-01-01

    Green roofs reduce runoff from impervious surfaces in urban development. This paper reviews the technical literature on green roof hydrology. Laboratory experiments and field measurements have shown that green roofs can reduce stormwater runoff volume by 30 to 86%, reduce peak flow rate by 22 to 93% and delay the peak flow by 0 to 30 min and thereby decrease pollution, flooding and erosion during precipitation events. However, the effectiveness can vary substantially due to design characteristics making performance predictions difficult. Evaluation of the most recently published study findings indicates that the major factors affecting green roof hydrology are precipitation volume, precipitation dynamics, antecedent conditions, growth medium, plant species, and roof slope. This paper also evaluates the computer models commonly used to simulate hydrologic processes for green roofs, including stormwater management model, soil water atmosphere and plant, SWMS-2D, HYDRUS, and other models that are shown to be effective for predicting precipitation response and economic benefits. The review findings indicate that green roofs are effective for reduction of runoff volume and peak flow, and delay of peak flow, however, no tool or model is available to predict expected performance for any given anticipated system based on design parameters that directly affect green roof hydrology. PMID:24569270

  2. Structural assessment of roof decking using visual inspection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site has approximately 1,100 buildings, some of which date back to the early 1940s. The roof on these buildings provides a weather resisting cover as well as the load resisting structure. Past experience has been that these roof structures may have structural modifications, the weather resisting membrane may have been replaced several times, and the members may experience some type of material degradation. This material degradation has progressed to cause the collapse of some roof deck members. The intent of the Hanford Site Central Engineering roof assessment effort is to provide an expedient structural assessment of the large number of buildings at the Hanford Site. This assessment is made by qualified structural inspectors following the open-quotes Preliminary Assessment close-quote procedures given in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standard ASCE 11-90. This roof assessment effort does not provide a total qualification of the roof for the design or in-place loads. This inspection does provide a reasonable estimate of the roof loading capacity to determine if personnel access restrictions are needed. A document search and a visual walkdown inspection provide the initial screening to identify modifications and components having questionable structural integrity. The structural assessment consists of baseline dead and live load stress calculations of all roofing components based on original design material strengths. The results of these assessments are documented in a final report which is retrievable form that future inspections will have comparative information

  3. Comparing wildlife habitat and biodiversity across green roof type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffman, R.R. [Oklahoma Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Landscape Architecture

    2007-07-01

    Green roofs represent restorative practices within human dominated ecosystems. They create habitat, increase local biodiversity, and restore ecosystem function. Cities are now promoting this technology as a part of mitigation for the loss of local habitat, making the green roof necessary in sustainable development. While most green roofs create some form of habitat for local and migratory fauna, some systems are designed to provide specific habitat for species of concern. Despite this, little is actually known about the wildlife communities inhabiting green roofs. Only a few studies have provided broad taxa descriptions across a range of green roof habitats, and none have attempted to measure the biodiversity across green roof class. Therefore, this study examined two different vegetated roof systems representative of North America. They were constructed under alternative priorities such as energy, stormwater and aesthetics. The wildlife community appears to be a result of the green roof's physical composition. Wildlife community composition and biodiversity is expected be different yet comparable between the two general types of green roofs, known as extensive and intensive. This study recorded the community composition found in the two classes of ecoroofs and assessed biodiversity and similarity at the community and group taxa levels of insects, spiders and birds. Renyi family of diversity indices were used to compare the communities. They were further described through indices and ratios such as Shannon's, Simpson's, Sorenson and Morsita's. In general, community biodiversity was found to be slightly higher in the intensive green roof than the extensive green roof. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  4. A Decision-Making Framework for Vegetated Roofing System Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Elizabeth Joyce

    2007-01-01

    Design frequently involves a series of trade-offs to obtain the "optimal" solution to a design problem. Green roofs have many different characteristics based on a variety of variables. Designers typically weigh the impacts of these characteristics in an implicit process based on intuition or past experience. But since vegetated roofing is a relatively complex and comparatively new technology to many practitioners, a rational, explicit method to help organize and rank the trade-offs made d...

  5. 中原城市屋顶花园景观设计研究%The Research of Landscape Design of Urban Building Roof Gardens at Central Plains Region in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    敬威

    2011-01-01

    By analyzing factors against? the sites at building roofs at urban areas of Central Plains, local climate, traditional garden culture, a design strategy is established in the consideration of vegetation allocation, Waterscape design and local culture interpretation.%通过对中原城市的屋顶场地、自然气候、传统园林文化等因素的分析,制定了中原城市屋顶花园在植物配置、水景设计、地域文化表达方面的设计策略。

  6. The influence of extensive vegetated roofs on runoff water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndtsson, Justyna Czemiel; Emilsson, Tobias; Bengtsson, Lars

    2006-02-15

    The influence of extensive sedum-moss vegetated roofs on runoff water quality was studied for four full scale installations located in southern Sweden. The aim of the study was to ascertain whether the vegetated roof behaves as a sink or a source of pollutants and whether the age of a vegetated roof influences runoff quality. The runoff quality from vegetated roofs was also compared with the runoff quality from non-vegetated roofs located in study areas. The following metals and nutrients were investigated: Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Pb, Zn, NO3-N, NH4-N, Tot-N, PO4-P, and Tot-P. The results show that, with the exception of nitrogen, vegetated roofs behave as source of contaminants. While in lower concentrations than normally found in urban runoff, some metals appear in concentrations that would correspond to moderately polluted natural water. Nitrate nitrogen is retained by the vegetation or soil or both. Apart from the oldest, the studied vegetated roofs contribute phosphate phosphorus to the runoff. The maintenance of the vegetation systems on the roofs has to be carefully designed in order to avoid storm-water contamination; for instance, the use of easily dissolvable fertilizers should be avoided. PMID:16442432

  7. Quality of Rainwater from Different Roof Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaoye, R.A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Roof material is an important consideration when designing a rainwater catchment system .This is because it affects the quality of the harvested rainwater which invariably affects the usage as potable or non potable.This study was carried out to determine the quality of rainwater from four different roofing materials (asbestos, aluminium, concrete and corrugated plastic within Ogbomosho North Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria, between the months of July to October, 2011. The rainwater samples were taken to the laboratory and analyzed as recommended by Nigerian standard for Drinking Water Quality (NSDQW and World Health Organization (WHO.All the Physical and most of the chemical parameters analyzed conformed to the recommended standard value apart from chloride and total hardness value. Of interest is the rainwater sample from asbestos roofing sheet which had the highest mean value for pH (6.75, total hardness (84 – 86mg/l, aluminium concentration (3 – 9 mg/l, copper (0.03 – 0.04 mg/l, nitrate (31.9 – 39mg/l, and sulphate value between 11- 14mg/l, although, all these parameters fell within the standard values. However, Coliform as bacterial indicator was present in samples from asbestos, concrete and corrugated plastic roof, only the aluminium roof was free from pathogenic contamination. To ensure that the rainwater harvested satisfies health requirement for consumption as specified, all the harvested rainwater should be given some level of treatment in terms of pH, total hardness, chloride concentration and bacterial contamination. It was recommended that the rainwater from all the roofs in this case study area, be carefully examined. Consequently, if the harvested rainwater is being considered for domestic use, the gutters and the catchment areas should be regularly cleaned to remove animal droppings and leaves from over hanging trees as well as boiled to adequate temperature.

  8. Typology of Retractable Roof Structures in Stadiums and Sports Halls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Mahovič

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Retractable roof structures are one of the four fundamental systems (in addition to the playing area, stands and facade in a stadium and sports hall. The roof protects users against various weather conditions and creates optimum circumstances for carrying out different activities. Stadiums and sports halls with retractable roof structures can host a greater variety of activities, improve the quality of their implementation and the quality of visitors’ experience, and affect the perception and experience of people using or observing such buildings. A retractable roof structure allows for natural lighting and ventilation of the venue, gives optimal conditions for grass growth on the playing field, and reduces costs of use and maintenance of the building. Different typologies of movement of roof structures (frequency of opening and closing, design of the structure, and methods of movement are categorised in terms of their architectural and structural design. Application of different retractable roof systems worldwide is indicator of their effectiveness and efficiency, and is basis for use of movement also in other fundamental systems of stadiums and sports halls. Research and identification of characteristics of retractable roof structures lead to the design of new moving systems that can with the application of the moving principle change the purpose of movable elements or assume the characteristics of other fundamental systems.

  9. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Luis A. M.; Facio, Dario S.; Mosquera, Maria J.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  10. Analysis of mechanical behaviors of big pipe roof for shallow buried large-span tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jian; Tan Zhongsheng; Yu Yu; Guo Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    A series of researches on mechanical behaviors of big pipe roof for shallow large-span loess tunnel were carried out based on the Wenxiang tunnel in Zhengzhou-Xi’an Special Passenger Railway. The longitudinal de-formations of the pipe roofs were monitored and the mechanical behaviors of the pipe roofs were analyzed at the test section. A new double-parameter elastic foundation beam model for pipe roof in shallow tunnels was put for-ward in Wenxiang tunnel. The measured values and the calculation results agreed well with each other,revealing the force-deformation law of big pipe roof in loess tunnel:At about 15 m in front of the excavating face,the pipe roof starts to bear the load;at about 15 m behind the excavating face,the force of the pipe roof tends to be stabi-lized;the longitudinal deformation of the whole pipe roofs is groove-shaped distribution,and the largest force of pipe roofs is at the excavating face. Simultaneously,the results also indicate that mechanical behaviors of pipe roof closely relate to the location of the excavation face,the footage of the tunnelling cycle and the mechanics pa-rameters of pipe roof and rock. The conclusions can be reference for the design parameter optimization and the con-struction scheme selection of pipe roofs,and have been verified by the result of numerical analysis software FLAC3D and deformation monitoring.

  11. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950's of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway

  12. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Spent Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950's of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway

  13. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustafa, S.E.; Rodehaver, S.M. [Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Frier, W.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Spent Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950`s of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway.

  14. Stormwater Attenuation by Green Roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.; Smart, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    Innovative municipal stormwater management technologies are urgently required in urban centers. Inadequate stormwater management can lead to excessive flooding, channel erosion, decreased stream baseflows, and degraded water quality. A major source of urban stormwater is unused roof space. Green roofs can be used as a stormwater management tool to reduce roof generated stormwater and generally improve the quality of runoff. With recent legislation in some North American cities, including Toronto, requiring the installation of green roofs on large buildings, research on the effectiveness of green roofs for stormwater management is important. This study aims to assess the hydrologic response of an extensive sedum green roof in London, Ontario, with emphasis on the response to large precipitation events that stress municipal stormwater infrastructure. A green roof rapidly reaches field capacity during large storm events and can show significantly different behavior before and after field capacity. At field capacity a green roof has no capillary storage left for retention of stormwater, but may still be an effective tool to attenuate peak runoff rates by transport through the green roof substrate. The attenuation of green roofs after field capacity is linked to gravity storage, where gravity storage is the water that is temporarily stored and can drain freely over time after field capacity has been established. Stormwater attenuation of a modular experimental green roof is determined from water balance calculations at 1-minute intervals. Data is used to evaluate green roof attenuation and the impact of field capacity on peak flow rates and gravity storage. In addition, a numerical model is used to simulate event based stormwater attenuation. This model is based off of the Richards equation and supporting theory of multiphase flow through porous media.

  15. Humble Opinion of Roof Gardens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXiaoxiao; MAQiangqiang; CAOXiaojun

    2005-01-01

    With the swift development of urban construction in China and the boost in people's demands for green environments in cities, roof gardens are widely used as a new way of greening. This paper deals chiefly with the functions, building principle, classification and composing elements of roof gardens, an analysis of main ecological factors, loads, and waterproof. It suggests that roof gardens will bring about a comparatively big leap in city greening both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  16. Extensive vegetated roofs in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Emilsson, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    This thesis discusses extensive vegetated roofs, i.e. vegetation systems placed on top of buildings as an aesthetical and/or ecological cover. Specific objectives was to (1) quantify how establishment techniques, substrates and plant mixes influence establishment and development of extensive vegetated roofs, (2) investigate effect of vegetated roofs on stormwater quality, and quantify how maintenance and starting fertilisation influences stormwater quality, and (4) investigate the role of veg...

  17. Green roofs for a drier world: effects of hydrogel amendment on substrate and plant water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, Tadeja; Marin, Maria; Boldrin, David; Incerti, Guido; Andri, Sergio; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-08-15

    Climate features of the Mediterranean area make plant survival over green roofs challenging, thus calling for research work to improve water holding capacities of green roof systems. We assessed the effects of polymer hydrogel amendment on the water holding capacity of a green roof substrate, as well as on water status and growth of Salvia officinalis. Plants were grown in green roof experimental modules containing 8 cm or 12 cm deep substrate (control) or substrate mixed with hydrogel at two different concentrations: 0.3 or 0.6%. Hydrogel significantly increased the substrate's water content at saturation, as well as water available to vegetation. Plants grown in 8 cm deep substrate mixed with 0.6% of hydrogel showed the best performance in terms of water status and membrane integrity under drought stress, associated to the lowest above-ground biomass. Our results provide experimental evidence that polymer hydrogel amendments enhance water supply to vegetation at the establishment phase of a green roof. In particular, the water status of plants is most effectively improved when reduced substrate depths are used to limit the biomass accumulation during early growth stages. A significant loss of water holding capacity of substrate-hydrogel blends was observed after 5 months from establishment of the experimental modules. We suggest that cross-optimization of physical-chemical characteristics of hydrogels and green roof substrates is needed to improve long term effectiveness of polymer-hydrogel blends.

  18. Green roofs for a drier world: effects of hydrogel amendment on substrate and plant water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, Tadeja; Marin, Maria; Boldrin, David; Incerti, Guido; Andri, Sergio; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-08-15

    Climate features of the Mediterranean area make plant survival over green roofs challenging, thus calling for research work to improve water holding capacities of green roof systems. We assessed the effects of polymer hydrogel amendment on the water holding capacity of a green roof substrate, as well as on water status and growth of Salvia officinalis. Plants were grown in green roof experimental modules containing 8 cm or 12 cm deep substrate (control) or substrate mixed with hydrogel at two different concentrations: 0.3 or 0.6%. Hydrogel significantly increased the substrate's water content at saturation, as well as water available to vegetation. Plants grown in 8 cm deep substrate mixed with 0.6% of hydrogel showed the best performance in terms of water status and membrane integrity under drought stress, associated to the lowest above-ground biomass. Our results provide experimental evidence that polymer hydrogel amendments enhance water supply to vegetation at the establishment phase of a green roof. In particular, the water status of plants is most effectively improved when reduced substrate depths are used to limit the biomass accumulation during early growth stages. A significant loss of water holding capacity of substrate-hydrogel blends was observed after 5 months from establishment of the experimental modules. We suggest that cross-optimization of physical-chemical characteristics of hydrogels and green roof substrates is needed to improve long term effectiveness of polymer-hydrogel blends. PMID:24867709

  19. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles, and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design.

  20. Determination of Wind Pressure Coefficients for Arc-Shaped Canopy Roof with Numerical Wind Tunnel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yue; ZHANG Tianshu; HAN Qinghua; YANG Huidong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the wind load on an arc-shaped canopy roof was studied with numerical wind tunnel method(NWTM). Three-dimensional models were set up for the canopy roof with opened or closed skylights. The air flow around the roof under wind action from three directions was analysed respectively. Wind pressure coeffi-cients on the canopy roof were determined by NWTM. The results of NWTM agreed well with those of wind tunnel test for the roof with opened skylights, which verified the applicability and rationality of NWTM. The effect of the closure of skylights was then investigated with NWTM. It was concluded that the closure of the skylights may in-crease the wind suction on the top surface of the roof greatly and should be considered in the structure design of the canopy roof.

  1. Numerical analysis of application for induction caving roof

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jian-hua; ZHOU Ke-ping; LI Xi-bing; YANG Nian-ge; SU Jia-hong

    2005-01-01

    New method for handling roof of the base successive mining is proposed, which is induction caving in the roof. The key is that it is made certain to the station of the space-time in the induction caving roof, as the stress is released with the mining process. And applying the catastrophe theory, the influencing factors of induction caving roof are studied in the emptied areas, such as the mechanical property of the surrounding rock, the area of the gob,the scope and dimension of tensile stress. The results show that the key factor is the area of the gob to the method of the induction caving roof. Then according to the geology and the ore characteristic, the three dimension FEM mechanical model is built in Tongkeng Mine, the laws of the tensile stress are analyzed to the space and the time in the roof with the mining, then it is rational design to the mine step and time of the handing the roof.

  2. Total heat loss coefficient of flat roof constructions with external insulation in tapered layers including the effects of thermal bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    be quite tedious, and therefore a method to generate and optimize solutions has been developed and implemented in a program that also takes into account the effects of different types of thermal bridges, i.e. roof windows, insulation fasteners, roof/wall joints etc. This paper describes a new method...... for design of flat roofs and a pc-program that can be used for calculating the total heat loss coefficient of externally insulated roofs with insulation in tapered layers, taking into account thermal bridges in the roof construction.......In order to achieve durability of flat roofs with external insulation, it is necessary to secure proper drainage of the roof, i.e. to avoid water leaking into the insulation. The design of the tapered insulation of the roof is quite difficult as requirements with respect to both drainage...

  3. Theoretical relationships between first flush of roof runoff and influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biao WANG; Tian LI

    2009-01-01

    Considering the short length of building roofs,a theoretical analysis of the first flush of roof runoff was conducted based on the kinematic wave and pollutant erosion equations.This mathematical derivation with analytical solutions predicts pollutant mass first flush(MFF),mean concentration of initial runoff(MCIF),mean concentration of roof runoff(MCRRl with diversion of initial portion and residual mass available on the bed surface (RS) after the entire rnnoff under the condition of constant excess rainfall.And the effects of the associated influencing factors(roof length,roof gradient,roof surface roughness.rainfall intensity,rainfall duration,and erosion coefficients)on them were discussed while the values of parameters referred to the previous studies.The results showed that for roofs whose length is shorter than 20 m.both the increase in roof length and roof gradient and the decrease in roof surface roughness result in larger MFF and MCIF and smaller MCRR and RS.which is beneficial to water reuse and pollution reduction.The theoretical relationship between the first flush and the influencing factors may aid the planning and design of roof in terms of rainwater utilization or diffuse pollution control.

  4. An eye for the green top : an independent voice for green roofs in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, M.; Gedge, D. [Livingroofs.org, England (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Livingroofs.org is a non-profit organization that was established to provide a resource for promoting green roofs in the United Kingdom (UK). Current policies in the UK related to the planning and development of green roofs are a constraint to their uptake. The emerging emphasis on sustainable development is bringing about a revision of planning policies that may make green roofs more desirable. However, green roof design standards are still being developed by a largely unmonitored industry furthering a product with which most people are unfamiliar. This paper reviewed a number of issues that need to be addressed to assist in the wider adoption of green roofs, including increased awareness; an identification of the real benefits of green roofs; guidance and research; planning policies; fiscal incentives; industry standards and codes of practice. Details of the current policy frameworks for construction, urban design and climate change were also outlined. Two specific projects were reviewed to provide an insight into the way in which Livingroofs.org intends to promote green roof technology: a roof owned by the Birmingham city council and a collaboration with a Swiss partner to design a roof for the Komodo Dragon House at the London Zoo. It was concluded that there is now a real likelihood that the widespread adoption of green roofs will occur in the UK within the next 5 years, both in terms of new developments and the vast potential for retro-fitting on existing buildings. 47 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Reliability Analysis of a Green Roof Under Different Storm Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, R. K.; Stillwell, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Urban environments continue to face the challenges of localized flooding and decreased water quality brought on by the increasing amount of impervious area in the built environment. Green infrastructure provides an alternative to conventional storm sewer design by using natural processes to filter and store stormwater at its source. However, there are currently few consistent standards available in North America to ensure that installed green infrastructure is performing as expected. This analysis offers a method for characterizing green roof failure using a visual aid commonly used in earthquake engineering: fragility curves. We adapted the concept of the fragility curve based on the efficiency in runoff reduction provided by a green roof compared to a conventional roof under different storm scenarios. We then used the 2D distributed surface water-groundwater coupled model MIKE SHE to model the impact that a real green roof might have on runoff in different storm events. We then employed a multiple regression analysis to generate an algebraic demand model that was input into the Matlab-based reliability analysis model FERUM, which was then used to calculate the probability of failure. The use of reliability analysis as a part of green infrastructure design code can provide insights into green roof weaknesses and areas for improvement. It also supports the design of code that is more resilient than current standards and is easily testable for failure. Finally, the understanding of reliability of a single green roof module under different scenarios can support holistic testing of system reliability.

  6. Roof sounding device - A loose rock detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Bureau of Mines has developed a method and device designed to detect loose rock material in underground mines. The technology is designed to be an aid to mine workers in detecting hazardous roof conditions in underground mines which can complement or replace the traditional roof sounding techniques where the miner relies on experience to determine whether rock conditions are sound. The leading cause of accidents and fatalities in underground mines is falls of loose rock pieces or rock slabs from the mine roof. In previous research the Bureau of Mines found that loose rock, when impacted, vibrates at a much lower frequency than intact rock material. A major problem in determining rock stability using this technique has been the repeatability of the impact signal. This difficulty has been greatly reduced in the current design by measuring the power spectra contained in two separate frequency bands of the signal produced by striking the rock in question. The ratio of the energy contained in each band is computed. This process minimizes any striking force differences, producing accurate, repeatable results for solid rock as well as loose, drummy material. The prototype has been successfully tested in a variety of underground environments including coal, uranium, molybdenum, silver, and salt. The technology has ben investigated by the US Mine Health and Safety Administration and the Department of Energy for use in detecting detached tunnel lining areas in nuclear repositories. The paper will discuss the technique, applicable results, and future applications

  7. 地下车库顶板采用无梁楼盖设计小结%Design Summary of the Roof of Underground Garage with Flat Slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐佶霆; 邢宁波

    2014-01-01

    The flat slab system is widely used in large area roof of underground garage structure. In this paper, the basic calculation method of flat slab is used, according to the dif-ferent function of underground garage (whether underground garage contains air-raid defense facilities) and common co-lumn grid size and the thickness of earth covering, the rein-forcement area form with flat slab of partial roof of und-erground garages is summarized.%无梁楼盖体系被广泛应用于大面积地下车库顶板结构。本文从无梁楼盖基本计算方法着手,根据不同的地库功能(地下车库是否兼顾人防设施)以及常见柱网的尺寸和覆土厚度,总结归纳了部分地库顶板无梁楼盖配筋面积表格。

  8. Design Summary of the Roof of Underground Garage with Flat Slab%地下车库顶板采用无梁楼盖设计小结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐佶霆; 邢宁波

    2014-01-01

    无梁楼盖体系被广泛应用于大面积地下车库顶板结构。本文从无梁楼盖基本计算方法着手,根据不同的地库功能(地下车库是否兼顾人防设施)以及常见柱网的尺寸和覆土厚度,总结归纳了部分地库顶板无梁楼盖配筋面积表格。%The flat slab system is widely used in large area roof of underground garage structure. In this paper, the basic calculation method of flat slab is used, according to the dif-ferent function of underground garage (whether underground garage contains air-raid defense facilities) and common co-lumn grid size and the thickness of earth covering, the rein-forcement area form with flat slab of partial roof of und-erground garages is summarized.

  9. 地下与地上一体化设计——地下空间有效发展的策略%Integrated design of Under-and Above-ground Urban Space: Strategies for Effective Development of Underground Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢济威; 陈泳

    2012-01-01

    This thesis discussed the feature,type,impacts and development trend of Chinese underground public space in the urbanization background.Through the analysis of the main influencing factors,the thesis indicates that aboveground space provides a basis for the development of underground part.Then it focuses on the design strategies of integrated underground and aboveground urban public space from two aspects——space morphology and integration model.Finally,the research summarized the main approaches to realize the integrated design,which provides reference and inspiration for effective development of underground public space.%介绍了在双重城市化背景下,我国城市地下公共空间的特征、类型与作用及发展趋势,分析了影响其发展的主要因素,指出地面是地下公共空间发展的根源,并从空间形态和整合模式2个方面探讨了地下与地上空间一体化的设计对策,提出了实现地下与地上空间一体化设计的策略.

  10. 上海世博会罗阿案例馆种植屋面的灌溉系统设计%Design of Planted Roof Irrigation System of Rhone-Alps Case Pavilion in World Expo Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐钟骏

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the planted roof irrigation system's control theory and design features in the Rhone-Apes case of 2010 Shanghai World Expo was introduced. By analyzing the relationship between the rainfall, relative humidity and the irrigation required water quantity, irrigation influence factors of the quantity of irrigation water and annual changes were illustrated and the execution of water-saving technology in planted roof irrigation system was summarized.%该文介绍了2010年上海世博会法国罗纳-阿尔卑斯案例馆种植屋面灌溉系统的构造、控制原理及设计要点,通过分析降雨量、相对湿度和浇灌用水量的相互关系,说明了浇灌用水量的影响因素及年度变化情况,阐述了节水技术在种植屋面灌溉系统中的具体实施及运用,为其他同类型项目节水设计提供了很好的借鉴.

  11. The effect of roofing material on the quality of harvested rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Carolina B; Klenzendorf, J Brandon; Afshar, Brigit R; Simmons, Mark T; Barrett, Michael E; Kinney, Kerry A; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2011-02-01

    Due to decreases in the availability and quality of traditional water resources, harvested rainwater is increasingly used for potable and non-potable purposes. In this study, we examined the effect of conventional roofing materials (i.e., asphalt fiberglass shingle, Galvalume(®) metal, and concrete tile) and alternative roofing materials (i.e., cool and green) on the quality of harvested rainwater. Results from pilot-scale and full-scale roofs demonstrated that rainwater harvested from any of these roofing materials would require treatment if the consumer wanted to meet United States Environmental Protection Agency primary and secondary drinking water standards or non-potable water reuse guidelines; at a minimum, first-flush diversion, filtration, and disinfection are recommended. Metal roofs are commonly recommended for rainwater harvesting applications, and this study showed that rainwater harvested from metal roofs tends to have lower concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria as compared to other roofing materials. However, concrete tile and cool roofs produced harvested rainwater quality similar to that from the metal roofs, indicating that these roofing materials also are suitable for rainwater harvesting applications. Although the shingle and green roofs produced water quality comparable in many respects to that from the other roofing materials, their dissolved organic carbon concentrations were very high (approximately one order of magnitude higher than what is typical for a finished drinking water in the United States), which might lead to high concentrations of disinfection byproducts after chlorination. Furthermore the concentrations of some metals (e.g., arsenic) in rainwater harvested from the green roof suggest that the quality of commercial growing media should be carefully examined if the harvested rainwater is being considered for domestic use. Hence, roofing material is an important consideration when designing a rainwater catchment. PMID

  12. A School on Roof

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhouChao

    2005-01-01

    March 23, Wednesday, Wuhan. It was a raining and cloudy day. One month passed but still more than 20 students had yet registered in Lingzhi Elementary School in Jianghan District, Wuhan, capital city of central Hubei Province. Zhu Zhongfan habitually looked out to the stairway of the building. “Whenever a new semester begins, a dozen of students will not come. They either go back to their hometowns or transfer to other school or even drop out.” Zhu, 49 years old, is the headmaster of the school. He began teaching at 19 and founded this school in 1999. Currently, there are 406 registered students, most of which are children of migrant workers from the countryside. As it is extremely hard to find a cheap place for school, Zhu had to locate his school on the roof of a vegetable fair building. Everyday, student's reciting of textbooks mixes with shouting of vendors, orchestrating unique symphonic melodies.

  13. Energy Performance Impacts from Competing Low-slope Roofing Choices and Photovoltaic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagengast, Amy L.

    With such a vast quantity of space, commercial low-slope roofs offer significant potential for sustainable roofing technology deployment. Specifically, building energy performance can be improved by installing rooftop energy technologies such as photovoltaic (PV) panels, and/or including designs such as white or green roofs instead of traditional black. This research aims to inform and support roof decisions through quantified energy performance impacts across roof choices and photovoltaic technologies. The primary dataset for this research was measured over a 16 month period (May 24, 2011 to October 13, 2012) from a large field experiment in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on top of a commercial warehouse with white, black and green roof sections, each with portions covered by polycrystalline photovoltaic panels. Results from the Pittsburgh experiment were extended to three different cities (San Diego, CA; Huntsville, AL; and Phoenix, AZ) chosen to represent a wide range of irradiance and temperature values. First, this research evaluated the difference in electricity production from a green-moss roof and black roof underneath photovoltaic panels to determine if the green roof's cooler air increases the panel efficiency. Second, separate studies examine 1) average hourly heat flux by month for unobstructed and shaded roof membranes 2) heat flux peak time delay, and 3) air temperature across roof types. Results of this research show green roofs slightly increased (0.8-1.5%) PV panel efficiency in temperatures approximately at or above 25° C (77°F) compared to black roofs. However in cool climates, like Pittsburgh, the roof type under the PV panels had little overall impact on PV performance when considering year round temperatures. Instead, roof decisions should place a stronger emphasis on heat flux impacts. The green roof outperformed both black and white roofs at minimizing total conductive heat flux. These heat flow values were used to develop a new, straight

  14. Green Roofs for Stormwater Runoff Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated green roofs as a stormwater management tool. Specifically, runoff quantity and quality from green and flat asphalt roofs were compared. Evapotranspiration from planted green roofs and evaporation from unplanted media roofs were also compared. The influence...

  15. Physico-technical measurement of green roof in climate chamber module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baláž Richard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Not for nothing it is said that "a good roof is priceless." Although it may lead to discussions, which roof is good, because there are a lot of requirements and criteria for the functional characterization. It must be understood that the roof structure defines the durability of the building as a unit, therefore it defines lifetime of other parts of the building and also the function of space that is covered by the roof. Therefore it is very important to pay particular attention to the design, as well as the realization of the roof structure. The aim of this publication is to judge the physical and technical parameters in the design of the roof coating module in a climatic chamber.

  16. The impact of roofing material on building energy performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiee, Ali

    The last decade has seen an increase in the efficient use of energy sources such as water, electricity, and natural gas as well as a variety of roofing materials, in the heating and cooling of both residential and commercial infrastructure. Oil costs, coal and natural gas prices remain high and unstable. All of these instabilities and increased costs have resulted in higher heating and cooling costs, and engineers are making an effort to keep them under control by using energy efficient building materials. The building envelope (that which separates the indoor and outdoor environments of a building) plays a significant role in the rate of building energy consumption. An appropriate architectural design of a building envelope can considerably lower the energy consumption during hot summers and cold winters, resulting in reduced HVAC loads. Several building components (walls, roofs, fenestration, foundations, thermal insulation, external shading devices, thermal mass, etc.) make up this essential part of a building. However, thermal insulation of a building's rooftop is the most essential part of a building envelope in that it reduces the incoming "heat flux" (defined as the amount of heat transferred per unit area per unit time from or to a surface) (Sadineni et al., 2011). Moreover, more than 60% of heat transfer occurs through the roof regardless of weather, since a roof is often the building surface that receives the largest amount of solar radiation per square annually (Suman, and Srivastava, 2009). Hence, an argument can be made that the emphasis on building energy efficiency has influenced roofing manufacturing more than any other building envelope component. This research project will address roofing energy performance as the source of nearly 60% of the building heat transfer (Suman, and Srivastava, 2009). We will also rank different roofing materials in terms of their energy performance. Other parts of the building envelope such as walls, foundation

  17. 40 CFR 65.43 - Fixed roof with an internal floating roof (IFR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... failures, the internal floating roof, and the seal through manholes and roof hatches on the fixed roof no...) of this section: (i) Visually inspect for IFR type B failures, the internal floating roof, the... internal floating roof and the other components as specified in the following: (A) For IFR type A...

  18. Green-Roof Effects on Neighborhood Microclimate and Human Thermal Sensation

    OpenAIRE

    C Y Jim; Lilliana L.H. Peng

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs have been recognized as an effective sustainable design tool to mitigate urban heat island (UHI) effects. Previous studies have identified green-roof benefits in cooling and energy-conservation at the building scale, with limited exploration of the wider influence on neighborhood microclimate and human thermal comfort (HTC). This paper investigated the impacts of community-scale green-roof installation on air temperature and HTC in five typical residential neighborhoods of subtrop...

  19. Measure Guideline. Deep Energy Enclosure Retrofit for Zero Energy Ready House Flat Roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, H. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Pettit, B. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-05-29

    This Measure Guideline provides design and construction information for a deep energy enclosure retrofit solution of a flat roof assembly. It describes the strategies and procedures for an exterior retrofit of a flat wood-framed roof with brick masonry exterior walls using exterior and interior (framing cavity) insulation. The approach supported in this guide could also be adapted for use with flat wood-framed roofs with wood-framed exterior walls.

  20. Measure Guideline: Deep Energy Enclosure Retrofit for Zero Energy Ready House Flat Roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, H. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Pettit, B. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This Measure Guideline provides design and construction information for a deep energy enclosure retrofit (DEER) solution of a flat roof assembly. It describes the strategies and procedures for an exterior retrofit of a flat, wood-framed roof with brick masonry exterior walls, using exterior and interior (framing cavity) insulation. The approach supported in this guide could also be adapted for use with flat, wood-framed roofs with wood-framed exterior walls.

  1. Evaluation of energy roof direct utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, R.; Rossetto, L.; Viero, L.

    1984-04-01

    Energy roofs are roofing systems equipped with channels which allow both solar and atmospheric energy collection. They were conceived as cold source for heat pump systems. The behavious of an energy roof in DHW direct heating was studied; this might extend energy roof utilization all year long. The estimates were performed through more reliable recently proposed correlations for wind convection heat transfer coefficients. The advantage of annual energy roof utilization in DHW direct heating is predictable.

  2. ENERGY STAR Certified Roof Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.3 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Roof Products that are effective as of July 1,...

  3. Impact of green roofs on stormwater quality in a South Australian urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Kazemi, F

    2014-02-01

    Green roofs are an increasingly important component of water sensitive urban design systems and can potentially improve the quality of urban runoff. However, there is evidence that they can occasionally act as a source rather than a sink for pollutants. In this study, the water quality of the outflow from both intensive and extensive green roof systems were studied in the city of Adelaide, South Australia over a period of nine months. The aim was to examine the effects of different green roof configurations on stormwater quality and to compare this with runoff from aluminium and asphalt roofs as control surfaces. The contaminant concentrations in runoff from both intensive and extensive green roofs generally decreased during the study period. A comparison between the two types of green roof showed that except for some events for EC, TDS and chloride, the values of the parameters such as pH, turbidity, nitrate, phosphate and potassium in intensive green roof outflows were higher than in the outflows from the extensive green roofs. These concentrations were compared to local, state, national and international water quality guidelines in order to investigate the potential for outflow runoff from green roofs to be reused for potable and non-potable purposes. The study found that green roof outflow can provide an alternative water source for non-potable purposes such as urban landscape irrigation and toilet flushing.

  4. Localization of buildings with a gable roof in very high-resolution aerial images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelhoff, Lykele; de With, Peter H. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at the robust automatic detection of buildings with a gable roof in varying rural areas from very-high-resolution aerial images. The originality of our approach resides in a custom-made design extracting key features close to modeling, such as e.g. roof ridges and gutters. In this way, we allow a large freedom in roof appearances. The proposed method is based on a combination of two hypotheses. First, it exploits the physical properties of gable roofs and detects straight line-segments within non-vegetated and non-farmland areas, as possibilities of occurring roof-ridges. Second, for each of these candidate roof-ridges, the likely roof-gutter positions are estimated for both sides of the line segment, resulting in a set of possible roof configurations. These hypotheses are validated based on the analysis of size, shadow, color and edge information, where for each roof-ridge candidate the optimal configuration is selected. Roof configurations with unlikely properties are rejected and afterwards ridges with overlapping configurations are fused. Experiments conducted on a set of 200 images covering various rural regions, with a large variation in both building appearance and surroundings, show that the algorithm is able to detect 75% of the buildings with a precision of 69.4%. We consider this as a reasonably good result, since the computing is fully unconstrained, numerous buildings were occluded by trees and because there is a significant appearance difference between the considered test images.

  5. Impact of green roofs on stormwater quality in a South Australian urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Kazemi, F

    2014-02-01

    Green roofs are an increasingly important component of water sensitive urban design systems and can potentially improve the quality of urban runoff. However, there is evidence that they can occasionally act as a source rather than a sink for pollutants. In this study, the water quality of the outflow from both intensive and extensive green roof systems were studied in the city of Adelaide, South Australia over a period of nine months. The aim was to examine the effects of different green roof configurations on stormwater quality and to compare this with runoff from aluminium and asphalt roofs as control surfaces. The contaminant concentrations in runoff from both intensive and extensive green roofs generally decreased during the study period. A comparison between the two types of green roof showed that except for some events for EC, TDS and chloride, the values of the parameters such as pH, turbidity, nitrate, phosphate and potassium in intensive green roof outflows were higher than in the outflows from the extensive green roofs. These concentrations were compared to local, state, national and international water quality guidelines in order to investigate the potential for outflow runoff from green roofs to be reused for potable and non-potable purposes. The study found that green roof outflow can provide an alternative water source for non-potable purposes such as urban landscape irrigation and toilet flushing. PMID:24184543

  6. Green roofs and implementing the goals of Smart Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart Growth is a movement developed by city planners to counteract urban sprawl and inner-city deterioration. This paper explored the use of green roofs as a tangible means to attain the following 4 main goals of Smart Growth: (1) support infill development which refers to the concentration of development in already existing nodes and corridors served by public transit, (2) make cities more liveable, healthy, and environmentally sustainable, (3) create new green space and habitat for biodiversity preservation, and (4) support efficient and green infrastructure. It was suggested that few technologies provide such a wide range of opportunity as green roofs do to generate tangible social, economic and environmental benefits. Roof space represents 15 to 35 per cent of the total land area in a city. In addition to providing stormwater management, green roofs contribute to a reduction of the urban heat island, bringing nature back into the city. It was noted that generating new accessible and inaccessible green space is consistent with the needs and desires or urban dwellers. The extent to which green roofs can provide public benefits depends on the type of design. Green roofs not only cool the buildings they sit upon, but generate cooling for the surrounding area that can result in reduced energy consumption and improvements in air quality. 64 refs., 2 figs

  7. Roof Defects in North Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    Aghghaleh, Shadi Pakpour

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The construction boom in North Cyprus, followed by Annan Plan, have resulted in the construction of a great number of buildings with minimum costs and quality. Although there exist certain rules for the construction of new buildings in North Cyprus, and part of these rules are related to the roofs, defects are observed few years after construction. This thesis intends to introduce different roof systems in North Cyprus, to find their problems and suggest solutions. In this respe...

  8. Hydrological Performance of Green Roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Poorova, Zuzana; Vranayova, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    There should be a balance between artificial environment and natural environment. As forests, fields, gardens and urban lands are being replaced with bituminous, concrete and unnatural surfaces, necessity of recovering green and blue spaces and natural areas is becoming more and more critical. Green roof is a tool in strategy of making more pervious areas and beating more impervious areas. Green roof is lately becoming part of urban storm water management. Considering this fact, new construct...

  9. [A review of green roof performance towards management of roof runoff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-ping; Huang, Pei; Zhou, Zhi-xiang; Gao, Chi

    2015-08-01

    Green roof has a significant influence on reducing runoff volume, delaying runoff-yielding time, reducing the peak flow and improving runoff quality. This paper addressed the related research around the world and concluded from several aspects, i.e., the definition of green roof of different types, the mechanism how green roof manages runoff quantity and quality, the ability how green roof controls roof runoff, and the influence factors of green roof toward runoff quantity and quality. Afterwards, there was a need for more future work on research of green roof toward roof runoff, i.e., vegetation selection of green roof, efficient construction model selection of green roof, the regulating characteristics of green roof on roof runoff, the value assessment of green roof on roof runoff, analysis of source-sink function of green roof on the water pollutants of roof runoff and the research on the mitigation measures of roof runoff pollution. This paper provided a guideline to develop green roofs aiming to regulating roof runoff.

