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Sample records for above-ground plant parts

  1. Effect of the density of transplants in reforestation on the morphological quality of the above-ground part of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. six years after planting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Houšková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of the above-ground part of European beech planted at different densities and spacing patterns for the purpose of artificial forest regeneration was monitored 3, 4 and 6 years after planting. The initial numbers of beech transplants were 5,000 pcs.ha−1, 10,000 pcs.ha−1, 15,000 pcs.ha−1 and 20,000 pcs.ha−1. The spacing pattern of transplants was either square or rectangular nearly in all variants: 1.4 × 1.4 m, 2 × 1 m, 1 × 1 m, 0.8 × 0.8 m, 1 ×0.65 m, 0.7 × 0.7 m and 1 × 0.5 m. Conclusions following out from the research are as follows: 1. neither the chosen density of transplants nor their spacing pattern had an essential influence on the after-planting loss or damage of trees; 2. through the planting of larger-diameter transplants it is possible to achieve canopy closure more rapidly as well as faster growth of the plantation; these beech plants keep the edge in growth and quality even 6 years after planting; 3. the higher is the beech plantation density, the less individuals occur in such a plantation with inappropriate stem form; 4. beech plants of the worst quality were found on plots with the lowest initial density of transplants (5,000 and 10,000 pcs.ha−1, yet the number of promising trees was sufficient even there. Thus, none of the experimental numbers of transplants per hectare or spacing arrangements of the European beech transplants can be claimed as inappropriate; however, further monitoring of the plots is necessary.

  2. Cadmium uptake in above-ground parts of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiwang; Pang, Yan; Ji, Puhui; Gao, Pengcheng; Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Tong, Yan'an

    2016-03-01

    Because of its high Cd uptake and translocation, lettuce is often used in Cd contamination studies. However, there is a lack of information on Cd accumulation in the above-ground parts of lettuce during the entire growing season. In this study, a field experiment was carried out in a Cd-contaminated area. Above-ground lettuce parts were sampled, and the Cd content was measured using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results showed that the Cd concentration in the above-ground parts of lettuce increased from 2.70 to 3.62mgkg(-1) during the seedling stage, but decreased from 3.62 to 2.40mgkg(-1) during organogenesis and from 2.40 to 1.64mgkg(-1) during bolting. The mean Cd concentration during the seedling stage was significantly higher than that during organogenesis (a=0.05) and bolting (a=0.01). The Cd accumulation in the above-ground parts of an individual lettuce plant could be described by a sigmoidal curve. Cadmium uptake during organogenesis was highest (80% of the total), whereas that during bolting was only 4.34%. This research further reveals that for Rome lettuce: (1) the highest Cd content of above-ground parts occurred at the end of the seedling phase; (2) the best harvest time with respect to Cd phytoaccumulation is at the end of the organogenesis stage; and (3) the organogenesis stage is the most suitable time to enhance phytoaccumulation efficiency by adjusting the root:shoot ratio. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Local above-ground persistence of vascular plants : Life-history trade-offs and environmental constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozinga, Wim A.; Hennekens, Stephan M.; Schaminee, Joop H. J.; Smits, Nina A. C.; Bekker, Renee M.; Roemermann, Christine; Klimes, Leos; Bakker, Jan P.; van Groenendael, Jan M.

    Questions: 1. Which plant traits and habitat characteristics best explain local above-ground persistence of vascular plant species and 2. Is there a trade-off between local above-ground persistence and the ability for seed dispersal and below-ground persistence in the soil seed bank? Locations: 845

  4. Local above-ground persistence of vascular plants: life-history trade-offs and environmental constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozinga, W.A.; Hennekens, S.M.; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Smits, N.A.C.; Bekker, R.M.; Römermann, C.; Bakker, J.P.; Groenendael, van J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Questions: 1. Which plant traits and habitat characteristics best explain local above-ground persistence of vascular plant species and 2. Is there a trade-off between local above-ground persistence and the ability for seed dispersal and below-ground persistence in the soil seed bank? Locations: 845

  5. Tundra plant above-ground biomass and shrub dominance mapped across the North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Logan T.; Jantz, Patrick; Tape, Ken D.; Goetz, Scott J.

    2018-03-01

    Arctic tundra is becoming greener and shrubbier due to recent warming. This is impacting climate feedbacks and wildlife, yet the spatial distribution of plant biomass in tundra ecosystems is uncertain. In this study, we mapped plant and shrub above-ground biomass (AGB; kg m-2) and shrub dominance (%; shrub AGB/plant AGB) across the North Slope of Alaska by linking biomass harvests at 28 field sites with 30 m resolution Landsat satellite imagery. We first developed regression models (p accounting for ~43% of regional plant AGB. The new maps capture landscape variation in plant AGB visible in high resolution satellite and aerial imagery, notably shrubby riparian corridors. Modeled shrub AGB was strongly correlated with field measurements of shrub canopy height at 25 sites (rs  = 0.88) and with a regional map of shrub cover (rs  = 0.76). Modeled plant AGB and shrub dominance were higher in shrub tundra than graminoid tundra and increased between areas with the coldest and warmest summer air temperatures, underscoring the fact that future warming has the potential to greatly increase plant AGB and shrub dominance in this region. These new biomass maps provide a unique source of ecological information for a region undergoing rapid environmental change.

  6. Fungal endophytes in above-ground tissues of desert plants: infrequent in culture, but highly diverse and distinctive symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, Nicholas C.; Nandi Devan, MM; Arendt, Kayla R.; Wilch, Margaret H.; Riddle, Jakob M.; Furr, Susan H.; Steen, Cole; U'Ren, Jana M.; Sandberg, Dustin C.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In hot deserts, plants cope with aridity, high temperatures, and nutrient-poor soils with morphological and biochemical adaptations that encompass intimate microbial symbioses. Whereas the root microbiomes of arid-land plants have received increasing attention, factors influencing assemblages of symbionts in above-ground tissues have not been evaluated for many woody plants that flourish in desert environments. We evaluated the diversity, host affiliations, and distributions of endophytic fungi associated with photosynthetic tissues of desert trees and shrubs, focusing on non-succulent woody plants in the species-rich Sonoran Desert. To inform our strength of inference, we evaluated the effects of two different nutrient media, incubation temperatures, and collection seasons on the apparent structure of endophyte assemblages. Analysis of >22,000 tissue segments revealed that endophytes were isolated four times more frequently from photosynthetic stems than leaves. Isolation frequency was lower than expected given the latitude of the study region, and varied among species a function of sampling site and abiotic factors. However, endophytes were very species-rich and phylogenetically diverse, consistent with less-arid sites of a similar latitudinal position. Community composition differed among host species, but not as a function of tissue type, sampling site, sampling month, or exposure. Estimates of abundance, diversity and composition were not influenced by isolation medium or incubation temperature. Phylogenetic analyses of the most commonly isolated genus (Preussia) revealed multiple evolutionary origins of desert-plant endophytism and little phylogenetic structure with regard to seasonality, tissue preference, or optimal temperatures and nutrients for growth in vitro. Together, these results provide insight into endophytic symbioses in desert plant communities, and can be used to optimize strategies for capturing endophyte biodiversity at regional scales. PMID

  7. The role of above-ground competition and nitrogen vs. phosphorus enrichment in seedling survival of common European plant species of semi-natural grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Ceulemans

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities have severely altered fluxes of nitrogen and phosphorus in ecosystems worldwide. In grasslands, subsequent negative effects are commonly attributed to competitive exclusion of plant species following increased above-ground biomass production. However, some studies have shown that this does not fully account for nutrient enrichment effects, questioning whether lowering competition by reducing grassland productivity through mowing or herbivory can mitigate the environmental impact of nutrient pollution. Furthermore, few studies so far discriminate between nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. We performed a full factorial experiment in greenhouse mesocosms combining nitrogen and phosphorus addition with two clipping regimes designed to relax above-ground competition. Next, we studied the survival and growth of seedlings of eight common European grassland species and found that five out of eight species showed higher survival under the clipping regime with the lowest above-ground competition. Phosphorus addition negatively affected seven plant species and nitrogen addition negatively affected four plant species. Importantly, the negative effects of nutrient addition and higher above-ground competition were independent of each other for all but one species. Our results suggest that at any given level of soil nutrients, relaxation of above-ground competition allows for higher seedling survival in grasslands. At the same time, even at low levels of above-ground competition, nutrient enrichment negatively affects survival as compared to nutrient-poor conditions. Therefore, although maintaining low above-ground competition appears essential for species' recruitment, for instance through mowing or herbivory, these management efforts are likely to be insufficient and we conclude that environmental policies aimed to reduce both excess nitrogen and particularly phosphorus inputs are also necessary.

  8. High Throughput Determination of Plant Height, Ground Cover, and Above-Ground Biomass in Wheat with LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Jimenez-Berni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Crop improvement efforts are targeting increased above-ground biomass and radiation-use efficiency as drivers for greater yield. Early ground cover and canopy height contribute to biomass production, but manual measurements of these traits, and in particular above-ground biomass, are slow and labor-intensive, more so when made at multiple developmental stages. These constraints limit the ability to capture these data in a temporal fashion, hampering insights that could be gained from multi-dimensional data. Here we demonstrate the capacity of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR, mounted on a lightweight, mobile, ground-based platform, for rapid multi-temporal and non-destructive estimation of canopy height, ground cover and above-ground biomass. Field validation of LiDAR measurements is presented. For canopy height, strong relationships with LiDAR (r2 of 0.99 and root mean square error of 0.017 m were obtained. Ground cover was estimated from LiDAR using two methodologies: red reflectance image and canopy height. In contrast to NDVI, LiDAR was not affected by saturation at high ground cover, and the comparison of both LiDAR methodologies showed strong association (r2 = 0.92 and slope = 1.02 at ground cover above 0.8. For above-ground biomass, a dedicated field experiment was performed with destructive biomass sampled eight times across different developmental stages. Two methodologies are presented for the estimation of biomass from LiDAR: 3D voxel index (3DVI and 3D profile index (3DPI. The parameters involved in the calculation of 3DVI and 3DPI were optimized for each sample event from tillering to maturity, as well as generalized for any developmental stage. Individual sample point predictions were strong while predictions across all eight sample events, provided the strongest association with biomass (r2 = 0.93 and r2 = 0.92 for 3DPI and 3DVI, respectively. Given these results, we believe that application of this system will provide new

  9. High Throughput Determination of Plant Height, Ground Cover, and Above-Ground Biomass in Wheat with LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Berni, Jose A; Deery, David M; Rozas-Larraondo, Pablo; Condon, Anthony Tony G; Rebetzke, Greg J; James, Richard A; Bovill, William D; Furbank, Robert T; Sirault, Xavier R R

    2018-01-01

    Crop improvement efforts are targeting increased above-ground biomass and radiation-use efficiency as drivers for greater yield. Early ground cover and canopy height contribute to biomass production, but manual measurements of these traits, and in particular above-ground biomass, are slow and labor-intensive, more so when made at multiple developmental stages. These constraints limit the ability to capture these data in a temporal fashion, hampering insights that could be gained from multi-dimensional data. Here we demonstrate the capacity of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), mounted on a lightweight, mobile, ground-based platform, for rapid multi-temporal and non-destructive estimation of canopy height, ground cover and above-ground biomass. Field validation of LiDAR measurements is presented. For canopy height, strong relationships with LiDAR ( r 2 of 0.99 and root mean square error of 0.017 m) were obtained. Ground cover was estimated from LiDAR using two methodologies: red reflectance image and canopy height. In contrast to NDVI, LiDAR was not affected by saturation at high ground cover, and the comparison of both LiDAR methodologies showed strong association ( r 2 = 0.92 and slope = 1.02) at ground cover above 0.8. For above-ground biomass, a dedicated field experiment was performed with destructive biomass sampled eight times across different developmental stages. Two methodologies are presented for the estimation of biomass from LiDAR: 3D voxel index (3DVI) and 3D profile index (3DPI). The parameters involved in the calculation of 3DVI and 3DPI were optimized for each sample event from tillering to maturity, as well as generalized for any developmental stage. Individual sample point predictions were strong while predictions across all eight sample events, provided the strongest association with biomass ( r 2 = 0.93 and r 2 = 0.92) for 3DPI and 3DVI, respectively. Given these results, we believe that application of this system will provide new

  10. Plants as green as phones: Novel insights into plant-mediated communication between below- and above-ground insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soler Gamborena, R.; Harvey, J.A.; Bezemer, T.M.; Stuefer, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    can act as vertical communication channels or ‘green phones’ linking soil-dwelling insects and insects in the aboveground ecosystem. When root-feeding insects attack a plant, the direct defense system of the shoot is activated, leading to an accumulation of phytotoxins in the leaves. The protection

  11. Qualitative and quantitative modifications of root mitochondria during senescence of above-ground parts of Arabidopis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanello, Diego Darío; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Guiamet, Juan José

    2017-05-01

    This work studied modifications experienced by root mitochondria during whole plant senescence or under light deprivation, using Arabidopsis thaliana plants with YFP tagged to mitochondria. During post-bolting development, root respiratory activity started to decline after aboveground organs (i.e., rosette leaves) had senesced. This suggests that carbohydrate starvation may induce root senescence. Similarly, darkening the whole plant induced a decrease in respiration of roots. This was partially due to a decrease in the number of total mitochondria (YFP-labelled mitochondria) and most probably to a decrease in the quantity of mitochondria with a developed inner membrane potential (ΔΨm, i.e., Mitotracker red- labelled mitochondria). Also, the lower amount of mitochondria with ΔΨm compared to YFP-labelled mitochondria at 10d of whole darkened plant, suggests the presence of mitochondria in a "standby state". The experiments also suggest that small mitochondria made the main contribution to the respiratory activity that was lost during root senescence. Sugar supplementation partially restored the respiration of mitochondria after 10d of whole plant dark treatment. These results suggest that root senescence is triggered by carbohydrate starvation, with loss of ΔΨm mitochondria and changes in mitochondrial size distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Above ground perennial plant biomass across an altitudinal and land-use gradient in Namaqualand, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anderson, PML

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available ground perennial plant biomas gradient in Namaqualand P.M.L. Anderson a,�, M.T a Plant Conservation Unit, Department of Botany, Universit b Natural Resources and the Environment, CSIR Received 9 June 2009; received in revised for can frequently...

  13. [Distribution of 137Cs, 90Sr and their chemical analogues in the components of an above-ground part of a pine in a quasi-equilibrium condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamikhin, S V; Manakhov, D V; Shcheglov, A I

    2014-01-01

    The additional study of the distribution of radioactive isotopes of caesium and strontium and their chemical analogues in the above-ground components of pine in the remote from the accident period was carried out. The results of the research confirmed the existence of analogy in the distribution of these elements on the components of this type of wood vegetation in the quasi-equilibrium (relatively radionuclides) condition. Also shown is the selective possibility of using the data on the ash content of the components of forest stands of pine and oak as an information analogue.

  14. Application of bounding spectra to seismic design of piping based on the performance of above ground piping in power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This report extends the potential application of Bounding Spectra evaluation procedures, developed as part of the A-46 Unresolved Safety Issue applicable to seismic verification of in-situ electrical and mechanical equipment, to in-situ safety related piping in nuclear power plants. The report presents a summary of earthquake experience data which define the behavior of typical U.S. power plant piping subject to strong motion earthquakes. The report defines those piping system caveats which would assure the seismic adequacy of the piping systems which meet those caveats and whose seismic demand are within the bounding spectra input. Based on the observed behavior of piping in strong motion earthquakes, the report describes the capabilities of the piping system to carry seismic loads as a function of the type of connection (i.e. threaded versus welded). This report also discusses in some detail the basic causes and mechanisms for earthquake damages and failures to power plant piping systems.

  15. Application of bounding spectra to seismic design of piping based on the performance of above ground piping in power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1995-02-01

    This report extends the potential application of Bounding Spectra evaluation procedures, developed as part of the A-46 Unresolved Safety Issue applicable to seismic verification of in-situ electrical and mechanical equipment, to in-situ safety related piping in nuclear power plants. The report presents a summary of earthquake experience data which define the behavior of typical U.S. power plant piping subject to strong motion earthquakes. The report defines those piping system caveats which would assure the seismic adequacy of the piping systems which meet those caveats and whose seismic demand are within the bounding spectra input. Based on the observed behavior of piping in strong motion earthquakes, the report describes the capabilities of the piping system to carry seismic loads as a function of the type of connection (i.e. threaded versus welded). This report also discusses in some detail the basic causes and mechanisms for earthquake damages and failures to power plant piping systems

  16. Fungi colonising the above-ground parts of fodder galega (Galega orientalis Lam. cultivated in pure sowing and mixed with smooth brome-grass (Bromus inermis Leyss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Cwalina-Ambroziak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were carried out in 1999-2001 in the experimental field in Knopin near Dobre Miasto to determine the intensity of fodder galega diseases cultivated in pure sowing and mixed with smooth brome-grass (the Hillstrand and Auld' s modified scale, 1982. The fungi colonising the phyllosphere of fodder galega were analysed in a laboratory (Chruoeciak , 1974. The following symptoms were observed in fodder galega: ascochyta blight (Ascochyta sp., gray mould (Botrytis cinerea and plant wilting (Fusarium oxysporum.. The climatic conditions had an effect on the development of diseases. The greatest intensity of gray mould (Ii = 24.3% and plant wilting (17.9% of plants with the disease symptoms were observed in 2001. Ascochyta blight occurred with the lowest intensity and the highest infection index in 1999 in the cultivation of fodder galega mixed with smooth brome-grass was only 12.1%. The type of cultivation also modified fodder galega disease intensity. Gray mould and plant wilting developed better in pure sowing than in mixed sowing with smooth brome-grass. Throughout the entire experiment period the average infection index was 22.8% and 15.9% of plants with the wilt symptoms. Ascochyta blight found better conditions for development in plants cultivated in a mix with smooth brome-grass (average infection index - 10.0%. The fodder galega phyllosphere provided 4149 fungal isolates represented by 17 species and yeast-like fungi. Yeast-like fungi dominated (75.6% of the total isolates. The following species were less numerous: Botrytis cinerea, Humicola brevis, Acremonium strictum and Cladosporium cladosporioides. From the leaves of fodder galega cultivated in pure sowing, 3.8% more fungi were obtained than from the leaves of plants cultivated with a mix of smooth brome-grass, including more frequently isolated pathogenic fungi representing the genera of Fusarium and the species of Botrytis cinerea.

  17. Refuse dumps from leaf-cutting ant nests reduce the intensity of above-ground competition among neighboring plants in a Patagonian steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farji-Brener, Alejandro G.; Lescano, María Natalia

    2017-11-01

    In arid environments, the high availability of sunlight due to the scarcity of trees suggests that plant competition take place mainly belowground for water and nutrients. However, the occurrence of soil disturbances that increase nutrient availability and thereby promote plant growth may enhance shoot competition between neighboring plants. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to evaluate the influence of the enriched soil patches generated by the leaf-cutting ant, Acromyrmex lobicornis, on the performance of the alien forb Carduus thoermeri (Asteraceae) under different intraspecific competition scenarios. Our results showed that substrate type and competition scenario affected mainly aboveground plant growth. As expected, plants growing without neighbors and in nutrient-rich ant refuse dumps showed more aboveground biomass than plants growing with neighbors and in nutrient-poor steppe soils. However, aboveground competition was more intense in nutrient-poor substrates: plants under shoot and full competition growing in the nutrient-rich ant refuse dumps showed higher biomass than those growing on steppe soils. Belowground biomass was similar among focal plants growing under different substrate type. Our results support the traditional view that increments in resource availability reduce competition intensity. Moreover, the fact that seedlings in this sunny habitat mainly compete aboveground illustrates how limiting factors may be scale-dependent and change in importance as plants grow.

  18. Puerto Rico Above Ground Biomass Map, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This image dataset details the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico above-ground forest biomass (AGB) (baseline 2000) developed by the United States (US) Environmental...

  19. Above Ground Growing Trends of Persian Shallot (Allium altissimum Regel. as Affected by Different Levels of Phosphorus Application and Planting Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kheirkhah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Crop Ecophysiology / Vol. 10, No. 2, 2016                                                                                          18     Domestication, cultivation and mass production of shallot to prevent the loss of its genetic resources are of particular importance. This study was conducted in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with 3 replications to evaluate the effects of different levels of phosphorus fertilizer and planting densities on medicinal and industrial plants of shallots at the Agricultural Research Station of Higher Education Complex of Shirvan. Treatments of this study were plant densities at tree levels (20, 30 and 40 plants per square meter and phosphorus applications (superphosphate at four levels (0, 150, 250 and 350 kg.ha-1. The results showed that phosphorus, plant density and the interactions between them significantly affected growth parameters such as leaf area index, leaf area ratio, crop growth, relative growth, and net assimilation rates as compared to controls. According to these results, it can be concluded that this plant reacts positively to the phosphorus fertilization.

  20. Allometric Equations for Estimating Above Ground Biomass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allometric Equations for Estimating Above Ground Biomass of Rhl'zophom mucronata Lamk. (Rhizophoraceae). Mangroves at Gazi Bay, Kenya. Kirui, B.,1 Kairo, 1.6.2 and Karachi, M.1. 'Egerton University. P. O. Box 536, Njoro. Kenya; 2Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute. PO. Box 8165], Mombasa, Kenya.

  1. Water activities in Forsmark (Part II). The final disposal facility for spent fuel: water activities above ground; Vattenverksamhet i Forsmark (del II). Slutfoervarsanlaeggningen foer anvaent kaernbraensle: Vattenverksamheter ovan mark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent (EmpTec (Sweden)); Hamren, Ulrika; Collinder, Per (Ekologigruppen AB (Sweden)); Ridderstolpe, Peter (WRS Uppsala AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    The construction of the repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark is associated with a number of measures above ground that constitute water operations according to Chapter 11 in the Swedish Environmental Code. This report, which is an appendix to the Environmental Impact Assessment, describes these water operations, their effects and consequences, and planned measures

  2. Potencial alelopático de extratos aquosos foliares de aveia sobre azevém e amendoim-bravo Effect of extracts from the above-ground part of oat genotypes on ryegrass and wild poinsettia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Raquel Hagemann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito alelopático de extratos aquosos de cinco cultivares de aveia branca (Avena sativa L. e quatro de aveia preta (Avena strigosa Schreb, nas concentrações de 0, 25%, 50% e 100%, sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento das plântulas de azevém (Lolium multiflorum Lam. e amendoim-bravo (Euphorbia heterophylla L.. O delineamento utilizado foi o inteiramente casualizado distribuído em um trifatorial (genótipos de aveia x plantas infestantes x concentrações do extrato. Utilizaram-se placas de Petri contendo 25 sementes de plantas infestantes que foram umedecidas com extrato da parte aérea dos genótipos de aveia. As variáveis observadas foram: percentual de germinação, comprimento de radícula e de hipocótilo, avaliados aos 14 dias após a instalação do experimento. Os extratos aquosos das cultivares de aveia branca e preta inibiram o potencial alelopático sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento das plantas daninhas testadas, e os genótipos de aveia branca 'IPR 126', 'UTF Iguaçu' e 'Fundacep FAPA 43' e de aveia preta 'UPFA 21 Moreninha' e 'UTG 9715' foram mais efetivos na inibição da germinação e no desenvolvimento do azevém e amendoim-bravo.The objective of this study was to evaluate the allelopathic effect of aqueous extracts from five common oat (Avena sativa L. and four black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb cultivars, at concentrations of 0, 25, 50, and 100%, on the germination and development of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. and wild poinsettia (Euphorbia heterophylla L. plantlets. A completely randomized design was adopted, distributed as a triple factorial arrangement (oat genotypes × weeds × concentrations. The experiment consisted of Petri dishes containing 25 weed seeds moistened with extract from the above-ground part of the oat genotypes. The following variables were observed: germination percentage, radicle length, and hypocotyl length, evaluated at 14 days after the

  3. Anti-Obesity Effect of the Above-Ground Part of Valeriana dageletiana Nakai ex F. Maek Extract in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese C57BL/6N Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kim, Ju Hee; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-07-02

    Valeriana dageletiana Nakai ex F. Maek (VD) has been used as traditional medicine for the treatment of restlessness and sleeping disorders. However, it is still unclear whether obesity in mice can be altered by diet supplementation with VD. In this study, we first investigated the influences of VD on the accumulation of lipid content in 3T3-L1 cells; and the results showed that the above-ground VD extracts (VDAE) suppressed the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. Thus, the effects of VDAE on preventing obesity were then studied in the C57BL/6N mice for 10 weeks ( n = 6): normal-fat diet, high-fat diet (HFD), HFD supplemented with 1% (10 g/kg) Garcinia combogia extract (positive control), and HFD supplemented with 1% (10 g/kg) VDAE. The results showed that VDAE reduced food efficiency ratio, body weight, epididymal adipose and hepatic tissue weight, hepatic lipid metabolites, and triacylglycerol and cholesterol serum levels compared to the high-fat diet group. Moreover, VD significantly inhibited the expression of adipogenic genes, such as PPAR-γ , C/EBP-α , and aP2 , and lipogenic genes, such as SREBP-1c , FAS , SCD-1 , and CD36 , in epididymal adipose tissue and hepatic tissue. These findings indicate anti-adipogenic and anti-lipogenic effects of VDAE and suggest that it could be a potent functional food ingredient for the prevention of high-fat diet-induced obesity.

  4. Long-term above-ground biomass production in a red oak-pecan agroforestry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agroforestry systems have widely been recognized for their potential to foster long-term carbon sequestration in woody perennials. This study aims to determine the above-ground biomass in a 16-year-old red oak (Quercus rubra) - pecan (Carya illinoinensis) silvopastoral planting (141 and 53 trees ha-...

  5. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  6. Disposal facility in Olkiluoto, description of above ground facilities in tunnel transport alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, T.

    2006-11-01

    The above ground facilities of the disposal plant on the Olkiluoto site are described in this report as they will be when the operation of the disposal facility starts in the year 2020. The disposal plant is visualised on the Olkiluoto site. Parallel construction of the deposition tunnels and disposal of the spent fuel canisters constitute the principal design basis of the disposal plant. The annual production of disposal canisters for spent fuel amounts to about 40. Production of 100 disposal canisters has been used as the capacity basis. Fuel from the Olkiluoto plant and from the Loviisa plant will be encapsulated in the same production line. The disposal plant will require an area of about 15 to 20 hectares above ground level. The total building volume of the above ground facilities is about 75000 m 3 . The purpose of the report is to provide the base for detailed design of the encapsulation plant and the repository spaces, as well as for coordination between the disposal plant and ONKALO. The dimensioning bases for the disposal plant are shown in the Tables at the end of the report. The report can also be used as a basis for comparison in deciding whether the fuel canisters are transported to the repository by a lift or a by vehicle along the access tunnel. (orig.)

  7. Disposal facility in olkiluoto, description of above ground facilities in lift transport alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, T.

    2006-11-01

    The above ground facilities of the disposal plant on the Olkiluoto site are described in this report as they will be when the operation of the disposal facility starts in the year 2020. The disposal plant is visualised on the Olkiluoto site. Parallel construction of the deposition tunnels and disposal of the spent fuel canisters constitute the principal design basis of the disposal plant. The annual production of disposal canisters for spent fuel amounts to about 40. Production of 100 disposal canisters has been used as the capacity basis. Fuel from the Olkiluoto plant and from the Loviisa plant will be encapsulated in the same production line. The disposal plant will require an area of about 15 to 20 hectares above ground level. The total building volume of the above ground facilities is about 75000 m 3 . The purpose of the report is to provide the base for detailed design of the encapsulation plant and the repository spaces, as well as for coordination between the disposal plant and ONKALO. The dimensioning bases for the disposal plant are shown in the Tables at the end of the report. The report can also be used as a basis for comparison in deciding whether the fuel canisters are transported to the repository by a lift or by a vehicle along the access tunnel. (orig.)

  8. Carbon stock in topsoil, standing floor litter and above ground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper provides information on carbon stock at the habitat level in the above ground biomass (ABG), standing floor litter and soils in a 10 year-old Tectona grandis plantation following restoration of a degraded secondary forest at Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife Nigeria. Four sample plots 25 m x 25 m, two in Tectona ...

  9. Underside corrosion of above ground storage tanks (ASTs) | Rim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Underside corrosion of a failed above ground storage tank (AST) was investigated by the physio-chemical analysis of water sample that was ingress between the tank bottom plate and the concrete foundation. The results of the water sample analysis showed pH (5.8), temperature (30°C), Conductivity (4800 μs/cm), ...

  10. Above-ground biomass of mangrove species. I. Analysis of models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mário Luiz Gomes; Schaeffer-Novelli, Yara

    2005-10-01

    This study analyzes the above-ground biomass of Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa located in the mangroves of Bertioga (SP) and Guaratiba (RJ), Southeast Brazil. Its purpose is to determine the best regression model to estimate the total above-ground biomass and compartment (leaves, reproductive parts, twigs, branches, trunk and prop roots) biomass, indirectly. To do this, we used structural measurements such as height, diameter at breast-height (DBH), and crown area. A combination of regression types with several compositions of independent variables generated 2.272 models that were later tested. Subsequent analysis of the models indicated that the biomass of reproductive parts, branches, and prop roots yielded great variability, probably because of environmental factors and seasonality (in the case of reproductive parts). It also indicated the superiority of multiple regression to estimate above-ground biomass as it allows researchers to consider several aspects that affect above-ground biomass, specially the influence of environmental factors. This fact has been attested to the models that estimated the biomass of crown compartments.

  11. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  12. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of Earth tempering as a practice and of specific Earth sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground are included. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 20 locations in the United States.

  13. Efeito do alumínio sobre o crescimento de raízes, peso seco da parte aérea e raízes de diferentes cultivares de soja Effect of aluminum on root growth, dry matter weight of the above ground parts and roots of soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipolito Assunção Antonio Mascarenhas

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram instalados dois experimentos preliminares, em solução nutritiva, para avaliar a tolerância da soja ao alumínio. No primeiro, foram testados os cultivares Cristalina e UFV-1, utilizando-se os teores 0, 5, 10 e 20mg/litro de Al. Esses níveis foram muito altos e reduziram drasticamente o comprimento das raízes primarias das plântulas após sete dias de crescimento. Com base nesses dados, outro experimento foi instalado, testando os cultivares Lee, Bragg, Cristalina e UFV-1. a 0, 1, 2 e 4mg/litro de Al. Os resultados mostraram que o comprimento das raízes primárias das plântulas foi melhor parâmetro do que o peso seco da parte aérea ou das raízes, para avaliar tolerância de soja ao alumínio. O nível de 1mg/litro na solução foi suficiente para separar os cultivares susceptíveis e tolerantes, enquanto os níveis de 2 e 4mg/litro causaram drástica redução do comprimento de raiz primária das plântulas de todos os cultivares. Nessas condições, 'Lee' e 'Cristalina' mostraram ser tolerantes enquanto o 'Bragg' se apresentou intermediário e o 'UFV-1' foi o mais susceptível entre eles. Os cultivares tolerantes revelaram tendência de acumular menores teores de Al na parte aérea, em comparação com os demais.Two experiments were conducted in nutrient solution to study the level of Al necessary to separate tolerant cultivars from the susceptible. In the first experiment the levels of Al were 0, 5, 10 and 20mg/l and two cultivars Cristalina and UFV-1 were studied. These levels were found to be too high as they had drastic effect on the primary roots after 7 days of transplanting. Based on this data another experiment was conducted using 0, 1, 2 and 4mg/l of Al and using cultivars Lee, Bragg, Cristalina and UFV-1. The results showed that the length of the primary root was the best parameter as compared with dry weight of the above ground parts and roots to evaluate tolerance of soybeans to Al. The level of 1mg/l was adequate to

  14. Spatial relationships among species, above-ground biomass, N, and P in degraded grasslands in Ordus Plateau, northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Cheng; S. An; J. chen; B. Li; Y. Liu; S. Liu

    2007-01-01

    We chose five communities, representing a mild to severe gradient of grassland desertification in a semi-arid area of Ordos Plateau, northwestern China, to explore the spatial relationships among plant species, above-ground biomass (AGB), and plant nutrients (N and P). Community 1 (Cl) was dominated by Stipa bungeana; community 2 (C2) by a mix of S...

  15. Comparative study of above ground biomass estimates for conterminous US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeti, N.; Kennedy, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate estimates of forest biomass are important for carbon accounting at both regional and national scale. There are four above ground biomass (AGB) maps available for conterminous US, one from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), two from the United States Forest Service (USFS) (Blackard and Wilson) and one from the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC). Although all four maps are meant to represent similar quantities, spatial patterns of AGB vary considerably from map to map. To use any of these AGB maps for carbon accounting, it is important to understand sources of uncertainty in individual maps and agreement and disagreement among them. Therefore, we compared the four AGB maps at ecoregion and state level to gain understanding of map consistency, leveraging discrepancies among maps to gain insight into the method and data sources. We also developed statewide summaries to compare with FIA forest AGB estimates, which are typically reported at the state level. We examined both absolute differences among these aggregated maps, and relative differences among regions within each map. The result shows that NASA biomass estimates are highest and Blackard estimates are lowest compared to other maps at both ecoregion and state level. The AGB for WHRC and Wilson are very similar at both ecoregion and state level specifically in the lower biomass regions compared to higher biomass regions. This could be associated with the differences in the spatial resolution of the data sources uses to generate these maps. At state level, WHRC map is found to be most similar and NASA biomass estimates least similar to FIA plot data. We discuss these differences in light of the different methods and data sources used to generate the maps.

  16. Above-ground tree outside forest (TOF) phytomass and carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and refinement of classified images (Rawat et al. 2004). At the national level, an attempt is being made in the National Carbon. Project (NCP) to estimate the total phytomass and carbon density for plants/trees inside and out-side the forest through a project taken up by the Indian. Space Research Organization (ISRO), ...

  17. Estimation and mapping of above ground biomass and carbon of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Park (BINP) using the Horizontal-Horizontal (HH) and Horizontal-Vertical (HV) polarizations acquired by the L-band .... radar signal can be propagated to and received from objects of interest in the Horizontal (H) or Vertical ... Three major tributaries of the Ishasha River drain into Lake Edward to the northern part of the park,.

  18. Measurement protocol for radon measurements in workplaces above ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjoenes, L.; Soederman, A.-L.

    2004-01-01

    measurement made during the warmer part of the year is likely to show radon levels that are not representative for the whole year. Measurements have to cover at least 20 % of the rooms used for work places situated on the ground floor, in upper floors one measurement per floor has to be made and at least one per 500 m 2 . More measurements are recommended for buildings constructed from material with enhanced uranium and radium levels, such as blue lightweight concrete. Rooms in upper floors with vertical piping or other vertical openings through the building or rooms adjacent to rooms with piping should be measured. The detectors should not be moved during the measurement period and they should be placed so that the result is representative for the work place. Measurement devises must be calibrated every 12 months. This can be done at SSI or another laboratory recommended by SSI. Laboratories, consulting firms etc responsible for radon measurements have to guarantee that the results are correct. A quality system is required in order to perform measurements. The measurement protocol describes every method that can be used for radon measurements in detail as far as calibration and control systems are concerned. (author)

  19. EnviroAtlas - Above Ground Live Biomass Carbon Storage for the Conterminous United States- Forested

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset includes the average above ground live dry biomass estimate for the Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) in kg/m...

  20. Below-ground plant–fungus network topology is not congruent with above-ground plant–animal network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Olesen, Jens M.; Thompson, John N.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, plants and their pollinating and/or seed-dispersing animals form complex interaction networks. The commonly observed pattern of links between specialists and generalists in these networks has been predicted to promote species coexistence. Plants also build highly species-rich mutualistic networks below ground with root-associated fungi, and the structure of these plant–fungus networks may also affect terrestrial community processes. By compiling high-throughput DNA sequencing data sets of the symbiosis of plants and their root-associated fungi from three localities along a latitudinal gradient, we uncovered the entire network architecture of these interactions under contrasting environmental conditions. Each network included more than 30 plant species and hundreds of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi belonging to diverse phylogenetic groups. The results were consistent with the notion that processes shaping host-plant specialization of fungal species generate a unique linkage pattern that strongly contrasts with the pattern of above-ground plant–partner networks. Specifically, plant–fungus networks lacked a “nested” architecture, which has been considered to promote species coexistence in plant–partner networks. Rather, the below-ground networks had a conspicuous “antinested” topology. Our findings lead to the working hypothesis that terrestrial plant community dynamics are likely determined by the balance between above-ground and below-ground webs of interspecific interactions. PMID:26601279

  1. Advanced Coupled Simulation of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Systems and Above Ground Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage in borehole heat exchanger arrays is a promising technology to reduce primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. These systems usually consist of several subsystems like the heat source (e.g. solarthermics or a combined heat and power plant), the heat consumer (e.g. a heating system), diurnal storages (i.e. water tanks), the borehole thermal energy storage, additional heat sources for peak load coverage (e.g. a heat pump or a gas boiler) and the distribution network. For the design of an integrated system, numerical simulations of all subsystems are imperative. A separate simulation of the borehole energy storage is well-established but represents a simplification. In reality, the subsystems interact with each other. The fluid temperatures of the heat generation system, the heating system and the underground storage are interdependent and affect the performance of each subsystem. To take into account these interdependencies, we coupled a software for the simulation of the above ground facilities with a finite element software for the modeling of the heat flow in the subsurface and the borehole heat exchangers. This allows for a more realistic view on the entire system. Consequently, a finer adjustment of the system components and a more precise prognosis of the system's performance can be ensured.

  2. ERC hazard classification matrices for above ground structures and groundwater and soil remediation activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, L.R.

    1997-01-01

    This document provides the status of the preliminary hazard classification (PHC) process for the Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) above ground structures and groundwater and soil remediation activities currently underway for planned for fiscal year (FY) 1997. This classification process is based on current US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) guidance for the classification of facilities and activities containing radionuclide and nonradiological hazardous material inventories. The above ground structures presented in the matrices were drawn from the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project Facility List (DOE 1996), which identifies the facilities in the RL-Environmental Restoration baseline contract in 1997. This document contains the following two appendices: (1) Appendix A, which consists of a matrix identifying PHC documents that have been issued for BHI's above ground structures and groundwater and soil remediation activities underway or planned for FY 1997, and (2) Appendix B, which consists of a matrix showing anticipated PHCs for above ground structures, and groundwater and soil remediation activities underway or planned for FY 1997. Appendix B also shows the schedule for finalization of PHCs for above ground structures with an anticipated classification of Nuclear

  3. Luxury consumption of soil nutrients: a possible competitive strategy in above-ground and below-ground biomass allocation and root morphology for slow-growing arctic vegetation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van M.T.; Williams, M.; Gough, L.; Hobbie, S.E.; Shaver, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    1 A field-experiment was used to determine how plant species might retain dominance in an arctic ecosystem receiving added nutrients. We both measured and modelled the above-ground and below-ground biomass allocation and root morphology of non-acidic tussock tundra near Toolik Lake, Alaska, after 4

  4. Chapter 6: Above Ground Deterioration of Wood and Wood-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Kirker; Jerrold Winandy

    2014-01-01

    Wood as a material has unique properties that make it ideal for above ground exposure in a wide range of structural and non-strucutral applications. However, no material is without limitations. Wood is a bio-polymer which is subject to degradative processes, both abiotic and biotic. This chapter is a general summary of the abiotic and biotic factors that impact service...

  5. Grass allometry and estimation of above-ground biomass in tropical alpine tussock grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Eynden, van der M.; Malhi, Y.; Cahuana, N.; Menor, C.; Zamora, F.; Haugaasen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The puna/páramo grasslands span across the highest altitudes of the tropical Andes, and their ecosystem dynamics are still poorly understood. In this study we examined the above-ground biomass and developed species specific and multispecies power-law allometric equations for four tussock grass

  6. Nondestructive estimates of above-ground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, K.; Newnham, G.; Burt, A.; Murphy, S.; Raumonen, P.; Herold, M.; Culvenor, D.; Avitabile, V.; Disney, M.; Armston, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Allometric equations are currently used to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) based on the indirect relationship with tree parameters. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can measure the canopy structure in 3D with high detail. In this study, we develop an approach to estimate AGB from TLS data, which

  7. Maize (Zea mays) seeds can detect above-ground weeds; thiamethoxam alters the view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Maha; Lee, Elizabeth; Lukens, Lewis; Swanton, Clarence

    2015-09-01

    Far red light is known to penetrate soil and delay seed germination. Thiamethoxam as a seed treatment has been observed to enhance seed germination. No previous work has explored the effect of thiamethoxam on the physiological response of buried maize seed when germinating in the presence of above-ground weeds. We hypothesised that the changes in red:far red reflected from above-ground weeds would be detected by maize seed phytochrome and delay seed germination by decreasing the level of GA and increasing ABA. We further hypothesised that thiamethoxam would overcome this delay in germination. Thiamethoxam enhanced seed germination in the presence of above-ground weeds by increasing GA signalling and downregulating DELLA protein and ABA signalling genes. An increase in amylase activity and a degradation of starch were also observed. Far red reflected from the above-ground weeds was capable of penetrating below the soil surface and was detected by maize seed phytochrome. Thiamethoxam altered the effect of far red on seed germination by stimulating GA and inhibiting ABA synthesis. This is the first study to suggest that the mode of action of thiamethoxam involves both GA synthesis and ABA inhibition. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Measuring and modelling above-ground carbon and tree allometry along a tropical elevation gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, A.R.; Willcock, S.; Platts, P.J.; Lovett, Jonathan Cranidge; Balmford, A.; Burgess, N.D.; Latham, J.E.; Munishi, P.K.T.; Salter, R.; Shirima, D.D.; Lewis, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging international policy aimed at reducing carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) in developing countries, has resulted in numerous studies on above-ground live carbon (AGC) in tropical forests. However, few studies have addressed the relative importance of

  9. Measuring and modelling above-ground carbon and tree allometry along a tropical elevation gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, A.R.; Willcock, S.; Platts, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging international policy aimed at reducing carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) in developing countries, has resulted in numerous studies on above-ground live carbon (AGC) in tropical forests. However, few studies have addressed the relative importance of distur...

  10. Below- and above-ground effects of deadwood and termites in plantation forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Richard Shefferson; Scott Horn; Melanie K. Taylor; Bryana Bush; Cavell Brownie; Sebastian Seibold; Michael S. Strickland

    2017-01-01

    Deadwood is an important legacy structure in managed forests, providing continuity in shelter and resource availability for many organisms and acting as a vehicle by which nutrients can be passed from one stand to the next following a harvest. Despite existing at the interface between below- and above-ground systems, however, much remains unknown about the role woody...

  11. Estimating above-ground carbon biomass in a newly restored coastal plain wetland using remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Joseph B; Bernhardt, Emily; Swenson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging) is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggrading vegetation. This study compared the abilities of discrete-return LiDAR and high resolution optical imagery to model above-ground carbon biomass at a young restored forested wetland site in eastern North Carolina. We found that the optical imagery model explained more of the observed variation in carbon biomass than the LiDAR model (adj-R(2) values of 0.34 and 0.18 respectively; root mean squared errors of 0.14 Mg C/ha and 0.17 Mg C/ha respectively). Optical imagery was also better able to predict high and low biomass extremes than the LiDAR model. Combining both the optical and LiDAR improved upon the optical model but only marginally (adj-R(2) of 0.37). These results suggest that the ability of discrete-return LiDAR to model above-ground biomass may be rather limited in areas with young, small trees and that high spatial resolution optical imagery may be the better tool in such areas.

  12. Estimating above-ground carbon biomass in a newly restored coastal plain wetland using remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph B Riegel

    Full Text Available Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggrading vegetation. This study compared the abilities of discrete-return LiDAR and high resolution optical imagery to model above-ground carbon biomass at a young restored forested wetland site in eastern North Carolina. We found that the optical imagery model explained more of the observed variation in carbon biomass than the LiDAR model (adj-R(2 values of 0.34 and 0.18 respectively; root mean squared errors of 0.14 Mg C/ha and 0.17 Mg C/ha respectively. Optical imagery was also better able to predict high and low biomass extremes than the LiDAR model. Combining both the optical and LiDAR improved upon the optical model but only marginally (adj-R(2 of 0.37. These results suggest that the ability of discrete-return LiDAR to model above-ground biomass may be rather limited in areas with young, small trees and that high spatial resolution optical imagery may be the better tool in such areas.

  13. Modelling the pressurization induced by solar radiation on above ground installations of LPG pipeline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporini, M.; Terenzi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Giacchetta, G.; Polonara, F.; Corvaro, F.; Cocci Grifoni, R.

    2017-11-01

    Pipelining Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) is a mode of LPG transportation more environmentally-friendly than others due to the lower energy consumption and exhaust emissions. Worldwide, there are over 20000 kilometers of LPG pipelines. There are a number of codes that industry follows for the design, fabrication, construction and operation of liquid LPG pipelines. However, no standards exist to modelling particular critical phenomena which can occur on these lines due to external environmental conditions like the solar radiation pressurization. In fact, the solar radiation can expose above ground pipeline sections at pressure values above the maximum Design Pressure with resulting risks and problems. The present work presents an innovative practice suitable for the Oil & Gas industry to modelling the pressurization induced by the solar radiation on above ground LPG pipeline sections with the application to a real case.

  14. Cathodic Protection for Above Ground Storage Tank Bottom Using Data Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseer Abbood Issa Al Haboubi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impressed current cathodic protection controlled by computer gives the ideal solution to the changes in environmental factors and long term coating degradation. The protection potential distribution achieved and the current demand on the anode can be regulated to protection criteria, to achieve the effective protection for the system. In this paper, cathodic protection problem of above ground steel storage tank was investigated by an impressed current of cathodic protection with controlled potential of electrical system to manage the variation in soil resistivity. Corrosion controller has been implemented for above ground tank in LabView where tank's bottom potential to soil was manipulated to the desired set point (protection criterion 850 mV. National Instruments Data Acquisition (NI-DAQ and PC controllers for tank corrosion control system provides quick response to achieve steady state condition for any kind of disturbances.

  15. Forest soil respiration rate and delta13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblad, Alf; Boström, Björn; Holm, Anders; Comstedt, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration.

  16. Spatial relationships between above-ground biomass and bird species biodiversity in Palawan, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Minerva; Friess, Daniel A.; Vilela, Bruno; Alban, Jose Don T. De; Monzon, Angelica Kristina V.; Veridiano, Rizza Karen A.; Tumaneng, Roven D.

    2017-01-01

    This study maps distribution and spatial congruence between Above-Ground Biomass (AGB) and species richness of IUCN listed conservation-dependent and endemic avian fauna in Palawan, Philippines. Grey Level Co-Occurrence Texture Matrices (GLCMs) extracted from Landsat and ALOS-PALSAR were used in conjunction with local field data to model and map local-scale field AGB using the Random Forest algorithm (r = 0.92 and RMSE = 31.33 Mg·ha-1). A support vector regression (SVR) model was used to iden...

  17. Disease ecology across soil boundaries: effects of below-ground fungi on above-ground host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Leiling; Gowler, Camden D; Ahmad, Aamina; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2015-10-22

    Host-parasite interactions are subject to strong trait-mediated indirect effects from other species. However, it remains unexplored whether such indirect effects may occur across soil boundaries and connect spatially isolated organisms. Here, we demonstrate that, by changing plant (milkweed Asclepias sp.) traits, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) significantly affect interactions between a herbivore (the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus) and its protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha), which represents an interaction across four biological kingdoms. In our experiment, AMF affected parasite virulence, host resistance and host tolerance to the parasite. These effects were dependent on both the density of AMF and the identity of milkweed species: AMF indirectly increased disease in monarchs reared on some species, while alleviating disease in monarchs reared on other species. The species-specificity was driven largely by the effects of AMF on both plant primary (phosphorus) and secondary (cardenolides; toxins in milkweeds) traits. Our study demonstrates that trait-mediated indirect effects in disease ecology are extensive, such that below-ground interactions between AMF and plant roots can alter host-parasite interactions above ground. In general, soil biota may play an underappreciated role in the ecology of many terrestrial host-parasite systems. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Disease ecology across soil boundaries: effects of below-ground fungi on above-ground host–parasite interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Leiling; Gowler, Camden D.; Ahmad, Aamina; Hunter, Mark D.; de Roode, Jacobus C.

    2015-01-01

    Host–parasite interactions are subject to strong trait-mediated indirect effects from other species. However, it remains unexplored whether such indirect effects may occur across soil boundaries and connect spatially isolated organisms. Here, we demonstrate that, by changing plant (milkweed Asclepias sp.) traits, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) significantly affect interactions between a herbivore (the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus) and its protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha), which represents an interaction across four biological kingdoms. In our experiment, AMF affected parasite virulence, host resistance and host tolerance to the parasite. These effects were dependent on both the density of AMF and the identity of milkweed species: AMF indirectly increased disease in monarchs reared on some species, while alleviating disease in monarchs reared on other species. The species-specificity was driven largely by the effects of AMF on both plant primary (phosphorus) and secondary (cardenolides; toxins in milkweeds) traits. Our study demonstrates that trait-mediated indirect effects in disease ecology are extensive, such that below-ground interactions between AMF and plant roots can alter host–parasite interactions above ground. In general, soil biota may play an underappreciated role in the ecology of many terrestrial host–parasite systems. PMID:26468247

  19. Above-ground and below-ground plant responses to fertilization in two subarctic ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G.F.; Sundqvist, Maja K.; Metcalfe, D.; Wilson, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Soil nutrient supply is likely to change in the Arctic due to altered process rates associated with climate change. Here, we compare the responses of herbaceous tundra and birch forest understory to fertilization, considering both above- and below-ground responses. We added nitrogen and phosphorus

  20. Continuous monitoring of a mountain snowpack in the Austrian Alps by above-ground neutron sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattan, Paul; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.; Schöber, Johannes; Fey, Christine; Francke, Till; Huttenlau, Matthias; Achleitner, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    In alpine catchments the knowledge of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous dynamics of snow accumulation and depletion is crucial for modelling and managing water resources. While snow covered area can be retrieved operationally from remote sensing data, continuous measurements of other snow state variables like snow depth (SD) or snow water equivalent (SWE) remain challenging. Existing methods of retrieving both variables in alpine terrain face severe issues like a lack of spatial representativeness, labour-intensity or discontinuity in time. Recently, promising new measurement techniques combining a larger support with low maintenance cost like above-ground gamma-ray scintillators, GPS interferometric reflectometry or above-ground cosmic-ray neutron sensors (CRNS) have been suggested. While CRNS has proven its potential for monitoring soil moisture in a wide range of environments and applications, the empirical knowledge of using CRNS for snowpack monitoring is still very limited and restricted to shallow snowpacks with rather uniform evolution. The characteristics of an above-ground cosmic-ray neutron sensor (CRNS) were therefore evaluated for monitoring a mountain snowpack in the Austrian Alps (Kaunertal, Tyrol) during three winter seasons. The measurement campaign included a number of measurements during the period from 03/2014 to 06/2016: (i) neutron count measurements by CRNS, (ii) continuous point-scale SD and SWE measurements from an automatic weather station and (iii) 17 Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) with simultaneous SD and SWE surveys. The highest accumulation in terms of SWE was found in 04/2014 with 600 mm. Neutron counts were compared to all available snow data. While previous studies suggested a signal saturation at around 100 mm of SWE, no complete signal saturation was found. A strong non-linear relation was found for both SD and SWE with best fits for spatially distributed TLS based snow data. Initially slightly different shapes were

  1. Diffusion of dust particles from a point-source above ground level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.; Eltayeb, I.A.