  10. [A review of green roof performance towards management of roof runoff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-ping; Huang, Pei; Zhou, Zhi-xiang; Gao, Chi

    2015-08-01

    Green roof has a significant influence on reducing runoff volume, delaying runoff-yielding time, reducing the peak flow and improving runoff quality. This paper addressed the related research around the world and concluded from several aspects, i.e., the definition of green roof of different types, the mechanism how green roof manages runoff quantity and quality, the ability how green roof controls roof runoff, and the influence factors of green roof toward runoff quantity and quality. Afterwards, there was a need for more future work on research of green roof toward roof runoff, i.e., vegetation selection of green roof, efficient construction model selection of green roof, the regulating characteristics of green roof on roof runoff, the value assessment of green roof on roof runoff, analysis of source-sink function of green roof on the water pollutants of roof runoff and the research on the mitigation measures of roof runoff pollution. This paper provided a guideline to develop green roofs aiming to regulating roof runoff. PMID:26685624

  11. Soil-water fluxes modelling in a green roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamera, Carlotta; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Becciu, Gianfranco; Rosso, Renzo

    2014-05-01

    Green roofs differ from a natural environment as they are on top of a building and are not connected to the natural ground; therefore it is critical that soils can drain and retain water simultaneously and that they work even in very shallow systems. The soil or growing medium used for green roofs is specifically engineered to provide the vegetation with nutrients, discharging any excess water into the drainage layer, and releasing stored water back into the substrate. In this way, medium depth and porosity plays an important role in stormwater retention and plant growth in a green roof. Due to the lack of a good understanding about the hydraulic efficiency of each green roof's layer in rainwater management, a detailed analysis of the hydrological dynamics, connected with the green roof technical design is essential in order to obtain a full characterization of the hydrologic behavior of a green roof system and its effects on the urban water cycle components. The purpose of this research is analyzing the soil-water dynamics through the different components of a green roof and modeling these processes though a detailed but clear subsurface hydrology module, based on green roof vertical soil water movement reproduction, in relation to climate forcing, basic technology components and geometric characteristics of green roof systems (thickness of the stratigraphy, soil layers and materials, vegetation typology and density). A multi-layer bucket model has been applied to examine the hydrological response of the green roof system under a temperate maritime climate, by varying the physical and geometric parameters that characterize the different components of the vegetated cover. Following a stage of validation and calibration, results confirm the suitability of the model to describe the hydrologic response of the green roof during the observed rainfall events: the discharge hydrograph profile, volume and timing, predicted by the model, matched experimental measurements

  12. Run-off from roofs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to find the run-off from roof material a roof has been constructed with two different slopes (30 deg C and 45 deg C). Beryllium-7 and caesium-137 has been used as tracers. Considering new roof material the pollution removed by runoff processes has been shown to be very different for various roof materials. The pollution is much more easily removed from silicon-treated material than from porous red-tile roof material. Caesium is removed more easily than beryllium. The content of caesium in old roof materials is greater in red-tile than in other less-porous materials. However, the measured removal from new material does not correspond to the amount accumulated in the old. This could be explained by weathering and by saturation effects. This last effect is probably the more important. The measurements on old material indicates a removal of 44-86% of the caesium pollution by run-off, whereas the measurement on new showed a removal of only 31-50%. It has been demonstrated that the pollution concentration in the run-off water could be very different from that in rainwater. The work was part of the EEC Radiation Protection Programme and done under a subcontract with Association Euratom-C.E.A. No. SC-014-BIO-F-423-DK(SD) under contract No. BIO-F-423-81-F. (author)

  13. Building America Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles, Orlando, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-11-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  14. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  15. Developing resilient green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Brien, C J

    2014-08-15

    Living roofs are an emerging green infrastructure technology that can potentially be used to ameliorate both climate change and urban heat island effects. There is not much information regarding the design of green roofs for dry climates and so the aim of this study was to develop low maintenance and unfertilized green roofs for a dry climate. This paper describes the effects of four important elements of green roofs namely slope, depth, growing media and plant species and their possible interactions in terms of plant growth responses in a dry climate. Sixteen medium-scale green roofs were set up and monitored during a one year period. This experiment consisted of twelve vegetated platforms and four non-vegetated platforms as controls. The design for the experiment was a split-split-plot design in which the factors Slope (1° and 25°) and Depth (100mm, 300 mm) were randomized to the platforms (main plots). Root depth and volume, average height of plants, final dry biomass and ground cover, relative growth rate, final dry shoot-root ratio, water use efficiency and leaf succulence were studied during a twelve month period. The results showed little growth of the plants in media type A, whilst the growth was significant in both media types B and C. On average, a 90% survival rate of plants was observed. Also the growth indices indicated that some plants can grow efficiently in the harsh environment created by green roofs in a dry climate. The root growth pattern showed that retained water in the drainage layer is an alternative source of water for plants. It was also shown that stormwater can be used as a source of irrigation water for green roofs during six months of the year at the study site. In summary, mild sloping intensive systems containing media type C and planted with either Chrysocephalum apiculatum or Disphyma crassifolium showed the best performance.

  16. Developing resilient green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Brien, C J

    2014-08-15

    Living roofs are an emerging green infrastructure technology that can potentially be used to ameliorate both climate change and urban heat island effects. There is not much information regarding the design of green roofs for dry climates and so the aim of this study was to develop low maintenance and unfertilized green roofs for a dry climate. This paper describes the effects of four important elements of green roofs namely slope, depth, growing media and plant species and their possible interactions in terms of plant growth responses in a dry climate. Sixteen medium-scale green roofs were set up and monitored during a one year period. This experiment consisted of twelve vegetated platforms and four non-vegetated platforms as controls. The design for the experiment was a split-split-plot design in which the factors Slope (1° and 25°) and Depth (100mm, 300 mm) were randomized to the platforms (main plots). Root depth and volume, average height of plants, final dry biomass and ground cover, relative growth rate, final dry shoot-root ratio, water use efficiency and leaf succulence were studied during a twelve month period. The results showed little growth of the plants in media type A, whilst the growth was significant in both media types B and C. On average, a 90% survival rate of plants was observed. Also the growth indices indicated that some plants can grow efficiently in the harsh environment created by green roofs in a dry climate. The root growth pattern showed that retained water in the drainage layer is an alternative source of water for plants. It was also shown that stormwater can be used as a source of irrigation water for green roofs during six months of the year at the study site. In summary, mild sloping intensive systems containing media type C and planted with either Chrysocephalum apiculatum or Disphyma crassifolium showed the best performance. PMID:24880547

  17. Physico-technical measurement of green roof in climate chamber module

    OpenAIRE

    Baláž Richard; Bagoňa Miloslav

    2015-01-01

    Not for nothing it is said that "a good roof is priceless." Although it may lead to discussions, which roof is good, because there are a lot of requirements and criteria for the functional characterization. It must be understood that the roof structure defines the durability of the building as a unit, therefore it defines lifetime of other parts of the building and also the function of space that is covered by the roof. Therefore it is very important to pay particular attention to the design,...

  18. Plant species and functional group combinations affect green roof ecosystem functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Lundholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or

  19. Plant Species and Functional Group Combinations Affect Green Roof Ecosystem Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundholm, Jeremy; MacIvor, J. Scott; MacDougall, Zachary; Ranalli, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium) green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. Conclusions/Significance Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or facilitation as mechanisms

  20. Green roofs and the urban renaissance in Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, M. [Peabody Trust, London (United Kingdom); Farrell, J. [Greater London Authority (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Green roofs in Britain are not very widespread. Their entry into the main stream has been slow due to conservative architectural design, planning, and a general lack of knowledge in green building practices. The national government has not issued any legislation or guidance, nor has it offered incentives to developers. In 1999, the British Government initiated a wide-ranging program in urban renaissance to revitalize towns and cities. The program deals mainly with high density development located on brownfields. Green roof technology has not yet entered the urban renaissance initiative, and the importance of brownfield land for biodiversity and amenity has not been recognized. However, London has seen some progress in environmental urban design and green roofs. Links have been established between the benefits of green roofs and the cross-sectoral Biodiversity Action Plan of the Government. Construction is being reassessed, as are building designs, urban green spaces, and climate change. Sustainable development in the City of London is the responsibility of the Mayor. It was emphasized that opportunities exist for establishing policies that promote green roofs that offer social benefits. The voluntary and public sectors have come up with several innovative projects. 47 refs.

  1. Ecological Impacts of Replacing Traditional Roofs with Green Roofs in Two Urban Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Carter; Colleen Butler

    2008-01-01

    Urban land cover is dominated by impervious surface that degrades both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems relative to predevelopment conditions. There are significant opportunities for designers of urban landscapes to use alternative land covers that have multiple functions, benefiting both human and nonhuman components of the urban ecosystem. Vegetated (green) roofs are one form of alternative land cover that has shown the potential to provide a variety of ecological benefits in urban areas....

  2. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  3. Performance Analysis of Cool Roof, Green Roof and Thermal Insulation on a Concrete Flat Roof in Tropical Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Zingre, Kishor T.; Yang, Xingguo; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    In the tropics, the earth surface receives abundant solar radiation throughout the year contributing significantly to building heat gain and, thus, cooling demand. An effective method that can curb the heat gains through opaque roof surfaces could provide significant energy savings. This study investigates and compares the effectiveness of various passive cooling techniques including cool roof, green roof and thermal insulation for reducing the heat gain through a flat concrete roof in tropic...

  4. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  5. Learning-based roof style classification in 2D satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Andi; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Xin; Agam, Gady

    2015-05-01

    Accurately recognizing building roof style leads to a much more realistic 3D building modeling and rendering. In this paper, we propose a novel system for image based roof style classification using machine learning technique. Our system is capable of accurately recognizing four individual roof styles and a complex roof which is composed of multiple parts. We make several novel contributions in this paper. First, we propose an algorithm that segments a complex roof to parts which enable our system to recognize the entire roof based on recognition of each part. Second, to better characterize a roof image, we design a new feature extracted from a roof edge image. We demonstrate that this feature has much better performance compared to recognition results generated by Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG), Scale-invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and Local Binary Patterns (LBP). Finally, to generate a classifier, we propose a learning scheme that trains the classifier using both synthetic and real roof images. Experiment results show that our classifier performs well on several test collections.

  6. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  7. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  8. Green Roof Potential in Arab Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Attia, Shady

    2014-01-01

    Urban green roofs have long been promoted as an easy and effective strategy for beautifying the built environment and increasing investment opportunity. The building roof is very important because it has a direct impact on thermal comfort and energy conservation in and around buildings. Urban green roofs can help to address the lack of green space in many urban areas. Urban green roofs provides the city with open spaces that helps reduce urban heat island effect and provides the human populat...

  9. GREEN ROOFS — A GROWING TREND

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the most interesting stormwater control systems under evaluation by EPA are “green roofs”. Green roofs are vegetative covers applied to building roofs to slow, or totally absorb, rainfall runoff during storms. While the concept of over-planted roofs is very ancient, the go...

  10. The green roof dilemma - discussion of Francis and Lorimer (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Alexandre; Frascaria-Lacoste, Nathalie

    2012-08-15

    Urban ecosystems are the most complex mosaics of vegetative land cover that can be found. In a recent paper, Francis and Lorimer (2011) evaluated the reconciliation potential of living roofs and walls. For these authors, these two techniques for habitat improvement have strong potential for urban reconciliation ecology. However they have some ecological and societal limitations such as the physical extreme environmental characteristics, the monetary investment and the cultural perceptions of urban nature. We are interested in their results and support their conclusions. However, for a considerable time, green roofs have been designed to provide urban greenery for buildings and the green roof market has only focused on extensive roof at a restricted scale within cities. Thus, we have strong doubts about the relevance of their use as possible integrated elements of the network. Furthermore, without dynamic progress in research and the implementation of well-thought-out policies, what will be the real capital gain from green roofs with respect to land-use complementation in cities? If we agree with Francis and Lorimer (2011) considering that urban reconciliation ecology between nature and citizens is a current major challenge, then "adaptive collaborative management" is a fundamental requirement.

  11. The green roof dilemma - discussion of Francis and Lorimer (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Alexandre; Frascaria-Lacoste, Nathalie

    2012-08-15

    Urban ecosystems are the most complex mosaics of vegetative land cover that can be found. In a recent paper, Francis and Lorimer (2011) evaluated the reconciliation potential of living roofs and walls. For these authors, these two techniques for habitat improvement have strong potential for urban reconciliation ecology. However they have some ecological and societal limitations such as the physical extreme environmental characteristics, the monetary investment and the cultural perceptions of urban nature. We are interested in their results and support their conclusions. However, for a considerable time, green roofs have been designed to provide urban greenery for buildings and the green roof market has only focused on extensive roof at a restricted scale within cities. Thus, we have strong doubts about the relevance of their use as possible integrated elements of the network. Furthermore, without dynamic progress in research and the implementation of well-thought-out policies, what will be the real capital gain from green roofs with respect to land-use complementation in cities? If we agree with Francis and Lorimer (2011) considering that urban reconciliation ecology between nature and citizens is a current major challenge, then "adaptive collaborative management" is a fundamental requirement. PMID:22484659

  12. Integrated Green Roofs System and its Role of Achieving Sustainability in Residential Buildings in Urban Area in Athens, Greece and Famagusta, North Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehran shahidipour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the characteristics and importance of the green roof in urban area would investigate in some residential buildings in Athens, Greece and then, some strategies give to integrate green roof in residential buildings in Famagusta, north Cyprus due to the importance of energy saving and thermal comfort in residential buildings. These days, sustainable architecture is spreading around the world. Therefore, Sustainable architecture has important role in design buildings and urban design due to high amount of energy use and global warming around the world. There are different methods in sustainable design and one of them that has significant role is design green roof. Green roof integrated to the roof of the buildings to provide the suitable indoor temperature without spending high amount of budget. The methodology is qualitative type that trough the literature review and survey would be understood the importance and role of the green roof in both architecture and urban area. There are many significant architects like Wright that they understood how greenery would improve the function of the building in terms of provide thermal comfort and indoor temperature for the residences, and green roof as well. In Famagusta, there is not any green roof however, the design and integrating of green roof is inexpensive. Green roof should design properly depend on the characteristic of the climate of every place so, the location, temperature, and humidity, location, and wind have influence on the design of the green roof.

  13. Crystalline roof glazing - Westside shopping centre, Berne; Kristalline Dachverglasungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkerli, W.

    2009-07-01

    This illustrated article takes a look at the new shopping and leisure centre on the western outskirts of Berne, Switzerland. In particular, the roof of this unusual building over the motorway with its sloping walls and zig-zag design is looked at. The centre's shopping mall, adventure baths and spa, a multiplex cinema, an old peoples' home and a hotel are briefly discussed, as is the embedding of the centre in its suburban environment. The roof construction with its crystalline skylights is examined and discussed in detail. The centre's building technical services are also briefly commented on.

  14. PREDICTING THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF ROOFING SYSTEMS IN SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MINTOROGO Danny Santoso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional roofing systems in the developing country likes Indonesia are still be dominated by the 30o, 45o, and more pitched angle roofs; the roofing cover materials are widely used to traditional clay roof tiles, then modern concrete roof tiles, and ceramic roof tiles. In the 90’s decay, shop houses are prosperous built with flat concrete roofs dominant. Green roofs and roof ponds are almost rarely built to meet the sustainable environmental issues. Some tested various roof systems in Surabaya were carried out to observe the roof thermal performances. Mathematical equation model from three references are also performed in order to compare with the real project tested. Calculated with equation (Kabre et al., the 30o pitched concrete-roof-tile, 30o clay-roof-tile, 45o pitched concrete-roof-tile are the worst thermal heat flux coming to room respectively. In contrast, the bare soil concrete roof and roof pond system are the least heat flux streamed onto room. Based on predicted calculation without insulation and cross-ventilation attic space, the roof pond and bare soil concrete roof (greenery roof are the appropriate roof systems for the Surabaya’s climate; meanwhile the most un-recommended roof is pitched 30o or 45o angle with concrete-roof tiles roofing systems.

  15. Asphalt and Wood Shingling. Roofing Workbook and Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arthur

    This combination workbook and set of tests contains materials on asphalt and wood shingling that have been designed to be used by those studying to enter the roofing and waterproofing trade. It consists of seven instructional units and seven accompanying objective tests. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: shingling…

  16. Hydrological Response of Sedum-Moss Roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, L.

    2004-12-01

    Eco-roofs are becoming popular for aesthetic reasons and also as units of stormwater systems. It is thought that such roofs with soil cover and vegetation reduces the total runoff, the peak flows and improves the quality of the roof water. Here are reported investigations of runoff from thin, 3-4 cm soil, extensive green roofs with sedum-moss in southern Sweden. The two-year study was performed on new roofs in the eco-city Augustenborg and also on nearby old vegetative roofs. The rain intensity and the roof runoff were measured with 5 min, or in some experiments with 1 min, resolution. The annual runoff from the eco-roofs was about half that from hard roofs and was close to that of small natural rivers. However, although most rainy days there was no or little runoff from the roofs, the highest observed daily runoff values were close to the daily rainfall. Runoff is initiated, when the soil is at field capacity. Thereafter the hourly runoff corresponds closely to the hourly rainfall. For short-term high intensity storms, the runoff peak is attenuated relative the rain intensity. The time of concentration for runoff was experimentally determined applying artificial rains on existing roofs and on experimental roof plots with varying slopes and using different drainage layers. The peak runoff from the roofs was found to correspond to the rain intensity over 20-30 minutes. The probability of high rain intensity is much higher than the probability of high runoff. When intensity-duration-frequency curves were constructed, runoff with 0.4 year return period corresponded to rain with 1.5 year return period. The influence of the slope of the roofs on the runoff peak was minor as was the effect of drainage layer. The vertical flow in the soil dominates the runoff process. The influence of extensive sedum-moss vegetated roofs on runoff quality was also studied to ascertain whether vegetated roofs behave as sink or source of pollutants and whether the runoff quality changes

  17. PREDICTING THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF ROOFING SYSTEMS IN SURABAYA

    OpenAIRE

    MINTOROGO Danny Santoso

    2015-01-01

    Traditional roofing systems in the developing country likes Indonesia are still be dominated by the 30o, 45o, and more pitched angle roofs; the roofing cover materials are widely used to traditional clay roof tiles, then modern concrete roof tiles, and ceramic roof tiles. In the 90’s decay, shop houses are prosperous built with flat concrete roofs dominant. Green roofs and roof ponds are almost rarely built to meet the sustainable environmental issues. Some tested various roof systems in Sura...

  18. Habitat connectivity shapes urban arthropod communities: the key role of green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaker, S; Ghazoul, J; Obrist, M K; Moretti, M

    2014-04-01

    that eventually even communities of low-mobility species become connected. Furthermore, improving the design of green roofs (composition and configuration of vegetation and soil types) could enhance the ecological value, particularly for low-mobility species.

  19. Habitat connectivity shapes urban arthropod communities: the key role of green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaker, S; Ghazoul, J; Obrist, M K; Moretti, M

    2014-04-01

    that eventually even communities of low-mobility species become connected. Furthermore, improving the design of green roofs (composition and configuration of vegetation and soil types) could enhance the ecological value, particularly for low-mobility species. PMID:24933819

  20. Preservation of a traditional timber roof: the case of the Handanija mosque

    OpenAIRE

    Mevludin Zečević; Amir Čaušević; Nerman Rustempašić

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a brief overview of their personal involvement in the inspection of the roof timbers of the Handanija Mosque in Prusac. As well as the inspection, the authors were asked to propose a design for the roof structure. The Handanija Mosque, built in 1617, is an important example of the cultural heritage of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the mosque was designated as a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2005. The form, design and proportions of this traditio...

  1. 华南地区屋顶菜园工程设计与建造技术研究%The Design and Construction of Urban Roof Vegetable Garden in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董斌; 林国雄; 易弦; 查钱慧; 洪文泓

    2015-01-01

    Urban roof vegetable garden originated from roof garden. Based on the development of urban roof vegetable garden in South China , the thesis takes the constrcutions and experiments with vegetables in Guangdong Agriculture Industry Business Polytechnic College as example , sums up a practical and key technique of urban roof vegetable garden in South China through researching the function division, variety selection, roof structure, load bearing, water supply and drainage, wind-proof technique so as to do some foundation works for constructions and developments of roof vegetable garden in the future.%城市屋顶菜园是在屋顶花园基础上衍生的新兴产物。结合华南地区屋顶菜园的建设现状,以广东农工商职业技术学院屋顶菜园工程建造和蔬菜适生性试验为例,从功能分区、适种品种、屋面结构、承重荷载、给排水技术、防风技术等层面入手,归纳出一套适宜华南地区屋顶菜园设计及建造的关键技术,以期为该区域屋顶菜园建设和发展做一些基础性工作。

  2. Generating realistic roofs over a rectilinear polygon

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2011-01-01

    Given a simple rectilinear polygon P in the xy-plane, a roof over P is a terrain over P whose faces are supported by planes through edges of P that make a dihedral angle π/4 with the xy-plane. In this paper, we introduce realistic roofs by imposing a few additional constraints. We investigate the geometric and combinatorial properties of realistic roofs, and show a connection with the straight skeleton of P. We show that the maximum possible number of distinct realistic roofs over P is ( ⌊(n-4)/4⌋ (n-4)/2) when P has n vertices. We present an algorithm that enumerates a combinatorial representation of each such roof in O(1) time per roof without repetition, after O(n 4) preprocessing time. We also present an O(n 5)-time algorithm for computing a realistic roof with minimum height or volume. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Single-sided natural ventilation through a centre-pivot roof window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Nielsen, Peter V.; Gunner, Amalie;

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of centre pivot roof windows for wind driven single-sided ventilation has not been studied before. These types of windows are dominating roof windows in Europe. Knowledge of flow characteristics of this kind of window is essential for accurate designing of natural ventilation...... systems. In this study, numerical methods were used to characterise a centre-pivot roof window for wind-driven single-sided ventilation. A 1:20 scale model house of the Energy Flex House (Denmark) was used in this study. The roof slope was 36o. It was found that the single-sided ventilation through the...... centre-pivot roof window can be characterised by a factor called the flow factor. The flow factor was a function of the sash opening-angle and wind direction. The flow factor increased with increase in opening-angle and decreased with increase in wind direction....

  4. Rock characterization while drilling and application of roof bolter drilling data for evaluation of ground conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Rostami

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in mine health and safety, roof collapse and instabilities are still the leading causes of injury and fatality in underground mining operations. Improving safety and optimum design of ground support requires good and reliable ground characterization. While many geophysical methods have been developed for ground characterizations, their accuracy is insufficient for customized ground support design of underground workings. The actual measurements on the samples of the roof and wall strata from the exploration boring are reliable but the related holes are far apart, thus unsuitable for design purposes. The best source of information could be the geological back mapping of the roof and walls, but this is disruptive to mining operations, and provided information is only from rock surface. Interpretation of the data obtained from roof bolt drilling can offer a good and reliable source of information that can be used for ground characterization and ground support design and evaluations. This paper offers a brief review of the mine roof characterization methods, followed by introduction and discussion of the roof characterization methods by instrumented roof bolters. A brief overview of the results of the preliminary study and initial testing on an instrumented drill and summary of the suggested improvements are also discussed.

  5. 深圳宝安体育场屋盖轮辐式索膜结构设计%Design of wheel-spoke cable-membrane roof structure of Shenzhen Bao′an Stadium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文波; 陈伟; 陈汉翔; 赵冉; 郭成志

    2011-01-01

    The system and the design philosophy of wheel-spoke cable structure of Shenzhen Bao′an Stadium were introduced.The key and difficult points together with their solutions were elaborated.The preliminary computer simulation on tensegrity construction of the roof of Shenzhen Bao′an Stadium was completed,and the changes of internal forces of the structural elements with the construction process were studied.%系统地介绍了宝安体育场屋盖罩篷轮辐式索膜结构的结构体系和设计理念,阐述了设计过程中的一些重点、难点问题及其解决方案,对该轮辐式屋盖结构的施工张拉过程进行了初步的模拟计算,并研究了屋盖结构各构件在此施工过程中的内力变化情况。

  6. Wind Tunnel Tests for Wind Pressure Distribution on Gable Roof Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-kun Jing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path.

  7. Scale model study on caving and lowering of roof strata behind longwall face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kazuhiko; Itakura, Kenichi; Hishiya, Tomoyuki; Nakagaki, Kaoru

    1987-01-25

    A scale model study on mechanical behaviors of the roof strata behind a longwall face is carried out and results obtained are discussed. In the model, the immediate and main roofs consist of laminated thin strata having a design strength. Results show that the roof behind a longwall face behaves like a beam. It undergoes initial fracture as the span exceeds a certain length. The failure progresses towards the upper beam elements as the face advances, and it reaches a saturated state when the goaf is filled with caved fragments. After this, the fracture proceeds steadily. Where the caving stays within the immediate roof, fracture occurs immediately behind the rear end of the face support as the support moves ahead. Where the caving reaches the main roof, fracture occurs periodically depending on the pitch of cracks across the main roof beam. Based on these findings, a roof model consisting of a beam and blocks is constructed to predict the caving angle and the self-supporting roof span up to the initial fracture. (10 refs, 13 figs, 2 tabs)

  8. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 5, 0.05 Roofing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for built-up membrane; single- ply membrane; metal roofing systems; coated foam membrane; shingles; tiles; parapets; roof drainage system; roof specialties; and skylights.

  9. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  10. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  11. Evaluating convex roof entanglement measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Géza; Moroder, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2015-04-24

    We show a powerful method to compute entanglement measures based on convex roof constructions. In particular, our method is applicable to measures that, for pure states, can be written as low order polynomials of operator expectation values. We show how to compute the linear entropy of entanglement, the linear entanglement of assistance, and a bound on the dimension of the entanglement for bipartite systems. We discuss how to obtain the convex roof of the three-tangle for three-qubit states. We also show how to calculate the linear entropy of entanglement and the quantum Fisher information based on partial information or device independent information. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method by concrete examples.

  12. Factors Influencing Arthropod Diversity on Green Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracha Y. Schindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs have potential for providing substantial habitat to plants, birds, and arthropod species that are not well supported by other urban habitats. Whereas the plants on a typical green roof are chosen and planted by people, the arthropods that colonize it can serve as an indicator of the ability of this novel habitat to support a diverse community of organisms. The goal of this observational study was to determine which physical characteristics of a roof or characteristics of its vegetation correlate with arthropod diversity on the roof. We intensively sampled the number of insect families on one roof with pitfall traps and also measured the soil arthropod species richness on six green roofs in the Boston, MA area. We found that the number of arthropod species in soil, and arthropod families in pitfall traps, was positively correlated with living vegetation cover. The number of arthropod species was not significantly correlated with plant diversity, green roof size, distance from the ground, or distance to the nearest vegetated habitat from the roof. Our results suggest that vegetation cover may be more important than vegetation diversity for roof arthropod diversity, at least for the first few years after establishment. Additionally, we found that even green roofs that are small and isolated can support a community of arthropods that include important functional groups of the soil food web.

  13. A novel solar multifunctional PV/T/D system for green building roofs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel transparent roof combines the solar PV/T/D system with green building design. • Novel photovoltaic-thermal roofing design can achieve excellent light control at noon. • The roof has no obvious influence on indoor light intensity in morning and afternoon. • Higher efficiency of solar energy utilization could be achieved with new roofing. - Abstract: A novel transparent roof which is made of solid CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) PV/T/D (Photovoltaic/Thermal/Day lighting) system is presented. It combines the solar PV/T/D system with green building design. The PV/T/D system can achieve excellent light control at noon and adjust the thermal environment in the building, such that high efficiency utilization of solar energy could be achieved in modern architecture. This kind of roof can increase the visual comfort for building occupants; it can also avoid the building interior from overheating and dazzling at noon which is caused by direct sunlight through transparent roof. Optical simulation software is used to track the light path in different incidence angles. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation and steady state experiment have been taken to investigate the thermal characteristic of PV/T/D device. Finally, the PV/T/D experimental system was built; and the PV efficiency, light transmittance and air heating power of the system are tested under real sky conditions

  14. The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S.A. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a 3 year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year 3 of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic temperature fluctuations.

  16. Aboveground and belowground competition between willow Salix caprea its understory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Hermová, Markéta; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The effects of aboveground and belowground competition with the willow S. caprea on its understory plant community were studied in unreclaimed post-mining sites. Belowground competition was evaluated by comparing (i) frames inserted into the soil that excluded woody roots (frame treatment), (ii) frames that initially excluded woody root growth but then allowed regrowth of the roots (open-frame treatment), and (iii) undisturbed soil (no-frame treatment). These treatments were combined with S. caprea thinning to assess the effect of aboveground competition. Three years after the start of the experiment, aboveground competition from S. caprea (as modified by thinning of the S. caprea canopy) had not affected understory biomass or species number but had affected species composition. In contrast, belowground competition significantly affected both the aboveground and belowground biomass of the understory. The aboveground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame treatment (which excluded woody roots) than in the other two treatments. The belowground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame than in the open-frame treatment. Unlike aboveground competition (light availability), belowground competition did not affect understory species composition. Our results suggest that S. caprea is an important component during plant succession on post-mining sites because it considerably modifies its understory plant community. Belowground competition is a major reason for the low cover and biomass of the herbaceous understory in S. caprea stands on post-mining sites.

  17. A field study to evaluate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Jianghai

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff and to provide reference data for the engineering design of dual substrate layer green roofs. The data were collected from eight different trays under three kinds of artificial rains. The results showed that except for total phosphorus, dual substrate layer green roofs behaved as a sink for most of the nutrient pollutants (significant at p green roof and the depth of the adsorption substrates. Compared with the influence of the substrates, the influence of the plant density and drainage systems was small.

  18. A field study to evaluate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Jianghai

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff and to provide reference data for the engineering design of dual substrate layer green roofs. The data were collected from eight different trays under three kinds of artificial rains. The results showed that except for total phosphorus, dual substrate layer green roofs behaved as a sink for most of the nutrient pollutants (significant at p green roof and the depth of the adsorption substrates. Compared with the influence of the substrates, the influence of the plant density and drainage systems was small. PMID:24355859

  19. Factors Influencing Arthropod Diversity on Green Roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Bracha Y. Schindler; Alden B. Griffith; Kristina N. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Green roofs have potential for providing substantial habitat to plants, birds, and arthropod species that are not well supported by other urban habitats. Whereas the plants on a typical green roof are chosen and planted by people, the arthropods that colonize it can serve as an indicator of the ability of this novel habitat to support a diverse community of organisms. The goal of this observational study was to determine which physical characteristics of a roof or characteristics of its veget...

  20. Extensive Green Roof Ecological Benefits in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Rušenieks, Rihards; Kamenders, Agris

    2013-01-01

    Extensive green roof ecological benefits are studiedin this paper. The research contains a brief explanation aboutgreen roof technology and green roof ecological benefits. Greenroof capability to retain rainwater runoff by accumulating it instorage layers and conducting it back into the atmospherethrough evapotranspiration is studied and modeled. Modeling isdone in Stormwater Management Model 5.0 software. The modelis based on an existing warehouse-type building located in Rigaand hourly Riga...

  1. Key factors in successful green roof training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The green roof market in Germany has increased significantly in the past 3 decades, reaching a market share of 11 to 14 per cent. Three factors were responsible for the success of the green roof movement in Germany, namely the early introduction of quality standards and guidelines; the scientific investigation of ecological and economic benefits and the development of innovative and reliable technologies. In addition, seminars and workshops targeted at relevant groups encouraged green roof construction. Training courses and seminars proved to be efficient communication tools with the advantage of direct feedback from the participants to address sophisticated green roof problems and to integrate current ecological and economic frameworks. The content of the courses were tailored to the specific needs of the participants. In addition, organizers had considerable knowledge of green roof technology and related disciplines. The green roof guidelines in Germany are based on a range of scientific studies from universities, technical colleges and regional research institutions. These studies explored the technical performance of different green roof constructions and the ecological benefits for people and the environment. The market development in Germany is backed by the development of a wide range of innovative technologies which offer solutions for nearly all green roof issues, such as landscaping of sloped, barrel shaped roofs with low load bearing capacities. The German company ZinCo offers the international market a range of well tested and proven green roof systems for intensive and extensive roofs. Their flexible modular products can be adapted to the needs of different roof constructions and to locally specific climatic conditions. 6 refs., 1 fig

  2. Organic Micropollutants in Roof Runoff - A Study of the Emission/Retention Potential of Green Roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Gromaire, Marie-Christine; Lamprea-Bretaudeau, Katerine; Mirande-Bret, Cécile; Caupos, Emilie; Seidl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    International audience The incidence of extensive roof greening structures in the contamination of roof runoff has been analysed for three families of organic micropollutants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], alkylphenols [APs], and bisphenol A [BPA]) by means of both laboratory leaching tests and field experiments. For PAHs, which do not have any local source on the green roof and originate only from atmospheric fallout, the green roof behaves as a sink and reduces by a factor 10 ...

  3. Green Roofs Impact on Buildings Cooling Load

    OpenAIRE

    Besbes, Karim; Zoughaib, Assaad; Bouchie, Remi; Farkh, Salem

    2012-01-01

    Green roofs are being more and more promoted in south Europe. The main sales arguments are based on esthetic, depolution and thermal comfort. This paper proposes a model of the heat and mass transfer phenomenon taking place in these roofs. An experimental validation of the model is performed and presented. Four types of roofs are studied; the varied parameter is the type of soil used for the vegetation and the thermal inertia of the roof itself. The use of the developed model permits to condu...

  4. Realistic roofs over a rectilinear polygon

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-11-01

    Given a simple rectilinear polygon P in the xy-plane, a roof over P is a terrain over P whose faces are supported by planes through edges of P that make a dihedral angle π/4 with the xy-plane. According to this definition, some roofs may have faces isolated from the boundary of P or even local minima, which are undesirable for several practical reasons. In this paper, we introduce realistic roofs by imposing a few additional constraints. We investigate the geometric and combinatorial properties of realistic roofs and show that the straight skeleton induces a realistic roof with maximum height and volume. We also show that the maximum possible number of distinct realistic roofs over P is ((n-4)(n-4)/4 /2⌋) when P has n vertices. We present an algorithm that enumerates a combinatorial representation of each such roof in O(1) time per roof without repetition, after O(n4) preprocessing time. We also present an O(n5)-time algorithm for computing a realistic roof with minimum height or volume. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Green roofs provide habitat for urban bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.L. Parkins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding bat use of human-altered habitat is critical for developing effective conservation plans for this ecologically important taxon. Green roofs, building rooftops covered in growing medium and vegetation, are increasingly important conservation tools that make use of underutilized space to provide breeding and foraging grounds for urban wildlife. Green roofs are especially important in highly urbanized areas such as New York City (NYC, which has more rooftops (34% than green space (13%. To date, no studies have examined the extent to which North American bats utilize urban green roofs. To investigate the role of green roofs in supporting urban bats, we monitored bat activity using ultrasonic recorders on four green and four conventional roofs located in highly developed areas of NYC, which were paired to control for location, height, and local variability in surrounding habitat and species diversity. We then identified bat vocalizations on these recordings to the species level. We documented the presence of five of nine possible bat species over both roof types: Lasiurus borealis, L. cinereus, L. noctivagans, P. subflavus,andE. fuscus. Of the bat calls that could be identified to the species level, 66% were from L. borealis. Overall levels of bat activity were higher over green roofs than over conventional roofs. This study provides evidence that, in addition to well documented ecosystem benefits, urban green roofs contribute to urban habitat availability for several North American bat species.

  6. A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

  7. New bolting structure of fractured roof based on the Bossinesq equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Present support theories contain a number of shortcomings in the designation of fractured roof bolt parameters of rectangular or trapezoidal coal roadways.Roof fall accidents occur easily in this kind of roadway.Based on the Bossinesq equations and the Mohr strength theory,we propose a theory of an anchored cluster structure for fractured roofs and have investigated the formation of such an anchored cluster structure,its self stability mechanism and mechanical properties.The results show that an anchor and ...

  8. Nutrient subsidies to belowground microbes impact aboveground food web interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jes; Megonigal, J Patrick; Denno, Robert F

    2006-06-01

    Historically, terrestrial food web theory has been compartmentalized into interactions among aboveground or belowground communities. In this study we took a more synthetic approach to understanding food web interactions by simultaneously examining four trophic levels and investigating how nutrient (nitrogen and carbon) and detrital subsidies impact the ability of the belowground microbial community to alter the abundance of aboveground arthropods (herbivores and predators) associated with the intertidal cord grass Spartina alterniflora. We manipulated carbon, nitrogen, and detrital resources in a field experiment and measured decomposition rate, soil nitrogen pools, plant biomass and quality, herbivore density, and arthropod predator abundance. Because carbon subsidies impact plant growth only indirectly (microbial pathways), whereas nitrogen additions both directly (plant uptake) and indirectly (microbial pathways) impact plant primary productivity, we were able to assess the effect of both belowground soil microbes and nutrient availability on aboveground herbivores and their predators. Herbivore density in the field was suppressed by carbon supplements. Carbon addition altered soil microbial dynamics (net potential ammonification, litter decomposition rate, DON [dissolved organic N] concentration), which limited inorganic soil nitrogen availability and reduced plant size as well as predator abundance. Nitrogen addition enhanced herbivore density by increasing plant size and quality directly by increasing inorganic soil nitrogen pools, and indirectly by enhancing microbial nitrification. Detritus adversely affected aboveground herbivores mainly by promoting predator aggregation. To date, the effects of carbon and nitrogen subsidies on salt marshes have been examined as isolated effects on either the aboveground or the belowground community. Our results emphasize the importance of directly addressing the soil microbial community as a factor that influences

  9. The variable effects of soil nitrogen availability and insect herbivory on aboveground and belowground plant biomass in an old-field ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blue, Jarrod D.; Souza, Lara; Classen, Aimée T.;

    2011-01-01

    in an old-field ecosystem. In 2004, we established 36 experimental plots in which we manipulated soil nitrogen (N) availability and insect abundance in a completely randomized plot design. In 2009, after 6 years of treatments, we measured aboveground biomass and assessed root production at peak growth......Nutrient availability and herbivory can regulate primary production in ecosystems, but little is known about how, or whether, they may interact with one another. Here, we investigate how nitrogen availability and insect herbivory interact to alter aboveground and belowground plant community biomass....... Overall, we found a significant effect of reduced soil N availability on aboveground biomass and belowground plant biomass production. Specifically, responses of aboveground and belowground community biomass to nutrients were driven by reductions in soil N, but not additions, indicating that soil N may...

  10. Improving the durability of flat roof constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbeck, Claus Christian; Svendsen, Sv Aa Højgaard

    1999-01-01

    as there is no easy method of drying it. To be able to dry the insulation, and thereby regain the functional requirements of the roofing system, two new solutions for insulating flat roofs with existing materials are proposed for high density mineral wool and expanded polystyrene. Monitoring equipment are part...

  11. Wind loads on solar energy roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Bentum, C.A. van

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the wind loads on roofs, equipped with solar energy products, so called Active Roofs. Values given in this paper have been based on wind tunnel and full scale measurements, carried out at TNO, and on an interpretation of existing rules and guidelines. The results a

  12. Aircraft-crash-protected steel reactor building roof structure for the European market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper recommends the use of all steel roof structures for the reactor building of European Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants. This change would make the advanced US BWR designs more compatible with European requirements. Replacement of the existing concrete roof slab with a sufficiently thick steel plate would eliminate the concrete spelling resulting from a postulated aircraft crash, potentially damaging the drywell head or the spent fuel pool

  13. The role of green roofs on reducing heating and cooling loads: a database across Chinese climates

    OpenAIRE

    Kokogiannakis, Georgios; Tietje, Annegret; Darkwa, Jo

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to use detailed modelling techniques and develop a database for assessing in a quick and easy way the energy performance of green roof designs across a range of Chinese climates. The focus is on heating and cooling loads by calculating indoor temperatures using the EnergyPlus simulation tool. The study covers 5328 configurations by varying model parameters such as location, climate, seasonal periods, glazing type, wall insulation levels, roof insulation, soil thickness and con...