    1998-10-01

    A pollutant of small particles is emitted by a point source at a height h above ground level in an atmosphere in which a uni-directional wind speed, U, is prevailing. The pollutant is subjected to diffusion in all directions in the presence of advection and settling due to gravity. The equation governing the concentration of the pollutant is studied with the wind speed and the different components of diffusion tensor are proportional to the distance above ground level and the source has a uniform strength. Adopting a Cartesian system of coordinates in which the x-axis lies along the direction of the wind velocity, the z-axis is vertically upwards and the y-axis completes the right-hand triad, the solution for the concentration c(x,y,z) is obtained in closed form. The relative importance of the components of diffusion along the three axes is discussed. It is found that for any plane y=constant (=A), c(x,y,z) is concentrated along a curve of ''extensive pollution''. In the plane A=0, the concentration decreases along the line of extensive pollution as we move away from the source. However, for planes A≅0, the line of extensive pollution possesses a point of accumulation, which lies at a nonzero value of x. As we move away from the plane A=0, the point of accumulation moves laterally away from the plane x=0 and towards the plane z=0. The presence of the point of accumulation is entirely due to the presence of lateral diffusion. (author)

  2. Estimating Stand Volume and Above-Ground Biomass of Urban Forests Using LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giannico

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessing forest stand conditions in urban and peri-urban areas is essential to support ecosystem service planning and management, as most of the ecosystem services provided are a consequence of forest stand characteristics. However, collecting data for assessing forest stand conditions is time consuming and labor intensive. A plausible approach for addressing this issue is to establish a relationship between in situ measurements of stand characteristics and data from airborne laser scanning (LiDAR. In this study we assessed forest stand volume and above-ground biomass (AGB in a broadleaved urban forest, using a combination of LiDAR-derived metrics, which takes the form of a forest allometric model. We tested various methods for extracting proxies of basal area (BA and mean stand height (H from the LiDAR point-cloud distribution and evaluated the performance of different models in estimating forest stand volume and AGB. The best predictors for both models were the scale parameters of the Weibull distribution of all returns (except the first (proxy of BA and the 95th percentile of the distribution of all first returns (proxy of H. The R2 were 0.81 (p < 0.01 for the stand volume model and 0.77 (p < 0.01 for the AGB model with a RMSE of 23.66 m3·ha−1 (23.3% and 19.59 Mg·ha−1 (23.9%, respectively. We found that a combination of two LiDAR-derived variables (i.e., proxy of BA and proxy of H, which take the form of a forest allometric model, can be used to estimate stand volume and above-ground biomass in broadleaved urban forest areas. Our results can be compared to other studies conducted using LiDAR in broadleaved forests with similar methods.

  3. Some effects of soil-moisture availability on above-ground production and reproductive allocation in Larrea tridentata (DC) Cov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, G L; Syvertsen, J P; Reynolds, J F; Willson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Data from the US/IBP Desert Biome validation studies indicate that above-ground production and biomass allocated to reproduction in Larrea tridentata vary from one year to another depending upon the timing and extent of soil-moisture availability. In an attempt to verify these observations and determine to what extent water availability can affect total aboveground production and reproductive allocation in this widely distributed warm desert shrub, a series of soil-moisture augmentation experiments were conducted. High levels of soil moisture had a greater effect on reproductive allocation than on total above-ground production. Enhanced soil moisture during the period of active growth increased total above-ground production and reduced the percentage of biomass allocated to reproduction. Enhanced soil moisture during the normal periods of little or no growth did not increase total above-ground production.

  4. Height-diameter allometry and above ground biomass in tropical montane forests: Insights from the Albertine Rift in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Gérard; Boyemba, Faustin; Lewis, Simon; Nabahungu, Nsharwasi Léon; Calders, Kim; Zapfack, Louis; Riera, Bernard; Balegamire, Clarisse; Cuni-Sanchez, Aida

    2017-01-01

    Tropical montane forests provide an important natural laboratory to test ecological theory. While it is well-known that some aspects of forest structure change with altitude, little is known on the effects of altitude on above ground biomass (AGB), particularly with regard to changing height-diameter allometry. To address this we investigate (1) the effects of altitude on height-diameter allometry, (2) how different height-diameter allometric models affect above ground biomass estimates; and (3) how other forest structural, taxonomic and environmental attributes affect above ground biomass using 30 permanent sample plots (1-ha; all trees ≥ 10 cm diameter measured) established between 1250 and 2600 m asl in Kahuzi Biega National Park in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Forest structure and species composition differed with increasing altitude, with four forest types identified. Different height-diameter allometric models performed better with the different forest types, as trees got smaller with increasing altitude. Above ground biomass ranged from 168 to 290 Mg ha-1, but there were no significant differences in AGB between forests types, as tree size decreased but stem density increased with increasing altitude. Forest structure had greater effects on above ground biomass than forest diversity. Soil attributes (K and acidity, pH) also significantly affected above ground biomass. Results show how forest structural, taxonomic and environmental attributes affect above ground biomass in African tropical montane forests. They particularly highlight that the use of regional height-diameter models introduces significant biases in above ground biomass estimates, and that different height-diameter models might be preferred for different forest types, and these should be considered in future studies.

  5. Nitrogen mediates above-ground effects of ozone but not below-ground effects in a rhizomatous sedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.L.M.; Hodges, G.; Mills, G.

    2010-01-01

    Ozone and atmospheric nitrogen are co-occurring pollutants with adverse effects on natural grassland vegetation. Plants of the rhizomatous sedge Carex arenaria were exposed to four ozone regimes representing increasing background concentrations (background-peak): 10-30, 35-55, 60-80 and 85-105 ppb ozone at two nitrogen levels: 12 and 100 kg N ha -1 yr -1 . Ozone increased the number and proportion of senesced leaves, but not overall leaf number. There was a clear nitrogen x ozone interaction with high nitrogen reducing proportional senescence in each treatment and increasing the ozone dose (AOT40) at which enhanced senescence occurred. Ozone reduced total biomass due to significant effects on root biomass. There were no interactive effects on shoot:root ratio. Rhizome tissue N content was increased by both nitrogen and ozone. Results suggest that nitrogen mediates above-ground impacts of ozone but not impacts on below-ground resource translocation. This may lead to complex interactive effects between the two pollutants on natural vegetation. - Nitrogen alters threshold of ozone-induced senescence, but not below-ground resource allocation.

  6. Above Ground Leafless Woody Biomass and Nutrient Content within Different Compartments of a P. maximowicii × P. trichocarpa Poplar Clone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Spiecker

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the quantification of biomass within all relevant compartments of a three-year-old poplar clone (P. maximowicii × P. trichocarpa planted on abandoned agricultural land at a density of 5000 trees ha−1 is presented. A total of 30 trees within a diameter range of 1.8 cm to 8.9 cm, at breast height (dbh at 1.3 m, were destructively sampled. In order to analyze the biomass, the complete tree, stem, as well as all branches, were divided into 1 cm diameter classes and all buds from the trees were completely removed. Total yield was calculated as 11.7 odt ha−1 year−1 (oven dry tonnes per hectare and year. Branches constituted 22.2% of total dry leafless biomass and buds 2.0%. The analyses revealed a strong correlation of the dry weight for all the three compartments with diameter at breast height. Debarked sample discs were used to obtain a ratio between wood and bark. Derived from these results, a model was developed to calculate the biomass of bark with dbh as the predictor variable. Mean bark percentage was found to be 16.8% of above ground leafless biomass. The results concur that bark percentage decreases with increasing tree diameter, providing the conclusion that larger trees contain a lower bark proportion, and thus positively influence the quality of the end product while consequently reducing the export of nutrients from site.

  7. Above ground standing biomass and carbon storage in village bamboos in North East India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jyoti Nath, Arun; Das, Ashesh Kumar [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Assam University, Silchar 788011, Assam (India); Das, Gitasree [Department of Statistics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India)

    2009-09-15

    Bamboo forms an important component in the traditional landscape of North East India. For biomass estimation of village bamboos of Barak Valley, North East India, allometric relationships were developed by harvest method describing leaf, branch and culm biomass with DBH as an independent variable using a log linear model. The culm density of the stand was 8950 culms ha{sup -1} during 2005 of which 67% of growing stock was represented by Bambusa cacharensis, 17.88% by Bambusa vulgaris and 15.12% by Bambusa balcooa. Above ground stand biomass was 121.51 t ha{sup -1} of which 86% was contributed by culm component followed by branch (10%) and leaf (4%). With respect to species, B. cacharensis made up to 46% of total stand biomass followed by B. vulgaris (28%) and B. balcooa (26%). Carbon storage in the above ground biomass was 61.05 t ha{sup -1}. Allocation of C was more in culm components (53.05 t ha{sup -1}) than in branch (5.81 t ha{sup -1}) and leaf (2.19 t ha{sup -1}). Carbon storage in the litter floor mass was 2.40 t ha{sup -1}, of which leaf litter made up the highest amount (1.37 t ha{sup -1}) followed by sheath (0.86 t ha{sup -1}) and branch (0.17 t ha{sup -1}). Carbon stock in the soil up to 30 cm depth was 57.3 t ha{sup -1}. Gross C stock in the plantation was estimated to be 120.75 t ha{sup -1}. Carbon storage estimated in the bamboo stand of present study offers insights into the opportunity of village bamboos in the rural landscape for carbon storage through carbon sequestration. Management and utilization of village bamboos as a potential source of carbon sink by smallholder farmers are discussed in the context of their livelihood security and the Millennium Development Goals of the United Nations. (author)

  8. Landsat Imagery-Based Above Ground Biomass Estimation and Change Investigation Related to Human Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofan Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest biomass is a significant indicator for substance accumulation and forest succession, and a spatiotemporal biomass map would provide valuable information for forest management and scientific planning. In this study, Landsat imagery and field data cooperated with a random forest regression approach were used to estimate spatiotemporal Above Ground Biomass (AGB in Fuyang County, Zhejiang Province of East China. As a result, the AGB retrieval showed an increasing trend for the past decade, from 74.24 ton/ha in 2004 to 99.63 ton/ha in 2013. Topography and forest management were investigated to find their relationships with the spatial distribution change of biomass. In general, the simulated AGB increases with higher elevation, especially in the range of 80–200 m, wherein AGB acquires the highest increase rate. Moreover, the forest policy of ecological forest has a positive effect on the AGB increase, particularly within the national level ecological forest. The result in this study demonstrates that human activities have a great impact on biomass distribution and change tendency. Furthermore, Landsat image-based biomass estimates would provide illuminating information for forest policy-making and sustainable development.

  9. Above-ground biomass and structure of 260 African tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon L.; Sonké, Bonaventure; Sunderland, Terry; Begne, Serge K.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; van der Heijden, Geertje M. F.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi; Baker, Timothy R.; Banin, Lindsay; Bastin, Jean-François; Beeckman, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal; Bogaert, Jan; De Cannière, Charles; Chezeaux, Eric; Clark, Connie J.; Collins, Murray; Djagbletey, Gloria; Djuikouo, Marie Noël K.; Droissart, Vincent; Doucet, Jean-Louis; Ewango, Cornielle E. N.; Fauset, Sophie; Feldpausch, Ted R.; Foli, Ernest G.; Gillet, Jean-François; Hamilton, Alan C.; Harris, David J.; Hart, Terese B.; de Haulleville, Thales; Hladik, Annette; Hufkens, Koen; Huygens, Dries; Jeanmart, Philippe; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Leal, Miguel E.; Lloyd, Jon; Lovett, Jon C.; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marshall, Andrew R.; Ojo, Lucas; Peh, Kelvin S.-H.; Pickavance, Georgia; Poulsen, John R.; Reitsma, Jan M.; Sheil, Douglas; Simo, Murielle; Steppe, Kathy; Taedoumg, Hermann E.; Talbot, Joey; Taplin, James R. D.; Taylor, David; Thomas, Sean C.; Toirambe, Benjamin; Verbeeck, Hans; Vleminckx, Jason; White, Lee J. T.; Willcock, Simon; Woell, Hannsjorg; Zemagho, Lise

    2013-01-01

    We report above-ground biomass (AGB), basal area, stem density and wood mass density estimates from 260 sample plots (mean size: 1.2 ha) in intact closed-canopy tropical forests across 12 African countries. Mean AGB is 395.7 Mg dry mass ha−1 (95% CI: 14.3), substantially higher than Amazonian values, with the Congo Basin and contiguous forest region attaining AGB values (429 Mg ha−1) similar to those of Bornean forests, and significantly greater than East or West African forests. AGB therefore appears generally higher in palaeo- compared with neotropical forests. However, mean stem density is low (426 ± 11 stems ha−1 greater than or equal to 100 mm diameter) compared with both Amazonian and Bornean forests (cf. approx. 600) and is the signature structural feature of African tropical forests. While spatial autocorrelation complicates analyses, AGB shows a positive relationship with rainfall in the driest nine months of the year, and an opposite association with the wettest three months of the year; a negative relationship with temperature; positive relationship with clay-rich soils; and negative relationships with C : N ratio (suggesting a positive soil phosphorus–AGB relationship), and soil fertility computed as the sum of base cations. The results indicate that AGB is mediated by both climate and soils, and suggest that the AGB of African closed-canopy tropical forests may be particularly sensitive to future precipitation and temperature changes. PMID:23878327

  10. Cathodic protection simulation of above ground storage tank bottom: Experimental and numerical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Marcelo [Inspection Department, Rio de Janeiro Refinery - REDUC, Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Brasil, Simone L.D.C. [Chemistry School, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Baptista, Walmar [Corrosion Department, Research Centre - CENPES, Petrobras (Brazil); Miranda, Luiz de [Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Program, COPPE, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Brito, Rosane F. [Corrosion Department, Research Centre, CENPES, Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The deterioration history of Above ground Storage Tanks (AST) of Petrobras' refineries - shows that the great incidence of corrosion in the AST bottom is at the external side. This is a problem in the disposability of storage crude oil and other final products. At this refinery, all AST's are built over a concrete base with a lot of pile to support the structure and distribute the charge homogeneously. Because of this it is very difficult to use cathodic protection as an anti-corrosive method for each one of these tanks. This work presents an alternative cathodic protection system to protect the external side of the tank bottom using a new metallic bottom, placed at different distance from the original one. The space between the two bottoms was filled with one of two kinds of soils, sand or clay, more conductive than the concrete. Using a prototype tank it was studied the potential distributions over the new tank bottom for different system parameters, as soil resistivity, number and position of anodes localized in the old bottom. These experimental results were compared to numerical simulations, carried out using a software based on the Boundary Element Method. The computer simulation validates this protection method, confirming to be a very useful tool to define the optimized cathodic protection system configuration. (authors)

  11. Remediation and recycling of oil-contaminated soil beneath a large above-ground storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, G.

    1994-01-01

    While retrofitting a large 30-year-old, above-ground petroleum storage tank, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) discovered that soil beneath the fixed-roof, single-bottom tank was contaminated with 40,000 gallons of number-sign 6 fuel oil. The steel tank was left in place during the excavation and remediation of the contaminated soil to retain the operating permit. The resulting 2,000 tons of contaminated aggregate was recycled to make asphalt concrete for paving the tank basin and the remaining 5,600 tons of oily soil was thermally treated on site for use as engineered fill at another location. This successful operation provided an economical cleanup solution for a common leakage problem of single-lined tanks and eliminated the long-term liability of Class 1 landfill disposal. As a pro-active environmental effort, this paper shares SCE's site assessment procedure, reveals the engineering method developed to stabilize the tank, discusses the soil treatment technologies used, describes the problems encountered and lessons learned during the cleanup, discloses the costs of the operation, and offers guidelines and recommendations for similar tank remediation. This paper does not describe the work or costs for removing or replacing the tank bottom

  12. Above-ground biomass models for Seabuckthorn (Hippophae salicifolia) in Mustang District, Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajchal, Rajesh; Meilby, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    weight of fruit and oven-dry weight of wood (stem and branches) and leaves were measured and used as a basis for developing biomass models. Diameters of the trees were measured at 30 cm above ground whereas the heights were measured in terms of the total tree height (m). Among several models tested.......91 for wood, fruit, and leaves, respectively. The models suggested for a slightly broader range of environmental conditions were: ln (woody biomass, oven-dry, kg) = -3.277 + 0.924 ln(diameter2 × height), ln(Fruit biomass, fresh, kg) = -3.146 + 0.485 ln(diameter2 × height) and ln(leaf biomass, oven-dry, kg...... of this study was to develop local biomass models for wood, fruit, and leaves of Seabuckthorn. In November 2006, a diameter-stratified sample of 30 trees was harvested in Lete and Kunjo Village Development Committees at an altitude of about 2300 m amsl in the lower part of Mustang District, Nepal. The fresh...

  13. Impacts of Woody Invader Dillenia suffruticosa (Griff. Martelli on Physio-chemical Properties of Soil and, Below and Above Ground Flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A.K. Wickramathilake

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dillenia suffruticosa (Griffith Martelli, that spreads fast in low-lying areas in wet zone of Sri Lanka is currently listed as a nationally important Invasive Alien Species that deserves attention in ecological studies. Thus, impact of this woody invader on physical, chemical properties of soil and below and above ground flora was investigated. Five sampling sites were identified along a distance of 46km from Avissawella to Ratnapura. At each site, two adjacent plots [1m x10m each for D. suffruticosa present (D+ and absent (D-] were outlined. Physical and chemical soil parameters, microbial biomass and number of bacterial colonies in soil were determined using standard procedures and compared between D+ and D- by ANOVA using SPSS. Rate of decomposition of D. suffruticosa leaves was also determined using the litter bag technique at 35% and 50% moisture levels. Above ground plant species richness in sample stands was compared using Jaccard and Sorenson diversity indices.  Decomposition of D. suffruticosa leaves was slow, but occurred at a more or less similar rate irrespective of moisture content of soil. Particle size distribution in D+ soil showed a much higher percentage of large soil particles.  Higher % porosity in D+ sites was a clear indication that the soil was aerated.  The pH was significantly lower for D+ than D- thus developing acidic soils whereas conductivity has been significantly high making soil further stressed. The significant drop in Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC in D+ soil was a remarkable finding to be concerned with as it correlated with fertility of soil. Significantly higher values of phosphates reported in D+ soil support the idea that plant invaders are capable to increase phosphates in soil. Higher biomass values recorded for D+ sites together with higher number of bacterial colonies could be related to the unexpectedly recorded higher Organic Carbon. Both  the  Jaccard  and  Sorenson   indices indicated  that

  14. [Tree above-ground biomass allometries for carbon stocks estimation in the Caribbean mangroves in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Adriana; Zapata, Mauricio; Bolivar, Jhoanata; Monsalve, Alejandra; Espinosa, Sandra Milena; Sierra-Correa, Paula Cristina; Sierra, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    The distribution of carbon in “Blue Carbon” ecosystems such as mangroves is little known, when compared with the highly known terrestrial forests, despite its particular and recognized high productivity and carbon storage capacity. The objective of this study was to analyze the above ground biomass (AGB) of the species Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans from the Marine Protected Area of Distrito de Manejo Integrado (DMI), Cispatá-Tinajones-La Balsa, Caribbean Colombian coast. With official authorization, we harvested and studied 30 individuals of each species, and built allometric models in order to estimate AGB. Our AGB results indicated that the studied mangrove forests of the DMI Colombian Caribbean was of 129.69 ± 20.24 Mg/ha, equivalent to 64.85 ± 10.12 MgC/ha. The DMI has an area of 8 570.9 ha in mangrove forests, and we estimated that the total carbon potential stored was about 555 795.93 Mg C. The equations generated in this study can be considered as an alternative for the assessment of carbon stocks in AGB of mangrove forests in Colombia; as other available AGB allometric models do not discriminate mangrove forests, despite being particular ecosystems. They can be used for analysis at a more detailed scale and are considered useful to determine the carbon storage potential of mangrove forests, as a country alternative to support forest conservation and emission reduction strategies. In general, the potential of carbon storage from Colombian Caribbean mangrove forests is important and could promote the country leadership of the “blue carbon” stored.

  15. Spatial relationships between above-ground biomass and bird species biodiversity in Palawan, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Minerva; Friess, Daniel A.; Vilela, Bruno; Alban, Jose Don T. De; Monzon, Angelica Kristina V.; Veridiano, Rizza Karen A.; Tumaneng, Roven D.

    2017-01-01

    This study maps distribution and spatial congruence between Above-Ground Biomass (AGB) and species richness of IUCN listed conservation-dependent and endemic avian fauna in Palawan, Philippines. Grey Level Co-Occurrence Texture Matrices (GLCMs) extracted from Landsat and ALOS-PALSAR were used in conjunction with local field data to model and map local-scale field AGB using the Random Forest algorithm (r = 0.92 and RMSE = 31.33 Mg·ha-1). A support vector regression (SVR) model was used to identify the factors influencing variation in avian species richness at a 1km scale. AGB is one of the most important determinants of avian species richness for the study area. Topographic factors and anthropogenic factors such as distance from the roads were also found to strongly influence avian species richness. Hotspots of high AGB and high species richness concentration were mapped using hotspot analysis and the overlaps between areas of high AGB and avian species richness was calculated. Results show that the overlaps between areas of high AGB with high IUCN red listed avian species richness and endemic avian species richness were fairly limited at 13% and 8% at the 1-km scale. The overlap between 1) low AGB and low IUCN richness, and 2) low AGB and low endemic avian species richness was higher at 36% and 12% respectively. The enhanced capacity to spatially map the correlation between AGB and avian species richness distribution will further assist the conservation and protection of forest areas and threatened avian species. PMID:29206228

  16. Spatial relationships between above-ground biomass and bird species biodiversity in Palawan, Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Singh

    Full Text Available This study maps distribution and spatial congruence between Above-Ground Biomass (AGB and species richness of IUCN listed conservation-dependent and endemic avian fauna in Palawan, Philippines. Grey Level Co-Occurrence Texture Matrices (GLCMs extracted from Landsat and ALOS-PALSAR were used in conjunction with local field data to model and map local-scale field AGB using the Random Forest algorithm (r = 0.92 and RMSE = 31.33 Mg·ha-1. A support vector regression (SVR model was used to identify the factors influencing variation in avian species richness at a 1km scale. AGB is one of the most important determinants of avian species richness for the study area. Topographic factors and anthropogenic factors such as distance from the roads were also found to strongly influence avian species richness. Hotspots of high AGB and high species richness concentration were mapped using hotspot analysis and the overlaps between areas of high AGB and avian species richness was calculated. Results show that the overlaps between areas of high AGB with high IUCN red listed avian species richness and endemic avian species richness were fairly limited at 13% and 8% at the 1-km scale. The overlap between 1 low AGB and low IUCN richness, and 2 low AGB and low endemic avian species richness was higher at 36% and 12% respectively. The enhanced capacity to spatially map the correlation between AGB and avian species richness distribution will further assist the conservation and protection of forest areas and threatened avian species.

  17. [Vegetation above-ground biomass and its affecting factors in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-guo; Fan, Jun; Wang, Quan-jiu; Wang, Li

    2011-03-01

    Field investigations were conducted in Liudaogou small watershed in late September 2009 to study the differences of vegetation above-ground biomass, soil moisture content, and soil nutrient contents under different land use patterns, aimed to approach the vegetation above-ground biomass level and related affecting factors in typical small watershed in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau. The above-ground dry biomass of the main vegetations in Liudaogou was 177-2207 g x m(-2), and that in corn field, millet field, abandoned farmland, artificial grassland, natural grassland, and shrub land was 2097-2207, 518-775, 248-578, 280-545, 177-396, and 372-680 g x m(-2), respectively. The mean soil moisture content in 0-100 layer was the highest (14.2%) in farmlands and the lowest (10.9%) in shrub land. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture content was the greatest (26. 7% ) in abandoned farmland, indicating the strong spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture in this kind of farmland. The mean soil water storage was in the order of farmland > artificial grassland > natural grassland > shrub land. Soil dry layer was observed in alfalfa and caragana lands. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.639, P water storage, and also, a very significant positive correlation between above-ground fresh biomass and vegetation height. The above-ground biomass of the higher vegetations could potentially better control the wind and water erosion in the water/wind erosion crisscross region. Vegetation above-ground biomass was highly correlated with soil moisture and nutrient contents, but had no significant correlations with elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, and soil bulk density.

  18. Structural Health Monitoring of Above-Ground Storage Tank Floors by Ultrasonic Guided Wave Excitation on the Tank Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premesh S. Lowe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in using ultrasonic guided waves to assess the structural degradation of above-ground storage tank floors. This is a non-invasive and economically viable means of assessing structural degradation. Above-ground storage tank floors are ageing assets which need to be inspected periodically to avoid structural failure. At present, normal-stress type transducers are bonded to the tank annular chime to generate a force field in the thickness direction of the floor and excite fundamental symmetric and asymmetric Lamb modes. However, the majority of above-ground storage tanks in use have no annular chime due to a simplified design and/or have a degraded chime due to corrosion. This means that transducers cannot be mounted on the chime to assess structural health according to the present technology, and the market share of structural health monitoring of above-ground storage tank floors using ultrasonic guided wave is thus limited. Therefore, the present study investigates the potential of using the tank wall to bond the transducer instead of the tank annular chime. Both normal and shear type transducers were investigated numerically, and results were validated using a 4.1 m diameter above-ground storage tank. The study results show shear mode type transducers bonded to the tank wall can be used to assess the structural health of the above-ground tank floors using an ultrasonic guided wave. It is also shown that for the cases studied there is a 7.4 dB signal-to-noise ratio improvement at 45 kHz for the guided wave excitation on the tank wall using shear mode transducers.

  19. Structural Health Monitoring of Above-Ground Storage Tank Floors by Ultrasonic Guided Wave Excitation on the Tank Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Premesh S; Duan, Wenbo; Kanfoud, Jamil; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2017-11-04

    There is an increasing interest in using ultrasonic guided waves to assess the structural degradation of above-ground storage tank floors. This is a non-invasive and economically viable means of assessing structural degradation. Above-ground storage tank floors are ageing assets which need to be inspected periodically to avoid structural failure. At present, normal-stress type transducers are bonded to the tank annular chime to generate a force field in the thickness direction of the floor and excite fundamental symmetric and asymmetric Lamb modes. However, the majority of above-ground storage tanks in use have no annular chime due to a simplified design and/or have a degraded chime due to corrosion. This means that transducers cannot be mounted on the chime to assess structural health according to the present technology, and the market share of structural health monitoring of above-ground storage tank floors using ultrasonic guided wave is thus limited. Therefore, the present study investigates the potential of using the tank wall to bond the transducer instead of the tank annular chime. Both normal and shear type transducers were investigated numerically, and results were validated using a 4.1 m diameter above-ground storage tank. The study results show shear mode type transducers bonded to the tank wall can be used to assess the structural health of the above-ground tank floors using an ultrasonic guided wave. It is also shown that for the cases studied there is a 7.4 dB signal-to-noise ratio improvement at 45 kHz for the guided wave excitation on the tank wall using shear mode transducers.

  20. Risk Assessment of Genetically Engineered Maize Resistant to Diabrotica spp.: Influence on Above-Ground Arthropods in the Czech Republic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Svobodová

    Full Text Available Transgenic maize MON88017, expressing the Cry3Bb1 toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt maize, confers resistance to corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp. and provides tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate. However, prior to commercialization, substantial assessment of potential effects on non-target organisms within agroecosystems is required. The MON88017 event was therefore evaluated under field conditions in Southern Bohemia in 2009-2011, to detect possible impacts on the above-ground arthropod species. The study compared MON88017, its near-isogenic non-Bt hybrid DK315 (treated or not treated with the soil insecticide Dursban 10G and two non-Bt reference hybrids (KIPOUS and PR38N86. Each hybrid was grown on five 0.5 ha plots distributed in a 14-ha field with a Latin square design. Semiquantitative ELISA was used to verify Cry3Bb1 toxin levels in the Bt maize. The species spectrum of non-target invertebrates changed during seasons and was affected by weather conditions. The thrips Frankliniella occidentalis was the most abundant species in all three successive years. The next most common species were aphids Rhopalosiphum padi and Metopolophium dirhodum. Frequently observed predators included Orius spp. and several species within the Coccinellidae. Throughout the three-year study, analysis of variance indicated some significant differences (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the abundance and diversity of plant dwelling insects was similar in maize with the same genetic background, for both Bt (MON88017 and non-Bt (DK315 untreated or insecticide treated. KIPOUS and PR38N86 showed some differences in species abundance relative to the Bt maize and its near-isogenic hybrid. However, the effect of management regime on arthropod community was insignificant and accounted only for a negligible portion of the variability.

  1. Evaluation of Above Ground Biomass Estimation Accuracy for Alpine Meadow Based on MODIS Vegetation Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Bao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal husbandry is the main agricultural type over the Tibetan Plateau, above ground biomass (AGB is very important to monitor the productivity for administration of grassland resources and grazing balance. The MODIS vegetation indices have been successfully used in numerous studies on grassland AGB estimation in the Tibetan Plateau area. However, there are considerable differences of AGB estimation models both in the form of the models and the accuracy of estimation. In this study, field measurements of AGB data at Sangke Town, Gansu Province, China in four years (2013-2016 and MODIS indices (NDVI and EVI are combined to construct AGB estimation models of alpine meadow grassland. The field measured AGB are also used to evaluate feasibility of models developed for large scale in applying to small area. The results show that (1 the differences in biomass were relatively large among the 5 sample areas of alpine meadow grassland in the study area during 2013-2016, with the maximum and minimum biomass values of 3,963 kg DW/ha and 745.5 kg DW/ha, respectively, and mean value of 1,907.7 kg DW/ha; the mean of EVI value range (0.42-0.60 are slightly smaller than the NDVI’s (0.59-0.75; (2 the optimum estimation model of grassland AGB in the study area is the exponential model based on MODIS EVI, with root mean square error of 656.6 kg DW/ha and relative estimation errors (REE of 36.3%; (3 the estimation errors of grassland AGB models previously constructed at different spatial scales (the Tibetan Plateau, the Gannan Prefecture, and Xiahe County are higher than those directly constructed based on the small area of this study by 9.5%–31.7%, with the increase of the modeling study area scales, the REE increasing as well. This study presents an improved monitoring algorithm of alpine natural grassland AGB estimation and provides a clear direction for future improvement of the grassland AGB estimation and grassland productivity from remote sensing

  2. Peculiarities of 137Cs translocation in higher plants under environmental and laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciulioniene, D.; Kiponas, D.; Luksiene, B.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of technogenic 137 Cs in higher plant roots and above-ground part and comparison of 137 Cs and 40 K transfer from roots to the above-ground part of plant as well as distribution within above-ground part of plant under environmental conditions were investigated. Parallely, the results of the investigations of 137 Cs accumulation in the roots and shoots of test-organism Lepidium sativum L. in the model hydroponic system aqueous solution-solid phase-plant were analyzed. Peculiarities of transfer of this radionuclide from roots to shoots during the entire plant growing period under experimental conditions were determined. 137 Cs activity in the tested plants of meadow ecotop was on an average 6-fold lower than in the plants of swamp and 10-fold lower than in the plants of forest ecotop. Differences in 137 Cs and 40 K transfer from roots to the above-ground part of plant and their distribution in plants indicate particular biological metabolism of these radionuclides in plants. Increased levels of 137 Cs in soil practically did not affect the 40 K transfer from roots to the above-ground part of plants. The results of investigations under natural and laboratory conditions show that increasing contamination of growth medium with 137 Cs caused higher accumulation of this radionuclide in roots but its transfer from roots to the above-ground part of plant decreased or changed insignificantly. 137 Cs transfer from roots to above-ground part under natural (Artemisia vulgaris) and laboratory (Lepidium sativum) conditions was rather similar. (authors)

  3. Can above-ground ecosystem services compensate for reduced fertilizer input and soil organic matter in annual crops?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Stijn; van der Putten, Wim H; Kleijn, David

    2016-01-01

    1.Above-ground and below-ground environmental conditions influence crop yield by pollination, pest pressure, and resource supply. However, little is known about how interactions between these factors contribute to yield. Here, we used oilseed rape Brassica napus to test their effects on crop

  4. Effect of nitrogen addition and drought on above-ground biomass of expanding tall grasses Calamagrostis epigejos and Arrhenatherum elatius

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiala, Karel; Tůma, Ivan; Holub, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2011), s. 275-281 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : nitrogen * drought * above-ground biomass Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.557, year: 2011

  5. The effect of cassava-based bioethanol production on above-ground carbon stocks: A case study from Southern Mali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vang Rasmussen, Laura; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Birch-Thomsen, Torben; Kristensen, Søren B.P.; Traoré, Oumar

    2012-01-01

    Increasing energy use and the need to mitigate climate change make production of liquid biofuels a high priority. Farmers respond worldwide to this increasing demand by converting forests and grassland into biofuel crops, but whether biofuels offer carbon savings depends on the carbon emissions that occur when land use is changed to biofuel crops. This paper reports the results of a study on cassava-based bioethanol production undertaken in the Sikasso region in Southern Mali. The paper outlines the estimated impacts on above-ground carbon stocks when land use is changed to increase cassava production. The results show that expansion of cassava production for bioethanol will most likely lead to the conversion of fallow areas to cassava. A land use change from fallow to cassava creates a reduction in the above-ground carbon stocks in the order of 4–13 Mg C ha −1 , depending on (a) the age of the fallow, (b) the allometric equation used and (c) whether all trees are removed or the larger, useful trees are preserved. This ‘carbon debt’ associated with the above-ground biomass loss would take 8–25 years to repay if fossil fuels are replaced with cassava-based bioethanol. - Highlights: ► Demands for biofuels make production of cassava-based bioethanol a priority. ► Farmers in Southern Mali are likely to convert fallow areas to cassava production. ► Converting fallow to cassava creates reductions in above-ground carbon stocks. ► Estimates of carbon stock reductions include that farmers preserve useful trees. ► The carbon debt associated with above-ground biomass loss takes 8–25 years to repay.

  6. Estimation of above ground biomass by using multispectral data for Evergreen Forest in Phu Hin Rong Kla National Park, Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwanprasit, C.

    2010-01-01

    Tropical forest is the most important and largest source for stocking CO 2 from the atmosphere which might be one of the main sources of carbon emission, global warming and climate change in recent decades. There are two main objectives of this study. The first one is to establish a relationship between above ground biomass and vegetation indices and the other is to evaluate above ground biomass and carbon sequestration for evergreen forest areas in Phu Hin Rong Kla National park, Thailand. Random sampling design based was applied for calculating the above ground biomass at stand level in the selected area by using Brown and Tsutsumi allometric equations. Landsat 7 ETM+ data in February 2009 was used. Support Vector Machine (SVM) was applied for identifying evergreen forest area. Forty-three of vegetation indices and image transformations were used for finding the best correlation with forest stand biomass. Regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between the biomass volume at stand level and digital data from the satellite image. TM51 which derived from Tsutsumi allometric equation was the highest correlation with stand biomass. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was not the best correlation in this study. The best biomass estimation model was from TM51 and ND71 (R2 =0.658). The totals of above ground biomass and carbon sequestration were 112,062,010 ton and 56,031,005 ton respectively. The application of this study would be quite useful for understanding the terrestrial carbon dynamics and global climate change. (author)

  7. Mapping Above-Ground Biomass in a Tropical Forest in Cambodia Using Canopy Textures Derived from Google Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Minerva; Evans, Damian; Friess, Daniel; Tan, Boun; Nin, Chan

    2015-01-01

    This study develops a modelling framework for utilizing very high-resolution (VHR) aerial imagery for monitoring stocks of above-ground biomass (AGB) in a tropical forest in Southeast Asia. Three different texture-based methods (grey level co-occurrence metric (GLCM), Gabor wavelets and Fourier-based textural ordination (FOTO)) were used in conjunction with two different machine learning (ML)-based regression techniques (support vector regression (SVR) and random forest (RF) regression). Thes...

  8. Forest Structure, Composition and Above Ground Biomass of Tree Community in Tropical Dry Forests of Eastern Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudam Charan SAHU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of biomass, structure and composition of tropical forests implies also the investigation of forest productivity, protection of biodiversity and removal of CO2 from the atmosphere via C-stocks. The hereby study aimed at understanding the forest structure, composition and above ground biomass (AGB of tropical dry deciduous forests of Eastern Ghats, India, where as a total of 128 sample plots (20 x 20 meters were laid. The study showed the presence of 71 tree species belonging to 57 genera and 30 families. Dominant tree species was Shorea robusta with an importance value index (IVI of 40.72, while Combretaceae had the highest family importance value (FIV of 39.01. Mean stand density was 479 trees ha-1 and a basal area of 15.20 m2 ha-1. Shannon’s diversity index was 2.01 ± 0.22 and Simpson’s index was 0.85 ± 0.03. About 54% individuals were in the size between 10 and 20 cm DBH, indicating growing forests. Mean above ground biomass value was 98.87 ± 68.8 Mg ha-1. Some of the dominant species that contributed to above ground biomass were Shorea robusta (17.2%, Madhuca indica (7.9%, Mangifera indica (6.9%, Terminalia alata (6.9% and Diospyros melanoxylon (4.4%, warranting extra efforts for their conservation. The results suggested that C-stocks of tropical dry forests can be enhanced by in-situ conserving the high C-density species and also by selecting these species for afforestation and stand improvement programs. Correlations were computed to understand the relationship between above ground biomass, diversity indices, density and basal area, which may be helpful for implementation of REDD+ (reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and foster conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks scheme.

  9. Above-ground dry matter accumulation by Eucalyptus grandis and its relation to standard meteorological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the rate of increase of biomass in some stands of Eucalyptus grandis, growing near Coffs Harbour, N.S.W., Australia, is explored in terms of estimated evapotranspiration and radiation interception, and related to a similar previous study of Pinus radiata. A possible role of method of planting, site slope and site aspect in biomass increase is also discussed

  10. Long-term changes in above ground biomass after disturbance in a neotropical dry forest, Hellshire Hills, Jamaica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niño, Milena; McLaren, Kurt P.; Meilby, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We used data from experimental plots (control, partially cut and clear-cut) established in 1998, in a tropical dry forest (TDF) in Jamaica, to assess changes in above ground biomass (AGB) 10 years after disturbance. The treatments reduced AGB significantly in 1999 (partially cut: 37.6 %, clear-cu...... for the clear-cut plots to recover pre-treatment AGB; this is significantly longer than AGB recovery time for some successional rainforests on abandoned pastures/farmland. Consequently, this TDF may not be as resilient as tropical rainforests....

  11. Development of Allometric Equations for Estimating Above-Ground Liana Biomass in Tropical Primary and Secondary Forests, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Addo-Fordjour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study developed allometric equations for estimating liana stem and total above-ground biomass in primary and secondary forests in the Penang National Park, Penang, Malaysia. Using biomass-diameter-length data of 60 liana individuals representing 15 species, allometric equations were developed for liana stem biomass and total above-ground biomass (TAGB. Three types of allometric equations were developed: models fitted to untransformed, weighted, and log-transformed (log10 data. There was a significant linear relationship between biomass and the predictors (diameter, length, and/or their combinations. The same set of models was developed for primary and secondary forests due to absence of differences in regression line slopes of the forests (ANCOVA: . The coefficients of determination values of the models were high (stem: 0.861 to 0.990; TAGB: 0.900 to 0.992. Generally, log-transformed models showed better fit (Furnival's index, FI 0.5. A comparison of the best TAGB model in this study (based on FI with previously published equations indicated that most of the equations significantly ( overestimated TAGB of lianas. However, a previous equation from Southeast Asia estimated TAGB similar to that of the current equation (. Therefore, regional or intracontinental equations should be preferred to intercontinental equations when estimating liana biomass.

  12. Impact of deforestation and climate on the Amazon Basin's above-ground biomass during 1993-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exbrayat, Jean-François; Liu, Yi Y; Williams, Mathew

    2017-11-15

    Since the 1960s, large-scale deforestation in the Amazon Basin has contributed to rising global CO 2 concentrations and to climate change. Recent advances in satellite observations enable estimates of gross losses of above-ground biomass (AGB) stocks due to deforestation. However, because of simultaneous regrowth, the net contribution of deforestation emissions to rising atmospheric CO 2 concentrations is poorly quantified. Climate change may also reduce the potential for forest regeneration in previously disturbed regions. Here, we address these points of uncertainty with a machine-learning approach that combines satellite observations of AGB with climate data across the Amazon Basin to reconstruct annual maps of potential AGB during 1993-2012, the above-ground C storage potential of the undisturbed landscape. We derive a 2.2 Pg C loss of AGB over the study period, and, for the regions where these losses occur, we estimate a 0.7 Pg C reduction in potential AGB. Thus, climate change has led to a decline of ~1/3 in the capacity of these disturbed forests to recover and recapture the C lost in disturbances during 1993-2012. Our approach further shows that annual variations in land use change mask the natural relationship between the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and AGB stocks in disturbed regions.

  13. Below-ground abiotic and biotic heterogeneity shapes above-ground infection outcomes and spatial divergence in a host-parasite interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Ayco J M; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Burdon, Jeremy J; Bissett, Andrew; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the impact of below-ground and above-ground environmental heterogeneity on the ecology and evolution of a natural plant-pathogen interaction. We combined field measurements and a reciprocal inoculation experiment to investigate the potential for natural variation in abiotic and biotic factors to mediate infection outcomes in the association between the fungal pathogen Melampsora lini and its wild flax host, Linum marginale, where pathogen strains and plant lines originated from two ecologically distinct habitat types that occur in close proximity ('bog' and 'hill'). The two habitat types differed strikingly in soil moisture and soil microbiota. Infection outcomes for different host-pathogen combinations were strongly affected by the habitat of origin of the plant lines and pathogen strains, the soil environment and their interactions. Our results suggested that tradeoffs play a key role in explaining the evolutionary divergence in interaction traits among the two habitat types. Overall, we demonstrate that soil heterogeneity, by mediating infection outcomes and evolutionary divergence, can contribute to the maintenance of variation in resistance and pathogenicity within a natural host-pathogen metapopulation. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Ultraviolet-B Radiation and Nitrogen Affect Nutrient Concentrations and the Amount of Nutrients Acquired by Above-Ground Organs of Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Carlos M.; Coutinho, João F.; Bacelar, Eunice A.; Gonçalves, Berta M.; Björn, Lars Olof; Moutinho Pereira, José

    2012-01-01

    UV-B radiation effects on nutrient concentrations in above-ground organs of maize were investigated at silking and maturity at different levels of applied nitrogen under field conditions. The experiment simulated a 20% stratospheric ozone depletion over Portugal. At silking, UV-B increased N, K, Ca, and Zn concentrations, whereas at maturity Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu increased and N, P and Mn decreased in some plant organs. Generally, at maturity, N, Ca, Cu, and Mn were lower, while P, K, and Zn concentrations in stems and nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were higher in N-starved plants. UV-B and N effects on shoot dry biomass were more pronounced than on nutrient concentrations. Nutrient uptake decreased under high UV-B and increased with increasing N application, mainly at maturity harvest. Significant interactions UV-B x N were observed for NUE and for concentration and mass of some elements. For instance, under enhanced UV-B, N, Cu, Zn, and Mn concentrations decreased in leaves, except on N-stressed plants, whereas they were less affected by N nutrition. In order to minimize nutritional, economical, and environmental negative consequences, fertiliser recommendations based on element concentration or yield goals may need to be adjusted. PMID:22629161

  15. Structural, physiognomic and above-ground biomass variation in savanna–forest transition zones on three continents – how different are co-occurring savanna and forest formations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Veenendaal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Through interpretations of remote-sensing data and/or theoretical propositions, the idea that forest and savanna represent "alternative stable states" is gaining increasing acceptance. Filling an observational gap, we present detailed stratified floristic and structural analyses for forest and savanna stands located mostly within zones of transition (where both vegetation types occur in close proximity in Africa, South America and Australia. Woody plant leaf area index variation was related to tree canopy cover in a similar way for both savanna and forest with substantial overlap between the two vegetation types. As total woody plant canopy cover increased, so did the relative contribution of middle and lower strata of woody vegetation. Herbaceous layer cover declined as woody cover increased. This pattern of understorey grasses and herbs progressively replaced by shrubs as the canopy closes over was found for both savanna and forests and on all continents. Thus, once subordinate woody canopy layers are taken into account, a less marked transition in woody plant cover across the savanna–forest-species discontinuum is observed compared to that inferred when trees of a basal diameter > 0.1 m are considered in isolation. This is especially the case for shrub-dominated savannas and in taller savannas approaching canopy closure. An increased contribution of forest species to the total subordinate cover is also observed as savanna stand canopy closure occurs. Despite similarities in canopy-cover characteristics, woody vegetation in Africa and Australia attained greater heights and stored a greater amount of above-ground biomass than in South America. Up to three times as much above-ground biomass is stored in forests compared to savannas under equivalent climatic conditions. Savanna–forest transition zones were also found to typically occur at higher precipitation regimes for South America than for Africa. Nevertheless, consistent across all three

  16. The relationship between growth and development of above ground organs with roots of winter wheat using 32P tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhifen; Chen Xueliu; Yu Meiyan

    1997-01-01

    The relationship of growth and development between above ground organs and roots of winter wheat, Lumai-14, was studied using 32 P tracer. The results showed that before the spike formation, dry matter accumulation in roots, stems and leaves were synchronous, and after that they were asynchronous. The dry matter accumulation in stems and leaves were significantly related to that of roots throughout the whole growing period of winter wheat. After the spike formation, the dry matter accumulation in spikes was not related to that of roots. The 32 P distribution in stems and leaves were related to that of roots significantly, however, the relationship between spikes and roots was not obviously related, which was consistent with the dry matter accumulations in various organs. The metabolic activities of stems, leaves and spike were significantly related to that of roots respectively

  17. Below and above-ground carbon distribution along a rainfall gradient. A case of the Zambezi teak forests, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoma, Justine; Moors, Eddy; Kruijt, Bart; Speer, James H.; Vinya, Royd; Chidumayo, Emmanuel N.; Leemans, Rik

    2018-02-01

    Understanding carbon (C) stocks or biomass in forests is important to examine how forests mitigate climate change. To estimate biomass in stems, branches and roots takes intensive fieldwork to uproot, cut and weigh the mass of each component. Different models or equations are also required. Our research focussed on the dry tropical Zambezi teak forests and we studied their structure at three sites following a rainfall gradient in Zambia. We sampled 3558 trees at 42 plots covering a combined area of 15ha. Using data from destructive tree samples, we developed mixed-species biomass models to estimate above ground biomass for small (southern Africa, will likely reduce the C storage potential of the Zambezi teak forests, thereby adversely affecting their mitigating role in climate change.

  18. Local above-ground persistence of vascular plants: Life-history trade-offs and environmental constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ozinga, W.A.; Hennekens, S.M.; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Smits, N.A.C.; Bekker, R.M.; Römermann, Ch.; Klimeš, Leoš; Bakker, J.P.; Van Groenendael, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2007), s. 489-497 ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0723 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : vegetation dynamics * dispersal * permanent plots Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.251, year: 2007

  19. Results on MeV-scale dark matter from a gram-scale cryogenic calorimeter operated above ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angloher, G.; Bauer, P.; Bento, A.; Iachellini, N.F.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Mancuso, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Reindl, F.; Rothe, J.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Pagliarone, C.; Schaeffner, K. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Defay, X.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Langenkaemper, A.; Mondragon, E.; Muenster, A.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Schoenert, S.; Thi, H.H.T.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Guetlein, A.; Kluck, H.; Puig, R.; Schieck, J.; Stahlberg, M.; Tuerkoglu, C. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Collaboration: CRESST Collaboration

    2017-09-15

    Models for light dark matter particles with masses below 1 GeV/c{sup 2} are a natural and well-motivated alternative to so-far unobserved weakly interacting massive particles. Gram-scale cryogenic calorimeters provide the required detector performance to detect these particles and extend the direct dark matter search program of CRESST. A prototype 0.5 g sapphire detector developed for the ν-cleus experiment has achieved an energy threshold of E{sub th} = (19.7 ± 0.9)eV. This is one order of magnitude lower than for previous devices and independent of the type of particle interaction. The result presented here is obtained in a setup above ground without significant shielding against ambient and cosmogenic radiation. Although operated in a high-background environment, the detector probes a new range of light-mass dark matter particles previously not accessible by direct searches. We report the first limit on the spin-independent dark matter particle-nucleon cross section for masses between 140 and 500 MeV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  20. Results on MeV-scale dark matter from a gram-scale cryogenic calorimeter operated above ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angloher, G.; Bauer, P.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Defay, X.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Iachellini, N. Ferreiro; Gorla, P.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Langenkämper, A.; Loebell, J.; Mancuso, M.; Mondragon, E.; Münster, A.; Oberauer, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Puig, R.; Reindl, F.; Rothe, J.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stahlberg, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Thi, H. H. Trinh; Türkoǧlu, C.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2017-09-01

    Models for light dark matter particles with masses below 1 GeV/c^2 are a natural and well-motivated alternative to so-far unobserved weakly interacting massive particles. Gram-scale cryogenic calorimeters provide the required detector performance to detect these particles and extend the direct dark matter search program of CRESST. A prototype 0.5 g sapphire detector developed for the ν -cleus experiment has achieved an energy threshold of E_{th}=(19.7± 0.9) eV. This is one order of magnitude lower than for previous devices and independent of the type of particle interaction. The result presented here is obtained in a setup above ground without significant shielding against ambient and cosmogenic radiation. Although operated in a high-background environment, the detector probes a new range of light-mass dark matter particles previously not accessible by direct searches. We report the first limit on the spin-independent dark matter particle-nucleon cross section for masses between 140 and 500 MeV/c^2.

  1. Mapping Above-Ground Biomass in a Tropical Forest in Cambodia Using Canopy Textures Derived from Google Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a modelling framework for utilizing very high-resolution (VHR aerial imagery for monitoring stocks of above-ground biomass (AGB in a tropical forest in Southeast Asia. Three different texture-based methods (grey level co-occurrence metric (GLCM, Gabor wavelets and Fourier-based textural ordination (FOTO were used in conjunction with two different machine learning (ML-based regression techniques (support vector regression (SVR and random forest (RF regression. These methods were implemented on both 50-cm resolution Digital Globe data extracted from Google Earth™ (GE and 8-cm commercially obtained VHR imagery. This study further examines the role of forest biophysical parameters, such as ground-measured canopy cover and vertical canopy height, in explaining AGB distribution. Three models were developed using: (i horizontal canopy variables (i.e., canopy cover and texture variables plus vertical canopy height; (ii horizontal variables only; and (iii texture variables only. AGB was variable across the site, ranging from 51.02 Mg/ha to 356.34 Mg/ha. GE-based AGB estimates were comparable to those derived from commercial aerial imagery. The findings demonstrate that novel use of this array of texture-based techniques with GE imagery can help promote the wider use of freely available imagery for low-cost, fine-resolution monitoring of forests parameters at the landscape scale.

  2. Safety assessment for the above ground storage of Cadmium Safety and Control Rods at the Solid Waste Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, K.W.

    1993-11-01

    The mission of the Savannah River Site is changing from radioisotope production to waste management and environmental restoration. As such, Reactor Engineering has recently developed a plan to transfer the safety and control rods from the C, K, L, and P reactor disassembly basin areas to the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Storage Pads for long-term, retrievable storage. The TRU pads are located within the Solid Waste Management Facilities at the Savannah River Site. An Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Safety Evaluation has been performed for the proposed disassembly basin operations phase of the Cadmium Safety and Control Rod Project. The USQ screening identified a required change to the authorization basis; however, the Proposed Activity does not involve a positive USQ Safety Evaluation. A Hazard Assessment for the Cadmium Safety and Control Rod Project determined that the above-ground storage of the cadmium rods results in no change in hazard level at the TRU pads. A Safety Assessment that specifically addresses the storage (at the TRU pads) phase of the Cadmium Safety and Control Rod Project has been performed. Results of the Safety Assessment support the conclusion that a positive USQ is not involved as a result of the Proposed Activity

  3. Evaluating Generic Pantropical Allometric Models for the Estimation of Above-Ground Biomass in the Teak Plantations of Southern Western Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sandeep

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of suitable tree biomass allometric equations is crucial for making precise and non- destructive estimation of carbon storage and biomass energy values. The aim of this research was to evaluate the accuracy of the most commonly used pantropical allometric models and site-specific models to estimate the above-ground biomass (AGB in different aged teak plantations of Southern Western Ghats of India. For this purpose, the AGB data measured for 70 trees with diameter >10 cm from different aged teak plantations in Kerala part of Southern Western Ghats following destructive procedure was used. The results show that site specific models based on a single predictor variable diameter at breast height (dbh, though simple, may grossly increase the uncertainty across sites. Hence, a generic model encompassing dbh, height and wood specific gravity with sufficient calibration taking into account different forest types is advised for the tropical forest systems. The study also suggests that the commonly used pantropical models should be evaluated for different ecosystems prior to their application at national or regional scales.