  14. Building Space Heating with a Solar-Assisted Heat Pump Using Roof-Integrated Solar Collectors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyong Yang; Li Zhu; Yiping Wang

    2011-01-01

    A solar assisted heat pump (SAHP) system was designed by using a roof-integrated solar collector as the evaporator, and then it was demonstrated to provide space heating for a villa in Tianjin, China. A building energy simulation tool was used to predict the space heating load and a three dimensional theoretical model was established to analyze the heat collection performance of the solar roof collector. A floor radiant heating unit was used to decrease the energy demand. The measurement resu...

  15. Aircraft-crash-protected steel reactor building roof structure for the European market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posta, B.A.; Kadar, I. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States); Rao, A.S. [General Electric Nuclear Engineering, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This paper recommends the use of all steel roof structures for the reactor building of European Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants. This change would make the advanced US BWR designs more compatible with European requirements. Replacement of the existing concrete roof slab with a sufficiently thick steel plate would eliminate the concrete spelling resulting from a postulated aircraft crash, potentially damaging the drywell head or the spent fuel pool.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Wind Action on Solar Panel Placed on Flat Roofs with and without Parapet

    OpenAIRE

    Văsieş, Georgeta; Elena AXINTE; Teleman, Elena-Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Used to convert solar energy into thermal energy (solar collectors) or electricity (photovoltaic panels), solar panels has become very popular in the last decade. Increasing the number of solar panels used in the world, determines behavior research on these systems in the aerodynamic field. Wherever they are located, on flat roofs, pitched roofs or at ground level, the wind represents the main action that determine the design of support systems for solar panels. In this paper the aim is to...

  17. Stratified aboveground forest biomass estimation by remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Hooman; Fassnacht, Fabian E.; Hartig, Florian; Berger, Christian; Hernández, Jaime; Corvalán, Patricio; Koch, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Remote sensing-assisted estimates of aboveground forest biomass are essential for modeling carbon budgets. It has been suggested that estimates can be improved by building species- or strata-specific biomass models. However, few studies have attempted a systematic analysis of the benefits of such stratification, especially in combination with other factors such as sensor type, statistical prediction method and sampling design of the reference inventory data. We addressed this topic by analyzing the impact of stratifying forest data into three classes (broadleaved, coniferous and mixed forest). We compare predictive accuracy (a) between the strata (b) to a case without stratification for a set of pre-selected predictors from airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data obtained in a managed mixed forest site in southwestern Germany. We used 5 commonly applied algorithms for biomass predictions on bootstrapped subsamples of the data to obtain cross validated RMSE and r2 diagnostics. Those values were analyzed in a factorial design by an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to rank the relative importance of each factor. Selected models were used for wall-to-wall mapping of biomass estimates and their associated uncertainty. The results revealed marginal advantages for the strata-specific prediction models over the unstratified ones, which were more obvious on the wall-to-wall mapped area-based predictions. Yet further tests are necessary to establish the generality of these results. Input data type and statistical prediction method are concluded to remain the two most crucial factors for the quality of remote sensing-assisted biomass models.

  18. Modular prevegetated green tank roof systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, P. M.; Olivieri, F.; Neila, F. J.; Bedoya, C. [Technical University of Madird, Madrid, (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Green architecture contributes to reducing the thermal load on a building's shell and the urban heat in densely built cities with little natural environment. This paper described the ecological rain tank roof. Vegetation offers great protection against solar radiation and minimizes energy flows between the external and interior environments, contributing to an improved comfort conditions. A modular pre-vegetated roof system has been developed. The vegetation species and the thermal insulation applied are selected according to the climatic zone in which the rooftop is. This study developed one module with different materials: the first green tank roof is made of lightweight concrete. The use of concrete contributed significantly to the roof's overweight. A second green tank roof was made of PVC. The modules presented easy maintenance as well as a significant reduction in final labour costs. Experiments showed that the system reaches optimal operation from day one.

  19. Green-Roof Effects on Neighborhood Microclimate and Human Thermal Sensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Jim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs have been recognized as an effective sustainable design tool to mitigate urban heat island (UHI effects. Previous studies have identified green-roof benefits in cooling and energy-conservation at the building scale, with limited exploration of the wider influence on neighborhood microclimate and human thermal comfort (HTC. This paper investigated the impacts of community-scale green-roof installation on air temperature and HTC in five typical residential neighborhoods of subtropical Hong Kong. The microclimate models ENVI-met and RayMan permitted studies of two main green-roof scenarios, namely extensive (EGR and intensive (IGR. Microclimatic monitoring data from a local experimental green-roof site validated the modeling methods. The results verified that green-roof cooling effects were not restricted to rooftops, but extended to the ground to improve neighborhood microclimate. EGR reduced pedestrian-level air temperature by 0.4–0.7 °C, and IGR by 0.5–1.7 °C, with maximum effect in open-set low rise sites. Coverage by building footprints and building height dampened lateral and vertical advection of cool air generated by green roofs. Roof greening also improved notably the rooftop-podium level HTC. Diurnal duration of high heat stress was reduced by 6–9 h for EGR scenarios, and 9–11 h for IGR. The findings indicated that large-scale green-roof installation could bring neighborhood-wide cooling, mitigate urban heat island effect, and furnish more comfortable thermal environment for urban residents.

  20. Performance of dryland and wetland plant species on extensive green roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIvor, J. Scott; Ranalli, Melissa A.; Lundholm, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Green roofs are constructed ecosystems where plants perform valuable services, ameliorating the urban environment through roof temperature reductions and stormwater interception. Plant species differ in functional characteristics that alter ecosystem properties. Plant performance research on extensive green roofs has so far indicated that species adapted to dry conditions perform optimally. However, in moist, humid climates, species typical of wetter soils might have advantages over dryland species. In this study, survival, growth and the performance of thermal and stormwater capture functions of three pairs of dryland and wetland plant species were quantified using an extensive modular green roof system. Methods Seedlings of all six species were germinated in a greenhouse and planted into green roof modules with 6 cm of growing medium. There were 34 treatments consisting of each species in monoculture and all combinations of wet- and dryland species in a randomized block design. Performance measures were survival, vegetation cover and roof surface temperature recorded for each module over two growing seasons, water loss (an estimate of evapotranspiration) in 2007, and albedo and water capture in 2008. Key Results Over two seasons, dryland plants performed better than wetland plants, and increasing the number of dryland species in mixtures tended to improve functioning, although there was no clear effect of species or habitat group diversity. All species had survival rates >75 % after the first winter; however, dryland species had much greater cover, an important indicator of green roof performance. Sibbaldiopsis tridentata was the top performing species in monoculture, and was included in the best treatments. Conclusions Although dryland species outperformed wetland species, planting extensive green roofs with both groups decreased performance only slightly, while increasing diversity and possibly habitat value. This study provides further

  1. Green roof impact on the hydrological cycle components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamera, Carlotta; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Becciu, Gianfranco; Rosso, Renzo

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades the importance of storm water management in urban areas has increased considerably, due to both urbanization extension and to a greater concern for environment pollution. Traditional storm water control practices, based on the "all to the sewer" attitude, rely on conveyance to route storm water runoff from urban impervious surfaces towards the nearby natural water bodies. In recent years, infiltration facilities are receiving an increasing attention, due to their particular efficiency in restoring a balance in hydrological cycle quite equal to quite pre-urbanization condition. In particular, such techniques are designed to capture, temporarily retain and infiltrate storm water, promote evapotranspiration and harvest water at the source, encouraging in general evaporation, evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge and the re-use of storm water. Green roofs are emerging as an increasingly popular Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) technique for urban storm water management. Indeed, they are able to operate hydrologic control over storm water runoff: they allow a significant reduction of peak flows and runoff volumes collected by drainage system, with a consequent reduction of flooding events and pollution masses discharges by CSO. Furthermore green roofs have a positive influence on the microclimate in urban areas by helping in lower urban air temperatures and mitigate the heat island effect. Last but not least, they have the advantage of improving the thermal insulation of buildings, with significant energy savings. A detailed analysis of the hydrological dynamics, connected both with the characteristics of the climatic context and with the green roof technical design, is essential in order to obtain a full characterization of the hydrologic behavior of a green roof system and its effects on the urban water cycle components. The purpose of this paper is to analysis the hydrological effects and urban benefits of the vegetation cover of a

  2. One hundred extensive green roofs : lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snodgrass, E. [Emory Knoll Farms, Street, MD (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Although green roofs have a history of success in western Europe, many of the plant lists used in Europe are not appropriate for many of the climatic regions of the United States. This paper shared some of the lessons learned by Emory Knoll Farms while developing plants suitable for extensive green roofs. The farm undertook plant trials to confirm which plants were suited to varied climatic conditions in North America in 1999. Over the past few years, the farm has cultivated both ground cover plants and plants that can be used as accents in a landscape. Ground cover plants selected for cultivation at the farm are persistent, have a fibrous root structure, and are able to live for the life of the roof. The farm typically uses succulents over herbaceous plants due to their ability to conserve water and tolerate heat stress and nutrient stress for extended periods of time. The farm is also developing plant lists for green roofs located in microclimates, and is now developing plant lists that include native plants currently threatened by invasive species. The farm has observed that the most successful green roofs are those where maintenance is considered an integral part of the installation. Green roof success is derived from a proper relationship among plant selection, climatic conditions and media. Most extensive green roof installations take 12-18 months to establish, and weeding and fertilization are needed more during this phase than at any other time. Early weeding is critical to protect the exposed media on a newly planted green roof. It was concluded that the North American green roof industry is still in its infancy. The farm will continue to observe installed green roofs and optimize plant lists for the future. 2 tabs.

  3. Unique Roll-Off Roof for Housing 1.3 m Telescope at Devasthal, Nainital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangia, Tarun

    2016-05-01

    Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES) had set up a 1.3 m telescope at Devasthal, Nainital, India in the year 2010. Country's largest roll-off roof was indigenously designed, fabricated and installed on top of a building (17 × 8 m) for housing 1.3 m telescope. Telescope was supplied by M/s DFM Engineering Inc., USA to ARIES and was installed in the building with unique roll-off roof to protect it from external environment. Roll-off roof was designed and fabricated considering various parameters and available manpower and resources at ARIES. This paper presents mechanical development work, simple but distinct design approach and innovative selection of materials to economically manufacture roll-off roof of large size (8 × 8 × 4 m) at hilly remote site of Devasthal situated in Central Himalayan region. All operations in the roof viz. opening of shutters and rolling of roof were motorized to facilitate observers during night observations.

  4. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W.H. van der Putten,; R.D. Bardgett; P.C. de Ruiter;

    2009-01-01

    from an empirical perspective and in specific ecological settings or contexts. Belowground interactions operate at different spatial and temporal scales. Due to the relatively low mobility and high survival of organisms in the soil, plants have longer lasting legacy effects belowground than aboveground...... and environmental settings, we explore where and how they can be supported by theoretical approaches to develop testable predictions and to generalise empirical results. We review four key areas where a combined aboveground-belowground approach offers perspectives for enhancing ecological understanding, namely...

  5. Green roof stormwater retention: effects of roof surface, slope, and media depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWoert, Nicholaus D; Rowe, D Bradley; Andresen, Jeffrey A; Rugh, Clayton L; Fernandez, R Thomas; Xiao, Lan

    2005-01-01

    Urban areas generate considerably more stormwater runoff than natural areas of the same size due to a greater percentage of impervious surfaces that impede water infiltration. Roof surfaces account for a large portion of this impervious cover. Establishing vegetation on rooftops, known as green roofs, is one method of recovering lost green space that can aid in mitigating stormwater runoff. Two studies were performed using several roof platforms to quantify the effects of various treatments on stormwater retention. The first study used three different roof surface treatments to quantify differences in stormwater retention of a standard commercial roof with gravel ballast, an extensive green roof system without vegetation, and a typical extensive green roof with vegetation. Overall, mean percent rainfall retention ranged from 48.7% (gravel) to 82.8% (vegetated). The second study tested the influence of roof slope (2 and 6.5%) and green roof media depth (2.5, 4.0, and 6.0 cm) on stormwater retention. For all combined rain events, platforms at 2% slope with a 4-cm media depth had the greatest mean retention, 87%, although the difference from the other treatments was minimal. The combination of reduced slope and deeper media clearly reduced the total quantity of runoff. For both studies, vegetated green roof systems not only reduced the amount of stormwater runoff, they also extended its duration over a period of time beyond the actual rain event.

  6. Green roof stormwater retention: effects of roof surface, slope, and media depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWoert, Nicholaus D; Rowe, D Bradley; Andresen, Jeffrey A; Rugh, Clayton L; Fernandez, R Thomas; Xiao, Lan

    2005-01-01

    Urban areas generate considerably more stormwater runoff than natural areas of the same size due to a greater percentage of impervious surfaces that impede water infiltration. Roof surfaces account for a large portion of this impervious cover. Establishing vegetation on rooftops, known as green roofs, is one method of recovering lost green space that can aid in mitigating stormwater runoff. Two studies were performed using several roof platforms to quantify the effects of various treatments on stormwater retention. The first study used three different roof surface treatments to quantify differences in stormwater retention of a standard commercial roof with gravel ballast, an extensive green roof system without vegetation, and a typical extensive green roof with vegetation. Overall, mean percent rainfall retention ranged from 48.7% (gravel) to 82.8% (vegetated). The second study tested the influence of roof slope (2 and 6.5%) and green roof media depth (2.5, 4.0, and 6.0 cm) on stormwater retention. For all combined rain events, platforms at 2% slope with a 4-cm media depth had the greatest mean retention, 87%, although the difference from the other treatments was minimal. The combination of reduced slope and deeper media clearly reduced the total quantity of runoff. For both studies, vegetated green roof systems not only reduced the amount of stormwater runoff, they also extended its duration over a period of time beyond the actual rain event. PMID:15888889

  7. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation-Mediated Reshaping of the Root Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun G.; Kim, Byung K.; Song, Geun C.; Lee, Soohyun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to various types of herbivore and pathogen attack using well-developed defensive machinery designed for self-protection. Infestation from phloem-sucking insects such as whitefly and aphid on plant leaves was previously shown to influence both the saprophytic and pathogenic bacterial community in the plant rhizosphere. However, the modulation of the root microbial community by plants following insect infestation has been largely unexplored. Only limited studies of culture-dependent bacterial diversity caused by whitefly and aphid have been conducted. In this study, to obtain a complete picture of the belowground microbiome community, we performed high-speed and high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We sampled the rhizosphere soils of pepper seedlings at 0, 1, and 2 weeks after whitefly infestation versus the water control. We amplified a partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene (V1–V3 region) by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers. Our analysis revealed that whitefly infestation reshaped the overall microbiota structure compared to that of the control rhizosphere, even after 1 week of infestation. Examination of the relative abundance distributions of microbes demonstrated that whitefly infestation shifted the proteobacterial groups at week 2. Intriguingly, the population of Pseudomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria significantly increased after 2 weeks of whitefly infestation, and the fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. recruited to the rhizosphere were confirmed to exhibit insect-killing capacity. Additionally, three taxa, including Caulobacteraceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Flavobacteriaceae, and three genera, including Achromobacter, Janthinobacterium, and Stenotrophomonas, were the most abundant bacterial groups in the whitefly infested plant rhizosphere. Our results indicate that whitefly infestation leads to the recruitment of specific groups of rhizosphere bacteria by the plant, which confer beneficial traits to the host plant. This

  8. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation-Mediated Reshaping of the Root Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun G.; Kim, Byung K.; Song, Geun C.; Lee, Soohyun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to various types of herbivore and pathogen attack using well-developed defensive machinery designed for self-protection. Infestation from phloem-sucking insects such as whitefly and aphid on plant leaves was previously shown to influence both the saprophytic and pathogenic bacterial community in the plant rhizosphere. However, the modulation of the root microbial community by plants following insect infestation has been largely unexplored. Only limited studies of culture-dependent bacterial diversity caused by whitefly and aphid have been conducted. In this study, to obtain a complete picture of the belowground microbiome community, we performed high-speed and high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We sampled the rhizosphere soils of pepper seedlings at 0, 1, and 2 weeks after whitefly infestation versus the water control. We amplified a partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene (V1–V3 region) by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers. Our analysis revealed that whitefly infestation reshaped the overall microbiota structure compared to that of the control rhizosphere, even after 1 week of infestation. Examination of the relative abundance distributions of microbes demonstrated that whitefly infestation shifted the proteobacterial groups at week 2. Intriguingly, the population of Pseudomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria significantly increased after 2 weeks of whitefly infestation, and the fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. recruited to the rhizosphere were confirmed to exhibit insect-killing capacity. Additionally, three taxa, including Caulobacteraceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Flavobacteriaceae, and three genera, including Achromobacter, Janthinobacterium, and Stenotrophomonas, were the most abundant bacterial groups in the whitefly infested plant rhizosphere. Our results indicate that whitefly infestation leads to the recruitment of specific groups of rhizosphere bacteria by the plant, which confer beneficial traits to the host plant. This

  9. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation-Mediated Reshaping of the Root Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun G; Kim, Byung K; Song, Geun C; Lee, Soohyun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to various types of herbivore and pathogen attack using well-developed defensive machinery designed for self-protection. Infestation from phloem-sucking insects such as whitefly and aphid on plant leaves was previously shown to influence both the saprophytic and pathogenic bacterial community in the plant rhizosphere. However, the modulation of the root microbial community by plants following insect infestation has been largely unexplored. Only limited studies of culture-dependent bacterial diversity caused by whitefly and aphid have been conducted. In this study, to obtain a complete picture of the belowground microbiome community, we performed high-speed and high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We sampled the rhizosphere soils of pepper seedlings at 0, 1, and 2 weeks after whitefly infestation versus the water control. We amplified a partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene (V1-V3 region) by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers. Our analysis revealed that whitefly infestation reshaped the overall microbiota structure compared to that of the control rhizosphere, even after 1 week of infestation. Examination of the relative abundance distributions of microbes demonstrated that whitefly infestation shifted the proteobacterial groups at week 2. Intriguingly, the population of Pseudomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria significantly increased after 2 weeks of whitefly infestation, and the fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. recruited to the rhizosphere were confirmed to exhibit insect-killing capacity. Additionally, three taxa, including Caulobacteraceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Flavobacteriaceae, and three genera, including Achromobacter, Janthinobacterium, and Stenotrophomonas, were the most abundant bacterial groups in the whitefly infested plant rhizosphere. Our results indicate that whitefly infestation leads to the recruitment of specific groups of rhizosphere bacteria by the plant, which confer beneficial traits to the host plant. This

  10. Early Reconstruction of Orbital Roof Fractures:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Koo Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Orbital roof fractures are frequently associated with a high energy impactto the craniofacial region, and displaced orbital roof fractures can cause ophthalmic andneurologic complications and occasionally require open surgical intervention. The purposeof this article was to investigate the clinical features and treatment outcomes of orbital rootfractures combined with neurologic injuries after early reconstruction.Methods Between January 2006 and December 2008, 45 patients with orbital roof fractureswere admitted; among them, 37 patients were treated conservatively and 8 patientsunderwent early surgical intervention for orbital roof fractures. The type of injuries thatcaused the fractures, patient characteristics, associated fractures, ocular and neurologicalinjuries, patient management, and treatment outcomes were investigated.Results The patients underwent frontal craniotomy and free bone fragment removal, theirorbital roofs were reconstructed with titanium micromesh, and associated fractures wererepaired. The mean follow up period was 11 months. There were no postoperative neurologicsequelae. Postoperative computed tomography scans showed anatomically reconstructedorbital roofs. Two of the five patients with traumatic optic neuropathy achieved full visualacuity recovery, one patient showed decreased visual acuity, and the other two patientscompletely lost their vision due to traumatic optic neuropathy. Preoperative ophthalmicsymptoms, such as proptosis, diplopia, upper eyelid ptosis, and enophthalmos were corrected.Conclusions Early recognition and treatment of orbital roof fractures can reduce intracranialand ocular complications. A coronal flap with frontal craniotomy and orbital roofreconstruction using titanium mesh provides a versatile method and provides good functionaland cosmetic results.

  11. A two-stage storage routing model for green roof runoff detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesuviano, Gianni; Sonnenwald, Fred; Stovin, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Green roofs have been adopted in urban drainage systems to control the total quantity and volumetric flow rate of runoff. Modern green roof designs are multi-layered, their main components being vegetation, substrate and, in almost all cases, a separate drainage layer. Most current hydrological models of green roofs combine the modelling of the separate layers into a single process; these models have limited predictive capability for roofs not sharing the same design. An adaptable, generic, two-stage model for a system consisting of a granular substrate over a hard plastic 'egg box'-style drainage layer and fibrous protection mat is presented. The substrate and drainage layer/protection mat are modelled separately by previously verified sub-models. Controlled storm events are applied to a green roof system in a rainfall simulator. The time-series modelled runoff is compared to the monitored runoff for each storm event. The modelled runoff profiles are accurate (mean Rt(2) = 0.971), but further characterization of the substrate component is required for the model to be generically applicable to other roof configurations with different substrate.

  12. A two-stage storage routing model for green roof runoff detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesuviano, Gianni; Sonnenwald, Fred; Stovin, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Green roofs have been adopted in urban drainage systems to control the total quantity and volumetric flow rate of runoff. Modern green roof designs are multi-layered, their main components being vegetation, substrate and, in almost all cases, a separate drainage layer. Most current hydrological models of green roofs combine the modelling of the separate layers into a single process; these models have limited predictive capability for roofs not sharing the same design. An adaptable, generic, two-stage model for a system consisting of a granular substrate over a hard plastic 'egg box'-style drainage layer and fibrous protection mat is presented. The substrate and drainage layer/protection mat are modelled separately by previously verified sub-models. Controlled storm events are applied to a green roof system in a rainfall simulator. The time-series modelled runoff is compared to the monitored runoff for each storm event. The modelled runoff profiles are accurate (mean Rt(2) = 0.971), but further characterization of the substrate component is required for the model to be generically applicable to other roof configurations with different substrate. PMID:24647183

  13. Mapping Aboveground Biomass in the Amazon Basin: Exploring Sensors, Scales, and Strategies for Optimal Data Linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, W. S.; Baccini, A.

    2013-05-01

    Information on the distribution and density of carbon in tropical forests is critical to decision-making on a host of globally significant issues ranging from climate stabilization and biodiversity conservation to poverty reduction and human health. Encouraged by recent progress at both the international and jurisdictional levels on the design of incentive-based policy mechanisms to compensate tropical nations for maintaining their forests intact, governments throughout the tropics are moving with urgency to implement robust national and sub-national forest monitoring systems for operationally tracking and reporting on changes in forest cover and associated carbon stocks. Monitoring systems will be required to produce results that are accurate, consistent, complete, transparent, and comparable at sub-national to pantropical scales, and satellite-based remote sensing supported by field observations is widely-accepted as the most objective and cost-effective solution. The effectiveness of any system for large-area forest monitoring will necessarily depend on the capacity of current and near-future Earth observation satellites to provide information that meets the requirements of developing monitoring protocols. However, important questions remain regarding the role that spatially explicit maps of aboveground biomass and carbon can play in IPCC-compliant forest monitoring systems, with the majority of these questions stemming from doubts about the inherit sensitivity of satellite data to aboveground forest biomass, confusion about the relationship between accuracy and resolution, and a general lack of guidance on optimal strategies for linking field reference and remote sensing data sources. Here we demonstrate the ability of a state-of-the-art satellite radar sensor, the Japanese ALOS/PALSAR, and a venerable optical platform, Landsat 5, to support large-area mapping of aboveground tropical woody biomass across a 153,000-km2 region in the southwestern Amazon

  14. Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar PV Racking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, Richard T.

    2015-01-23

    The objective of this project was to reduce the cost of racking for PV solar on flat commercial rooftops. Cost reductions would come from both labor savings and material savings related to the installation process. The rack would need to accommodate the majority of modules available on the market. Cascade Engineering has a long history of converting traditional metal type applications over to plastic. Injection molding of plastics have numerous advantages including selection of resin for the application, placing the material exactly where it is needed, designing in features that will speed up the installation process, and weight reduction of the array. A plastic rack would need to meet the requirements of UL2703, Mounting systems, mounting devices, clamping/retention devices, and ground lugs for use with flat-plate photovoltaic modules and panels. Comparing original data to the end of project racking design, racking material costs were reduced 50% and labor costs reduced 64%. The racking product accommodates all 60 and 72 cell panels on the market, meets UL2703 requirements, contributes only 1.3 pounds per square foot of weight to the array, requires little ballast to secure the array, automatically grounds the module when the module is secured, stacks/nests well for shipping/fewer lifts to the roof, provides integrated wire routing, allows water to drain on the roof, and accommodates various seismic roof connections. Project goals were achieved as noted in the original funding application.

  15. Analysis on thermal measuring of green roof

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐鸣放; 蒋琳

    2009-01-01

    Comparison of thermal performance between a green roof room and a bare roof room was presented during the cooling period in Shanghai. The results show that the electricity can be saved about 0.08 kW·h/(d·m2),and the heat flux can be reduced by about 70%; the inner surface temperature variation is about 1.0 ℃ comparing with the indoor temperature when using the green roof,and the extra equivalent heat resistance is 1.0 m2·K/W.

  16. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van der W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Hol, W.H.G.; Meyer, K.M.; Bezemer, T.M.; Bradford, M.A.; Christensen, S.; Eppinga, M.B.; Fukami, T.; Hemerik, L.; Molofsky, J.; Schädler, M.; Scherber, C.; Strauss, S.Y.; Vos, M.; Wardle, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that aboveground and belowground communities and processes are intrinsically linked, and that feedbacks between these subsystems have important implications for community structure and ecosystem functioning. Almost all studies on this topic have been carried out from

  17. Assessing aboveground tropical forest biomass using Google Earth canopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploton, Pierre; Pélissier, Raphaël; Proisy, Christophe; Flavenot, Théo; Barbier, Nicolas; Rai, S N; Couteron, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) in efforts to combat climate change requires participating countries to periodically assess their forest resources on a national scale. Such a process is particularly challenging in the tropics because of technical difficulties related to large aboveground forest biomass stocks, restricted availability of affordable, appropriate remote-sensing images, and a lack of accurate forest inventory data. In this paper, we apply the Fourier-based FOTO method of canopy texture analysis to Google Earth's very-high-resolution images of the wet evergreen forests in the Western Ghats of India in order to (1) assess the predictive power of the method on aboveground biomass of tropical forests, (2) test the merits of free Google Earth images relative to their native commercial IKONOS counterparts and (3) highlight further research needs for affordable, accurate regional aboveground biomass estimations. We used the FOTO method to ordinate Fourier spectra of 1436 square canopy images (125 x 125 m) with respect to a canopy grain texture gradient (i.e., a combination of size distribution and spatial pattern of tree crowns), benchmarked against virtual canopy scenes simulated from a set of known forest structure parameters and a 3-D light interception model. We then used 15 1-ha ground plots to demonstrate that both texture gradients provided by Google Earth and IKONOS images strongly correlated with field-observed stand structure parameters such as the density of large trees, total basal area, and aboveground biomass estimated from a regional allometric model. Our results highlight the great potential of the FOTO method applied to Google Earth data for biomass retrieval because the texture-biomass relationship is only subject to 15% relative error, on average, and does not show obvious saturation trends at large biomass values. We also provide the first reliable map of tropical forest aboveground biomass predicted

  18. Metal and nutrient dynamics on an aged intensive green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speak, A F; Rothwell, J J; Lindley, S J; Smith, C L

    2014-01-01

    Runoff and rainfall quality was compared between an aged intensive green roof and an adjacent conventional roof surface. Nutrient concentrations in the runoff were generally below Environmental Quality Standard (EQS) values and the green roof exhibited NO3(-) retention. Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations were in excess of EQS values for the protection of surface water. Green roof runoff was also significantly higher in Fe and Pb than on the bare roof and in rainfall. Input-output fluxes revealed the green roof to be a potential source of Pb. High concentrations of Pb within the green roof soil and bare roof dusts provide a potential source of Pb in runoff. The origin of the Pb is likely from historic urban atmospheric deposition. Aged green roofs may therefore act as a source of legacy metal pollution. This needs to be considered when constructing green roofs with the aim of improving pollution remediation.

  19. Metal and nutrient dynamics on an aged intensive green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speak, A F; Rothwell, J J; Lindley, S J; Smith, C L

    2014-01-01

    Runoff and rainfall quality was compared between an aged intensive green roof and an adjacent conventional roof surface. Nutrient concentrations in the runoff were generally below Environmental Quality Standard (EQS) values and the green roof exhibited NO3(-) retention. Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations were in excess of EQS values for the protection of surface water. Green roof runoff was also significantly higher in Fe and Pb than on the bare roof and in rainfall. Input-output fluxes revealed the green roof to be a potential source of Pb. High concentrations of Pb within the green roof soil and bare roof dusts provide a potential source of Pb in runoff. The origin of the Pb is likely from historic urban atmospheric deposition. Aged green roofs may therefore act as a source of legacy metal pollution. This needs to be considered when constructing green roofs with the aim of improving pollution remediation. PMID:24017999

  20. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  1. Hydrologic Restoration in the Urban Environment Using Green Roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Palla; Ilaria Gnecco; Luca G. Lanza

    2010-01-01

    Loss of natural soil and vegetation within the urban environment can significantly affect the hydrologic cycle by increasing storm water runoff rates and volumes. In order to mitigate these modifications in urban areas engineered systems are developed, such as green roofs, to mimic and replace functions (evapo-transpiration, infiltration, percolation) which have been altered due to the impact of human development. Green roofs, also known as vegetated roof covers, eco-roofs or nature roofs, ar...

  2. Spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itinteang, Tinte; Lambe, Gerald Francis; MacKinnon, Craig; Agir, Hakan

    2012-07-01

    We report a case of a spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof blow-in fracture with resolution of associated diplopia and blepharoptosis highlighting the need for a low threshold for reimaging this cohort of facial fracture patients. PMID:22801127

  3. Effects of substrate properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, V. P.; Suarez, F. I.; Victorero, F.; Bonilla, C.; Gironas, J. A.; Vera, S.; Bustamante, W.; Rojas, V.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Green roofs are a sustainable urban development solution that incorporates a growing media (also known as substrate) and vegetation into infrastructures to reach additional benefits such as the reduction of: rooftop runoff peak flows, roof surface temperatures, energy utilized for cooling/heating buildings, and the heat island effect. The substrate is a key component of the green roof that allows achieving these benefits. It is an artificial soil that has an improved behavior compared to natural soils, facilitating vegetation growth, water storage and typically with smaller densities to reduce the loads over the structures. Therefore, it is important to study the effects of substrate properties on green roof performance. The objective of this study is to investigate the physical properties of four substrates designed to improve the behavior of a green roof, and to study their impact on the efficiency of a green roof. The substrates that were investigated are: organic soil; crushed bricks; a mixture of mineral soil with perlite; and a mixture of crushed bricks and organic soil. The thermal properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) were measured using a dual needle probe (Decagon Devices, Inc.) at different saturation levels, and the hydraulic properties were measured with a constant head permeameter (hydraulic conductivity) and a pressure plate extractor (water retention curve). This characterization, combined with numerical models, allows understanding the effect of these properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof. Results show that substrates composed by crushed bricks improve the thermal insulation of infrastructures and at the same time, retain more water in their pores. Simulation results also show that the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof strongly depends on the moisture content prior to a rainstorm.

  4. The hydrological behaviour of extensive and intensive green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents the results of a hydrological investigation of four medium scale green roofs that were set up at the University of South Australia. In this study, the potential of green roofs as a source control device was investigated over a 2 year period using four medium size green roof beds comprised of two growth media types and two media depths. During the term of this study, 226 rainfall events were recorded and these were representative of the Adelaide climate. In general, there were no statistically significant differences between the rainfall and runoff parameters for the intensive and extensive beds except for peak attenuation and peak runoff delay, for which higher values were recorded in the intensive beds. Longer dry periods generally resulted in higher retention coefficients and higher retention was also recorded in warmer seasons. The average retention coefficient for intensive systems (89%) was higher than for extensive systems (74%). It was shown that rainfall depth, intensity, duration and also average dry weather period between events can change the retention performance and runoff volume of the green roofs. Comparison of green and simulated conventional roofs indicated that the former were able to mitigate the peak of runoff and could delay the start of runoff. These characteristics are important for most source control measures. The recorded rainfall and runoff data displayed a non-linear relationship. Also, the results indicated that continuous time series modelling would be a more appropriate technique than using peak rainfall intensity methods for green roof design and simulation.

  5. The hydrological behaviour of extensive and intensive green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents the results of a hydrological investigation of four medium scale green roofs that were set up at the University of South Australia. In this study, the potential of green roofs as a source control device was investigated over a 2 year period using four medium size green roof beds comprised of two growth media types and two media depths. During the term of this study, 226 rainfall events were recorded and these were representative of the Adelaide climate. In general, there were no statistically significant differences between the rainfall and runoff parameters for the intensive and extensive beds except for peak attenuation and peak runoff delay, for which higher values were recorded in the intensive beds. Longer dry periods generally resulted in higher retention coefficients and higher retention was also recorded in warmer seasons. The average retention coefficient for intensive systems (89%) was higher than for extensive systems (74%). It was shown that rainfall depth, intensity, duration and also average dry weather period between events can change the retention performance and runoff volume of the green roofs. Comparison of green and simulated conventional roofs indicated that the former were able to mitigate the peak of runoff and could delay the start of runoff. These characteristics are important for most source control measures. The recorded rainfall and runoff data displayed a non-linear relationship. Also, the results indicated that continuous time series modelling would be a more appropriate technique than using peak rainfall intensity methods for green roof design and simulation. PMID:25194906

  6. Analysis of DOE s Roof Savings Calculator with Comparison to other Simulation Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New, Joshua Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huang, Yu [White Box Technologies, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanyal, Jibonananda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Kenneth W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned based on national averages and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance surfaces, HVAC duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation levels, and other parameters. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA. However, RSC gives different energy savings estimates than previous cool roof simulation tools so more thorough software and empirical validation proved necessary. This report consolidates much of the preliminary analysis for comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to that from other simulation engines.

  7. Study of water infiltration in a lightweight green roof substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomankova, Klara; Holeckova, Martina; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Snehota, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Green roofs have a positive impact on the environment (e.g. improving microclimate and air quality in cities, reducing solar absorbance and storm water). A laboratory infiltration experiment was conducted on the narrow flume serving as 2D vertical model of a green roof. The lightweight Optigreen substrate Type M was used (depth of 20 cm). The front wall of the flume was transparent and inspected by digital camera. The experiment was designed to measure pressure head, volumetric water content and calculate water retention in the substrate. Experiment comprised three artificial rainfall intensities with different values of initial water content of the substrate. The experimental results confirmed that green roofs have the ability to retain rainwater and thus have a beneficial effect on reducing runoff. In the experiment with the artificial 10 minutes rainfall event (total precipitation of 29 mm), the air dry substrate retained 95.9 % of precipitation. On the other hand for moist initial condition 4.2 % of precipitations amount was captured in the substrate. Additionally, the analysis of images taken during the experiment confirmed preferential flow and uneven advancement of the wetting front. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech Science Foundation under project number 14-10455P.

  8. Preservation of a traditional timber roof: the case of the Handanija mosque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevludin Zečević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors provide a brief overview of their personal involvement in the inspection of the roof timbers of the Handanija Mosque in Prusac. As well as the inspection, the authors were asked to propose a design for the roof structure. The Handanija Mosque, built in 1617, is an important example of the cultural heritage of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the mosque was designated as a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2005. The form, design and proportions of this traditional vernacular building render it a unique example of the classical style.The mosque is rectangular in plan, with sides of 16.30 x 12.70 m, and belongs to the single-space type of mosque with an open porch and stone minaret. It was damaged by shelling during the 1992-1995 war, taking several direct hits to the walls, roof and minaret. The roof timbers were completely destroyed and the rest of the building was badly damaged.The authors suggested amending the structural bearing system by eliminating the hanging trusses and introducing the traditional components of posts, beams, struts and tie beams, as typical of this type of building. A 52.5° roof pitch was suggested, in keeping with Bosnia"s traditional vernacular architecture, which also reduces the intensity of horizontal forces. Authors suggest a 52.5° roof pitch for the following reasons: it is in keeping with the indigenous architecture of Central Bosnia, it reduces the intensity of horizontal forces, and it takes account of the fact that a hand-cut roof cladding does not always ensure identical geometry and pitch.

  9. Reconstruction of St. Petersburg roofs based on light steel thin-walled structures and de-icing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Vatin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Insecurity of applied coatings and low service lives of St. Petersburg roofs generate the development of new technological solutions. Necessity of roof protection from the ice dams is a special factor in selecting technological solutions of the roof structure.The aim is selection of an optimal design solution for the roof and the device against the ice based on the parameters of efficiency and effectiveness. After completion of research as a design of the roof system was chosen light steel thin-walled structures (LSTC. As the device against the ice is proposed a constructive adaptation of drainage, which includes the transfer of the gutter from the roof edge closer to Snow barriers. Herewith downspouts must finish in the system and urban runoff.Efficiency of this method is confirmed by mathematical calculations and trial operation of such existing systems in the Nordic countries. The combination of the device against the ice with modern technology LSTC solve the problem of icicles, and generally can guarantee continuous and reliable operation of the roof.

  10. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites.

  11. Estimates of forest canopy height and aboveground biomass using ICESat

    OpenAIRE

    Lefsky, Michael A; Harding, David J.; Keller, Michael; Cohen, Warren B.; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Espirito-Santo, Fernando Del Bom; Hunter, Maria O.; de Oliveira, Raimundo

    2005-01-01

    Exchange of carbon between forests and the atmosphere is a vital component of the global carbon cycle. Satellite laser altimetry has a unique capability for estimating forest canopy height, which has a direct and increasingly well understood relationship to aboveground carbon storage. While the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) has collected an unparalleled dataset of lidar waveforms over terrestrial targets, processing of IC...

  12. MODIS Based Estimation of Forest Aboveground Biomass in China

    OpenAIRE

    Guodong Yin; Yuan Zhang; Yan Sun; Tao Wang; Zhenzhong Zeng; Shilong Piao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of forest biomass C stock is essential to understand carbon cycles. However, current estimates of Chinese forest biomass are mostly based on inventory-based timber volumes and empirical conversion factors at the provincial scale, which could introduce large uncertainties in forest biomass estimation. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of Chinese forest aboveground biomass from 2001 to 2013 at a spatial resolution of 1 km by integrating a recently reviewed plot-level gr...

  13. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites. PMID:27147449

  14. Green roof valuation: a probabilistic economic analysis of environmental benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Corrie; Adriaens, Peter; Talbot, F Brian

    2008-03-15

    Green (vegetated) roofs have gained global acceptance as a technologythat has the potential to help mitigate the multifaceted, complex environmental problems of urban centers. While policies that encourage green roofs exist atthe local and regional level, installation costs remain at a premium and deter investment in this technology. The objective of this paper is to quantitatively integrate the range of stormwater, energy, and air pollution benefits of green roofs into an economic model that captures the building-specific scale. Currently, green roofs are primarily valued on increased roof longevity, reduced stormwater runoff, and decreased building energy consumption. Proper valuation of these benefits can reduce the present value of a green roof if investors look beyond the upfront capital costs. Net present value (NPV) analysis comparing a conventional roof system to an extensive green roof system demonstrates that at the end of the green roof lifetime the NPV for the green roof is between 20.3 and 25.2% less than the NPV for the conventional roof over 40 years. The additional upfront investment is recovered at the time when a conventional roof would be replaced. Increasing evidence suggests that green roofs may play a significant role in urban air quality improvement For example, uptake of N0x is estimated to range from $1683 to $6383 per metric ton of NOx reduction. These benefits were included in this study, and results translate to an annual benefit of $895-3392 for a 2000 square meter vegetated roof. Improved air quality leads to a mean NPV for the green roof that is 24.5-40.2% less than the mean conventional roof NPV. Through innovative policies, the inclusion of air pollution mitigation and the reduction of municipal stormwater infrastructure costs in economic valuation of environmental benefits of green roofs can reduce the cost gap that currently hinders U.S. investment in green roof technology.