  4. Influence of landscape heterogeneity on spatial patterns of wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Anderson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies using the RAINFOR network of forest plots have generated significant insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest carbon cycling in Amazonia. In this work, we map and explore the landscape context of several major RAINFOR plot clusters using Landsat ETM+ satellite data. In particular, we explore how representative the plots are of their landscape context, and test whether bias in plot location within landscapes may be influencing the regional mean values obtained for important forest biophysical parameters. Specifically, we evaluate whether the regional variations in wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass derived from the RAINFOR network could be driven by systematic and unintentional biases in plot location. Remote sensing data covering 45 field plots were aggregated to generate landscape maps to identify the specific physiognomy of the plots. In the Landsat ETM+ data, it was possible to spectrally differentiate three types of terra firme forest, three types of forests over Paleovarzea geomorphologycal formation, two types of bamboo-dominated forest, palm forest, Heliconia monodominant vegetation, swamp forest, disturbed forests and land use areas. Overall, the plots were generally representative of the forest physiognomies in the landscape in which they are located. Furthermore, the analysis supports the observed regional trends in those important forest parameters. This study demonstrates the utility of landscape scale analysis of forest physiognomies for validating and supporting the finds of plot based studies. Moreover, the more precise geolocation of many key RAINFOR plot clusters achieved during this research provides important contextual information for studies employing the RAINFOR database.

  5. Structure and distribution of glandular and non-glandular trichomes on above-ground organs in Inula helenium L. (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Sulborska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Micromorphology and distribution of glandular and non-glandular trichomes on the above-ground organs of Inula helenium L. were investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Two types of biseriate glandular trichomes, i.e. sessile and stalk hairs, and non-glandular trichomes were recorded. Sessile glandular trichomes were found on all examined I. helenium organs (with their highest density on the abaxial surface of leaves and disk florets, and on stems, whereas stalk glandular trichomes were found on leaves and stems. Sessile trichomes were characterised by a slightly lower height (58–103 μm and width (32–35 μm than the stalk trichomes (62–111 μm x 31–36 μm. Glandular hairs were composed of 5–7 (sessile trichomes or 6–9 (stalk trichomes cell tiers. Apical trichome cell tiers exhibited features of secretory cells. Secretion was accumulated in subcuticular space, which expanded and ruptured at the top, and released its content. Histochemical assays showed the presence of lipids and polyphenols, whereas no starch was detected. Non-glandular trichomes were seen on involucral bracts, leaves and stems (more frequently on involucral bracts. Their structure comprised 2–9 cells; basal cells (1–6 were smaller and linearly arranged, while apical cells had a prozenchymatous shape. The apical cell was the longest and sharply pointed. Applied histochemical tests revealed orange-red (presence of lipids and brow colour (presence of polyphenols in the apical cells of the trichomes. This may suggest that beside their protective role, the trichomes may participate in secretion of secondary metabolites.

  6. Estimating Above-Ground Biomass in Sub-Tropical Buffer Zone Community Forests, Nepal, Using Sentinel 2 Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santa Pandit

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of above-ground biomass (AGB is important for the sustainable management of forests, especially buffer zone (areas within the protected area, where restrictions are placed upon resource use and special measure are undertaken to intensify the conservation value of protected area areas with a high dependence on forest products. This study presents a new AGB estimation method and demonstrates the potential of medium-resolution Sentinel-2 Multi-Spectral Instrument (MSI data application as an alternative to hyperspectral data in inaccessible regions. Sentinel-2 performance was evaluated for a buffer zone community forest in Parsa National Park, Nepal, using field-based AGB as a dependent variable, as well as spectral band values and spectral-derived vegetation indices as independent variables in the Random Forest (RF algorithm. The 10-fold cross-validation was used to evaluate model effectiveness. The effect of the input variable number on AGB prediction was also investigated. The model using all extracted spectral information plus all derived spectral vegetation indices provided better AGB estimates (R2 = 0.81 and RMSE = 25.57 t ha−1. Incorporating the optimal subset of key variables did not improve model variance but reduced the error slightly. This result is explained by the technically-advanced nature of Sentinel-2, which includes fine spatial resolution (10, 20 m and strategically-positioned bands (red-edge, conducted in flat topography with an advanced machine learning algorithm. However, assessing its transferability to other forest types with varying altitude would enable future performance and interpretability assessments of Sentinel-2.

  7. Modelling above Ground Biomass in Tanzanian Miombo Woodlands Using TanDEM-X WorldDEM and Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Puliti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR data has great potential for monitoring large scale forest above ground biomass (AGB in the tropics due to the increased ability to retrieve 3D information even under cloud cover. To date; results in tropical forests have been inconsistent and further knowledge on the accuracy of models linking AGB and InSAR height data is crucial for the development of large scale forest monitoring programs. This study provides an example of the use of TanDEM-X WorldDEM data to model AGB in Tanzanian woodlands. The primary objective was to assess the accuracy of a model linking AGB with InSAR height from WorldDEM after the subtraction of ground heights. The secondary objective was to assess the possibility of obtaining InSAR height for field plots when the terrain heights were derived from global navigation satellite systems (GNSS; i.e., as an alternative to using airborne laser scanning (ALS. The results revealed that the AGB model using InSAR height had a predictive accuracy of R M S E = 24.1 t·ha−1; or 38.8% of the mean AGB when terrain heights were derived from ALS. The results were similar when using terrain heights from GNSS. The accuracy of the predicted AGB was improved when compared to a previous study using TanDEM-X for a sub-area of the area of interest and was of similar magnitude to what was achieved in the same sub-area using ALS data. Overall; this study sheds new light on the opportunities that arise from the use of InSAR data for large scale AGB modelling in tropical woodlands.

  8. Sensitivity of Above-Ground Biomass Estimates to Height-Diameter Modelling in Mixed-Species West African Woodlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Valbuena

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that above-ground biomass (AGB inventories should include tree height (H, in addition to diameter (D. As H is a difficult variable to measure, H-D models are commonly used to predict H. We tested a number of approaches for H-D modelling, including additive terms which increased the complexity of the model, and observed how differences in tree-level predictions of H propagated to plot-level AGB estimations. We were especially interested in detecting whether the choice of method can lead to bias. The compared approaches listed in the order of increasing complexity were: (B0 AGB estimations from D-only; (B1 involving also H obtained from a fixed-effects H-D model; (B2 involving also species; (B3 including also between-plot variability as random effects; and (B4 involving multilevel nested random effects for grouping plots in clusters. In light of the results, the modelling approach affected the AGB estimation significantly in some cases, although differences were negligible for some of the alternatives. The most important differences were found between including H or not in the AGB estimation. We observed that AGB predictions without H information were very sensitive to the environmental stress parameter (E, which can induce a critical bias. Regarding the H-D modelling, the most relevant effect was found when species was included as an additive term. We presented a two-step methodology, which succeeded in identifying the species for which the general H-D relation was relevant to modify. Based on the results, our final choice was the single-level mixed-effects model (B3, which accounts for the species but also for the plot random effects reflecting site-specific factors such as soil properties and degree of disturbance.

  9. Detection of large above-ground biomass variability in lowland forest ecosystems by airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jubanski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of tropical forest above-ground biomass (AGB over large areas as input for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+ projects and climate change models is challenging. This is the first study which attempts to estimate AGB and its variability across large areas of tropical lowland forests in Central Kalimantan (Indonesia through correlating airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR to forest inventory data. Two LiDAR height metrics were analysed, and regression models could be improved through the use of LiDAR point densities as input (R2 = 0.88; n = 52. Surveying with a LiDAR point density per square metre of about 4 resulted in the best cost / benefit ratio. We estimated AGB for 600 km of LiDAR tracks and showed that there exists a considerable variability of up to 140% within the same forest type due to varying environmental conditions. Impact from logging operations and the associated AGB losses dating back more than 10 yr could be assessed by LiDAR but not by multispectral satellite imagery. Comparison with a Landsat classification for a 1 million ha study area where AGB values were based on site-specific field inventory data, regional literature estimates, and default values by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC showed an overestimation of 43%, 102%, and 137%, respectively. The results show that AGB overestimation may lead to wrong greenhouse gas (GHG emission estimates due to deforestation in climate models. For REDD+ projects this leads to inaccurate carbon stock estimates and consequently to significantly wrong REDD+ based compensation payments.

  10. Detection of large above-ground biomass variability in lowland forest ecosystems by airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubanski, J.; Ballhorn, U.; Kronseder, K.; Franke, J.; Siegert, F.

    2013-06-01

    Quantification of tropical forest above-ground biomass (AGB) over large areas as input for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) projects and climate change models is challenging. This is the first study which attempts to estimate AGB and its variability across large areas of tropical lowland forests in Central Kalimantan (Indonesia) through correlating airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to forest inventory data. Two LiDAR height metrics were analysed, and regression models could be improved through the use of LiDAR point densities as input (R2 = 0.88; n = 52). Surveying with a LiDAR point density per square metre of about 4 resulted in the best cost / benefit ratio. We estimated AGB for 600 km of LiDAR tracks and showed that there exists a considerable variability of up to 140% within the same forest type due to varying environmental conditions. Impact from logging operations and the associated AGB losses dating back more than 10 yr could be assessed by LiDAR but not by multispectral satellite imagery. Comparison with a Landsat classification for a 1 million ha study area where AGB values were based on site-specific field inventory data, regional literature estimates, and default values by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) showed an overestimation of 43%, 102%, and 137%, respectively. The results show that AGB overestimation may lead to wrong greenhouse gas (GHG) emission estimates due to deforestation in climate models. For REDD+ projects this leads to inaccurate carbon stock estimates and consequently to significantly wrong REDD+ based compensation payments.

  11. Comprehensive compositional analysis of plant cell walls (Lignocellulosic biomass) part I: lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Cliff E; Martin, Tina M; Pauly, Markus

    2010-03-11

    The need for renewable, carbon neutral, and sustainable raw materials for industry and society has become one of the most pressing issues for the 21st century. This has rekindled interest in the use of plant products as industrial raw materials for the production of liquid fuels for transportation(1) and other products such as biocomposite materials(7). Plant biomass remains one of the greatest untapped reserves on the planet(4). It is mostly comprised of cell walls that are composed of energy rich polymers including cellulose, various hemicelluloses (matrix polysaccharides, and the polyphenol lignin(6) and thus sometimes termed lignocellulosics. However, plant cell walls have evolved to be recalcitrant to degradation as walls provide tensile strength to cells and the entire plants, ward off pathogens, and allow water to be transported throughout the plant; in the case of trees up to more the 100 m above ground level. Due to the various functions of walls, there is an immense structural diversity within the walls of different plant species and cell types within a single plant(4). Hence, depending of what crop species, crop variety, or plant tissue is used for a biorefinery, the processing steps for depolymerization by chemical/enzymatic processes and subsequent fermentation of the various sugars to liquid biofuels need to be adjusted and optimized. This fact underpins the need for a thorough characterization of plant biomass feedstocks. Here we describe a comprehensive analytical methodology that enables the determination of the composition of lignocellulosics and is amenable to a medium to high-throughput analysis. In this first part we focus on the analysis of the polyphenol lignin (Figure 1). The method starts of with preparing destarched cell wall material. The resulting lignocellulosics are then split up to determine its lignin content by acetylbromide solubilization(3), and its lignin composition in terms of its syringyl, guaiacyl- and p-hydroxyphenyl units(5

  12. Sr 90 behaviour in the soil-plant system of moors of the Gomel' range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostereva, I.V.; Kudryashov, V.P.; Shamal', N.V.; Matusevich, Zh.L.

    2005-01-01

    The wavy dependence is installed between pH of the soil of moors and rate of accumulation (RA) of Sr 90 by phytomass of plants. The direct correlation is marked between concentration of mineral materials and RA of an above - ground part of herbaceous plants. Is abnormal high values RA are observed for the green forms of semifrutexs and undershrubs. (authors)

  13. A Comparison of Regression Techniques for Estimation of Above-Ground Winter Wheat Biomass Using Near-Surface Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibo Yue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Above-ground biomass (AGB provides a vital link between solar energy consumption and yield, so its correct estimation is crucial to accurately monitor crop growth and predict yield. In this work, we estimate AGB by using 54 vegetation indexes (e.g., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index and eight statistical regression techniques: artificial neural network (ANN, multivariable linear regression (MLR, decision-tree regression (DT, boosted binary regression tree (BBRT, partial least squares regression (PLSR, random forest regression (RF, support vector machine regression (SVM, and principal component regression (PCR, which are used to analyze hyperspectral data acquired by using a field spectrophotometer. The vegetation indexes (VIs determined from the spectra were first used to train regression techniques for modeling and validation to select the best VI input, and then summed with white Gaussian noise to study how remote sensing errors affect the regression techniques. Next, the VIs were divided into groups of different sizes by using various sampling methods for modeling and validation to test the stability of the techniques. Finally, the AGB was estimated by using a leave-one-out cross validation with these powerful techniques. The results of the study demonstrate that, of the eight techniques investigated, PLSR and MLR perform best in terms of stability and are most suitable when high-accuracy and stable estimates are required from relatively few samples. In addition, RF is extremely robust against noise and is best suited to deal with repeated observations involving remote-sensing data (i.e., data affected by atmosphere, clouds, observation times, and/or sensor noise. Finally, the leave-one-out cross-validation method indicates that PLSR provides the highest accuracy (R2 = 0.89, RMSE = 1.20 t/ha, MAE = 0.90 t/ha, NRMSE = 0.07, CV (RMSE = 0.18; thus, PLSR is best suited for works requiring high

  14. Quantitative Estimation of Above Ground Crop Biomass using Ground-based, Airborne and Spaceborne Low Frequency Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, C.; Watanabe, M.; Shimada, M.

    2016-12-01

    Estimation of crop biomass is one of the important challenges in environmental remote sensing related to agricultural as well as hydrological and meteorological applications. Usually passive optical data (photographs, spectral data) operating in the visible and near-infrared bands is used for such purposes. The virtue of optical remote sensing for yield estimation, however, is rather limited as the visible light can only provide information about the chemical characteristics of the canopy surface. Low frequency microwave signals with wavelength longer 20 cm have the potential to penetrate through the canopy and provide information about the whole vertical structure of vegetation from the top of the canopy down to the very soil surface. This phenomenon has been well known and exploited to detect targets under vegetation in the military radar application known as FOPEN (foliage penetration). With the availability of polarimetric interferometric SAR data the use PolInSAR techniques to retrieve vertical vegetation structures has become an attractive tool. However, PolInSAR is still highly experimental and suitable data is not yet widely available. In this study we focus on the use of operational dual-polarization L-band (1.27 GHz) SAR which is since the launch of Japan's Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS, 2006-2011) available worldwide. Since 2014 ALOS-2 continues to deliver such kind of partial polarimetric data for the entire land surface. In addition to these spaceborne data sets we use airborne L-band SAR data acquired by the Japanese Pi-SAR-L2 as well as ultra-wideband (UWB) ground based SAR data operating in the frequency range from 1-4 GHz. By exploiting the complex dual-polarization [C2] Covariance matrix information, the scattering contributions from the canopy can be well separated from the ground reflections allowing for the establishment of semi-empirical relationships between measured radar reflectivity and the amount of fresh-weight above-ground

  15. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (5-year interval) airborne lidar data set for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved and/or coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change was estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 yr-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 yr-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01 (fire return rate of 100 years), as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  16. Modeling Water and Nutrient Transport through the Soil-Root-Canopy Continuum: Explicitly Linking the Below- and Above-Ground Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.; Drewry, D.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation roots provide a fundamental link between the below ground water and nutrient dynamics and above ground canopy processes such as photosynthesis, evapotranspiration and energy balance. The “hydraulic architecture” of roots, consisting of the structural organization of the root system and the flow properties of the conduits (xylem) as well as interfaces with the soil and the above ground canopy, affect stomatal conductance thereby directly linking them to the transpiration. Roots serve as preferential pathways for the movement of moisture from wet to dry soil layers during the night, both from upper soil layer to deeper layers during the wet season (‘hydraulic descent’) and vice-versa (‘hydraulic lift’) as determined by the moisture gradients. The conductivities of transport through the root system are significantly, often orders of magnitude, larger than that of the surrounding soil resulting in movement of soil-moisture at rates that are substantially larger than that through the soil. This phenomenon is called hydraulic redistribution (HR). The ability of the deep-rooted vegetation to “bank” the water through hydraulic descent during wet periods for utilization during dry periods provides them with a competitive advantage. However, during periods of hydraulic lift these deep-rooted trees may facilitate the growth of understory vegetation where the understory scavenges the hydraulically lifted soil water. In other words, understory vegetation with relatively shallow root systems have access to the banked deep-water reservoir. These inter-dependent root systems have a significant influence on water cycle and ecosystem productivity. HR induced available moisture may support rhizosphere microbial and mycorrhizal fungi activities and enable utilization of heterogeneously distributed water and nutrient resources To capture this complex inter-dependent nutrient and water transport through the soil-root-canopy continuum we present modeling

  17. Estimation of crown biomass of Pinus pinaster stands and shrubland above-ground biomass using forest inventory data, remotely sensed imagery and spatial prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Viana; J. Aranha; D. Lopes; Warren B. Cohen

    2012-01-01

    Spatially crown biomass of Pinus pinaster stands and shrubland above-ground biomass (AGB) estimation was carried-out in a region located in Centre-North Portugal, by means of different approaches including forest inventory data, remotely sensed imagery and spatial prediction models. Two cover types (pine stands and shrubland) were inventoried and...

  18. Evaluation of drought and UV radiation impacts on above-ground biomass of mountain grassland by spectral reflectance and thermal imaging techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Kateřina; Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Rapantová, Barbora; Urban, Otmar

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, 1-2 (2016), s. 21-30 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : above-ground biomass * drought stress * grassland * UV radiation * precipitation * spectral reflectance * thermal imaging Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  19. Above-ground biomass production and allometric relations of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. coppice plantations along a chronosequence in the central highlands of Ethiopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zewdie, Mulugeta; Olsson, Mats; Verwijst, Theo [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Crop Production Ecology, P.O. Box 7043, 75007 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-03-15

    Eucalyptus plantations are extensively managed for wood production in the central highlands of Ethiopia. Nevertheless, little is known about their biomass (dry matter) production, partitioning and dynamics over time. Data from 10 different Eucalyptus globulus stands, with a plantation age ranging from 11 to 60 years and with a coppice-shoot age ranging from 1 to 9 years were collected and analyzed. Above-ground tree biomass of 7-10 sampled trees per stand was determined destructively. Dry weights of tree components (W{sub c}; leaves, twigs, branches, stembark, and stemwood) and total above-ground biomass (W{sub a}) were estimated as a function of diameter above stump (D), tree height (H) and a combination of these. The best fits were obtained, using combinations of D and H. When only one explanatory variable was used, D performed better than H. Total above-ground biomass was linearly related to coppice-shoot age. In contrast a negative relation was observed between the above-ground biomass production and total plantation age (number of cutting cycles). Total above-ground biomass increased from 11 t ha{sup -1} at a stand age of 1 year to 153 t ha{sup -1} at 9 years. The highest dry weight was allocated to stemwood and decreased in the following order: stemwood > leaves > stembark > twigs > branches. The equations developed in this study to estimate biomass components can be applied to other Eucalyptus plantations under the assumption that the populations being studied are similar with regard to density and tree size to those for which the relationships were developed. (author)

  20. Above-ground biomass production and allometric relations of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. coppice plantations along a chronosequence in the central highlands of Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zewdie, Mulugeta; Olsson, Mats; Verwijst, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Eucalyptus plantations are extensively managed for wood production in the central highlands of Ethiopia. Nevertheless, little is known about their biomass (dry matter) production, partitioning and dynamics over time. Data from 10 different Eucalyptus globulus stands, with a plantation age ranging from 11 to 60 years and with a coppice-shoot age ranging from 1 to 9 years were collected and analyzed. Above-ground tree biomass of 7-10 sampled trees per stand was determined destructively. Dry weights of tree components (W c ; leaves, twigs, branches, stembark, and stemwood) and total above-ground biomass (W a ) were estimated as a function of diameter above stump (D), tree height (H) and a combination of these. The best fits were obtained, using combinations of D and H. When only one explanatory variable was used, D performed better than H. Total above-ground biomass was linearly related to coppice-shoot age. In contrast a negative relation was observed between the above-ground biomass production and total plantation age (number of cutting cycles). Total above-ground biomass increased from 11 t ha -1 at a stand age of 1 year to 153 t ha -1 at 9 years. The highest dry weight was allocated to stemwood and decreased in the following order: stemwood > leaves > stembark > twigs > branches. The equations developed in this study to estimate biomass components can be applied to other Eucalyptus plantations under the assumption that the populations being studied are similar with regard to density and tree size to those for which the relationships were developed

  1. The effect of elevated cadmium content in soil on the uptake of nitrogen by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciecko, Z.; Kalembasa, S.; Wyszkowski, M.; Rolka, E. [University of Warmia & Mazury Olsztyn, Olsztyn (Poland). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cadmium (10, 20, 30 and 40 mg Cd/kg of soil) contamination in soil with the application of different substances (compost, brown coal, lime and bentonite) on the intake of nitrogen by some plants. The correlations between the nitrogen content in the plants and the cadmium concentration in the soil, as well as the plant yield and the content of micro- and macroelements in the plants were determined. Plant species and cadmium dose determined the effects of soil contamination with cadmium on the content of nitrogen. Large doses of cadmium caused an increase in nitrogen content in the Avena sativa straw and roots and in the Zea mays roots. Soil contamination with cadmium resulted in a decrease of nitrogen content in the Avena sativa grain, in above-ground parts and roots of the Lupinus luteus, in the above-ground parts of the Zea mays and in the above-ground parts and roots of Phacelia tanacaetifolia. Among the experimental different substances, the application of bentonite had the strongest and a usually negative effect on the nitrogen content in plants. The greatest effect of bentonite was on Avena sativa grain, above-ground parts Zea mays and Lupinus luteus and Phacelia tanacaetifolia. The content of nitrogen in the plants was generally positively correlated with the content of the macroelements and some of the microelements, regardless of the substances added to the soil.

  2. Risk assessment of genetically engineered maize resistant to Diabrotica spp.: Influence on above-ground arthropods in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Zdeňka; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Hutchison, W. D.; Hussein, Hany; Sehnal, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2015), e0130656 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH91093 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Diabrotica Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0130656

  3. The impact of forest structure and spatial scale on the relationship between ground plot above ground biomass and GEDI lidar waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armston, J.; Marselis, S.; Hancock, S.; Duncanson, L.; Tang, H.; Kellner, J. R.; Calders, K.; Disney, M.; Dubayah, R.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) will place a multi-beam waveform lidar instrument on the International Space Station (ISS) to provide measurements of forest vertical structure globally. These measurements of structure will underpin empirical modelling of above ground biomass density (AGBD) at the scale of individual GEDI lidar footprints (25m diameter). The GEDI pre-launch calibration strategy for footprint level models relies on linking AGBD estimates from ground plots with GEDI lidar waveforms simulated from coincident discrete return airborne laser scanning data. Currently available ground plot data have variable and often large uncertainty at the spatial resolution of GEDI footprints due to poor colocation, allometric model error, sample size and plot edge effects. The relative importance of these sources of uncertainty partly depends on the quality of ground measurements and region. It is usually difficult to know the magnitude of these uncertainties a priori so a common approach to mitigate their influence on model training is to aggregate ground plot and waveform lidar data to a coarser spatial scale (0.25-1ha). Here we examine the impacts of these principal sources of uncertainty using a 3D simulation approach. Sets of realistic tree models generated from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data or parametric modelling matched to tree inventory data were assembled from four contrasting forest plots across tropical rainforest, deciduous temperate forest, and sclerophyll eucalypt woodland sites. These tree models were used to simulate geometrically explicit 3D scenes with variable tree density, size class and spatial distribution. GEDI lidar waveforms are simulated over ground plots within these scenes using monte carlo ray tracing, allowing the impact of varying ground plot and waveform colocation error, forest structure and edge effects on the relationship between ground plot AGBD and GEDI lidar waveforms to be directly assessed. We

  4. A review of the challenges and opportunities in estimating above ground forest biomass using tree-level models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam Temesgen; David Affleck; Krishna Poudel; Andrew Gray; John Sessions

    2015-01-01

    Accurate biomass measurements and analyses are critical components in quantifying carbon stocks and sequestration rates, assessing potential impacts due to climate change, locating bio-energy processing plants, and mapping and planning fuel treatments. To this end, biomass equations will remain a key component of future carbon measurements and estimation. As...

  5. Microbial Root Mutualists Affect the Predators and Pathogens of Herbivores above Ground: Mechanisms, Magnitudes, and Missing Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiling Tao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tri-trophic interactions among plants, herbivores, and natural enemies of herbivores are common in nature, and are crucial components of trophic cascades and the dynamics of community composition. Plant traits are key determinants of the interactions between herbivores and their natural enemies aboveground, which in turn are affected by soil organisms. Recent years have seen a surge in studies of the interactions between below- and aboveground biota, including descriptions of how microbial root mutualists influence plant traits and herbivore performance. However, concomitant effects on the natural enemies of herbivores remain relatively poorly understood. Here, we review the currently available literature to assess how and when mutualistic root microbes impose significant indirect effects on the performance of predators and pathogens of insect herbivores. We focus on how root microbes influence predator attraction, on-plant foraging efficiency, and the quality of prey tissues. We also consider the underappreciated effects of microbial root mutualists on the growth, transmission, and virulence of insect pathogens. We end by discussing missing links and important directions for future research.

  6. Urban Watershed Forestry Manual Part 3: Urban Tree Planting Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Cappiella; Tom Schueler; Tiffany Wright; Jennifer Tomlinson

    2006-01-01

    This is the third in a three-manual series on using trees to protect and restore urban watersheds. A brief description of each part follows. Part 3. Urban Tree Planting Guide provides detailed guidance on urban tree planting that is applicable at both the development site and the watershed scales. Topics covered include site assessment, planting design, site...

  7. The diversity of endophytic fungi in the above-ground tissue of two Lycopodium species in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Pawłowska, Julia; Wilk, Mateusz; Śliwińska-Wyrzychowska, Anna; Mętrak, Monika; Wrzosek, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Endophytes are a large and diverse group of fungi that colonize healthy plant tissues without causing any symptoms. The majority of studies have focused on angiosperm and conifer hosts and few have examined the endophytes of lycophytes. In the present study, we characterized culturable endophytic fungi in two closely related Lycopodium species (L. annotinum and L. clavatum) from pine, beech, oak and spruce forests across Poland. More than 400 strains were isolated but only 18 Ascomycete speci...

  8. Jasmonate signaling in plant interactions with resistance-inducing beneficial microbes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ent, S. van der; Wees, A.C.M. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    Beneficial soil-borne microorganisms can induce an enhanced defensive capacity in above-ground plant parts that provides protection against a broad spectrum of microbial pathogens and even insect herbivores. The phytohormones jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene emerged as important regulators of this

  9. Estimation of Above Ground Biomass in the Everglades National Park using X-, C-, and L-band SAR data and Ground-based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, E. A.; Wdowinski, S.; Potts, M.; Kim, S.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities are disrupting bio-diverse wetland ecosystems including the South Florida Everglades. To quantify these acute changes is difficult given its limited accessibility. Remote sensing is widely used for successful ecosystem monitoring. We use ground-based LiDAR a.k.a. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) and space-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations to estimate vegetation structure, above-ground biomass, and track their changes over time in the Everglades National Park. These surveys were conducted in six vegetation communities: short-mangrove, intermediate-mangrove, tall-mangrove, pine, dwarf cypress and hammock. The TLS surveys provided detailed 3-D estimates of the vegetation structure and above ground biomass. The upscaling approach started with the SAR acquisitions at the three different wavelengths, showing the interacted signal with different aspects of the vegetation. We use single- (HH and VV), dual- (HH/VV, HH/HV and VV/HV) and quad-polarization observations of the TerraSAR-X, RadarSAT-2, and ALOS satellites, acquired around same dates as the ground TLS surveys were conducted. The different polarization data reflect radar signal interaction with different sections of the vegetation due to different scattering mechanisms. The processing of the SAR included: Sigma Nought backscattering coefficient calibration, speckle noise suppression filtering and geocoding with the TLS data. A comparative analysis of the three bands of SAR to quantify above ground biomass in the different communities will be presented. We also plan to determine the essential bands needed to most efficiently estimate biomass. We expect to find that the performance of SAR upscaling differs by community types. We are optimistic that the integration of TLS and SAR could be applied to monitor different ecosystems around the world. This will increase the chance that the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), in which large

  10. A comparison of two above-ground biomass estimation techniques integrating satellite-based remotely sensed data and ground data for tropical and semiarid forests in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiames, J. S.; Riegel, J.; Lunetta, R.

    2013-12-01

    Two above-ground forest biomass estimation techniques were evaluated for the United States Territory of Puerto Rico using predictor variables acquired from satellite based remotely sensed data and ground data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) program. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimated above-ground forest biomass implementing methodology first posited by the Woods Hole Research Center developed for conterminous United States (National Biomass and Carbon Dataset [NBCD2000]). For EPA's effort, spatial predictor layers for above-ground biomass estimation included derived products from the U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) National Land Cover Dataset 2001 (NLCD) (landcover and canopy density), the USGS Gap Analysis Program (forest type classification), the USGS National Elevation Dataset, and the NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (tree heights). In contrast, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) biomass product integrated FIA ground-based data with a suite of geospatial predictor variables including: (1) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)-derived image composites and percent tree cover; (2) NLCD land cover proportions; (3) topographic variables; (4) monthly and annual climate parameters; and (5) other ancillary variables. Correlations between both data sets were made at variable watershed scales to test level of agreement. Notice: This work is done in support of EPA's Sustainable Healthy Communities Research Program. The U.S EPA funded and conducted the research described in this paper. Although this work was reviewed by the EPA and has been approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy. Mention of any trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  11. Strength and durability tests of pipeline supports for the areas of above-ground routing under the influence of operational loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surikov Vitaliy Ivanovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with integrated research works and tests of pipeline supports for the areas of above-ground routing of the pipeline system “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe” which is laid in the eternally frozen grounds. In order to ensure the above-ground routing method for the oil pipeline “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe” and in view of the lack of construction experience in case of above-ground routing of oil pipelines, the leading research institute of JSC “Transneft” - LLC “NII TNN” over the period of August, 2011 - September, 2012 performed a research and development work on the subject “Development and production of pipeline supports and pile foundation test specimens for the areas of above-ground routing of the pipeline system “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe”. In the course of the works, the test specimens of fixed support, linear-sliding and free-sliding pipeline supports DN1000 and DN800 were produced and examined. For ensuring the stable structural reliability of the supports constructions and operational integrity of the pipelines the complex research works and tests were performed: 1. Cyclic tests of structural elements of the fixed support on the test bed of JSC “Diascan” by means of internal pressure and bending moment with the application of specially prepared equipment for defining the pipeline supports strength and durability. 2. Tests of the fixed support under the influence of limit operating loads and by means of internal pressure for confirming the support’s integrity. On the test bed there were simulated all the maximum loads on the support (vertical, longitudinal, side loadings, bending moment including subsidence of the neighboring sliding support and, simultaneously, internal pressure of the carried medium. 3. Cyclic tests of endurance and stability of the displacements of sliding supports under the influence of limit operating loads for confirming their operation capacity. Relocation of the pipeline on the sliding

  12. Ethnobotanical evaluation of some plant resources in Northern part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethnobotanical evaluation of some plant resources in Northern part of Pakistan. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... An ethnobotanical study on the medicinal and economic plants of Malam Jabba valley, District Swat was conducted with the aims of documenting the inventory of medicinal plants, examinining the current ...

  13. Above-ground woody carbon sequestration measured from tree rings is coherent with net ecosystem productivity at five eddy-covariance sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Flurin; Bouriaud, Olivier; Papale, Dario; Gielen, Bert; Janssens, Ivan A; Nikinmaa, Eero; Ibrom, Andreas; Wu, Jian; Bernhofer, Christian; Köstner, Barbara; Grünwald, Thomas; Seufert, Günther; Ciais, Philippe; Frank, David

    2014-03-01

    • Attempts to combine biometric and eddy-covariance (EC) quantifications of carbon allocation to different storage pools in forests have been inconsistent and variably successful in the past. • We assessed above-ground biomass changes at five long-term EC forest stations based on tree-ring width and wood density measurements, together with multiple allometric models. Measurements were validated with site-specific biomass estimates and compared with the sum of monthly CO₂ fluxes between 1997 and 2009. • Biometric measurements and seasonal net ecosystem productivity (NEP) proved largely compatible and suggested that carbon sequestered between January and July is mainly used for volume increase, whereas that taken up between August and September supports a combination of cell wall thickening and storage. The inter-annual variability in above-ground woody carbon uptake was significantly linked with wood production at the sites, ranging between 110 and 370 g C m(-2) yr(-1) , thereby accounting for 10-25% of gross primary productivity (GPP), 15-32% of terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER) and 25-80% of NEP. • The observed seasonal partitioning of carbon used to support different wood formation processes refines our knowledge on the dynamics and magnitude of carbon allocation in forests across the major European climatic zones. It may thus contribute, for example, to improved vegetation model parameterization and provides an enhanced framework to link tree-ring parameters with EC measurements. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Forest above ground biomass estimation and forest/non-forest classification for Odisha, India, using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, M.; Kiran Chand, T. R.; Fararoda, R.; Jha, C. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Tropical forests contribute to approximately 40 % of the total carbon found in terrestrial biomass. In this context, forest/non-forest classification and estimation of forest above ground biomass over tropical regions are very important and relevant in understanding the contribution of tropical forests in global biogeochemical cycles, especially in terms of carbon pools and fluxes. Information on the spatio-temporal biomass distribution acts as a key input to Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation Plus (REDD+) action plans. This necessitates precise and reliable methods to estimate forest biomass and to reduce uncertainties in existing biomass quantification scenarios. The use of backscatter information from a host of allweather capable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems during the recent past has demonstrated the potential of SAR data in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / nonforest classification. In the present study, Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) / Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data along with field inventory data have been used in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / non-forest classification over Odisha state, India. The ALOSPALSAR 50 m spatial resolution orthorectified and radiometrically corrected HH/HV dual polarization data (digital numbers) for the year 2010 were converted to backscattering coefficient images (Schimada et al., 2009). The tree level measurements collected during field inventory (2009-'10) on Girth at Breast Height (GBH at 1.3 m above ground) and height of all individual trees at plot (plot size 0.1 ha) level were converted to biomass density using species specific allometric equations and wood densities. The field inventory based biomass estimations were empirically integrated with ALOS-PALSAR backscatter coefficients to derive spatial forest above ground biomass estimates for the study area. Further, The Support Vector Machines (SVM) based Radial

  15. Below-ground plant parts emit herbivore-induced volatiles: olfactory responses of a predatory mite to tulip bulbs infested by rust mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aratchige, N.S.; Lesna, I.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Although odour-mediated interactions among plants, spider mites and predatory mites have been extensively studied above-ground, belowground studies are in their infancy. In this paper, we investigate whether feeding by rust mites (Aceria tulipae) cause tulip bulbs to produce odours that attract

  16. Semivolatile organic compounds monitored using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer at 200m above ground in rural Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Jessica; Klinger, Andreas; Herbig, Jens; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are anthropogenically and naturally occurring chemical compounds that have vapor pressures such that they exist in both the gas and condensed phase at room temperature. Due to the fact SVOCs condense easily, they are interesting in the context of organic aerosol formation and these compounds impact atmospheric properties and human health. Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS, resolution 1200 FWHM) is a method that facilitates deeper analysis of SVOCs. Our setup, consisting of a PTR-MS with a time of flight mass spectrometer coupled to a denuder sampler (DS) was stationed as part of the European ACTRIS-2 program at 200m atop the Cabauw tower in the Netherlands as of September, 2016. The DS consists of three denuders in series. The first two denuders are coated with dimethylpolysiloxane (DB1, OD 4mm, 3cm long) and consists of an assemblage of micro-channels (ID 80 micrometer). The third denuder is an activated charcoal monolith of the same dimensions but with larger (thus fewer) channels (ID 800 micrometer). The air sampled at 800mL/min is pulled through these denuders as laminar flow and the SVOCs will collide and condense on the wall. Undesirable wall losses are minimized by using a short and high flow inlet lines. The collected SVOCs are thermally desorbed under a Nitrogen (N2) gas flow and transferred to the PTR-MS through heated lines to avoid re-condensation. Evaluation of the full mass spectra revealed over 200 different compounds in the range 15-500 Da. The majority of the mass of SVOCs was contained in m/z > 100 and typical mixing ratios of the detected SVOCs were a few pmol/mol in ambient air. Discernible contamination from the DB1 coating was detected and therefore, different blank methods have been tested and evaluated using a student T-test. Proper blank correction is an important issue of this method and will be discussed in detail. Data from October 19th, 2016, are used as case studies for analyzing

  17. Estimation and mapping of above-ground biomass of mangrove forests and their replacement land uses in the Philippines using Sentinel imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jose Alan A.; Apan, Armando A.; Maraseni, Tek N.; Salmo, Severino G.

    2017-12-01

    The recent launch of the Sentinel-1 (SAR) and Sentinel-2 (multispectral) missions offers a new opportunity for land-based biomass mapping and monitoring especially in the tropics where deforestation is highest. Yet, unlike in agriculture and inland land uses, the use of Sentinel imagery has not been evaluated for biomass retrieval in mangrove forest and the non-forest land uses that replaced mangroves. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Sentinel imagery for the retrieval and predictive mapping of above-ground biomass of mangroves and their replacement land uses. We used Sentinel SAR and multispectral imagery to develop biomass prediction models through the conventional linear regression and novel Machine Learning algorithms. We developed models each from SAR raw polarisation backscatter data, multispectral bands, vegetation indices, and canopy biophysical variables. The results show that the model based on biophysical variable Leaf Area Index (LAI) derived from Sentinel-2 was more accurate in predicting the overall above-ground biomass. In contrast, the model which utilised optical bands had the lowest accuracy. However, the SAR-based model was more accurate in predicting the biomass in the usually deficient to low vegetation cover non-forest replacement land uses such as abandoned aquaculture pond, cleared mangrove and abandoned salt pond. These models had 0.82-0.83 correlation/agreement of observed and predicted value, and root mean square error of 27.8-28.5 Mg ha-1. Among the Sentinel-2 multispectral bands, the red and red edge bands (bands 4, 5 and 7), combined with elevation data, were the best variable set combination for biomass prediction. The red edge-based Inverted Red-Edge Chlorophyll Index had the highest prediction accuracy among the vegetation indices. Overall, Sentinel-1 SAR and Sentinel-2 multispectral imagery can provide satisfactory results in the retrieval and predictive mapping of the above-ground biomass of mangroves and the replacement

  18. Forest Type and Above Ground Biomass Estimation Based on Sentinel-2A and WorldView-2 Data Evaluation of Predictor nd Data Suitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Andreas; Enßle, Fabian; Zhang, Xiaoli; Koch, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    The present study analyses the two earth observation sensors regarding their capability of modelling forest above ground biomass and forest density. Our research is carried out at two different demonstration sites. The first is located in south-western Germany (region Karlsruhe) and the second is located in southern China in Jiangle County (Province Fujian). A set of spectral and spatial predictors are computed from both, Sentinel-2A and WorldView-2 data. Window sizes in the range of 3*3 pixels to 21*21 pixels are computed in order to cover the full range of the canopy sizes of mature forest stands. Textural predictors of first and second order (grey-level-co-occurrence matrix) are calculated and are further used within a feature selection procedure. Additionally common spectral predictors from WorldView-2 and Sentinel-2A data such as all relevant spectral bands and NDVI are integrated in the analyses. To examine the most important predictors, a predictor selection algorithm is applied to the data, whereas the entire predictor set of more than 1000 predictors is used to find most important ones. Out of the original set only the most important predictors are then further analysed. Predictor selection is done with the Boruta package in R (Kursa and Rudnicki (2010)), whereas regression is computed with random forest. Prior the classification and regression a tuning of parameters is done by a repetitive model selection (100 runs), based on the .632 bootstrapping. Both are implemented in the caret R pack- age (Kuhn et al. (2016)). To account for the variability in the data set 100 independent runs are performed. Within each run 80 percent of the data is used for training and the 20 percent are used for an independent validation. With the subset of original predictors mapping of above ground biomass is performed.

  19. A comparative analysis of extended water cloud model and backscatter modelling for above-ground biomass assessment in Corbett Tiger Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, Sarnam; Chatterjee, R. S.; Trivedi, Mukul

    2016-04-01

    Forest biomass acts as a backbone in regulating the climate by storing carbon within itself. Thus the assessment of forest biomass is crucial in understanding the dynamics of the environment. Traditionally the destructive methods were adopted for the assessment of biomass which were further advanced to the non-destructive methods. The allometric equations developed by destructive methods were further used in non-destructive methods for the assessment, but they were mostly applied for woody/commercial timber species. However now days Remote Sensing data are primarily used for the biomass geospatial pattern assessment. The Optical Remote Sensing data (Landsat8, LISS III, etc.) are being used very successfully for the estimation of above ground biomass (AGB). However optical data is not suitable for all atmospheric/environmental conditions, because it can't penetrate through clouds and haze. Thus Radar data is one of the alternate possible ways to acquire data in all-weather conditions irrespective of weather and light. The paper examines the potential of ALOS PALSAR L-band dual polarisation data for the estimation of AGB in the Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) covering an area of 889 km2. The main focus of this study is to explore the accuracy of Polarimetric Scattering Model (Extended Water Cloud Model (EWCM) with respect to Backscatter model in the assessment of AGB. The parameters of the EWCM were estimated using the decomposition components (Raney Decomposition) and the plot level information. The above ground biomass in the CTR ranges from 9.6 t/ha to 322.6 t/ha.

  20. Nutrient leaching when soil is part of plant growth media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soils can serve as sorbents for phosphorus (P) within plant growth media, negating the need for artificial sorbents. The purpose of this study was to compare soils with different properties, as part of plant growth media, for their effect on nutrient levels in effluent. Four soils were mixed with sa...

  1. Inhibiting Cadmium Transport Process in Root Cells of Plants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Yan-ling

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium(Cd is the most common element found in the heavy-metal contaminated soils in China. Roots of rice and vegetables can concentrate Cd from acid soils, and then transport Cd to above-ground parts. Cd in edible part of plants directly influences the food safety. Cellwall, plasma membrane and organells of root cells in plant can discriminate Cd from other elements. A lot of Cd can be fixed in root cells by precipitation, complexation, compartmentation, and so on, to inhibit its transport from roots to shoot and guarantee the physiological activities in above-ground parts carrying out normally. This paper summarized recent advance on inhibiting Cd transport process in subcellular fractions of root cells of plants, which is in advantage of exploring excellent germplasms and gene resources in the future.

  2. Accumulation of contaminants of emerging concern in food crops-part 2: Plant distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Katherine C; Blaine, Andrea C; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Arid agricultural regions often turn to using treated wastewater (reclaimed water) to irrigate food crops. Concerns arise, however, when considering the potential for persistent contaminants of emerging concern to accumulate into plants intended for human consumption. The present study examined the accumulation of a suite of 9 contaminants of emerging concern into 2 representative food crops, lettuce and strawberry, following uptake via the roots and subsequent distribution to other plant tissues. Calculating accumulation metrics (concentration factors) allowed for comparison of the compartmental affinity of each chemical for each plant tissue compartment. The root concentration factor was found to exhibit a positive linear correlation with the pH-adjusted octanol-water partition coefficient (DOW ) for the target contaminants of emerging concern. Coupled with the concentration-dependent accumulation observed in the roots, this result implies that accumulation of these contaminants of emerging concern into plant roots is driven by passive partitioning. Of the contaminants of emerging concern examined, nonionizable contaminants, such as triclocarban, carbamazepine, and organophosphate flame retardants displayed the greatest potential for translocation from the roots to above-ground plant compartments. In particular, the organophosphate flame retardants displayed increasing affinity for shoots and fruits with decreasing size/octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW ). Cationic diphenhydramine and anionic sulfamethoxazole, once transported to the shoots of the strawberry plant, demonstrated the greatest potential of the contaminants examined to be then carried to the edible fruit portion. © 2015 SETAC.

  3. Supplying high-quality alternative prey in the litter increases control of an above-ground plant pest by a generalist predator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz-Cárdenas, Karen; Ersin, Firdevs; Pijnakker, Juliette; Houten, van Yvonne; Hoogerbrugge, Hans; Leman, Ada; Pappas, Maria L.; Duarte, Marcus V.A.; Messelink, Gerben J.; Sabelis, Maurice W.; Janssen, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Supplying predators with alternative food can have short-term positive effects on prey densities through predator satiation (functional response) and long-term negative effects through increases of predator populations (numerical response). In biological control, alternative food sources for

  4. Supplying high-quality alternative prey in the litter increases control of an above-ground plant pest by a generalist predator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz-Cárdenas, K.; Ersin, F.; Pijnakker, J.; van Houten, Y.; Hoogerbrugge, H.; Leman, A.; Pappas, M.L.; Duarte, M.V.A.; Messelink, G.J.; Sabelis, M.W.; Janssen, A.

    Supplying predators with alternative food can have short-term positive effects on prey densities through predator satiation (functional response) and long-term negative effects through increases of predator populations (numerical response). In biological control, alternative food sources for

  5. Estimating Mangrove Canopy Height and Above-Ground Biomass in the Everglades National Park with Airborne LiDAR and TanDEM-X Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuelle A. Feliciano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forests are important natural ecosystems due to their ability to capture and store large amounts of carbon. Forest structural parameters, such as canopy height and above-ground biomass (AGB, provide a good measure for monitoring temporal changes in carbon content. The protected coastal mangrove forest of the Everglades National Park (ENP provides an ideal location for studying these processes, as harmful human activities are minimal. We estimated mangrove canopy height and AGB in the ENP using Airborne LiDAR/Laser (ALS and TanDEM-X (TDX datasets acquired between 2011 and 2013. Analysis of both datasets revealed that mangrove canopy height can reach up to ~25 m and AGB can reach up to ~250 Mg•ha−1. In general, mangroves ranging from 9 m to 12 m in stature dominate the forest canopy. The comparison of ALS and TDX canopy height observations yielded an R2 = 0.85 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 1.96 m. Compared to a previous study based on data acquired during 2000–2004, our analysis shows an increase in mangrove stature and AGB, suggesting that ENP mangrove forests are continuing to accumulate biomass. Our results suggest that ENP mangrove forests have managed to recover from natural disturbances, such as Hurricane Wilma.

  6. Simulating Stakeholder-Based Land-Use Change Scenarios and Their Implication on Above-Ground Carbon and Environmental Management in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Lippe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine whether the coupling of a land-use change (LUC model with a carbon-stock accounting approach and participatory procedures can be beneficial in a data-limited environment to derive implications for environmental management. Stakeholder-based LUC scenarios referring to different storylines of agricultural intensification and reforestation were simulated to explore their impact on above-ground carbon (AGC for a period of twenty years (2009–2029. The watershed of Mae Sa Mai, Northern Thailand was used as a case study for this purpose. Coupled model simulations revealed that AGC stocks could be increased by up to 1.7 Gg C through expansion of forests or orchard areas. A loss of up to 0.4 Gg C would occur if vegetable production continue to expand at the expense of orchard and fallow areas. The coupled model approach was useful due to its moderate data demands, enabling the comparison of land-use types differing in AGC build-up rates and rotation times. The scenario analysis depicted clear differences in the occurrence of LUC hotspots, highlighting the importance of assessing the impact of potential future LUC pathways at the landscape level. The use of LUC scenarios based on local stakeholder scenarios offer a higher credibility for climate mitigation strategies but also underline the need to co-design policy frameworks that acknowledge the heterogeneity of stakeholder needs and environmental management frameworks.

  7. Microbial rhodopsins on leaf surfaces of terrestrial plants

    OpenAIRE

    Atamna-Ismaeel, Nof; Finkel, Omri M.; Glaser, Fabian; Sharon, Itai; Schneider, Ron; Post, Anton F.; Spudich, John L.; von Mering, Christian; Vorholt, Julia A.; Iluz, David; Béjà, Oded; Belkin, Shimshon

    2011-01-01

    The above-ground surfaces of terrestrial plants, the phyllosphere, comprise the main interface between the terrestrial biosphere and solar radiation. It is estimated to host up to 1026 microbial cells that may intercept part of the photon flux impinging on the leaves. Based on 454-pyrosequencing-generated metagenome data, we report on the existence of diverse microbial rhodopsins in five distinct phyllospheres from tamarisk (Tamarix nilotica), soybean (Glycine max), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis t...

  8. Can liming change root anatomy, biomass allocation and trace element distribution among plant parts of Salix × smithiana in trace element-polluted soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondráčková, Stanislava; Tlustoš, Pavel; Száková, Jiřina

    2017-08-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are considered to be effective for the phytoremediation of trace elements from contaminated soils, but their efficiency is limited in heavily polluted soils because of poor growth. Liming can be a desirable measure to decrease the plant availability of elements, resulting in improved plant development. Notably, large root area and maximum soil penetration are basic parameters that improve the efficiency of phytoremediation. The impact of soil chemical properties on willow root anatomy and the distribution of trace elements below-ground have rarely been studied. The effect of liming on root parameters, biomass allocation and trace element distribution in non-harvestable (coarse roots, fine roots, stumps) and harvestable plant parts (twigs and leaves) of Salix × smithiana was assessed at the end of a 4-year pot experiment with two trace element-polluted soils that differed in terms of soil pH. Stump biomass predominated in weakly acidic soil. In neutral soil, the majority of biomass was located in fine roots and stumps; the difference from other plant parts was minor. Trace elements were the most concentrated in fine roots. Translocation to above-ground biomass increased as follows: Pb roots roots). Lime application decreased the concentrations of mobile Cd and Zn and related levels in plants, improved biomass production and root parameters and increased the removal of all trace elements in weakly acidic soil. None or minimum differences in the monitored parameters were recorded for dolomite treatments in both soils. The dose and source of liming had crucial effects on root anatomy. Growing willows in limed trace element-polluted soils is a suitable measure for combination of two remediation strategies, i.e. phytoextraction of Cd and Zn and assisted phytostabilization of As and Pb.

  9. Transportation of part supply improvement in agricultural machinery assembly plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saysaman, Anusit; Chutima, Parames

    2018-02-01

    This research focused on the problem caused by the transportation of part supply in agricultural machinery assembly plant in Thailand, which is one of the processes that are critical to the whole production process. If poorly managed, it will affect transportation of part supply, the emergence of sink cost, quality problems, and the ability to respond to the needs of the customers in time. Since the competition in the agricultural machinery market is more intense, the efficiency of part transportation process has to be improved. In this study, the process of transporting parts of the plant was studied and it was found that the efficiency of the process of transporting parts from the sub assembly line to its main assembly line was 83%. The approach to the performance improvement is done by using the Lean tool to limit wastes based on the ECRS principle and applying pull production system by changing the transportation method to operate as milkrun for transportation of parts to synchronize with the part demands of the main assembly line. After the transportation of parts from sub-assembly line to the main assembly line was improved, the efficiency raised to 98% and transportation process cost was saved to 540,000 Baht per year.

  10. Inventory Control of Spare Parts for Operating Nuclear Power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong-Hyuck; Jang, Se-Jin; Hwang, Eui-Youp; Yoo, Sung-Soo; Yoo, Keun-Bae; Lee, Sang-Guk; Hong, Sung-Yull

    2006-01-01

    Inventory control of spare parts plays an increasingly important role in operation management. The trade-off is clear: on one hand a large number of spare parts ties up a large amount of capital, while on the other hand too little inventory may result in extremely costly emergency actions. This is why during the last few decades inventory of spare parts control has been the topics of many publications. Recently management systems such as manufacturing resources planning (MRP) and enterprise resource planning (ERP) have been added. However, most of these contributions have similar theoretical background. This means the concepts and techniques are mainly based on mathematical assumptions and modeling inventory of spare parts situations Nuclear utilities in Korea have several problems to manage the optimum level of spare parts though they used MRP System. Because most of items have long lead time and they are imported from United States, Canada, France and so on. In this paper, we will examine the available inventory optimization models which are applicable to nuclear power plant and then select optimum model and assumptions to make inventory of spare parts strategies. Then we develop the computer program to select and determine optimum level of spare parts which should be automatically controlled by KHNP ERP system. The main contribution of this paper is an inventory of spare parts control model development, which can be applied to nuclear power plants in Korea

  11. Towards ground-truthing of spaceborne estimates of above-ground life biomass and leaf area index in tropical rain forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The canopy height h of forests is a key variable which can be obtained using air- or spaceborne remote sensing techniques such as radar interferometry or LIDAR. If new allometric relationships between canopy height and the biomass stored in the vegetation can be established this would offer the possibility for a global monitoring of the above-ground carbon content on land. In the absence of adequate field data we use simulation results of a tropical rain forest growth model to propose what degree of information might be generated from canopy height and thus to enable ground-truthing of potential future satellite observations. We here analyse the correlation between canopy height in a tropical rain forest with other structural characteristics, such as above-ground life biomass (AGB (and thus carbon content of vegetation and leaf area index (LAI and identify how correlation and uncertainty vary for two different spatial scales. The process-based forest growth model FORMIND2.0 was applied to simulate (a undisturbed forest growth and (b a wide range of possible disturbance regimes typically for local tree logging conditions for a tropical rain forest site on Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia in South-East Asia. In both undisturbed and disturbed forests AGB can be expressed as a power-law function of canopy height h (AGB = a · hb with an r2 ~ 60% if data are analysed in a spatial resolution of 20 m × 20 m (0.04 ha, also called plot size. The correlation coefficient of the regression is becoming significant better in the disturbed forest sites (r2 = 91% if data are analysed hectare wide. There seems to exist no functional dependency between LAI and canopy height, but there is also a linear correlation (r2 ~ 60% between AGB and the area fraction of gaps in which the canopy is highly disturbed. A reasonable agreement of our results with observations is obtained from a

  12. Estimating the Above-Ground Biomass in Miombo Savanna Woodlands (Mozambique, East Africa Using L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Vasconcelos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of forest above-ground biomass (AGB is important for such broader applications as decision making, forest management, carbon (C stock change assessment and scientific applications, such as C cycle modeling. However, there is a great uncertainty related to the estimation of forest AGB, especially in the tropics. The main goal of this study was to test a combination of field data and Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR backscatter intensity data to reduce the uncertainty in the estimation of forest AGB in the Miombo savanna woodlands of Mozambique (East Africa. A machine learning algorithm, based on bagging stochastic gradient boosting (BagSGB, was used to model forest AGB as a function of ALOS PALSAR Fine Beam Dual (FBD backscatter intensity metrics. The application of this method resulted in a coefficient of correlation (R between observed and predicted (10-fold cross-validation forest AGB values of 0.95 and a root mean square error of 5.03 Mg·ha−1. However, as a consequence of using bootstrap samples in combination with a cross validation procedure, some bias may have been introduced, and the reported cross validation statistics could be overoptimistic. Therefore and as a consequence of the BagSGB model, a measure of prediction variability (coefficient of variation on a pixel-by-pixel basis was also produced, with values ranging from 10 to 119% (mean = 25% across the study area. It provides additional and complementary information regarding the spatial distribution of the error resulting from the application of the fitted model to new observations.

  13. An alternative approach for estimating above ground biomass using Resourcesat-2 satellite data and artificial neural network in Bundelkhand region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Dibyendu; Singh, J P; Deb, Shovik; Datta, Debajit; Ghosh, Arunava; Chaurasia, R S

    2017-10-20

    Determination of above ground biomass (AGB) of any forest is a longstanding scientific endeavor, which helps to estimate net primary productivity, carbon stock and other biophysical parameters of that forest. With advancement of geospatial technology in last few decades, AGB estimation now can be done using space-borne and airborne remotely sensed data. It is a well-established, time saving and cost effective technique with high precision and is frequently applied by the scientific community. It involves development of allometric equations based on correlations of ground-based forest biomass measurements with vegetation indices derived from remotely sensed data. However, selection of the best-fit and explanatory models of biomass estimation often becomes a difficult proposition with respect to the image data resolution (spatial and spectral) as well as the sensor platform position in space. Using Resourcesat-2 satellite data and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), this pilot scale study compared traditional linear and nonlinear models with an artificial intelligence-based non-parametric technique, i.e. artificial neural network (ANN) for formulation of the best-fit model to determine AGB of forest of the Bundelkhand region of India. The results confirmed the superiority of ANN over other models in terms of several statistical significance and reliability assessment measures. Accordingly, this study proposed the use of ANN instead of traditional models for determination of AGB and other bio-physical parameters of any dry deciduous forest of tropical sub-humid or semi-arid area. In addition, large numbers of sampling sites with different quadrant sizes for trees, shrubs, and herbs as well as application of LiDAR data as predictor variable were recommended for very high precision modelling in ANN for a large scale study.

  14. [Incidence of hypertension and borderline hypertension with reference to complex professional stress in above ground and under ground workers in ore mining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwingenberger, W; Nestler, K; Faulhaber, H D; Schneider, R

    1989-09-01

    Comprehensive health care for working people requires a deeper insight into the relationship between work load and biological reactions. This is necessary to be able to adequately influence the field of industrial medicine. The incidence of both hypertension and borderline-hypertension in a group of 200 face workers with complex work load as well as 150 pithead metal workers aged between 25 and 45 was measured over a period of 5 years (1981-1986). The hypertension incidence was 0.90% in the group of face workers and 1.46% with the pithead metal workers, while the incidence of borderline-hypertension was 1.30% for the face workers and 2.12% for the pithead metal workers. A statistically significant difference between those people working above ground and those working underground was not apparent. No relationship was found between age, Broca-index, habit of smoking, shift work, the total time away from home and the development of an increase in blood pressure. Both a hypertension incidence totalling 1.14% and an incidence of borderline-hypertension of 1.66% were found in the test group aged between 25 and 45. This roughly corresponded to the nationally statistical level and was in line with the relevant literature. There was no discernable effect with regard to developing hypertension and borderline-hypertension, respectively, as a result of complex work load in the test group. The incidence rates require regular blood pressure tests on normotensive miners and pithead workers, respectively, as a prerequisite for early detection and registering as well as an adequate therapy of both hypertension and borderline-hypertension.

  15. Variation in stem mortality rates determines patterns of above-ground biomass in Amazonian forests: implications for dynamic global vegetation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle O; Galbraith, David; Gloor, Manuel; De Deurwaerder, Hannes; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Rammig, Anja; Thonicke, Kirsten; Verbeeck, Hans; von Randow, Celso; Monteagudo, Abel; Phillips, Oliver L; Brienen, Roel J W; Feldpausch, Ted R; Lopez Gonzalez, Gabriela; Fauset, Sophie; Quesada, Carlos A; Christoffersen, Bradley; Ciais, Philippe; Sampaio, Gilvan; Kruijt, Bart; Meir, Patrick; Moorcroft, Paul; Zhang, Ke; Alvarez-Davila, Esteban; Alves de Oliveira, Atila; Amaral, Ieda; Andrade, Ana; Aragao, Luiz E O C; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro; Arets, Eric J M M; Arroyo, Luzmila; Aymard, Gerardo A; Baraloto, Christopher; Barroso, Jocely; Bonal, Damien; Boot, Rene; Camargo, Jose; Chave, Jerome; Cogollo, Alvaro; Cornejo Valverde, Fernando; Lola da Costa, Antonio C; Di Fiore, Anthony; Ferreira, Leandro; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio, Euridice N; Killeen, Tim J; Laurance, Susan G; Laurance, William F; Licona, Juan; Lovejoy, Thomas; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marimon, Bia; Marimon, Ben Hur; Matos, Darley C L; Mendoza, Casimiro; Neill, David A; Pardo, Guido; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pitman, Nigel C A; Poorter, Lourens; Prieto, Adriana; Ramirez-Angulo, Hirma; Roopsind, Anand; Rudas, Agustin; Salomao, Rafael P; Silveira, Marcos; Stropp, Juliana; Ter Steege, Hans; Terborgh, John; Thomas, Raquel; Toledo, Marisol; Torres-Lezama, Armando; van der Heijden, Geertje M F; Vasquez, Rodolfo; Guimarães Vieira, Ima Cèlia; Vilanova, Emilio; Vos, Vincent A; Baker, Timothy R

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the processes that determine above-ground biomass (AGB) in Amazonian forests is important for predicting the sensitivity of these ecosystems to environmental change and for designing and evaluating dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). AGB is determined by inputs from woody productivity [woody net primary productivity (NPP)] and the rate at which carbon is lost through tree mortality. Here, we test whether two direct metrics of tree mortality (the absolute rate of woody biomass loss and the rate of stem mortality) and/or woody NPP, control variation in AGB among 167 plots in intact forest across Amazonia. We then compare these relationships and the observed variation in AGB and woody NPP with the predictions of four DGVMs. The observations show that stem mortality rates, rather than absolute rates of woody biomass loss, are the most important predictor of AGB, which is consistent with the importance of stand size structure for determining spatial variation in AGB. The relationship between stem mortality rates and AGB varies among different regions of Amazonia, indicating that variation in wood density and height/diameter relationships also influences AGB. In contrast to previous findings, we find that woody NPP is not correlated with stem mortality rates and is weakly positively correlated with AGB. Across the four models, basin-wide average AGB is similar to the mean of the observations. However, the models consistently overestimate woody NPP and poorly represent the spatial patterns of both AGB and woody NPP estimated using plot data. In marked contrast to the observations, DGVMs typically show strong positive relationships between woody NPP and AGB. Resolving these differences will require incorporating forest size structure, mechanistic models of stem mortality and variation in functional composition in DGVMs. © 2016 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Condensed tannins and saponin content in different plant parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the proanthocyanidin (PA; condensed tannin) and saponin contents of different parts of Stylosanthes scabra (Fitzroy) plants harvested from five agro-ecologically different sites in Zimbabwe. Condensed tannins and saponin content of S. scabra leaves and twigs were determined ...

  17. Nuclear power plant simulators for operator licensing and training. Part I. The need for plant-reference simulators. Part II. The use of plant-reference simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.L.; Bolton, P.A.; Shikiar, R.; Saari, L.M.

    1984-05-01

    Part I of this report presents technical justification for the use of plant-reference simulators in the licensing and training of nuclear power plant operators and examines alternatives to the use of plant-reference simulators. The technical rationale is based on research on the use of simulators in other industries, psychological learning and testing principles, expert opinion and user opinion. Part II discusses the central considerations in using plant-reference simulators for licensing examination of nuclear power plant operators and for incorporating simulators into nuclear power plant training programs. Recommendations are presented for the administration of simulator examinations in operator licensing that reflect the goal of maximizing both reliability and validity in the examination process. A series of organizational tasks that promote the acceptance, use, and effectiveness of simulator training as part of the onsite training program is delineated

  18. Distribution of seven heavy metals among hot pepper plant parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonious, George F

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to monitor concentrations of seven metals (Cd, Pb, Ni, Mo, Cu, Zn, and Cr) in the fruits, leaves, stem, and roots of Capsicum annuum L. (cv. Xcatic) plants grown under four soil management practices: yard waste (YW), sewage sludge (SS), chicken manure (CM), and no-much (NM) bare soil. Elemental analyses were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Pb and Cd concentrations in soil amended with YW, SS, and CM were not significantly different (P fruits of plants grown in NM soil were greater compared to the fruits of plants grown in other treatments. Total Ni concentration (sum of Ni in all plant parts) in plants grown in NM bare soil was greater than in plants grown in SS-, YW-, and CM-amended soils. Values of the bioaccumulation factor indicated that pepper fruits of plants grown in YW, SS, and CM did not show any tendency to accumulate Pb, Cr, and Ni in their edible fruits.

  19. Preliminary Studies to Characterize the Temporal Variation of Micronutrient Composition of the Above Ground Organs of Maize and Correlated Uptake Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Vilaça Martins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of agronomic practices and the use of high technology in field crops contributes for significant increases in maize productivity, and may have altered the dynamics of nutrient uptake and partition by the plant. Official recommendations for fertilizer applications to the maize crop in Brazil and in many countries are based on critical soil nutrient contents and are relatively outdated. Since the factors that interact in an agricultural production system are dynamic, mathematical modeling of the growth process turns out to be an appropriate tool for these studies. Agricultural modeling can expand our knowledge about the interactions prevailing in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. The objective of this study is to propose a methodology for characterizing the micronutrient composition of different organs and their extraction, and export during maize crop development, based on modeling nutrient uptake, crop potential evapotranspiration and micronutrient partitioning in the plant, considering the production environment. This preliminary characterization study (experimental growth analysis considers the temporal variation of the micronutrient uptake rate in the aboveground organs, which defines crop needs and the critical nutrient content of the soil solution. The methodology allowed verifying that, initially, the highest fraction of dry matter, among aboveground organs, was assigned to the leaves. After the R1 growth stage, the largest part of dry matter was partitioned to the stalk, which in this growth stage is the main storage organ of the maize plant. During the reproductive phase, the highest fraction of dry matter was conferred to the reproductive organs, due to the high demand for carbohydrates for grain filling. The micronutrient (B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn content follows a power model, with higher values for the initial growth stages of development and leveling off to minimum values at the R6 growth stage. The proposed model

  20. Chemical Characterization of Cotton Plant Parts for Multiple Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqi He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton ( L. is an important crop in the southern and southeastern parts of the United States, but cotton plant biomass residues are underutilized because the high-value lint receives the most attention. In this study, whole cotton plants were collected at midseason and just before harvest and were chemically characterized to explore multiple uses. The plant samples were separated into six (midseason or eight (pre-defoliation for harvest biomass fractions. We determined the macro- and trace elements, protein, fiber, and lignin contents in the biomass materials. Growth stages affected the relative contents of some, but not all, of the measured parameters. Correlation coefficient analysis of the measured data revealed that some of the parameters were well related to each other, whereas some were quite independent. The information reported in this work will be helpful in exploring and optimizing management practices and processing strategies for best utilization of these types of cotton crop biomass materials as renewable natural resources.

  1. Water Activities in Laxemar Simpevarp. The final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel - removal of groundwater and water activities above ground; Vattenverksamhet i Laxemar-Simpevarp. Slutfoervarsanlaeggning foer anvaent kaernbraensle - bortledande av grundvatten samt vattenverksamheter ovan mark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent (EmpTec (Sweden)); Hamren, Ulrika; Collinder, Per (Ekologigruppen AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This report concerns water operations (Chapter 11 in the Environmental Code) below and above ground associated with construction, operation, and decommissioning of a repository for spent nuclear fuel in Laxemar in the municipality of Oskarshamn. SKB has chosen Forsmark in the municipality of Oesthammar as site for the repository, and the report hence describes a non-chosen alternative. The report provides a comprehensive description of how the water operations would be executed, their hydrogeological and hydrological effects and the resulting consequences. The description is a background material for comparisons between the two sites in terms of water operations. The underground part of a repository in Laxemar would, among other things, consist of an access ramp and a repository area at a depth of approximately 500 metres. The construction, operation, and decommissioning phases would in total comprise a time period of 60-70 years. Inflowing groundwater would be diverted during construction and operation. The modelling tool MIKE SHE has been used to assess the effects of the groundwater diversion, for instance in terms of groundwater levels and stream discharges. According to MIKE SHE calculations for a hypothetical case with a fully open repository, the total groundwater inflow would be in the order of 55-90 litres per second depending on the permeability of the grouted zone around ramp, shafts and tunnels. In reality, the whole repository would not be open simultaneously, and the inflow would therefore be less. The groundwater diversion would cause groundwater- level drawdown in the rock, which in turn would lead to drawdown of the groundwater table in relatively large areas above and around the repository. According to model calculations, there would be an insignificant drawdown of the water level in Lake Frisksjoen, the largest lake in the area. The discharge in the most important stream of the area (Laxemaraan) would be reduced by less than ten percent

  2. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Uranium Conversion Plant Equipment and Plutonium Conversion Plant Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrative List of Uranium Conversion Plant Equipment and Plutonium Conversion Plant Equipment Under NRC Export Licensing Authority J Appendix J to Part 110.... 110, App. J Appendix J to Part 110—Illustrative List of Uranium Conversion Plant Equipment and...

  3. Soil C:N stoichiometry controls carbon sink partitioning between above-ground tree biomass and soil organic matter in high fertility forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberti, G.; Vicca, S.; Inglima, I.; Belelli Marchesini, L.; Genesio, L.; Miglietta, F.; Marjanovic, H.; Martinez, C.; Matteucci, G.; D ' Andrea, E.; Peressotti, A.; Petrella, F.; Rodeghiero, M.; Cotrufo, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    The release of organic compounds from roots is a key process influencing soil carbon (C) dynamics and nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems. Through this process, plants stimulate microbial activity and soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization thus releasing nitrogen (N) that sustains

  4. The effect of precipitation changes on above-ground biomass production of Beskydy mountain grassland in comparison with grassland in lowland and highland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 20, - (2007), s. 69-76. ISBN 978-80-7375-069-5 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : different altitudes * biomass * plant litter Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  5. Lower parts of Temelin nuclear power plant cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebek, J.

    1988-01-01

    The progress of work is described in detail on the foundations and lower parts of the cooling towers of the Temelin nuclear power plant. The cooling tower is placed on a reinforced concrete footing of a circular layout. Support pillars are erected on the reinforced concrete continuous footing. They consists of oblique shell stanchions. Inside, the footing joins up to monolithic wall and slab structures of the cooling tower tub. The tub bottom forms a foundation plate supporting prefab structures of the cooling tower inner structural systems. The framed support of the chimney shell consists of 56 pairs of prefabricated oblique stanchions. Following their erection into the final position and anchoring in the continuous footing, the concreting of the casing can start of the reinforced conrete chimney. (Z.M.). 3 figs

  6. Observations on north-west European limestone grassland communities. V, a. An experimental approach to the study of species diversity and above-ground biomass in chalk grassland

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    In 1971 a number of permanent plots were established in an abandoned Dutch calcareous grassland, then belonging to the association Arrhenatheretum elatioris with some elements of Mesobrometum erecti and Poo-Lolietum. A part of the plots was treated with fertilizer of varying N.P.K.-content. Another part was treated with farm yard manure, calcium carbonate, or left untreated. All plots were mown once a year. Each year, species composition, including bryophytes, as well as peak standing crop we...

  7. Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity from Different Plant Parts of Senduduk Herb: Extraction Conditions Optimization of Selected Plant Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaludin Nor Helya Iman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports a study on evaluation of antioxidant properties from flower of Senduduk herb. Natural occurring antioxidant was mostly preferred due to their little or no toxicity compared to the synthetic antioxidants which posses carcinogenic effects. Extraction was done on selected plant parts of Sendududk herb including leaves, stem, flower and berry parts to evaluate their antioxidant potentiality. Flower part of Sendudk herb extracted using acetonic solvent promotes highest antioxidant activity which is 93.97 ± 1.38 % as compared to leaves (92.20 ± 0.20 %, stem (47.94 ± 1.42% and berry (92.88 ± 0.63% using the same extracting solvent. Thus, Senduduk flower was chosen to be continued with screening and optimization process. Single factor experiment using the one factor at a time (OFAT method was done to study the effect of each extraction parameter that was solid to solvent ratio, temperature and solvent concentration. The extraction condition in each parametric study which results in highest antioxidant activity was used as the middle level of optimization process using Response Surface Methodology (RSM coupled with Central Composite Design (CCD. The optimum condition was at 1:20 solid to solvent ratio, 64.61°C temperature and 80.24% acetone concentration which result in antioxidant activity of 96.53%. The verification of RSM showed that the model used to predict the antioxidant activity was valid and adequate with the experimental parameters.

  8. Heavy metal concentrations in plants and different harvestable parts: A soil-plant equilibrium model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guala, Sebastian D. [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Gutierrez 1150, Los Polvorines, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vega, Flora A. [Departamento de Bioloxia Vexetal e Ciencia do Solo, Facultade de Bioloxia, Universidade de Vigo, Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain); Covelo, Emma F., E-mail: emmaf@uvigo.e [Departamento de Bioloxia Vexetal e Ciencia do Solo, Facultade de Bioloxia, Universidade de Vigo, Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    A mathematical interaction model, validated by experimental results, was developed to modeling the metal uptake by plants and induced growth decrease, by knowing metal in soils. The model relates the dynamics of the uptake of metals from soil to plants. Also, two types of relationships are tested: total and available metal content. The model successfully fitted the experimental data and made it possible to predict the threshold values of total mortality with a satisfactory approach. Data are taken from soils treated with Cd and Ni for ryegrass (Lolium perenne, L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.), respectively. Concentrations are measured in the aboveground biomass of plants. In the latter case, the concentration of metals in different parts of the plants (tillering, shooting and earing) is also modeled. At low concentrations, the effects of metals are moderate, and the dynamics appear to be linear. However, increasing concentrations show nonlinear behaviors. - The model proposed in this study makes possible to characterize the nonlinear behavior of the soil-plant interaction with metal pollution.

  9. Observations on north-west European limestone grassland communities. V, a. An experimental approach to the study of species diversity and above-ground biomass in chalk grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    In 1971 a number of permanent plots were established in an abandoned Dutch calcareous grassland, then belonging to the association Arrhenatheretum elatioris with some elements of Mesobrometum erecti and Poo-Lolietum. A part of the plots was treated with fertilizer of varying N.P.K.-content. Another

  10. THE USE OF INTER SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEATS (ISSR) IN DISTINGUISHING NEIGHBORING DOUGLAS-FIR TREES AS A MEANS TO IDENTIFYING TREE ROOTS WITH ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are attempting to identify specific root fragments from soil cores with individual trees. We successfully used Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) to distinguish neighboring old-growth Douglas-fir trees from one another, while maintaining identity among each tree's parts. W...

  11. Free atmospheric CO2 enrichment increased above ground biomass but did not affect symbiotic N2-fixation and soil carbon dynamics in a mixed deciduous stand in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Through increases in net primary production (NPP, elevated CO2 is hypothesized to increase the amount of plant litter entering the soil. The fate of this extra carbon on the forest floor or in mineral soil is currently not clear. Moreover, increased rates of NPP can be maintained only if forests can escape nitrogen limitation. In a Free atmospheric CO2 Enrichment (FACE experiment near Bangor, Wales, 4 ambient and 4 elevated [CO2] plots were planted with patches of Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa and Fagus sylvatica on a former arable field. After 4 years, biomass averaged for the 3 species was 5497 (se 270 g m−2 in ambient and 6450 (se 130 g m−2 in elevated [CO2] plots, a significant increase of 17% (P = 0.018. During that time, only a shallow L forest floor litter layer had formed due to intensive bioturbation. Total soil C and N contents increased irrespective of treatment and species as a result of afforestation. We could not detect an additional C sink in the soil, nor were soil C stabilization processes affected by elevated [CO2]. We observed a decrease of leaf N content in Betula and Alnus under elevated [CO2], while the soil C/N ratio decreased regardless of CO2 treatment. The ratio of N taken up from the soil and by N2-fixation in Alnus was not affected by elevated [CO2]. We infer that increased nitrogen use efficiency is the mechanism by which increased NPP is sustained under elevated [CO2] at this site.

  12. Modeling utility-scale wind power plants, part 1: Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, M.

    2000-06-29

    As the worldwide use of wind turbine generators continues to increase in utility-scale applications, it will become increasingly important to assess the economic and reliability impact of these intermittent resources. Although the utility industry in the United States appears to be moving towards a restructured environment, basic economic and reliability issues will continue to be relevant to companies involved with electricity generation. This paper is the first of two that address modeling approaches and results obtained in several case studies and research projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This first paper addresses the basic economic issues associated with electricity production from several generators that include large-scale wind power plants. An important part of this discussion is the role of unit commitment and economic dispatch in production-cost models. This paper includes overviews and comparisons of the prevalent production-cost modeling met hods, including several case studies applied to a variety of electric utilities. The second paper discusses various methods of assessing capacity credit and results from several reliability-based studies performed at NREL.

  13. Turkish folk medicinal plants, Part IV: Gönen (Balikesir).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzlaci, E; Aymaz, P E

    2001-05-01

    Eighty-four folk medicinal plants from Gönen (Turkey) are reported. Among them 73 species are wild and 11 species are cultivated plants. The folk medicinal plants are mostly used for the treatment of hemorrhoids, rheumatism, stomach and kidney ailments.

  14. Evaluation of Some Heavy Metals in Aerial Parts of Wild Rice Plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2014-11-13

    upper parts of wild rice plant in three locations (Gure, Kagoro, and Kaduna) of Kaduna state. HNO3-H2O2 was used to digest the plant samples and analyzed using AA320N model Atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

  15. Chemical composition of buckwheat plant parts and selected buckwheat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Vojtíšková

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition plant parts (roots, stalks, leaves, blossoms of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench and selected products made from its seeds (peels, whole seed, wholemeal flour, broken seeds, crunchy products Natural and Cocoa, flour, and pasta was determined. Samples were dried and ground to a fine powder. All analyses were performed according to the Commission Regulation no. 152/2009, while rutin concentration was determined by the modified HPLC method. The lowest content of moisture was found in roots (4.3% and in peels (almost 8% and the highest moisture (nearly 11% was discovered in seeds. The lowest amount of crude protein (3.5% was found in peels, the highest crude protein amount (>13% in both flours and leaves (23%. The starch content (>50% in dry matter differs from one sample to another. Only in peels the content of starch was about 3.5%. From all examined samples, the lowest content of fat was found in crunchy products Cocoa, 1.7%. The lowest amount of histidine was determined in all studied samples, except peels, the highest content of glutamic acid was determined in almost all samples, except peels. Whole-meal flour is very rich source of Ca and Fe. The content of these elements was 1172 mg.kg-1 and 45.9 mg.kg-1, respectively. On the other hand, the highest content of Pb (>1 mg.kg-1 was found in broken seeds. The greatest concentration of rutin was determined in blossoms and leaves (83.6 and 69.9 mg.g-1, respectively. On the other hand, the lowest concentrations of rutin were found in buckwheat products (generally less then 1 mg.g-1, i.e. in wholemeal flour, 702 μg.kg-1, the lowest almost 10 μg.kg-1 in pasta.

  16. Part 2: Conserving and Planting Trees at Development Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Cappiella; Tom Schueler; Tiffany Wright

    2006-01-01

    This manual presents specific ways to enable developers, engineers or landscape architects to incorporate more trees into a development site. The proposed approach focuses on protecting existing trees, planting trees in storm water treatment practices, and planting trees in other open spaces at the development site. This manual introduces conceptual designs for storm...

  17. Integration of new nuclear power plants into transmission grids part I: Transmission system issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abi-Samra, N.

    2008-01-01

    Integration of new nuclear plants into a transmission system is a two sided problem. On one side, adding the nuclear plant into an existing grid will change the attributes of that grid: e.g., loading of certain transmission lines will increase; voltages will be affected, etc. On the other side, the grid itself will affect the plant, and the plant needs to be designed to accommodate the specifics of the grid. Based on that, this paper is divided into two parts. Part I addresses the grid issues with the integration of the new plant, with emphasis on the electrical aspects of these issues. Part II of this paper, concentrates on the vulnerability of the plant from grid disturbances. Part II reintroduces a relatively new concept by this author called the Zone of Vulnerability (ZoV) for the new nuclear plants. (authors)

  18. Measuring Above Ground Biomass and Vegetation Structure in the South Florida Everglades Wetland Ecosystem with X-, C-, and L-band SAR data and Ground-based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, E. A.; Wdowinski, S.; Potts, M.; Chin, S.; Phillips, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Worldwide, anthropogenic activities are disturbing and disrupting nutrient rich bio-diverse wetland ecosystems. Disturbance of the South Florida Everglades has been particularly acute, but difficult to quantify given its limited accessibility. Successful ecosystem monitoring requires the use of remote sensing. We used space-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations to estimate vegetation structure and above-ground biomass and track their changes over time. Our study leveraged three different SAR wavelengths that interact with different aspects of the vegetation. The short wavelength X-band (3.2 cm) signal interacts mainly with canopies; the intermediate wavelength C-band (5.6 cm) signal interacts with both canopies and branches; and the long wavelength L-band (24 cm) signal interacts with both the surface and lower portion of the vegetation. We used dual- and quadruple-polarization observations acquired from the TerraSAR-X, RadarSAT-2, and ALOS satellites. Different polarization data reflect radar signal interaction with different sections of the vegetation due to different scattering mechanisms. In order to calibrate the multi-wavelength and multi-polarization SAR observations, we conducted field measurement in three vegetation communities: hammock, pine and cypress. Our ground measurements included both traditional forestry surveys and state-of-the-art Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), a.k.a. ground based LiDAR surveys. A week long TLS survey was conducted in the Everglades National Park in the three calibrations sites using a Leica ScanStation C10 TLS instrument which utilizes a narrow, green (532 nm) laser beam. During this week we collected a total of 29 scans (33 GB of data). The TLS surveys provided centimeter resolution 3-D point clouds of the ground surface and below-canopy vegetation. Initial analysis of the data has provided detailed 3-D estimates of the vegetation structure and above ground biomass. A comparative analysis of the ability of the

  19. 40 CFR 63.4282 - What parts of my plant does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What parts of my plant does this subpart cover? 63.4282 Section 63.4282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... and Other Textiles What This Subpart Covers § 63.4282 What parts of my plant does this subpart cover...

  20. Regulation of above-ground oil and waste containers. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation, Tourism, and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, January 26, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Representatives from the petroleum industry, US EPA, National Bureau of Standards and Congress were among those testifying at a hearing to discuss one of the worst inland environmental disasters in this Nation's history. The January 2 collapse of the Ashland Oil Co.'s storage tank in Floreffe, Pennsylvania resulted in the release of some 4 million gallons of diesel fuel. Approximately a million gallons escaped the containment structures and spilled over into the Monongahela River. This spill has contaminated the drinking water sources for millions of people downstream, from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati to Louisville, and beyond. Attention is focused on the causes of this tank's collapse, the response measures taken by Ashland Oil, the Coast Guard, the EPA, and the need for tighter federal regulations of above-ground tanks used for the storage of petroleum and hazardous substances.

  1. Phytoremediation: plant-endophyte partnerships take the challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2009-04-01

    A promising field to exploit plant-endophyte partnerships is the remediation of contaminated soils and (ground) water. Many plant growth promoting endophytes can assist their host plant to overcome contaminant-induced stress responses, thus providing improved plant growth. During phytoremediation of organic contaminants, plants can further benefit from endophytes possessing appropriate degradation pathways and metabolic capabilities, leading to more efficient contaminant degradation and reduction of both phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration of volatile contaminants. For phytoremediation of toxic metals, endophytes possessing a metal-resistance/sequestration system can lower metal phytotoxicity and affect metal translocation to the above-ground plant parts. Furthermore, endophytes that can degrade organic contaminants and deal with or, even better, improve extraction of the metals offer promising ways to improve phytoremediation of mixed pollution.

  2. Effect of plant species on the specific activity of 65Zn and 54Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, T.; Neptune, A.M.L.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of five plant species on the specific activity of 65 Zn and 54 Mn is studied. Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merril), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, L.), rice (Oryza sativa, L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.) and tomato (Lycopersium esculentum Mill) were grown in PV and TE soils labelled with 65 Zn and 54 Mn. The plants were harvested 30 days after seeding and specific activities of zinco and manganese were determined in the above ground part and in the roots. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Quantitative description of woody plant communities: Part II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formulas for the calculation of spatial tree volume are given as computer compatible expressions and the calculation procedures are described.Language: English. Keywords: botany; Calculations; canopy spread; dry mass; evapotranspiration; Formulas; plant communities; production; spatial tree volume; Spatial tree ...

  4. Distributions of vascular plants in the Czech Republic. Part 3

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplan, Zdeněk; Danihelka, Jiří; Lepší, M.; Lepší, P.; Ekrt, L.; Chrtek, Jindřich; Kocián, J.; Prančl, Jan; Kobrlová, L.; Hroneš, M.; Šulc, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2016), s. 459-544 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : distribution * vascular plants * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2016

  5. Distributions of vascular plants in the Czech Republic. Part 4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplan, Zdeněk; Danihelka, Jiří; Koutecký, P.; Šumberová, Kateřina; Ekrt, L.; Grulich, V.; Řepka, R.; Hroudová, Zdenka; Štěpánková, Jitka; Dvořák, V.; Dančák, M.; Dřevojan, P.; Wild, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 2 (2017), s. 115-201 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : distribution * maps * phytogeography Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2016

  6. Distributions of vascular plants in the Czech Republic. Part 5

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplan, Zdeněk; Danihelka, Jiří; Šumberová, Kateřina; Chrtek, Jindřich; Rotreklová, O.; Ekrt, L.; Štěpánková, Jitka; Taraška, V.; Trávníček, B.; Prančl, Jan; Ducháček, M.; Hroneš, M.; Kobrlová, L.; Horák, D.; Wild, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 4 (2017), s. 333-439 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : distribution * maps * phytogeography Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2016

  7. Nuclear material safeguards for enrichments plants: Part 4, Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant: Diversion scenarios and IAEA safeguards activities: Safeguards training course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This publication is Part 4 of a safeguards training course in Nuclear Material Safeguards for enrichment plants. This part of the course deals with diversion scenarios and safeguards activities at gas centrifuge enrichment plants.

  8. Nutrient Leaching When Soil Is Part of Plant Growth Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally D. Logsdon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soils can serve as sorbents for phosphorus (P, negating the need for artificial sorbents. The purpose of this study was to compare soils with different properties for their effect on nutrient levels in effluent. Four soils were mixed with sand and packed into columns 0.5 m long, with or without compost on the surface. Infiltration and effluent concentrations were measured before and after growing plants [Buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt. Engelm. and bluegrama grasses (Bouteloua gracilis H.B.K. and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.]. The growth media with compost at the surface had higher nutrient levels than the media without the compost, but the final effluent nitrate concentrations post-harvest were significantly lower for columns with the compost blanket (59 vs. 86 mg L−1. All of the nitrate concentrations were high (many >100 mg L−1 due to mineralization and nitrogen fixation. The final effluent P concentrations before planting were significantly higher in the soil with the most sand (0.71 mg L−1, and after harvest in the mixture that contained the high soil P levels (0.58 mg L−1. Some soils (high in aluminum or calcium were adequate sorbents for P without additions of other sorbents, but soils often generated too much nitrate in effluent.

  9. Improved Management of Part Safety Classification System for Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Young; Park, Youn Won; Park, Heung Gyu; Park, Hyo Chan [BEES Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    As, in recent years, many quality assurance (QA) related incidents, such as falsely-certified parts and forged documentation, etc., were reported in association with the supply of structures, systems, components and parts to nuclear power plants, a need for a better management of safety classification system was addressed so that it would be based more on the level of parts . Presently, the Korean nuclear power plants do not develop and apply relevant procedures for safety classifications, but rather the safety classes of parts are determined solely based on the experience of equipment designers. So proposed in this paper is a better management plan for safety equipment classification system with an aim to strengthen the quality management for parts. The plan was developed through the analysis of newly introduced technical criteria to be applied to parts of nuclear power plant.

  10. Acquisition and statistical analysis of reliability data for I and C parts in plant protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, T. J.; Byun, S. S.; Han, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Lim, J. S.; Oh, S. J.; Park, K. Y.; Song, H. S. [Soongsil Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    This project has been performed in order to construct I and C part reliability databases for detailed analysis of plant protection system and to develop a methodology for analysing trip set point drifts. Reliability database for the I and C parts of plant protection system is required to perform the detailed analysis. First, we have developed an electronic part reliability prediction code based on MIL-HDBK-217F. Then we have collected generic reliability data for the I and C parts in plant protection system. Statistical analysis procedure has been developed to process the data. Then the generic reliability database has been constructed. We have also collected plant specific reliability data for the I and C parts in plant protection system for YGN 3,4 and UCN 3,4 units. Plant specific reliability database for I and C parts has been developed by the Bayesian procedure. We have also developed an statistical analysis procedure for set point drift, and performed analysis of drift effects for trip set point. The basis for the detailed analysis can be provided from the reliability database for the PPS I and C parts. The safety of the KSNP and succeeding NPPs can be proved by reducing the uncertainty of PSA. Economic and efficient operation of NPP can be possible by optimizing the test period to reduce utility's burden. 14 refs., 215 figs., 137 tabs. (Author)

  11. Plants and parts of plants used in food supplements: an approach to their safety assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Carratù

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italy most herbal products are sold as food supplements and are subject only to food law. A list of about 1200 plants authorised for use in food supplements has been compiled by the Italian ministry of Health. In order to review and possibly improve the ministry's list an ad hoc working group of Istituto Superiore di Sanità was requested to provide a technical and scientific opinion on plant safety. The listed plants were evaluated on the basis of their use in food, therapeutic activity, human toxicity and in no-alimentary fields. Toxicity was also assessed and plant limitations to use in food supplements were defined.

  12. Part-task simulator for a WWER-440 nuclear power plant subsystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, B.K.

    1988-07-01

    PC-based part-task simulators for simulating subsystems of nuclear power plants are low cost tools for operator training. In the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest, a simulator system has been developed to facilitate fast development of such simulators. The first application simulates the Neutron Flux Monitoring System of WWER-440 nuclear power plants. (author) 9 refs.; 2 figs

  13. Composition of beddings of artificial forest planting in sonth part of Krivoy Rog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Shevchuk

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Studied biomass and factious composition of the artificial forest .planting beddings in a spring period in south part of Krivoy Rog. It is found out, that supplies and factious composition of beddings depend on age of planting and types of trees.

  14. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 1: Final summary report; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  15. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  16. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC's overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively

  17. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 1: Final summary report; Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC's overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively

  18. Influence of seasons, different plant parts, and plant growth stages on saponin quantity and distribution in Bacopa monnieri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watoo Phrompittayarat

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Brahmi or Bacopa monnieri (L. Wettst. is becoming popular as a food supplement due to its enhancing effect onmemory and intellect. Previous studies showed that a group of saponins are active compounds in this plant. However, untilnow little evidence has been obtained to indicate whether saponins are consistently present throughout the plant growthstages or the compounds are affected by the seasons. In order to answer those questions, we cultivated Brahmi under thenet house in three seasons. Influence of plant growth stages on saponin quantity and distribution was also investigated.In each season, treatments were plant ages with different plant parts having a factorial completely randomized design with 3replications. Five saponins, i.e. bacoside A3, bacopaside II, bacopaside X, bacopasaponin C and bacopaside I, were analyzedusing HPLC and reported as total saponins.The results showed that total saponin contents in Brahmi were the highest in rainy season while the weight yield ofBrahmi was the highest in summer. Ages of Brahmi (1-4 months slightly affected total saponin content. High level of totalsaponins (1.91±0.48% w/w was detected at the shoot of Brahmi. These findings indicate that the saponin quantity is affectedby seasons and the distribution of the saponins is different in each part of the plant. This information will be beneficial tothe production of Brahmi for both household and industry

  19. 40 CFR 63.6590 - What parts of my plant does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Internal Combustion Engines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6590 What parts of my plant does this subpart... ignition (CI) stationary RICE with a site rating of less than or equal to 500 brake HP, must meet the... engines or 40 CFR part 60 subpart JJJJ, for spark ignition engines. No further requirements apply for such...

  20. Effect of soil contamination with oil substances on the growth of selected plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sara, V.; Kult, L.; Vavra, J.

    1993-12-01

    The growth of barley, maize, wheat and alfalfa was studied in dependence on the level of soil pollution with crude oil. Attention was also paid to the effect of such contamination on the vanadium and nickel contents of the above-ground parts of the plants. Experiments revealed that, with the exception of alfalfa, the vanadium content of plants which had been grown in the contaminated soil was about one-half with respect to the values observed in plants grown in uncontaminated soil, and the nickel content was also lower than in control plants. Introduced into the soil by injection in concentrations of 180 to 500 ppm, crude oil was found to induce local damage in the plants, resulting in a smaller size of the plants and a delayed or missing earing phase, with repercussions on the grain size and quantity. (J.B.). 2 tabs., 6 figs

  1. Encapsulation plant at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, Anders

    2007-08-15

    SKB has already carried out a preliminary study of an encapsulation plant detached from Clab (Central interim storage for spent fuels). This stand-alone encapsulation plant was named FRINK and its assumed siting was the above-ground portion of the final repository, irrespective of the repository's location. The report previously presented was produced in cooperation with BNFL Engineering Ltd in Manchester and the fuel reception technical solution was examined by Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH (GNS) in Hannover and by Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN) in Paris. This report is an update of the earlier preliminary study report and is based on the assumption that the encapsulation plant and also the final repository will be sited in the Forsmark area. SKB's main alternative for siting the encapsulation plant is next to Clab. Planning of this facility is ongoing and technical solutions from the planning work have been incorporated in this report. An encapsulation plant placed in proximity to any final repository in Forsmark forms part of the alternative presentation in the application for permission to construct and operate an installation at Clab. The main technical difference between the planned encapsulation plant at Clab and an encapsulation plant at a final repository at Forsmark is how the fuel is managed and prepared before actual encapsulation. Fuel reception at the encapsulation plant in Forsmark would be dry, i.e. there would be no water-filled pools at the facility. Clab is used for verificatory fuel measurements, sorting and drying of the fuel before transport to Forsmark. This means that Clab will require a measure of rebuilding and supplementary equipment. In purely technical terms, the prospects for building an encapsulation plant sited at Forsmark are good. A description of the advantages and drawbacks of siting the encapsulation plant at Clab as opposed to any final repository at Forsmark is presented in a separate

  2. Biomassas de partes aéreas em plantas da caatinga Aboveground biomass of caatinga plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grécia Cavalcanti Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available As biomassas de partes aéreas de nove espécies da caatinga foram determinadas e relacionadas com as medidas das plantas, cortando-se 30 plantas de cada espécie e separando-as em caule, galhos, ramos e folhas. As espécies foram divididas em dois grupos: seis espécies com plantas grandes e três com plantas menores. Cada grupo foi separado em classes de diâmetro do caule (DAP. As alturas totais (HT dobraram (3,8 a 8,5 m da classe de menor para a de maior diâmetro (Biomass of aboveground parts of nine caatinga species were determined and related to plant measurements. Thirty plants of each species were collected and separated into stems, branches, twigs and leaves. The species were divided in two groups: six species of large plants and three species of smaller plants. Each group was divided into classes of stem diameter (DBH. Plant height (H doubled (3.8 to 8.5 m from the smallest-diameter class to the largest diameter ( 5 cm diameter, 20% of branches from 1 to 5 cm, 5% of twigs < 1 cm and 5% of leaves. DBH was the single variable that best predicted biomass of parts, in both species groups, according to a power equation (B = a DBH b. H and CPA were also significantly related to biomass for some parts and group, but with R² lower than DBH. Combining DBH and H improved estimation but not enough to justify the extra field effort in determining H. Therefore, plant part biomass can be estimated from measurements of stem diameter, in a non-destructive process.

  3. Identifying Plant Part Composition of Forest Logging Residue Using Infrared Spectral Data and Linear Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquah, Gifty E; Via, Brian K; Billor, Nedret; Fasina, Oladiran O; Eckhardt, Lori G

    2016-08-27

    As new markets, technologies and economies evolve in the low carbon bioeconomy, forest logging residue, a largely untapped renewable resource will play a vital role. The feedstock can however be variable depending on plant species and plant part component. This heterogeneity can influence the physical, chemical and thermochemical properties of the material, and thus the final yield and quality of products. Although it is challenging to control compositional variability of a batch of feedstock, it is feasible to monitor this heterogeneity and make the necessary changes in process parameters. Such a system will be a first step towards optimization, quality assurance and cost-effectiveness of processes in the emerging biofuel/chemical industry. The objective of this study was therefore to qualitatively classify forest logging residue made up of different plant parts using both near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) together with linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Forest logging residue harvested from several Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) plantations in Alabama, USA, were classified into three plant part components: clean wood, wood and bark and slash (i.e., limbs and foliage). Five-fold cross-validated linear discriminant functions had classification accuracies of over 96% for both NIRS and FTIRS based models. An extra factor/principal component (PC) was however needed to achieve this in FTIRS modeling. Analysis of factor loadings of both NIR and FTIR spectra showed that, the statistically different amount of cellulose in the three plant part components of logging residue contributed to their initial separation. This study demonstrated that NIR or FTIR spectroscopy coupled with PCA and LDA has the potential to be used as a high throughput tool in classifying the plant part makeup of a batch of forest logging residue feedstock. Thus, NIR/FTIR could be employed as a tool to rapidly probe/monitor the variability of forest

  4. Induced Plant Accumulation of Lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Kavanagh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lithium’s (Li value has grown exponentially since the development of Li-ion batteries. It is usually accessed in one of two ways: hard rock mineral mining or extraction from mineral-rich brines. Both methods are expensive and require a rich source of Li. This paper examines the potential of agro-mining as an environmentally friendly, economically viable process for extracting Li from low grade ore. Agro-mining exploits an ability found in few plant species, to accumulate substantial amounts of metals in the above ground parts of the plant. Phyto-mined metals are then retrieved from the incinerated plants. Although the actual amount of metal collected from a crop may be low, the process has been shown to be profitable. We have investigated the suitability of several plant species including: Brassica napus and Helianthus annuus, as Li-accumulators under controlled conditions. Large plant trials were carried out with/without chelating agents to encourage Li accumulation. The question we sought to answer was, can any of the plant species investigated accumulate Li at levels high enough to justify using them to agro-mine Li. Results show maximum accumulated levels of >4000 mg/kg Li in some species. Our data suggests that agro-mining of Li is a potentially viable process.

  5. Rock siting of nuclear power plants from a reactor safety standpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The study has aimed at surveying the advantages and disadvantages of a rock sited nuclear power plant from a reactor safety standpoint. The studies performed are almost entirely concentrated on the BWR alternative. The design of a nuclear power plant in rock judged most appropriate has been studied in greater detail, and a relatively extensive safety analysis has been made. It is found that the presented technical design of the rock sited alternative is sufficiently advanced to form a basis for further projecting treatment. The chosen technical design of the reactor plant demands a cavern with a 45-50 metre span. Caverns without strengthening efforts with such spans are used in mines, but have no previously been used for industrial plants. Studies of the stability of such caverns show that a safety level is attainable corresponding to the safety required for the other parts of the nuclear power plant. The conditions are that the rock is of high quality, that necessary strengthening measures are taken and that careful studies of the rock are made before and during the blasting, and also during operation of the plant. When locating a rock sited nuclear power plant, the same criteria must be considered as for an above ground plant, with additional stronger demands for rock quality. The presented rock sited nuclear power plant has been assessed to cost 20 % more in total construction costs than a corresponding above ground plant. The motivations for rock siting also depend on whether a condensing plant for only electricity production, or a plant for combined power production and district heating, is considered. The latter would under certain circumstances make rock siting look more attractive. (author)

  6. Polysaccharides, total flavonoids content and antioxidant activities in different parts of Silybum marianum L. plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Li, Xinhua; Yu, Xiaolei

    2017-01-01

    Silybum marianum L. is used for the production of silymarin, a flavonoid utilized for regenerating damaged hepatic tissues. Herein, the total flavonoid content (TFC) and polysaccharides content (PC) in the roots, main stems, leaves, fruit receptacles, and pappi of Silybum marianum were determined. The antioxidant activities of plant ethanol extracts were assessed to validate the medicinal potential of the various plant parts. The pappi exhibited the highest TFC (17.10 mg rutin/g of dry plant material), followed by the fruit receptacles (15.34 mg/g). The PC varied from 3.57±0.23 to 11.02±0.35 mg glucose /g dry plant material; the highest PC was obtained from the roots. At 50 ug/mL, the pappi ethanol extract showed the highest 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (69.68%), followed by the roots (66.02%).

  7. Distribution of the horticultural plants in togo according to decorative parts and medical value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radji, R.; Kokou, K

    2014-01-01

    In Togo, more than six hundred species of horticultural plants were identified belonging to approximately 59% of Dicotyledons (49 families, 145 genera and 315 species) and 37.37% were monocotyledons. Pteridophytes and gymnosperms accounted for less than 6%. The spectrum of morphological types indicated that herbs accounted for 55%, while trees and shrubs were 15%. More than 50% of the species of this flora were exotic. The species distributions were made according to their decorative parts and their place of use. Across the country, 55 plantings were recorded and unevenly distributed in cities. Apart from their ornamental use, these plants were used for feeding, traditional and industrial cosmetics in psychotherapy, horticultural therapy and in traditional and conventional medicine preparation. In this study, 79 species from 39 families are reported as medicinal plants. The Apocynaceae and Fabaceae (6 species), the Euphorbiaceae and Liliaceae (5 species), the Arecaceae and Verbenaceae (4 species) were the best represented families. (author)

  8. Assessment of contamination potential of lettuce by Salmonella enterica serovar Newport added to the plant growing medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Nirit; Sela, Shlomo; Neder-Lavon, Sarit

    2007-07-01

    The capacity of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport to contaminate Romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Nogal) via the root system was evaluated in 17-, 20-, and 33-day-old plants. Apparent internalization of Salmonella via the root to the above-ground parts was identified in 33- but not 17- or 20-day-old plants and was stimulated by root decapitation. Leaves of lettuce plants with intact and damaged roots harbored Salmonella at 500 +/- 120 and 5,130 +/- 440 CFU/g of leaf, respectively, at 2 days postinoculation but not 5 days later. These findings are first to suggest that Salmonella Newport can translocate from contaminated roots to the aerial parts of lettuce seedlings and propose that the process is dependent on the developmental stage of the plant.

  9. Echinophorin D a new polyacetylene from an edible plant, Echinophora platyloba aerial parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mohammadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The aerial parts of Echinophora platyloba are added to cheese and yoghurt for flavoring. Besides, it is used for the treatment of flatulence and as air freshener. Despite several pharmacological studies on the plant, no attempt has been made to isolate non-volatile secondary metabolites from this plant. So, phytochemical investigation seems to be useful for better use of this plant in and to discover new compounds. Methods: Powdered aerial parts of the plant were extracted by Soxhlet apparatus with hexane, dichloromethane (DCM and acetone. The concentrated acetone extract was fractionated using silica open column and mixture of heptane and ethyl acetate while DCM extract was fractionated by reverse phase column chromatography on RP-18 sorbent using mixture of methanol and water as solvent system with decreasing polarity. All subfractions were analysed by 1H- NMR, COSY, HSQC, HMBC and 13C-NMR. Results: After column chromatography and HPLC purification of DCM extract one new polyacetylene compound called echinophorin D was obtained and one fatty acid (coriolic acid and one esteric polyacetylene (echinophorin B were isolated and identified from the acetone extract. Conclusion: Due to the isolation of coriolic acid for the first time from this genus and the role of this fatty acid in inflammatory processes and anticancer activity as well as isolating polyacetylene compounds which have antioxidant and anti-tomur activity, this plant can be used as a source for compounds with antioxidant and anticancer effects.

  10. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants in western part of central Taurus Mountains: Aladaglar (Nigde - Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Ebru; Alpınar, Kerim

    2015-05-26

    With this study, we aimed to document traditional uses of medicinal plants in the western part of Aladaglar/Nigde. This study was conducted between 2003 and 2005. The research area was in the western part of the Aladaglar mountains. The settlements in Aladaglar (5 towns and 10 villages) were visited during the field work. The plants collected by the help of medicinal plant users. The plants were identified and voucher specimens prepared. These voucher specimens were kept at the Herbarium of Istanbul University Faculty of Pharmacy (ISTE). We collected the information by means of semi-structured interviews with 170 informants (90 men and 80 women). In addition, the relative importance value of the species was determined and the informant consensus factor (FIC) was calculated for the medicinal plants researched in the study. According to the results of the identification, among 126 plants were used by the inhabitants and 110 species belonging to 40 families were used for medicinal purposes. Most of the medicinal plants used in Aladaglar/Nigde belong to the families Lamiaceae (25 species), Asteraceae (16 species), Apiaceae (7 species), Fabaceae (6 species) and Brassicaceae (5 species). The most commonly used plant species were Hypericum perforatumThymus sipyleus var. sipyleus, Rosa canina, Urtica dioica, Malva neglecta, Thymus leucotrichus, Salix alba, Mentha longifolia, Berberis crataegina, Juniperus oxycedrus, Viscum album subsp. abietis, Allium rotundum and Taraxacum stevenii. The most common preparations were infusion and decoction. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases (86%), hemorrhoids (79%), urinary diseases (69%), diabetes (68%) and respiratory diseases (61%). The use of traditional medicine was still widespread among the inhabitants of Aladaglar mountains/Nigde region. Due to the lack of medical facilities in the villages of Aladaglar mountains, local people prefer herbal treatment rather than

  11. Fuzzy logic utilization for the diagnosis of metallic loose part impact in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.-G.; Hong, H.-P.; Han, S.-J.; Chun, C.S.; Kim, B.-K.