  15. Green roof valuation: a probabilistic economic analysis of environmental benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Corrie; Adriaens, Peter; Talbot, F Brian

    2008-03-15

    Green (vegetated) roofs have gained global acceptance as a technologythat has the potential to help mitigate the multifaceted, complex environmental problems of urban centers. While policies that encourage green roofs exist atthe local and regional level, installation costs remain at a premium and deter investment in this technology. The objective of this paper is to quantitatively integrate the range of stormwater, energy, and air pollution benefits of green roofs into an economic model that captures the building-specific scale. Currently, green roofs are primarily valued on increased roof longevity, reduced stormwater runoff, and decreased building energy consumption. Proper valuation of these benefits can reduce the present value of a green roof if investors look beyond the upfront capital costs. Net present value (NPV) analysis comparing a conventional roof system to an extensive green roof system demonstrates that at the end of the green roof lifetime the NPV for the green roof is between 20.3 and 25.2% less than the NPV for the conventional roof over 40 years. The additional upfront investment is recovered at the time when a conventional roof would be replaced. Increasing evidence suggests that green roofs may play a significant role in urban air quality improvement For example, uptake of N0x is estimated to range from $1683 to $6383 per metric ton of NOx reduction. These benefits were included in this study, and results translate to an annual benefit of $895-3392 for a 2000 square meter vegetated roof. Improved air quality leads to a mean NPV for the green roof that is 24.5-40.2% less than the mean conventional roof NPV. Through innovative policies, the inclusion of air pollution mitigation and the reduction of municipal stormwater infrastructure costs in economic valuation of environmental benefits of green roofs can reduce the cost gap that currently hinders U.S. investment in green roof technology. PMID:18409652

  16. Uncertainty Analysis in Large Area Aboveground Biomass Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, A.; Carvalho, L.; Dubayah, R.; Goetz, S. J.; Friedl, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite and aircraft-based remote sensing observations are being more frequently used to generate spatially explicit estimates of aboveground carbon stock of forest ecosystems. Because deforestation and forest degradation account for circa 10% of anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere, policy mechanisms are increasingly recognized as a low-cost mitigation option to reduce carbon emission. They are, however, contingent upon the capacity to accurately measures carbon stored in the forests. Here we examine the sources of uncertainty and error propagation in generating maps of aboveground biomass. We focus on characterizing uncertainties associated with maps at the pixel and spatially aggregated national scales. We pursue three strategies to describe the error and uncertainty properties of aboveground biomass maps, including: (1) model-based assessment using confidence intervals derived from linear regression methods; (2) data-mining algorithms such as regression trees and ensembles of these; (3) empirical assessments using independently collected data sets.. The latter effort explores error propagation using field data acquired within satellite-based lidar (GLAS) acquisitions versus alternative in situ methods that rely upon field measurements that have not been systematically collected for this purpose (e.g. from forest inventory data sets). A key goal of our effort is to provide multi-level characterizations that provide both pixel and biome-level estimates of uncertainties at different scales.

  17. Water quality and quantity investigation of green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecham, S; Razzaghmanesh, M

    2015-03-01

    Low-energy pollutant removal strategies are now being sought for water sensitive urban design. This paper describes investigations into the water quality and quantity of sixteen, low-maintenance and unfertilized intensive and extensive green roof beds. The factors of Slope (1° and 25°), Depth (100 mm and 300 mm), Growing media (type A, type B and type C) and Species (P1, P2 and P3) were randomized according to a split-split plot design. This consisted of twelve vegetated green roof beds and four non-vegetated beds as controls. Stormwater runoff was collected from drainage points that were installed in each area. Samples of run-off were collected for five rainfall events and analysed for water retention capacity and the water quality parameters of NO₂, NO₃, NH₄, PO₄, pH, EC, TDS, Turbidity, Na, Ca, Mg and K. The results indicated significant differences in terms of stormwater water quality and quantity between the outflows of vegetated and non-vegetated systems. The water retention was between 51% and 96% and this range was attributed to the green roof configurations in the experiment. Comparing the quality of rainfall as inflow, and the quality of runoff from the systems showed that green roofs generally acted as a source of pollutants in this study. In the vegetated beds, the intensive green roofs performed better than the extensive beds with regard to outflow quality while in the non-vegetated beds, the extensive beds performed better than intensive systems. This highlights the importance of vegetation in improving water retention capacity as well as the role of vegetation in enhancing pollutant removal in green roof systems. In addition growing media with less organic matter had better water quality performance. Comparison of these results with national and international standards for water reuse confirmed that the green roof outflow was suitable for non-potable uses such as landscape irrigation and toilet flushing.

  18. Water quality and quantity investigation of green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecham, S; Razzaghmanesh, M

    2015-03-01

    Low-energy pollutant removal strategies are now being sought for water sensitive urban design. This paper describes investigations into the water quality and quantity of sixteen, low-maintenance and unfertilized intensive and extensive green roof beds. The factors of Slope (1° and 25°), Depth (100 mm and 300 mm), Growing media (type A, type B and type C) and Species (P1, P2 and P3) were randomized according to a split-split plot design. This consisted of twelve vegetated green roof beds and four non-vegetated beds as controls. Stormwater runoff was collected from drainage points that were installed in each area. Samples of run-off were collected for five rainfall events and analysed for water retention capacity and the water quality parameters of NO₂, NO₃, NH₄, PO₄, pH, EC, TDS, Turbidity, Na, Ca, Mg and K. The results indicated significant differences in terms of stormwater water quality and quantity between the outflows of vegetated and non-vegetated systems. The water retention was between 51% and 96% and this range was attributed to the green roof configurations in the experiment. Comparing the quality of rainfall as inflow, and the quality of runoff from the systems showed that green roofs generally acted as a source of pollutants in this study. In the vegetated beds, the intensive green roofs performed better than the extensive beds with regard to outflow quality while in the non-vegetated beds, the extensive beds performed better than intensive systems. This highlights the importance of vegetation in improving water retention capacity as well as the role of vegetation in enhancing pollutant removal in green roof systems. In addition growing media with less organic matter had better water quality performance. Comparison of these results with national and international standards for water reuse confirmed that the green roof outflow was suitable for non-potable uses such as landscape irrigation and toilet flushing. PMID:25546359

  19. The Development of a Roof Integrated Solar Hot Water System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, David F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Infrastructure and DER Dept.; Moss, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solar Technologies Dept.; Palomino, G. Ernest [Salt River Project (SRP), Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The Salt River Project (SRP), in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Energy Laboratories, Inc. (ELI), collaborated to develop, test, and evaluate an advanced solar water-heating product for new homes. SRP and SNL collaborated under a Department of Energy Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), with ELI as SRP's industry partner. The project has resulted in the design and development of the Roof Integrated Thermal Siphon (RITH) system, an innovative product that features complete roof integration, a storage tank in the back of the collector and below the roofline, easy installation by homebuilders, and a low installed cost. SRP's market research guided the design, and the laboratory tests conducted at SNL provided information used to refine the design of field test units and indicated that the RITH concept is viable. ELI provided design and construction expertise and is currently configured to manufacture the units. This final report for the project provides all of the pertinent and available materials connected to the project including market research studies, the design features and development of the system, and the testing and evaluation conducted at SNL and at a model home test site in Phoenix, Arizona.

  20. Integrated real-time roof monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Bao-tang; GUO Hua; KING Andrew

    2009-01-01

    CSIRO has recently developed a real-time roof monitoring system for under-ground coal mines and successfully tried the system in gate roads at Ulan Mine. The sys-tem integrated displacement monitoring, stress monitoring and seismic monitoring in one package. It included GEL multianchor extensometers, vibrating wire uniaxial stress meters, ESG seismic monitoring system with microseismic sensors and high-frequency AE sen-sors. The monitoring system automated and the data can be automatically collected by a central computer located in an underground nonhazardous area. The data are then trans-ferred to the surface via an optical fiber cable. The real-time data were accessed at any location with an Internet connection. The trials of the system in two tailgates at Ulan Mine demonstrate that the system is effective for monitoring the behavior and stability of read-ways during Iongwall mining. The continuous roof displacement/stress data show clear precursors of roof falls. The seismic data (event count and locations) provide insights into the roof failure process during roof fall.

  1. Retention capacity of extensive green roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobczyk Małgorzata

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change causes a more frequent occurrence of extreme events. The result of these phenomena is the occurrence of floods and flooding, and periods of drought. Particularly unfavorable is intensive rainfall over the urban catchments. To prevent the negative consequences of these phenomena, unconventional solutions should be used. The use of green roofs in urban areas will serve the sustainable development of cities and the impact on local ecological changes. The study was performed at two green roof platforms 1.2×1.2×0.1 m each. An analysis was performed at different intensities given for precipitation. 20 min for the rain to stop was observed from 68 to 100% precipitation. The study was divided into two parts. The first part of the study has been performed in the dry period. In contrast, another round of tests was repeated in other conditions after rainfall. The amount of water at two experimental green roofs platforms before the test was 11.0 dm3. The research relates to the impact of green roofs on local hydrological changes. Development of technologies for green roofs had a positive impact on mitigating the effects of climate change associated with the occurrence of flooding the city.

  2. Fuel Consumption Impacts of Auto Roof Racks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuche; Meier, Alan

    2016-05-01

    The after-market roof rack is one of the most common components attached to a vehicle for carrying over-sized items, such as bicycles and skis. It is important to understand these racks' fuel consumption impacts on both individual vehicles and the national fleet because they are widely used. We estimate the national fuel consumption impacts of roof racks using a bottom-up approach. Our model incorporates real-world data and vehicle stock information to enable assessing fuel consumption impacts for several categories of vehicles, rack configurations, and usage conditions. In addition, the model draws on two new data-gathering techniques, on-line forums and crowd-sourcing. The results show that nationwide, roof racks are responsible for 0.8% of light duty vehicle fuel consumption in 2015, corresponding to 100 million gallons of gasoline per year. Sensitivity analyses show that results are most sensitive to the fraction of vehicles with installed roof racks but carrying no equipment. The aerodynamic efficiency of typical roof racks can be greatly improved and reduce individual vehicle fuel consumption; however, government policies to minimize extensive driving with empty racks--if successful--could save more fuel nationally.

  3. Impact of Sustainable Cool Roof Technology on Building Energy Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuppuluri, Prem Kiran

    Highly reflective roofing systems have been analyzed over several decades to evaluate their ability to meet sustainability goals, including reducing building energy consumption and mitigating the urban heat island. Studies have isolated and evaluated the effects of climate, surface reflectivity, and roof insulation on energy savings, thermal load mitigation and also ameliorating the urban heat island. Other sustainable roofing systems, like green-roofs and solar panels have been similarly evaluated. The motivation for the present study is twofold: the first goal is to present a method for simultaneous evaluation and inter-comparison of multiple roofing systems, and the second goal is to quantitatively evaluate the realized heating and cooling energy savings associated with a white roof system compared to the reduction in roof-top heat flux. To address the first research goal a field experiment was conducted at the International Harvester Building located in Portland, OR. Thermal data was collected for a white roof, vegetated roof, and a solar panel shaded vegetated roof, and the heat flux through these roofing systems was compared against a control patch of conventional dark roof membrane. The second research goal was accomplished using a building energy simulation program to determine the impact of roof area and roof insulation on the savings from a white roof, in both Portland and Phoenix. The ratio of cooling energy savings to roof heat flux reduction from replacing a dark roof with a white roof was 1:4 for the month of July, and 1:5 annually in Portland. The COP of the associated chillers ranges from 2.8-4.2, indicating that the ratio of cooling energy savings to heat flux reduction is not accounted for solely by the COP of the chillers. The results of the building simulation indicate that based on energy savings alone, white roofs are not an optimal choice for Portland. The benefits associated with cooling energy savings relative to a black roof are offset by

  4. Roofing as a source of nonpoint water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mingteh; McBroom, Matthew W; Scott Beasley, R

    2004-12-01

    Sixteen wooden structures with two roofs each were installed to study runoff quality for four commonly used roofing materials (wood shingle, composition shingle, painted aluminum, and galvanized iron) at Nacogdoches, Texas. Each roof, either facing NW or SE, was 1.22 m wide x 3.66 m long with a 25.8% roof slope. Thus, there were 32 alternatively arranged roofs, consisting of four roof types x two aspects x four replicates, in the study. Runoff from the roofs was collected through galvanized gutters, downspouts, and splitters. The roof runoff was compared to rainwater collected by a wet/dry acid rain collector for the concentrations of eight water quality variables, i.e. Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), EC and pH. Based on 31 storms collected between October 1997 and December 1998, the results showed: (1) concentrations of pH, Cu, and Zn in rainwater already exceed the EPA freshwater quality standards even without pollutant inputs from roofs, (2) Zn and Cu, the two most serious pollutants in roof runoff, exceeded the EPA national freshwater water quality standards in virtually 100% and more than 60% of the samples, respectively, (3) pH, EC, and Zn were the only three variables significantly affected by roofing materials, (4) differences in Zn concentrations were significant among all roof types and between all roof runoff and rainwater samples, (5) although there were no differences in Cu concentrations among all roof types and between roof runoff and rainwater, all means and medians of runoff and rainwater exceeded the national water quality standards, (6) water quality from wood shingles was the worst among the roof types studied, and (7) although SE is the most frequent and NW the least frequent direction for incoming storms, only EC, Mg, Mn, and Zn in wood shingle runoff from the SE were significantly higher than those from the NW; the two aspects affected no other elements in runoff from the other three roof types. Also, Zn concentrations from

  5. The Perception of Malaysian Architects towards the Implementation of Green Roofs: A Review of Practices, Methodologies and Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahir M.H. Md.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of green roofs or vegetated roof as a sustainable tool to mitigate the Urban Heat Island effect is relatively new in Malaysia. Although it has not been tested on an urban scale, many research findings have indicated that green roofs can contribute towards enhancing the environmental and aesthetical quality of the built environment. It was hypothesized that the low application of green roofs in the Malaysian construction industry is due to the lack of awareness, understanding and experience in its benefits especially among building practitioners. As a result, this research was initiated to determine the perception and understanding of Malaysian architects in green roofs implementation issues, as well as to identify their level of acceptance and readiness. This paper reviews practices and different research approaches in understanding the factors that influence architect’s perception towards the implementation of green roofs in the Malaysian construction industry. Architects were chosen as the only respondents due to their intensive involvement in the conceptualisation, planning, design and construction stage of a built environment project. Extensive literature review was conducted to explore past experiences in green roof implementation and to develop the theoretical framework for this research.

  6. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2006-03-30

    An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

  7. Flat roof integration. CPT solar (AET IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianese, D.; Pola, I.; Bernasconi, A.; Bura, E.; Cereghetti, N.; Realini, A.; Pasinelli, P.; Rioggi, S.

    2007-11-15

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at a 15.4 kWp solar power installation in Trevano, Switzerland, that features flexible amorphous silicon triple-junction modules, mounted nearly horizontally and directly laminated to flexible polyolefin membranes that form the covering of a flat roof. The main objective of this study was to verify in which order of magnitude the better thermal behaviour of amorphous silicon cells can compensate for losses due to the quasi-horizontal roof integration (lower irradiation and higher reflection), and thus be competitive in the flat roof construction and refurbishment markets. The modules used and their characteristics are described. Performance, temperature levels and energy-production are reviewed for the panels of the installation. The performance of the inverter used is also reviewed. Data on temperatures and production are presented in graphical form and optical losses are examined.

  8. Sustainable urban energy: Development of a mesoscale assessment model for solar reflective roof technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buildings and other engineered structures that form cities are responsible for a significant portion of the global and local impacts of climate change. Consequently, the incorporation of building design strategies and materials such as the use of reflective roof materials, or 'cool' roofs, are being widely investigated. However, although their benefits for individual buildings have been studied, as yet there is little understanding of the potential benefits of urban scale implementation of such systems. Here we report the development of a new methodology for assessing the potential capacity and benefits of installing reflective roofs in an urbanized area. The new methodology combines remote sensing image data with a building energy computer simulation to quantify the current rooftop reflectivity and predict the potential benefits of albedo improvement. In addition to the direct electricity savings, cool roof systems reduce peak electrical demand in the month of August when the peak demand is at its highest in the case study area. Environmental benefits associated with lowering greenhouse-gas emissions are also substantial. The new methodology allows the calculation of payback periods to assist planners to evaluate the potential economic benefits of the widespread installation of cool roof systems. - Research highlights: →Integrated remote sensing technique into building energy simulation quantifies rooftop reflectivity and predicts the potential benefits of albedo improvement. →70% buildings can improve rooftop reflectivity. →Cool roof application can reduce the study area's electrical demand by 4.3%. →Payback period will be 7-11 years depending on low and high-end cool roof cost assumptions.

  9. Stability analysis of subgrade cave roofs in karst region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋冲; 赵明华; 曹文贵

    2008-01-01

    According to the engineering features of subgrade cave roof in karst region, the clamped beam model of subgrade cave roof in karst region was set up. Based on the catastrophe theory, the cusp catastrophe model for bearing capacity of subgrade cave roof and safe thickness of subgrade cave roof in karst region was established. The necessary instability conditions of subgrade cave roof were deduced, and then the methods to determine safe thickness of cave roofs under piles and bearing capacity of subgrade cave roof were proposed. At the same time, a practical engineering project was applied to verifying this method, which has been proved successfu1ly. At last, the major factors that affect the stability on cave roof under pile in karst region were deeply discussed and some results in quality were acquired.

  10. Thermoplastic Single-Ply Roof Relieves Water Damage and Inconvenience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Assesses use of thermoplastic single-ply roofs by North Carolina's Mars Hill College to prevent leaks, reduce maintenance costs, and enhance the value of their older historic buildings. Administrators comment on the roof's installation efficiency and cleanliness. (GR)

  11. Roof separation characteristics of laminated weak roof strata of longwall roadway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ting-kan; LIU Yu-zhou

    2004-01-01

    The roof separation was investigated in a coal mine as part of the site characterization of roof strata deterioration in a longwall roadway. The separation of laminated,weak roof strata was initially characterized as the maximum separation, effect of geological setting on separation and the effect of mining activities (heading development,time-dependent and longwall extraction) on separation. Then the separation process was studied, so as to answer the questions of: when the separation occurs; where the separation is located and what geological setting it relates to; how large of the separation is; and how the separation propagates.

  12. A simulation-based framework for a mapping tool that assesses the energy performance of green roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Kokogiannakis, Georgios; Darkwa, Jo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for the development of a GIS open source mapping tool that aims to disseminate a database with results of detailed simulations in order to assess in a quick and easy way the energy performance of green roof designs across a range of Chinese climates. Detailed simulation results for heating and cooling loads are obtained from the EnergyPlus simulation tool. The study covers 12264 configurations by varying model parameters such as climate, glazing type, roof insu...

  13. The Benefits of Green Roofing for Latvian Building Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, P; Pastars, P

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs serve several purposes for a building, such as absorbing rainwater, providing insulation, creating a habitat for wildlife and helping to lower urban air temperatures and mitigate the heat island effect. The modern trend started when green roofs were developed in Germany in the 1960s, and has since spread to many countries. Today, it is estimated that about 10% of all German roofs have been “greened”. Green roofs are also becoming increasingly popular in the United States, although...

  14. The Potential Incidence of Green Roofs on Urban Runoff Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Seidl, Martin; Mirande-Bret, Cécile; Saad, Mohammed; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    International audience The article presents the results of one year of study on a set of pilot green roofs. The roofs were monitored for outflow and water quality of the runoff. The flux data of green roofs were compared to the reference roof consisting of bituminous membrane. The results show similar findings as the literature data, slight release of solids and nutrients. However, the metals can be retained (Zn) or released (Cu, Ni). Atmospheric pollutants like PAH are strongly retained, ...

  15. Human and environmental controls over aboveground carbon storage in Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asner Gregory P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate, high-resolution mapping of aboveground carbon density (ACD, Mg C ha-1 could provide insight into human and environmental controls over ecosystem state and functioning, and could support conservation and climate policy development. However, mapping ACD has proven challenging, particularly in spatially complex regions harboring a mosaic of land use activities, or in remote montane areas that are difficult to access and poorly understood ecologically. Using a combination of field measurements, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR and satellite data, we present the first large-scale, high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon stocks in Madagascar. Results We found that elevation and the fraction of photosynthetic vegetation (PV cover, analyzed throughout forests of widely varying structure and condition, account for 27-67% of the spatial variation in ACD. This finding facilitated spatial extrapolation of LiDAR-based carbon estimates to a total of 2,372,680 ha using satellite data. Remote, humid sub-montane forests harbored the highest carbon densities, while ACD was suppressed in dry spiny forests and in montane humid ecosystems, as well as in most lowland areas with heightened human activity. Independent of human activity, aboveground carbon stocks were subject to strong physiographic controls expressed through variation in tropical forest canopy structure measured using airborne LiDAR. Conclusions High-resolution mapping of carbon stocks is possible in remote regions, with or without human activity, and thus carbon monitoring can be brought to highly endangered Malagasy forests as a climate-change mitigation and biological conservation strategy.

  16. Study of Falling Roof Vibrations in a Production Face at Roof Support Resistance in the Form of Concentrated Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyalich, G. D.; Buyalich, K. G.; Umrikhina, V. Yu

    2016-08-01

    One of the main reasons of roof support failures in production faces is mismatch of their parameters and parameters of dynamic impact on the metal structure from the falling roof during its secondary convergences. To assess the parameters of vibrational interaction of roof support with the roof, it was suggested to use computational models of forces application and a partial differential equation of fourth order describing this process, its numerical solution allowed to assess frequency, amplitude and speed of roof strata movement depending on physical and mechanical properties of the roof strata as well as on load bearing and geometry parameters of the roof support. To simplify solving of the differential equation, roof support response was taken as the concentrated force.

  17. Recovery and reuse of asphalt roofing waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.; Graziano, G.; Shepherd, P.

    1984-02-02

    Burning of asphalt roofing waste as a fuel and incorporating asphalt roofing waste in bituminous paving were identified as the two outstanding resource recovery concepts out of ten studied. Four additional concepts might be worth considering under different market or technical circumstances. Another four concepts were rated as worth no further consideration at this time. This study of the recovery of the resource represented in asphalt roofing waste has identified the sources and quantities of roofing waste. About six million cubic yards of scrap roofing are generated annually in the United States, about 94% from removal of old roofing at the job site and the remainder from roofing material production at factories. Waste disposal is a growing problem for manufacturers and contractors. Nearly all roofing waste is hauled to landfills at a considerable expense to roofing contractors and manufacturers. Recovery of the roofing waste resource should require only a modest economic incentive. The asphalt contained in roofing waste represents an energy resource of more than 7 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year. Another 1 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year may be contained in field-applied asphalt on commercial building roofs. The two concepts recommended by this study appear to offer the broadest applicability, the most favorable economics, and the highest potential for near-term implementation to reuse this resource.

  18. The Self-Drying Concept for Flat Roofs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Vagn; Bunch-Nielsen, Tommy; Rode, Carsten

    1996-01-01

    Moisture in flat roof systems with an insulation layer has been a long-standing issue for the roof industry. It is now realised, that it is unrealistic and too costly to try to completely keep moisture from entering a roof assembly during its service life. The approach, therefore, should be to keep...

  19. Which Roof is Tops? Grades PreK-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Erik; Ryan, Emily; Swift, Charles

    This introductory activity explores the advantages of different roof shapes for different climates or situations. It addresses questions such as "When you walk or drive around your neighborhood, what do the roofs look like?" and "What if you lived in an area with a different climate, how would that affect the style of roof that you might find?"…

  20. 40 CFR 65.44 - External floating roof (EFR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operator shall visually inspect for EFR failures, the external floating roof, the primary seal, secondary... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false External floating roof (EFR). 65.44... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels § 65.44 External floating roof (EFR). (a)...

  1. The growth and survival of plants in urban green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Kazemi, F

    2014-04-01

    Green roofs as one of the components of water-sensitive urban design have become widely used in recent years. This paper describes performance monitoring of four prototype-scale experimental green roofs in a northern suburb of Adelaide, South Australia, undertaken over a 1-year period. Four species of indigenous Australian ground cover and grass species comprising Carpobrotus rossii, Lomandra longifolia 'Tanika,' Dianella caerula 'Breeze' and Myoporum parvifolium were planted in extensive and intensive green roof configurations using two different growing media. The first medium consisted of crushed brick, scoria, coir fibre and composted organics while the second comprised scoria, composted pine bark and hydro-cell flakes. Plant growth indices including vertical and horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot and root biomasses, water use efficiency and irrigation regimes were studied during a 12-month period. The results showed that the succulent species, C. rossii, can best tolerate the hot, dry summer conditions of South Australia, and this species showed a 100% survival rate and had the maximum horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot biomass and water use efficiency. All of the plants in the intensive green roofs with the crushed brick mix media survived during the term of this study. It was shown that stormwater can be used as a source of irrigation water for green roofs during 8 months of the year in Adelaide. However, supplementary irrigation is required for some of the plants over a full annual cycle.

  2. Monitoring roof beam lateral displacement at the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateral displacement in the immediate roof beam at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a significant factor in assessment of excavation performance for the design of ground control systems. Information on roof beam lateral displacement, expansion, fracture formation, as well as excavation convergence, is gathered using a variety of manually and remotely read instruments. Visual observations are also used when possible. This paper describes the methods used to measure lateral displacement, or offset, at the WIPP. Offset magnitudes are determined by the degree of occlusion in drillholes that intersect the offset plane. The Borehole Lateral Displacement Sensor (BLDS) was developed for installation at WIPP to monitor offset at a high degree of accuracy at a short reading frequency. Offset measurements have historically been obtained by visual estimation of borehole occlusion. Use of the BLDS will enable relationships between time dependent roof beam lateral displacement and expansion to be established in much shorter periods than is possible using visual observations. The instrument will also allow remote monitoring of roof beam displacement in areas where visual estimations are not possible. Continued monitoring of roof beam displacement, convergence, and expansion, is integral to timely and pertinent assessments of WIPP excavation performance

  3. The growth and survival of plants in urban green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Kazemi, F

    2014-04-01

    Green roofs as one of the components of water-sensitive urban design have become widely used in recent years. This paper describes performance monitoring of four prototype-scale experimental green roofs in a northern suburb of Adelaide, South Australia, undertaken over a 1-year period. Four species of indigenous Australian ground cover and grass species comprising Carpobrotus rossii, Lomandra longifolia 'Tanika,' Dianella caerula 'Breeze' and Myoporum parvifolium were planted in extensive and intensive green roof configurations using two different growing media. The first medium consisted of crushed brick, scoria, coir fibre and composted organics while the second comprised scoria, composted pine bark and hydro-cell flakes. Plant growth indices including vertical and horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot and root biomasses, water use efficiency and irrigation regimes were studied during a 12-month period. The results showed that the succulent species, C. rossii, can best tolerate the hot, dry summer conditions of South Australia, and this species showed a 100% survival rate and had the maximum horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot biomass and water use efficiency. All of the plants in the intensive green roofs with the crushed brick mix media survived during the term of this study. It was shown that stormwater can be used as a source of irrigation water for green roofs during 8 months of the year in Adelaide. However, supplementary irrigation is required for some of the plants over a full annual cycle. PMID:24468503

  4. Monitoring roof beam lateral displacement at the waste isolation pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrill, L.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lateral displacement in the immediate roof beam at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a significant factor in assessment of excavation performance for the design of ground control systems. Information on roof beam lateral displacement, expansion, fracture formation, as well as excavation convergence, is gathered using a variety of manually and remotely read instruments. Visual observations are also used when possible. This paper describes the methods used to measure lateral displacement, or offset, at the WIPP. Offset magnitudes are determined by the degree of occlusion in drillholes that intersect the offset plane. The Borehole Lateral Displacement Sensor (BLDS) was developed for installation at WIPP to monitor offset at a high degree of accuracy at a short reading frequency. Offset measurements have historically been obtained by visual estimation of borehole occlusion. Use of the BLDS will enable relationships between time dependent roof beam lateral displacement and expansion to be established in much shorter periods than is possible using visual observations. The instrument will also allow remote monitoring of roof beam displacement in areas where visual estimations are not possible. Continued monitoring of roof beam displacement, convergence, and expansion, is integral to timely and pertinent assessments of WIPP excavation performance.

  5. Assessment of a fiber-optic distributed-temperature-sensing system to monitor the thermal dynamics of vegetated roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousiño, J. A.; Hausner, M. B.; Victorero, F.; Bonilla, C.; Gironas, J. A.; Vera, S.; Bustamante, W.; Rojas, V.; Pasten, P.; Suarez, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs include a growing media and vegetation layer, and offer a range of benefits such as the reduction of: the heat island effect, rooftop runoff peak flows, roof surface temperatures, energy used for cooling or heating buildings, and noise levels inside infrastructures. Vegetated roofs also offer aesthetic benefits and increase the biodiversity of the urban environment, and are increasingly used in sustainable urban development. Understanding the thermal dynamics of vegetated roofs will make it possible to improve their design and to better assess their impacts on energy efficiency. Here, we evaluate the first vertical high-resolution distributed-temperature-sensing (DTS) system installed in a vegetated roof. This system allows a continuous measurement of the thermal profile within a vegetated roof - going from the interior, upward through the drainage layers and soil substrate of the vegetated roof and ending in the air above the vegetation. Temperatures can be observed as frequently as every 30 s at a spatial resolution on the order of centimeters. This DTS system was installed in the "Laboratory of Vegetal Infrastructure of Buildings" (LIVE - its acronym in Spanish), located in the San Joaquín Campus of the Pontifical Catholic University, Santiago, Chile. The laboratory features 18 experimental modules to investigate different configurations of the vegetated roof layers. The LIVE was designed with the installation of the optical fibers in mind, and the DTS system allows simultaneous monitoring of three or four modules of the LIVE. In this work, we describe the design of this DTS deployment, the calibration metrics obtained using the software provided by the manufacturers, and other calibration algorithms previously developed. We compare the results obtained using single- and double-ended measurements, highlighting strengths and weaknesses of DTS methods. Finally, we present the observations obtained from this biophysical environment

  6. The Potential of Roof Deck Play Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., Ottawa (Ontario).

    This report, the fifteenth in a series of twenty completed by the Children's Environments Advisory Service for the International Year of the Child, 1979, presents a guide for planning play spaces on roof decks in high density family housing projects where on-grade land is too scarce or too expensive for development as communal recreation space.…

  7. Load-Bearing Capacity of Roof Trusses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Damkilde, Lars; Munch-Andersen, J.

    2004-01-01

    systems such as roof trusses are established and statistical characteristics of the load bearing capacity are determined. The results show that there is a significant increase in the characteristic (nominal) value and a reduction in the coefficient of variation (COV) for typical loads such as permanent...

  8. Putative linkages between below- and aboveground mutualisms during alien plant invasions

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Traveset, Anna

    2015-01-01

    © The Authors 2015. Evidence of the fundamental role of below-aboveground links in controlling ecosystem processes is mostly based on studies done with soil herbivores or mutualists and aboveground herbivores. Much less is known about the links between belowground and aboveground mutualisms, which have been studied separately for decades. It has not been until recently that these mutualisms-mycorrhizas and legume-rhizobia on one hand, and pollinators and seed dispersers on the other hand-have...

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-06-30

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 134 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as “Aboveground Storage Tanks” and consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 3, 15, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site: · CAS 03-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank · CAS 03-01-04, Tank · CAS 15-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank · CAS 29-01-01, Hydrocarbon Stain

  10. Integration of thermal insulation coating and moving-air-cavity in a cool roof system for attic temperature reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel integrated cool roof system for attic temperature reduction is introduced. • 13 °C temperature reduction achieved due to its efficient heat transfer mechanism. • Aluminium tube cavity of the roof is able to reduce the attic temperature. • This positive result is due to its efficient heat reflection and hot air rejection. • Thermal insulation coating incorporates the usage of eggshell waste as bio-filler. - Abstract: Cool roof systems play a significant role in enhancing the comfort level of occupants by reducing the attic temperature of the building. Heat transmission through the roof can be reduced by applying thermal insulation coating (TIC) on the roof and/or installing insulation under the roof of the attic. This paper focuses on a TIC integrated with a series of aluminium tubes that are installed on the underside of the metal roof. In this study, the recycled aluminium cans were arranged into tubes that act as a moving-air-cavity (MAC). The TIC was formulated using titanium dioxide pigment with chicken eggshell (CES) waste as bio-filler bound together by a polyurethane resin binder. The thermal conductivity of the thermal insulation paint was measured using KD2 Pro Thermal Properties Analyzer. Four types of cool roof systems were designed and the performances were evaluated. The experimental works were carried out indoors by using halogen light bulbs followed by comparison of the roof and attic temperatures. The temperature of the surrounding air during testing was approximately 27.5 °C. The cool roof that incorporated both TIC and MAC with opened attic inlet showed a significant improvement with a reduction of up to 13 °C (from 42.4 °C to 29.6 °C) in the attic temperature compared to the conventional roof system. The significant difference in the results is due to the low thermal conductivity of the thermal insulation paint (0.107 W/mK) as well as the usage of aluminium tubes in the roof cavity that was able to transfer

  11. The Effect of Roof Angles on Indoor Air Temperatures in Terrace Houses in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Ramly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of energy efficiency in building design is to create buildings that utilise minimum amount of energy while meeting the comfort standards as high as or higher than those provided by conventional buildings.To achieve these standards, it is necessary to study the local environment in order to assess its positive and negative features (impact on the building. The results will provide a basic understanding of heat transfer and human thermal comfort requirements. It also provides foundation for which an energy efficient design of buildings can be established. The design of residential buildings has a significant impact on everyday lives of people. It includes the types and forms of buildings that are commonly occupied by people. In Malaysia, the 'terrace house' constitutes the majority of the residential building stock on which this study is based. The study considers the effects of the different roof angles on reducing solar gain and indoor temperatures through eight directions within 24 hours. To analyse and explain that effect, five different angles of roof were chosen for the simulations. In general, all the angles were chosen due 10 their architectural design characteristics. These angles start from 0 degree as a horizontal flat roof to 60 degrees, i.e. increment of every 15 degrees. The research is seen as providing a tool in evaluating the dynamic indoor air temperature and the effect of roof angles. The evaluation is derived from a series of computer simulations using commercially available software called BLAST.

  12. Structure, Aboveground Biomass, and Soil Characterization of Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park, Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsumaiti, Tareefa Saad Sultan

    Mangrove forests are national treasures of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other arid countries with limited forested areas. Mangroves form a crucial part of the coastal ecosystem and provide numerous benefits to society, economy, and especially the environment. Mangrove trees, specifically Avicennia marina, are studied in their native habitat in order to characterize their population structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties. This study focused on Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park in Abu Dhabi, which was the first mangrove protected area to be designated in UAE. In situ measurements were collected to estimate Avicennia marina status, mortality rate (%), height (m), crown spread (m), stem number, diameter at breast height (cm), basal area (m), and aboveground biomass (t ha-1 ). Small-footprint aerial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data acquired by UAE were processed to characterize mangrove canopy height and aboveground biomass density. This included extraction of LIDAR-derived height percentile statistics, segmentation of the forest into structurally homogenous units, and development of regression relationships between in situ reference and remote sensing data using a machine learning approach. An in situ soil survey was conducted to examine the soils' physical and chemical properties, fertility status, and organic matter. The data of soil survey were used to create soil maps to evaluate key characteristics of soils, and their influence on Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park. The results of this study provide new insights into Avicennia marina canopy population, structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties in Abu Dhabi, as data in such arid environments is lacking. This valuable information can help in managing and preserving this unique ecosystem.

  13. Green roofs as a means of pollution abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Green roofs involve growing vegetation on rooftops and are one tool that can help mitigate the negative effects of pollution. This review encompasses published research to date on how green roofs can help mitigate pollution, how green roof materials influence the magnitude of these benefits, and suggests future research directions. The discussion concentrates on how green roofs influence air pollution, carbon dioxide emissions, carbon sequestration, longevity of roofing membranes that result in fewer roofing materials in landfills, water quality of stormwater runoff, and noise pollution. Suggestions for future directions for research include plant selection, development of improved growing substrates, urban rooftop agriculture, water quality of runoff, supplemental irrigation, the use of grey water, air pollution, carbon sequestration, effects on human health, combining green roofs with complementary related technologies, and economics and policy issues.

  14. Green roofs as a means of pollution abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Green roofs involve growing vegetation on rooftops and are one tool that can help mitigate the negative effects of pollution. This review encompasses published research to date on how green roofs can help mitigate pollution, how green roof materials influence the magnitude of these benefits, and suggests future research directions. The discussion concentrates on how green roofs influence air pollution, carbon dioxide emissions, carbon sequestration, longevity of roofing membranes that result in fewer roofing materials in landfills, water quality of stormwater runoff, and noise pollution. Suggestions for future directions for research include plant selection, development of improved growing substrates, urban rooftop agriculture, water quality of runoff, supplemental irrigation, the use of grey water, air pollution, carbon sequestration, effects on human health, combining green roofs with complementary related technologies, and economics and policy issues. PMID:21074914

  15. Establishing green roof infrastructure through environmental policy instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Timothy; Fowler, Laurie

    2008-07-01

    Traditional construction practices provide little opportunity for environmental remediation to occur in urban areas. As concerns for environmental improvement in urban areas become more prevalent, innovative practices which create ecosystem services and ecologically functional land cover in cities will be in higher demand. Green roofs are a prime example of one of these practices. The past decade has seen the North American green roof industry rapidly expand through international green roof conferences, demonstration sites, case studies, and scientific research. This study evaluates existing international and North American green roof policies at the federal, municipal, and community levels. Green roof policies fall into a number of general categories, including direct and indirect regulation, direct and indirect financial incentives, and funding of demonstration or research projects. Advantages and disadvantages of each category are discussed. Salient features and a list of prompting standards common to successfully implemented green roof strategies are then distilled from these existing policies. By combining these features with data collected from an experimental green roof site in Athens, Georgia, the planning and regulatory framework for widespread green roof infrastructure can be developed. The authors propose policy instruments be multi-faceted and spatially focused, and also propose the following recommendations: (1) Identification of green roof overlay zones with specifications for green roofs built in these zones. This spatial analysis is important for prioritizing areas of the jurisdiction where green roofs will most efficiently function; (2) Offer financial incentives in the form of density credits and stormwater utility fee credits to help overcome the barriers to entry of the new technology; (3) Construct demonstration projects and institutionalize a commitment greening roofs on publicly-owned buildings as an effective way of establishing an educated

  16. Establishing Green Roof Infrastructure Through Environmental Policy Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Timothy; Fowler, Laurie

    2008-07-01

    Traditional construction practices provide little opportunity for environmental remediation to occur in urban areas. As concerns for environmental improvement in urban areas become more prevalent, innovative practices which create ecosystem services and ecologically functional land cover in cities will be in higher demand. Green roofs are a prime example of one of these practices. The past decade has seen the North American green roof industry rapidly expand through international green roof conferences, demonstration sites, case studies, and scientific research. This study evaluates existing international and North American green roof policies at the federal, municipal, and community levels. Green roof policies fall into a number of general categories, including direct and indirect regulation, direct and indirect financial incentives, and funding of demonstration or research projects. Advantages and disadvantages of each category are discussed. Salient features and a list of prompting standards common to successfully implemented green roof strategies are then distilled from these existing policies. By combining these features with data collected from an experimental green roof site in Athens, Georgia, the planning and regulatory framework for widespread green roof infrastructure can be developed. The authors propose policy instruments be multi-faceted and spatially focused, and also propose the following recommendations: (1) Identification of green roof overlay zones with specifications for green roofs built in these zones. This spatial analysis is important for prioritizing areas of the jurisdiction where green roofs will most efficiently function; (2) Offer financial incentives in the form of density credits and stormwater utility fee credits to help overcome the barriers to entry of the new technology; (3) Construct demonstration projects and institutionalize a commitment greening roofs on publicly-owned buildings as an effective way of establishing an educated

  17. Green Roof Evaluation: A Holistic ‘Long Life, Loose Fit, Low Energy’ Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Langston

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs have potential to improve the social and environmental performance of detached housing in Australia, yet often they are overlooked due to prohibitive capital cost and a range of other perceptions that are difficult to quantify. A classic evaluation problem is invoked that must balance short and long term benefits. Using two distinct designs of the same floor area, green roof and traditional housing prototypes are analysed to determine the relative ‘breakeven’ point when long-term benefits become feasible. It is discovered that green roofs are unlikely to be viable in their own right, but when coupled with an overall design strategy of long life (durability, loose fit (adaptability and low energy (sustainability they can deliver least cost (affordability over time as well as unlock valuable social and environmental rewards. This outcome can be realised within 25% of a home’s expected design life of at least one hundred years. The results demonstrate that residential green roofs, when integrated as part of a holistic approach, can be both individually and collectively justified on key economic, social and environmental criteria, and are therefore able to claim a valuable contribution towards wider sustainable development goals.