    1996-01-01

    In consideration of the fuzzy nature of impact signals detected from the complex mechanical structures in a nuclear power plant under operation. Loose Part Monitoring System with a signal processing technique utilizing fuzzy logic is proposed. In the proposed Fuzzy Loose Part Monitoring System design, comprehensive relations among the impact signal features are taken into account in the fuzzy rule bases for the alarm discrimination and impact event diagnosis. Through the performance test with a mock-up facility, the proposed approach for the loose parts monitoring and diagnosis has been revealed to be effective not only in suppressing the false alarm generation but also in characterizing the metallic loose-part impact event, from the points of Possible Impacted-Area and Degree of Impact Magnitude

  12. Location of plant species in Norway gathered as a part of a survey vegetation mapping programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryn, Anders; Kristoffersen, Hans-Petter; Angeloff, Michael; Nystuen, Ingvild; Aune-Lundberg, Linda; Endresen, Dag; Svindseth, Christian; Rekdal, Yngve

    2015-01-01

    Georeferenced species data have a wide range of applications and are increasingly used for e.g. distribution modelling and climate change studies. As an integrated part of an on-going survey programme for vegetation mapping, plant species have been recorded. The data described in this paper contains 18.521 registrations of plants from 1190 different circular plots throughout Norway. All species localities are georeferenced, the spatial uncertainty is provided, and additional ecological information is reported. The published data has been gathered from 1991 until 2015. The entries contain all higher vascular plants and pteridophytes, and some cryptogams. Other ecological information is also provided for the species locations, such as the vegetation type, the cover of the species and slope. The entire material is stored and available for download through the GBIF server. PMID:26958614

  13. Plant parts of the apple tree (Malus spp.) as possible indicators of heavy metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tošić, Snežana; Alagić, Slađana; Dimitrijević, Mile; Pavlović, Aleksandra; Nujkić, Maja

    2016-05-01

    The content of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Cd, and Ni was determined by ICP-OES in spatial soil and parts (root, branches, leaves, and fruit) of the apple tree (Malus spp.) from polluted sites near The Mining and Smelting Complex Bor (Serbia). The aim of this study was to examine if the obtained results can be used for biomonitoring purposes. Data recorded in plant parts, especially leaves, gave very useful information about the environmental state of the Bor region. Conveniently, these data described well the capability of investigated plant species to assimilate and tolerate severely high concentrations of heavy metals in its tissues, which may further allow the possibility for utilization of the apple tree for phytostabilization.

  14. Standards for plant synthetic biology: a common syntax for exchange of DNA parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Nicola J; Orzaez, Diego; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Warzecha, Heribert; Matthewman, Colette; Youles, Mark; Raitskin, Oleg; Leveau, Aymeric; Farré, Gemma; Rogers, Christian; Smith, Alison; Hibberd, Julian; Webb, Alex A R; Locke, James; Schornack, Sebastian; Ajioka, Jim; Baulcombe, David C; Zipfel, Cyril; Kamoun, Sophien; Jones, Jonathan D G; Kuhn, Hannah; Robatzek, Silke; Van Esse, H Peter; Sanders, Dale; Oldroyd, Giles; Martin, Cathie; Field, Rob; O'Connor, Sarah; Fox, Samantha; Wulff, Brande; Miller, Ben; Breakspear, Andy; Radhakrishnan, Guru; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Loqué, Dominique; Granell, Antonio; Tissier, Alain; Shih, Patrick; Brutnell, Thomas P; Quick, W Paul; Rischer, Heiko; Fraser, Paul D; Aharoni, Asaph; Raines, Christine; South, Paul F; Ané, Jean-Michel; Hamberger, Björn R; Langdale, Jane; Stougaard, Jens; Bouwmeester, Harro; Udvardi, Michael; Murray, James A H; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Schäfer, Patrick; Denby, Katherine; Edwards, Keith J; Osbourn, Anne; Haseloff, Jim

    2015-10-01

    Inventors in the field of mechanical and electronic engineering can access multitudes of components and, thanks to standardization, parts from different manufacturers can be used in combination with each other. The introduction of BioBrick standards for the assembly of characterized DNA sequences was a landmark in microbial engineering, shaping the field of synthetic biology. Here, we describe a standard for Type IIS restriction endonuclease-mediated assembly, defining a common syntax of 12 fusion sites to enable the facile assembly of eukaryotic transcriptional units. This standard has been developed and agreed by representatives and leaders of the international plant science and synthetic biology communities, including inventors, developers and adopters of Type IIS cloning methods. Our vision is of an extensive catalogue of standardized, characterized DNA parts that will accelerate plant bioengineering. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Exploring Cancer Therapeutics with Natural Products from African Medicinal Plants, Part II: Alkaloids, Terpenoids and Flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwodo, Justina N; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Simoben, Conrad V; Ntie-Kang, Fidele

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stands as second most common cause of disease-related deaths in humans. Resistance of cancer to chemotherapy remains challenging to both scientists and physicians. Medicinal plants are known to contribute significantly to a large population of Africa, which is to a very large extent linked to folkloric claims which is part of their livelihood. In this review paper, the potential of naturally occurring anti-cancer agents from African flora has been explored, with suggested modes of action, where such data is available. Literature search revealed plant-derived compounds from African flora showing anti-cancer and/or cytotoxic activities, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo. This corresponds to 400 compounds (from mildly active to very active) covering various compound classes. However, in this part II, we only discussed the three major compound classes which are: flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids.

  16. Trends and problems in development of the power plants electrical part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Yu. P.

    2015-03-01

    The article discusses some problems relating to development of the electrical part of modern nuclear and thermal power plants, which are stemming from the use of new process and electrical equipment, such as gas turbine units, power converters, and intellectual microprocessor devices in relay protection and automated control systems. It is pointed out that the failure rates of electrical equipment at Russian and foreign power plants tend to increase. The ongoing power plant technical refitting and innovative development processes generate the need to significantly widen the scope of research works on the electrical part of power plants and rendering scientific support to works on putting in use innovative equipment. It is indicated that one of main factors causing the growth of electrical equipment failures is that some of components of this equipment have insufficiently compatible dynamic characteristics. This, in turn may be due to lack or obsolescence of regulatory documents specifying the requirements for design solutions and operation of electric power equipment that incorporates electronic and microprocessor control and protection devices. It is proposed to restore the system of developing new and updating existing departmental regulatory technical documents that existed in the 1970s, one of the fundamental principles of which was placing long-term responsibility on higher schools and leading design institutions for rendering scientific-technical support to innovative development of components and systems forming the electrical part of power plants. This will make it possible to achieve lower failure rates of electrical equipment and to steadily improve the competitiveness of the Russian electric power industry and energy efficiency of generating companies.

  17. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 52 - Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Combined Licenses To Construct and Operate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Licenses To Construct and Operate Nuclear Power Reactors of Identical Design at Multiple Sites N Appendix N... FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Pt. 52, App. N Appendix N to Part 52—Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant... that the applicant wishes to have the application considered under 10 CFR part 52, appendix N, and must...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Lithium Isotope Separation Facilities, Plants and Equipment Under NRC's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Plants and Equipment Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority N Appendix N to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Pt. 110, App. N Appendix N to Part 110—Illustrative List of Lithium Isotope Separation Facilities, Plants and Equipment...

  19. Complement activity of polysaccharides from three different plant parts of Terminalia macroptera extracted as healers do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Bing-Zhao; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Barsett, Hilde; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-08-08

    Water decoctions of the root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera are used by traditional healers in Mali to cure a wide range of illnesses, such as wounds, hepatitis, malaria, fever, cough and diarrhea as well as tuberculosis. Plant polysaccharides isolated from crude water extracts have previously shown effects related to the immune system. The aims of this study are comparing the properties of the polysaccharides among different plant parts, as well as relationship between chemical characteristics and complement fixation activities when the plant material has been extracted as the traditional healers do, with boiling water directly. Root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were extracted by boiling water, and five purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained by anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Chemical compositions were determined by GC of the TMS derivatives of the methyl-glycosides and the linkage determined after permethylation and GC-MS of the derived partly methylated alditol acetates. The bioactivity was determined by the complement fixation assay of the crude extracts and purified fractions. The acidic fraction TRBD-I-I isolated from the root bark was the most active of the fractions isolated. Structural studies showed that all purified fractions are of pectic nature, containing rhamnogalacturonan type I backbone. Arabinogalactan type II side chains were present in all fractions except TRBD-I-II. The observed differences in complement fixation activities among the five purified polysaccharide fractions are probably due to differences in monosaccharide compositions, linkage types and molecular sizes. The crude extracts from root bark and stem bark have similar total activities, both higher than those from leaves. The root bark, leaves and stem bark are all good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides. But due to sustainability, it is prefer to use leaves rather than the other two plant

  20. On-line acoustic monitoring of EDF nuclear plants in operation and loose-part diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.L.; Puyal, C.

    1991-05-01

    In order to detect incipient failures in nuclear power plant components, EDF has now put into operation more than 50 loose-part monitoring systems, on its 900 MW and 1 300 MW units. This paper first reviews the experience gained on the 900 MW reactors in recent years. It then focuses on the 1 300 MW loose part monitoring system (IDEAL) and to the tools developed for the diagnosis off site within a specific Expertise Laboratory at the Research and Development Division. New studies have been undertaken within the Monitoring and Aid to Diagnosis Station (PSAD) in order to extend the capabilities of loose part diagnosis on site. The new tools here presented integrate the recent progress in acquisition technology (SMART system) and in artificial intelligence (MIGRE expert system)

  1. Root system size of alfalfa varieties under different plant densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmail Al-Mosanif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The field experiment was established from pre-grown alfalfa sprouts in 2008. In 2009 and 2010, the harvest was carried out. The yield and the root size system (RSS were evaluated in the total of five cuts. Two localities of diverse soil and weather conditions were selected. Žabčice is a dry location with a highly permeable sandy soil layer, but at the same time, with a considerable fluctuation of the underground water level; Troubsko, on the other hand, represented a location with a higher content of clay in soil suitable for growing alfalfa. The trial was established in two types of plant spacing – 25 × 25 cm (16 plants per m2 and 50 × 50 cm (4 plants per m2. Two alfalfa varieties were used – Hodonínka (an old variety and Oslava (a new variety. The following factors were evaluated by statistical means: location, variety, plant spacing, and cut number. The effect of location on the above ground phytomass and the RSS value proved highly statistically decisive. The higher average values of above ground phytomass as well as RSS were achieved on the Troubsko location where the above ground phytomass was 19.57 t.ha−1 and RSS was 2.71 nanofarad (nF. The impact of the variety was highly statistically significant only in respect to RSS. The effect of variety on the alfalfa above ground phytomass was not proven. The higher average RSS values were reached by the Hodonínka variety (2.59 nF. The effect of the plant spacing on both the above ground phytomass and the RSS values was highly statistically significant. The higher average above ground phytomass was achieved when the 25 × 25 cm plant spacing was employed (18.64 t.ha−1. As for the RSS value, the case was exactly opposite – the higher average value was reached when the plant spacing was 50 × 50 cm (2.99 nF. The impact of the cut number on both the above ground phytomass and the RSS was highly statistically significant. The highest average above ground phytomass and root

  2. MEDICINAL PLANTS AND HERBS OF NEWFOUNDLAND. PART 1. CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF THE AERIAL PART OF PINEAPPLE WEED (Matricaria matricarioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIMOTHY F. LOOMIS

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aerial part of Pineapple weed (Matricaria matricarioides, an adulterant of Chamomile, was investigated for its chemical constituents. Nine compounds were isolated and identified as two spiroethers [cis - en - yn - dicycloether 1 and trans - en - yn - dicycloether 2], three coumarins [7 - methoxycoumarin (Herniarin 3, umbelliferone 4 and 7 - methoxy - 3, 4 -dihydrocoumarin 5], phytol 6, luteolin - 7 - glucoside 7, (Z - 2 - β - D - Glucopyranosyloxyl - 4 - methoxycinnamic acid 8, and (E - 2 - β -D-Glucopyranosyloxyl - 4 -methoxycinnamic acid 9. By GC-MS analysis, the major components of the steam distilled volatile oil were identified as trans-en-yn-dicycloether and cis-en- yn-dicycloether, with the trans-form being more abundant than the cis-form. The results indicated some similarities between the constituents of Pineapple weed and those of German Chamomile. All these nine compounds are reported for the first time from Pineapple weed growing in Newfoundland. Compound 5 is reported from this plant genus for the first time.

  3. Below-ground plant parts emit herbivore-induced volatiles: olfactory responses of a predatory mite to tulip bulbs infested by rust mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aratchige, N S; Lesna, I; Sabelis, M W

    2004-01-01

    Although odour-mediated interactions among plants, spider mites and predatory mites have been extensively studied above-ground, belowground studies are in their infancy. In this paper, we investigate whether feeding by rust mites (Aceria tulipae) cause tulip bulbs to produce odours that attract predatory mites (Neoseiulus cucumeris). Since our aim was to demonstrate such odours and not their relevance under soil conditions, the experiments were carried out using a classic Y-tube olfactometer in which the predators moved on a Y-shaped wire in open air. We found that food-deprived female predators can discriminate between odours from infested bulbs and odours from uninfested bulbs or artificially wounded bulbs. No significant difference in attractiveness to predators was found between clean bulbs and bulbs either wounded 30 min or 3 h before the experiment. These results indicate that it may not be simply the wounding of the bulbs, but rather the feeding by rust mites, which causes the bulb to release odours that attract N. cucumeris. Since bulbs are belowground plant structures, the olfactometer results demonstrate the potential for odour-mediated interactions in the soil. However, their importance in the actual soil medium remains to be demonstrated.

  4. Speciation analysis of aluminium in plant parts of Betula pendula and in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin

    2018-03-01

    The research presents the first results of aluminium speciation analysis in aqueous extracts of individual plant parts of Betula pendula and soil samples, using High Performance Ion Chromatography with Diode Array Detection (HPIC-DAD). The applied method allowed us to carry out a full speciation analysis of aluminium in the form of predominant aluminium-fluoride complexes: AlF (x=2,3,4) (3-x) (first analytical signal), AlF 2+ (second analytical signal) and Al 3+ (third analytical signal) in samples of lateral roots, tap roots, twigs, stem, leaf and soil collected under roots of B. pendula. Concentrations of aluminium and its complexes were determined for two types of environment characterised by different degree of human impact: contaminated site of the Chemical Plant in Luboń and protected area of the Wielkopolski National Park. For all the analysed samples of B. pendula and soil, AlF (x=2,3,4) (3-x) had the largest contribution, followed by Al 3+ and AlF 2+ . Significant differences in concentration and contribution of Al-F complexes and Al 3+ form, depending on the place of sampling (different anthropogenic pressure) and plant part of B. pendula were observed. Based on the obtained results, it was found that transport of aluminium is "blocked" by lateral roots, and is closely related to Al content of soil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of methanolic plant part extracts of Theobroma cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharum, Zainal; Akim, Abdah Md; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Hamid, Roslida Abdul; Kasran, Rosmin

    2014-11-10

    The aims of this study were to determine the antioxidant and antiproliferative activity of the following Theobroma cacao plant part methanolic extracts: leaf, bark, husk, fermented and unfermented shell, pith, root, and cherelle. Antioxidant activity was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and Folin-Ciocalteu assays; the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to determine antiproliferative activity. The root extract had the highest antioxidant activity; its median effective dose (EC50) was 358.3±7.0 µg/mL and total phenolic content was 22.0±1.1 g GAE/100 g extract as compared to the other methanolic plant part extracts. Only the cherelle extract demonstrated 10.4%±1.1% inhibition activity in the lipid peroxidation assay. The MTT assay revealed that the leaf extract had the highest antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cells [median inhibitory concentration (IC50)=41.4±3.3 µg/mL]. Given the overall high IC50 for the normal liver cell line WRL-68, this study indicates that T. cacao methanolic extracts have a cytotoxic effect in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. Planned future investigations will involve the purification, identification, determination of the mechanisms of action, and molecular assay of T. cacao plant extracts.

  6. Corrosion investigations at Masnedoe combined heat and power plants: Part VII[Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, M. [Danmarks Tekniske Univ., Dept. for Manufacturing Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Biede, O. [ENERGI E2 Power Company, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O. [Elsam - Fynsvaerket, Fredericia (DK)

    2002-12-01

    In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plats. Straw is considered a carbon dioxide neutral fuel and is therefore environmentally acceptable. Masnedoe CHP Plant is a straw-fired power plant on Sjaelland, Denmark. Corrosion tests were undertaken at Masnedoe CHP Plant by building a test superheater loop and subject it to higher steam temperatures than those of the actual plant. Furthermore, a test section welded into the superheater was investigated. The test superheater loop showed varying corrosion rates that could not be explained by a linear increase in steam temperature over the length of the loop. This was related to the flue gas direction giving a higher surface metal temperature, however, there could be other factors giving localised high heat flux and therefore a higher metal temperature. Using steamside inner oxide thickness, an improved calculation of the metal temperatures was undertaken in order to explain the corrosion rates observed. Thus a variation of heat flux gave temperatures 43 deg. C higher than a linear heat flux. It is important to bear in mind when assessing corrosion rates that a local high heat flux will result in higher metal temperatures in certain parts of a loop and subsequently high corrosion rates. (BA)

  7. Update on impact effects in nuclear plants Part I--overview and need for integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliter, G.E.; Ravindra, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, an ASCE working group on impact effects in nuclear plants updates the review of this technology contained in a five-yearold ASCE report. In Part I, an overview is given of the impact conditions addressed in nuclear plant design against missiles generated by such postulated extreme events as tornados, turbine failures, pipe ruptures, aircraft crashes, and drops of heavy objects from lifting devices. The conclusion of a brief evaluation of the state of the art in predicting structural response for the various missile impact types is that two of them--pipe whip and heavy object drop--would benefit most by further development of design and analysis methods. Parts II and III of this paper review current practice and identify its limitations for these two impact types. Part I continues with a discussion of the general characteristics of impacts and the structural response they produce and concludes with a recommendation for and brief description of an ''integrated approach'' for treating impact effects. The adoption of this systematic approach in future development of impact technology would guide engineers in the use of the most appropriate and accurate available techniques for designing against a particular impact event

  8. A chronic plant test for the assessment of contaminated soils. Part 2. Testing of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junker, T.; Roembke, J. [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Floersheim (Germany); Kalsch, W.

    2006-06-15

    Background and scope. A new chronic plant test system which is based on experiences with various acute plant tests (e.g. published by OECD or ISO) and existing north American plant-life-cycle bioassays was standardised in a project sponsored by the German government. Characteristic properties of the test system, which can be performed either with Brassica rapa (turnip rape) or Avena sativa (oat), are described in part 1 of this mini-series. Methods. This new test was used to assess the effects of natural soil samples contaminated with TNT (2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene) or PAHs (poly-aromatic hydrocarbons). The soils were tested after taken from the field as well as after being remediated. Different control and reference soils were used to evaluate the test results. In addition, they were compared with the results of tests in which either TNT or Pyrene were spiked to field and standard soils (see part 1 of this mini-series). Results. All contaminated soils showed clear effects in the chronic plant test (usually B. rapa was more sensitive than A. sativa). LUFA 2.2 standard soil and OECD artificial soil are well-suited as control and mixture substrates, while reference soils collected at uncontaminated sites were several times as phytotoxic. In most of the latter cases, soil properties could be identified as the main cause of these effects (e.g. the pH value). While the sensitivity of the reproduction and biomass endpoints did not differ much in general, it is recommended to measure different endpoints (i.e. biomass and reproduction) due to the different mode-of-action of contaminants. In the case of TNT, a good agreement between the results of single chemical tests and tests with TNT-contaminated soils was found (due to the minimal effects of Pyrene, the same statement is not possible for PAHs). (orig.)

  9. A test of the herbivore optimization hypothesis using muskoxen and a graminoid meadow plant community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Smith

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A prediction from the herbivore optimization hypothesis is that grazing by herbivores at moderate intensities will increase net above-ground primary productivity more than at lower or higher intensities. I tested this hypothesis in an area of high muskox {Ovibos moschatus density on north-central Banks Island, Northwest Territories, Canada (73°50'N, 119°53'W. Plots (1 m2 in graminoid meadows dominated by cottongrass (Eriophorum triste were either clipped, exposed to muskoxen, protected for part of one growing season, or permanently protected. This resulted in the removal of 22-44%, 10-39%, 0-39% or 0%, respectively, of shoot tissue during each growing season. Contrary to the predictions of the herbivore optimization hypothesis, productivity did not increase across this range of tissue removal. Productivity of plants clipped at 1.5 cm above ground once or twice per growing season, declined by 60+/-5% in 64% of the tests. The productivity of plants grazed by muskoxen declined by 56+/-7% in 25% of the tests. No significant change in productivity was observed in 36% and 75% of the tests in clipped and grazed treatments, respecrively. Clipping and grazing reduced below-ground standing crop except where removals were small. Grazing and clipping did not stimulate productivity of north-central Banks Island graminoid meadows.

  10. Method for increasing the resistance of a plant or a part thereof to a pathogen, method for screening the resistance of a plant or part thereof to a pathogen, and use thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    (EN)The present invention relates to the field of plant biotechnology. More in particular, the present invention relates to methods for increasing the resistance of a plant or part thereof that is susceptible to infection with a pathogen comprising an ortholog of the Avr4 protein of Cladosporium

  11. Information system design of inventory control spare parts maintenance (valuation class 5000) (case study: plant kw)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitriana, Rina; Moengin, Parwadi; Riana, Mega

    2016-02-01

    Plat KW hadn't using optimal inventory level planning yet and hadn't have an information system that well computerized. The research objective is to be able to design an information system related inventory control of spare parts maintenance. The study focused on five types of spare parts with the highest application rate during February 2013- March 2015 and included in the classification of fast on FSN analysis Grinding stones Cut 4". Cable Tie 15". Welding RB 26-32MM. Ring Plat ½" and Ring Plate 5/8 ". Inventory calculation used Economic Order Quantity (EOQ). Safety Stock (SS) and Reorder Point (ROP) methods. System analysis conducted using the framework PIECES with the proposed inventory control system. the performance of the plant KW relating to the supply of spare parts maintenance needs can be more efficient as well as problems at the company can be answered and can perform inventory cost savings amounting Rp.267.066. A computerized information system of inventory control spare parts maintenance provides a menu that can be accessed by each departments as the user needed.

  12. Volatile Constituents of Different Plant Parts and Populations of Malabaila aurea Boiss. from Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Vučković

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The volatile constituents of different plant parts and populations of Malabaila aurea Boiss. from Montenegro were obtained by simultaneous distillation-extraction and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. A total of 12 samples were examined and 45 compounds were identified. The volatile content of different M. aurea populations was very similar, while the volatile fractions obtained from different plant parts showed significant qualitative and quantitative differences. The most abundant compounds found in stems & leaves were apiole (51.0-56.3%, myristicin (16.3-25.4%, and falcarinol (4.1-10.7%. The roots showed the same major components, but with different relative abundances: 30.9-49.1% of apiole, 12.9-34.7% of falcarinol, and 9.9-31.1% of myristicin. The volatile constituents of fruits & flowers were remarkably different, containing up to 71.2-80.5% octyl butyrate, 11.4-18.0% octanol, and 2.7-6.8% octyl hexanoate. The results were discussed as possible indication of relatedness of Malabaila aurea and Pastinacasativa (parsnip .

  13. Translocation of metal ions from soil to tobacco roots and their concentration in the plant parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cleber Pinto; de Almeida, Thiago E; Zittel, Rosimara; de Oliveira Stremel, Tatiana R; Domingues, Cinthia E; Kordiak, Januário; de Campos, Sandro Xavier

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study on the translocation factors (TFs) and bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) ions in roots, stems, and leaves of tobacco. The results revealed that during the tobacco growth, the roots are able to increase the sensitiveness of the physiological control, reducing the translocation of the metals Ni (0.38) and Pb (0.48) to the leaves. Cd and Zn presented factors TF and BCF >1 in the three tissues under analysis, which indicates the high potential for transportation and accumulation of these metals in all plant tissues. The TF values for Cr (0.65) and As (0.63) revealed low translocation of these ions to the aerial parts, indicating low mobility of ions from the roots. Therefore, tobacco can be considered an efficient accumulator of Ni, Cr, As and Pb in roots and Cd and Zn in all plant parts.

  14. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant... Appendix O to Part 110—Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority Note: Nuclear fuel elements are manufactured from source or special...

  15. Systematic review of biological effects of exposure to static electric fields. Part II: Invertebrates and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedchen, Kristina; Petri, Anne-Kathrin; Driessen, Sarah; Bailey, William H

    2018-01-01

    The construction of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines for the long-distance transport of energy is becoming increasingly popular. This has raised public concern about potential environmental impacts of the static electric fields (EF) produced under and near HVDC power lines. As the second part of a comprehensive literature analysis, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of static EF exposure on biological functions in invertebrates and plants and to provide the basis for an environmental impact assessment of such exposures. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was used to guide the methodological conduct and reporting. Thirty-three studies - 14 invertebrate and 19 plant studies - met the eligibility criteria and were included in this review. The reported behavioral responses of insects and planarians upon exposure strongly suggest that invertebrates are able to perceive the presence of a static EF. Many other studies reported effects on physiological functions that were expressed as, for example, altered metabolic activity or delayed reproductive and developmental stages in invertebrates. In plants, leaf damage, alterations in germination rates, growth and yield, or variations in the concentration of essential elements, for example, have been reported. However, these physiological responses and changes in plant morphology appear to be secondary to surface stimulation by the static EF or caused by concomitant parameters of the electrostatic environment. Furthermore, all of the included studies suffered from methodological flaws, which lowered credibility in the results. At field levels encountered from natural sources or HVDC lines ( 35kV/m), adverse effects on physiology and morphology, presumably caused by corona-action, appear to be more likely. Higher quality studies are needed to unravel the role of air ions, ozone, nitric oxide and corona current on alterations in physiological functions

  16. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk [Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung, E-mail: gheo@khu.ac.kr [Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. • The concepts of Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. • Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) and Objective Provision Tree (OPT) were performed and updated. • This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. - Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate safety issues using Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM) proposed by Generation IV Forum Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO). In ongoing nuclear energy research such as Generation IV fission power plant (GEN-IV), new methodology based on Technology-Neutral Framework (TNF) has been applied for safety assessment. In this methodology, design and regulatory requirements for safety of nuclear power plants are considered simultaneously. The design based on regulatory requirements can save resource, time, and manpower while maintaining high level safety. ISAM is one of the options to apply TNF in K-DEMO. We have performed safety studies for K-DEMO using Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) and Objective Provision Tree (OPT) which are constitutive part of ISAM. Considering the design phase of K-DEMO, the current study focused on PIRT and OPT for K-DEMO. Results have been reviewed and updated by Korean fusion advisory group after considering the views of specialists from domestic universities, industries, and national institutes in South Korea.

  17. Whole plant senescence of sunflower following seedhead removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, InSun; Below, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to further clarify the relationship between seed development and monocarpic senescence of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Field-grown plants with and without seedheads were evaluated for rate and duration of accumulation of dry weight, reduced N, and P by whole shoots, and for partitioning of these constituents within the individual plant parts. Concurrent with seedhead removal, [ 15 N]nitrate was applied to the plants in a selected are of the experimental plot. Whole plants (above ground portions) were harvested seven times during the seed-filling period and analyzed from dry weight, reduced N, and P. Although seedhead removal depressed the rates of dry weight, reduced N, and P accumulation by whole shoots, it extended the duration of accumulation of these constituents, relative to headed control plants. As a result, the final whole shoot dry weight and N and P contents at seed maturity were similar for deheaded and headed plants. Seedhead removal also affected the partitioning of dry matter, reduced N, and P but the relative proportions varied as a function of constituent and growth stage. Analysis of 15 N present in whole shoots at physiological maturity showed that similar amounts of nitrate were absorbed during the postflowering period by headed and deheaded plants. These data indicate that the absence of seeds does not affect the total accumulation of dry matter, reduced N, or P, by sunflower plants, but does alter the rates of accumulation and partitioning of these constituents

  18. Uptake and phytotoxicity of anthracene and benzo[k]fluoranthene applied to the leaves of celery plants (Apium graveolens var. secalinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Jolanta; Sienkiewicz, Stanisław; Pietrzak, Monika; Wieczorek, Zbigniew

    2015-05-01

    The above-ground parts of celery plants were exposed to two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): 3-ring anthracene (ANT) and 5-ring benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), and the combination of ANT and BkF. After 43 days of exposure (overall dose of 1325µg/plant), celery plants retained only 1.4% of the total dose of ANT and 17.5% of the total dose of BkF. After exposure to a combination of ANT and BkF (1325µg of each compound per plant), the average ANT concentrations were more than twofold higher in/on leaf blades, whereas BkF levels were insignificantly higher. Under natural photoperiod conditions equivalent to a normal day, the combined application of ANT and BkF to the above-ground parts of celery plants slowed down physicochemical transformations of ANT. A similar effect was observed when PAHs were applied to glass surfaces. The combination of both PAHs probably led to stacking interactions, which decreased volatilization, in particular of ANT. Phytotoxicity of ANT and BkF could not be unambiguously established based on the results of this study. In all analyzed treatments, the chlorophyll content of leaf blades remained unchanged. Foliar application of ANT reduced ascorbic acid levels in all analyzed plant parts and increased the total acidity of celery leaves. In all experimental treatments, the total phenolic content of leaves increased up to 15%. Interestingly, ANT and BkF did not produce cumulative effects when applied in combination (when total PAH concentrations per plant were twofold higher). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Electromagnetic Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC Export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Equipment and Components Under NRC Export Licensing Authority H Appendix H to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Pt. 110, App. H Appendix H to Part 110—Illustrative List of Electromagnetic Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components Under...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Plasma Separation Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC Export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Equipment and Components Under NRC Export Licensing Authority G Appendix G to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Pt. 110, App. G Appendix G to Part 110—Illustrative List of Plasma Separation Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

  1. Effects of phosphate and thiosulphate on arsenic accumulation in Brassica juncea plants grown in soil and in hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzarossa, Beatrice; Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Grifoni, Martina; Rosellini, Irene; Malagoli, Mario; Schiavon, Michela

    2013-04-01

    Arsenic is recognised as a toxic metalloid and a strong pollutant in soils of many countries. Thus, the reclamation of contaminated areas is fundamental in order to protect both human health and agricultural production. This study is focused on the assisted phytoextraction, a technology for reclaiming polluted soils that takes advantage of the capability of some plants to extract inorganic elements from soils with the aid of additive agents. The nutrients phosphorus, as phosphate, and sulphur, as thiosulphate, can compete with the form more oxidised of arsenic, both in soil and plant. This study examined the capability of thiosulphate (Th) and phosphate (Ph) to promote the release of As from soil surfaces in order to improve the phytoavailability and thus the absorption of As by Brassica juncea plants. In the first experiment B. juncea plants were grown on a soil that had been sampled from an industrial area strongly contaminated by As (790 mg As kg-1 soil). The second experiment was carried out in hydroponics where As has been added at a concentration (100 microM) similar to the As available concentration measured in soil. In both trials ammonium thiosulphate (at the concentration of 0.27 M in soil, and 400 microM in hydroponics) and potassium hydrogen phosphate (at the concentration of 0.05 M in soil, and 112 microM in hydroponics) were added. The biomass of B. juncea was determined and the accumulation of P, S and As in root and in the above-ground tissues have been analyzed. Our results showed that thiosulphate and phosphate acted either as nutrients and detoxifying agents, due to the stimulation of plant defensive systems, and influenced either the biomass production and the As accumulation in plant tissues. In the plants grown in soil, As accumulated at higher levels in the above-ground part than in the roots and the addition of Th induced a higher biomass production and a higher total As accumulation (concentration x biomass) in the above-ground tissues

  2. Evaluation of Mediterranean plants for controlling gully erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baets, S. de; Poesen, J.; Muys, B.

    2009-01-01

    In Mediterranean environments, gullies are responsible for large soil losses causing loss of fertile cropland soil, reservoir sedimentation and flooding. To limit soil loss and sediment export it is important to prevent the initiation or rills and to stabilise gullies. This can be done by establishing vegetation at vulnerable places in the landscape. Although in the past, the effects of vegetation on soil erosion rates were predicted using above-ground biomass characteristics only, plant roots also play an important role in protecting the soil against erosion by concentrated runoff. Especially in conditions where the above-ground biomass becomes very scarce (e.g. due to drought, harvest, overgrazing or fire) the effects of vegetation will be underestimated when only above-ground plant characteristics are taken into account. (Author) 6 refs.

  3. The microbe-free plant: fact or artefact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila P. Pamela Partida-Martinez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant-microbe interactions are ubiquitous. Plants are often colonized by pathogens but even more commonly engaged in neutral or mutualistic interactions with microbes: below-ground microbial plant associates are mycorrhizal fungi, Rhizobia and rhizosphere bacteria, above-ground plant parts are colonized by bacterial and fungal endophytes and by microbes in the phyllosphere. We emphasize here that a completely microbe-free plant is an exotic exception rather than the biologically relevant rule. The complex interplay of such microbial communities with the host plant affects plant nutrition, growth rate, resistance to biotic and abiotic stress, and plant survival and distribution. The mechanisms involved reach from nutrient acquisition, the production of plant hormones or direct antibiosis to effects on host resistance genes or interactions at higher trophic levels. Plant-associated microbes are heterotrophic and cause costs to their host plant, whereas the benefits depend on the environment. Thus, the outcome of the interaction is highly context-dependent. Considering the microbe-free plant as the ‘normal’ or control stage significantly impairs research into important phenomena such as (1 phenotypic and epigenetic plasticity, (2 the ‘normal’ ecological outcome of a given interaction and (3 the evolution of plants. For the future, we suggest cultivation-independent screening methods using direct PCR from plant tissue of more than one fungal and bacterial gene to collect data on the true microbial diversity in wild plants. The patterns found could be correlated to host species and environmental conditions, in order to formulate testable hypotheses on the biological roles of plant endophytes in nature. Experimental approaches should compare different host-endophyte combinations under various environmental conditions and study at the genetic, transcriptional and physiological level the parameters that shift the interaction along the mutualism

  4. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. Part 1. Potatoes and other tuber crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.

    1984-01-01

    In Part 1 of a planned series of articles on preservation of foods of plant origin by gamma irradiation, the current state of research on the technological, nutritional, and biochemical aspects of sprout inhibition of potatoes and other tuber crops are reviewed. These include varietal responses, dose effects, time of irradiation, pre- and postirradiation storage, and handling requirements; postirradiation changes in carbohydrates, ascorbic acid, amino acids, and other nutrients; respiration; biochemical mechanisms involved in sprout inhibition; wound healing and microbial infection during storage; formation of wound and light-induced glycoalkaloids and identification of irradiated potatoes. The culinary and processing qualities with particular reference to darkening of boiled and processed potatoes are discussed. The prospects of irradiation on an industrial scale as an alternative to chemical sprout inhibitors or mechanical refrigeration are considered

  5. Literature study regarding fire protection in nuclear power plants. Part 2: Fire detection and -extinguishing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, S.

    1996-01-01

    This literature study has been made on behalf of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. The aim is to describe different aspects of fire protection in nuclear power plants. Detection and extinguishing systems in Swedish nuclear power plants have only to a limited extent been designed after functional demands, such as a maximum acceptable damage or a maximum time to detect a fire. The availability of detection systems is difficult to assess, partly because of lack of statistics. The user interface is very important in complex systems as nuclear plants. An extinguishing system designed according to the insurance companies' regulations will only fulfill the basic demands. It should be noted that normal sprinkler design does not aim for extinguishing fires, the objective is to control fire until manual extinguishment is possible. There is a great amount of statistics on wet and dry pipe sprinkler systems, while statistics are more scarce for deluge systems. The statistics on the reliability of gaseous extinguishing systems have been found very scarce. A drawback of these systems is that they are normally designed for one shot only. There are both traditional and more recent extinguishing systems that can replace halons. From now on there will be a greater need for a thorough examination of the properties needed for the individual application and a quantification of the acceptable damage. There are several indications on the importance of a high quality maintenance program as well as carefully developed routines for testing and surveillance to ensure the reliability of detection and extinguishing systems. 78 refs, 8 figs, 10 tabs

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyls in alfalfa: Accumulation, sorption and speciation in different plant parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ying; Sun, Xianghui; Zhu, Lingjia; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2017-08-03

    The accumulation, chemical speciation and distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were investigated in various parts of alfalfa. Moreover, the adsorption characteristics for PCB 28 by alfalfa and the influencing factors of the adsorption characteristics were studied. There were different degrees of PCB accumulation in alfalfa roots, root nodules and shoots. The decreasing order of the accumulation of PCBs in plant tissues was root nodules > roots > shoots, and the decreasing order of the total PCB contents was roots > shoots > root nodules, indicating that the roots were the main sink for PCB accumulation. There were three modes of PCB speciation in alfalfa roots and root nodules, comprising strong sorption (78%) and weak sorption (19%) on tissue surfaces and absorption within tissues (2%). The adsorption isotherms of PCB 28 indicate that the adsorption capacities of root nodules and shoots were both significantly higher than that of the roots. Both lipids and carbohydrates, and especially lipids, affected the PCB adsorption capacities of the tissues. These results may help in the elucidation of the mechanisms of sorption and accumulation of PCBs in the plants and their main influencing factors and thus contribute to the development of phytoremediation technologies for PCB-contaminated soils.

  7. The roots of defense: plant resistance and tolerance to belowground herbivory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Watts

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There is conclusive evidence that there are fitness costs of plant defense and that herbivores can drive selection for defense. However, most work has focused on above-ground interactions, even though belowground herbivory may have greater impacts on individual plants than above-ground herbivory. Given the role of belowground plant structures in resource acquisition and storage, research on belowground herbivores has much to contribute to theories on the evolution of plant defense. Pocket gophers (Geomyidae provide an excellent opportunity to study root herbivory. These subterranean rodents spend their entire lives belowground and specialize on consuming belowground plant parts.We compared the root defenses of native forbs from mainland populations (with a history of gopher herbivory to island populations (free from gophers for up to 500,000 years. Defense includes both resistance against herbivores and tolerance of herbivore damage. We used three approaches to compare these traits in island and mainland populations of two native California forbs: 1 Eschscholzia californica populations were assayed to compare alkaloid deterrents, 2 captive gophers were used to test the palatability of E. californica roots and 3 simulated root herbivory assessed tolerance to root damage in Deinandra fasciculata and E. californica. Mainland forms of E. californica contained 2.5 times greater concentration of alkaloids and were less palatable to gophers than island forms. Mainland forms of D. fasciculata and, to a lesser extent, E. californica were also more tolerant of root damage than island conspecifics. Interestingly, undamaged island individuals of D. fasciculata produced significantly more fruit than either damaged or undamaged mainland individuals.These results suggest that mainland plants are effective at deterring and tolerating pocket gopher herbivory. Results also suggest that both forms of defense are costly to fitness and thus reduced in the absence of

  8. Accumulation and localization of sodium and potassium ions in maize plants on saline soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kabuzenko

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is studying the accumulation and distribution of Na+ and K+ in maize hybrids of different salt tolerance under conditions of the chloride salinity. The new corn hybrid Veselka MV (salt-tolerant and Odessa 375 MB (not salt-tolerant were studied. The plants grown in salt-free chernozem soil are control. In the experiment, sodium chloride was dissolved in the irrigation water to form the salinity of test soils up to concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0% of ovendry weight. Soil moisture in the pots was maintained at 60% of the full field water capacity, the air temperature was +25…+27 °C, and the light – 10 klux. Plant samples were dried in the oven under 70 °C. Then, the average sample of 10 specimens was thoroughly levigated in the porcelain pounder  and dispersed in distilled water at 100 °C. The ions were extracted, and the extracts were centrifuged for 20 min at 3000 rpm. The ions content in the cell sap was analysed. Plant samples (1 g were incubated 10 min in chloroform, dried carefully with filter paper, and then the cell sap was squeezed. 1 ml of clear top layer of the cell sap was dissolved in 10 ml of distilled water. Ions content was determined by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer ("Karl Zeiss", Germany. Salt-tolerant maize hybrid Veselka MW (14 days age is characterized by an increased content of Na+ in the root tissues in comparison with the above-ground parts. In Odessa 375 MB hybrid this regularity is less pronounced. With the increase of sodium chloride concentration in the soil the content of Na+ in the aerial parts of plants rises. That may be connected with the reduced role of a root barrier. The salt-tolerant hybrid has a higher content of Na+ in the roots as compared to the above-ground parts. The content of K+ was higher in the above-ground parts, which is more pronounced in the salt-tolerant hybrid Veselka MB. The decrease of K+ in cell sap of the root under saline conditions was

  9. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Part 1: International availability data exchange for thermal generating plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallard, G.S.; Deschaine, R. [Black and Veatch (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 1 (WG1). WG1's primary focus is to analyse the best ways to measure, evaluate, and apply power plant performance and availability data to promote plant performance improvements worldwide. The paper explores the specific work activities of 2004-2007 to extend traditional analysis and benchmarking frameworks. It is divided into two major topics: Overview of current electric supply industry issues/trends; and, Technical Methods/Tools to evaluate performance in today's ESI.

  10. Operational readiness decisions at nuclear power plants - part 2. Which factors influence the decisions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena; Petterson, Sara

    2008-04-01

    The first report contained a summary of relevant research of decision making, a case study at Ringhals power plant and an analysis of some real cases of operational readiness decisions. In this report two case studies in the Swedish power plants, OKG and Forsmark are presented. The case study description consists of three parts; a description of the support from the management system for the decision making process, interviews with decision makers and an analysis of real cases of operational readiness decisions. The purpose of the project has been to increase the understanding of the decision process in operational readiness decisions as well as the support given from the management system and what factors influence the decisions. From a general point of view the circumstances where the decision must be taken varies, but situations and events that lead to questioning of the operational readiness are often easy to identify. There are often support documents such as procedures, rules and technical documents which specify operational limitations which give explicit decision criteria. These decisions are easy. When needed colleagues can be consulted for support. In unclear situations and/or when the technical criteria is not clear, e.g. when the rules and regulations are vague or even in conflict or when it is not evident that you need to question the operational readiness, the decision is more difficult to make. The results from the study shows that such decisions in general are not made by the shift crew manager but handed over to the next management level. The decision making process differs between the power plants. At one of the power plants the decision process is organised in specific meetings where decision made are reviewed by the next higher management level. At another plant the decisions are often made in groups or in consultation with colleagues. The management system makes a distinction between decisions made in consultation and when decisions already

  11. The effect of plant population and nitrogen fertilizer on

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohamad reza asgaripor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest has increased towards hemp (Cannabis sativa L. fibre production due to renewed demand for natural fibre in the world. A Study was conducted in 2005 at Shirvan in Northern Khorasan province, Iran, to determine the effects of three plant populations (30, 90 and 150 plant per m2 and three rates of nitrogen application (50, 150 and 250 kg N per ha on final stand, stalk height, basal stalk diameter, total stalk yield as well as fibre content from stalk and fibre yield in male and female plants. A split plot experimental with three replications was used. The result indicated that due to enhanced competition for light at higher population on density and N2 level plant mortality was higher than other treatment Morphological characteristics were highly correlated with plant sexual, plant population and nitrogen fertilizer. Highest stem, leaf and inflorescence yield were obtained at 250 plant m-2 when 150 kg N ha-1 was used. Lowest plant density did not show self-thinning but reduced above ground dry matter. Shoot dry matter increased with increasing plant density and nitrogen supply. Apparently, fibre content was greater at medium density and lowest nitrogen fertilizer, however, fibre yield was greatest at highest plant population and nitrogen fertilizer. In terms of fibre yield, approximate 31.7% of the fibre was located in the bottom parts, 22.4% in the middle and only 9.9% in the top part of the stem. The results suggest that hemp can yield large quantities of useful fibre at Shirvan when planted in proper plant densities and suitable nitrogen fertilizer.

  12. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Part 3: Renewable energy plant: reports on wind, photovoltaics and biomas energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoha, Bruno; Cohen, Martin [Electricite de France (France)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 3 (WG3). WG3 will promote the introduction of performance indicators for renewable energy generating plant (wind, geothermal, solar and biomass) developed by the Committee. It will also assess selected transitional technology issues and environmental factors related to non-conventional technologies. The WG3 report includes sections on Wind Energy Today, Photovoltaics Energy Today, Biomass Electricity Today and appendices.

  13. Analysis of solute transport in plants using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partelova, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the work, geometrically and radiochemically characterized standards (phantoms) imitating the plant tissues and allowing the exact quantification of visualised radioindicator in plant tissues were designed and prepared within the study of visual and analytical characteristics of used positron emission tomograph (microPET system) commercially developed for animal objects at visualization of thin objects. Individual experiments carried out by exposure of excised leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in solutions of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with positron emitter 18 F (2-[ 18 F]FDG) containing 10-, 100-, or 1000-times higher concentrations of D-glucose (c glu ) in comparison with the original 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution showed that the significant changes in visualisation of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution as well as in chemical portion of 2-[ 18 F]FDG within the leaf blade were observed as result of increased c glu . In the experiments with the whole plants of tobacco or radish exposed in 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution through the root system, only minimal translocation of 18 F radioactivity into the above-ground parts of plants, also in the case of increased c glu , was observed, which suggest the role of root system as a selective barrier of 2-[ 18 F]FDG transport from roots to the above-ground parts. On the basis of mentioned knowledge and analytical approaches (application of prepared phantoms), the dynamic study of 2-[ 18 F]FDG uptake and transport within the excised leaf of tobacco or whole radish plant was carried out. The description of these processes was realized through the 3D PET images and through the quantification of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution within the chosen regions of interest from the point of view of accumulated 18 F radioactivity (in Bq) or amount of D-glucose (in μg) as well. Application of methods of multivariate analysis allows to found the similarities between studied objects mainly from the point

  14. USE OF FRESH PARTS OF MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR HEALTH AND PRODUCTION IN LIVESTOCK – A NEW CONCEPT OF FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibabrata Pattanayak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Farm animals are reared for production to meet up the demand for animal protein in human. Various modern medicines are extensively used for production as well as treatment and prevention of diseases of animals, which can ultimately reach us through food chain. Herbs are now considered as an important source of alternative medicines. The Ayurvedic medicines prepared by manufacturers contain processed plant parts and added with preservative and other chemicals in many cases. The present way of research on herbal medicine follows the path of identification of active principles from the extracts of preserved parts of medicinal plants after testing of their efficacy in laboratory. This concept of research have the limitation of loss of many aromatic and other phytochemicals present in the living plant, which may have very important role when used together. Animals maintained in modern farm may be given relief from modern medicines in minor and moderate ailments, cure of problems related with their production with the validated fresh plant medicine available from the plants cultivated adjacent to the farm area. Consulting the reports of ethno-botanical study, a preliminary list of medicinal plant is prepared which are having antipyretic, analgesic, wound healing, immunostimulant, hepato-protective, fertility enhancing, pregnancy assisting, lactation assisting, anthelmintic, astringent, expectorant, purgative and anti-flatulent, nutriceutical, antiseptic, anti-dermatitis, anti-dysenteric and anti-enteric, hematenic, stomachic, diuretic and kidney stone removing effects and insecticidal or insect repelling effects. This list may be enriched further and plants may be selected for a farm from these groups according to the agro-climatic condition of the area, disease prevalence, problems encountered during farming practice and other requirements of the farm. Validation of reported effects of the plants is to be performed in fresh condition, so that parts

  15. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) conceptual design report. Part I: executive summary. Part II: facilities and system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The pilot plant is developed for ERDA low-level contact-handled transuranic waste, ERDA remote-handled intermediate-level transuranic waste, and for high-level waste experiments. All wastes placed in the WIPP arrive at the site processed and packaged; no waste processing is done at the WIPP. All wastes placed into the WIPP are retrievable. The proposed site for WIPP lies 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. This document includes the executive summary and a detailed description of the facilities and systems

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) conceptual design report. Part I: executive summary. Part II: facilities and system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The pilot plant is developed for ERDA low-level contact-handled transuranic waste, ERDA remote-handled intermediate-level transuranic waste, and for high-level waste experiments. All wastes placed in the WIPP arrive at the site processed and packaged; no waste processing is done at the WIPP. All wastes placed into the WIPP are retrievable. The proposed site for WIPP lies 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. This document includes the executive summary and a detailed description of the facilities and systems. (DLC)

  17. The Distributions of the Radionuclides Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 in Various Parts of The Alfalfa Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahel Din, K.; Harb, S.; Abbady, A.; Saad, N.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of naturally occurring Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 in different part of alfalfa plant from two different soils of Qena (South Valley University and Qena governorate farms) was studied under natural field conditions. Sixty two samples (alfalfa plant and its soil) were taken from nine sites inside farms. The samples were analyzed for their Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 activity concentrations using gamma ray spectrometer consists of 3 x 3 NaI (Tl). The daily intakes of these radioisotopes by calves, milking cattle and sheep were calculated by multiplying concentrations in alfalfa and the daily consumption rates of these plants.

  18. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 6, appendices A, B, and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events (including internal flooding, but excluding internal fire). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, reviewed the WE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. In particular, these results are assessed in relation to the design and operational characteristics of the various reactor and containment types, and by comparing the IPEs to probabilistic risk assessment characteristics. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants

  19. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Part 2: Thermal Generating Plant Unavailability Factors and Availability Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curley, G. Michael [North American Electric Reliability Corporation (United States); Mandula, Jiri [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 2 (WG2). WG2's main task is to facilitate the collection and input on an annual basis of power plant performance data (unit-by-unit and aggregated data) into the WEC PGP database. The statistics will be collected for steam, nuclear, gas turbine and combined cycle, hydro and pump storage plant. WG2 will also oversee the ongoing development of the availability statistics database, including the contents, the required software, security issues and other important information. The report is divided into two sections: Thermal generating, combined cycle/co-generation, combustion turbine, hydro and pumped storage unavailability factors and availability statistics; and nuclear power generating units.

  20. Rhizofiltration of lead using an aromatic medicinal plant Plectranthus amboinicus cultured in a hydroponic nutrient film technique (NFT) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, A; Arunbabu, V; Neethu, J; Ramasamy, E V

    2014-11-01

    Heavy metal contamination of water bodies and groundwater is a major concern of the modern world. Rhizofiltration--the use of plant root system to remove/extract pollutants from wastewater--has proven advantages over conventional methods of treatment. However, commercialization of this in situ remediation technology requires a better understanding of plant-metal interactions especially on the ability of different plant species to accumulate metals at different parts of the plant system which is critical for the successful remediation of contaminated medium. Many aquatic and terrestrial plants have been reported to accumulate heavy metals when grown hydroponically. Therefore, a batch experiment with different concentrations of lead and a nutrient film technique (NFT) experiment with recycling of wastewater were employed in this study in order to investigate the rhizofiltration of lead-containing wastewater using Plectranthus amboinicus, an aromatic medicinal plant. Results show that P. amboinicus is tolerant to a wide range of lead concentrations and nutrient deficiency. The plant accumulates considerable amount of lead, particularly in the roots, and translocation to the stem and leaf was limited, indicating that the use of leaves/above-ground parts of the plant for medicinal purposes is not hindered by its ability to remove lead from the soil or water. The study also suggests that the plant can be considered for the clean-up of lead-contaminated wastewater in combination with safe biomass disposal alternatives.

  1. Medical plants have been part of human society to combat diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dandixon tech

    civilization. History shows that the Sumerian. (5,300B.C) used herbs as medicine. Many of the drugs used today were obtained from plants. These include castor, Rauwolfia, Aloe, foxglove. Despite these facts, interest in medical plants ... neem or dogonyaro is a plant that has found varied use in ecological, medicinal and.

  2. Application of risk based inspection as a part of life management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinod, Gopika; Babar, A.K.; Saraf, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Risk Informed approach is a systematic effort to improve plant safety in a more efficient manner by distributing the available safety resources depending on the importance to plant safety. This approach has found immense application in various aspects associated with Nuclear Power Plants, including design, manufacturing, operation and regulation. Typical applications of Risk Informed approach are in Technical Specification, In-Service Inspection (ISI) requirements, Motor Operated Valve testing, Configuration Control etc. In order to cater to such variety of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) based Risk Informed requirements, a software package, 'Risk Monitor' has been developed by the authors. An important application of Risk informed approach that has been undertaken for Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is towards Risk Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI). Studies are being conducted to evolve an inspection plan that is optimised to provide effective inspections at the right location with a proper inspection frequency. Using risk informed approach, the identification of system / component for inspection resource allocation is based on the results from Level 1 PSA of a NPP. Even though this methodology can be employed on any of the nuclear components/systems such as mechanical systems, instrumentation, etc., as a starting point, piping has been considered for employing Risk Informed Inspection. Plant risk assessment is modelled through the analysis of Core Damage Frequency (CDF) using PSA models. Risk Informed Inspection program of piping involves the estimation of failure probability or frequency of a piping segment and estimation of consequences of piping failures. ISI program changes could affect the failure probability values of piping and can introduce a change in CDF. These effects can be brought out through the implementation of Risk Informed inspection strategy. Various importance measures like Fussel-Vesely, Birnbaum

  3. Effect of specific plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on growth and uptake of neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam in corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myresiotis, Charalampos K; Vryzas, Zisis; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2015-09-01

    Corn (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important cereal crops in the world and is used for food, feed and energy. Inoculation with plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) would reduce the use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides and could be suggested as an alternative practice for sustainable production of corn in modern agricultural systems. In this study, the effect of two Bacillus PGPR formulated products, Companion (B. subtilis GB03) and FZB24 (B. subtilis FZB24), on corn growth and root uptake of insecticide thiamethoxam was investigated. All bacterial treatments enhanced root biomass production by 38-65% compared with the uninoculated control, with no stimulatory effect of PGPR on above-ground biomass of corn. The uptake results revealed that, in plants inoculated with the PGPR B. subtilis FZB24 and B. subtilis GB03, singly or in combination, the uptake and/or systemic translocation of thiamethoxam in the above-ground corn parts was significantly higher at the different growth ages compared with the control receiving no bacterial treatment. The findings suggest that the PGPR-elicited enhanced uptake of thiamethoxam could lead to improved efficiency of thiamethoxam using reduced rates of pesticides in combination with PGPR as an alternative crop protection technique. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Medicinal plants used for liver diseases in some parts of Kamrup district of Assam, a North Eastern State of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoky, J; Das, P N

    2008-07-01

    An ethno-botanical survey was conducted in some tribal dominated pockets of Kamrup district of ASSAM, a North Eastern State of India. This report deals with 24 plant species used as herbal remedies for the treatment of liver ailments. Each entry includes the botanical and prevalent local name(s), other medicinal use(s), part(s) used, method of preparation and mode of administration.

  5. Pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical evaluation of extracts from different plant parts of indigenous origin for their hypoglycemic responses in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naveed; Khan, Barkat Ali; Majid, Abdul; Khan, Haji M Shoaib; Mahmood, Tariq; Gulfishan; Saeed, Tariq

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the hypoglycemic effects of different plant extracts in single and in combined formulation, in experimentally induced "diabetic rabbits". The extracts were obtained from seeds of Syzygium jambolana, fruits of Momordica charantia and leaves of Azadirachta indica. Treatment of diabetes with plant extracts was started at 8 days after alloxan injection. Rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, each group consisting of six rabbits. Each group of rabbits was given a dose of granules containing 200 mg/kg b.w. concentrated ethanolic extract of a plant while the fourth group was given a dose of granules consisting of combined extract of all three folk plants. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 h. Serum glucose estimation was done by glucose oxidase kit method. Anti-diabetic effect was produced after 72 h in groups 1, 2 and 3 that were administered with a dose of granules of ethanolic extract of single plant but in group 4, treated with 200 mg/kg body weight of combined extract of all three plants, hypoglycemic effect was produced after 96 h. Hypoglycemic effects may be induced in rabbits by administration of extracts of various plant parts. The hypoglycemic effect produced by granules of single plant extract was more pronounced than antidiabetic effect produced by combining three extracts in a single formulation.

  6. A technical and financial analysis of two recuperated, reciprocating engine driven power plants. Part 2: Financial analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbaiz, Pedro Jose; Brear, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The financial performance of two hybrid power plants is analyzed. • Biomass and solar thermal energy are used as the renewable energy inputs. • The LCOE of both power plants is estimated using reference data. • The proposed power plants are of comparable LCOE to natural gas combined cycle. • Hybrid cycles resulted in cost-effective renewable energy generation. - Abstract: This paper is the second of a two part study that analyses the technical and financial performance of particular, recuperated engine systems. This second paper examines the financial performance of two hybrid (renewable/fossil), chemically recuperated power plants. One of these plants uses the combustion of biomass as the renewable energy input. The other assumes that solar thermal energy is used. This financial analysis estimates the so-called Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) of both hybrids using reference data from several sources. Using consistent financial inputs, the LCOE of both hybrid plants is found to be comparable to the LCOE of natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power generation. Further, the LCOE of the renewable portion of the hybrid plants’ total power output is significantly cheaper than that of all the renewable plants examined in the EPRI report, and is competitive with the fossil plants. As a result, the proposed hybrids appear to be a cost-effective form of greenhouse gas mitigation

  7. Repository for spent nuclear fuel. Plant description layout D - Forsmark; Slutfoervarsanlaeggning foer anvaent kaernbraensle. Anlaeggningsbeskrivning layout D - Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-15

    This document describes the final repository for spent nuclear fuel, SFK, which is located at Forsmark, in Oesthammar. The bedrock at the site is part of a so-called tectonic lens, in which the rock composition is relatively homogeneous and less deformed than outside the lens. The bedrock consists mainly of granite with high quartz content and good thermal conductivity. The central parts above ground are grouped in an operations area, located at the Soederviken on the south side of the intake duct for cooling water for nuclear power plant. Operating area is divided into an internal, secured portion, where the canisters of fuel are handled and there are links to the underground part, and a outer part, where the buffer, backfill and sealing used in the repository's barriers are produced. The above-ground part of the plant and also include storage of excavated rock, ventilation stations, and supplies of bentonite. The underground portion consists of a central area and a storage area. Caverns of the central area contain features for the underground operation. It communicates with the internal operating range above ground via a spiral ramp and several shafts. The ramp used to transport capsules of spent fuel and other heavy or bulky transport. The shafts are used to transport rock, buffer, backfill and staff, as well as for ventilation. The largest part of the space below ground is the repository where the canisters with the spent fuel are disposed. The capsules are deposited in vertical holes in the tunnels. When the deposit in a tunnel is complete, the tunnel is re-filled. The two main activities underground is rock work and disposal work, which are conducted separately from each other. Rock works covers all steps required to excavate tunnels and drill deposition holes, as well as to make temporary installations in the tunnels. To the landfill works count, besides the deposit of the capsule, the placement of the bentonite buffer in the deposition hole and

  8. Estimation and mapping of above ground biomass and carbon of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, field data from 35 sample plots comprising of the Diameter at Breast Height (DBH), co-ordinates of centroids and angles to the top and bottom of the individual trees was used for the analysis. The relationship between biomass and radar backscatter for selected sample plots was established using pairwise ...

  9. Above-ground biomass and nutrient accumulation in the tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This means that the impact of logging in the Ebom rainforest remains low. However, additional research is needed on nutrient input in the forest from outside as well as on the impact of logging on nutrient leaching in order to get a complete picture of the nutrient cycles. Key-words: phytomass, nutrient pools, logging, ...

  10. Above-ground tree outside forest (TOF) phytomass and carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study results conclude that the classification of TOF and estimation of phytomass and carbon content in TOF can be successfully achieved through the combined approach of Remote Sensing and GIS based spatial technique with the supplement of field data. The present approach will help to find out the potential ...

  11. Blast Loading on Above Ground Barricaded Munition Storage Magazines - 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    Development Administration ATTN: IDG/AFISC, Department of Military (SEW) W.F. Gavitt, Jr. Applications (SEY) Mr. K.R. Sopher Washington, DC 20545 Norton AFB...DISTRIBUTION LIST No. of No. of Copies Oranization Copies Organization SCommander 2 Commander " Naval Surface i.eapons Center David W. Taylor

  12. Predicting the above-ground biomass of calabrian pine ( Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karaisalý Regional Forestry Management Area. Thirty three sample plots, each of 0.04 ha, were chosen in order to define the biomass equations of calabrian pine, the most common needle leave species in Turkey. A tree which is the most similar ...

  13. Above-ground tree outside forest (TOF) phytomass and carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Environmental Science, Maharishi Dayanand University, Rohtak, Haryana 124 001, India. 2Centre for the .... Programme in XI FYP. ...... 112, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United. Nations, Rome. FAO 2005 Tree outside forest; Food and Agricultural Orga- nization of the United Nations, Rome.

  14. Above ground performance of preservative-treated western wood species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey J. Morrell; D.J. Miller; Stan T. Lebow

    2000-01-01

    Incised and non-incised Douglas-fir, western hemlock, and ponderosa pine L- joints were treated with ammoniacal-based pentachlorophenol, chromated zinc chloride, thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole (TCMBT) or TCMTB plus methylenebisthiocyanate or 3 iodo-2-propynyl carbamate with or without chlorpyrifos to retentions between 0.8 and 6.4 kg/m3 and exposed, uncoated, above...

  15. Transfer of elements relevant to radioactive waste from soil to five boreal plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roivainen, Päivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2011-04-01

    In long-term safety assessment models for radioactive waste disposal, uptake of radionuclides by plants is an important process with possible adverse effects in ecosystems. Cobalt-60, (59,63)Ni, (93)Mo, and (210)Pb are examples of long-living radionuclides present in nuclear waste. The soil-to-plant transfer of stable cobalt, nickel, molybdenum and lead and their distribution across plant parts were investigated in blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) at two boreal forest sites in Eastern Finland. The concentrations of all of the studied elements were higher in roots than in above-ground plant parts showing that different concentration ratios (CR values) are needed for modelling the transfer to roots and stems/leaves. Some significant differences in CR values were found in comparisons of different plant species and of the same species grown at different sites. However, large within-species variation suggests that it is not justified to use different CR values for modelling soil-to-plant transfer of these elements in the different boreal forest plant species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 50 - Quality Assurance Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and Fuel Reprocessing Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., or component will perform satisfactorily in service. Quality assurance includes quality control... periodic audits shall be carried out to verify compliance with all aspects of the quality assurance program... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality Assurance Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 50 - Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To Construct and Licenses To Operate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Construct and Licenses To Operate Nuclear Power Reactors of Identical Design at Multiple Sites N Appendix N... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App.N Appendix N to Part 50—Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To..., apply to construction permits and operating licenses subject to this appendix N. 2. Applications for...

  18. Enantioselective Reduction by Crude Plant Parts: Reduction of Benzofuran-2-yl Methyl Ketone with Carrot ("Daucus carota") Bits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravia, Silvana; Gamenara, Daniela; Schapiro, Valeria; Bellomo, Ana; Adum, Jorge; Seoane, Gustavo; Gonzalez, David

    2006-01-01

    The use of biocatalysis and biotransformations are important tools in green chemistry. The enantioselective reduction of a ketone by crude plant parts, using carrot ("Daucus carota") as the reducing agent is presented. The experiment introduces an example of a green chemistry procedure that can be tailored to fit in a regular laboratory session.…

  19. Factors determining plant species richness in Alaskan artic tundra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, van der M.E.W.; Vermeulen, P.J.; Shaver, G.R.; Berendse, F.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the relationship between plant N:P ratio, soil characteristics and species richness in wet sedge and tussock tundra in northern Alaska at seven sites. We also collected data on soil characteristics, above-ground biomass, species richness and composition. The N:P ratio of the vegetation

  20. MANAGING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF MEAT PROCESSING PLANTS AS PART OF THE MECHANISM OF STRATEGIC PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Gusev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have proven that, at present one of the priority research areas as part of the Development Strategy of the Food Processing Industry of the Russian Federation until 2020 is to develop effective mechanisms for sustainable socio-economic development of industrial enterprises. This article investigated the logic of strategic planning within the framework of sustainable economic growth, analyzed the structure of strategic planning, study the subject of strategic planning in the management of sustainable development of enterprises, justified the basic principles of strategic planning for the effective management of sustainable development of industrial enterprises, as well as the complex of organizational tactical activities of operational management strategy for sustainable development of the enterprise. The observation revealed that currently there was a high need for the framework of the branch, departmental and state programs implemented in industrial management of scientific and methodological approaches of strategic planning. Studies have shown that these approaches in its conceptual entity should be based on the growth potential of the sustainable development of meat processing plants in space and time in order to achieve high competitive advantages. Conducted a systematic analysis of industry conditions proved that the problem of sustainable operation and development of meat processing enterprises as a problem of management and control is relatively new, unexplored and highly relevant. On the contrary, it is the basis of modern management strategy and management is a concept and methodology of the so-called adaptive enterprise development under the action of various external and internal factors, risks that may threaten its economic stability and sustainability.

  1. Conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant. Part I. An integrated facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This study is a new preliminary conceptual design and economic analysis of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plant performed by Bechtel under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of a new conceptual design is to examine alternatives to the LLNL HYLIFE power plant and to incorporate information from the recent liquid metal cooled power plant conceptual design study (CDS) into the reactor system and balance of plant design. A key issue in the design of a laser fusion power plant is the degree of symmetry in the illumination of the target that will be required for a proper burn. Because this matter is expected to remain unresolved for some time, another purpose of this study is to determine the effect of symmetry requirements on the total plant size, layout, and cost

  2. Phosphorus and Defoliation Interact and Improve the Growth and Composition of the Plant Community and Soil Properties in an Alpine Pasture of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Juan; Nie, Zhongnan; Jiao, Ting; Zhang, Degang

    2015-01-01

    Pasture degradation caused by overgrazing and inappropriate fertiliser management is a major production and environmental threat in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Previous research has focused on the effects of mixed nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertiliser and reduced grazing pressure on the plant community of the grassland; however, the role of P and how it interacts with various defoliation (the process of the complete or partial removal of the above-ground parts of plants by grazing or cutting) intensities on the plant and soil of the grassland ecosystem have not been quantified. A field experiment was conducted to quantify how P application in combination of defoliation pressure could impact the dynamic change of the plant and soil in a native alpine grassland ecosystem of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China, from May 2012 to September 2014. A split-plot design with 4 replicates and repeated measures was used to determine the growth and composition of plant community and soil physical and chemical properties under various levels of P fertiliser and defoliation intensity. The results showed that applying 20 kg P/ha increased the herbage yield of Melissitus ruthenica by 68% and total pasture yield by 25%. Close defoliation favoured the growth and plant frequency of the shorter species, whereas lax defoliation favoured that of the taller plant species. Medium P rate and cutting to 3 cm above ground gave an overall best outcome in pasture yield, quality and frequency and soil moisture and nutrient concentration. Application of P fertiliser with a moderate defoliation pressure to promote legume growth and N fixation has the potential to achieve multiple benefits in increasing pasture and livestock production and improving environmental sustainability in the alpine pasture of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, a fragile and P-deficient ecosystem zone in China and its western neighbouring countries.

  3. A multitrophic perspective on functioning and evolution of facilitation in plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van der W.H.

    2009-01-01

    1. Plant facilitation has been studied mostly in the context of plant–plant interactions, whereas multitrophic interactions including those that occur below ground have not yet received much attention. Here, I will discuss how above-ground and below-ground natural enemies and their predators

  4. Nuclear power and heating plants in the electric power system. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalincik, L.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures used and results obtained in the following works are described: Incorporation of the nuclear power plants in the power system in the long term perspective; physical limitations on the WWER 440 reactor power changes during fuel campaigns; evaluation of the consumption and start-up characteristics of WWER type nuclear power plants (2x440 MWe); evaluation of refuelling campaigns distribution of nuclear power plant units with regard to comprehensive control properties of nuclear power plants; the possibilities are investigated of the utilization of the WWER type reactor for heat supply in Czechoslovakia. (author)

  5. Uptake of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes by plants growing in dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region (Kazakhstan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matveyeva, Ilona; Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology; Jacimovic, Radojko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Planinsek, Petra; Smodis, Borut [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-04-01

    The activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in dominant species of plants (Xantium strumarium, Phragmites communis, Artemisia nitrosa and Artemisia serotina) growing on the territories contaminated by uranium industry of Kazakhstan (close to dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region) are presented. The obtained data showed the significant variations of activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in above ground parts. The concentrations of most of the investigated radionuclides in the root system are higher than in the aboveground parts; it can be explained by root barrier. It was found that the highest root barrier has Xantium strumarium, especially for uranium isotopes. The concentration ratios of radionuclides were calculated, and as the result it was found that the highest accumulation ability in the investigated region has Artemisia serotina.

  6. Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 7: Key invasive nonnative plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneva Chong; Tom Stohlgren; Catherine Crosier; Sara Simonson; Greg Newman; Eric Petterson

    2003-01-01

    Invasive, nonnative plant species pose one of the greatest potential threats to long-term ecosystem integrity in the area burned by the 2002 Hayman Fire. In other ecosystems, nonnative invaders have been shown to cause decline of native plant species and pollinators, as well as adverse changes in fire regimes, nutrient cycling, and hydrology. Thus, invasive, nonnative...

  7. Local plant names reveal that enslaved Africans recognized substantial parts of the New World flora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, van T.R.; Klooster, van 't E.A.; Quiroz Villarreal, D.K.; Towns, A.M.; Ruysschaert, S.; Berg, van den M.

    2014-01-01

    How did the forced migration of nearly 11 million enslaved Africans to the Americas influence their knowledge of plants? Vernacular plant names give insight into the process of species recognition, acquisition of new knowledge, and replacement of African species with American ones. This study traces

  8. Plant Parts Snack--A Way to Family Involvement, Science Learning, and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Megan Mason

    2008-01-01

    As a teacher who loves to bring botany into her preschool classroom of 4- and 5-year-olds, the author makes edible plants a regular, popular feature of her students' environment. The author is fascinated when her students become increasingly adventurous in their tastes for vegetables the more they handle and understand plants. The author decided…

  9. MHD retrofit of steam power plants. Feasibility study. Summary and conclusions, Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Division of Magnetohydrodynamics (DOE/MHD) initiated this study to evaluate the feasibility of a retrofit option to reduce the time and cost of commercializing MHD. The MHD retrofit option will integrate a nominal 260 megawatt thermal (MWt) MHD topping cycle into an existing or scheduled private utility steam plant; this facility will test both the MHD system and the combined operation of the MHD/steam plant. The 260 MWt input level was determined to be the size which could most effectively demonstrate and verify the engineering design and operational characteristics of a coal-fired, open-cycle, MHD power plant. Details are presented. A goal of the MHD program is to have operational by the year 2003 a commercial size, fully integrated MHD plant. This would be accomplished by demonstrating commercial scale, baseload performance of a fully integrated, MHD/steam power plant. (WHK)

  10. Wild food plants and fungi used by Ukrainians in the western part of the Maramureş region in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Łuczaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild food and fungi use in the countryside has always been an important part of human-nature relationships. Due to social changes in most rural areas of Europe this part of traditional ecological knowledge is shrinking. The aim of our study was to record the use of wild foods and plants among the Ukrainian (Carpatho-Rusyns minority in the western part of Romanian Maramureş. We carried out 64 interviews in two villages. Voucher specimens were collected and DNA barcoding was used to identify most fungi taxa. We recorded the use of 44 taxa of plants altogether (including 8 taxa used only for herbal teas and 24 taxa of fungi. On average 7.7 species of plants and 9.7 species of fungi were listed per interview. Edible fungi are thus an important part of local cuisine and they are eagerly gathered by everyone. The use of a few woodland bracket fungi is worth pointing out. No signs of degeneration of this knowledge were observed. Wild fruits are less collected now and wild greens are rarely collected nowadays. This pattern is typical of many places in Central Europe.

  11. Evaluation of phenolic content and antioxidant potency in various parts of Cassia auriculata L.: a traditionally valued plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, K N; Annegowda, H V; Sathish, N K; Ramesh, B; Mansor, S M

    2014-01-01

    Presence of polyphenolic content in various part of the plant exhibit wide pharmacological activities including antioxidant activity. The present study was designed to evaluate the phenolic contents (total phenols, flavonoid and tannins) and antioxidant properties of ethanolic extracts of flower, leaf, pod, bark and root obtained from Cassia auriculata. Ethanolic extracts of various parts of C. auriculata obtained by sonication extraction techniques are studied for their phenolic contents and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazine) radical scavenging assay as well as total antioxidant assays using UV visible spectrophotometer. Among the various parts of the plant studied, bark showed significant content of phenolics, flavonoids and tannins followed by the root, leaf, flower and pod. Even bark extract exhibited highest antioxidant capacity in DPPH assay followed by root, leaf, flower and pod with a value of 766.7, 679.3, 644.9, 572.5 and 474.7 mg vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity (mg VCEAC)/sample, respectively. In addition, mg VCEAC values obtained from the total antioxidant assay was in the increasing order of bark > root > leaf > flower > pod. Moreover, a strong correlation was also found between phenolic contents and antioxidant values indicating their influence in the found antioxidant activity, hence the bark extract can be employed as an ideal candidate for herbal based pharmaceutical product. Results of the present study also emphasize variation in the chemical composition as well as biological activity ensuring the importance of proper selection of particular part of the plant to evaluate their therapeutic potency.

  12. Nutritional Value and Bioactive Compounds Characterization of Plant Parts From Cynara cardunculus L. (Asteraceae Cultivated in Central Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon A. Petropoulos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the nutritional value of the edible parts (immature capitula of cardoon plants was evaluated, while further analyses were carried out in order to assess antioxidant properties and phenolic compounds composition of the various plant parts and seed oils. Cardoon capitula (heads were a rich source of carbohydrates, with the main detected free sugar being sucrose, as well as of macro- and micro-minerals (K, Ca, Mg, and Fe. Heads were also abundant in saturated fatty acids (palmitic, behenic, linoleic, stearic, caproic, and oleic acid, whereas seed oils in unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic acid. Total phenolic compounds (TPC content and phenolics composition differed between the various plant parts, with heads and leaf blades having higher TPC than midribs and petioles. Moreover, heads and leaf midribs and petioles consisted mainly of phenolic acids (5-O-caffeoylquinic and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, with flavonoids being detected in lower amounts. In contrast, the composition of polyphenols in leaf blades consisted mostly of flavonoids (Luteolin-7-O-glucoside and luteolin-7-O-malonylhexoside, whereas phenolic acids were also detected in considerable amounts (5-O-feruloylquinic and 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid. Regarding antioxidant properties, leaf blades and seeds exhibited the highest potency for all the tested assays which could be partly attributed to the synergistic effects of the phenolic compounds present in each sample. In conclusion, cardoon plant parts may find various uses in the food and pharmaceutical industry, since they contain considerable amounts of bioactive molecules, while seed oils can be considered as alternative vegetable oils for human consumption.

  13. Evaluating Bioaerosol Emissions form in different parts of a Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jahangiri

    2014-02-01

    .Conclusion: Wastewater treatment processes can contaminate the air surrounding the plant, particularly with bacteria bioaerosols. Therefore, it is necessary to control the emissions and protect the health of workers against risks arising from exposure to bioaerosols.

  14. Water Treatment Plant Sludges--An Update of the State of the Art: Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Water Works Association Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This report outlines the state of the art with respect to nonmechanical and mechanical methods of dewatering water treatment plant sludge, ultimate solids disposal, and research and development needs. (CS)

  15. An improved seawater desalination plant as a selfstoring part of a sustainable island supply for electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plantikow, U. [WME GmbH, Dranske/Rugia (Germany); Huss, R. [FH Kempten (Germany); Lehmann, J. [IFEU e.V., Stralsund (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Because of the use of steel in the quality 1.4565 S in thermal seawater desalination plants, esp. with an energy input of wind energy converters it is possible to run the plant up to higher evaporation temperatures of 80 C without any corrosion in the whole plant and especially not in the evaporator-condensor unit. Because of these higher temperatures the specific energy efficiency and the volume-time-yield and therefore the specific costs of desalination process of these plants were considerable improved. This is the result of 4 years praxis test on a wind driven seawater desalination at the island of Ruegen in the Baltic sea. Moreover it is shown that there are synergies from the use of renewable energies for grid off supply and the production of potable water even in remote and recreation areas. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of methods for seismic analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, F.J.; Murray, R.C.; Arthur, D.F.; Feng, W.W.; Wight, L.H.; Zaslawsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Currently, no guidelines exist for choosing methods of structural analysis to evaluate the seismic hazard of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. This study examines available methods and their applicability to fuel reprocessing plant structures. The results of this study should provide a basis for establishing guidelines recommending methods of seismic analysis for evaluating future fuel reprocessing plants. The approach taken is: (1) to identify critical plant structures and place them in four categories (structures at or near grade; deeply embedded structures; fully buried structures; equipment/vessels/attachments/piping), (2) to select a representative structure in each of the first three categories and perform static and dynamic analysis on each, and (3) to evaluate and recommend method(s) of analysis for structures within each category. The Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant is selected as representative of future commercial reprocessing plants. The effect of site characteristics on the structural response is also examined. The response spectra method of analysis combined with the finite element model for each category is recommended. For structures founded near or at grade, the lumped mass model could also be used. If a time history response is required, a time-history analysis is necessary. (U.S.)

  17. Agroforestry leads to shifts within the gammaproteobacterial microbiome of banana plants cultivated in Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eKöberl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bananas (Musa spp. belong to the most important global food commodities, and their cultivation represents the world’s largest monoculture. Although the plant-associated microbiome has substantial influence on plant growth and health, there is a lack of knowledge of the banana microbiome and its influencing factors. We studied the impact of i biogeography, and ii agroforestry on the banana-associated gammaproteobacterial microbiome analyzing plants grown in smallholder farms in Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Profiles of 16S rRNA genes revealed high abundances of Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, Xanthomonadales, and Legionellales. An extraordinary high diversity of the gammaproteobacterial microbiota was observed within the endophytic microenvironments (endorhiza and pseudostem, which was similar in both countries. Enterobacteria were identified as dominant group of above-ground plant parts (pseudostem and leaves. Neither biogeography nor agroforestry showed a statistically significant impact on the gammaproteobacterial banana microbiome in general. However, indicator species for each microenvironment and country, as well as for plants grown in Coffea intercropping systems with and without agri-silvicultural production of different Fabaceae trees (Inga spp. in Nicaragua and Erythrina poeppigiana in Costa Rica could be identified. For example, banana plants grown in agroforestry systems were characterized by an increase of potential plant-beneficial bacteria, like Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas, and on the other side by a decrease of Erwinia. Hence, this study could show that as a result of legume-based agroforestry the indigenous banana-associated gammaproteobacterial community noticeably shifted.

  18. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 2: The medicinal plants used in Katoro Ward, Bukoba District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbabazi Pamela K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practices. The dynamic inter-ethnic interactions of different people from the surrounding countries constitute a rich reservoir of herbal based healing practices. This study, the second on an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plant species used in Katoro ward, Bukoba District, and tries to use the literature to establish proof of the therapeutic claims. Methodology Ethnomedical information was collected using Semi-structured interviews in Kyamlaile and Kashaba villages of Katoro, and in roadside bushes on the way from Katoro to Bukoba through Kyaka. Data collected included the common/local names of the plants, parts used, the diseases treated, methods of preparation, dosage, frequency and duration of treatments. Information on toxicity and antidote were also collected. Literature was consulted to get corroborative information on similar ethnomedical claims and proven biological activities of the plants. Results Thirty three (33 plant species for treatement of 13 different disease categories were documented. The most frequently treated diseases were those categorized as specific diseases/conditions (23.8% of all remedies while eye diseases were the least treated using medicinal plants (1.5% of all remedies. Literature reports support 47% of the claims including proven anti-malarial, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activity or similar ethnomedical uses. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part (20 species followed by roots (13 species while making of decoctions, pounding, squeezing, making infusions, burning and grinding to powder were the most common methods used to prepare a majority of the therapies. Conclusion Therapeutic claims made on plants used in traditional medicine in Katoro ward of Bukoba district are well supported by literature, with 47% of the claims having already been reported. This study further

  19. Pyranometers and Reference Cells: Part 2: What Makes the Most Sense for PV Power Plants?; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meydbray, J.; Riley, E.; Dunn, L.; Emery, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-10-01

    As described in Part 1 of this two-part series, thermopile pyranometers and photovoltaic (PV) reference cells can both be used to measure irradiance; however, there are subtle differences between the data that are obtained. This two-part article explores some implications of uncertainty and subtleties of accurately measuring PV efficiency in the field. Part 2 of the series shows how reference cells can be used to more confidently predict PV performance, but how this could best be accomplished if historic irradiance data could be available in PV-technology-specific formats.

  20. Circadian Rhythms and Redox State in Plants: Till Stress Do Us Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela R. Guadagno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence demonstrates a significant relationship between cellular redox state and circadian rhythms. Each day these two vital components of plant biology influence one another, dictating the pace for metabolism and physiology. Diverse environmental stressors can disrupt this condition and, although plant scientists have made significant progress in re-constructing functional networks of plant stress responses, stress impacts on the clock-redox crosstalk is poorly understood. Inter-connected phenomena such as redox state and metabolism, internal and external environments, cellular homeostasis and rhythms can impede predictive understanding of coordinated regulation of plant stress response. The integration of circadian clock effects into predictive network models is likely to increase final yield and better predict plant responses to stress. To achieve such integrated understanding, it is necessary to consider the internal clock not only as a gatekeeper of environmental responses but also as a target of stress syndromes. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a reliable and high-throughput probe of stress coupled to functional genomics and metabolomics will provide insights on the crosstalk across a wide range of stress severity and duration, including potential insights into oxidative stress response and signaling. We suggest the efficiency of photosystem II in light conditions (Fv′/Fm′ to be the most dynamic of the fluorescence variables and therefore the most reliable parameter to follow the stress response from early sensing to mortality.

  1. Traits of Heracleum sosnowskyi Plants in Monostand on Invaded Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V Dalke

    Full Text Available The ability of giant hogweeds to form monodominant communities and even pure monostands in invaded areas has been well documented. Understanding of the mechanisms leading to monostand formation can aid in determining the limitations of existing community ecology models and establishing an effective management plan for invasive species elimination. The aim of this observational study was to investigate traits of Heracleum sosnowskyi plants (demography, canopy structure, morphology and physiology of the plants in a pure stand in an invaded area useful for understanding potential monostand formation mechanisms. All measurements were performed in one typical Heracleum sosnowskyi monostand located in an abandoned agriculture field located in Syktyvkar city suburb (North-east Russia. This monostand consisted of five main plant growth stages: seed, seedling, juvenile, vegetative adult, and generative adult. Plants of all stages began to grow simultaneously shortly after the snowmelt, at the same time as spring ephemeral plant species grew. The density of generative plants did not change during the vegetation period, but the density of the other plant stages rapidly decreased after the formation of a tall (up to 2-2.5 m and dense (Leaf area index up to 6.5 canopy. The canopy captured approximately 97% of the light. H. sosnowskyi showed high (several orders of magnitude higher than average taiga zone grasses photosynthetic water use efficiency (6-7 μM CO2/μM H2O. Formation of H. sosnowskyi monostands occurs primarily in disturbed areas with relatively rich and well-moistened soils. Early commencement of growth, rapid formation of a dense canopy, high efficiency of light and water use during photosynthesis, ability of young plants to survive in low light conditions, rapid recovery of above-ground plant parts after damage, and the high density of the soil seed bank are the most important traits of H. sosnowskyi plants for monostand formation in invaded

  2. Seed priming with extracts of Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. ex Delile and Sapindus mukorossi (L.) plant parts in the control of root rot fungi and growth of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafi, H.; Dawar, S.; Zaki, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Seed priming with plant extracts and chemicals has been used as an important growth enhancement tool in crop plants. In this research, an attempt was made to understand the mechanism of various seed priming treatments on greenhouse-grown okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) for the control of root infecting fungi like Rhizoctonia solani (Kn), Fusarium spp. and Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid by plant parts extracts (stem, leaves and seeds) of Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. ex Delile and Sapindus mukorossi (L) at different time intervals (5, 10, 20, 40 minutes). Results showed significant suppression of root rot fungi and significantly enhanced the growth parameters like shoot length, root length, shoot weight and root weight. Seed-priming with A. nilotica and S. mukorossi leaves extract for 10 minutes time interval was found to be effective for the control of root rot fungi and growth of all tested leguminous and non-leguminous plants. (author)

  3. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Part 4: Markets and Risk Management Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Terry; Loedolff, Gerhard; Griffin, Rob; Kydd, Robert; Micali, Vince [Eskom (South Africa)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 4 (WG4). WG4 will monitor the development of power markets, in particular from the market risk management point of view, including operational risks. It will assess various risk management strategies used by market players around the world and develop recommendations for a wider deployment of successful strategies. The report covers the project approach and outcomes.

  4. The part played by applied geology in nuclear power plant site studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giafferi, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Site-related geological problems are one of the constraints affecting the environment of nuclear power plants. The natural features (soil and subsoil) at the nuclear power plant site affect numerous factors in the design, construction and operation of the civil engineering structures. The site geological criteria are not solely restricted to the soil as a static support for the structures. Earth tremors in France are of moderate intensity but the likelihood of their occurrence must nevertheless be taken into account for each site. Studies must concern the geological and seismic features of the region as well as the soil and subsoil configurations and composition in the immediate vicinity of the site in order to determine the physical characteristics of the earthquakes so that the safety of the plant can be guaranteed; in many cases, water tables have also to be taken into consideration. Geologic survey techniques are discussed. 13 figs., 7 refs

  5. Fire protection for nuclear power plants. Part 1. Fundamental approaches. Version 6/99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The KTA nuclear safety code sets out the fundamental approaches and principles for the prevention of fires in nuclear power plants, addressing aspects such as initiation, spreading, and effects of a fire: (a) Fire load and ignition sources, (b) structural and plant engineering conditions, (c) ways and means relating to fire call and fire fighting. Relevant technical and organisational measures are defined. Scope and quality of fire prevention measures to be taken, as well the relevant in-service inspection activities are determined according to the protective goals pursued in each case. (orig./CB) [de

  6. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M L; Hallin, Emil

    2015-07-17

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed.

  7. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 100 - Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... analysis or test shall take into account soil-structure interaction effects and the expected duration of... conservatism. The analysis or test shall take into account soil-structure interaction effects and the expected... plant structures, systems, and components important to safety be designed to withstand the effects of...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) The evaluation must take into account soil-structure interaction effects and the expected duration of... design must take into account soil-structure interaction effects and the duration of vibratory ground... nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components important to safety to withstand the effects of...

  9. Accounting Issues: An Essay Series Part IV--Property, Plant, & Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2007-01-01

    This fourth article in a series of theoretical essays intended to supplement the introductory financial accounting course is dedicated to the topic of property, plant, and equipment (PP&E), including both the accounting treatment and its related conceptual connections. The paper also addresses the measurement dilemmas, scandalous accounting…

  10. Evaluation of energy efficiency opportunities of a typical Moroccan cement plant: Part I. Energy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellaou, S.; Bounahmidi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We have analyzed the degree of freedom of the overall system. • We validated the redundant measurements by the Lagrange multipliers technique. • We have analyzed the mass and the energy balances by two approaches. • We identified the factors that penalize the energetic performance of the whole plant. • We assessed options to improve energy efficiency of the entire cement plant. - Abstract: The cement industry is one of Morocco’s most highly energy intensive economic sectors. It suffers from abnormally high cost of energy supplies, representing more than two thirds of the cost of cement; the first item of expenditure is electricity and fuel with 40% and 30% respectively. Herefor, much more effort is needed to make the cement sector reach energy saving targets set by the Moroccan energy efficiency strategy. The present work aims to evaluate energy performance of an existing Moroccan cement plant based on a detailed mass and energy balances analysis. Redundant measurements were validated by the Lagrange multipliers technique before being used for the calculation of unmeasured variables. The values for energy consumption and related losses through the whole production line are reported, and the results obtained have been used to assess the energy performance of the process. The evaluation was completed by both an analysis of possible energy loss sources and important solutions described in the international literature to improve the energy efficiency of the entire cement plant.

  11. Rock siting of nuclear power plants from a reactor safety standpoint. Status report October 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clearify the advantages and disadvantages of an underground nuclear power plant from a reactor safety point of view, compared to a plant above ground. Principles for the technical design of a rock sited BWR nuclear power plant is presented. Also questions of sabotage and closing down the plant at the end of the operational period are treated. (K.K.)

  12. Ethnopharmacological Approaches for Therapy of Jaundice: Part II. Highly Used Plant Species from Acanthaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Asteraceae, Combretaceae, and Fabaceae Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Tewari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In many developing countries, jaundice is the common symptom of hepatic diseases which are a major cause of mortality. The use of natural product-based therapies is very popular for such hepatic disorders. A great number of medicinal plants have been utilized for this purpose and some facilitated the discovery of active compounds which helped the development of new synthetic drugs against jaundice. However, more epidemiological studies and clinical trials are required for the practical implementation of the plant pharmacotherapy of jaundice. The focus of this second part of our review is on several of the most prominent plants used against jaundice identified in the analysis performed in the first part of the review viz. Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f. Nees, Silybum marianum (L. Gaertn., Terminalia chebula Retz., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and some species of genus Phyllanthus. Furthermore, we discuss their physiological effects, biologically active ingredients, and the potential mechanisms of action. Some of the most important active ingredients were silybin (also recommended by German commission, phyllanthin and andrographolide, whose action leads to bilirubin reduction and normalization of the levels of relevant serum enzymes indicative for the pathophysiological status of the liver.

  13. A resistance representation of schemes for evaporation from bare and partly plant-covered surfaces for use in atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailovic, D.T.; Pielke, R.A.; Rajkovic, B.; Lee, T.J.; Jeftic, M. (Novi Sad Univ. (Yugoslavia) Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States) Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia))

    1993-06-01

    In the parameterization of land surface processes, attention must be devoted to surface evaporation, one of the main processes in the air-land energy exchange. One of the most used approaches is the resistance representation which requires the calculation of aerodynamic resistances. These resistances are calculated using K theory for different morphologies of plant communities; then, the performance of the evaporation schemes within the alpha, beta, and their combination approaches that parameterize evaporation from bare and partly plant-covered soil surfaces are discussed. Additionally, a new alpha scheme is proposed based on an assumed power dependence alpha on volumetric soil moisture content and its saturated value. Finally, the performance of the considered and the proposed schemes is tested based on time integrations using real data. The first set was for 4 June 1982, and the second for 3 June 1981 at the experimental site in Rimski Sancevi, Yugoslavia, on chernozem soil, as representative for a bare, and partly plant-covered surface, respectively. 63 refs.

  14. A birdcage model for the Chinese meridian system: Part V: Applications to animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Kaung-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Since we all belong to the Kingdom Animalia, it is not surprising that animals in general benefit from the healing art of acupuncture that helps humans. Consequently, any proposed mechanism of Qi and acupuncture for humans based on animal physiology is probably applicable to animals as well, yet none is capable of explaining most of the complicated physiological effects observed. Not much attention was paid to the effects of Qi and acupuncture on plants (Kingdom Plantae) and on enoki mushrooms (Kingdom Fungi) by the TCM community, probably because they cannot be explained in terms of neurochemistry or connective tissue structures. However, our transmission and birdcage model is in principle applicable across Kingdom boundaries, because it is based on physical properties underlying the biological structure, thus its explanatory power is not restricted by categories of biology. We estimate several possible parameters of the birdcage model for animals and plants and give a possible interpretation for the sound fertilization phenomenon.

  15. Growth responses of maritime sand dune plant species to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Tadych

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a pot experiment conducted in a greenhouse, the response of 6 plant species dominating in the succession of vegetation of a deflation hollow of the Łeba Bar to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF was investigated. The inoculum was a mixture of soil, roots and spores of 5 species of AMF with the dominant species Glomus aggregatum. Except for Corynephorus canescens and Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria, both the growth and the dry matter of above-ground parts of plants of Agrostis stolonifera, Ammophila arenaria, Corynephorus canescens, Juncus articulatus and J. balticus inoculated with AMF were higher than those growing in soils lacking infection propagules of these fungi. Inoculation with AMF decreased the dry matter of root: shoot ratios in 5 plant species. This property was not determined in Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria due to the death of all control plants. The level of mycorrhizal infection was low and did not correlate with the growth responses found. The high growth reaction of Juncus spp. to AMF found in this study suggests that the opinion of non-mycotrophy or low dependence of plants of Juncaceae on AMF was based on results of investigations of plants growing in wet sites known to inhibit the formation of mycorrhizae.

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains Appendix D2, engineering design basis reports. Contents include: Design considerations for the waste hoist of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); A site-specific study of wind and tornado probabilities at the WIPP Site in southeast New Mexico; Seismic evaluation report of underground facilities; and calculations for analysis of wind loads and tornado loads for WHB, seismic calculations, calculations for VOC-10 monitoring system, and for shaft at station A

  17. Antioxidant property of aerial parts and root of Phyllanthus fraternus Webster, an important medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Richa; Chaurasia, Jitendra Kumar; Tiwari, Kavindra Nath; Singh, Karuna

    2014-01-01

    In present study free radical scavenging potential of aerial parts and root of Phyllanthus fraternus was investigated. Extraction was done in water and ethanol. Total antioxidant capacity was measured by DPPH free radical scavenging method; ethanolic extract of aerial part was most potent in activity with 50% inhibition at 258 μg/mL concentration. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) was measured in terms of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) by using egg-yolk homogenates as lipid-rich media with EC₅₀ of aerial part (ethanolic) 1522 μg/mL which was found to be most active. Superoxide (SO) radical scavenging activity was measured using riboflavin-light-nitroblue tetrazolium assay. Ethanolic and aqueous extract of both aerial part and root was almost similar in superoxide radical scavenging activity. Reducing power was determined on the basis of Fe³⁺-Fe⁺ transformation in the presence of extract. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also measured by spectroscopic method. Results showed that the ethanolic fraction of aerial part is most active towards antioxidant potential and this activity is related to its polyphenolic content and reducing potential. Thus, P. fraternus extract can be used as potent natural antioxidant.

  18. A simple, fast and inexpensive method to assess salt stress tolerance of aerial plant part: Investigations in the mandarin group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yahmed, Jihène; de Oliveira, Tahise M; Novillo, Pedro; Quinones, Anna; Forner, Maria-Angeles; Salvador, Alexandra; Froelicher, Yann; Ben Mimoun, Mehdi; Talon, Manuel; Ollitrault, Patrick; Morillon, Raphaël

    2016-01-15

    For grafted plants, salt stress tolerance of the aerial plant part is poorly documented. Thus, we developed a simple, fast and inexpensive method to identify tolerant genotypes. Twigs of 14 mandarin accessions that we previously analyzed as seedlings were cut in solution to prevent embolism and were then evaluated in salt stress condition for a week. Physiological parameters such as gas exchanges, leaf Cl(-) and Na(+), as well as the presence of H2O2 and the activity of enzymes involved in ROS synthesis and detoxification processes were analyzed. One accession known to be tolerant as rootstock was shown to be sensitive with limited Cl(-) translocation from the solution to the shoot while sensitive accessions when grown as seedlings presented limited wilting symptoms and accumulated large leaf Cl(-) content. A model is proposed to explain the different strategies of the plant to cope with high toxic ion content. This method allows separation of the root compartment, where ion exclusion mechanisms may exist and have an impact on the salt stress tolerance of the whole plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Cast Steels for Creep-resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Drotlew

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium ironalloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  20. Cast Steels for Creep-Resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drotlew A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium iron alloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  1. Plant-insect interactions under bacterial influence: ecological implications and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugio, Akiko; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Plants and insects have been co-existing for more than 400 million years, leading to intimate and complex relationships. Throughout their own evolutionary history, plants and insects have also established intricate and very diverse relationships with microbial associates. Studies in recent years have revealed plant- or insect-associated microbes to be instrumental in plant-insect interactions, with important implications for plant defences and plant utilization by insects. Microbial communities associated with plants are rich in diversity, and their structure greatly differs between below- and above-ground levels. Microbial communities associated with insect herbivores generally present a lower diversity and can reside in different body parts of their hosts including bacteriocytes, haemolymph, gut, and salivary glands. Acquisition of microbial communities by vertical or horizontal transmission and possible genetic exchanges through lateral transfer could strongly impact on the host insect or plant fitness by conferring adaptations to new habitats. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and molecular tools have dramatically enhanced opportunities to characterize the microbial diversity associated with plants and insects and have unveiled some of the mechanisms by which symbionts modulate plant-insect interactions. Here, we focus on the diversity and ecological consequences of bacterial communities associated with plants and herbivorous insects. We also highlight the known mechanisms by which these microbes interfere with plant-insect interactions. Revealing such mechanisms in model systems under controlled environments but also in more natural ecological settings will help us to understand the evolution of complex multitrophic interactions in which plants, herbivorous insects, and micro-organisms are inserted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions

  2. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections.

  3. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections

  4. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section

  5. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

  6. Nuclear power plant safety, their a social acceptance and the part played by the Administration in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Santos, A.

    1980-01-01

    The safety of nuclear power plants is introduced as the complement of risk, which is futhermore explained as the proximity of damage, therefore as frequency of accidents times damage. The reduced risk and, as a consequence, the high standards of safety of nuclear power plants are explained with reference to the American Reactor Safety Study and the German Risikostudie; the situation in less industrial countries is also analyzed. The social rejection of nuclear energy is studied with reference to the concept of risk and explanations are given of the present situation. Within this context, and making reference to Spain, the part played by the Administration is safeguarding the health and safety of the public is discussed. Specific reference is made to the newly published law regulating Nuclear Safety. (author)

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Aerial Part Crude Extracts from the Saharan plant Anabasis aretioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. AMARI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of several crude extracts from the aerial parts of Anabasis aretioides was investigated by the disc diffusion method. The S. aureus, C. albicans and S. cereviceae Bacteria showed good efficiency in bacterial activity with most of the tested extract.

  8. Corrosion investigations at Masnedoe combined heat and power plant. Part VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, M. [Danmarks Tekniske Univ., Dept. for Manufacturing Engineering, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Karlsson, A. [ENERGI E2, Power Company, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O. [Elsam - Fynsvaerket, Fredericia (Denmark)

    2001-02-01

    In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plats. Straw is considered a carbon dioxide neutral fuel and is therefore environmentally acceptable. Masnedoe CHP Plant is a straw-fired power plant on Sjaelland, Denmark. Corrosion tests were undertaken at Masnedoe CHP Plant by building a test superheater loop and subject it to higher steam temperatures than those of the actual plant. In addition a test section welded into superheater was investigated. The conclusions from the project are as follows: 1. The corrosion rates of the steels investigated are very close to one another and differences are small. 2. For the lower steam of 450 deg. C, a parabolic kinetic of oxide growth is not seen but more a paralinear corrosion rate for TP347H and a linear corrosion rate for the 12% Cr steel. 3. At temperatures above approx. 520 deg. C metal temperature for the austenitic steels, grain boundary attack is seen as a precursor for corrosion within the metal grains. For HCM12, attack of individual metal grains is also seen. The corrosion attack leads to depletion of chromium and manganese from the surface of the alloy. It is at these temperatures general corrosion changes to grain boundary corrosion attack. 4. Over one of the test superheater loops, varying corrosion rates could be measured that could not be explained by the change in steam temperature. This was related to the flue gas direction giving a higher surface metal temperature, however, there may be other factors giving localised high heat flux and therefore a higher metal temperature. The corrosion rate was lower this year (1999-2000) than the previous year and this is attributed to the lower flue gas temperatures or other factors such as a change in fuel or combustion characteristics. It must be noted that where the flue gas temperature is assumed to be highest similar corrosion rates are observed for both 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. There is much evidence to indicate that after

  9. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex-Plant part II: Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knief, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper very briefly describes criticality investigations for nuclear weapon dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. The investigations performed were for pit staging, and build on previous criticality calculations for single pits. The KENO and MCNP computer models were used for pit and container combinations. Scenarios were based on administrative limits and actual or potential physical conditions in the facilities. Essentially all of the pit configurations modeled were subcritical by a substantial amount. It was concluded that a critical configuration involving pit/container combinations is not credible

  10. Development of advanced concept for shortening construction period of ABWR plant (part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Satoh, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    The construction of the first building fully applying SC structure, which is indispensable for shortening construction period of ABWR plants (21.5 months from the first concrete work to fuel loading), has been started since August 2002 in Japan. Before the construction start, a pre-construction test with some actual size SC panels was carried out to confirm the SC modular construction method. The outline of the design and the construction of the first full-SC building and the results of the pre-construction test are reported. (author)

  11. Geoecological characteristics of plant endemism in the Balkan part of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović Bojan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to complex and heterogeneous geographical characteristics, Serbia is represented by a diverse flora with many endemic taxa of vascular plants. Investigation of plant endemics stored in the national herbaria and perusal of extensive literature sources indicate that 46 taxa occur exclusively within the political borders of the Republic of Serbia, while 104 taxa can also be found in adjacent countries of the Balkan Peninsula. These national and subendemics are presented in the form of a list together with their ecological and geographical characteristics. Centres of endemism are located in the southern and eastern regions of Serbia and on the territory of Kosovo and Metohija. The majority of taxa are associated with mountainous regions of Kosovo, Metohija, and Central Serbia, at medium elevations between 500 and 1500 m. Most of the national endemics occur on limestones and dolomites and on soils such as cambisols, lithosols, and rankers. They are mainly under the influence of a modified mountain and moderately continental climate.

  12. Full scale vibration test on nuclear power plant auxiliary building: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, V.; Tinic, S.; Berger, E.; Zwicky, P.; Prater, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    In connection with the construction of the reinforced concrete auxiliary building housing the two boric water tanks (so-called BOTA building) of the Beznau Nuclear Power Plant in Switzerland the opportunity was given to carry out full scale vibration tests in November 1985. The overall aim of the tests was to validate computational models and parameters widely used in the seismic analysis of the structures and critical components of nuclear power plants. The scope of the experimental investigation was the determination of the eigenfrequencies and damping values for the fundamental soil-structure interaction (SSI) modes. The excitation level was aimed to be as high as feasibly possible. A working group was formed of representatives of the owner, NOK, the consulting firm Basler and Hofmann and the ETH to supervise the project. The project's main phases were the planning and execution of the tests, the evaluation of recorded data, numerical simulation of the tests using different computer models and finally the comparison and interpretation of measured and computed results

  13. The importance of nitrogen and carbohydrate storage for plant growth of the alpine herb Veratrum album

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleijn, David; Treier, Urs; Müller-Schärer, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether nitrogen (N) and carbohydrates reserves allow Veratrum album, an alpine forb, to start spring growth earlier than the neighbouring vegetation and to survive unpredictable disturbances resulting in loss of above-ground biomass.Seasonal dynamics of plant reserves, soil N...

  14. Heavy metals accumulation in parts of paddy Oryza sativa L. grown in paddy field adjacent to ultrabasic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadif, Waqeed Mahdi; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Sahid, Ismail; Bhuiyan, Atiqur Rahman; Ibrahim, Izyanti

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the accumulation and translocation of heavy metals from soil around the root zone to various parts of the paddy plant, namely the roots, stems, leaves and rice grains. This study was conducted in 2014 in paddy field adjacent to ultrabasic soil (field 1 and 2) located in Ranau, Sabah and one field (Field 3) taken as control located at the UKM experimental plot in peninsular of Malaysia. The plant species used in the present investigation is Paddy Batu. The heavy metals studied were Chromium (Cr), Iron (Fe) and Nickel (Ni). Heavy metals in soil and plant were extracted by wet digestion method. Heavy metals present in paddy plants and soils extract were measured using the ICP-MS. Heavy metals concentrations in the plant parts in descending order is the root > leaves > stem > rice grain. Lower concentration of all heavy metals in soils and plant parts was shown by the control site (Field 3) in UKM Bangi. Higher concentration of heavy metals occurred in the roots compared to other above ground parts (stem, leaves, and grains) of the paddy plant in all of the paddy field. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of heavy metals in all locations were recorded in descending order as Ni > Cr > Fe, the BAF values for all metals in the rice grains were low, whereas the BAF values were recorded high for Ni in all locations. The results also showed that Fe was the most predominant metal ion in the roots, followed by Ni then Cr.