  18. Studies on Hydroponics Design and Its Effect of Vegetables on the Roof Platform of Buildings%楼顶平台蔬菜水培系统设计及应用效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶正平; 李梦玲; 边鸣镝

    2001-01-01

    By circulating hydroponic culture technique to soilless cultur e of vegetables on the roof platform of buildings, we could get higher ec onomic and social benefit.In south China,12~16 powing periods of green veg etables could be planted in a year,which produced by an average of 52~66 kilogr ams or 58 yuan per square meter.The key cultural techniques is how to make u se of win dbreak wall、shelter shed and other equipments,as well as how to overcome greatl y variable microclimate conditions on the top of buildings.%在平顶楼房的顶部平台,利用循环水培技术进行蔬菜无土栽培,具有较高的 经济效益和社会效益,在南方地区,每年可生产绿叶蔬菜12~16茬,平均每平方米可生产蔬 菜52~66kg,每平方米面积创利58元。其栽培关键技术是利用防风墙、防护棚等设施,克服 楼房顶部小气候条件变化激烈问题。

  19. Impact of climate and vegetation type on evapotranspiration from green roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, M. E.; Robinson, C. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Voogt, J. A.; Smart, C. C.; Way, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Green roofs are an increasingly popular low impact development tool used to mitigate the adverse effects of urbanization and the loss of vegetated spaces. The benefits of green roofs include reducing stormwater volume and peak flows, reducing building energy loads, and mitigating the urban heat island effect. Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key process fundamental to hydrologic and thermal performance of green roofs. For example, ET governs the water storage volume available in the soil medium and thus the ability of the green roof to retain and attenuate stormwater. Green roof design considerations such as soil medium depth and plant type impact ET rates. Additionally, climate has a strong impact on ET rates. To date, the influence between climate and green roof design factors (e.g. vegetation type and soil medium depth) on ET rates have not been well quantified. We performed a field study to evaluate the impact of climate, vegetation type, and soil medium depth on ET rates from extensive modular green roofs over prolonged drying periods. Three Canadian cities with distinct climates were chosen as field sites: London, ON, Calgary, AB, and Halifax, NS. At each site, daily module weights were recorded from May to August in 2013 and 2014 for approximately 40 green roof modules. These modules were divided into four vegetation treatments (three single species and one mixed species), and each treatment was divided into two groups of soil medium depth (10 cm or 15 cm). Daily ET rates and seasonal moisture loss were calculated and compared for the modules to determine which treatment provided the highest ET rates. The root depth profile, leaf area index, and stomatal resistance were also measured. On average, daily ET rates among the vegetation treatments did not vary greatly, however, observations on plant survival indicate which plant types are best suited for each site. In all three sites, mixed species in 15 cm of soil medium had higher seasonal moisture loss compared to

  20. Quality of roof-harvested rainwater – Comparison of different roofing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study reported in this paper was to assess the quality of harvested rainwater on the basis of the roofing materials used and the presence of lichens/mosses on the roofing surface. Four pilot structures with different roofing materials (i.e., wooden shingle tiles, concrete tiles, clay tiles [Gi-Wa] and galvanized steel) were installed in a field. The galvanized steel was found to be the most suitable for rainwater harvesting applications, with their resulting physical and chemical water quality parameters meeting the Korean guidelines for drinking water quality (e.g., pH (5.8–8.5), TSS 3− 42− < 200 mg/L, Al < 0.2 mg/L, Cu < 1 mg/L, Fe < 0.3 mg/L, Pb < 0.05 mg/L, Zn < 1 mg/L, and E. coli (No detection)). In the galvanized steel case, the relatively high water quality was probably due to ultraviolet light and the high temperature effectively disinfecting the harvested rainwater. It was also found that the presence of lichens and mosses may adversely affect the physical, chemical and microbiological quality of rainwater. - Highlights: ► The quality of the harvested rainwater depends on the roofing materials. ► The presence of lichen on the roofing surface affects the quality of the harvested rainwater. ► The galvanized steel roof is suitable for the quality of the harvested rainwater. - To assess the quality of harvested rainwater on the basis of the roofing materials used with the presence of lichens.

  1. ALLOMETRIC EQUATIONS FOR ESTIMATING ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS IN PAPUA TROPICAL FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhi Imam Maulana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Allometric equations can be used to estimate biomass and carbon stock of  the forest. However, so far the allometric equations for commercial species in Papua tropical forests have not been appropriately developed. In this research, allometric equations are presented based on the genera of  commercial species. Few equations have been developed for the commercial species of  Intsia, Pometia, Palaquium and Vatica genera and an equation of  a mix of  these genera. The number of  trees sampled in this research was 49, with diameters (1.30 m above-ground or above buttresses ranging from 5 to 40 cm. Destructive sampling was used to collect the samples where Diameter at Breast Height (DBH and Wood Density (WD were used as predictors for dry weight of  Total Above-Ground Biomass (TAGB. Model comparison and selection were based on the values of  F-statistics, R-sq, R-sq (adj, and average deviation. Based on these statistical indicators, the most suitable model for Intsia, Pometia, Palaquium and Vatica genera respectively are Log(TAGB = -0.76 + 2.51Log(DBH, Log(TAGB = -0.84 + 2.57Log(DBH, Log(TAGB = -1.52 + 2.96Log(DBH, and Log(TAGB = -0.09 + 2.08Log(DBH. Additional explanatory variables such as Commercial Bole Height (CBH do not really increase the indicators’ goodness of  fit for the equation. An alternative model to incorporate wood density should  be considered for estimating the above-ground biomass for mixed genera. Comparing the presented mixed-genera equation; Log(TAGB = 0.205 + 2.08Log(DBH + 1.75Log(WD, R-sq: 97.0%, R-sq (adj: 96.9%, F statistics 750.67, average deviation: 3.5%; to previously published datashows that this local species specific equation differs substantially from previously published equations and this site-specific equation is  considered to give a better estimation of  biomass.

  2. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density

  3. 坡屋顶的绿化技术%THE TECHNICAL MEASURES OF GREENING OF SLOPING ROOF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海英; 杨洁

    2014-01-01

    The present study of roof greening is more concentrated in the flat roof , and less in the sloping roof .With respect to flat roof , loss of soil and water is the main problem of greening of sloping roofs .The paper studied anti-skid measures, irrigation and drainage system and combining with rainwater collection to popularize the design of greening of sloping roofs .%目前屋顶绿化的研究大多集中于平屋顶,而坡屋顶的较少;相对平屋顶,水土流失是坡屋顶绿化存在的主要问题。通过研究坡屋顶绿化的防滑措施、灌溉方式、蓄排水系统及结合雨水收集等关键技术来推广和普及坡屋顶绿化的设计。

  4. Natural convection heat transfer in Gambrel roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varol, Yasin; Koca, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Education, Technical Education Faculty, Firat University, TR-23119 Elazig (Turkey); Oztop, Hakan F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Firat University,TR-23119 Elazig (Turkey)

    2007-03-15

    Buoyancy induced natural convection is investigated with a numerical technique in Gambrel roofs. The geometry adapted to both winter day conditions, the bottom is hot temperature while top is cold, and summer day conditions, bottom is cold and inclined top wall is hot temperature. Governing equations in stream function-vorticity form are solved with finite difference technique and algebraic equations are solved using successive under relaxation (SUR) method. Rayleigh number is taken as parameter which affects the flow and heat transfer. Its value changes between 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 7}. It is found that winterlike boundary conditions are more effective than summerlike boundary conditions on the flow field and heat transfer in the roof. (author)

  5. PERFORMANCE OF AN EARTHQUAKE EXCITED ROOF DIAPHRAGM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.; Brady, G.; Safak, E.; Converse, A.; ,

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the earthquake performance of the roof diaphragm of the West Valley College gymnasium in Saratoga, California through a complete set of acceleration records obtained during the 24 April 1984 Morgan Hill Earthquake (M equals 6. 1). The roof diaphragm of the 112 ft. multiplied by 144 ft. rectangular, symmetric gymnasium consists of 3/8 in. plywood over tongue-and-groove sheathing attached to steel trusses supported by reinforced concrete columns and walls. Three sensors placed in the direction of each of the axes of the diaphragm facilitate the evaluation of in-plane deformation of the diaphragm. Other sensors placed at ground level measure vertical and horizontal motion of the building floor, and consequently allow the calculation of the relative motion of the diaphragm with respect to the ground level.

  6. Some metals in aboveground biomass of Scots pine in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varnagiryte-Kabašinskiene, Iveta; Armolaitis, Kestutis; Stupak, Inge;

    2014-01-01

    The stocks of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and aluminium (Al) in different compartments of the aboveground tree biomass were estimated in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands in Lithuania. Simulated removals of metals due to the forest biomass extraction in a model Scots pine stands...... during a 100-year-long rotation period were compared with metals pools in sandy soil and the fluxes through atmospheric deposition. Applying whole tree harvesting, total removal comprised about 20kgha-1 of each Al and Mn, and 5 times lower amount of each Zn and Fe. The metals were mainly removed....... The content of metals in forest biomass fuel ash was relatively small to compare with their total removals. The findings of this study have an important implications for future practice, i.e. the recommended maximum forest biomass fuel ash dose for the compensating fertilising could be increased with respect...

  7. Evaluating lidar point densities for effective estimation of aboveground biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Stoker, Jason; Vogel, John M.; Velasco, Miguel G.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) was recently established to provide airborne lidar data coverage on a national scale. As part of a broader research effort of the USGS to develop an effective remote sensing-based methodology for the creation of an operational biomass Essential Climate Variable (Biomass ECV) data product, we evaluated the performance of airborne lidar data at various pulse densities against Landsat 8 satellite imagery in estimating above ground biomass for forests and woodlands in a study area in east-central Arizona, U.S. High point density airborne lidar data, were randomly sampled to produce five lidar datasets with reduced densities ranging from 0.5 to 8 point(s)/m2, corresponding to the point density range of 3DEP to provide national lidar coverage over time. Lidar-derived aboveground biomass estimate errors showed an overall decreasing trend as lidar point density increased from 0.5 to 8 points/m2. Landsat 8-based aboveground biomass estimates produced errors larger than the lowest lidar point density of 0.5 point/m2, and therefore Landsat 8 observations alone were ineffective relative to airborne lidar for generating a Biomass ECV product, at least for the forest and woodland vegetation types of the Southwestern U.S. While a national Biomass ECV product with optimal accuracy could potentially be achieved with 3DEP data at 8 points/m2, our results indicate that even lower density lidar data could be sufficient to provide a national Biomass ECV product with accuracies significantly higher than that from Landsat observations alone.

  8. Above-ground biomass functions for Scots pine in Lithuania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miksys, Virgilijus; Varnagiryte-Kabasinskiene, Iveta; Armolaitis, Kestutis [Lithuanian Forest Research Institute, Liepu 1, Girionys, LT-53101 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Stupak, Inge [Forest and Landscape Denmark, Hoersholm Kongevej 11, DK-2970 Hoersholm (Denmark); Kukkola, Mikko [The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, Vantaa Unit, PL 18, 01301 Vantaa (Finland); Wojcik, Josef [Forest Research Institute, Sekocin-Las, 05-090 Raszyn (Poland)

    2007-10-15

    This study presents biomass functions applicable to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) on Arenosols in Lithuania, and exemplifies the potential biomass removal from Scots pine stands during thinnings. Scots pine is the most common tree species on Arenosols in Lithuania. Stands of ages 10, 20, 40, 50 and 65 years were chosen for the biomass study. We sampled 5 Scots pine trees per plot (in total 25 trees) that were stratified according to the basal area. The sampling was performed in April 2003, before the vegetative period. The following components of each tree were sampled for the above-ground biomass measurements: (1) 5 stem discs, (2) 1 branch with needles from each whorl and (3) 1 dead branch per tree. Observed biomasses of above-ground components were examined using a non-linear regression model, using stem diameter (D), tree height (H) and D{sup 2}H as independent variables. For stemwood biomass, the best approximation was D{sup 2}H. However, D{sup 2}H was not the best parameter for crown biomass because it does not allow evaluation of the opposite effects of diameter and height on crown biomass. The calculations at stand level showed that crown biomass changed insignificantly with the increase in stand age. However, the total stand biomass increased with age due to the growth of the stem. The removal of all logging residues from the Scots pine stand over a 100-year rotation could increase extraction of forest fuel by 15-20% compared with conventional harvesting. (author)

  9. Installation of a Roof Mounted Photovoltaic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to create a safe and comfortable environment for students to learn, a lot of electricity, which is generated from coal fired power plants, is used. Therefore, ISF Academy, a school in Hong Kong with approximately 1,500 students, will be installing a rooftop photovoltaic (PV) system with 302 solar panels. Not only will these panels be used to power a classroom, they will also serve as an educational opportunity for students to learn about the importance of renewable energy technology and its uses. There were four different options for the installation of the solar panels, and the final choice was made based on the loading capacity of the roof, considering the fact that overstressing the roof could prove to be a safety hazard. Moreover, due to consideration of the risk of typhoons in Hong Kong, the solar panel PV system will include concrete plinths as counterweights - but not so much that the roof would be severely overstressed. During and after the installation of the PV system, students involved would be able to do multiple calculations, such as determining the reduction of the school's carbon footprint. This can allow students to learn about the impact renewable energy can have on the environment. Another project students can participate in includes measuring the efficiency of the solar panels and how much power can be produced per year, which in turn can help with calculate the amount of money saved per year and when we will achieve economic parity. In short, the installation of the roof mounted PV system will not only be able to help save money for the school but also provide learning opportunities for students studying at the ISF Academy.

  10. Aboveground biomass investments and light interception of tropical forest trees early in succession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selaya, N.G.; Anten, N.P.R.; Mathies, M.; Oomen, R.J.; Werger, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims: Crown structure and above-ground biomass investment was studied in relation to light interception of trees and lianas growing in a 6-month-old regenerating forest. Methods: The vertical distribution of total above-ground biomass, height, diameter, stem density, leaf angles and c

  11. Above-ground biomass and productivity in a rain forest of eastern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chave, J.; Olivier, J.; Bongers, F.J.J.M.; Chatelet, P.; Forget, P.M.; Meer, van der P.J.; Norden, N.; Riera, B.; Charles-Dominique, P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The dynamics of tropical forest woody plants was studied at the Nouragues Field Station, central French Guiana. Stem density, basal area, above-ground biomass and above-ground net primary productivity, including the contribution of litterfall, were estimated from two large permanent census

  12. Aging and weathering of cool roofing membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Levinson, Ronnen; Graveline,Stanley; Foley, Kevin; Delgado, Ana H.; Paroli, Ralph M.

    2005-08-23

    Aging and weathering can reduce the solar reflectance of cool roofing materials. This paper summarizes laboratory measurements of the solar spectral reflectance of unweathered, weathered, and cleaned samples collected from single-ply roofing membranes at various sites across the United States. Fifteen samples were examined in each of the following six conditions: unweathered; weathered; weathered and brushed; weathered, brushed and then rinsed with water; weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, and then washed with soap and water; and weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, washed with soap and water, and then washed with an algaecide. Another 25 samples from 25 roofs across the United States and Canada were measured in their unweathered state, weathered, and weathered and wiped. We document reduction in reflectivity resulted from various soiling mechanisms and provide data on the effectiveness of various cleaning approaches. Results indicate that although the majority of samples after being washed with detergent could be brought to within 90% of their unweathered reflectivity, in some instances an algaecide was required to restore this level of reflectivity.

  13. Quality of roof-harvested rainwater--comparison of different roofing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Bak, Gippeum; Han, Mooyoung

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study reported in this paper was to assess the quality of harvested rainwater on the basis of the roofing materials used and the presence of lichens/mosses on the roofing surface. Four pilot structures with different roofing materials (i.e., wooden shingle tiles, concrete tiles, clay tiles [Gi-Wa] and galvanized steel) were installed in a field. The galvanized steel was found to be the most suitable for rainwater harvesting applications, with their resulting physical and chemical water quality parameters meeting the Korean guidelines for drinking water quality (e.g., pH (5.8-8.5), TSS case, the relatively high water quality was probably due to ultraviolet light and the high temperature effectively disinfecting the harvested rainwater. It was also found that the presence of lichens and mosses may adversely affect the physical, chemical and microbiological quality of rainwater. PMID:22243894

  14. 公共游憩型屋顶花园设计解析*--以日本琦玉广场屋顶花园为例%Design Analysis of Recreational Public Green Roof--Case Study of Saitama Plaza in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱万惠; 唐洪辉; 赵庆

    2016-01-01

    公共游憩型屋顶花园利用建筑“第五立面”创造生态绿色空间,是城市公共空间发展的新方向。文章通过文献资料研究及实地调查,提出了公共游憩型屋顶花园基本设计原则,以日本琦玉广场屋顶花园为具体案例,对其设计方法、建造技术与材料运用进行分析,总结出公共游憩型屋顶花园的建设必须依赖科学合理的设计、恰当的选材及先进的建造技术,三者缺一不可。%Recreational public green roof, which use the fifth elevation of building to create ecological greenspace, is a new direction for the development of urban public space. After literature review and site to visit, this paper summarized the basic design principle and used Saitama Plaza in Japan as an case study to analyse it’s designing methods and the application of techniques and materials, aiming at providing reference to the future research and design.

  15. Lightning protection for roof-mounted solar cell using two masts

    OpenAIRE

    N. Petcharaks

    2013-01-01

    Houses invested in roof-mounted solar cell need protection from direct lightning. This paper presents the application of numerical method in designing the height and location of masts based on protection angle method according to international standard IEC 62305. An isolated external lightning protection system using two isolated masts is designed. The protected zone which is in the volume according to the protection angle method, depends on the protection level, the rolling sphere radius and...

  16. Thermal Behavior of Green Roofs Applied to Tropical Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Tibério Cardoso; Francisco Vecchia

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present results on an experimental field about the green roofs thermal behavior, compared to other traditional roof covering systems. On the one hand, it intends to describe shortly the constructive system of a green roof with a lightweight building system, which has a sustainable building materials character and, on the other, it worries with the water reuse and with the run-off delay. The main methodological procedure adopted to study the thermal behavior o...

  17. Standard tests for the characterization of roofing slate pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Cárdenes, V.; Mateos, F. J.; Rubio-Ordoñez, A.; Monterroso, C.

    2012-01-01

    The pathologies formed in slate roofs are mainly due to the presence of potentially unstable minerals (iron sulfides, carbonates and organic matter). These minerals may become altered by the effect of environmental agents, once the slate roof is finished. The pathologies are mainly associated with oxidation and gypsification processes of the cited mineral phases. In this work, the potential pathologies of several Spanish roofing slates are identified, using the tests defined in the European N...

  18. Estimation of exposure to sunlight of the liner under a tiled roof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ole; Rosenfeld, J.L.J.

    2005-01-01

    to the roof. Analytic expressions for the size of the illuminated area are obtained using a thick slit model. The accuracy of the model was assessed by some experimental measurements. The exposure over one year of the roof liner was calculated using the Design Reference Year for Copenhagen, Denmark...... and strike the liner, accelerating its degradation. The purpose of this study is to estimate the extent and duration of the exposure. A typical gap is modelled in a ray-tracing program and the size and position of the illuminated area on the liner is calculated for given directions of the light beam relative....... Simulations were carried out for a roof tilted at 25degrees, 35degrees or 45degrees, facing SE, S, SW or W. For the particular roof construction and gap studied, the maximum annual exposure of a 25 mm(2) piece of the liner placed 150 mm below the gap (corresponding to about 100 mm below the base of the tiles...

  19. Synergistic instability of coal pillar and roof system and filling method based on plate model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Congliang; Tan Zhixiang; Deng Kazhong; Li Peixian

    2013-01-01

    The security challenges from room and pillar gobs include land subsidence,spontaneous combustion of coal pillars and mine flood caused by gob water.To explore the instability mechanism of room and pillar gob,we established a mechanical model of elastic plate on elastic foundation in which pillars and hard roofs were considered as continuous Winkler foundations and elastic plates,respectively.The synergetic instability of pillar and roof system was analyzed based on plate bending theory and catastrophe theory.In addition,mechanical conditions and math criterion of roof failure and overall instability of coal pillar and roof system were given.Through analyzing both advantages and disadvantages of some technologies such as induced caving,filling,gob sealing and isolation,we presented a new filling method named boxfilling,in view of box foundation theory,to control the disasters of ground collapse,water inrush and mine fire.In a gob's treatment project in Ordos,safety assessment and filling design of a room and pillar gob have been done by the mechanical model.The results show that the gob will collapse when the pillars' average yield band is wider than 0.93 m,and box-filling can control land collapse,mine flood and mine fire economically and efficiently.So it is worth to study further and popularize.

  20. Modelling runoff on ceramic tile roofs using the kinematic wave equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Alexandre; Abrantes, João; de Lima, João; Lira, Lincoln

    2016-04-01

    Rainwater harvesting is a water saving alternative strategy that presents many advantages and can provide solutions to address major water resources problems, such as fresh water scarcity, urban stream degradation and flooding. In recent years, these problems have become global challenges, due to climatic change, population growth and increasing urbanisation. Generally, roofs are the first to come into contact with rainwater; thus, they are the best candidates for rainwater harvesting. In this context, the correct evaluation of roof runoff quantity and quality is essential to effectively design rainwater harvesting systems. Despite this, many studies usually focus on the qualitative aspects in detriment of the quantitative aspects. Laboratory studies using rainfall simulators have been widely used to investigate rainfall-runoff processes. These studies enabled a detailed exploration and systematic replication of a large range of hydrologic conditions, such as rainfall spatial and temporal characteristics, providing for a fast way to obtain precise and consistent data that can be used to calibrate and validate numerical models. This study aims to evaluate the performance of a kinematic wave based numerical model in simulating runoff on sloping roofs, by comparing the numerical results with the ones obtained from laboratory rainfall simulations on a real-scale ceramic tile roof (Lusa tiles). For all studied slopes, simulated discharge hydrographs had a good adjust to observed ones. Coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values were close to 1.0. Particularly, peak discharges, times to peak and peak durations were very well simulated.

  1. Numerical study of rock bolting parameter variation effect on stability of stratified, composite roof structure of drift in a coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ting-kan; LIU Yu-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Described the outcomes of a comprehensive numerical modeling on the rock bolting performance for preventing the deformation of stratified, composite roof structure of drift in a coal mine. The investigation was undertaken in the adverse geological conditions, with variation of belt parameters, including length, density, distribution, pretension,as well as the geometry of opening, so as to determine the effect of bolting parameter variation on roof deformation and stability. The outcomes clearly demonstrated that a significant improvement of roof stability can be achieved associating with bolting parameters optimization, and indicated the importance of flexible geotechnical designation of rock mbolting reinforcement in mining practice.

  2. Simulation and Study of Natural Fire in a Wide-Framed Multipurpose Hall with Steel Roof Trusses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, the structural fire safety of unprotected steel roof trusses in a wide-framed multipurpose hall was evaluated according to the natural fire safety concept. The design fires were simulated with FDS in order to determine the temperature development inside the hall. The temperature of the steel was calculated based on the results from the simulation and the structural analysis was carried out in Robot. It was established that the steel roof trusses could be left unprotected under certain conditions, however, a more violent design fire resulted in failure of the truss. 

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF ROOF AND INDOOR TEMPERATURES IN TROPICAL CLIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. M. Ponni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A roof provides protection to be safe from direct sunlight. From the shelter, shadow alone is not expected. Durability, sustainability, less life cycle cost, and low maintenance cost are expected from a selected roof. The world has a thirst to have a best roof. No roof will fulfil the requirement of humanity since the climatic conditions are different. Hence the roof should be selected according to the prevailing climate. And the roof selection depends on the need, taste and the spending capability of the house owner. Thatched shed, tiles covered roof, light roofs either using galvanized sheets or asbestos sheets, painted or unpainted metal sheets, RCC, Green roof, Roof pond, insulated roof, reflective roof, and cool roof are the roofs so far brought into use. Whatever be the roof, it should provide thermal comfort. Thermal comfort is felt through the thermal experience of the occupants. Thermal experience depends on the indoor temperature. Energy efficiency of a building is highly based on the indoor ambient temperature. Energy efficiency in buildings is compelling, cost effective, saves money and useful to compromise resource energy shortage. A light roof named as Single Decker (SID and an insulated double roof using hybrid technique named as (DOD are taken for this study. Among the selected roofs the DOD provides a better thermal performance and thermal comfort. The study has been carried out for the summer peak period in April 2014. Thermal performance and indoor temperature of the DOD is compared with other roof studies.

  4. Entire cities could benefit from green roofs : Heleen Mees is investigating how five metropolises are greenifying their roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Mees, Heleen

    2014-01-01

    Rotterdam is making good progress with its creation of green roofs. Heleen Mees, researcher at Utrecht University, drew this conclusion from her research, in which she compared the green roof policy of four different cities with that of Rotterdam. Rotterdam awards grants to those wishing to create a green roof, thereby helping to promote the general acceptance of green roofs in the city. However, the researcher thinks this policy should be followed up: “You can’t award grants forever.”

  5. Carbon Sequestration Potential of Extensive Green Roofs%屋顶绿地碳固定潜力的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈爱葵; 陆剑; 袁剑刚; 徐亚幸; 杨中艺

    2015-01-01

    .Mean decrease of CO2 concentration and CO2 exchange rate in the chamber over the measurement period were 77.8 ×10 -6 and -0.24 g·m -2·h -1 ,respectively.However,there was a high degree of variability because the photosynthesis rate of green roof plant greatly is dependent on light intensity and temperature,which change from time to time.Decrease of CO2 concentrations ranged from 23.50 ×10 -6 to 162.00 ×10 -6 ,and CO2 exchange rates ranged from -0.06 to -0.46 g·m -2·h -1 in the chamber.In the aboveground harvest experiment,data of the carbon reserve investigations showed that these green roofs stored an average of 92.55 g·m -2 in aboveground biomass with also a wide variability (from 39.47 to 138.41 g·m -2 ),depended on the harvested biomass and carbon content of the biomass collected from the studied green roofs.In addition,it is notable that a significant correlation (R2 =0.93) was observed between plant carbon content and substrate depth,while the correlations between substrate nutrient variables and carbon content was not statistically significant.Overall,the experimental results suggested that green roof can reduce the CO2 concentration in surrounding environment by absorbing CO2 in the daytime and act as a small carbon sink in urban area.It is likely that substrate depth may have big impacts on green roof carbon sequestration potential.Additional sophisticated research should be needed to evaluate the factors that contribute to the carbon sequestration potential of green roofs.

  6. Development of test method for evaluating root resistance of pavement used for roof garden caused by thickening growth of root

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Saori; Tanaka, Kyoji [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The growth of roots of plants can damage roof garden components, such as pavements. This paper developed a test method for evaluating the resistance of pavement used in roof gardens to damage from a thickening growth of roots. The study assessed the behaviour of plant roots and evaluated the force of root growth subjected to hypertrophy. A system to measure the enlargement force of roots was designed and used for measurements over a period of 8 months on a cherry blossom of 21 years growth. The enlargement force was approximately 440 N/cm. A mechanical simulated root was designed and used to carry out experimental tests on asphalt pavements. The tests results demonstrated the viability of simulated root for evaluation of root resistances in pavements and various components of roof gardens.

  7. Roof renovation of buildings 128 and 129

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The roof renovation of buildings 128 and 129 is scheduled to take place from 17 August to 15 October 2015.   During this period, access to the "raw material" workshop will be limited and controlled due to asbestos removal. Collecting your orders directly from the building will be difficult, or even impossible, and urgent requests will be difficult to carry out. We therefore ask you to create your requests via EDH, so that delivery may be carried out as soon as possible. Thank you for your understanding. GS Department

  8. Estimating Above-Ground Carbon Biomass in a Newly Restored Coastal Plain Wetland Using Remote Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Riegel, Joseph B.; Emily Bernhardt; Jennifer Swenson

    2013-01-01

    Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging) is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggradi...

  9. Aboveground to belowground herbivore defense signaling in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Torrence; Zhu, Lixue; Lopéz, Lorena; Pechanova, Olga; Shivaji, Renuka; Ankala, Arunkanth; Williams, W. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Insect pests that attempt to feed on the caterpillar-resistant maize genotype Mp708 encounter a potent, multipronged defense system that thwarts their invasion. First, these plants are on “constant alert” due to constitutively elevated levels of the phytohormone jasmonic acid that signals the plant to activate its defenses. The higher jasmonic acid levels trigger the expression of defense genes prior to herbivore attack so the plants are “primed” and respond with a faster and stronger defense. The second defense is the rapid accumulation of a toxic cysteine protease called Mir1-CP in the maize whorl in response to caterpillar feeding. When caterpillars ingest Mir1-CP, it damages the insect's midgut and retards their growth. In this article, we discuss a third possible defense strategy employed by Mp708. We have shown that foliar caterpillar feeding causes Mir1-CP and defense gene transcripts to accumulate in its roots. We propose that caterpillar feeding aboveground sends a signal belowground via the phloem that results in Mir1-CP accumulation in the roots. We also postulate that the roots serve as a reservoir of Mir1-CP that can be mobilized to the whorl in response to caterpillar assault. PMID:21270535

  10. Regional Mapping, Modelling, and Monitoring of Tree Aboveground Biomass Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Airborne lidar collections are preferred for mapping aboveground biomass carbon (AGBC), while historical Landsat imagery are preferred for monitoring decadal scale forest cover change. Our modelling approach tracks AGBC change regionally using Landsat time series metrics; training areas are defined by airborne lidar extents within which AGBC is accurately mapped with high confidence. Geospatial topographic and climate layers are also included in the predictive model. Validation is accomplished using systematically sampled Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data that have been independently collected, processed and summarized at the county level. Our goal is to demonstrate that spatially and temporally aggregated annual AGBC map predictions show no bias when compared to annual county-level summaries across the Northwest USA. A prominent source of bias is trees outside forest; much of the more arid portions of our study area meet the FIA definition of non-forest because the tree cover does not exceed their minimum tree cover threshold. We employ detailed tree cover maps derived from high-resolution aerial imagery to extend our AGBC predictions into non-forest areas. We also employ Landsat-derived annual disturbance maps into our mapped AGBC predictions prior to aggregation and validation.

  11. Life cycle assessment of roof integrated solar cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research protocol, applied in this report, is designed for use within the energy R and D-context: it provides a framework for finding bottlenecks and opportunities for (new) energy technologies in the context of (energy) resource scarcity and environmental issues. Finding and analyzing these bottlenecks and opportunities is a major objective of this study. A derived objective of this study is to gain experience in using the LCA-framework and the research protocol described earlier, and to evaluate the usefulness of these instruments in helping to find and analyze bottlenecks and opportunities in energy technologies. Photovoltaic solar cell systems (PV systems) are comprised of solar cell modules and a Balance-of-System (BOS): a support structure and power conditioning equipment. In this LCA amorphous silicon cells (a-Si) are considered. For the Netherlands roof-integrated, grid-connected systems are assumed to be the major application of PV in the future. Two cases will be studied. In case 1 a system of 30 m2 of modules which are connected to the grid via a single inverter are studied. The modules are comprised of a-Si cells and have a conversion efficiency of 10%. Integration into the roof is done with aluminium profiles. In case 2 a system of 30 m2 a-Si cell modules integrated in the roof with plastic 'tiles' is studied. The modules have an efficiency of 15% and connection to the grid is more or less centralized: 25 systems share an inverter which is connected to the grid. The goal and scope of the LCA and the functional unit are described in chapter 2. In chapter 3 the process tree and descriptions of the distinguished processes are given and the inventory table is drawn up. In chapter 4 the impact assessment is dealt with, followed by a discussion of improvement options in chapter 5. Conclusions and recommendations are given in the chapters 6 and 7 only regarding the environmental aspects. 9 figs., 13 tabs., 4 appendices, 13 refs

  12. Cost-benefit analysis of green roofs in urban areas : case study in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Nurmi, VÀinö; Votsis, Athanasios; Perrels, Adriaan; LehvÀvirta, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This report presents a green roof cost-benefit analysis. Green roofs are roofs that are partially (or almost completely) covered with vegetation; between the roofing membrane and the vegetation there may be several technical layers. In this report we discuss the benefits and costs of lightweight self-sustaining vegetated roofs that do not require structural modifications from the building. The costs and benefits have been analysed in Helsinki, Finland. Green roofs o...

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF ROOF AND INDOOR TEMPERATURES IN TROPICAL CLIMATE

    OpenAIRE

    Mrs. M. Ponni; Dr. R. Baskar

    2015-01-01

    A roof provides protection to be safe from direct sunlight. From the shelter, shadow alone is not expected. Durability, sustainability, less life cycle cost, and low maintenance cost are expected from a selected roof. The world has a thirst to have a best roof. No roof will fulfil the requirement of humanity since the climatic conditions are different. Hence the roof should be selected according to the prevailing climate. And the roof selection depends on the need, taste and the spending capa...

  14. 深圳天麓三区种植屋面施工技术%Shenzhen Tianlu 3rd Zone planted roof construction technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石伟国

    2011-01-01

    In Shenzhen Tianlu 3rd Zone Rhine Castle project, basement roof is designed as the sky garden, and it is planted roof above the waterproof layer. This paper introduces the waterproof design scheme, waterproof material characteristics, roof greening, and construction process of the planted roof.%深圳天麓三区莱茵堡项目地下室顶板设计为空中花园,防水层上为种植屋面.介绍该种植屋面防水设计方案、防水材料特点、屋面绿化及种植屋面的施工工艺.

  15. Discussion on technical measures for water saving of roof greening%屋顶绿化节水技术措施的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓宇

    2014-01-01

    Combined with the specific characteristics of roof greening , hydrophobic layer of water -saving irrigation technology of roof greening and planting area of roof garden structural layer is improved , the reasonable design thoughts solving the roof greening irrigation and drainage problems often meet in the course of designing were put forward .%本文结合屋顶绿化的具体特点,探讨屋顶绿化的节水灌溉技术的选择和屋顶花园种植区构造层中的疏水层改进,对解决屋顶绿化灌溉与排水设计过程中常遇见的问题提出了合理的设计思路。

  16. BioTRIZ Suggests Radiative Cooling of Buildings Can Be Done Passively by Changing the Structure of Roof Insulation to Let Longwave Infrared Pass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salmaan Craig; David Harrison; Andrew Cripps; Daniel Knott

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of a design tool called Bio TRIZ. Its developers claim that it can be used to access biological strategies for solving engineering problems. Our aim is to design a roof for hot climates that gets free cooling through radiant coupling with the sky. The insulation in a standard roof stops the sun and convection from warming the thermal mass.But it also restricts the mass's longwave view of the cool sky. Different solutions to this conflict are offered by BioTRIZ. The chosen solution is to replace the standard insulation component with an open cell honeycomb. The vertical cells would allow longwave radiation to pass, while arresting convection. The solutions offered by BioTRIZ's technological counterpart include no such changes in structure. It is estimated that the thermal mass in the biomimetic roof would remain on average 4.5℃ cooler than in a standard roof over a year in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

  17. 郑州市屋顶绿化现状及分析%The Roof Greening Situation and Analysis of Zhengzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秋红

    2014-01-01

    屋顶绿化在城市绿化美化中占有重要作用,拥有巨大的市场潜力。通过对郑州市现有及施工中屋顶花园的调查勘测,从屋顶绿化的设计和工程两大部分进行研究分析,并对比两种屋顶绿化的建造形式(简单式屋顶绿化和花园式屋顶绿化)。总结郑州市屋顶绿化规划中存在的问题与不足,并针对这些问题和不足提出改进措施和规划意见。%Roof greening plays an important role in urban greening landscaping, and has huge market potential. Based on the investigation of roof garden existing and under construction in Zhengzhou, two parts that contained the design and engineering of roof greening were analyzed. And the two roof greening construction forms (simple roof greening and garden green roof) were compared. This paper summarized the existing problems about roof greening planning of Zhengzhou, and put forward some superficial improvement measures and planning ideas to solve these problems and deficiencies.

  18. Green roof and storm water management policies: monitoring experiments on the ENPC Blue Green Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Gires, Auguste; Fitton, George; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Currently widespread in new urban projects, green roofs have shown a positive impact on urban runoff at the building/parcel scale. Nevertheless, there is no specific policy promoting their implementation neither in Europe nor in France. Moreover they are not taken into account (and usually considered as an impervious area) in the sizing of a retention basin for instance. An interesting example is located in the heart of the Paris-East Cluster for Science and Technology (Champs-sur-Marne, France). Since 2013 a large (1 ha) wavy-form vegetated roof (called bleu green wave) is implemented. Green roof area and impervious areas are connected to a large retention basin, which has been oversized. The blue green wave represents a pioneering site where an initially amenity (decorative) design project has been transformed into a research oriented one. Several measurement campaigns have been conducted to investigate and better understand the hydrological behaviour of such a structure. Rainfall, humidity, wind velocity, water content and temperature have been particularly studied. The data collected are used for several purposes: (i) characterize the spatio-temporal variability of the green roof response, (ii) calibrate and validate a specific model simulating its hydrological behavior. Based on monitoring and modeling results, green roof performances will be quantified. It will be possible to estimate how they can reduce stormwater runoff and how these performances can vary in space and in time depending on green roof configuration, rainfall event characteristics and antecedent conditions. These quantified impacts will be related to regulation rules established by stormwater managers in order to connect the parcel to the sewer network. In the particular case of the building of a retention basin, the integration of green roof in the sizing of the basin will be studied. This work is funded by the European Blue Green Dream project (http://bgd.org.uk/, funded by Climate

  19. Reflective ‘cool’ roofs under aerosol-burdened skies: radiative benefits across selected Indian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of reflective surfaces offers one low-cost solution for reducing solar loading to urban environments and the Earth that should be considered as part of sustainable urban design. Here, we characterize the radiative benefits, i.e. the additional shortwave radiation leaving the atmosphere, from the installation of highly reflective ‘cool’ roofs in urban areas in India that face relatively large local aerosol burdens. We use a previously tested column radiative transfer model to estimate the energy per unit area reflected to space from increasing the surface albedo at six cities within India. The model is used to characterize radiative transfer each day over five years (2008–2012) based on mid-day satellite retrievals of MODIS aerosol depth, cloud water path, and average surface albedo and MERRA atmospheric profiles of temperature and composition. Compared against ten months of field observations in two cities, the model derived incoming surface shortwave radiation estimates relative to observations show small biases (0.5% and −2.6%, at Pantnagar and Nainital, respectively). Despite the high levels of local aerosols we found cool roofs provided significant radiative benefits at all locations. Averaged over the five year period we found that increasing the albedo of 1 m2 of roof area by 0.5 would reflect to space 0.9–1.2 kWh daily from 08:30–15:30 LST, depending on location. This is equivalent to a constant forcing of 37–50 W m−2 (equivalent to reducing CO2 emissions by 74 to 101 kg CO2 m−2 roof area). Last, we identify a co-benefit of improving air quality, in that removing aerosols from the atmosphere could increase the radiative benefits from cool roofs by 23–74%, with the largest potential increase found at Delhi and the smallest change found at Nainital. (letter)

  20. DIFFERENT ROOF BEHAVIOUR UNDER DIFFERENT UPPER MINING BOUNDARY CONDITION IN DATONG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康立勋

    1997-01-01

    Understanding roof behaviour and immediate roof failure patterns of Iongwall face is a prerequisite for establishing correct roof control theory and appplying effective roof control measures. Roof behaviour and immediate roof failure pattern have a close relationship with upper mining boundary conditions of Iongwall face. According to actual situation of Datong Mining Area, upper mining boundary conditions of Iongwall face have been classified into 5 types in this paper. Roof behaviour and immediate roof failure pattern under each upper mining boundary condition are discussed in details.