  15. Export Control Guide: Loose Parts Monitoring Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenberg, Donald W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report describes a typical LPMS, emphasizing its application to the RCS of a modern NPP. The report also examines the versatility of AE monitoring technology by describing several nuclear applications other than loose parts monitoring, as well as some non-nuclear applications. In addition, LPMS implementation requirements are outlined, and LPMS suppliers are identified. Finally, U.S. export controls applicable to LPMSs are discussed.

  16. Above- and Belowground Trophic Interactions on Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense) in High- and Low-Diversity Plant Communities: Potential for Biotic Resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Graça, O.; Rousseau, P.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of local communities to control introduced plants is called biotic resistance. Biotic resistance has been almost exclusively tested for plant competition and above-ground herbivores and pathogens, while neglecting root herbivores and soil pathogens. Here, we present biotic resistance by

  17. Terpenoids in plant and arbuscular mycorrhiza-reinforced defence against herbivorous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Esha; Anand, Garima; Kapoor, Rupam

    2017-03-01

    Plants, though sessile, employ various strategies to defend themselves against herbivorous insects and convey signals of an impending herbivore attack to other plant(s). Strategies include the production of volatiles that include terpenoids and the formation of symbiotic associations with fungi, such as arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM). This constitutes a two-pronged above-ground/below-ground attack-defence strategy against insect herbivores. Terpenoids represent an important constituent of herbivore-induced plant volatiles that deter herbivores and/or attract their predators. Terpenoids serve as airborne signals that can induce defence responses in systemic undamaged parts of the plant and also prime defence responses in neighbouring plants. Colonization of roots by AM fungi is known to influence secondary metabolism in plants; this includes alteration of the concentration and composition of terpenoids, which can boost both direct and indirect plant defence against herbivorous insects. Enhanced nutrient uptake facilitated by AM, changes in plant morphology and physiology and increased transcription levels of certain genes involved in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway result in alterations in plant terpenoid profiles. The common mycorrhizal networks of external hyphae have added a dimension to the two-pronged plant defence strategy. These act as conduits to transfer defence signals and terpenoids. Improved understanding of the roles of terpenoids in plant and AM defences against herbivory and of interplant signalling in natural communities has significant implications for sustainable management of pests in agricultural ecosystems. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Development of Intelligent Database Program for PSI/ISI Data Management of Nuclear Power Plant (Part II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Un Su; Park, Ik Keun; Um, Byong Guk; Lee, Jong Po; Han, Chi Hyun

    2000-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have discussed the intelligent Windows 95-based data management program(IDPIN) which was developed for effective and efficient management of large amounts of pre-/in-service inspection(PSI/ISI) data of Kori nuclear power plants. The IDPIN program enables the prompt extraction of previously conducted PSI/ISI conditions and results so that the time-consuming data management, painstaking data processing and analysis of the past are avoided. In this study, the intelligent Windows based data management program(WS-IDPIN) has been developed as an effective data management of PSI/ISI data for the Wolsong nuclear power plants. The WS-IDPIN program includes the modules of comprehensive management and analysis of PSI/ISI results, statistical reliability assessment program of PSI/ISI results(depth and length sizing performance etc), standardization of UT report form and computerization of UT results. In addition, the program can be further developed as a unique PSI/ISI data management expert system which can be part of the PSI/ISI total support system for Korean nuclear power plants

  19. Identification of Flavonoids (Quercetin, Gallic acid and Rutin from Catharanthus roseus Plant Parts using Deep Eutectic Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Nisar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Green technology is the most important topic in the pharmaceutical field because it reduces the cost of medicines and minimizes the environmental impact of the field and is better for human health and safety. Green chemistry emphasizes that the solvent should be nontoxic, safe, cheap, green, readily available, recyclable, and biodegradable. Deep eutectic solvents, a new type of green solvent, have some renowned properties—for instance, high thermal stability, low vapor pressure, low cost, biodegradability, and high viscosity. In this study, deep eutectic solvents made up of choline chloride-glycerol (1:2 were used for the extraction and isolation of flavonoid (rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin from Catharanthus roseus plant parts, flower petal, leaves, stem, and root. The amounts of rutin and quercetin in flower petal are 29.46 and 6.51%, respectively, whereas, rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin amounts in leaves are 25.16, 8.57, and 10.47%, respectively. In stem the amounts of rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin are 13.02, 5.89, and 7.47%, respectively. In root, only quercetin has been obtained that is 13.49%. The HPLC is an analytical method, which was found to be an excellent technique for determination of rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin using deep eutectic solvent extraction from plant parts of Catharanthus roseus.

  20. How tests of lubricating and transformer oils became part of power plant chemistry in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H. [I/S Nordjyllandsvaerket, Vodskov (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    Lubricating, hydraulic and transformer oils based on refined crude oil are used in nearly all power station components, such as gear, turbines, hydraulic stations, feed pumps and transformers. The function of these components totally depends on the condition of the oils and their properties. Seen from this point one may wonder why examination and evaluation of oils did not become part of the power station chemistry within the ELSAM utility area until during the middle of the eighties. We started to examine the properties of lubricating oils at the time when several steam turbines experienced serious problems with formation of deposits in their hydraulic control circuits. This work was intensified in connection with the significant number of CHPs and wind turbines erected within the Danish electricity sector during the past 10 years or so. The majority of the CHPs are natural gas fired turbines or motors, equipment which severely stresses the lubricating oil. In collaboration with KEMA, the Netherlands, we have carried through with a large examination of lubricating oils in gas turbines and we have found suitable oil types. The objectives of our work with lubricating and transformer oils have been to link together the laboratory measurements with operational experience. Only by doing this is it possible to utilize the laboratory measurements in a correct way. It must be remembered that the main part of all oil specifications concerns the properties of new oils. Only very little is published about the requirements concerning used oils. (EG)

  1. Energetic and Exergetic Analysis of Combined Cycle Power Plant: Part-1 Operation and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Almutairi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Energetic and exergetic analyses are conducted using operating data for Sabiya, a combined cycle power plant (CCPP with an advanced triple pressure reheat heat recovery steam generator (HRSG. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis is carried out on the HRSG using a recent approach to differentiate between the sources of irreversibility. The proposed system was modelled using the IPSEpro software and further validated by the manufacturer’s data. The performance of the Sabiya CCPP was examined for different climatic conditions, pressure ratios, pinch point temperatures, high-pressure steam, and condenser pressure values. The results confirmed that 60.9% of the total exergy destruction occurs in the combustion chamber, which constitutes the main source of irreversibilities within a system. The exergy destruction was significantly affected by both the pressure ratio and the high-pressure steam, where the relation between them was seen to be inversely proportional. The high-pressure stage contributes about 50% of the exergy destruction within the HRSG compared to other stages and the reheat system, due to the high temperature difference between the streams and the large number of components, which leads to high energy loss to the surroundings. Numerous possibilities for improving the CCPP’s performance are introduced, based on the obtained results.

  2. Present status and future of maintenance robots of nuclear power plants. Part 2. Toshiba Corporation's activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Katsuhiko; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Underwater remotely operated vehicle for inspection, repair and preventive maintenance in a narrow space had been developed with advanced robot technologies. Maintenance robot for core internals worked under high radiation environment and size limit of applied parts and passage space. Visual inspection (VT) and ultrasonic testing (UT) of welds using core shroud vehicle had been realized. Swimming type vehicle for VT and crawler type vehicle for cleaning was also prepared. Position measuring system for VT with image processing based on position information of movable joint axis and micro replica equipment to obtain microstructure image of structure surface could be combined. Underwater remotely operated maintenance and repair system was applied to improve surface stresses around welds to compression with laser peening technology and also to remove cracks with electric discharge machining for prevention of crack propagation. (T. Tanaka)

  3. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Dakshina R.; Martin, Cliff G.

    2016-01-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether fruit length and infestation state affect fruit numbers, weights, and proportions of fruit that are infested. Counts of A. eugenii adults and marks from oviposition and feeding suggested that C. chinense Jacquin “Habanero” was least susceptible, and C. annuum L. cultivars “SY” and “SR” were most susceptible. Comparison of plant parts and fruit sizes revealed that A. eugenii preferred the peduncle, calyx, and top of pepper fruits over the middle, bottom, leaves, or remainder of flowers. Anthonomus eugenii does not discriminate between green or yellow fruit color nor vary diurnally in numbers. Based on adult counts, medium to extra-large fruits (≥1.5 cm long) attracted more weevils than small fruits (fruit numbers or fruit weights that were infested, there were no differences between large and small fruits. Choice of pepper cultivar can thus be an important part of an IPM cultural control program designed to combat A. eugenii by reduced susceptibility or by synchronous fruit drop of infested fruits. Our results are potentially helpful in developing scouting programs including paying particular attention to the preferred locations of adults and their sites of feeding and oviposition on the fruit. The results also suggested the potential value of spraying when the fruits are still immature to prevent and control infestation. PMID:26959066

  4. Literature study regarding fire protection in nuclear power plants. Part I: Fire rated separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, S.

    1995-06-01

    This literature study has been made on behalf of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. The aim is to describe different aspects of fire protection in nuclear power plants. Conventional building codes can not give guidance on where to make fire rated separations in order to separate redundant trains of safety systems. The separation must originate in functional demands from the authorities on what functions are essential during and after a fire, and under what circumstances these functions shall be retained, i.e. the number of independent faults and initiating events. As a basic demand it is suggested to rate the strength of separations according to conventional building code, based on fire load. The whole separating construction shall have the same fire rating, including the ventilation system. Deviations from the basic demand can de done in case it can be proven that it is possible to compensate some or all of the fire rating with other measures. There is a general lack of statistical information regarding the reliability of fire separating constructions such as walls, fire doors, penetration seals and fire dampers. The amount of cables penetrating a seal is in many cases much higher in real installations than what has been tested for type approval. It would therefore be valuable to perform a furnace test with a more representative amount of cables passing through a penetration seal. Tests have shown that the 20 foot horizontal separation distance stipulated by NRC is not a guarantee against fire damage. Spatial separations based on general requirements shall not be allowed, but considered from case to case based on actual circumstances. For fire protection by isolation or coatings, it is of great importance to choose the method of protection carefully, to be compatible with the material it shall be applied on, and the environment and types of fire that may occur. 48 refs, 2 figs, 5 tabs

  5. Determination of element distributions between symplasm and apoplasm of cucumber plant parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, A.; Zaray, G.; Fodor, F.

    2000-01-01

    Total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) is a suitable method for determination of trace elements in biological samples due to its low detection limits, small sample demand, simple quantification and the absence of memory effects. In the present work the concentration of Pb, Cd, Ni, Mn and Fe was determined inside the cells (symplasm) and in the space among the cells (apoplasm) of cucumber plants. The cucumber seeds were grown in different nutrient solutions containing iron as Fe(III)-EDTA or Fe(III)-citrate, as well as Pb, Cd or Ni as contaminants in concentration of 10 -5 M. After growing period and the appropriate pretreatment (infiltration, leaching, washing and drying) the roots and the leaves were prepared for the analysis using a microwave assisted digestion system. The solutions obtained were spiked with Ni (in the case of the experiments with Pb) or Ga as internal standard. It was established that in the root the relative amount of lead in the symplasm related to the total absorbed amount (symplasm + apoplasm) is 2.5 % in presence of EDTA and 24% in presence of citrate. Studying its transport to the shoots, the amount of lead shows a decreasing tendency towards the young leaves and the symplasm/apoplasm ratio also changes: the ratio increased up to 66 % and 50 % in case of EDTA and citrate, respectively. Investigating of iron content similar phenomenon could be observed, however the presence of lead and complex forming agents did not result in any significant changes of the manganese distribution between symplasm and apoplasm. The results of experiments with Ni and Cd contaminants will be presented and discussed in the lecture. (author)

  6. Safety assessment in plant layout design using indexing approach: implementing inherent safety perspective. Part 1 - guideword applicability and method description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, Alessandro; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2008-12-15

    Layout planning plays a key role in the inherent safety performance of process plants since this design feature controls the possibility of accidental chain-events and the magnitude of possible consequences. A lack of suitable methods to promote the effective implementation of inherent safety in layout design calls for the development of new techniques and methods. In the present paper, a safety assessment approach suitable for layout design in the critical early phase is proposed. The concept of inherent safety is implemented within this safety assessment; the approach is based on an integrated assessment of inherent safety guideword applicability within the constraints typically present in layout design. Application of these guidewords is evaluated along with unit hazards and control devices to quantitatively map the safety performance of different layout options. Moreover, the economic aspects related to safety and inherent safety are evaluated by the method. Specific sub-indices are developed within the integrated safety assessment system to analyze and quantify the hazard related to domino effects. The proposed approach is quick in application, auditable and shares a common framework applicable in other phases of the design lifecycle (e.g. process design). The present work is divided in two parts: Part 1 (current paper) presents the application of inherent safety guidelines in layout design and the index method for safety assessment; Part 2 (accompanying paper) describes the domino hazard sub-index and demonstrates the proposed approach with a case study, thus evidencing the introduction of inherent safety features in layout design.

  7. Antiproliferative constituents in plants 9. Aerial parts of Lippia dulcis and Lippia canescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Fumiko; Nagao, Tsuneatsu; Okabe, Hikaru

    2002-07-01

    The antiproliferative constituents in the MeOH extracts of the aerial parts of Lippia dulcis Trev. and Lippia canescens Kunth (Verbenaceae) were investigated. Activity-guided chemical investigation of the MeOH extracts resulted in the isolation of the three bisabolane-type sesquiterpenes [(+)-hernandulcin (1), (-)-epihernandulcin (2), and (+)-anymol (3)] and four phenylethanoid glycosides [acteoside (4), isoacteoside (5), martynoside (6), and a new diacetylmartynoside (7)] from the former, and four phenylethanoid glycosides [acteoside (4), isoacteoside (5), arenarioside (8), and leucosceptoside A (9)] and three flavones [desmethoxycentaureidin (10), eupafolin (11), and 6-hydroxyluteolin (12)] from the latter. Antiproliferative activity of the isolated compounds against murine melanoma (B16F10), human gastric adenocarcinoma (MK-1), and human uterine carcinoma (HeLa) cells was estimated. (+)-Anymol (3), acteoside (4), isoacteoside (5), arenarioside (8), eupafolin (11), and 6-hydroxyluteolin (12) had GI50 values of 10-16 microM against B16F10 cell. Desmethoxycentaureidin (10) and eupafolin (11) showed high inhibitory activity against HeLa cell growth (GI50 9 microM, and 6 microM, respectively).

  8. Ecological studies in a Scanian woodland and meadow area, southern Sweden. Ti. Plant biomass, primary production and turnover of organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, F.

    1970-01-01

    As a part of an IBP project the productivity of the south Swedish deciduous woodland ecosystems and their secondary successional stages a comparison between the distribution of organic matter in a mixed deciduous woodland dominated by Quercus robur, Tilia cordata, Corylus avellana and Anemone nemorosa and a tall herb meadow with Filipendula ulmaria within the nemoral zone in the southernmost part of Sweden has been made. Estimations of the plant biomass and production in the woodland was made by a dimension analysis applying allometric equations. A total plant biomass of 240 t/ha was found with 201 t/ha and 39 t/ha as above-and below-ground figures respectively. The corresponding figures of the net primary production are 15.6, 13.3 and 2.3 t/ha. A production of 0.77 t/ha is included for the above-ground production of the field layer. The litter fall, fractions less than 50 cm long, during a three year period amounted to 5.28 t/ha with considerable variation between years. Including coarser litter fractions an yearly input to the ground of 6.5 t/ha was found. After estimation of the remaining litter before the leaf fall, 6.1 t/ha, the yearly turnover of the litter layer is calculated to 52%. As the humus fraction amounts to 218 t/ha, the total content of organic matter in the woodland ecosystem thus is 463 t/ha with an almost equal distribution between above-and below-ground portions. In the meadow the distribution of above-and below-ground portions of the organic matter is 1/49, calculated from the following figures: Above-ground biomass 4.7 t/ha, below-ground biomass 13.2 t/ha, surface litter 2.4 t/ha and humus 304 t/ha making the total organic matter of the meadow ecosystem 324 t/ha. The yearly above-ground production is estimated to be 7.2 t/ha and taking this as the yearly litter input to the ground and taking the remaining litter into account a turnover of the litter layer 75% is calculated.

  9. Transfer pathways of {sup 54}Mn, {sup 57}Co, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 103}Ru and {sup 134}Cs in rice and radish plants directly contaminated at different growth stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Y.H. E-mail: yhchoi1@kaeri.re.kr; Lim, K.M.; Yu, D.; Park, H.G.; Choi, Y.G.; Lee, C.M

    2002-03-01

    In order to study radionuclide transfer pathways related to direct contamination of plants, the above-ground parts of rice and radish plants were sprayed with a solution containing {sup 54}Mn, {sup 57}Co, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 103}Ru and {sup 134}Cs in a greenhouse at 5 or 6 different times. Showing little difference among radionuclides, the interception factor increased as plants grew to maturity. Its highest observed value was 0.94 in rice and 0.83 in radish. Weathering losses of the intercepted activity by harvest were 32-89% in rice and 32-85% in radish depending on application time and radionuclide. Half lives for weathering loss were estimated to be longer on the whole for earlier applications. The translocation factor varied with application time by factors of 6-110 for hulled rice seeds and 2-23 for radish roots depending on the radionuclide. It varied with radionuclides by factors of 6-800 depending on application time and plant species. It was highest in the plants sprayed during active seed growth for rice and during early plant growth for radish. In general, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 57}Co had the highest translocation factors followed by {sup 54}Mn, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 103}Ru. Based on the experimental results, radionuclide concentrations in the edible parts of mature plants were predicted for unit deposition.

  10. A tsunami wave propagation analysis for the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant considering the tsunami sources of western part of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Hyun Me; Kim, Min Kyu; Sheen, Dong Hoon; Choi, In Kil

    2013-01-01

    The accident which was caused by a tsunami and the Great East-Japan earthquake in 2011 occurred at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) site. It is obvious that the NPP accident could be incurred by the tsunami. Therefore a Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) for an NPP site should be required in Korea. The PTHA methodology is developed on the PSHA (Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis) method which is performed by using various tsunami sources and their weights. In this study, the fault sources of northwestern part of Japan were used to analyze as the tsunami sources. These fault sources were suggested by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). To perform the PTHA, the calculations of maximum and minimum wave elevations from the result of tsunami simulations are required. Thus, in this study, tsunami wave propagation analysis were performed for developing the future study of the PTHA

  11. Uptake and translocation of [14C]-monoethanolamine in barley plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, H.; Bergmann, H.; Reissmann, P.

    1988-01-01

    Uptake and translocation of 14 C-monoethanolamine (EA) and its hydrochloride were investigated after application to an unwounded part of the fifth leaf from the main shoot of intact spring barley plants. After 48 and 72 h, resp., the free EA base was both absorbed rapidly and translocated out of the feeding leaf. The absorbed 14 C preferably migrated to the tillers, which resulted in an approximately uniform distribution of the radioactivity in the above ground parts of the plant after the uptake phase (similar 14 C concentrations in the main shoot and tillers), whereas only few radioactivity moved to the roots. On the other hand, the protonated EA (EA-HCl) exhibited both a reduced uptake and a restricted mobility. The bulk of radioactivity remained in the main shoot. As a consequence of the principally analogous metabolism of EA and its protonated form, the translocation differences are compensated during ontogenesis. When the plants reached maturity, similar distribution patterns could be found in which the kernels represented a considerable sink. (author)

  12. Selenium distribution and speciation in plant parts of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) from a seleniferous area of Punjab, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiche, E; Bardelli, F; Nothstein, A K; Charlet, L; Göttlicher, J; Steininger, R; Dhillon, K S; Sadana, U S

    2015-02-01

    The concentration, distribution, and speciation of selenium in different parts of wheat and Indian mustard, grown in a seleniferous area in Punjab, were investigated using synchrotron based (XAS) and classical acid digestion and extraction methods. The analyses revealed a high Se enrichment in all investigated plant parts, with Se levels in the range of 133-931 mg/kg (dry weight, dw). Such high Se enrichment is mainly due to the considerable amounts of easily available Se detected in the soil, which are renewed on a yearly basis to some extent via irrigation. Speciation analysis in soil and plants indicated selenate and organic Se as major Se species taken up by plants, with a minor presence of selenite. The analyses also revealed that the highest Se enrichment occurs in the upper plant parts, in agreement with the high uptake rate and mobility of selenate within plants. In both wheat and mustard, highest Se enrichments were found in leaves (387 mg/kg·dw in wheat and 931 mg/kg·dw in mustard). Organic species (dimethylselenide and methylselenocysteine) were found in different parts of both plants, indicating that an active detoxification response to the high Se uptake is taking place through methylation and/or volatilization. The high proportion of selenate in wheat and mustard leaves (47% and 70%, respectively) is the result of the inability of the plant metabolism to completely transform selenate to non-toxic organic forms, if oversupplied. Methylselenocysteine, a common Se species in accumulating plants, was detected in wheat, suggesting that, in the presence of high Se concentration, this plant develops similar response mechanisms to accumulator plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An improved parameterization of the allocation of assimilated carbon to plant parts in vegetation dynamics for Noah-MP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Hyeon-Ju; Park, Seon Ki; Kang, Minseok; Thakuri, Bindu Malla; Kim, Joon; Ho, Chang-Hoi

    2017-08-01

    In the land surface models predicting vegetation growth and decay, representation of the seasonality of land surface energy and mass fluxes largely depends on how to describe the vegetation dynamics. In this study, we developed a new parameterization scheme to characterize allocation of the assimilated carbon to plant parts, including leaves and fine roots. The amount of carbon allocation in this scheme depends on the climatological net primary production (NPP) of the plants. The newly developed scheme is implemented in the augmented Noah land surface model with multiple parameterization options (Noah-MP) along with other biophysical processes related to variations in photosynthetic capacity. The scheme and the augmented biophysical processes are evaluated against tower measurements of vegetation from four forest sites in various regions—two for the deciduous broadleaf and two for the needleleaf evergreen forest. Results from the augmented Noah-MP showed good agreement with the observations and demonstrated improvements in representing the seasonality of leaf area index (LAI), gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER), and latent heat flux. In particular, significant improvements are found in simulating amplitudes and phase shift timing in the LAI seasonal cycle, and the amount of GPP and ER in the growing season. Furthermore, the augmented Noah-MP performed reasonably well in simulating the spatial distributions of LAI, GPP, and NPP in East Asia, consistent with the satellite observations.

  14. The stuble-field plant communities in South-East Poland. Part V. The comparative characteristics of stuble-fleld plant communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czesława Trąba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this of the presented paper results of the studies conducted in preceding four parts (I-IV were synthetically assumed. On that background a comparative characteristics of specified stuble-field plant communities was conducted. It contains the most important features of communities and seats, in which they appear. In climatically, geomorphologically, hydrologically and with respect to soils differentiated conditions of South-East Poland, especially in former Rzeszów region, there were described stubble-field plant communities occurring as well on lowland, as on highland agricultural utility complexes. There were analysed 359 phytosociological records, in which 232 ones came from lowland, while 127 from highland complexes. The specified communities were included to two orders: Secali-Violetalia arvensis (suborder Polygono-Chenopodienalia : alliances Eu-Polygono-Chenopodion and Panico-Setarion and Cyperetalia fusci (alliance Nanocyperion flavescentis. On the lowland agricultural utility complexes specified were seven types of communities: 3 belonged to Panico-Setarion alliance (association Digitarietum ischaemi; community with Setaria glauca and association Echinochloo-Setarietum, 2 to Eu-Polygono-Chenopodion alliance (the community with Euphorbia esula and Oxalis stricta as well the community with Veronica persica, while 2 associations from the Nanocyperion flavescentis (Hyperico-Spergularietum and Centunculo-Anthocerotetum alliance. On the other hand, on the highland complexes of South-East Poland only 3 communities were found: 1 with Setaria glauca included to Panico-Setarion alliance, 2 with Veronica persica from Eu-Polygono-Chenopodion alliance and 3 Centunculo-Anthocerotetum association from Nanocyperion flavescentis alliance. The specified floral types, as well as lower units (variants and sub variants, reflected the mechanical structure, hydrological conditions and pH soils in their seats, what confrumed a great differentiation of soil

  15. Occupational exposure to heavy metals in a metal-mechanical auto part manufacturing plant in Puebla, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F Romero-Zarazua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The concentration of Cd, Cr, Al and Pb present in inhalable air and deposited dust in a metal-mechanical parts manufacturing plant in Puebla, México were determined in order to assess the occupational exposure of workers in this plant. Materials and Methods: Fourteen air samples, six from the metal welding (MW and eight from the metal forming (MF areas, as well as metal dust accumulated on the floor of an auto part manufacturing plant, were collected. Sampling and analysis followed the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH recommended methods for metals in inhalable air. Results: The average concentration of Al and Cd determined in a volume of inhalable air were adequate under NIOSH maximal exposure concentration limits in both sampled sites. Average concentrations of 0.001 (MF sampling site and 0.105 μg/L (MW sampling site for Al; 0.003 (MF and 0.0005 (MW μg/L for Cd, with respect to the NIOHS limits, 10 and 0.005 μg/L, for Al and Cd, respectively. However, Cr and Pb concentrations exceeded or were close to the limits recommended by NIOHS in both places (0.5 and 0.05 μg/L for Cr and Pb, respectively. Average concentrations of 0.345 (MF and 0.77 (MW μg/L for Cr and 0.153 (MF and 0.649 (MW μg/L for Pb, were determined. Levels of metal content (Cd, Cr and Pb in powder samples collected in both sampling sites were also higher than the suggested limits. Conclusion: The average concentration of Cr and Pb exceeded the limits recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and NIOSH for inhalable air in the workplace. Workers may be on risk of heavy metal occupational exposure. It is endorsed to implement safety measurements to avoid the breathing of contaminated air and also industrial level systems for dust and aerosol particle filtering or precipitation, altogether with stricter policies to regulate heavy metal exposure at these industries.

  16. Phyto-radiological studies of trifolium alexandrinum L. part-IV: effects of gamma radiations on growth; investigated after periodic cutting of various parts of the plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The gamma irradiated seeds of Trifolium alexandrinum after growing in the botanical garden soil were subjected to the periodic cuttings, over a period of six months. The 10 kR, 20 kR and 30 kR irradiated plants showed stimulation in plant height, number of nodes, number of tillers, girth of the stems and plant dry matter in terms of leaf and stem dry weights, during the early cutting periods; when compared with the non-irradiated and other dose treated plants. Most of the stimulating effects, however disappeared during the latter cutting periods. 30 kR radiation dose seemed to be the most significant, which have great influence on stimulating the height of the plants, number of nodes and tillers, girth of the stems and on leaf and stem dry matters; when compared with the other doses and with the non-irradiated controlled plants. This trend was observed in the plants, subjected to periodic cuttings and also in uncut plants. The possible mechanism of their effects on over all yield of this species have been discussed. (author)

  17. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.S. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Abrahmson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilbert, E.S. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

  18. Long-term performance of structures comprising nuclear power plants PART 1: Deterioration assessment of nuclear power station buildings PART 2: Long-term stability and the leak-tightness of reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, D.C.; Worthington, J.C.; Oberpichler, R.; Van Exel, H.; Beukelmann, D.; Huth, R.; Rose, B.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the long-term performance of structures comprising nuclear power plants. The time period of interest for this study is 140 years (this figure is based on maximum periods of 40 years for operation and 100 years of storage). It was divided in two parts: - the first based on four UK nuclear power plants examine the principle deterioration mechanism of reinforced structure which is chloride ingress and carbonation penetration - the second based on 2 German nuclear power plants examine the long term behaviour of reinforced and prestressed concrete and also the corrosion of steel containments with particular reference on plastic seals and potential risk areas

  19. Rooting depth and distributions of deep-rooted plants in the 200 Area control zone of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepper, E.L.; Gano, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study was conducted to document rooting depths and distributions of deep-rooted plants common to the Hanford Site 200-Area plateau. The effort concentrated on excavating plant species suspected of having deep root systems, and species that have been reported in previous studies to contain radionuclides in above ground parts. The information obtained in this study will be useful in modeling radionuclide transport by plants and in designing covers and barriers for decommissioning low-level radioactive waste burial sites. Fourteen species including 58 individual plants were excavated to measure maximum rooting depth and root density distribution (g dry root/dm/sup 3/) through the root zone. Age and canopy volumes of shrubs were also determined. Eight of the 14 species excavated had average rooting depths of 150 cm or more. The two deepest rooted plants were antelope bitterbrush and sagebrush with average depths of 296 and 200 cm, respectively. Gray rabbitbrush had an average rooting depth of 183 cm. Summer annuals, Russian thistle and bursage, had average rooting depths of 172 and 162 cm, respectively. 7 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Draft forecast of the final report for the comparison to 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.; Gomez, L.S.; Rechard, R.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The United States Department of Energy is planning to dispose of transuranic wastes, which have been generated by defense programs, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The WIPP Project will assess compliance with the requirements of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. This report forecasts the planned 1992 document, Comparison to 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart B, for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). 130 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Transport of plutonium, americium, and curium from soils into plants by roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpl, M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1979-12-01

    For assessing the dose from radionuclides in agricultural products by ingestion it is necessary to know the soil to plant transfer factors. The literature was entirely investigated, in order to judge the size of the soil to plant transfer factors. In total, 92 publications - from 1948 to 1978 -have been evaluated. As result, transfer factors from 10 -9 to 10 -3 have been found for Plutonium, and from 10 -6 to 1 for Americium. For Curium only few data are available in literature. The considerable variation of the measured transfer factors is based on the dependence of these transfer factors from the ion exchange capacity of soils, from the amount of organic materials, from the pH-value, and from the mode of contamination. There are, in any case, contradictory data, although there has been detected a dependence of the transfer factors from these parameters. Chelating agenst increase the transfer factors to approximately 1300. As well, fertilizers have an influence on the size of the transfer factors - however, the relationships have been scarcely investigated. The distribution of actinides within the individual parts of plants has been investigated. The highest concentrations are in the roots; in the plant parts above ground the concentration of actinides decreases considerably. The most inferior transfer factors were measured for the respective seed or fruits. The soil to plant transfer factors of actinides are more dependend on the age of the plants within one growing period. At the beginning of the period, the transfer factor is considerably higher than at the end of this period. With respect to plants with a growing period of several years, correlations are unknown. (orig.) [de

  2. Fire protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This translation of an IAEA publication (Safety Series No. 50-SD-D2, Rev.1) is a safety guide for fire protection of above-ground nuclear power plants equipped with reactors working with thermal neutrons. It is aimed at designers and surveillance bodies as an aid for setting up the fire protection concept in the design of the nuclear power plant and in its operation. The publication defines generic requirements and aims of fire protection, prevention and extinguishing, gives hints for reducing the secondary impacts of fires, and lays down requirements for quality assurance and basic principles of fire protection. (M.D.). 9 figs., 1 tab

  3. The application of the finite element method for the low-cycle fatigue calculation of the elementsof the pipelines’ fixed support construction for the areas of above-ground routing of the oil pipeline «Zapolyarye — NPS „Pur-Pe“»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surikov Vitaliy Ivanovich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article studies the order of performing low-cycle fatigue strength calculation of the elements of the full-scale specimen construction of the fixed support DN 1000 of the above-ground oil pipeline “Zapolyarye — Purpe” during rig-testing. The calculation is performed with the aim of optimizing the quantity of testing and, accordingly, cost cutting for expensive experiments. The order of performing the calculation consists of two stages. At the first stage the calculation is performed by the finite element method of the full-scale specimen construction’s stressed-deformed state in the calculation complex ANSYS. Thearticle describes the main creation stages of the finite element calculation model for the full-scale specimen in ANSYS. The calculation model is developed in accordance with a three-dimensional model of the full-scale specimen, adapted for rig-testing by cyclic loads. The article provides the description of the full-scale specimen construction of the support and loading modes in rig-testing. Cyclic loads are accepted as calculation ones, which influence the support for the 50 years of the oil pipeline operation and simulate the composite impact in the process of the loads’ operation connected to the changes in the pumping pressure, operational bending moment. They also simulate preloading in the case of sagging of the neighboring free support. For the determination of the unobservable for the diagnostic devices defects impact on the reliability of the fixed support and welding joints of the fixed support with the oil pipeline by analogy with the full-scale specimen, artificial defects were embedded in the calculation model. The defects were performed in the form of cuts of the definite form, located in a special way in the spool and welding joints. At the second stage of calculation for low-cycle fatigue strength, the evaluation of the cyclic strength of the full-scale specimen construction’s elements of the

  4. Anticancer Properties and Phenolic Contents of Sequentially Prepared Extracts from Different Parts of Selected Medicinal Plants Indigenous to Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiza Altine Adamu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Different parts of four edible medicinal plants (Casearia capitellata, Baccaurea motleyana, Phyllanthus pulcher and Strobilanthus crispus, indigenous to Malaysia, were extracted in different solvents, sequentially. The obtained 28 extracts were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer properties, using the MTS assay, on four human cancer cell lines: colon (HT-29, breast (MCF-7, prostate (DU-145 and lung (H460 cancers. The best anticancer activity was observed for the ethyl acetate (EA extract of Casearia capitellata leaves on MCF-7 cell lines with IC50 2.0 μg/mL and its methanolic (MeOH extract showed an outstanding activity against lung cancer cell lines. Dichloromethane (DCM extract of Phyllanthus pulcher aerial parts showed the highest anticancer activity against DU-145 cell lines, while significant activity was exhibited by DCM extract of Phyllanthus pulcher roots on colon cancer cell lines with IC50 value of 8.1 μg/mL. Total phenolic content (TPC ranged over 1–40 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE/g. For all the samples, highest yields of phenolics were obtained for MeOH extracts. Among all the extracts analyzed, the MeOH extracts of Strobilanthus crispus leaves exhibited the highest TPC than other samples (p < 0.05. This study shows that the nature of phenol determines its anticaner activity and not the number of phenols present.

  5. Fiscal 1995 achievement report. Development of entrained bed coal gasification power plant (Part 5 - Surveys and studies of demonstration plant); 1995 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 5. Jissho plant ni kansuru chosa kenkyu hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Surveys and studies were conducted concerning a demonstration plant for establishing the technology of integrated coal gasification combined cycle, and the fiscal 1995 results are compiled. In this fiscal year, a demonstration plant conceptual design was prepared for assuring smooth transition from a pilot plant to a commercial plant. The design followed the system employed at the Nakoso pilot plant for its gasification power generation. It was decided that the gasification furnace be of the air-blown (oxygen enriched) 2-stage entrained bed type, that the desulfurization system be of the dry type 2-stage fluidized bed type, the dedusting system be of the dry type granular bed type (moving bed type), that the combined cycle power facility be derived from the commercialized gas turbine, and that the cycle of the steam system agree with the integrated coal gasification combined cycle system now under discussion. Studies were made, which covered heat efficiency (generating end/sending end), heat/matter balance, process flow, gas turbine/steam system optimization, comparison in performance with a pilot plant with its dimensions increased, estimation of the performance of each of the facilities, estimation of the construction cost, calculation of the generation cost, environmental friendliness, operating characteristics, acceptable coal types, and the like. (NEDO)

  6. Preliminary comparison with 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P.; Anderson, D.R.; Swift, P.N.; Baker, B.L.; Bean, J.E. Jr.; McCurley, R.D.; Rudeen, D.K.; Beyeler, W.; Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V.; Schreiber, J.D.; Helton, J.C.; Vaughn, P.

    1990-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is planned as the first mined geologic repository for transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by defense programs of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Before disposing of waste at the WIPP, the DOE must evaluate compliance with the United states Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Standard, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR Part 191, US EPA, 1985). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating long-term performance against criteria in Subpart B of the Standard. ''Performance assessment'' as used in this report includes analyses for the Containment Requirements (section 191.13(a)) and the Individual Protection Requirements (section 191.15). Because proving predictions about future human actions or natural events is not possible, the EPA expects compliance to be determined on the basis of specified quantitative analyses and informed, qualitative judgment. The goal of the WIPP performance-assessment team at SNL is to provide as detailed and thorough a basis as practical for the quantitative aspects of that decision. This report summarizes SNL's late-1990 understanding of the WIPP Project's ability to evaluate compliance with Subpart B. 245 refs., 88 figs., 23 tabs

  7. Preliminary comparison with 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P.; Anderson, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Swift, P.N. (Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Baker, B.L. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Bean, J.E. Jr.; McCurley, R.D.; Rudeen, D.K. (New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Beyeler, W.; Brinster, K.F.; Guzowski, R.V.; Sch

    1990-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is planned as the first mined geologic repository for transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by defense programs of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Before disposing of waste at the WIPP, the DOE must evaluate compliance with the United states Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Standard, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR Part 191, US EPA, 1985). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating long-term performance against criteria in Subpart B of the Standard. Performance assessment'' as used in this report includes analyses for the Containment Requirements ({section} 191.13(a)) and the Individual Protection Requirements ({section} 191.15). Because proving predictions about future human actions or natural events is not possible, the EPA expects compliance to be determined on the basis of specified quantitative analyses and informed, qualitative judgment. The goal of the WIPP performance-assessment team at SNL is to provide as detailed and thorough a basis as practical for the quantitative aspects of that decision. This report summarizes SNL's late-1990 understanding of the WIPP Project's ability to evaluate compliance with Subpart B. 245 refs., 88 figs., 23 tabs.

  8. Implementation of the resource disincentive in 40 CFR Part 191.14(e) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    In 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project Office (WPO) (DOE-WPO) prepared a strategy for complying with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Standards for the management of transuranic (TRU) waste. Section 3.2.2.2 of the DOE's report addressed compliance with the Assurance Requirements found in 40 CFR Part 191.14. One of the Assurance Requirements addresses the selection of repository sites that contain recoverable natural resources and is referred to as the Resource Disincentive Requirement: This document addresses 40 CFR 191, Subpart B, Section 14 (e). The approach is to first summarize the development of the resource requirement to provide a proper perspective for evaluation of WIPP compliance. In addition, a summary of the discussions regarding resources at the WIPP is provided to demonstrate the extent to which the topic has been discussed between the DOE and various oversight groups. Finally, the information on resources at the WIPP site is presented, along with a summary of activities to mitigate negative impacts associated with the denial of resources. 77 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Validation of plant part measurements using a 3D reconstruction method suitable for high-throughput seedling phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golbach, Franck; Kootstra, Gert; Damjanovic, Sanja; Otten, Gerwoud; Zedde, van de Rick

    2016-01-01

    In plant phenotyping, there is a demand for high-throughput, non-destructive systems that can accurately analyse various plant traits by measuring features such as plant volume, leaf area, and stem length. Existing vision-based systems either focus on speed using 2D imaging, which is consequently

  10. Intraspecific variability of Holostylis reniformis: concentration of lignans, as determined by maceration and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE-CO{sub 2}), as a function of plant provenance and plant parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Gislaine F.; Pereira, Marcos D.P.; Lopes, Lucia M.X., E-mail: lopesxl@iq.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Silva, Tito da [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Imperatriz, MA (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Sociais, Saude e Tecnologia; Rosa, Paulo de T. Vieira e; Barbosa, Fernanda P. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Messiano, Gisele B. [Instituto Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Krettli, Antoniana U. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Instituto Rene Rachou

    2014-04-15

    Maceration and supercritical fluid extraction were used to prepare extracts from parts of plants (Holostylis reniformis) collected in two different regions of Brazil. {sup 1}H NMR, HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, HPLC-DAD, GC-MS, and chemometric techniques were used to analyse lignans in the extracts and showed that yields of SFE-CO{sub 2} were less than or equal to those of hexane maceration extracts. These analyses, in conjunction with the concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids and their methyl and ethyl derivatives in the extracts, also allowed the chemical composition of parts and provenance of the plant to be differentiated. (author)

  11. Uprooting force balance for pioneer woody plants: A quantification of the relative contribution of above- and below-ground plant architecture to uprooting susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater-Reyes, S.; Wilcox, A. C.; Lightbody, A.; Skorko, K.; Stella, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Cottonwood (Populus), willow (Salix), and tamarisk (Tamarix) populate riparian areas in many dryland regions, and their recruitment depends heavily on hydrogeomorphic conditions. The survival of pioneer woody seedlings depends in part on the establishment of root systems capable of anchoring plants in subsequent floods, and this root system development in turn influences the cohesion that plants provide to bars. The factors influencing the anchoring ability and resistance to scour of woody seedlings include plant frontal area and flexibility, root structure, and water table elevation. This study aims to quantify the factors comprising the force balance to uproot woody seedlings and saplings in two field sites characterized by different hydrologic conditions. The Bill Williams River (AZ) is an impounded river with elevated water table elevations produced by dam-released base flows. The Bitterroot River (MT) is an unimpounded river with a snowmelt hydrograph and seasonal fluctuations in river and water table elevation. We simulate uprooting from flooding events by saturating substrates and applying force near the base of the plant in a lateral, downstream direction until uprooting occurs, for a range of plant sizes but with a focus on small (plants, with cottonwood and tamarisk seedlings showing greater variability than willow. In contrast, root length and stem diameter are only weakly correlated with pull-out force. By combining pull test results with measurements of geomorphic and groundwater conditions, this study provides insights into the relative contribution of a plant's above-ground and below-ground architecture to uprooting potential and into the feedbacks between vegetation and morphodynamics on river bars.

  12. QUALITATIVE COMPOSITION AND ORGANI C ACIDS CONTENT IN THE ABOVEGROUN D PART OF PLANTS FRO M FAMILIES LAMIACEAE, ASTERACEAE, APIACEAE AND CHENOPODIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Marchyshyn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Organic acids are the compounds of aliphatic or aromatic orders, which are widespread in flora and have a wide range of biological activity. We studied the qualitative composition and quantitative contents of organic acids in the aboveground part of some unofficial medicinal plants from families Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, Apiaceae and Chenopodiaceae is relevant. Objective. The objects of the research are the aboveground part of unofficial medicinal plants from families Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, Apiaceae and Chenopodiaceae. Methods. Identification of organic acids was performed by means of thin-layer and paper chromatography, their content was determined by means of gas chromatography, the quantitative amount of organic acids was defined by titrimetric analysis. Results. In the studied raw plants the quality of organic acids and their total contents were determined (in terms of malic acid. It is established that the maximum content of organic acids is accumulated in the grass Hyssopus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae, and the minimal is in the leaves of Chrysánthemum xhortorum L. variety Apro (Asteraceae. In all studied raw plants the dominance of aliphatic acids (citric, malic, oxalic and malonic was determined by means of gas chromatography. Benzoic is predominant among the aromatic acids. Conclusions. In the studied raw plants the quality of organic acids and their total content were determined. The following results can be used in developing the methods of quality control of the studied raw plants and during the study of new bioactive substances.

  13. Evidence of the involvement of plant ligno-cellulosic structure in the sequestration of Pb: an X-ray spectroscopy-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmiroli, Marta [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 11/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Antonioli, Gianni [Department of Physics, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 11/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Maestri, Elena [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 11/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Marmiroli, Nelson [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 11/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)]. E-mail: nelson.marmiroli@unipr.it

    2005-03-01

    European walnut (Juglans regia) plants were grown in pots, on peat soil contaminated with lead (Pb), for four years. European walnut was chosen because it grows in Mediterranean climates, it yields a high biomass, and a fine quality wood. In the above ground parts Pb concentration was 1000 times lower than in roots: in 50 g roots there was 450 mg of Pb. Microanalysis of roots found in periderm more than 50% of the total root Pb. Pb L{sub III} EXAFS spectroscopy was performed on: root powder from Pb-exposed plants, Pb-impregnated cellulose and lignin. Comparison of plant material with lignin and cellulose helped to envisage a plant disposal strategy for Pb. This may consist in establishing links with large organic molecules, which are abundant constituents of cell walls. EXAFS spectroscopy evidenced the presence of Pb-O bindings within the ligno-cellulosic structure in roots. Lead was scantly conveyed to the shoots, giving to walnut plants an added asset in Pb phytostabilization. - Lignin and cellulose can play a major role in the accumulation of lead in Juglans regia roots.

  14. Physiological Responses to N-NO3 and N-NH4 of Triazine Resistant and Susceptible Plants of Horseweed (Erigeron canadensis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Stanek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Triazine resistant and susceptible biotypes of horseweed (Erigeron canadensis L. were grown under controlled conditions in nutrient solution with NH4 or NO3 ions as nitrogen source. Indicators such as: dry matter, CO2 assimilation, chloroplasts activity, dark respiration and the content of K, Ca, Mg in the above ground parts displayed lower levels when plants were fed with NH4 than with NO ions. Reduction of these indicators was stronger for the triazine susceptible plants which grew better than their resistant counterparts when fed with N-NO3. The triazine resistant plants grown with N-NH4 contained more protein-N and K than the susceptible ones. Chloroplasts of the resistant plants were also less sensitive to NH4CL treatment. It is concluded that the resistant plants appear to be more tolerant to NH4 ions as compared with their susceptible counterparts. For this reason application of ammonium forms of nitrogen fertilization in horticultural practice could favour spreading of triazine resistant horseweed.

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for container storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This document contains Part B of the Permit Application for Container Storage Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Sections cover the following areas: Facility description; Waste characteristics; Process information; Ground water monitoring; Procedures to prevent hazards; Contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; Recordkeeping; Other federal laws; Organic air emissions; Solid waste management units; and Certification

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for container storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document contains Part B of the Permit Application for Container Storage Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Sections cover the following areas: Facility description; Waste characteristics; Process information; Ground water monitoring; Procedures to prevent hazards; Contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; Recordkeeping; Other federal laws; Organic air emissions; Solid waste management units; and Certification.

  17. 10 CFR Appendix F to Part 50 - Policy Relating to the Siting of Fuel Reprocessing Plants and Related Waste Management Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and Related Waste Management Facilities F Appendix F to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Relating to the Siting of Fuel Reprocessing Plants and Related Waste Management Facilities 1. Public health... facilities for the temporary storage of highlevel radioactive wastes, may be located on privately owned...

  18. Nuclear material safeguards for enrichment plants: Part 4, Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant: Diversion scenarios and IAEA safeguards activities: Safeguards training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    This 5-day training course on nuclear material safeguards for uranium enrichment plants has been developed to train IAEA professionals who are responsible for safeguarding uranium enrichment facilties on the safeguards relevant principles of enrichment technology, particularly as related to centrifuge enrichment plants. This volume contains discussions of diversions of declared material at a centrifuge plant, centrifuge facility material balance verification activities, enriching beyond declared levels in a centrifuge facility, safeguards inspection techniques that may be used inside cascade areas, and demonstration of the enrichment verification measurement technique for cascade header pipes

  19. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs

  20. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

  1. Development of resilience evaluation method for nuclear power plant. Part 1. Proposal of resilience index for assessment of safety of nuclear power plant under severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demachi, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Masaaki; Itoi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    In this research, a new index 'The Resilience Index' was proposed to evaluate the capability of nuclear power plant to recover from the situation of safety function lost. Three elements assumed to evaluate the resilience index are the achievement rate, necessary time, and probability of success of each accident management activity. The resilience index is expected to visualize the improvement of safety of each nuclear power plant against severe accidents. (author)

  2. 50 CFR 23.92 - Are any wildlife or plants, and their parts, products, or derivatives, exempt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE... derivatives that are not designated. (2) Plant hybrids. (i) Seeds and pollen (including pollinia), cut flowers...

  3. FY 1991 report on the results of the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant. Part 4. Operation of pilot plant; 1991 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-01-01

    A record was summarized of the operation of the 200 t/d entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant that was constructed with the aim of establishing technology of the integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation. As to the actual results of operation hours, the paper summarized the records of gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities, gas turbine facilities and safety environment facilities which were collected from April 1991 to January 1993. Relating to the actual results of start-up/stop, the paper summarized the records of gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities (desulfurization), gas refining facilities (dedusting), gas turbine facilities and safety environment facilities. Further, operation manuals were made for the schedule of plant start-up/stop, generalization, gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities (desulfurization), gas refining facilities (dedusting), gas turbine facilities, actual pressure/actual size combustor testing facilities and safety environment facilities. (NEDO)

  4. Achievement report for fiscal 1993 on developing entrained bed coal gasification power plant. Part 4. Pilot plant operation edition; 1993 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Tests and researches have been carried out on operation of a 200-t/d entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant built with an objective of establishing the coal gasification composite power generation technology. This paper summarizes the operation achievements in fiscal 1993. The plant operation record in fiscal 1993 was as follows: 430 hours 27 minutes in the gasification furnace (ten gasification operations), 233 hours 51 minutes in the gas refining facility, 140 hours 31 minutes in the gas turbine facility (power generation amount of 746.8 MWh with nine actuations), 1,263 hours 09 minutes in the processing furnace in the safety environment facility, and 427 hours 22 minutes in the NOx removal equipment. Descriptions were given with detailed graphs on the actuation and shutdown record with respect to the run D2, the run D3 (1 and 2), the run D4, the run D5, the run D6, and the run D7 (1 through 4). The operation procedures were prepared for the plant startup and shutdown schedule, the generalization report, the gasification furnace facility, the gas refining facility (dry type desulfurizing facility), the gas refining facility (dry type dust removing facility), the gas turbine facility, the combustor testing facility with actual pressure and size, and the safety environment facilities. (NEDO)

  5. CO2 capture from power plants. Part I : A parametric study of the technical performance based on monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Zahra, M. R. M.; Schneiders, L. H. J.; Niederer, J. P. M.; Feron, P. H. M.; Versteeg, G. F.

    Capture and storage of CO2 from fossil fuel fired power plants is drawing increasing interest as a potential method for the control of greenhouse gas emissions. An optimization and technical parameter study for a CO2 capture process from flue gas of a 600 MWe bituminous coal fired power plant, based

  6. Smart Operation of Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Plants : Prediction and Improvement of Thermal Efficiency at Part Load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boksteen, S.Z.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates various operational aspects of Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Power Plants (GTCC). GTCC power plants are expected to play an increasingly important role in the balancing of supply and demand in the electricity grid. Although originally meant for predominantly base load operation

  7. PLE in the analysis of plant compounds. Part II: One-cycle PLE in determining total amount of analyte in plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Wianowska, Dorota

    2005-04-29

    Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) is recognised as one of the most effective sample preparation methods. Despite the enhanced extraction power of PLE, the full recovery of an analyte from plant material may require multiple extractions of the same sample. The presented investigations show the possibility of estimating the true concentration value of an analyte in plant material employing one-cycle PLE in which plant samples of different weight are used. The performed experiments show a linear dependence between the reciprocal value of the analyte amount (E*), extracted in single-step PLE from a plant matrix, and the ratio of plant material mass to extrahent volume (m(p)/V(s)). Hence, time-consuming multi-step PLE can be replaced by a few single-step PLEs performed at different (m(p)/V(s)) ratios. The concentrations of rutin in Sambucus nigra L. and caffeine in tea and coffee estimated by means of the tested procedure are almost the same as their concentrations estimated by multiple PLE.

  8. Development of a procedure for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of human factors as a part of probabilistic safety assessments of nuclear power plants. Part B. Technical documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richei, A.