  1. Spatio-temporal dynamics of solar shading for a parametrically defined roof system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardaljevic, J. [Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development (IESD), De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The evaluation of shading devices is generally carried out using a sequence of shadow-pattern images showing the progression of solar penetration for particular times of the day or year. This approach can reveal when solar penetration may occur, say at the summer solstice, but it cannot give a quantitative measure of the degree and likelihood of solar penetration over a representative period of a full year. This paper describes a new image-based technique to quantify the effectiveness of shading devices. It is founded on predictions of direct solar irradiation using hourly meteorological data for a full year. In addition to numerical output, the technique produces synoptic images that reveal the spatial and temporal variation of solar irradiation. There are no practical limits on the scene geometry and buildings with thousands of individual shading elements can be evaluated. The technique is designed to be both fast and highly scalable making it suitable for the evaluation of a large number of design variants. This is demonstrated in the paper using a parametrically defined model of a complex roof shading system based on the Changi Airport Terminal 3 design. The 3600 fins that comprise the roof shading system were generated using a parametric scheme where the fin orientation has a random component. A total of 42 design variants of the roof shading system were evaluated using the new technique. (author)

  2. An innovative roofing system for tropical building interiors: Separating heat from useful visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Obaidi, K.M.; Ismail, M.; Abdul Rahman, A.M. [School of Housing, Building and Planning, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2013-07-01

    Generally it has been known that energy consumption costs are high in temperate countries. In buildings, room spaces are normally designed so as to consume less energy for thermal comfort especially in winter. Passive strategies such large double-glazing windows are to contain heat indoors and also for maximum daylight to reduce dependence on artificial lighting. Thus roof lights are popular building design elements in cold and temperate countries. Unlike in the tropics where it has high temperatures and humidity throughout the year, achieving indoor comfort is a challenge especially with plenty of sunshine and unpredictable wind conditions. This paper explores the possibility of roof light for indoor comfort to be considered as a tropical design element. Initial simulation was carried out before any attempt to do life-sized model for empirical data. By simulation, the hypothesis has been achieved but several factors have to be considered. The solution is not as simple as those achieved in the temperate countries. Comfort can be achieved but permutations of several design factors such as dimensions of room, glazing, reflective materials, blackbody concept and building materials need adjustment to meet the Malaysian Comfort Temperature. With this finding the Tropical Architecture would then be redefined with the introduction of this Innovative Roofing System (IRS) as named by the author.

  3. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  4. Hydrologic Restoration in the Urban Environment Using Green Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Palla

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss of natural soil and vegetation within the urban environment can significantly affect the hydrologic cycle by increasing storm water runoff rates and volumes. In order to mitigate these modifications in urban areas engineered systems are developed, such as green roofs, to mimic and replace functions (evapo-transpiration, infiltration, percolation which have been altered due to the impact of human development. Green roofs, also known as vegetated roof covers, eco-roofs or nature roofs, are composite complex layered structures with specific environmental benefits. They are increasingly being used as a source control measure for urban storm water management. Indeed, they are able to re-establish the natural water cycle processes and to operate hydrologic control over storm water runoff with a derived peak flow attenuation, runoff volume reduction and increase of the time of concentration. Furthermore green roofs exhibit the capacity to reduce storm water pollution; they generally act as a storage device, consequently pollutants are accumulated in the substrate layer and released when intensive rainwater washes them out. In order to investigate the hydrologic response of a green roof, the University of Genova recently developed a joint laboratory and full-scale monitoring programme by installing a “controlled” laboratory test-bed with known rainfall input and a companion green roof experimental site (40 cm depth in the town of Genoa. In the paper, data collected during the monitoring programme are presented and compared with literature data.

  5. Extensive Green Roof Research Program at Colorado State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the high elevation, semi-arid climate of Colorado, green roofs have not been scientifically tested. This research examined alternative plant species, media blends, and plant interactions on an existing modular extensive green roof in Denver, Colorado. Six plant species were ev...

  6. The Discharge Coefficient of a Centre-Pivot Roof Window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Afshari, Alireza; Nielsen, Peter V.;

    2012-01-01

    value of discharge coefficient is used. The constant value of discharge coefficient leads to deceptive airflow estimation in the cases of centre-pivot roof windows. The object of this paper is to study and evaluate the discharge coefficient of the centre pivot roof window. Focus is given on...

  7. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate

  8. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards-Separator floating roof. 63...) National Emission Standards for Oil-Water Separators and Organic-Water Separators § 63.1043 Standards—Separator floating roof. (a) This section applies to owners and operators subject to this subpart...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1042 - Standards-Separator fixed roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards-Separator fixed roof. 63...) National Emission Standards for Oil-Water Separators and Organic-Water Separators § 63.1042 Standards—Separator fixed roof. (a) This section applies to owners and operators subject to this subpart...

  10. Single-Sided Natural Ventilation through a Velux Roof Window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhigang; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Fransson, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the single-sided natural ventilation through a VELUX centre pivot roof window under natural weather conditions. The aim of the investigation is to develop an empirical formulation for air flow rate through a roof window based on CFD and tracer gas decay measurement methods...

  11. Hygrothermal Performance of West Coast Wood Deck Roofing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallin, Simon B [ORNL; Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL

    2014-02-01

    Simulations of roofing assemblies are necessary in order to understand and adequately predict actual the hygrothermal performance. At the request of GAF, simulations have been setup to verify the difference in performance between white and black roofing membrane colors in relation to critical moisture accumulation for traditional low slope wood deck roofing systems typically deployed in various western U.S. Climate Zones. The performance of these roof assemblies has been simulated in the hygrothermal calculation tool of WUFI, from which the result was evaluated based on a defined criterion for moisture safety. The criterion was defined as the maximum accepted water content for wood materials and the highest acceptable moisture accumulation rate in relation to the risk of rot. Based on the criterion, the roof assemblies were certified as being either safe, risky or assumed to fail. The roof assemblies were simulated in different western climates, with varying insulation thicknesses, two different types of wooden decking, applied with varying interior moisture load and with either a high or low solar absorptivity at the roof surface (black or white surface color). The results show that the performance of the studied roof assemblies differs with regard to all of the varying parameters, especially the climate and the indoor moisture load.

  12. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah; Zakaria, Nor Zaini

    2014-07-01

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  13. 40 CFR 63.1063 - Floating roof requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... constitutes inspection failure. (i) Stored liquid on the floating roof. (ii) Holes or tears in the primary or... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floating roof requirements. 63.1063...) National Emission Standards for Storage Vessels (Tanks)-Control Level 2 § 63.1063 Floating...

  14. Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

  15. Integrated Green Roofs System and its Role of Achieving Sustainability in Residential Buildings in Urban Area in Athens, Greece and Famagusta, North Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mehran shahidipour

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics and importance of the green roof in urban area would investigate in some residential buildings in Athens, Greece and then, some strategies give to integrate green roof in residential buildings in Famagusta, north Cyprus due to the importance of energy saving and thermal comfort in residential buildings. These days, sustainable architecture is spreading around the world. Therefore, Sustainable architecture has important role in design build...

  16. Modelling of green roof hydrological performance for urban drainage applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locatelli, Luca; Mark, Ole; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen;

    2014-01-01

    Green roofs are being widely implemented for stormwater management and their impact on the urban hydrological cycle can be evaluated by incorporating them into urban drainage models. This paper presents a model of green roof long term and single event hydrological performance. The model includes...... surface and subsurface storage components representing the overall retention capacity of the green roof which is continuously re-established by evapotranspiration. The runoff from the model is described through a non-linear reservoir approach. The model was calibrated and validated using measurement data...... from 3 different extensive sedum roofs in Denmark. These data consist of high-resolution measurements of runoff, precipitation and atmospheric variables in the period 2010–2012. The hydrological response of green roofs was quantified based on statistical analysis of the results of a 22-year (1989...

  17. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics.

  18. Thermal Behavior of Green Roofs Applied to Tropical Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Tibério Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to present results on an experimental field about the green roofs thermal behavior, compared to other traditional roof covering systems. On the one hand, it intends to describe shortly the constructive system of a green roof with a lightweight building system, which has a sustainable building materials character and, on the other, it worries with the water reuse and with the run-off delay. The main methodological procedure adopted to study the thermal behavior of green roof was installing thermocouples to collect surface temperatures and indoor air, later comparing them with existing prototypes in an experimental plot. The thermal behavior analysis of cover systems was assessed by a representative episode of the climate fact, based on the dynamic climate approach. The experimental results from internal air temperature measurements show that the green roofs applied to warm and dry climates also provide an interesting time lag with surface and internal air temperature reduction.

  19. A pilot study to evaluate runoff quantity from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, Min Jung; Han, Mooyoung

    2015-04-01

    The use of green roofs is gaining increased recognition in many countries as a solution that can be used to improve environmental quality and reduce runoff quantity. To achieve these goals, pilot-scale green roof assemblies have been constructed and operated in an urban setting. From a stormwater management perspective, green roofs are 42.8-60.8% effective in reducing runoff for 200 mm soil depth and 13.8-34.4% effective in reducing runoff for 150 mm soil depth. By using Spearman rank correlation analysis, high rainfall intensity was shown to have a negative relationship with delayed occurrence time, demonstrating that the soil media in green roofs do not efficiently retain rainwater. Increasing the number of antecedent dry days can help to improve water retention capacity and delay occurrence time. From the viewpoint of runoff water quality, green roofs are regarded as the best management practice by filtration and adsorption through growth media (soil).

  20. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics. PMID:24135095

  1. APPLICATION OF THE ROOF DISTURBANCETO MONITORING AND PREDICTINGTHE GROUND PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付国彬; 钱鸣高

    1992-01-01

    Based on study of the influence of main roof fracture on ground pressure,this paper considered the immediate roof as a semi-infinite long beam on a Winkler elastic foundation. In the model the coal seam is the foundation and the pressure caused by rnian roof deflection is the load.Having solved the model and analyzed relevant factors,the authors indicate that the disturbance caused by the breakage of the mian roof can be observed in both gates of iongwaii face and explain why it can be. The paper points out that the applicability of the method to obtain the disturbance information by measuring the loads on supports is wider than that by measuring the roof convergence rate. The results are useful for monitoring and predicting ground pressure.

  2. Root-fed Salicylic Acid in Grape Involves the Response Caused by Aboveground High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Liu; Yue-Ping Liu; Wei-Dong Huang

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the transportation and distribution of salicylic acid (SA) from root to aboveground tissues in response to high temperature, the roots of grape plant were fed with 14C-SA before high temperature treatment. Radioactivity results showed that progressive increase in SA transportation from root to aboveground as compared with the control varied exactly with the heat treatment time. Radioactivity results of leaves at different stem heights indicated that the increase in SA amount at the top and middle leaves during the early period was most significant in comparison with the bottom leaves. The up-transportation of SA from root to aboveground tissues was dependent on xylem rather than phloem. Auto-radiographs of whole grape plants strongly approved the conclusions drawn above. Root-derived SA was believed to be a fundamental source in response to aboveground high temperature.

  3. Aboveground biomass investments and light interception of tropical forest trees early in succession.

    OpenAIRE

    Selaya, N. G.; Anten, N. P. R.; Mathies, M.; Oomen, R. J.; Werger, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims: Crown structure and above-ground biomass investment was studied in relation to light interception of trees and lianas growing in a 6-month-old regenerating forest. Methods: The vertical distribution of total above-ground biomass, height, diameter, stem density, leaf angles and crown depth were measured for individual plants of three short-lived pioneers (SLPs), four long-lived pioneers (LLPs) and three lianas. Daily light interception per individual Fd was calculated with...

  4. Distribution of Aboveground Live Biomass in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Houghton, R. A.; DosSantos Alvala, R. C.; Soares, J. V.; Yu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The amount and spatial distribution of forest biomass in the Amazon basin is a major source of uncertainty in estimating the flux of carbon released from land-cover and land-use change. Direct measurements of aboveground live biomass (AGLB) are limited to small areas of forest inventory plots and site-specific allometric equations that cannot be readily generalized for the entire basin. Furthermore, there is no spaceborne remote sensing instrument that can measure tropical forest biomass directly. To determine the spatial distribution of forest biomass of the Amazon basin, we report a method based on remote sensing metrics representing various forest structural parameters and environmental variables, and more than 500 plot measurements of forest biomass distributed over the basin. A decision tree approach was used to develop the spatial distribution of AGLB for seven distinct biomass classes of lowland old-growth forests with more than 80% accuracy. AGLB for other vegetation types, such as the woody and herbaceous savanna and secondary forests, was directly estimated with a regression based on satellite data. Results show that AGLB is highest in Central Amazonia and in regions to the east and north, including the Guyanas. Biomass is generally above 300Mgha(sup 1) here except in areas of intense logging or open floodplains. In Western Amazonia, from the lowlands of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia to the Andean mountains, biomass ranges from 150 to 300Mgha(sup 1). Most transitional and seasonal forests at the southern and northwestern edges of the basin have biomass ranging from 100 to 200Mgha(sup 1). The AGLB distribution has a significant correlation with the length of the dry season. We estimate that the total carbon in forest biomass of the Amazon basin, including the dead and below ground biomass, is 86 PgC with +/- 20% uncertainty.

  5. Entire cities could benefit from green roofs : Heleen Mees is investigating how five metropolises are greenifying their roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, Heleen

    2014-01-01

    Rotterdam is making good progress with its creation of green roofs. Heleen Mees, researcher at Utrecht University, drew this conclusion from her research, in which she compared the green roof policy of four different cities with that of Rotterdam. Rotterdam awards grants to those wishing to create a

  6. Mobilization and distribution of lead originating from roof dust and wet deposition in a roof runoff system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianghua; Yu, Haixia; Huang, Xiaogu

    2015-12-01

    In this research, the mobilization and distribution of lead originating in roof dust and wet deposition were investigated within a roof dust-rooftop-runoff system. The results indicated that lead from roof dust and wet deposition showed different transport dynamics in runoff system and that this process was significantly influenced by the rainfall intensity. Lead present in the roof dust could be easily washed off into the runoff, and nearly 60 % of the total lead content was present in particulate form. Most of the lead from the roof dust was transported during the late period of rainfall; however, the lead concentration was higher for several minutes at the rainfall beginning. Even though some of the lead from wet deposition, simulated with a standard isotope substance, was adsorbed onto adhered roof dust and/or retained on rooftop in runoff system, most of it (50-82 %) remained as dissolved lead in the runoff for rainfall events of varying intensity. Regarding the distribution of lead in the runoff system, the results indicated that it could be carried in the runoff in dissolved and particulate form, be adsorbed to adhered roof dust, or remain on the rooftop because of adsorption to the roof material. Lead from the different sources showed different distribution patterns that were also related to the rainfall intensity. Higher rainfall intensity resulted in a higher proportion of lead in the runoff and a lower proportion of lead remaining on the rooftop.

  7. Electron beam-curing coating for pressed cement roof tiles with high-build and excellent durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick slate has expanded the demand steadily and spread to whole Japan except the northernmost part as a roof material, because it deals with rain water well, its strength, coldness resistance and endurance are excellent, and it can be worked easily. The ornamental finishing by urethane coating is not satisfactory in view of the improvement of productivity and the measures to pollution as well as the design and color. In order to meet this background, new coating has been sought, and electron beam-curing coating seems to be most suitable to cement roof tiles. The history and the present state of cement roof tiles are explained. About 700 tons/month of the coating for cement roof tiles is used at present, and acryl resin coating occupies about 75%, while urethane resin coating is used in Kyushu relatively more. The urethane coating is applied in shops by electrostatic coating, but the acryl coating is mostly applied in sites after tiling over. Electron beam curing used electron beam of 200 keV, and polymerization starts from the radicals formed through ionization, excitation and neutralization. The features of electron beam-curing coating are good adhesion to roof tiles, keeping luster and endurance to discoloration, strong film and feeling like porcelain, drying at normal temperature, productivity and economy. (J.P.N.)

  8. Drawing green in New York city : aesthetic design and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland-Smith, S. [Balmori Associates Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Strong aesthetic design can advance the development of the green roof industry in the United States. Many architects are beginning to adopt green roofs as a design element that merges architecture and landscapes in sustainable systems. Innovative design of green roofs will draw attention to the technology and create momentum for the green roof movement, which may lead to more incentives and policy programs. With the development of a range of watertight membranes, geotextiles and specific soil substrates, the idea of merging landscape and architecture within a single structure is now a more viable and efficient reality. Design intent needs to be clearly illustrated. This paper provided an outline of the philosophy and practices of Balmori, a green roof design firm that envisions the rooftops of New York City as a potential second central park. Green roofs designed by the organization to date include the Solaire building roof garden; a green roof network in Long Island; the Gratz Industries and Silvercup Studios roof projects; and a new residential green roof for a building in Manhattan. Details of funding, partnerships and technical specifications were provided for each project. Descriptions of the completed and ongoing projects were used to illustrate Balmori's philosophy of promoting sustainable green roofs that alter their urban context through aesthetic means. It was concluded that it is only when green roof technologies are conceived as being powerful design tools as opposed to ecological experiments will their widespread adoption occur.1 ref., 4 figs.

  9. Cool roofs and the influence on the energy consumption under Danish conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Erik; Bunch-Nielsen, Tommy; Juhl, Lasse

    Experience from countries in warm climates has shown that the color of the roofing material has a significant effect on the energy consumption of the building. Especially changing from black to white roofing material provides reduction in energy consumption. The investigated roofs have been...... with a moderate amount of thermal insulation. The Danish Roofing Advisory Board in Denmark has conducted an analysis of the effects of roofing color on buildings energy consumption under Danish conditions i.e. with a colder climate and with a larger amount of thermal insulation. An experiment was performed...... in order to study the effects of the roofing color on the temperature distribution in a roof structure. The studied roof specimens were flat roofs covered with roofing felt in different colors. Temperatures have been measured in the roofing felt as well as in the middle and the bottom of the structure...

  10. Dynamic Analysis of Cable Roofs Under Transient Wind:A Comparison Between Time Domain and Frequency Domain Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Ali Ghafari Oskoei; Ghyslaine McClure

    2008-01-01

    At present,high.speed computing capabilities and advanced nonlinear dynamic finite element procedures enable detailed dynamic analysis of cable structures.Although deterministic approaches require considerable analysis time and effort in relation to modeling,running,and data processing,they seem to be the only alternative to obtain high accuracy.Detailed dynamic analysis of cable roof networks is sophisticated and requires advanced modeling expertise.This paper presents a comparison between detailed nonlinear dynamic analysis and a simplified frequency domain approach to estimate the maximum probable response of weakly nonlinear cable roofs.The approach can be considered as alternative to detailed time-domain analysis in the preliminary design phase,or can be used to validate results obtained from more elaborated numerical models.The proposed method is illustrated with two examples of cable net roofs that were also analysed in the time domain.

  11. Suggestions on building roof waterproofing construction suggestions%建筑屋面防水施工建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海强

    2015-01-01

    从设计、材料、排水、管道四方面分析了建筑屋面出现积水、渗水以及漏水的原因,并深入探讨了建筑屋面防水施工的措施,分析了不同屋面结构防水施工的要求,以选择合理的防水技术,达到良好的防水效果。%The paper analyzes building roof ponding,seepaging and leakaging causes from four aspects of design,materials,drainage and pipe-line,explores building roof waterproofing measures,and analyzes different roof structure waterproofing construction demands,with a view to select rational waterproofing techniques and achieve good waterproofing effect as well.

  12. Stormwater quality from extensive green roofs in a subtropical region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onis Pessoa, Jonas; Allasia, Daniel; Tassi, Rutineia; Vaz Viega, Juliana; Fensterseifer, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Green roofs have increasingly become an integral part of urban environments, mainly due to their aesthetic benefits, thermal comfort and efficiency in controlling excess runoff. However, the effects of this emerging technology in the qualitative characteristics of rainwater is still poorly understood. In this study was evaluated the effect of two different extensive green roofs (EGRs) and a traditional roof built with corrugated fiber cement sheets (control roof) in the quality of rainwater, in a subtropical climate area in the city of Santa Maria, in southern Brazil. The principal variant between the two EGRs were the type of plant species, time since construction, soil depth and the substrate characteristics. During the monitoring period of the experiment, between the months of April and December of 2015 fourteen rainfall events were selected for qualitative analysis of water from the three roofs and directly from rainfall. It was analyzed physical (turbidity, apparent color, true color, electrical conductivity, total solids, dissolved solids, suspended solids and temperature), chemical (pH, phosphate, total nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, sulfate, BOD, iron and total hardness), heavy metals (copper, zinc, lead and chromium) and microbiological parameters (total coliforms and E. coli). It was also characterized the substrates used in both extensive green roofs. The results showed that the quality of the water drained from EGR s was directly influenced by their substrates (in turn containing significant levels of nutrients, organic matter and some metals). The passage of rainwater through green roofs and control roof resulted in the elevation of pH, allowing the conversion of the slightly acidic rainfall into basic water. Similarly, on both types of roofs occurred an increase of the values of most of the physical, chemical and microbiological parameters compared to rainwater. This same trend was observed for heavy metals, although with a much smaller degree

  13. Precast Prestressed Concrete Truss-Girder for Roof Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Samir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel trusses are the most popular system for supporting long-span roofs in commercial buildings, such as warehouses and aircraft hangars. There are several advantages of steel trusses, such as lightweight, ease of handling and erection, and geometric flexibility. However, they have some drawbacks, such as high material and maintenance cost, and low fire resistance. In this paper, a precast concrete truss is proposed as an alternative to steel trusses for spans up to 48 m (160 ft without intermediate supports. The proposed design is easy to produce and has lower construction and maintenance costs than steel trusses. The truss consists of two segments that are formed using standard bridge girder forms with block-outs in the web which result in having diagonals and vertical members and reduces girder weight. The two segments are then connected using a wet joint and post-tensioned longitudinally to form a crowned truss. The proposed design optimizes the truss-girder member locations, cross-sections, and material use. A 9 m (30 ft long truss specimen is constructed using self-consolidated concrete to investigate the constructability and structural capacity of the proposed design. A finite element analysis of the specimen is conducted to investigate stresses at truss diagonals, verticals, and connections. Testing results indicate the production and structural efficiency of the developed system.

  14. Stress analysis of a double bottom retrofit of an aboveground storage tank including effects of soil/structure interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.; Andreani, J.L. [BP Oil Co., Cleveland, OH (United States). Engineering Services

    1995-12-31

    Concern about differential settlement of aboveground atmospheric storage tanks and the effects of the resulting large strains on tank floor integrity has become an important issue in the refining industry, prompting much of the industry to undertake massive programs to retrofit substantial numbers of existing tanks with second floors. This is normally accomplished by cutting a horizontal slot in the tank shell parallel to the existing floor, placing a liner and fill material (such as sand) over the existing floor, installing annular plates through the slot in the shell, and then welding in the remaining floor plate. In this process, the decision whether or not to weld the bottom side of the new floor plate to the shell stub attached to the original floor is a key design consideration which can significantly impact the stress distribution in both the new floor and the existing shell stub. Finite element analysis is used to study operating stresses in a typical double-bottom aboveground atmospheric storage tank on a raised compacted earth pad and gravel ringwall foundation. Results are compared for cases in which the new floor is welded to the existing shell stub and in which the new floor simply rests on the shell stub without further attachment. Effects of soil/structure interaction for a typical granular soil are included in the analysis.

  15. Adventures on the roof of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie,, David M.

    2013-01-01

    To conduct field biology requires tenacity, grit, and flexibility; to endeavor to achieve conservation success requires patience, persistence, and passion. The essence of field biology and the hope for conservation success are both reflected admirably in George B. Schaller's most recent book, Tibet Wild: A Naturalist's Journeys on the Roof of the World. I can think of no living biologist who embodies these characteristics more than Schaller does. Nearly 80 years old, he still regularly treks in faraway lands, observing and recording the natural history of species that the vast majority of us will never see in the wild. Schaller is a vanguard, and Tibet Wild, like his other books, is a sentinel of urgent conservation need.

  16. A field study to evaluate runoff quality from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, U M; Balasubramanian, R

    2012-03-15

    Green (vegetated) roofs are emerging as practical strategies to improve the environmental quality of cities. However, the impact of green roofs on the storm water quality remains a topic of concern to city planners and environmental policy makers. This study investigated whether green roofs act as a source or a sink of various metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni, Li and Co), inorganic anions (NO3-, NO2-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), Cl-, F- and Br-) and cation (NH4+). A series of green roof assemblies were constructed. Four different real rain events and several artificial rain events were considered for the study. Results showed that concentrations of most of the chemical components in runoff were highest during the beginning of rain events and subsided in the subsequent rain events. Some of the important components present in the runoff include Na, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Fe, Al, Cu, NO3-, PO4(3-) and SO4(2-). However, the concentration of these chemical components in the roof runoff strongly depends on the nature of substrates used in the green roof and the volume of rain. Based on the USEPA standards for freshwater quality, we conclude that the green roof used in this study is reasonably effective except that the runoff contains significant amounts of NO3- and PO4(3-).

  17. Comparative life cycle assessment of standard and green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Susana; Kennedy, Christopher; Bass, Brad; Pressnail, Kim

    2006-07-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the benefits, primarily from reduced energy consumption, resulting from the addition of a green roof to an eight story residential building in Madrid. Building energy use is simulated and a bottom-up LCA is conducted assuming a 50 year building life. The key property of a green roof is its low solar absorptance, which causes lower surface temperature, thereby reducing the heat flux through the roof. Savings in annual energy use are just over 1%, but summer cooling load is reduced by over 6% and reductions in peak hour cooling load in the upper floors reach 25%. By replacing the common flat roof with a green roof, environmental impacts are reduced by between 1.0 and 5.3%. Similar reductions might be achieved by using a white roof with additional insulation for winter, but more substantial reductions are achieved if common use of green roofs leads to reductions in the urban heat island.

  18. A field study to evaluate runoff quality from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, U M; Balasubramanian, R

    2012-03-15

    Green (vegetated) roofs are emerging as practical strategies to improve the environmental quality of cities. However, the impact of green roofs on the storm water quality remains a topic of concern to city planners and environmental policy makers. This study investigated whether green roofs act as a source or a sink of various metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni, Li and Co), inorganic anions (NO3-, NO2-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), Cl-, F- and Br-) and cation (NH4+). A series of green roof assemblies were constructed. Four different real rain events and several artificial rain events were considered for the study. Results showed that concentrations of most of the chemical components in runoff were highest during the beginning of rain events and subsided in the subsequent rain events. Some of the important components present in the runoff include Na, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Fe, Al, Cu, NO3-, PO4(3-) and SO4(2-). However, the concentration of these chemical components in the roof runoff strongly depends on the nature of substrates used in the green roof and the volume of rain. Based on the USEPA standards for freshwater quality, we conclude that the green roof used in this study is reasonably effective except that the runoff contains significant amounts of NO3- and PO4(3-). PMID:22244273

  19. A Calculation Method for the Sloshing Impact Pressure Imposed on the Roof of a Passive Water Storage Tank of AP1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daogang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a large water storage tank installed at the top of containment of AP1000, which can supply the passive cooling. In the extreme condition, sloshing of the free surface in the tank may impact on the roof under long-period earthquake. For the safety assessment of structure, it is necessary to calculate the impact pressure caused by water sloshing. Since the behavior of sloshing impacted on the roof is involved into a strong nonlinear phenomenon, it is a little difficult to calculate such pressure by theoretical or numerical method currently. But it is applicable to calculate the height of sloshing in a tank without roof. In the present paper, a simplified method was proposed to calculate the impact pressure using the sloshing wave height, in which we first marked the position of the height of roof, then produced sloshing in the tank without roof and recorded the maximum wave height, and finally regarded approximately the difference between maximum wave height and roof height as the impact pressure head. We also designed an experiment to verify this method. The experimental result showed that this method overpredicted the impact pressure with a certain error of no more than 35%. By the experiment, we conclude that this method is conservative and applicable for the engineering design.

  20. Rainwater runoff retention on an aged intensive green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speak, A F; Rothwell, J J; Lindley, S J; Smith, C L

    2013-09-01

    Urban areas are characterised by large proportions of impervious surfaces which increases rainwater runoff and the potential for surface water flooding. Increased precipitation is predicted under current climate change projections, which will put further pressure on urban populations and infrastructure. Roof greening can be used within flood mitigation schemes to restore the urban hydrological balance of cities. Intensive green roofs, with their deeper substrates and higher plant biomass, are able to retain greater quantities of runoff, and there is a need for more studies on this less common type of green roof which also investigate the effect of factors such as age and vegetation composition. Runoff quantities from an aged intensive green roof in Manchester, UK, were analysed for 69 rainfall events, and compared to those on an adjacent paved roof. Average retention was 65.7% on the green roof and 33.6% on the bare roof. A comprehensive soil classification revealed the substrate, a mineral soil, to be in good general condition and also high in organic matter content which can increase the water holding capacity of soils. Large variation in the retention data made the use of predictive regression models unfeasible. This variation arose from complex interactions between Antecedant Dry Weather Period (ADWP), season, monthly weather trends, and rainfall duration, quantity and peak intensity. However, significantly lower retention was seen for high rainfall events, and in autumn, which had above average rainfall. The study period only covers one unusually wet year, so a longer study may uncover relationships to factors which can be applied to intensive roofs elsewhere. Annual rainfall retention for Manchester city centre could be increased by 2.3% by a 10% increase in intensive green roof construction. The results of this study will be of particular interest to practitioners implementing greenspace adaptation in temperate and cool maritime climates.

  1. Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

    2003-04-07

    We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

  2. Rainwater runoff retention on an aged intensive green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speak, A F; Rothwell, J J; Lindley, S J; Smith, C L

    2013-09-01

    Urban areas are characterised by large proportions of impervious surfaces which increases rainwater runoff and the potential for surface water flooding. Increased precipitation is predicted under current climate change projections, which will put further pressure on urban populations and infrastructure. Roof greening can be used within flood mitigation schemes to restore the urban hydrological balance of cities. Intensive green roofs, with their deeper substrates and higher plant biomass, are able to retain greater quantities of runoff, and there is a need for more studies on this less common type of green roof which also investigate the effect of factors such as age and vegetation composition. Runoff quantities from an aged intensive green roof in Manchester, UK, were analysed for 69 rainfall events, and compared to those on an adjacent paved roof. Average retention was 65.7% on the green roof and 33.6% on the bare roof. A comprehensive soil classification revealed the substrate, a mineral soil, to be in good general condition and also high in organic matter content which can increase the water holding capacity of soils. Large variation in the retention data made the use of predictive regression models unfeasible. This variation arose from complex interactions between Antecedant Dry Weather Period (ADWP), season, monthly weather trends, and rainfall duration, quantity and peak intensity. However, significantly lower retention was seen for high rainfall events, and in autumn, which had above average rainfall. The study period only covers one unusually wet year, so a longer study may uncover relationships to factors which can be applied to intensive roofs elsewhere. Annual rainfall retention for Manchester city centre could be increased by 2.3% by a 10% increase in intensive green roof construction. The results of this study will be of particular interest to practitioners implementing greenspace adaptation in temperate and cool maritime climates. PMID:23712113

  3. Developing a generalized allometric equation for aboveground biomass estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Balamuta, J. J.; Greenberg, J. A.; Li, B.; Man, A.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A key potential uncertainty in estimating carbon stocks across multiple scales stems from the use of empirically calibrated allometric equations, which estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) from plant characteristics such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and/or height (H). The equations themselves contain significant and, at times, poorly characterized errors. Species-specific equations may be missing. Plant responses to their local biophysical environment may lead to spatially varying allometric relationships. The structural predictor may be difficult or impossible to measure accurately, particularly when derived from remote sensing data. All of these issues may lead to significant and spatially varying uncertainties in the estimation of AGB that are unexplored in the literature. We sought to quantify the errors in predicting AGB at the tree and plot level for vegetation plots in California. To accomplish this, we derived a generalized allometric equation (GAE) which we used to model the AGB on a full set of tree information such as DBH, H, taxonomy, and biophysical environment. The GAE was derived using published allometric equations in the GlobAllomeTree database. The equations were sparse in details about the error since authors provide the coefficient of determination (R2) and the sample size. A more realistic simulation of tree AGB should also contain the noise that was not captured by the allometric equation. We derived an empirically corrected variance estimate for the amount of noise to represent the errors in the real biomass. Also, we accounted for the hierarchical relationship between different species by treating each taxonomic level as a covariate nested within a higher taxonomic level (e.g. species genus). This approach provides estimation under incomplete tree information (e.g. missing species) or blurred information (e.g. conjecture of species), plus the biophysical environment. The GAE allowed us to quantify contribution of each different covariate

  4. Vehicle roof with solar power supply and contact device. Fahrzeugdach mit Solarstromquelle und Kontakteinrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz, W.; Meiler, K.; Schumacher, T.; Bienert, H.; Hirschberger, A.; Pfisterer, H.; Hoeller, M.

    1991-05-02

    Vehicle roof with at least one cover, carrying a solar power supply for optional covering or at least for partial uncovering of a roof opening. In addition, with at least one load driven by the solar power supply which is arranged separately from the cover and with a contact device for establishing of an electric connection between the solar power supply and the load. The contact device is designed as a switching configuration and the cover is a part of this switching configuration, so that depending on the adjustment motion of the cover, the load is connected to the solar power supply in one or several predetermined cover positions, and is disconnected in all other covert positions.

  5. Characteristics of wind pressure pulse on large-span flat roofs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ying; CAO Zheng-gang; WU Yue

    2009-01-01

    The wind pressure pulse events, among the most important characteristics of wind pressure fluctuations on large-span fiat roofs, were investigated by wind tunnel tests in this paper. Incorporating the formation mechanism of wind pressure pulse events, the peak over threshold method was employed to study properties of this kind of events. The event duration time, the energy contribution, the number of the pulse events, and the distribution of average peak pressure were calculated. Probability density functions of some typical samples in separation region were also given. Results show that the non-Gaussian roof pressure is strong in the flow separa tion region owing to the wind pressure pulse events. Evaluations of the extreme peak pressures, which can be determined by the peak over threshold method effectively, are important to the design of building cladding.

  6. Building Space Heating with a Solar-Assisted Heat Pump Using Roof-Integrated Solar Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Yang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A solar assisted heat pump (SAHP system was designed by using a roof-integrated solar collector as the evaporator, and then it was demonstrated to provide space heating for a villa in Tianjin, China. A building energy simulation tool was used to predict the space heating load and a three dimensional theoretical model was established to analyze the heat collection performance of the solar roof collector. A floor radiant heating unit was used to decrease the energy demand. The measurement results during the winter test period show that the system can provide a comfortable living space in winter, when the room temperature averaged 18.9 °C. The average COP of the heat pump system is 2.97 and with a maximum around 4.16.

  7. Roofing waterproof Engineering%浅谈屋面防水工程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄萍

    2012-01-01

      屋面防水工程是一个系统工程,若想解决防水的防渗问题,就要从工程的设计选材、施工及维修管理着手,综合管理,严格控制,以提高防水工程质量,增强防水效果,延长屋面防水使用寿命。%  roofing waterproof project is project of a system, to solve the water seepage problem, must from the engineering design material selection, construction and repair management to begin, comprehensive management, strict control, in order to improve the quality of waterproof engineering, reinforced waterproof effect, prolonging the service life of the roofing waterproof.

  8. Entry roof truss-bolt system test under the gob of contiguous seams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN Chuan-jie; XU Wei-ya; WANG Ya-jie

    2007-01-01

    Roof bolt support system has been widely applied in the No.7.9 seam in Caozhuang coal mine.However,it has not been able to be applied in the NO.10-2 seam since the small interburden(2m)between NO.9 and NO.10-2 seam.The NO.9 and NO.10-2 seams are contiguous seams.The NO.9 seam has been mined out and the NO.10-2 seam will be mined under the gob of the NO.9 seam.The roof strata of the NO.10-2 seam may have been weakened and fractured due to the shear failure caused by the NO.9 seam mining activities.The steel beam sets spaced at 0.8 m have been used to support the entry of the NO.10-2 seam.In order to speed up the advance rate and cut entry development cost,a test area,using roof bolt in conjunction with truss-system,was successfully conducted.This paper presents the support system design,application of designed system,and the test results.Test results provide a cheaper,quicker,and safer way to support entry for the No.10-2 seam.

  9. Cool Roofs to Save Money and Delay Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2006-04-01

    White roofs, and now cool-colored roofs, with a high reflectivity or `albedo' have a long history (best known around the Mediterranean) of keeping buildings and cities cool. In modern times, cool roofs have been shown to reduce air conditioning (a-c) demand and slow the formation of ozone (smog). Studies establishing a typical 10% reduction in a-c demand and electricity savings due to white roofs in California (CA) resulted in the 2005 CA new building energy efficiency standard prescribing that low-slope roofs be white, but exempting sloping roofs for aesthetic reasons. The advent (thanks to physicists' efforts) of inexpensive colored pigments with high albedo has led to 2008 CA standards requiring that even sloping roofs be cool. Here, I show that cooling the planet by reducing urban albedo through white and other cool roofs is a direct effect, much larger and immediate than the 2nd-order cooling from reduced CO2 from reduced a-c use. I then investigate widespread deployment of cool roof in major tropical and temperate cities, which cover 2% of global land area and have a proportionately higher albedo impact due to lower latitude. Here, cool roofs and cooler pavements can raise urban albedo by 10%. This directly drops the global average temperature by ˜0.05 /deg C. Though small compared to a likely 3 /deg C rise by 2060, an immediate drop of 0.05 /deg C represents a reprieve in global warming of 1 year, and represents avoiding a year's current annual world emissions of CO2, i.e. 25 GT(CO2). At a trading price of 25/tCO2, this is worth ˜625B. Cooling the planet also could save annually hundreds of billions on a-c electric bills. Finally I suggest policies to increase cool roof deployment, for example, developed world Kyoto signatories could use its CDM (Clean Development Mechanism) for cool roof programs in developing countries.

  10. Automatic Generation of 3D Building Models with Multiple Roofs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenichi Sugihara; Yoshitugu Hayashi

    2008-01-01

    Based on building footprints (building polygons) on digital maps, we are proposing the GIS and CG integrated system that automatically generates 3D building models with multiple roofs. Most building polygons' edges meet at right angles (orthogonal polygon). The integrated system partitions orthogonal building polygons into a set of rectangles and places rectangular roofs and box-shaped building bodies on these rectangles. In order to partition an orthogonal polygon, we proposed a useful polygon expression in deciding from which vertex a dividing line is drawn. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for partitioning building polygons and show the process of creating 3D roof models.

  11. Effects of Solar Photovoltaic Panels on Roof Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Klessl, J.; Samady, M.; Luvall, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Building Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) is a major contributor to urban energy use. In single story buildings with large surface area such as warehouses most of the heat enters through the roof. A rooftop modification that has not been examined experimentally is solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays. In California alone, several GW in residential and commercial rooftop PV are approved or in the planning stages. With the PV solar conversion efficiency ranging from 5-20% and a typical installed PV solar reflectance of 16-27%, 53-79% of the solar energy heats the panel. Most of this heat is then either transferred to the atmosphere or the building underneath. Consequently solar PV has indirect effects on roof heat transfer. The effect of rooftop PV systems on the building roof and indoor energy balance as well as their economic impacts on building HVAC costs have not been investigated. Roof calculator models currently do not account for rooftop modifications such as PV arrays. In this study, we report extensive measurements of a building containing a flush mount and a tilted solar PV array as well as exposed reference roof. Exterior air and surface temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation were measured and thermal infrared (TIR) images of the interior ceiling were taken. We found that in daytime the ceiling surface temperature under the PV arrays was significantly cooler than under the exposed roof. The maximum difference of 2.5 C was observed at around 1800h, close to typical time of peak energy demand. Conversely at night, the ceiling temperature under the PV arrays was warmer, especially for the array mounted flat onto the roof. A one dimensional conductive heat flux model was used to calculate the temperature profile through the roof. The heat flux into the bottom layer was used as an estimate of the heat flux into the building. The mean daytime heat flux (1200-2000 PST) under the exposed roof in the model was 14.0 Watts per square meter larger than

  12. The effects of green roofs in a sub-tropical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, M. [Austin Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center; Gardiner, B. [Austech Roof Consultants Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The building and environmental benefits of green roofs in non-temperate, or subtropical systems were discussed. Since there are greater climatic extremes in such systems, green roofs may offer more benefits. Most green roof research has focused on the use of succulent plants due to their low water demand and slow growth rates. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center and the Roof Consultants Institute Foundation are conducting joint research project to assess the suitability of native vegetation for use on extensive green roofs in central Texas. The project examined the effects of green roofing in a subtropical climate and the thermal properties of buildings, stormwater runoff rates, water quality, and irrigation requirements. Stormwater retention capacity of green roofs and water quality of stormwater runoff was compared to conventional roofs. The growing media that are most successful for this particular ecoregion was also identified. The focus on native plants in this study identified the characteristics of climatic adaptation, which may help to reduce total water and nutrient demand, and avoid problems associated with the introduction of potentially invasive species. The study compared performance of 6 types of green roofs and two types of traditional roof materials using simulated roof platforms. During the hottest days in August, roof membrane temperatures on the green roofs were 10 degrees C cooler than white roofs and 40 degrees C cooler than conventional black roofs. It was concluded that the temperature and water quantity characteristics of green roofs are advantageous in subtropical climates. 4 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  13. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  14. Can green roof act as a sink for contaminants? A methodological study to evaluate runoff quality from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, Umid Man

    2014-11-01

    The present study examines whether green roofs act as a sink or source of contaminants based on various physico-chemical parameters (pH, conductivity and total dissolved solids) and metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb). The performance of green roof substrate prepared using perlite, vermiculite, sand, crushed brick, and coco-peat, was compared with local garden soil based on improvement of runoff quality. Portulaca grandiflora was used as green roof vegetation. Four different green roof configurations, with vegetated and non-vegetated systems, were examined for several artificial rain events (un-spiked and metal-spiked). In general, the vegetated green roof assemblies generated better-quality runoff with less conductivity and total metal ion concentration compared to un-vegetated assemblies. Of the different green roof configurations examined, P. grandiflora planted on green roof substrate acted as sink for various metals and showed the potential to generate better runoff.

  15. Can green roof act as a sink for contaminants? A methodological study to evaluate runoff quality from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, Umid Man

    2014-11-01

    The present study examines whether green roofs act as a sink or source of contaminants based on various physico-chemical parameters (pH, conductivity and total dissolved solids) and metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb). The performance of green roof substrate prepared using perlite, vermiculite, sand, crushed brick, and coco-peat, was compared with local garden soil based on improvement of runoff quality. Portulaca grandiflora was used as green roof vegetation. Four different green roof configurations, with vegetated and non-vegetated systems, were examined for several artificial rain events (un-spiked and metal-spiked). In general, the vegetated green roof assemblies generated better-quality runoff with less conductivity and total metal ion concentration compared to un-vegetated assemblies. Of the different green roof configurations examined, P. grandiflora planted on green roof substrate acted as sink for various metals and showed the potential to generate better runoff. PMID:25106048

  16. Roof structure theory and support resistance determination of longwall face in shallow seam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qing-xiang(黄庆享)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the structure models founded in shallow seam, the roof asymmetry arch with three articulations in roof first weighting and the step voussoir beam in roof periodic weighting. These structure models are differ from classic theory, it establishes the new roof control theory of instability structure roof, especially in shallow seam. Based on the new roof structure theory, the support working state of "given sliding load" is put forward, and the factor of load transmitting is introduced to determine the load on roof structure. Therefore, the proper and accurate calculating methods of support resistance are established. Based on this, the dynamic structure theory in shallow seam could be predicted.

  17. Application of temporary roof method for OPR 1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress Status: Delay in AB structural work due to unsound bedrock -3.5 months delayed start from IPS Rev.0→Difficult to meet the milestone of Energizing. Promote of 47 month schedule for enhancing the competitiveness of OPR 1000. Accumulated experience and technical know-how for the temporary roof system in domestic construction field. Weather condition of site: Increase in rainy days due to global warming (Rainy day: Average 84 days ('95∼'99)→115 days ('07). Change of worker's recognition→pursuing the work environment, health and leisure than making money. '08/02 Adopt an agenda in 47 months TFT meeting. '08.03 Survey the subcontractor and implement the basic design. '08/04 Perform the detail design and structural analysis. '08/05 Start manufacturing→Complete installing ('08/06). '08/10 Removal for installing the upper structural steel. '09/05 Scheduled to be reinstalled in 1 AB. About 1 month schedule reduction→Assist to meet the milestone of Energizing→Minimize the over-time work. Accumulate the utilizing experience for all-weather method→Continuous application for the future domestic and overseas NPP, Essential method for rainy season in China and South East Asia. Increase the quality and safety due to indoor work, No need to continue the work in rainy day. Promote the image of Nuclear Construction, Provide with a better work environment, Contribute to enhance the competitiveness of OPR 1000

  18. The Feasibility of Installing and Monitoring an Extensive Green Roof at Purdue University

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Kristin; Thurner, Kensey; Preisendanz, Heather; Davis, Amélie Y; Colony, Hollie; Schuster, Dan; Nies, Larry; Wilson, Kim

    2007-01-01

    The Boiler Green Initiative (BGI) is a student-run organization working to improve environmental sustainability at the Purdue University West Lafayette campus. A main goal of BGI's is to install a green roof on an existing building on campus that is being replaced. We discuss the benefits of green roofs, the feasibility of having one installed on the Armory's roof and the various monitoring options we have researched. Flat roofs are especially amenable to the green roof system, so a building ...

  19. Dynamic Simulation of the Green Roofs Impact on Building Energy Performance, Case Study of Antananarivo, Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Hery Tiana Rakotondramiarana; Tojo Fanomezana Ranaivoarisoa; Dominique Morau

    2015-01-01

    Green roofs improve building energy performance and constitute an alternative to sustainable buildings. A green roof model is dynamically coupled with a building thermal model to assess its energy performance that takes into account the indoor air temperature dynamic changes. Under the climate conditions in Antananarivo, we compared green and conventional roofs. The present study shows that green roofs protect the roof structure under extreme temperature and large temperature fluctuations. Fo...

  20. Experimental measurements and numerical modelling of a green roof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, Renato M.; Castellotti, Francesco; Busato, Filippo [Padova Univ., Dept. of Management and Engineering, Vicenza (Italy)

    2005-12-15

    Green roof utilisation has been known since ancient times both in hot and cold climates. Nowadays, it has been reconsidered at issue of energy saving and pollution reduction. In this paper, some measurement sessions on a green roof installed by the Vicenza Hospital are described. A data logging system with temperature, humidity, rainfall, radiation, etc. sensors surveyed both the parameters related to the green roof and to the rooms underneath. The aim is to evaluate the passive cooling, stressing the evapotranspiration role in summer time. Furthermore, the enhanced insulating properties have been tested during winter time. A predictive numerical model has been developed in a building simulation software (TRNSYS) to calculate thermal and energy performances of a building with a green roof, varying the meteorological dataset for a specific geographic zone. (Author)

  1. MODELING OF STORM WATER RUNOFF FROM GREEN ROOFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Burszta-Adamiak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Apart from direct measurements, modelling of runoff from green roofs is valuable source of information about effectiveness of this type of structure from hydrological point of view. Among different type of models, the most frequently used are numerical models. They allow to assess the impact of green roofs on decrease and attenuation of runoff, reduction of peak runoff and value of water retention. This paper presents preliminary results of research on computing the rate of runoff from green roofs using GARDENIA model. The analysis has been carried out for selected rainfall events registered during measuring campaign on pilot-scale green roofs. Obtained results are promising and show good fit between observed and simulated runoff.

  2. High Alumina Refractory Bricks for Electric Arc Furnace Roofs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the sort, technical requirement, test method, inspection rules, marking, packing, transportation, storage and quality certification of high alumina refractory bricks for electric arc furnace roofs.

  3. Home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowich, Paul

    2012-10-01

    This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility.

  4. Analysis of mechanism of shock bump due to roof fall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Xin-jian; LI Jian-xiong

    2004-01-01

    According to the characteristics of the shock bump due to roof fall, a simple mechanics model has been established by applying the catastrophic theory and the law of energy conservation. The author suggests that the shock bump may be induced by the sudden energy release in the roof falling after underground mineral extractions, and through the systematic analysis of actual examples on site, the empirical formulae for the roof falling and energy release are derived, which would provide a new way for the study of the origin and mechanism of mine tremor due to fallen-in roof structure. It is of a great importance to enrich the shock bump theory and production safety in mine.

  5. Application of solar roof shallow pool at individual residental buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović Dragan J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the possibility of applying shallow roof pools of water on the basis of passive solar water capture functioning as thermal batteries and thermal "regulators" in a "hot - cold" mode with individual residential buildings. With this application, the utilization of the existing functionality of the building roof area would improve and open up the possibility of achieving better overall bio-climate individual object. By using this system, a flat roof impassable "terrace" takes on a new, additional energy function, which proves the ability to reduce overall energy consumption of total conventional seasonal heating and cooling consumption of a building. Supporting of this intention, the paper gives a variant solution of an easily prefabricated reinforced concrete roof system of shallow water pool that works on the principle of passive solar energy capture.

  6. Diaphragm Effect of Steel Space Roof Systems in Hall Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet FENKLİ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hall structures have been used widely for different purposes. They have are reinforced concrete frames and shear wall with steel space roof systems. Earthquake response of hall structures is different from building type structures. One of the most critical nodes is diaphragm effect of steel space roof on earthquake response of hall structures. Diaphragm effect is depending on lateral stiffness capacity of steel space roof system. Lateral stiffness of steel space roof system is related to modulation geometry, support conditions, selected sections and system geometry. In current paper, three representative models which are commonly used in Turkey were taken in to account for investigation. Results of numerical tests were present comparatively

  7. Estimating forest and woodland aboveground biomass using active and passive remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Aboveground biomass was estimated from active and passive remote sensing sources, including airborne lidar and Landsat-8 satellites, in an eastern Arizona (USA) study area comprised of forest and woodland ecosystems. Compared to field measurements, airborne lidar enabled direct estimation of individual tree height with a slope of 0.98 (R2 = 0.98). At the plot-level, lidar-derived height and intensity metrics provided the most robust estimate for aboveground biomass, producing dominant species-based aboveground models with errors ranging from 4 to 14Mg ha –1 across all woodland and forest species. Landsat-8 imagery produced dominant species-based aboveground biomass models with errors ranging from 10 to 28 Mg ha –1. Thus, airborne lidar allowed for estimates for fine-scale aboveground biomass mapping with low uncertainty, while Landsat-8 seems best suited for broader spatial scale products such as a national biomass essential climate variable (ECV) based on land cover types for the United States.

  8. RESEARCH ON CONSTRUCTION AND BUDGET OF BEAM ROOF (FLOOR) SLAB REINFORCEMENT IN SPECIFICATION FOR NEW PLANE OVERALL DESIGN METHOD%新平法规范中有梁楼盖楼(屋)面板钢筋施工与预算研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李茂英; 曾庆军

    2012-01-01

    According to the requirements of Drawing Rules of Plane Overall Design Method and Structure Drawings for Concrete Structure Construction (Cast-in-place Concrete Frame, Shear Wall, Beam and Slab) (11G101-1), beam roof (floor) slab reinforcement, including slab bottom through reinforcement (or non-through reinforcement), slab top thjough reinforcement, support through reinforcement, distributed reinforcement in support non-through reinforcement and temperature reinforcement at middle of slab top (crack-resistant and temperature-resistant structural reinforcement), are researched on the aspects of construction and budget for changes at support node and changes in reinforcement layout and overlap length. Key construction points and workload calculation for budget of such kind of reinforcement are analyzed.%根据新平法规范《混凝土结构施工平面整体表示方法制图规则和构造详图(现浇混凝土框架、剪力墙、梁、板)》(11G101-1)的要求,就有梁楼盖楼(屋)面板钢筋,包括板底部贯通筋(或非贯通筋)、板顶部贯通筋、支座非贯通筋、支座非贯通筋内分布筋、板顶中部温度筋(抗裂抗温构造筋),在支座节点处变化、钢筋排布变化、搭接长度变化等从施工和预算两方面作了较为详尽的研究,分析了这类钢筋在施工中的注意事项和预算时的工程量计算.

  9. Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Yan, En-Rong; Chen, Han Y. H.; Chang, Scott X.; Zhao, Yan-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ming-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern China. We employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand structural diversity, species diversity, and stand age on aboveground C storage. The three final SEMs with different directions for the path between species diversity and stand structural diversity had a similar goodness of fit to the data. They accounted for 82 % of the variation in aboveground C storage, 55-59 % of the variation in stand structural diversity, and 0.1 to 9 % of the variation in species diversity. Stand age demonstrated strong positive total effects, including a positive direct effect (β = 0.41), and a positive indirect effect via stand structural diversity (β = 0.41) on aboveground C storage. Stand structural diversity had a positive direct effect on aboveground C storage (β = 0.56), whereas there was little total effect of species diversity as it had a negative direct association with, but had a positive indirect effect, via stand structural diversity, on aboveground C storage. The negligible total effect of species diversity on aboveground C storage in the forests under study may have been attributable to competitive exclusion with high aboveground biomass, or a historical logging preference for productive species. Our analyses suggested that stand structural diversity was a major determinant for variations in aboveground C storage in the secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China. Hence, maintaining tree DBH and

  10. The role of green roofs in sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Fotouhi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, due to this fact that city and urbanity have been increasingly expanded, the destruction process of urban green space is developing with more speed which this process makes numerous problems among which we can refer to increase in level of air pollution, reducing urban landscape, increase in respiratory diseases, etc. The green roofs, the gardens which are built in the houses’ roof instead of the land, nowadays have been replaced with urban green space or parks in most of the advanc...

  11. Soil microarthropod community dynamics in extensive green roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Rumble, Heather; Gange, Alan C.

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs are of increasing interest to ecologists, engineers and architects, as cities grow and aim to become more sustainable. They could be exploited to improve urban biodiversity and ecosystem services, yet almost nothing is known about them from a soil community ecology perspective, despite how critical soil food webs are to ecosystem functioning. This paper provides the first comprehensive study incorporating the annual cycle of green roof soil microarthropods. Microarthropod communit...

  12. Statistical Building Roof Reconstruction from WORLDVIEW-2 Stereo Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovi, T.; Huang, H.; Krauß, T.; Mayer, H.; Reinartz, P.

    2015-03-01

    3D building reconstruction from point clouds is an active research topic in remote sensing, photogrammetry and computer vision. Most of the prior research has been done on 3D building reconstruction from LiDAR data which means high resolution and dense data. The interest of this work is 3D building reconstruction from Digital Surface Models (DSM) of stereo image matching of space borne satellite data which cover larger areas than LiDAR datasets in one data acquisition step and can be used also for remote regions. The challenging problem is the noise of this data because of low resolution and matching errors. In this paper, a top-down and bottom-up method is developed to find building roof models which exhibit the optimum fit to the point clouds of the DSM. In the bottom up step of this hybrid method, the building mask and roof components such as ridge lines are extracted. In addition, in order to reduce the computational complexity and search space, roofs are classified to pitched and flat roofs as well. Ridge lines are utilized to estimate the roof primitives from a building library such as width, length, positions and orientation. Thereafter, a topdown approach based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo and simulated annealing is applied to optimize roof parameters in an iterative manner by stochastic sampling and minimizing the average of Euclidean distance between point cloud and model surface as fitness function. Experiments are performed on two areas of Munich city which include three roof types (hipped, gable and flat roofs). The results show the efficiency of this method in even for this type of noisy datasets.

  13. MODELING OF STORM WATER RUNOFF FROM GREEN ROOFS

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Burszta-Adamiak; Wiesław Fiałkiewicz

    2014-01-01

    Apart from direct measurements, modelling of runoff from green roofs is valuable source of information about effectiveness of this type of structure from hydrological point of view. Among different type of models, the most frequently used are numerical models. They allow to assess the impact of green roofs on decrease and attenuation of runoff, reduction of peak runoff and value of water retention. This paper presents preliminary results of research on computing the rate of runoff from green ...

  14. Potential energy savings from cool roofs in Spain and Andalusia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool roofs are an inexpensive method to save energy and to improve the comfort level in buildings in mild and hot climates. A high scale implementation of cool roofs in Andalusia, in the south of Spain, could potentially save 295,000 kWh per year, considering only residential buildings with flat roofs using electrical heating. At the current energy prices, consumers can save 59 million euros annually in electricity costs and the emission of 136,000 metric tons of CO2 can be directly avoided every year from the production of that electricity. If radiative forcings are considered, Andalucía can potentially offset between 9.44 and 12 Mt of CO2. All the provinces in the rest of Spain are also studied in this paper. The biggest savings are achieved in Gran Canaria (48%), Tenerife (48%), Cádiz (36%), Murcia (33%), Huelva (30%), Málaga (29%), Almería (29%) and Sevilla (28%), where savings are greater than 2 euros per square meter of flat roof for old buildings with dark roofs. For the biggest cities the range of savings obtained are: between 7.4% and 11% in Madrid, between 12% and 18% in Barcelona and between 14% and 20% in Valencia. -- Highlights: ► We estimate potential savings in energy, CO2, and money for cool roofs in Spain (residential sector with flat roofs). ► Average savings are of around one euro per square meter in the biggest cities. ► Potential savings are of more than 2 €/m2 in the hottest cities. ► In Andalusia the potential savings are 300 MWh, 60 millions euro and 136,000 tons of CO2 per year. ► With forcings, the CO2 equivalence of cool roofs in Andalusia is between 9 and 12 Mt.

  15. Composition and Diversity of Avian Communities Using a New Urban Habitat: Green Roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Brian E.; Swearingin, Ryan M.; Pullins, Craig K.; Rice, Matthew E.

    2016-06-01

    Green roofs on buildings are becoming popular and represent a new component of the urban landscape. Public benefits of green roof projects include reduced stormwater runoff, improved air quality, reduced urban heat island effects, and aesthetic values. As part of a city-wide plan, several green roofs have been constructed at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD). Like some other landscaping features, green roofs on or near an airport might attract wildlife and thus increase the risk of bird-aircraft collisions. During 2007-2011, we conducted a series of studies to evaluate wildlife use of newly constructed green roofs and traditional (gravel) roofs on buildings at ORD. These green roofs were 0.04-1.62 ha in area and consisted of primarily stonecrop species for vegetation. A total of 188 birds were observed using roofs during this research. Of the birds using green roofs, 66, 23, and 4 % were Killdeer, European Starlings, and Mourning Doves, respectively. Killdeer nested on green roofs, whereas the other species perched, foraged, or loafed. Birds used green roofs almost exclusively between May and October. Overall, avian use of the green roofs was minimal and similar to that of buildings with traditional roofs. Although green roofs with other vegetation types might offer forage or cover to birds and thus attract potentially hazardous wildlife, the stonecrop-vegetated green roofs in this study did not increase the risk of bird-aircraft collisions.

  16. Modelling of green roofs' hydrologic performance using EPA's SWMM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burszta-Adamiak, E; Mrowiec, M

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs significantly affect the increase in water retention and thus the management of rain water in urban areas. In Poland, as in many other European countries, excess rainwater resulting from snowmelt and heavy rainfall contributes to the development of local flooding in urban areas. Opportunities to reduce surface runoff and reduce flood risks are among the reasons why green roofs are more likely to be used also in this country. However, there are relatively few data on their in situ performance. In this study the storm water performance was simulated for the green roofs experimental plots using the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) with Low Impact Development (LID) Controls module (version 5.0.022). The model consists of many parameters for a particular layer of green roofs but simulation results were unsatisfactory considering the hydrologic response of the green roofs. For the majority of the tested rain events, the Nash coefficient had negative values. It indicates a weak fit between observed and measured flow-rates. Therefore complexity of the LID module does not affect the increase of its accuracy. Further research at a technical scale is needed to determine the role of the green roof slope, vegetation cover and drying process during the inter-event periods.

  17. Modelling of green roofs' hydrologic performance using EPA's SWMM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burszta-Adamiak, E; Mrowiec, M

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs significantly affect the increase in water retention and thus the management of rain water in urban areas. In Poland, as in many other European countries, excess rainwater resulting from snowmelt and heavy rainfall contributes to the development of local flooding in urban areas. Opportunities to reduce surface runoff and reduce flood risks are among the reasons why green roofs are more likely to be used also in this country. However, there are relatively few data on their in situ performance. In this study the storm water performance was simulated for the green roofs experimental plots using the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) with Low Impact Development (LID) Controls module (version 5.0.022). The model consists of many parameters for a particular layer of green roofs but simulation results were unsatisfactory considering the hydrologic response of the green roofs. For the majority of the tested rain events, the Nash coefficient had negative values. It indicates a weak fit between observed and measured flow-rates. Therefore complexity of the LID module does not affect the increase of its accuracy. Further research at a technical scale is needed to determine the role of the green roof slope, vegetation cover and drying process during the inter-event periods. PMID:23823537

  18. Soil-roots Strength Performance of Extensive Green Roof by Using Axonopus Compressus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, N. A.; Ramli, M. N.; Chik, T. N. T.; Ahmad, H.; Abdullah, M. F.; Kasmin, H.; Embong, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Green roof technology has been proven to provide potential environmental benefits including improved building thermal performance, removal of air pollution and reduced storm water runoff. Installation of green roof also involved soil element usage as a plant growth medium which creates several interactions between both strands. This study was carried out to investigate the soil-roots strength performance of green roof at different construction period up to 4 months. Axonopus compressus (pearl grass) was planted in a ExE test plot with a designated suitable soil medium. Direct shear test was conducted for each plot to determine the soil shear strength according to different construction period. In addition, some basic geotechnical testing also been carried out. The results showed that the shear strength of soil sample increased over different construction period of 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th month with average result 3.81 kPa, 5.55 kPa, 6.05 kPa and 6.48 kPa respectively. Shear strength of rooted soil samples was higher than the soil samples without roots (control sample). In conclusion, increment of soil-roots shear strength was due to root growth over the time. The soil-roots shear strength development of Axonopus compressus can be expressed in a linear equation as: y = 0.851x + 3.345, where y = shear stress and x = time.

  19. ANALYSIS OF WATER RELATIONS OF SUBSTRATES USED IN GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baryła

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs, as the restoration of biologically active area, are fairly common and effective method of storm water management in urban areas. Depend on the design of the green roof and the type of substrate, they are able to retain 50–90% of rainwater. The aim of the study was to determine the physicochemical properties of two substrates used in the construction of green roofs (intensive and extensive. Water retention of substrates was compared to water retention of substrates undelined with the drainage layer made from crushed autoclaved aerated concrete. In the experiment, which uses drainage layer, higher drying the top layer of the substrate was observed, which may be related to high water absorption drainage material. The effluent from the substrate using aerated concrete as a drainage layer amounted to an average of 22–51% of the volume of water supplied to the extensive substrate, whereas 19–46% of the volume of water supplied to the intensive substrate. The effluent from the substrate without the drainage layer amounted 40-48% of the volume of water supplied.

  20. Development of elastomeric isolators to reduce roof bolting machine drilling noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Robert; Yantek, David; Johnson, David; Ferro, Ernie; Swope, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Among underground coal miners, hearing loss remains one of the most common occupational illnesses. In response to this problem, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) conducts research to reduce the noise emission of underground coal-mining equipment, an example of which is a roof bolting machine. Field studies show that, on average, drilling noise is the most significant contributor to a roof bolting machine operator’s noise exposure. NIOSH OMSHR has determined that the drill steel and chuck are the dominant sources of drilling noise. NIOSH OMSHR, Corry Rubber Corporation, and Kennametal, Inc. have developed a bit isolator that breaks the steel-to-steel link between the drill bit and drill steel and a chuck isolator that breaks the mechanical connection between the drill steel and the chuck, thus reducing the noise radiated by the drill steel and chuck, and the noise exposure of the roof bolter operator. This paper documents the evolution of the bit isolator and chuck isolator including various alternative designs which may enhance performance. Laboratory testing confirms that production bit and chuck isolators reduce the A-weighted sound level generated during drilling by 3.7 to 6.6 dB. Finally, this paper summarizes results of a finite element analysis used to explore the key parameters of the drill bit isolator and chuck isolator to understand the impact these parameters have on noise. PMID:26568650

  1. Bioenergy production potential for aboveground biomass from a subtropical constructed wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi-Chung [Department of Forestry and Nature Conservation, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 11114 (China); Ko, Chun-Han [School of Forestry and Resource Conservation, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Bioenergy Research Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Chang, Fang-Chih [The Instrument Center, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan City 70101 (China); Chen, Pen-Yuan [Department of Landscape Architecture, National Chiayi University, Chiayi City 60004 (China); Liu, Tzu-Fen [School of Forestry and Resource Conservation, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Sheu, Yiong-Shing [Department of Water Quality Protection, Environmental Protection Administration, Executive Yuan, Taipei 10042 (China); Shih, Tzenge-Lien [Department of Chemistry, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taipei 25137 (China); Teng, Chia-Ji [Environmental Protection Bureau, Taipei County Government, Taipei 22001 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Wetland biomass has potentials for bioenergy production and carbon sequestration. Planted with multiple species macrophytes to promote biodiversity, the 3.29 ha constructed wetland has been treated 4000 cubic meter per day (CMD) domestic wastewater and urban runoff. This study investigated the seasonal variations of aboveground biomass of the constructed wetland, from March 2007 to March 2008. The overall aboveground biomass was 16,737 kg and total carbon content 6185 kg at the peak of aboveground accumulation for the system emergent macrophyte at September 2007. Typhoon Korsa flood this constructed wetland at October 2007, however, significant recovery for emergent macrophyte was observed without human intervention. Endemic Ludwigia sp. recovered much faster, compared to previously dominated typha. Self-recovery ability of the macrophyte community after typhoon validated the feasibility of biomass harvesting. Incinerating of 80% biomass harvested of experimental area in a nearby incineration plant could produce 11,846 kWh for one month. (author)

  2. Aboveground predation by an American badger (Taxidea taxus) on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, D.A.; Biggins, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    During research on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), we repeatedly observed a female American badger (Taxidea taxus) hunting prairie dogs on a colony in southern Phillips County, Montana. During 1-14 June 2006, we observed 7 aboveground attacks (2 successful) and 3 successful excavations of prairie dogs. The locations and circumstances of aboveground attacks suggested that the badger improved her probability of capturing prairie dogs by planning the aboveground attacks based on perceptions of speeds, angles, distances, and predicted escape responses of prey. Our observations add to previous reports on the complex and varied predatory methods and cognitive capacities of badgers. These observations also underscore the individuality of predators and support the concept that predators are active participants in predator-prey interactions.

  3. Interrelated effects of mycorrhiza and free-living nitrogen fixers cascade up to aboveground herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitov, Botir; Patiño-Ruiz, José David; Pina, Tatiana; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Aboveground plant performance is strongly influenced by belowground microorganisms, some of which are pathogenic and have negative effects, while others, such as nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, usually have positive effects. Recent research revealed that belowground interactions between plants and functionally distinct groups of microorganisms cascade up to aboveground plant associates such as herbivores and their natural enemies. However, while functionally distinct belowground microorganisms commonly co-occur in the rhizosphere, their combined effects, and relative contributions, respectively, on performance of aboveground plant-associated organisms are virtually unexplored. Here, we scrutinized and disentangled the effects of free-living nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum (DB) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae (AMF) on host plant choice and reproduction of the herbivorous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae on common bean plants Phaseolus vulgaris. Additionally, we assessed plant growth, and AMF and DB occurrence and density as affected by each other. Both AMF alone and DB alone increased spider mite reproduction to similar levels, as compared to the control, and exerted additive effects under co-occurrence. These effects were similarly apparent in host plant choice, that is, the mites preferred leaves from plants with both AMF and DB to plants with AMF or DB to plants grown without AMF and DB. DB, which also act as AMF helper bacteria, enhanced root colonization by AMF, whereas AMF did not affect DB abundance. AMF but not DB increased growth of reproductive plant tissue and seed production, respectively. Both AMF and DB increased the biomass of vegetative aboveground plant tissue. Our study breaks new ground in multitrophic belowground-aboveground research by providing first insights into the fitness implications of plant-mediated interactions between interrelated belowground fungi

  4. Estimating Aboveground Biomass of Oil Palm Trees by Using the Destructive Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sunaryathy, Putri Ida; Suhasman; Kanniah, Kasturi Devi; Tan, Kian Pang

    2015-01-01

    Palm oil is one of the important commodities in Indonesia. Estimating the aboveground biomass of oil palms is one of the most important oil palm carbon studies. The objective of this study was to estimate the aboveground biomass of oil palm trees at plot scale for three age classes namely, class 1 (1 to 3 years), class 2 (4 to 10 years) and class 3 (11 to 20 years) in South Sulawesi, Indonesia using destructive method. The AGB for each age class: class 1, class 2, and class 3 they are 5.84 kg...

  5. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-12-15

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title

  6. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a non-cool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential (NR) building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 3.2 kW h/m2 (300 kW h/1000 ft2), average annual natural gas deficits of 5.6 MJ/m2 (4.9 therm/1000 ft2), average annual source energy savings of 30 MJ/m2 (2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2), and average peak power demand savings of 2.1 W/m2 (0.19 kW/1000 ft2). The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $4.90/m2 ($450/1000 ft2) with time-dependent valuation (TDV), and $4.00/m2 ($370/1000 ft2) without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV+equipment savings) rises to $5.90/m2 ($550/1000 ft2) with TDV, and to $5.00/m2 ($470/1000 ft2) without TDV. Total savings range from 1.90 to 8.30 $/m2 (0.18-0.77 $/ft2) with TDV, and from 1.70 to 7.10 $/m2 (0.16-0.66 $/ft2) without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00-2.20 $/m2 (0.00-0.20 $/ft2). Cool roofs with premiums up to $2.20/m2 ($0.20/ft2) are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2-16; those with premiums not exceeding $1.90/m2 ($0.18/ft2) are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24

  7. 基于 Zi gB ee和 STM 32的矿用顶板离层监测实验系统设计%Design of roof separation indicator experimental system based on ZigBee and STM32

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 程永强

    2014-01-01

    结合煤矿安全专业的教学特点和工程实践,给出了一套矿用顶板离层监测系统的教学实验方案设计。该方案以ZigBee无线网络和嵌入式系统为基础,包括监测节点和监测分站两部分,节点负责数据的采集,并通过ZigBee点对点的通信方式进行互联,分站负责数据存储和转存处理,支持触屏操作,实现人机交互,与传统的机械式和有线式离层仪相比,具有读数方便、准确和精度高等优势。通过该系统平台可以让学生深刻理解ZigBee和嵌入式技术在煤矿中的应用,满足了煤矿相关专业的实践教学要求。%Combining-the-teaching-characteristic-of-coal-mine-professional-and-the-requirement-of-coal-mine-production-,this-paper-gives-a-design-of-roof-separation-indicator-,which-is-used-in-practice-teaching-.Based-on-ZigBee-and-embedded-system-,the-design-includes-two-parts-,i-.e-.,monitoring-node-and-monitoring-station-.-The-monitoring-node-is-used-to-collect-data-and-connect-with-each-other-through-ZigBee-.-The-monitoring-station-is-used-to-save-data-and-send-the-data-to-other-terminal-,it-has-a-touch-screen-,users-can-control-the-node-through-it-.Compared-with-the-old-two-indicators-,it-is-convenient-to-read-and-have-an-accurate-reading-and-higher-precision-.The-students-can-learn-more-about-the-ZigBee-and-embedded-system-,this-system-meets-the-requirement-of-the-related-professional’s-practical-teaching-.

  8. Manipulating soil microbial communities in extensive green roof substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineux, Chloe J; Connop, Stuart P; Gange, Alan C

    2014-09-15

    There has been very little investigation into the soil microbial community on green roofs, yet this below ground habitat is vital for ecosystem functioning. Green roofs are often harsh environments that would greatly benefit from having a healthy microbial system, allowing efficient nutrient cycling and a degree of drought tolerance in dry summer months. To test if green roof microbial communities could be manipulated, we added mycorrhizal fungi and a microbial mixture ('compost tea') to green roof rootzones, composed mainly of crushed brick or crushed concrete. The study revealed that growing media type and depth play a vital role in the microbial ecology of green roofs. There are complex relationships between depth and type of substrate and the biomass of different microbial groups, with no clear pattern being observed. Following the addition of inoculants, bacterial groups tended to increase in biomass in shallower substrates, whereas fungal biomass change was dependent on depth and type of substrate. Increased fungal biomass was found in shallow plots containing more crushed concrete and deeper plots containing more crushed brick where compost tea (a live mixture of beneficial bacteria) was added, perhaps due to the presence of helper bacteria for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Often there was not an additive affect of the microbial inoculations but instead an antagonistic interaction between the added AM fungi and the compost tea. This suggests that some species of microbes may not be compatible with others, as competition for limited resources occurs within the various substrates. The overall results suggest that microbial inoculations of green roof habitats are sustainable. They need only be done once for increased biomass to be found in subsequent years, indicating that this is a novel and viable method of enhancing roof community composition.

  9. Evaluation of solar energy on the roofs of livestock houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Liberati

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a great potential for production of thermal and electrical energy by means of solar collectors on farms. To assess in advance the performance of the alternative plant solutions, a computational model for the determination of solar energy absorbed by surfaces with different exposures as a function of latitude, day, orientation and inclination has been created. Its application to roofs of buildings typically used for animal housing is presented; these were mono-pitch, gabled, and shed type roofs. For each building, the annual energy absorption per unit of floor area is calculated by varying orientation and slope of the pitches. For roof surfaces exposed only in one direction (mono-pitch or shed, the orientation is shown to be a dominant factor with respect to the slope in determining the annual energy uptake. The maximum uptake is obtained with exposure to the south and is greater the higher the slope (up to 67.5%. For gabled roofs, the total uptake is negatively affected by the worse exposed pitch and does not vary significantly, for a given slope, with orientation (up to 2.8%. The maximum gain is obtained with the optimal building azimuth (0° and the highest slope. The shed type, since it is affected by the shade induced by the upper pitch over the lower, cannot reach the level of a mono-pitch roof: -1.5% with a slope of 10% and -21% with a slope of 67.5% with the optimal building azimuth of 90°. However, its performance is slightly higher than the corresponding gabled roof (+2.5%, therefore, it could be a convenient alternative if optimally oriented and, above all, if the collectors are installed on the predominantly sunny part of the roof.

  10. Manipulating soil microbial communities in extensive green roof substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineux, Chloe J; Connop, Stuart P; Gange, Alan C

    2014-09-15

    There has been very little investigation into the soil microbial community on green roofs, yet this below ground habitat is vital for ecosystem functioning. Green roofs are often harsh environments that would greatly benefit from having a healthy microbial system, allowing efficient nutrient cycling and a degree of drought tolerance in dry summer months. To test if green roof microbial communities could be manipulated, we added mycorrhizal fungi and a microbial mixture ('compost tea') to green roof rootzones, composed mainly of crushed brick or crushed concrete. The study revealed that growing media type and depth play a vital role in the microbial ecology of green roofs. There are complex relationships between depth and type of substrate and the biomass of different microbial groups, with no clear pattern being observed. Following the addition of inoculants, bacterial groups tended to increase in biomass in shallower substrates, whereas fungal biomass change was dependent on depth and type of substrate. Increased fungal biomass was found in shallow plots containing more crushed concrete and deeper plots containing more crushed brick where compost tea (a live mixture of beneficial bacteria) was added, perhaps due to the presence of helper bacteria for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Often there was not an additive affect of the microbial inoculations but instead an antagonistic interaction between the added AM fungi and the compost tea. This suggests that some species of microbes may not be compatible with others, as competition for limited resources occurs within the various substrates. The overall results suggest that microbial inoculations of green roof habitats are sustainable. They need only be done once for increased biomass to be found in subsequent years, indicating that this is a novel and viable method of enhancing roof community composition. PMID:24992459

  11. Quantification of uncertainty in aboveground biomass estimates derived from small-footprint LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Greenberg, J. A.; Li, B.; Ramirez, C.; Balamuta, J. J.; Evans, K.; Man, A.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A promising approach to determining aboveground biomass (AGB) in forests comes through the use of individual tree crown delineation (ITCD) techniques applied to small-footprint LiDAR data. These techniques, when combined with allometric equations, can produce per-tree estimates of AGB. At this scale, AGB estimates can be quantified in a manner similar to how ground-based forest inventories are produced. However, these approaches have significant uncertainties that are rarely described in full. Allometric equations are often based on species-specific diameter-at-breast height (DBH) relationships, but neither DBH nor species can be reliably determined using remote sensing analysis. Furthermore, many approaches to ITCD only delineate trees appearing in the upper canopy so subcanopy trees are often missing from the inventories. In this research, we performed a propagation-of-error analysis to determine the spatially varying uncertainties in AGB estimates at the individual plant and stand level for a large collection of LiDAR acquisitions covering a large portion of California. Furthermore, we determined the relative contribution of various aspects of the analysis towards the uncertainty, including errors in the ITCD results, the allometric equations, the taxonomic designation, and the local biophysical environment. Watershed segmentation was used to obtain the preliminary crown segments. Lidar points within the preliminary segments were extracted to form profiling data of the segments, and then mode detection algorithms were applied to identify the tree number and tree heights within each segment. As part of this analysis, we derived novel "remote sensing aware" allometric equations and their uncertainties based on three-dimensional morphological metrics that can be accurately derived from LiDAR data.

  12. An Integrative Analysis of an Extensive Green Roof System: A Case Study of the Schleman Green Roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, F.; Bowling, L. C.

    2013-12-01

    In urban environments where populations continue to rise, the need for affective stormwater management and runoff control methods is ever prevalent. Increased population growth and city expansion means greater impervious surfaces and higher rates of stormwater runoff. In well-established cities, this proves particularly difficult due to a constraining built environment and limited pervious spaces, even in cities as small as 40,000 residents. Work to reduce runoff in combined sewer systems (CSS) and municipal separated storm sewer systems (MS4) by use of best-management practices is one route currently under investigation. The Purdue University campus is making efforts to reduce their impact on the West Lafayette CSS and MS4. Green roofs are one management practice being used for runoff mitigation. Specifically, Schleman Hall, an administrative student affairs building, has a small green roof located on the second floor installed in 2008. In cooperation with Purdue Physical Facilities, monitoring and analysis for the Schleman extensive green roof at Purdue University was performed from June 2012 to December 2012. The objective was to determine the stormwater retention, output water quality and net present value for the 165 m2 roof. The results from the water balance analysis revealed retention rates on average of 58% of precipitation per rain event, where retention included soil moisture, evaporation and detention/depression storage. The water quality metrics tested were Nitrate-Nitrite (NO2-NO3), Orthophosphate (PO4), Ammonia-Ammonium ion (NH3-NH4), Sulfate (SO4), total suspended solids (TSS) and pH. The pollutant concentration and load results varied, but the pH levels from precipitation increased in all samples after passing through the substrate. SO4 and PO4 results yielded higher concentrations and loads in the green roof output than the control output and precipitation, while NO2-NO3 and NH3-NH4 yielded concentrations and loads that were reduced by the green

  13. 屋顶绿化节能效益研究%Benefit of Energy Efficiency of Green Roofs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 管乃彦

    2015-01-01

    屋顶绿化是在改善城市区域的生态环境,美化城市景观,并且在有限的城市空间提高绿地率最有效的方式。屋顶绿化不但可以缓解城市热岛效应,还可以在节能和城市绿化方面发挥很好的作用。借助天津地区多层建筑的顶层房间为研究对象,综述多种不同的屋顶绿化构造及施工方式。通过 DesignBuilder 软件对非绿化与绿化屋顶房间在能耗方面进行分析模拟,采用碳税率法对屋顶绿地的固碳经济价值进行评估,将各项生态效益的经济价值进行计算,屋顶绿化对节能十分有效。%Roof greening is the most efficient way to improve the greening rate in limited urban space. It can not only alleviate the urban heat island effect, but also play a good role in energy conservation and urban greening. As the research object, the top floor of multi-story buildings in Tianjin combines with various structures of roof greening and ways of construction. The paper is to analyze and simulate differences of energy consumption between non-greening roof and greening roof by DesignBuilder software, and finally gets a conclusion that greening roof is available in energy efficiency.

  14. The Influence of Hydrologic Parameters on the Hydraulic Efficiency of an Extensive Green Roof in Mediterranean Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Garofalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In an urban environment, green roofs represent a sustainable solution for mitigating stormwater volumes and hydrograph peaks. So far, many literature studies have investigated the hydraulic efficiency and the subsurface runoff coefficient of green roofs, showing their strong variability according to several factors, including the characteristics of storm events. Furthermore, only few studies have focused on the hydraulic efficiency of green roofs under Mediterranean climate conditions and defined the influencing hydrological parameters on the subsurface runoff coefficient. Nevertheless, for designing purposes, it is crucial to properly assess the subsurface runoff coefficient of a given green roof under specific climate conditions and its influencing factors. This study intends to, firstly, evaluate the subsurface runoff coefficient at daily and event-time scales for a given green roof, through a conceptual model implemented in SWMM. The model was loaded with both daily and 1-min rainfall data from two Mediterranean climate sites, one in Thessaloniki, Greece and one in Cosenza, Italy, respectively. Then, the most influencing hydrological parameters were examined through a statistical regression analysis. The findings show that the daily subsurface runoff coefficient is 0.70 for both sites, while the event-based one is 0.79 with a standard deviation of 0.23 for the site in Cosenza, Italy. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the influencing parameters are the rainfall intensity and antecedent dry weather period with a confidence level of 95%. This study demonstrated that, due to the high variability of the subsurface runoff coefficient, the use of a unique value for design purposes is inappropriate and that a preliminary estimation could be obtained as a function of the total rainfall depth and the antecedent dry weather period by using the validated multi-regression relationship which is site specific.

  15. Effects of root herbivory on pyrrolizidine alkaloid content and aboveground plant-herbivore-parasitoid interactions in Jacobaea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostenko, O.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of root herbivory is increasingly recognized in ecological studies, and the effects of root herbivory on plant growth, chemistry, and performance of aboveground herbivores have been relatively well studied. However, how belowground herbivory by root feeding insects affects aboveground

  16. Effects of Root Herbivory on Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Content and Aboveground Plant-Herbivore-Parasitoid Interactions in Jacobaea Vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostenko, O.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of root herbivory is increasingly recognized in ecological studies, and the effects of root herbivory on plant growth, chemistry, and performance of aboveground herbivores have been relatively well studied. However, how belowground herbivory by root feeding insects affects aboveground

  17. Above-ground biomass investments and light interception of tropical forest trees and lianas early in succession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selaya, N.G.; Anten, N.P.R.; Oomen, R.J.; Matthies, M.; Werger, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Crown structure and above-ground biomass investment was studied in relation to light interception of trees and lianas growing in a 6-month-old regenerating forest. Methods The vertical distribution of total above-ground biomass, height, diameter, stem density, leaf angles and cro

  18. Local above-ground persistence of vascular plants : Life-history trade-offs and environmental constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozinga, Wim A.; Hennekens, Stephan M.; Schaminee, Joop H. J.; Smits, Nina A. C.; Bekker, Renee M.; Roemermann, Christine; Klimes, Leos; Bakker, Jan P.; van Groenendael, Jan M.

    2007-01-01

    Questions: 1. Which plant traits and habitat characteristics best explain local above-ground persistence of vascular plant species and 2. Is there a trade-off between local above-ground persistence and the ability for seed dispersal and below-ground persistence in the soil seed bank? Locations: 845

  19. Local above-ground persistence of vascular plants: life-history trade-offs and environmental constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozinga, W.A.; Hennekens, S.M.; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Smits, N.A.C.; Bekker, R.M.; Römermann, C.; Bakker, J.P.; Groenendael, van J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Questions: 1. Which plant traits and habitat characteristics best explain local above-ground persistence of vascular plant species and 2. Is there a trade-off between local above-ground persistence and the ability for seed dispersal and below-ground persistence in the soil seed bank? Locations: 845

  20. A comparative analysis of selected parameters of roofing used in the Polish construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radziszewska-Zielina Elżbieta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Roofing is an important element in the construction of the roof. It is also one of the essential elements of the whole building. The choice of roofing should depend on technical parameters that affect the quality of the materials used and the price. The present paper is a comparative analysis of the properties of five roofing materials selected as examples with respect to twelve parameters. As can be seen from the comparative analysis of the roofing parameters, roofing tile is by far the best material, receiving the highest score in the ranking

  1. The Artistic Forms of Roof Moulds of Chinese Art Deco Style Residence%国内Art Deco风格住宅屋顶造型的艺术形式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昕楠; 陆影

    2015-01-01

    文章从影响Art Deco风格流变的几种思想着手,分析国内Art Deco风格住宅的屋顶造型演变过程,结合实例总结了3种常用的屋顶造型及其设计手法。%The evolution process of the roof shapes of domestic Art Deco residence is analysed by starting from several thoughts, which inlfuenced Art Deco. Combining with examples, three kinds of roof modeling are commonly used. And how to design these kinds of roof is analysed in the article.

  2. Roof heat loss detection using airborne thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Bauer, C.; Sulzer, W.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Austrian and European attempt to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, thermal rehabilitation and the improvement of the energy efficiency of buildings became an important topic in research as well as in building construction and refurbishment. Today, in-situ thermal infrared measurements are routinely used to determine energy loss through the building envelope. However, in-situ thermal surveys are expensive and time consuming, and in many cases the detection of the amount and location of waste heat leaving building through roofs is not possible with ground-based observations. For some years now, a new generation of high-resolution thermal infrared sensors makes it possible to survey heat-loss through roofs at a high level of detail and accuracy. However, to date, comparable studies have mainly been conducted on buildings with uniform roof covering and provided two-dimensional, qualitative information. This pilot study aims to survey the heat-loss through roofs of the buildings of the University of Graz (Austria) campus by using high-resolution airborne thermal infrared imagery (TABI 1800 - Thermal Airborne Broadband imager). TABI-1800 acquires data in a spectral range from 3.7 - 4.8 micron, a thermal resolution of 0.05 °C and a spatial resolution of 0.6 m. The remote sensing data is calibrated to different roof coverings (e.g. clay shingle, asphalt shingle, tin roof, glass) and combined with a roof surface model to determine the amount of waste heat leaving the building and to identify hot spots. The additional integration of information about the conditions underneath the roofs into the study allows a more detailed analysis of the upward heat flux and is a significant improvement of existing methods. The resulting data set provides useful information to the university facility service for infrastructure maintenance, especially in terms of attic and roof insulation improvements. Beyond that, the project is supposed to raise public

  3. Integrated Modelling and Performance Analysis of Green Roof Technologies in Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Mijic, Ana; Maksimovic, Cedo

    2014-05-01

    As a result of the changing global climate and increase in urbanisation, the behaviour of the urban environment has been significantly altered, causing an increase in both the frequency of extreme weather events, such as flooding and drought, and also the associated costs. Moreover, uncontrolled or inadequately planned urbanisation can exacerbate the damage. The Blue-Green Dream (BGD) project therefore develops a series of components for urban areas that link urban vegetated areas (green infrastructure) with existing urban water (blue) systems, which will enhance the synergy of urban blue and green systems and provide effective, multifunctional BGD solutions to support urban adaptation to future climatic changes. Coupled with new urban water management technologies and engineering, multifunctional benefits can be gained. Some of the technologies associated with BGD solutions include green roofs, swales that might deal with runoff more effectively and urban river restoration that can produce benefits similar to those produced from sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS). For effective implementation of these technologies, however, appropriate tools and methodologies for designing and modelling BGD solutions are required to be embedded within urban drainage models. Although several software packages are available for modelling urban drainage, the way in which green roofs and other BGD solutions are integrated into these models is not yet fully developed and documented. This study develops a physically based mass and energy balance model to monitor, test and quantitatively evaluate green roof technology for integrated BGD solutions. The assessment of environmental benefits will be limited to three aspects: (1) reduction of the total runoff volume, (2) delay in the initiation of runoff, and (3) reduction of building energy consumption, rather than water quality, visual, social or economic impacts. This physically based model represents water and heat dynamics in a

  4. The hydrological performance of a green roof test bed under UK climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovin, Virginia; Vesuviano, Gianni; Kasmin, Hartini

    2012-01-01

    . Through a detailed examination of data from three contrasting events, it is argued that the inter-event processes are too complex to be captured by this type of modelling approach. Instead, an understanding of the hydrological processes affecting the flux of moisture into and out of the substrate is required to explain the observed runoff response. Locally-derived evapotranspiration rates and the roof's observed maximum retention capacity are utilised to provide pragmatic guidance on the retention performance to be expected in response to selected design events.

  5. Relationships at the aboveground-belowground interface: plants, soil biota and soil processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porazinska, D.L.; Bardgett, R.D.; Postma-Blaauw, M.B.; Hunt, H.W.; Parsons, A.N.; Seastedt, T.R.; Wall, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interactions at the aboveground-below ground interface provide important feedbacks that regulate ecosystem processes. Organisms within soil food webs are involved in processes of decomposition and nutrient mineralization, and their abundance and activity have been linked to plant ecophysiological tr

  6. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure and associated represented hazardous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Technical Basis Document is to determine the consequences and FR-equency of aboveground structure failures. These failures include drops of contained equipment, such as a pump, FR-om a SST or DST, a crane failure resulting in a load drop onto a HEPA filter. These failures can result in an uncontrolled release of radiological and toxicological material

  7. Nondestructive estimates of above-ground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, K.; Newnham, G.; Burt, A.; Murphy, S.; Raumonen, P.; Herold, M.; Culvenor, D.; Avitabile, V.; Disney, M.; Armston, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Allometric equations are currently used to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) based on the indirect relationship with tree parameters. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can measure the canopy structure in 3D with high detail. In this study, we develop an approach to estimate AGB from TLS data, which

  8. Estimation of Aboveground Biomass Using Manual Stereo Viewing of Digital Aerial Photographs in Tropical Seasonal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuto Shimizu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to: (1 evaluate accuracy of tree height measurements of manual stereo viewing on a computer display using digital aerial photographs compared with airborne LiDAR height measurements; and (2 develop an empirical model to estimate stand-level aboveground biomass with variables derived from manual stereo viewing on the computer display in a Cambodian tropical seasonal forest. We evaluate observation error of tree height measured from the manual stereo viewing, based on field measurements. RMSEs of tree height measurement with manual stereo viewing and LiDAR were 1.96 m and 1.72 m, respectively. Then, stand-level aboveground biomass is regressed against tree height indices derived from the manual stereo viewing. We determined the best model to estimate aboveground biomass in terms of the Akaike’s information criterion. This was a model of mean tree height of the tallest five trees in each plot (R2 = 0.78; RMSE = 58.18 Mg/ha. In conclusion, manual stereo viewing on the computer display can measure tree height accurately and is useful to estimate aboveground stand biomass.

  9. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  10. Conventional tree height-diameter relationships significantly overestimate aboveground carbon stocks in the Central Congo Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kearsley, E.; Haulleville, de T.; Hufkens, K.; Kidimbu, A.; Toirambe, B.; Baert, G.; Huygens, D.; Kebede, Y.; Defourny, P.; Bogaert, J.; Beeckman, H.; Steppe, K.; Boeckx, P.; Verbeeck, H.

    2013-01-01

    Policies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation largely depend on accurate estimates of tropical forest carbon stocks. Here we present the first field-based carbon stock data for the Central Congo Basin in Yangambi, Democratic Republic of Congo. We find an average aboveground

  11. Putative linkages between below- and aboveground mutualisms during alien plant invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Traveset, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of the fundamental role of below-aboveground links in controlling ecosystem processes is mostly based on studies done with soil herbivores or mutualists and aboveground herbivores. Much less is known about the links between belowground and aboveground mutualisms, which have been studied separately for decades. It has not been until recently that these mutualisms-mycorrhizas and legume-rhizobia on one hand, and pollinators and seed dispersers on the other hand-have been found to influence each other, with potential ecological and evolutionary consequences. Here we review the mechanisms that may link these two-level mutualisms, mostly reported for native plant species, and make predictions about their relevance during alien plant invasions. We propose that alien plants establishing effective mutualisms with belowground microbes might improve their reproductive success through positive interactions between those mutualists and pollinators and seed dispersers. On the other hand, changes in the abundance and diversity of soil mutualists induced by invasion can also interfere with below-aboveground links for native plant species. We conclude that further research on this topic is needed in the field of invasion ecology as it can provide interesting clues on synergistic interactions and invasional meltdowns during alien plant invasions. PMID:26034049

  12. Root growth dynamics linked to aboveground growth in walnuts (Juglans regia L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Aims: Examination of belowground plant responses to canopy and soil moisture manipulation is scant compared to that aboveground but needed to understand whole plant responses to environmental factors. Plasticity in the seasonal timing and vertical distribution of root growth in respon...

  13. Modeling compatible single-tree aboveground biomass equations for masson pine (Pinus massoniana) in southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Wei-sheng; TANG Shou-zheng

    2012-01-01

    Because of global climate change,it is necessary to add forest biomass estimation to national forest resource monitoring.The biomass equations developed for forest biomass estimation should be compatible with volume equations.Based on the tree volume and aboveground biomass data of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) in southern China,we constructed one-,two-and three-variable aboveground biomass equations and biomass conversion functions compatible with tree volume equations by using error-in-variable simultaneous equations.The prediction precision of aboveground biomass estimates from one variable equation exceeded 95%.The regressions of aboveground biomass equations were improved slightly when tree height and crown width were used together with diameter on breast height,although the contributions to regressions were statistically insignificant.For the biomass conversion function on one variable,the conversion factor decreased with increasing diameter,but for the conversion function on two variables,the conversion factor increased with increasing diameter but decreased with increasing tree height.

  14. Allometric equations for aboveground and belowground biomass estimations in an evergreen forest in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nam, Vu Thanh; Kuijk, Van Marijke; Anten, Niels P.R.

    2016-01-01

    Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations fo

  15. Aboveground Biomass Production of Rhizophora apiculata Blume in Sarawak Mangrove Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Mangrove forests are found in tropical and subtropical coastal tidal regions. Rhizophora apiculata Blume is one of the most important species in mangrove forest. It is also one of the commercial mangrove timber species in Asia-Pacific region which dominates large areas of mangrove in this region. In order to understand forest ecosystem characteristics and to establish the proper management system, a precise estimation of biomass is necessary. The objective of this study is to quantify the aboveground biomass production and stem volume of R. apiculata in Awat-Awat mangrove forest, Sarawak. Approach: Seven representative trees were used in this study for sampling from February 2011 to March 2011. Allometric relationships were examined using either independent variable Diameter (D or combination of quadratic of D and Height (D2H. Results: The best fit of allometric equations were developed from the combination of quadratic of D and H (y = 0.055×0.948, R2 = 0.98 which is more recommended to estimate biomass and stem volume of R. apiculata in Awat-Awat mangrove forest, Sarawak. Total aboveground biomass and stem volume of R. apiculata were 116.79 t h-1 and 65.55 m3 h-1, respectively. Conclusion: Aboveground biomass and stem volume is closely related with tree diameter and height which indicates that aboveground biomass and stem volume will increase with increasing diameter and height of R. apiculata.

  16. Grass allometry and estimation of above-ground biomass in tropical alpine tussock grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Eynden, van der M.; Malhi, Y.; Cahuana, N.; Menor, C.; Zamora, F.; Haugaasen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The puna/páramo grasslands span across the highest altitudes of the tropical Andes, and their ecosystem dynamics are still poorly understood. In this study we examined the above-ground biomass and developed species specific and multispecies power-law allometric equations for four tussock grass speci

  17. Capabilities and limitations of Landsat and land cover data for aboveground woody biomass estimation of Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avitabile, V.; Baccini, A.; Friedl, M.A.; Schmullius, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aboveground woody biomass for circa-2000 is mapped at national scale in Uganda at 30-m spatial resolution on the basis of Landsat ETM + images, a National land cover dataset and field data using an object-oriented approach. A regression tree-based model (Random Forest) produces good results (cross-v

  18. Above-ground biomass of mangrove species. I. Analysis of models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mário Luiz Gomes; Schaeffer-Novelli, Yara

    2005-10-01

    This study analyzes the above-ground biomass of Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa located in the mangroves of Bertioga (SP) and Guaratiba (RJ), Southeast Brazil. Its purpose is to determine the best regression model to estimate the total above-ground biomass and compartment (leaves, reproductive parts, twigs, branches, trunk and prop roots) biomass, indirectly. To do this, we used structural measurements such as height, diameter at breast-height (DBH), and crown area. A combination of regression types with several compositions of independent variables generated 2.272 models that were later tested. Subsequent analysis of the models indicated that the biomass of reproductive parts, branches, and prop roots yielded great variability, probably because of environmental factors and seasonality (in the case of reproductive parts). It also indicated the superiority of multiple regression to estimate above-ground biomass as it allows researchers to consider several aspects that affect above-ground biomass, specially the influence of environmental factors. This fact has been attested to the models that estimated the biomass of crown compartments.

  19. Standing crop and aboveground biomass partitioning of a dwarf mangrove forest in Taylor River Slough, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado-Molina, C.; Day, J.W.; Reyes, E.; Perez, B.C.

    2004-01-01

    The structure and standing crop biomass of a dwarf mangrove forest, located in the salinity transition zone ofTaylor River Slough in the Everglades National Park, were studied. Although the four mangrove species reported for Florida occurred at the study site, dwarf Rhizophora mangle trees dominated the forest. The structural characteristics of the mangrove forest were relatively simple: tree height varied from 0.9 to 1.2 meters, and tree density ranged from 7062 to 23 778 stems haa??1. An allometric relationship was developed to estimate leaf, branch, prop root, and total aboveground biomass of dwarf Rhizophora mangle trees. Total aboveground biomass and their components were best estimated as a power function of the crown area times number of prop roots as an independent variable (Y = B ?? Xa??0.5083). The allometric equation for each tree component was highly significant (pRhizophora mangle contributed 85% of total standing crop biomass. Conocarpus erectus, Laguncularia racemosa, and Avicennia germinans contributed the remaining biomass. Average aboveground biomass allocation was 69% for prop roots, 25% for stem and branches, and 6% for leaves. This aboveground biomass partitioning pattern, which gives a major role to prop roots that have the potential to produce an extensive root system, may be an important biological strategy in response to low phosphorus availability and relatively reduced soils that characterize mangrove forests in South Florida.

  20. A New Kind of Roof Greening System in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    With the wider use of green roofs, new technology and new materials are being applied to the field of building roof greening forbuildings. This paper introduces BRGS (built- up roof greening system), a new type of roof greening system that differs from roofgreening systems currently used in China in that it integrates a main and an auxiliary water storage capacity into the roof greeningsystem. Compared to other systems currently in use, BRGS offers a simpler, quicker, less labor intensive construction process;lighter floor load; and lower long term maintenance requirements and costs. It also makes full use of rainwater and snowmelt,which provides a significant amount of water to plants. This paper also introduces a planting experiment, the results of whichindicate that plants during their early stages of growth tolerate an alkaline environment, and that after a period of time, the pHvalue level of water stored in BRGS approaches 8.3, so we can conclude that BRGS is suitable for construction engineering.

  1. Thermal Performance of Building Roof with Infrared Reflective Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hui; TAN Hong-wei; KATSUO MIKI; LIU Xiao-yu

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the applicability and effects of infrared reflective coating on energy con-sumption of factory building in hot summer and warm winter zone. It first resorted to theoretical calculation, which demonstrated the beneficial effects of infrared reflective coating on reducing building energy consumption. Then it analyzed a field measurement done on two identical rooms respectively with ordinary coated roof and in-frared reflective coated roof from November 2006 to October 2007, on a 24h basis. The measured data include exterior and interior roof surface temperature, indoor air temperature, and indoor globe temperature. The relat-ed weather data is from a weather station near the measured area. The continuous measurement has been accom-plished in southern China, and the measured data indicate that roof surface temperature and heat gain are signifi-cantly decreased in summer while slight negative effects in winter are induced by adopting infrared reflective coating. Thus it is simple and applicable to reduce building energy consumption in this area by applying infrared reflective coating. Regress equation between reduced roof thermal property, such as surface temperature and heat gain, and reduction in absorbed solar radiation shows their highly linear relationship. Based on the mea-sured data, it is estimated that the reduced power consumption is 3.45 kWh/m2·month in June.

  2. A pilot study to evaluate runoff quantity from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, Min Jung; Han, Mooyoung

    2015-04-01

    The use of green roofs is gaining increased recognition in many countries as a solution that can be used to improve environmental quality and reduce runoff quantity. To achieve these goals, pilot-scale green roof assemblies have been constructed and operated in an urban setting. From a stormwater management perspective, green roofs are 42.8-60.8% effective in reducing runoff for 200 mm soil depth and 13.8-34.4% effective in reducing runoff for 150 mm soil depth. By using Spearman rank correlation analysis, high rainfall intensity was shown to have a negative relationship with delayed occurrence time, demonstrating that the soil media in green roofs do not efficiently retain rainwater. Increasing the number of antecedent dry days can help to improve water retention capacity and delay occurrence time. From the viewpoint of runoff water quality, green roofs are regarded as the best management practice by filtration and adsorption through growth media (soil). PMID:25666437

  3. Effect of Composite Action on the Strength of Wood Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Campos Varela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet current building codes. Rather than requiring expensive structural retrofits, we desire to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong if the effect of composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction is considered. In a series of laboratory experiments using a limited number of two-by-four wood joists with and without sheathing panels, conventionally sheathed stud-grade joists, surprisingly, exhibited between 18% and 63% higher nominal strength than similar bare joists. To explain this strength increase, a simple model was developed to predict the strengths of the nailed partially composite sections, but the model only justifies a 1.4% to 3.8% increase in bending strength of joists with an allowable bending strength of 1000 psi. More testing is indicated to resolve this discrepancy between laboratory results and analytical modeling results. In addition to elucidating nonlinear partial composite behavior of existing roof systems, this paper shows that, with minor changes in roof framing practices, strength increases of 70% or more are achievable, compared to the strengths of conventionally sheathed joists.

  4. 屋顶农场的意义及实践--以上海“天空菜园”系列为例%Research on the Significance and Practice of Roof Farm Taking Shanghai's "V-roof Rooftop Vegetable Garden" as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱胜萱; 高宁

    2013-01-01

      The roof is the negative space in Chinese city. The roof farm is a positive utilization of the roof space with economic, ecological and social benefits. Taking the"V-roof Rooftop Vegetable Garden" in Shanghai as an example, this paper introduces and analyses the spatial design, applicable technology and operation pattern of the roof farm. The authors found out that the roof farm is spatial y and technical y feasible, and the relevant urban management system is urgently needed during the operation process.%  屋顶是我国城市中的消极空间。屋顶农场是对建筑屋顶的一种积极利用方式,并具有经济效益、生态效益和社会效益。以上海“天空菜园”系列项目为研究对象,分别对屋顶农场的空间设计、适用技术以及运作模式进行介绍和分析:屋顶农场在空间及技术上是可行的,在运作过程中则急需城市管理制度的正面响应和引导。

  5. Understanding green roof spatial dynamics: results from a scale based hydrologic study and introduction of a low-cost method for wide-range monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimdavar, Raha; Culligan, Patricia J.; Guido, Aida

    2014-05-01

    Green roofs have the potential, if implemented on a wide scale and with proper foresight, to become an important supplement to traditional urban water management infrastructure, while also helping to change the face of cities from concrete draped, highly modified environments, to hybrid places where nature is more closely integrated into designs rather than pushed out of them. The ability of these systems to act as a decentralized rainwater handling network has been the topic of many recent studies. While these studies have attempted to quantify the hydrologic performance of green roofs, it's clear that they are dynamic systems whose responses are difficult to generalize. What also seems to be lacking from many studies is a discussion on the effects of green roof scale, spatial planning and configuration. This research aims to understand how rainfall characteristics and green roof scale impact its hydrologic performance. Three extensive green roof systems in New York City, with the same engineered components, age and regional climatic conditions, but different drainage areas, are analyzed. We find that rainfall volume and event duration are two of the parameters that most affect green roof performance, while rainfall intensity and antecedent dry weather period are less significant. We also find that green roof scale does in fact affect hydrologic performance, but mainly in reducing runoff peaks, with rainfall retention and lag time being much less affected by drainage area. We also introduce a low-cost monitoring method, termed the Soil Water Apportioning (SWA) method, which uses a water balance approach to analytically link precipitation to substrate moisture, and enable inference of green runoff and evapotranspiration from information on substrate moisture changes over time. Twelve months of in situ rainfall and soil moisture observations from three different green roof systems - extensive vegetated mat, semi-intensive vegetated mat, and semi-intensive tray - are

  6. Tank design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that aboveground tanks can be designed with innovative changes to complement the environment. Tanks can be constructed to eliminate the vapor and odor emanating from their contents. Aboveground tanks are sometimes considered eyesores, and in some areas the landscaping has to be improved before they are tolerated. A more universal concern, however, is the vapor or odor that emanates from the tanks as a result of the materials being sorted. The assertive posture some segments of the public now take may eventually force legislatures to classify certain vapors as hazardous pollutants or simply health risks. In any case, responsibility will be leveled at the corporation and subsequent remedy could increase cost beyond preventive measures. The new approach to design and construction of aboveground tanks will forestall any panic which might be induced or perceived by environmentalists. Recently, actions by local authorities and complaining residents were sufficient to cause a corporation to curtail odorous emissions through a change in tank design. The tank design change eliminated the odor from fuel oil vapor thus removing the threat to the environment that the residents perceived. The design includes reinforcement to the tank structure and the addition of an adsorption section. This section allows the tanks to function without any limitation and their contents do not foul the environment. The vapor and odor control was completed successfully on 6,000,000 gallon capacity tanks

  7. Estimating above-ground carbon biomass in a newly restored coastal plain wetland using remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph B Riegel

    Full Text Available Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggrading vegetation. This study compared the abilities of discrete-return LiDAR and high resolution optical imagery to model above-ground carbon biomass at a young restored forested wetland site in eastern North Carolina. We found that the optical imagery model explained more of the observed variation in carbon biomass than the LiDAR model (adj-R(2 values of 0.34 and 0.18 respectively; root mean squared errors of 0.14 Mg C/ha and 0.17 Mg C/ha respectively. Optical imagery was also better able to predict high and low biomass extremes than the LiDAR model. Combining both the optical and LiDAR improved upon the optical model but only marginally (adj-R(2 of 0.37. These results suggest that the ability of discrete-return LiDAR to model above-ground biomass may be rather limited in areas with young, small trees and that high spatial resolution optical imagery may be the better tool in such areas.

  8. Improved allometric models to estimate the aboveground biomass of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Jérôme; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime; Búrquez, Alberto; Chidumayo, Emmanuel; Colgan, Matthew S; Delitti, Welington B C; Duque, Alvaro; Eid, Tron; Fearnside, Philip M; Goodman, Rosa C; Henry, Matieu; Martínez-Yrízar, Angelina; Mugasha, Wilson A; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Nelson, Bruce W; Ngomanda, Alfred; Nogueira, Euler M; Ortiz-Malavassi, Edgar; Pélissier, Raphaël; Ploton, Pierre; Ryan, Casey M; Saldarriaga, Juan G; Vieilledent, Ghislain

    2014-10-01

    Terrestrial carbon stock mapping is important for the successful implementation of climate change mitigation policies. Its accuracy depends on the availability of reliable allometric models to infer oven-dry aboveground biomass of trees from census data. The degree of uncertainty associated with previously published pantropical aboveground biomass allometries is large. We analyzed a global database of directly harvested trees at 58 sites, spanning a wide range of climatic conditions and vegetation types (4004 trees ≥ 5 cm trunk diameter). When trunk diameter, total tree height, and wood specific gravity were included in the aboveground biomass model as covariates, a single model was found to hold across tropical vegetation types, with no detectable effect of region or environmental factors. The mean percent bias and variance of this model was only slightly higher than that of locally fitted models. Wood specific gravity was an important predictor of aboveground biomass, especially when including a much broader range of vegetation types than previous studies. The generic tree diameter-height relationship depended linearly on a bioclimatic stress variable E, which compounds indices of temperature variability, precipitation variability, and drought intensity. For cases in which total tree height is unavailable for aboveground biomass estimation, a pantropical model incorporating wood density, trunk diameter, and the variable E outperformed previously published models without height. However, to minimize bias, the development of locally derived diameter-height relationships is advised whenever possible. Both new allometric models should contribute to improve the accuracy of biomass assessment protocols in tropical vegetation types, and to advancing our understanding of architectural and evolutionary constraints on woody plant development.

  9. Deer browsing delays succession by altering aboveground vegetation and belowground seed banks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio DiTommaso

    Full Text Available Soil seed bank composition is important to the recovery of natural and semi-natural areas from disturbance and serves as a safeguard against environmental catastrophe. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus populations have increased dramatically in eastern North America over the past century and can have strong impacts on aboveground vegetation, but their impacts on seed bank dynamics are less known. To document the long-term effects of deer browsing on plant successional dynamics, we studied the impacts of deer on both aboveground vegetation and seed bank composition in plant communities following agricultural abandonment. In 2005, we established six 15 × 15 m fenced enclosures and paired open plots in recently followed agricultural fields near Ithaca, NY, USA. In late October of each of six years (2005-2010, we collected soil from each plot and conducted seed germination cycles in a greenhouse to document seed bank composition. These data were compared to measurements of aboveground plant cover (2005-2008 and tree density (2005-2012. The impacts of deer browsing on aboveground vegetation were severe and immediate, resulting in significantly more bare soil, reduced plant biomass, reduced recruitment of woody species, and relatively fewer native species. These impacts persisted throughout the experiment. The impacts of browsing were even stronger on seed bank dynamics. Browsing resulted in significantly decreased overall species richness (but higher diversity, reduced seed bank abundance, relatively more short-lived species (annuals and biennials, and fewer native species. Both seed bank richness and the relative abundance of annuals/biennials were mirrored in the aboveground vegetation. Thus, deer browsing has long-term and potentially reinforcing impacts on secondary succession, slowing succession by selectively consuming native perennials and woody species and favoring the persistence of short-lived, introduced species that continually

  10. Deer browsing delays succession by altering aboveground vegetation and belowground seed banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTommaso, Antonio; Morris, Scott H; Parker, John D; Cone, Caitlin L; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-01-01

    Soil seed bank composition is important to the recovery of natural and semi-natural areas from disturbance and serves as a safeguard against environmental catastrophe. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations have increased dramatically in eastern North America over the past century and can have strong impacts on aboveground vegetation, but their impacts on seed bank dynamics are less known. To document the long-term effects of deer browsing on plant successional dynamics, we studied the impacts of deer on both aboveground vegetation and seed bank composition in plant communities following agricultural abandonment. In 2005, we established six 15 × 15 m fenced enclosures and paired open plots in recently followed agricultural fields near Ithaca, NY, USA. In late October of each of six years (2005-2010), we collected soil from each plot and conducted seed germination cycles in a greenhouse to document seed bank composition. These data were compared to measurements of aboveground plant cover (2005-2008) and tree density (2005-2012). The impacts of deer browsing on aboveground vegetation were severe and immediate, resulting in significantly more bare soil, reduced plant biomass, reduced recruitment of woody species, and relatively fewer native species. These impacts persisted throughout the experiment. The impacts of browsing were even stronger on seed bank dynamics. Browsing resulted in significantly decreased overall species richness (but higher diversity), reduced seed bank abundance, relatively more short-lived species (annuals and biennials), and fewer native species. Both seed bank richness and the relative abundance of annuals/biennials were mirrored in the aboveground vegetation. Thus, deer browsing has long-term and potentially reinforcing impacts on secondary succession, slowing succession by selectively consuming native perennials and woody species and favoring the persistence of short-lived, introduced species that continually recruit from an

  11. Plant functional traits predict green roof ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundholm, Jeremy; Tran, Stephanie; Gebert, Luke

    2015-02-17

    Plants make important contributions to the services provided by engineered ecosystems such as green roofs. Ecologists use plant species traits as generic predictors of geographical distribution, interactions with other species, and ecosystem functioning, but this approach has been little used to optimize engineered ecosystems. Four plant species traits (height, individual leaf area, specific leaf area, and leaf dry matter content) were evaluated as predictors of ecosystem properties and services in a modular green roof system planted with 21 species. Six indicators of ecosystem services, incorporating thermal, hydrological, water quality, and carbon sequestration functions, were predicted by the four plant traits directly or indirectly via their effects on aggregate ecosystem properties, including canopy density and albedo. Species average height and specific leaf area were the most useful traits, predicting several services via effects on canopy density or growth rate. This study demonstrates that easily measured plant traits can be used to select species to optimize green roof performance across multiple key services.

  12. Spare Roof Technique: A Middle Third New Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Miguel Gonçalves; Monteiro, Daniel; Reis, Claudia; Almeida e Sousa, Cecilia

    2016-02-01

    To our knowledge, the spare roof technique (SRT) is the first technique that is based on a complete skeletonization/preservation of the upper lateral cartilages. This technique is used to keep the natural roof of the nose's middle third, while dehumping and/or correcting the crooked septum. From January 2014 till March 2015, a total of 40 rhinoplasties were performed through the SRT: 28 reduction rhinoplasties, 6 complex crooked noses (with extracorporeal septoplasty), and 6 mixed cases. The SRT is an excellent middle third technique. The natural roof was kept and fitted the accurate new position in almost all cases with no surgical complexity. It is an easy technique with many applications and it is also very useful in the classical humpectomy of the Caucasian nose and correction of the crooked nose. PMID:26862972

  13. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleiman, Mohamad [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kirchstetter, Thomas W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Berdahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gilbert, Haley E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quelen, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Marlot, Lea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Preble, Chelsea V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Montalbano, Amandine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rosseler, Olivier [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Akbari, Hashem [Concordia Univ., Montreal (Canada); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Destaillats, Hugo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  14. The Application of “Symbolic Metaphor” Design Technique in Urban Disadvantaged Space Regeneration --The Design Analysis of The MOMA Roof Garden in New York%“符号隐喻”设计手法在城市弱势空间再生中的应用1--纽约现代艺术馆屋顶花园设计解析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周林

    2015-01-01

    现代城市语境中弱势空间再生的形式语言受到多种因素的制约,是一个多学科聚焦的热点问题。纽约现代艺术博物馆屋顶花园设计由于其丰富的符号学语义特征,成为解析城市弱势空间再生设计手法的一个有益视角。本文透过符号学视角,梳理了“符号隐喻”手法的脉络渊源。通过解析符号语义与功能意义之间的语义关联,明确了知觉组织、语义冲突和象征联系作为“符号隐喻”设计手法的基本原则和方法。研究结论对于寻求符号学途径重新塑造城市活力具有借鉴意义。%In the context of modern city, the regenerative formal language in disadvantageous space is subject to the restriction of various factors, thus it is a multi-disciplinary hot issue. Roof garden design of the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) has become a beneifcial perspective to analyze the regeneration design methods of urban disadvantageous space due to its rich semantic features. This paper organizes the origins and development of “symbolic metaphor” from the perspective if semiotics, and clariifes the basic principles and methods of perceptual organization, semantic conlficts and symbolic connection as the“symbolic metaphor” design method through the semantic connection between symbolic semantics and functional meaning. The research conclusion has some reference signiifcance to recreate the urban vitality through semiology.

  15. Field Testing Unvented Roofs with Asphalt Shingles in Cold and Hot-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Kohta [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, Joseph W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Test houses with unvented roof assemblies were built to measure long-term moisture performance, in the Chicago area (5A) and the Houston area (2A). The Chicago-area test bed had seven experimental rafter bays, including a control vented compact roof, and six unvented roof variants with cellulose or fiberglass insulation. The interior was run at 50% RH. The Houston-area roof was an unvented attic insulated with spray-applied fiberglass. Most ridges and hips were built with a diffusion vent detail, capped with vapor permeable roof membrane. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions at the roof peak in wintertime, but during the summer, RHs and MCs were higher than the unvented roof (albeit in the safe range).

  16. Extraction of Roof Lines from High-Resolution Images by a Grouping Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Poz, A. P.; Fernandes, V. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for extracting groups of straight lines that represent roof boundaries and roof ridgelines from highresolution aerial images using corresponding Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) roof polyhedrons as initial approximations. The proposed method is based on two main steps. First, straight lines that are candidates to represent roof ridgelines and roof boundaries of a building are extracted from the aerial image. Second, a group of straight lines that represent roof boundaries and roof ridgelines of a selected building is obtained through the optimization of a Markov Random Field (MRF)-based energy function using the genetic algorithm optimization method. The formulation of this energy function considers several attributes, such as the proximity of the extracted straight lines to the corresponding projected ALS-derived roof polyhedron and the rectangularity (extracted straight lines that intersect at nearly 90°). Experimental results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  17. Photovoltaic roofs in the city centre of Unterseen: photovoltaic roof integration in a protected old-city environment; PV Daecher Altstadt Unterseen: Photovoltaik Dachintegration in geschuetzter Altstadtumgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigler, F.

    2001-07-01

    Unterseen, Switzerland, a part of the city of Interlaken, located on the river Aare between the two lakes of Thun and Brienz, has a historical centre, which is marked by an old town house and other historical monuments. The integration of photovoltaic modules into the roof of a newly designed building in an old town, taking historical aspects into account, represented a special challenge in terms of a combination of modern technology and a traditional townscape. A clever module design and lot of convincing was necessary in order to have the photovoltaic project approved by the local townscape authority, the cantonal as well as the national preservation of historical monuments. The installed power is 6 kWp and the energy production so far meets the expected output. (author)

  18. Modelling of green roof hydrological performance for urban drainage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Luca; Mark, Ole; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten; Bergen Jensen, Marina; Binning, Philip John

    2014-11-01

    Green roofs are being widely implemented for stormwater management and their impact on the urban hydrological cycle can be evaluated by incorporating them into urban drainage models. This paper presents a model of green roof long term and single event hydrological performance. The model includes surface and subsurface storage components representing the overall retention capacity of the green roof which is continuously re-established by evapotranspiration. The runoff from the model is described through a non-linear reservoir approach. The model was calibrated and validated using measurement data from 3 different extensive sedum roofs in Denmark. These data consist of high-resolution measurements of runoff, precipitation and atmospheric variables in the period 2010-2012. The hydrological response of green roofs was quantified based on statistical analysis of the results of a 22-year (1989-2010) continuous simulation with Danish climate data. The results show that during single events, the 10 min runoff intensities were reduced by 10-36% for 5-10 years return period and 40-78% for 0.1-1 year return period; the runoff volumes were reduced by 2-5% for 5-10 years return period and 18-28% for 0.1-1 year return period. Annual runoff volumes were estimated to be 43-68% of the total precipitation. The peak time delay was found to greatly vary from 0 to more than 40 min depending on the type of event, and a general decrease in the time delay was observed for increasing rainfall intensities. Furthermore, the model was used to evaluate the variation of the average annual runoff from green roofs as a function of the total available storage and vegetation type. The results show that even a few millimeters of storage can reduce the mean annual runoff by up to 20% when compared to a traditional roof and that the mean annual runoff is not linearly related to the storage. Green roofs have therefore the potential to be important parts of future urban stormwater management plans.

  19. Siphonic roof drainage system analysis utilising unsteady flow theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, S.; Swaffield, J.A. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Building Engineering and Surveying

    2001-10-01

    Over the past three years a UK EPSRC research programme has been underway at Heriot-Watt University investigating siphonic roof rainwater systems. This text aims to report the principle findings of the project to date. A brief description of experimental and numerical aims is given. The priming procedure which occurs in an idealised system is documented. The test procedures employed are described, and experimental results are illustrated. The framework employed to numerically model the ambient hydraulics is described in some detail. Conclusions are drawn regarding the operational characteristics of siphonic roof rainwater systems as a whole. (author)

  20. Roof collapse of shallow tunnels with limit analysis method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-li; LONG Ze-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A new failure mechanism is proposed to analyze the roof collapse based on nonlinear failure criterion. Limit analysis approach and variational principle are used to obtain analytical findings concerning the stability of potential roof. Then, parametric study is carried out to derive the change rule of corresponding parameters on the influence of collapsing shape, which is of paramount engineering significance to instruct the tunnel excavations. In comparison with existing results, the findings show agreement and validity of the proposed method. The actual collapse in certain shallow tunnels is well in accordance with the proposed failure mechanism.