    1998-01-01

    As international studies have shown, accidents in plants are increasingly caused by combinations of technical failures and human errors. Therefore careful investigations of man-machine-interactions to determine human reliability are gaining importance worldwide. Regarding nuclear power plants such investigations are usually carried out within the scope of probabilistic safety assessments. A great number of procedures to evaluate human factors has been developed up to now. However, none of them is able to take into account the whole spectrum of requirements - as for instance transferability of date to other plants, analysis of weak points, and evaluation of cognitive tasks - for a complete and reliable probabilistic safety assessment. Based on an advanced model for a man-machine-system, the Human Error Rate Assessment and Optimizing System (HEROS) and a corresponding expert system of the same name are introduced. This expert system enables the quantification of human error probabilities for plant operator actions on the one hand and is also capable of providing quantitative statements regarding the optimization of man-machine-system in terms of human error probability minimization on the other one. Three relevant evaluation levels, i.e. 'Management Structure', 'Working Environment' and 'Man-Machine-Interface', are derived from a model of the man-machine-system. Linguistic variables are assigned to all performance shaping factors at these levels. These variables are used to establish a rule-based expert system. The knowledge bases of this system are represented by rules. Processing of these rules is carried out by means of the fuzzy set theory, after provision of relevant data for a particular personal action to be evaluated. This procedure enables a simple and effective use of ergonomic studies as the relevant database, which is also transferable to other plants with any design. The expert system consist in total of 16 rule bases in which all ascertainable and

  9. Pantoea agglomerans : a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pantoea agglomerans , a bacterium associated with plants, is not an obligate infectious agent in humans. However, it could be a cause of opportunistic human infections, mostly by wound infection with plant material, or as a hospital-acquired infection, mostly in immunocompromised individuals. Wound infection with P. agglomerans usually follow piercing or laceration of skin with a plant thorn, wooden splinter or other plant material and subsequent inoculation of the plant-residing bacteria, mostly during performing of agricultural occupations and gardening, or children playing. Septic arthritis or synovitis appears as a common clinical outcome of exogenous infection with P. agglomerans , others include endophthalmitis, periostitis, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Another major reason for clinical infection with P. agglomerans is exposure of hospitalized, often immunodeficient individuals to medical equipment or fluids contaminated with this bacterium. Epidemics of nosocomial septicemia with fatal cases have been described in several countries, both in adult and paediatric patients. In most cases, however, the clinical course of the hospital-acquired disease was mild and application of the proper antibiotic treatment led to full recovery. Compared to humans, there are only few reports on infectious diseases caused by Pantoea agglomerans in vertebrate animals. This species has been identified as a possible cause of equine abortion and placentitis and a haemorrhagic disease in dolphin fish ( Coryphaena hippurus . P. agglomerans strains occur commonly, usually as symbionts, in insects and other arthropods. Pantoea agglomerans usually occurs in plants as an epi- or endophytic symbiont, often as mutualist. Nevertheless, this species has also also been identified as a cause of diseases in a range of cultivable plants, such as cotton, sweet onion, rice, maize, sorghum, bamboo, walnut, an ornamental plant called Chinese taro ( Alocasia cucullata , and a

  10. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-02

    Pantoea agglomerans, a bacterium associated with plants, is not an obligate infectious agent in humans. However, it could be a cause of opportunistic human infections, mostly by wound infection with plant material, or as a hospital-acquired infection, mostly in immunocompromised individuals. Wound infection with P. agglomerans usually follow piercing or laceration of skin with a plant thorn, wooden splinter or other plant material and subsequent inoculation of the plant-residing bacteria, mostly during performing of agricultural occupations and gardening, or children playing. Septic arthritis or synovitis appears as a common clinical outcome of exogenous infection with P. agglomerans, others include endophthalmitis, periostitis, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Another major reason for clinical infection with P. agglomerans is exposure of hospitalized, often immunodeficient individuals to medical equipment or fluids contaminated with this bacterium. Epidemics of nosocomial septicemia with fatal cases have been described in several countries, both in adult and paediatric patients. In most cases, however, the clinical course of the hospital-acquired disease was mild and application of the proper antibiotic treatment led to full recovery. Compared to humans, there are only few reports on infectious diseases caused by Pantoea agglomerans in vertebrate animals. This species has been identified as a possible cause of equine abortion and placentitis and a haemorrhagic disease in dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus). P. agglomerans strains occur commonly, usually as symbionts, in insects and other arthropods. Pantoea agglomerans usually occurs in plants as an epi- or endophytic symbiont, often as mutualist. Nevertheless, this species has also also been identified as a cause of diseases in a range of cultivable plants, such as cotton, sweet onion, rice, maize, sorghum, bamboo, walnut, an ornamental plant called Chinese taro (Alocasia cucullata), and a grass called onion couch

  11. Development of resilience evaluation method for nuclear power plants. Part 3. Study on evaluation method and applicability of resilience index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masaaki; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Murakami, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new index, called the resilience index, that evaluates the dynamic stability of the system safety of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident by considering the ability to recover system safety functions that have become lost in the situation. In this paper, a detailed evaluation procedure for the resilience index is described. The system safety of a PWR plant during a severe accident is then assessed according to the resilience index in order to discuss the applicability of the index. We find that the resilience index successfully represents management capability and, therefore, the resilience capability of a nuclear power plant. (author)

  12. Evidence that acidification-induced declines in plant diversity and productivity are mediated by changes in below-ground communities and soil properties in a semi-arid steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dima; Lan, Zhichun; Bai, Xue; Grace, James B.; Bai, Yongfei

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic acid deposition–induced soil acidification is one of the major threats to biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and services. Few studies, however, have explored in detail how above-ground changes in plant species richness and productivity resulting from soil acidification are mediated by effects on below-ground biota and soil properties.

  13. Development of a procedure for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of human factors as a part of probabilistic safety assessments of nuclear power plants. Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richei, A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a procedure for the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of human factors in the probabilistic safety assessment for nuclear power plants. The Human Error Rate Assessment and Optimizing System (HEROS) is introduced. The evaluation of a task with HEROS is realized in the three evaluation levels, i.e. 'Management Structure', 'Working Environment' and 'Man-Machine-Interface'. The developed expert system uses the fuzzy set theory for an assessment. For the evaluation of cognitive tasks evaluation criteria are derived also. The validation of the procedure is based on three examples, reflecting the common practice of probabilistic safety assessments and including problems, which cannot, respectively - only insufficiently - be evaluated with the established human risk analysis procedures. HERO applications give plausible and comprehensible results. (orig.) [de

  14. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part I: Plants with carcinogenic, teratogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the use of herbal medicines and food products has been widely embraced in many developed countries. These products are generally highly accepted by consumers who often believe that "natural" equals "safe". This is, however, an oversimplification because several botanicals have been found to contain toxic compounds in concentrations harmful to human health. Acutely toxic plants are in most cases already recognised as dangerous as a result of their traditional use, but plants with subacute and chronic toxicity are difficult or even impossible to detect by traditional use or by clinical research studies. In this review, we systematically address major issues including the carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine-disrupting effects associated with the use of herbal preparations with a strong focus on plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe. The basic information regarding the molecular mechanisms of the individual subtypes of plant-induced non-acute toxicity is given, which is followed by a discussion of the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. We describe the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of alkenylbenzenes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and bracken fern ptaquiloside, the teratogenicity issues regarding anthraquinone glycosides and specific alkaloids, and discuss the human health concerns regarding the phytoestrogens and licorice consumption in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fiscal 1995 achievement report. Development of entrained bed coal gasification power plant (Part 4 - Pilot plant operation); 1995 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The 200 tons/day entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant constructed for establishing the technology of integrated coal gasification combined cycle was subjected to operational tests, and the fiscal 1995 results are compiled. In fiscal 1995, 1328 hours and 3 minutes (8 gasification operations) was recorded with gasification furnace facility, 899 hours and 53 minutes with the gas clean-up facility, 831 hours and 27 minutes with the gas turbine facility (11 startups for the generation of 6657 MWh), and 1958 hours and 2 minutes with the treatment furnace and 1331 hours and 10 minutes with the denitration unit of the safety/environment-related facility. The details of starts and stops were described in graphs which covered Runs D13, D14-1, D14-2, E1, D15, and A14. Operating procedures were studied and compiled for the plant start/stop schedule, general guidelines, gasification furnace facility, gas clean-up facility (dry type desulfurization facility), gas clean-up facility (dry type dedusting facility), gas turbine facility, real-pressure natural-size combustor test facility, and the safety/environment-related facility. (NEDO)

  16. FY 1992 report on the results of the development of an entrained bed coal gasification power plant. Part 4. Operation of pilot plant; 1992 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    A record was summarized of the operation test study in FY 1992 of the 200 t/d entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant that was constructed with the aim of establishing technology of the integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation. The operating hour of gasifier facilities in FY 1992 was 635 hours 19 minutes, and the number of times of gasification operation was 9. The operating hour of letting gas through to gas refining facilities was 549 hours 14 minutes. The operating hour of gas turbine facilities was 310 hours 18 minutes, and the generated output was 1,366.2 MWh. The operating hour of treatment furnace of safety environment facilities was 1,401 hours 4 minutes, and that of the denitrification system was 621 hours 24 minutes. As to the actual results of the start-up/stop, the paper detailedly recorded those of RUNs 10, 11, 12, 13 and D1. Further, operation manuals were made for the schedule of plant start-up/stop, gasifier facilities, gas refining facilities (dry desulfurization facilities), gas refining facilities (dry dedusting facilities), actual pressure/actual size combustor testing facilities and safety environment facilities. (NEDO)

  17. Fiscal 1994 achievement report. Development of entrained bed coal gasification power plant (Part 4 - Pilot plant operation); 1994 nendo seika hokokusho. Funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden plant kaihatsu - Sono 4. Pilot plant unten sosa hen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The 200 tons/day entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant constructed for the establishment of the technology of integrated coal gasification combined cycle power generation was operated for testing, and the results are put together. Operating hours recorded were 1347 hours and 7 minutes for the gasification furnace facility (7 gasification operations), 752 hours and 22 minutes for the gas clean-up facilities, 425 hours and 20 minutes for the gas turbine facility (6 startups for generating 2616.1 MWh), and 1852 hours for the treatment furnace and 1304 hours and 32 minutes for the denitration system in the safety/environment-related facility. Detailed graphs were drawn for the description of starts and stops in Run D8, Run D9 (1-3), Run D10, Run D11, and in Run D12. Operating procedures were studied and then compiled for the plant start-stop schedule, general guidelines, gasification furnace facility, gas clean-up facility (dry type desulfurization facility), gas clean-up facility (dry type dedusting facility), gas turbine facility, real-pressure natural-size combustor test facility, and for the safety/environment related facility. (NEDO)

  18. Socio-economic impact in a region in the southern part of Jutland by the establishment of a plant for processing of bio ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Henning; Hjort-Gregersen, K.

    2005-09-15

    The Farmers Association of Southern Jutland took an interest in the establishment of a plant for processing of Ethanol primarily due to the wish to contribute to the business development in the western part of Southern Jutland. A large plant for production of bio ethanol will bring along a significant number of local jobs with positive derived economic effects in the local community. Further the plant will also form the basis for a new possibility of marketing of cereal crops. From asocial point of view the request to produce ethanol and other biomass based propellants are motivated by the international obligation to reduce emission of greenhouse gasses, which primarily originate from energy production from conventional fossil fuels. A certain amount of fossil fuels is required in the production of crops, but it has been estimated that the net emission of CO{sub 2} by production of ethanol only constitutes 10% of the emission by fossil energy. (au)

  19. MEASURE/ANOMTEST. Anomaly detection software package for the Dodewaard power plant facility. Supplement 1. Extension of measurement analysis part, addition of plot package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoonewelle, H.

    1995-01-01

    The anomaly detection software package installed at the Dodewaard nuclear power plant has been revised with respect to the part of the measurement analysis. A plot package has been added to the package. Signals in which an anomaly has been detected are automatically plotted including the uncertainty margins of the signals. This report gives a description of the revised measurement analysis part and the plot package. Each new routine of the plot package is described briefly and the new input and output files are given. (orig.)

  20. Stalk It up to Integrated Learning: Using Foods We Eat and Informational Texts to Learn About Plant Parts and Their Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rachel; Bradbury, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The diet of many students consists of on-the-go processed food. As part of a larger school garden project, the authors wanted students to consider the relevance of plants in their own lives, both as food sources for us and for the animals that we eat. In this article, they present a mini-unit they taught in a third-grade classroom that helped…

  1. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part II: Plants with hepato-, neuro-, nephro- and immunotoxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    A tremendous surge of public interest in natural therapies has been reported in the past several decades in both developing and developed countries. Furthermore, edible wild-growing plants whose use had long been associated with poverty and famine have also gained in popularity among people in developed countries. An important fraction of herbal products evade all control measures and are generally perceived as safe. However, this may not always be true. It is important to recognize that some plants are not associated with acute toxicity but rather produce more insidious problems, which develop only with long-term exposure. In this review, we continue a systematic analysis of the subacute and chronic toxicity associated with the use of herbal preparations. The hepato-, neuro-, nephro- and immunotoxicity of plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe are discussed in some detail. The basic concepts regarding the molecular mechanisms implicated in their nonacute toxicity and their pathophysiological, clinical and epidemiological characteristics are included. Among others, we discuss the hepatotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, the nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid, the lathyrism associated with neurotoxin swainsonine, thiamine depletion and thyroid dysfunction of herbal cause, and finally address also the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Resource Managements as a part of the Human Factors Management Program(HFMP) for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, DaeHo; Lee, YongHee; Lee, JungWoon; Kim, Younggab

    2007-01-01

    Programs for the effective implementation and management of human factor issues in nuclear power plants (NPPs) should contain technical criteria, an establishment of a job process, and activities for job improvements and be a system through which human factors can be managed in an integrated way. Human factors to be managed should include those related to an operation of plants as well as those related to a plant design as mentioned in NUREG-0800(2004), NUREG- 0711(2004), and NUREG-0700(2002). Human factor items to be managed for an operation of plants are listed in the PSR (Periodic Safety Review) items defined in the Enforcement of Regulation of the Atomic Energy Act. They are procedures, a work management system including a shift work management, a qualification management of plant personnel, training, a work amount assessment, a MMI (Man Machine Interface), and the use of experience. Among these factors, factors related to a human resource management include work management systems and the status of a work management including shift work, a qualification management ensuring qualified workers on duty at all times, and the systems for and the status of training and education. This paper addresses the scope of a human resource management, guidelines and procedures to be developed for a human resource management, and considerations critical in the development of guidelines and procedures

  3. Human Resource Managements as a part of the Human Factors Management Program(HFMP) for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, DaeHo; Lee, YongHee; Lee, JungWoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Younggab [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. LTD, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Programs for the effective implementation and management of human factor issues in nuclear power plants (NPPs) should contain technical criteria, an establishment of a job process, and activities for job improvements and be a system through which human factors can be managed in an integrated way. Human factors to be managed should include those related to an operation of plants as well as those related to a plant design as mentioned in NUREG-0800(2004), NUREG- 0711(2004), and NUREG-0700(2002). Human factor items to be managed for an operation of plants are listed in the PSR (Periodic Safety Review) items defined in the Enforcement of Regulation of the Atomic Energy Act. They are procedures, a work management system including a shift work management, a qualification management of plant personnel, training, a work amount assessment, a MMI (Man Machine Interface), and the use of experience. Among these factors, factors related to a human resource management include work management systems and the status of a work management including shift work, a qualification management ensuring qualified workers on duty at all times, and the systems for and the status of training and education. This paper addresses the scope of a human resource management, guidelines and procedures to be developed for a human resource management, and considerations critical in the development of guidelines and procedures.

  4. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available [i]Pantoea agglomerans[/i], a bacterium associated with plants, is not an obligate infectious agent in humans. However, it could be a cause of opportunistic human infections, mostly by wound infection with plant material, or as a hospital-acquired infection, mostly in immunocompromised individuals. Wound infection with [i]P. agglomerans[/i] usually follow piercing or laceration of skin with a plant thorn, wooden splinter or other plant material and subsequent inoculation of the plant-residing bacteria, mostly during performing of agricultural occupations and gardening, or children playing. Septic arthritis or synovitis appears as a common clinical outcome of exogenous infection with [i]P. agglomerans[/i], others include endophthalmitis, periostitis, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Another major reason for clinical infection with [i]P. agglomerans[/i] is exposure of hospitalized, often immunodeficient individuals to medical equipment or fluids contaminated with this bacterium. Epidemics of nosocomial septicemia with fatal cases have been described in several countries, both in adult and paediatric patients. In most cases, however, the clinical course of the hospital-acquired disease was mild and application of the proper antibiotic treatment led to full recovery. Compared to humans, there are only few reports on infectious diseases caused by [i]Pantoea agglomerans[/i] in vertebrate animals. This species has been identified as a possible cause of equine abortion and placentitis and a haemorrhagic disease in dolphin fish ([i]Coryphaena hippurus[/i]. [i]P. agglomerans[/i] strains occur commonly, usually as symbionts, in insects and other arthropods. [i]Pantoea agglomerans[/i] usually occurs in plants as an epi- or endophytic symbiont, often as mutualist. Nevertheless, this species has also also been identified as a cause of diseases in a range of cultivable plants, such as cotton, sweet onion, rice, maize, sorghum, bamboo, walnut, an ornamental

  5. Task 3: new man-machine interfaces in nuclear power plants. Part 1 executive summary and summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The present document summarises the reports provided by the member countries reflecting the actual status of consideration of Human Factors principles for the nuclear power plants. The adoption of Human Factor principles, in conjunction with the availability of advanced digital technology, has already led to the addition of computerised operator aids to almost all the operating plants in the member countries and to the study and the design of fully digitized control rooms for the future plants in some of them. As regards the licensing issue, many uncertainties still exist on the methodology and tools to be used and no internationally accepted standards have been established by now, especially for the software to be used in safety systems of nuclear power plants. The licensing of Man-Machine Interfaces (MMIs) is, in conclusion, at the very beginning of the process as in the past not enough attention has been given to human factor and software licensing aspects. In some countries the preparation of new ad hoc guidelines, or the updating of the existing one for digital equipment, are under way. Several examples of licensing of MMIs in countries where control room systems are safety classified, are described in the report highlighting the different approaches adopted. Important aspects of the design and implementation process of MMIs are the evaluation / validation phase, the provision of advanced alarm system supporting the operator in his supervisory tasks (and avoiding at the same time the problems related to information overload); the use of Artificial Intelligence under the form of Expert Systems is another opportunity that can be applied to several areas of plant supervision and control such as real time diagnostics, decision support, emergency response in order to enhance operator understanding of the plant status in whatever situation and therefore to help him in the operational decision-making process. The proper balance between automation and human actions is

  6. Scada Systems – Control, Supervision and Data Acquisition for the Power Plants Settled on a Stream (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin Ursoniu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Scada (supervisory control and data acquisition is a complex system that supervises and control an industrial process and performs several functions. A human machine interface will also be presented and how the process in a power plant is controlled and supervised through it by the operator. The main screen will be described (which is a global view of the hydro unit and what the operator can see and what he can press to control the power plants process also a few more screens will be presented for auxiliary installations and it will be described what the operator can see and what he can do to control the installation.

  7. Scada Systems – Control, Supervision and Data Acquisition for the Power Plants Settled on a Stream (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin Ursoniu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Scada (supervisory control and data acquisition is a complex system that supervises and controls an industrial process and performs several functions. A human machine interface will also be presented and how the process in a power plant is controlled and supervised through it by the operator. The main screen will be described (which is a global view of the hydro unit and what the operator can see and what he can press to control the power plants process also a few more screens will be presented for auxiliary installations and it will be described what the operator can see and what he can do to control the installation.

  8. Uptake of radionuclide thorium by twelve native plants grown in uranium mill tailings soils from south part of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xun, E-mail: m13836295186@163.com

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Screen dominant plants grown in uranium mill tailings soils. • Quantify the content of {sup 232}Th of soil samples from uranium mill tailings. • Quantify the transfer factor, bioconcentration factor and phytoremediation factor. • Screen out the plant species capable of remediating radionuclide contaminated soils. • Guide the reuse of study area in future. - Abstract: The concentrations of thorium ({sup 232}Th) in soil from a uranium mill tailings repository in South China were analyzed. The results showed that all the soil samples were acidic and the concentrations of {sup 232}Th in all the soil samples were more than the natural radionuclide content in soil of China. Through the field investigation, twelve kinds of dominant plants were discovered. The total quantity of {sup 232}Th in the whole plant is highest in rice flat sedge. We also found that Miscanthus floridulus has the greatest transfer factor (TF) for {sup 232}Th, rice flat sedge has the greatest bioconcentration factor (BF) for {sup 232}Th. At the mean time, M. floridulus has the greatest phytoremediation factor (PF) for {sup 232}Th. On the basis of the above conclusions and the definition for hyperaccumulator, rice flat sedge and M. floridulus could be the candidates of phytoremediation for radionuclide {sup 232}Th in the soil.

  9. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  10. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the gas flow is of importance in a gaseous diffusion plant. All this leads to a need to equip the... are normally designed for a buffer gas in-leakage rate of less than 1000 cm3/min. 1.5 Heat Exchangers...

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  12. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Components Under NRC's Export Licensing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the centrifuges or to control the plant. Normally UF6 is evaporated from the solid using heated... disc-shaped baffle(s) and a stationary tube arrangement for feeding and extracting UF6 gas and... main separation chamber and, in some cases, to assist the UF6 gas circulation within the main...

  13. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part I: experimental tests in full scale plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Rigamonti, Lucia; Marras, Roberto; Grosso, Mario

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, several waste-to-energy plants in Italy have experienced an increase of the concentration of acid gases (HCl, SO2 and HF) in the raw gas. This is likely an indirect effect of the progressive decrease of the amount of treated municipal waste, which is partially replaced by commercial waste. The latter is characterised by a higher variability of its chemical composition because of the different origins, with possible increase of the load of halogen elements such as chlorine (Cl) and fluorine (F), as well as of sulphur (S). A new dolomitic sorbent was then tested in four waste-to-energy plants during standard operation as a pre-cleaning stage, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber. For a sorbent injection of about 6 kg per tonne of waste, the decrease of acid gases concentration downstream the boiler was in the range of 7-37% (mean 23%) for HCl, 34-95% (mean 71%) for SO2 and 39-80% (mean 63%) for HF. This pre-abatement of acid gases allowed to decrease the feeding rate of the traditional low temperature sorbent (sodium bicarbonate in all four plants) by about 30%. Furthermore, it was observed by the plant operators that the sorbent helps to keep the boiler surfaces cleaner, with a possible reduction of the fouling phenomena and a consequent increase of the specific energy production. A preliminary quantitative estimate was carried out in one of the four plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Final environmental statement. Final addendum to Part II: Manufacture of floating nuclear power plants by Offshore Power Systems. DOCKET-STN--50-437

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    This Addendum to Part II of the Final Environmental Statement related to manufacture of floating nuclear power plants by Offshore Power Systems (OPS), NUREG-0056, issued September 1976, was prepared by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The staff's basic evaluation is presented in NUREG-0056. The current Addendum provides further consideration of a number of topics discussed in NUREG-0056, particularly additional consideration of shore zone siting at estuarine and ocean regions. This Summary and Conclusions recapitulates and is cumulative for Part II of the FES and the current Addendum. Augmentations to the Summary and Conclusions presented in Part II of the FES and arising from the evaluations contained in this Addendum are italicized

  15. Applications of the monitor of loose parts in the cycle 6 of the Laguna Verde Unit 2 power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleros, G.; Mendez, A.; Gomez, R.A.; Castillo, R.; Bravo, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The monitor of loose parts (Loose Parts Monitoring System) installed in the Unit 2 of the Laguna Verde Central is a tool to detect strange objects or parts loose in the system of refrigeration of the reactor that could be impacted in the walls of the recirculation knots or in the internal of the reactor. In this work two applications are shown carried out with the Monitor of Loose Parts, determining the characteristics of the stable nominal conditions, those which when changing, they are used to diagnose during the Cycle 6 of the Unit 2, failures in the components of the the recirculation circuits or to identify mechanical vibrations of the recirculation knots induced by a flow of recirculation bistable associated to operative conditions of the reactor. (Author)

  16. Probabilistic methods applied to the safety of nuclear power plant: annual report - 1980. Part. 1: theoretical fundaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F.S. de; Hesles, J.B.S.; Milidiu, R.L.; Maciel, C.C.; Gibelli, S.M.O.; Oliveira, L.C.; Fleming, P.V.; Rivera, R.R.J.

    1981-02-01

    The probabilistic Safety Analysis Group from COPPE was founded in 1980. This first part of the report shows the theoretical fundaments used for reliability analysis of some safety systems for Angra-1 [pt

  17. Thermoeconomic and environmental analyses of a low water consumption combined steam power plant and refrigeration chillers – Part 1: Energy and economic modelling and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ifaei, Pouya; Rashidi, Jouan; Yoo, ChangKyoo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposing two energy systems by combining refrigeration chillers and power plants. • Model-based comparison of the systems through energy and economic standpoints. • Reducing total annual costs of the base system up to 4.7% by process integration. • Decreasing the water loss in wet cooling towers by up to 18% in the proposed system. • Suggesting a water-fuel economic management strategy based on parametric analysis. - Abstract: Two novel configurations are proposed to replace the conventional Rankine cycle based steam power plants (SPP) with natural draft wet cooling towers (NDWCT) as cooling units. Closed feedwater heater unit of the base SPP-NDWCT system is eliminated in order to combine a vapor compression refrigeration (VCR) and an absorption heat pump (ABHP) with the base SPP-NDWCT system. Both VCR-SPP-NDWCT and ABHP-SPP-NDWCT systems are integrated to decrease the NDWCT load which could result in water losses decrease. In part one of the presented two-part paper, model-based energy and economic analyses are performed to compare systems performance and applicability. The temperature difference at pinch point and temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of the heat exchangers which were used for systems integration in VCR-SPP-NDWCT, and the absorber pressure and temperature in ABHP-SPP-NDWCT system are studied using parametric analysis procedure. A water-fuel management strategy is also introduced for the ABHP-SPP-NDWCT system according to the influence of the absorber pressure changes on system water and fuel consumption. In part 2, environmental and thermoeconomic analyses are performed to complete a comprehensive study on designing steam power plants. The results of part 1 showed that water losses and total annual costs decreased by 1–18% and 0–4.7% for the ABHP-SPP-NDWCT system but increased by 11% and 60% for the VCR-SPP-NDWCT system, respectively.

  18. Growth, Metabolism and Yield of Rice Cultivated in Soils Amended with Fly Ash and Cyanobacteria and Metal Loads in Plant Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N. Padhy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil amendment with fly ash (FA and combined supplementation with N2-fixing cyanobacteria masses as biofertilizer were done in field experiments with rice. Amendments with FA levels, 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kg/m2, caused increase in growth and yield of rice up to 8.0 kg/m2, monitored with several parameters. Pigment contents and enzyme activities of leaves were enhanced by FA, with the maximum level of FA at 10.0 kg/m2. Protein content of rice seeds was the highest in plants grown at FA level 4.0 kg/m2. Basic soil properties, pH value, percentage of silt, percentage of clay, water-holding capacity, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content increased due to the FA amendment. Parallel supplementation of FA amended plots with 1.0 kg/m2 N2-fixing cyanobacteria mass caused further significant increments of the most soil properties, and rice growth and yield parameters. 1000-grain weight of rice plants grown at FA level 4.0 kg/m2 along with cyanobacteria supplementation was the maximum. Cyanobacteria supplementation caused increase of important basic properties of soil including the total N-content. Estimations of elemental content in soils and plant parts (root and seed were done by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Accumulations of K, P, Fe and several plant micronutrients (Mn, Ni, Co, Zn and Cu and toxic elements (Pb, Cr and Cd increased in soils and plant parts as a function of the FA gradation, but Na content remained almost unchanged in soils and seeds. Supplementation of cyanobacteria had ameliorating effect on toxic metal contents of soils and plant parts. The FA level 4.0 kg/m2, with 1.0 kg/m2 cyanobacteria mass supplementation, could be taken ideal, since there would be recharging of the soil with essential micronutrients as well as toxic chemicals in comparative lesser proportions, and cyanobacteria mass would cause lessening toxic metal loads with usual N2-fixation.

  19. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part II: Simulation of a boiler system operating in a power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    A case of dynamic performance simulation model of a CFB boiler is presented in this study. The dynamic system of a CFB boiler in an operating power plant and the transient behavior of sub-models is described in the accompanying paper, Part I. The current paper, Part II, describes the model extension for the CFB boiler system in a power plant. The open loop model in Paper I was expanded by applying a set of PID (Proportional-integral-differential) control loops. In the control loop, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate of the main steam, the drum water level and the oxygen level at the stack were controlled. Dynamic performance was simulated to check the response of the closed control loop. Finally, performance of the total boiler system for a range of operation load of the power plant was simulated, where the parameters were calculated and control variables were maintained at the set values by PID control. Dynamic performance of a boiler at a selected load variation case was simulated and compared with actual measurements and their transient response characteristics were discussed. The simulation can also directly produce useful operation parameters, which are not measurable, but could be used for engineering evaluation

  20. Early prediction of 90Sr and 137Cs content in edible parts of crops and selection of plants with high uptake ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenhu; Xu Shiming; Hou Lanxin; Shang Zhaorong

    1995-10-01

    The uptake characteristics to 90 Sr and 137 Cs of nine kinds of crops, including spring wheat, rice, soybean, vegetables etc., were studied from seedling to maturity. The change of 90 Sr content per unit of dry weight can be classified into two types--the 90 Sr content kept in the same level during the whole growing season and kept increasing with the growing period until it came to the maximum point at the time of maturity. 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the aerial part of plants were mainly distributed in leaves, but the amounts in seeds and fruits were less. The content of 90 Sr decreased but the content of 137 Cs increased from young to old leaves. So it could be concluded that early prediction of the radioactive content of edible parts according to the content of young leaves was possible. Selection of 169 species in 18 families of plants with high uptake ability of 90 Sr and 137 Cs, which grow in Qinshan region near a nuclear power plant and in Beijing region, is also reported. (8 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.)

  1. Determination of element distribution between the symplasm and apoplasm of cucumber plant parts by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Anita; Záray, Gyula; Fodor, Ferenc

    2002-04-10

    The distribution of Cd, Ni, Pb and Fe between the symplasm (cytoplasm) and apoplasm (cell wall) of cucumber roots and leaves was determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry following a special sample preparation procedure. The plants were grown in modified Hoagland nutrient solution containing Fe in chemical form of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-EDTA, as well as the heavy metal contaminants, each in concentration of 10 microM. In the roots the larger part of Pb was found in the apoplasm, while Ni and Cd were mostly in the symplasm. In the leaves however, about 50-60% of the Pb content and practically the total amount of Cd were detected in the symplasm. About 30-40% of the translocated Ni remained in the apoplasm of the leaves. The Cd-, Ni- and Pb-treatments resulted in higher total concentration of Fe in the roots, however, the relative amount of Fe in the symplasm decreased in all cases. In the leaves of the control plants the larger part (60-80%) of Fe occurs in the symplasm. Due to the heavy metal effects, the relative amount of Fe in the symplasm decreased except in the Pb-contaminated plants, where in the presence of Fe(III)-EDTA, the Pb treatment resulted in a moderate increment of Fe concentration in the symplasm.

  2. Solar radiation concentrators paired with multijunction photoelectric converters in ground-based solar power plants (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionova, E. A.; Ulanov, M. V.; Davidyuk, N. Yu.; Sadchikov, N. A.

    2017-04-01

    The present work is devoted to determining the conditions of the joint operation of photoelectric converter-solar concentrator pairs, which are used in solar power plants with concentrators. Three-cascade photoconverters based on A3B5 materials with different distributions of solar radiation in spectral ranges are studied. Concentrators of solar radiation are designed as the Fresnel lenses with silicon-on-glass structure. Refractive lens profile fabricated on the basis of Wacker RT604 silicone rubber is characterized by significant changes in refractive index with temperature. The effect of geometric parameters of the Fresnel lenses and their operating temperature on characteristics of solar radiation concentration in specified spectral intervals have been examined. The parameters of concentrators being paired with a photoelectric converter, which may ensure the efficient functioning of the solar power plant, have been calculated.

  3. Development of Wall-Thinning Evaluation Procedure for Nuclear Power Plant Piping—Part 1: Quantification of Thickness Measurement Deviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Yun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pipe wall thinning by flow-accelerated corrosion and various types of erosion is a significant and costly damage phenomenon in secondary piping systems of nuclear power plants (NPPs. Most NPPs have management programs to ensure pipe integrity due to wall thinning that includes periodic measurements for pipe wall thicknesses using nondestructive evaluation techniques. Numerous measurements using ultrasonic tests (UTs; one of the nondestructive evaluation technologies have been performed during scheduled outages in NPPs. Using the thickness measurement data, wall thinning rates of each component are determined conservatively according to several evaluation methods developed by the United States Electric Power Research Institute. However, little is known about the conservativeness or reliability of the evaluation methods because of a lack of understanding of the measurement error. In this study, quantitative models for UT thickness measurement deviations of nuclear pipes and fittings were developed as the first step for establishing an optimized thinning evaluation procedure considering measurement error. In order to understand the characteristics of UT thickness measurement errors of nuclear pipes and fittings, round robin test results, which were obtained by previous researchers under laboratory conditions, were analyzed. Then, based on a large dataset of actual plant data from four NPPs, a quantitative model for UT thickness measurement deviation is proposed for plant conditions.

  4. Environmental analysis of a construction and demolition waste recycling plant in Portugal--Part I: energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    This work is a part of a wider study involving the economic and environmental implications of managing construction and demolition waste (CDW), focused on the operation of a large scale CDW recycling plant. This plant, to be operated in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (including the Setúbal peninsula), is analysed for a 60 year period, using primary energy consumption and CO2eq emission impact factors as environmental impact performance indicators. Simplified estimation methods are used to calculate industrial equipment incorporated, and the operation and transport related impacts. Material recycling--sorted materials sent to other industries, to act as input--is taken into account by discounting the impacts related to industrial processes no longer needed. This first part focuses on calculating the selected impact factors for a base case scenario (with a 350 tonnes/h installed capacity), while a sensitivity analysis is provided in part two. Overall, a 60 year global primary energy consumption of 71.4 thousand toe (tonne of oil equivalent) and a total CO2eq emission of 135.4 thousand tonnes are expected. Under this operating regime, around 563 thousand toe and 1465 thousand tonnes CO2eq could be prevented by replacing raw materials in several construction materials industries (e.g.: ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, paper and cardboard). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enrichment ratios of elements in selected plant species from black coal mine dumps in Lower Silesia (Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samecka-Cymerman, A.; Kempers, A.J. [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2003-07-01

    Concentration of the metals Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn and V as well as N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe and S were measured in soils and in two tree species (leaves of Betula pendula and Salix caprea) and two herbs (whole above-ground parts of Solidago canadensis and Tanacetum vulgare) sampled from dumps in the Walbrzych coal mine area (Lower Silesia, SW Poland). These plants, as used to evaluate the distribution of elements in the examined dumps, contained elevated levels of Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Especially the highest levels of Mn in Betula pendula seriously exceed background values. Betula pendula characterized also the highest enrichment ratio for Mn, Salix caprea for Ni and Sr and Tanacetum vulgare for Cu. Test-t indicated that from both herbs Tanace-tum vulgare accumulated much more K, N, S and Zn than Solidago canadensis and of both trees Salix caprea accumulated significantly more Cd, Cu, K and Ca than Betula pendula, while this last species accumulated significantly more Fe and Mn than Salix caprea. A post hoc LSD test indicated that all examined plants had similar enrichment ratios for Al, Pb and V.

  6. Comparative Methods of Application of Wild Plant Parts on Growth and in the Control of Root Rot Fungi of Leguminous Crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, N.; Dawae, S.

    2016-01-01

    Present research work was carried out for the management of root rot fungi with wild plant part capsules and pellets formulation in soil. When application of pellets and capsules was carried out with Prosopis juliflora stem, leaves and flowers showed significant reduction in disease incidence and enhancement in growth and physiological parameters. Colonization of Fusarium spp., Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani was completely suppressed when P. juliflora leaves pellets incorporated in soil. Physiological parameters such as chlorophyll a and b and protein were significantly increased when leaves pellets incorporated in soil at the rate of 1 percent w/w so P. juliflora leaves pellets were most effective in the control of root rot fungi and enhanced the growth of crop plants. (author)

  7. Ethnomedicinal plants to cure skin diseases-an account of the traditional knowledge in the coastal parts of Central Western Ghats, Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pradeep; Hegde, Ganesh R; Hegde, Gurumurthi; Mulgund, Gangadhar S

    2014-01-01

    Documentation of ethnomedicinal knowledge pertaining to the treatment of different types of skin diseases from the Central Western Ghats of India, a rich habitat of different ethnic communities. Frequent field surveys were carried out to invent the 'key informants' in the treatment of skin diseases in the study area. The information was collected through semi-structured open ended interviews with questionnaire in their local Kannada language. All medicinal plants recorded for the treatment of skin diseases were photographed in the field; voucher specimens were made subsequently and are deposited in the Herbarium, P.G. Department of Botany, Karnatak University, Dharwad. The information such as botanical name, status, family, vernacular name, habit and habitat, analysis like percentage of parts used, percentage of drug preparations, use value (UV), informants consensus factor (ICF), fidelity level (FL) and correlation between UV and use mention (Np) of the plants are provided. In all, 48 informants were interviewed. Amongst which 38 were the 'key informants' who gave the information exclusively about the treatment of skin diseases. Among 102 plant species collected, seven species are endemic to India and eleven species have their nativity outside India. Twelve species could be considered as new claims for skin diseases as their use has not been mentioned in Ayurveda or any other research articles surveyed. Of all the drug formulations, paste is the most preferred method (50%) followed by oil extraction (18.89%), juice (14.44%), ash (4.44%) etc. The highest UV is for Pongamia pinnata, Naregamia alata, Randia dumetorum and Girardinia diversifolia (1.50 each). The treatment for different types of skin diseases by the herbal healers are classified into 13 categories, out of which ringworm scored the highest ICF value. Similarly, the 100% FL value scored was in the order of 10 plants for boils, 4 plants for different types of sore, 2 plants for ringworm, intertrigo

  8. Plant carnivory beyond bogs: reliance on prey feeding in Drosophyllum lusitanicum (Drosophyllaceae) in dry Mediterranean heathland habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cabeza, E.; Ojeda, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims In a cost–benefit framework, plant carnivory is hypothesized to be an adaptation to nutrient-poor soils in sunny, wetland habitats. However, apparent exceptions to this cost–benefit model exist, although they have been rarely studied. One of these exceptions is the carnivorous subshrub Drosophyllum lusitanicum, which thrives in Mediterranean heathlands on dry sandstone soils and has relatively well-developed, xeromorphic roots. Here, the roles of leaf (carnivory) and root (soil) nutrient uptake in growth promotion of this particular species were assessed. Methods In a greenhouse experiment, plants were fed with laboratory-reared fruit flies (Drosophila virilis) and received two concentrations of soil nutrients in a factorial design. Above-ground plant growth and final above- and below-ground dry biomass after 13 weeks were recorded. Nutrient uptake via roots was also evaluated, using stable nitrogen isotope analysis. Key Results Insect feeding resulted in significantly higher growth and above- and below-ground biomass compared with soil fertilization. No additional benefits of fertilization were discernable when plants were insect-fed, indicating that roots were not efficient in nutrient absorption. Conclusions The first evidence of strong reliance on insect prey feeding in a dry-soil carnivorous plant with well-developed roots is provided, suggesting that carnivory per se does not preclude persistence in dry habitats. Instead, the combination of carnivory and xeromorphic root features allows Drosophyllum to thrive on non-waterlogged soils. New evidence is added to recent research emphasizing the role of root systems of carnivorous plants in explaining their distribution, partly challenging the cost–benefit hypothesis. PMID:28065921

  9. Valence of wind power, photovoltaic and peak-load power plants as a part of the entire electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schüppel, A.

    2014-01-01

    The transition to a higher share of renewable energy sources in the electricity sector leads to a multitude of challenges for the current electricity system. Within this thesis, the development of wind power and photovoltaics generation capacities in Germany is analysed based on the evaluation of technical and economic criteria. In order to derive those criteria, different scenarios with a separated and combined increase of wind and photovoltaics capacity are simulated using the model ATLANTIS. The results are compared to a reference scenario without additional wind and PV capacities. Furthermore, the value and functionality of the energy only market based on economic methods, as well as the value of peak load power plants based on opportunity costs are determined. The results of this thesis show, that the current market system is able to gain an additional annual welfare of four to six billion Euro at the best. This result shows that the task of optimising the power plant dispatch is well fulfilled by the current market design. However, the effects, e.g. fuel costs, which may influence this margin. The value of wind power and photovoltaics within the overall electricity system can be derived from the effort which is necessary to integrate these generation technologies into the existing system, and the changes in total costs of electricity generation. Based on the evaluation of time dependencies (seasonality of energy yield from wind and PV) as well as the development of total generation costs, the conclusion can be drawn that wind power is the more suitable RES generation technology for Germany. However, when it comes to grid integration measures, PV shows better results due to a higher generation potential in Southern Germany, which leads to a higher degree of utilisation. Therefore, there is no need to transport electricity from Northern to Southern Germany as it is the case with wind power. A common expansion of wind power and photovoltaics even shows slight

  10. Model Thermoelectric Generator TEG Small Modular As Micro Electricity Plant At Indonesia Part 1 Design And Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisman M. Mahmud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectrically Generator TEG can generate electricity from the temperature difference between hot and cold at the junction thermoelectric module with two different semiconductor materials there will be a flow of current through the junction so as to produce a voltage. This principle uses the Seebeck effect thermoelectric generator as a base. By using these principles this study was conducted to determine the potential of the electric energy of the two Peltier modules which would be an alternative source for micro electricity plant using heat from methylated. The focus of this research is to design a model TEG Thermoelectric Generator Small Modular to produce the kind of material that is optimum for a TEG on the simulation Computer Aided Design CAD with a variety of four different materials that Bi2Te3 Bismuth Telluride PbTe-BiTe CMO-32 -62S Cascade and CMO-32-62S Calcium Manganese Oxide to its cold side using the heat sink fan and simulating heat aluminum plate attached to the hot side of the TEG modules with heat source of methylated. Model simulation results on TEG Small Modular micro electrical plant material obtained CMO-32-62S Cascade thermal material that has a value greater than 3 other material.

  11. Modularity and intra-floral integration in metameric organisms: plants are more than the sum of their parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggle, Pamela K

    2014-08-19

    Within-individual variation in virtually every conceivable morphological and functional feature of reiterated structures is a pervasive feature of plant phenotypes. In particular, architectural effects, regular, repeatable patterns of intra-individual variation in form and function that are associated with position are nearly ubiquitous. Yet, flowers also are predicted to be highly integrated. For animal-pollinated plants, the coordination of multiple organs within each flower is required to achieve the complex functions of pollinator attraction and orientation, pollen donation and pollen receipt. To the extent that pollinators may select for multiple independent functions, phenotypic integration within flowers may also be modular. That is, subsets of floral structures may be integrated but vary independently of other subsets of structures that are themselves integrated. How can phenotypic integration and modularity be understood within the context of architectural effects? This essay reviews recent research on patterns of floral integration and modularity and explores the potential for spatial and temporal changes in the selective environment of individual flowers to result in positional variation in patterns of morphological integration. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Plant-Derived Antimalarial Agents: New Leads and Efficient Phytomedicines. Part II. Non-Alkaloidal Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaíde Braga de Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is still the most destructive and dangerous parasitic infection in many tropical and subtropical countries. The burden of this disease is getting worse, mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against the widely available antimalarial drugs. There is an urgent need for new, more affordable and accessible antimalarial agents possessing original modes of action. Natural products have played a dominant role in the discovery of leads for the development of drugs to treat human diseases, and this fact anticipates that new antimalarial leads may certainly emerge from tropical plant sources. This present review covers most of the recently-published non-alkaloidal natural compounds from plants with antiplasmodial and antimalarial properties, belonging to the classes of terpenes, limonoids, flavonoids, chromones, xanthones, anthraquinones, miscellaneous and related compounds, besides the majority of papers describing antiplasmodial crude extracts published in the last five years not reviewed before. In addition, some perspectives and remarks on the development of new drugs and phytomedicines for malaria are succinctly discussed.

  13. Inorganic analysis of herbal drugs. Part I. Metal determination in herbal drugs originating from medicinal plants of the family Lamiacae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLAVICA RAZIC

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Elemental profiles of the total analyte content ofmajor, minor and trace elements (Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Ba and B in 8 herbal drugs, originating from medicinal plants of the family Lamiacae, were determined. Flame atomic absorption/emission spectroscopy (FAAS/FAES, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF were applied, and the advantages and limitations of these techniques are also discussed. The whole procedure, from sample preparation via dissolution to the actual measurements, was validated by using CRM (NIST 1573a – Tomato leaves. The recovery values obtained were in the range 90.64 – 101.58 %. A high degree of similarity in their elemental profiles was noticed from the results of qualitative analysis, while quantitative analysis shows significant diversity due to the variety of the influencing sources. The medicinal plants investigated in this work contained Cu (5.92–14.79 mg kg-1, Zn (15.0 – 43.0 mg kg-1, Mn (25 – 111 mg kg-1, Fe (74 – 546 mg kg-1, K (1.80 – 6.24 %, Ca (0.90 – 1.43 %, Mg (0.17 – 0.67 %, Al (49 – 378 mg kg-1, Ba (15.53 – 69.84 mg kg-1 and B (34.7 – 56.5 mg kg-1.

  14. [A historical review of the therapeutic use of wood creosote. Part II: Original plant source of crude drug wood creosote].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Nobuaki; Sato, Akane; Shibata, Takashi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Wood creosote is a medicine that has been listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia (JP) since the first edition published in 1886. Medicines containing wood creosote and other natural ingredients have been very popular in Japan and Southeast Asian countries. In Japan, one such medicine, named Seirogan, has been used for more than 100 years. In this paper, we report the results of our examination on the historical aspects of wood creosote. One finding was that creosote, called "kereosote" at that time, was imported to Japan for the first time to Nagasaki by Johann Erdewin Niemann, who was the Director of the Dutch Mercantile House, and prescribed by Johannes Lijdius Catharinus Pompe van Meerdervoort and Anthonius Franciscus Bauduin. From our findings, we concluded that wood creosote was one of the essential medicines for the successful introduction and progression of Western medicine in Japan. Furthermore, we found that Dutch physicians introduced wood creosote to Japanese physicians, including Taizen Sato, Dokai Hayashi, and Jun Matsumoto, and that wood creosote was subsequently popularized by Rintaro (Ogai) Mori during the Russo-Japanese war. In addition, we examined the original plant for wood creosote, and consequently confirmed that the 15th edition of the JP, Supplement Two, clarifying the original plant for wood creosote, matches the pharmaceutical and historical facts. We also provide drug information relating to distinguishing between wood creosote and the creosote bush.

  15. Development of containers sealing system like part of surveillance program of the vessel in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero C, J.; Hernandez C, R.; Fernandez T, F.; Rocamontes A, M.; Perez R, N.

    2009-10-01

    The owners of nuclear power plants should be demonstrate that the embrittlement effects by neutronic radiation do not commit the structural integrity from the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors, during conditions of routine operation and below postulate accident. For this reason, there are surveillance programs of vessels of nuclear power plants, in which are present surveillance capsules. A surveillance capsule is compound by the support, six containers for test tubes and dosimeters. The containers for test tubes are of two types: rectangular container for test tubes, Charpy V and Cylindrical Container for tension test tubes. These test tubes are subject to a same or bigger neutronic flow to that of vessel, being representative of vessel mechanical conditions. The test tubes are rehearsed to watch over the increase of embrittlement that presents the vessel. This work describes the development of welding system to seal the containers for test tubes, these should be filled with helium of ultra high purity, to a pressure of an atmosphere. In this system the welding process Gas Tungsten Arc Welding is used, a hermetic camera that allows to place the containers with three grades of freedom, a vacuum subsystem and pressure, high technology equipment's like: power source with integrated computer, arc starter of high frequency, helium flow controller, among others. Finally, the advances in the inspection system for the qualification of sealing system are mentioned, system that should measure the internal pressure of containers and the helium purity inside these. (Author)

  16. DNA barcoding for species identification from dried and powdered plant parts: a case study with authentication of the raw drug market samples of Sida cordifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassou, Sophie Lorraine; Kusuma, G; Parani, Madasamy

    2015-03-15

    The majority of the plant materials used in herbal medicine is procured from the markets in the form of dried or powdered plant parts. It is essential to use authentic plant materials to derive the benefits of herbal medicine. However, establishing the identity of these plant materials by conventional taxonomy is extremely difficult. Here we report a case study in which the species identification of the market samples of Sida cordifolia was done by DNA barcoding. As a prelude to species identification by DNA barcoding, 13 species of Sida were collected, and a reference DNA barcode library was developed using rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH and ITS2 markers. Based on the intra-species and inter-species divergence observed, psbA-trnH and ITS2 were found to be the best two-marker combination for species identification of the market samples. The study showed that none of the market samples belonged to the authentic species, S. cordifolia. Seventy-six per cent of the market samples belonged to other species of Sida. The predominant one was Sida acuta (36%) followed by S. spinosa (20%), S. alnifolia (12%), S. scabrida (4%) and S. ravii (4%). Such substitutions may not only fail to give the expected therapeutic effect, but may also give undesirable effects as in case of S. acuta which contains a 6-fold higher amount of ephedrine compared to the roots of S. cordifolia. The remaining 24% of the samples were from other genera such as Abutilon sp. (8%), Ixonanthes sp., Terminalia sp., Fagonia sp., and Tephrosia sp. (4% each). This observation is in contrast to the belief that medicinal plants are generally substituted or adulterated with closely related species. The current study strongly suggests that the raw drug market samples of herbal medicines need to be properly authenticated before use, and DNA barcoding has been found to be suitable for this purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Yield estimation comparison of oil palm based on plant density coefficient variation index using spot-6 imagery in part of Riau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati, H. A.; S, S. H. Murti B.; Widyatmanti, W.

    2016-06-01

    Oil palm plantations consist of diverse plant density level that influence the appearance of soil surface or commonly in remote sensing terms called as soil background. Choosing the right density coefficient of vegetation transformation can decrease the noise of soil background for estimating oil palm yield. This research aims 1) to examine the accuracy of SPOT-6 to identify the oil palm l plant growth level and to estimate their yield 2) to know the variation of oil palm yield based on SAVI index vegetation using different density coefficient; and 3) to determine the best density coefficient to estimate the yield of oil palm. This research was held in part of Air Molek, Indragiri Hulu Regency, Riau, one of the largest oil palm plantations in Indonesia. This research method utilises SAVI transformation with density coefficient L-0, L-0.5, and L-1, and regression statistics analysis. The land-cover primary data is derived from SPOT-6 imagery archived in 13rd June 2013. The field survey was conducted in the same month of image's acquisition time and 120 sample areas were taken during that time. Two steps of regression analyses were applied to see the correlation between, first, vegetation index value and oil palm plant; and second, oil palm plant, vegetation index values, and oil palm yield from field observation. These steps produced a model to estimate the oil palm yield based on the index values of yield and vegetation, and the productivity estimation. The result shows that SPOT-6 imagery has 96% accuracy level which is considered high for identifying the oil palm variation. The R value for L-0 density coefficient is 0.8, for L-5 is 0.81 whereas for L-1 is 0.82. The best plant's density coefficient for estimating oil palm yield/yield is L-0 with yield estimation accuracy of 83.33%.

  18. Assessment of local management practices on the population ecology of some medicinal plants in the coniferous forest of Northern Parts of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Hassan; Elyemeni, Mohammad; Khan, Abdur Rehman; Sabir, Amjad

    2010-01-01

    A study on the assessment of local management practices on the population of three medicinal plants viz.: Persicaria amplexicaule. D. Don., Valeriana jatamansi Jones and Viola serpens Wall ex Roxb was conducted during 2002–2004 in the coniferous forest of Northern Parts of Pakistan. The objective of the study was to know the impact of current management practices on the population size of targeted plants. The study showed that the involvement of locals in the gathering of targeted plants varied with the change in elevation. Among the targeted plants V. serpens was collected by large majorities of people (83.3%) at 2700 m followed by 72% at 2300 m and 37% at 1900 m. V. jatamansi was harvested by a small number of people (18.1%) at 1900 and 2300 m each, followed by 8.3% at 2700 m. While P. amplexicaule was harvested by a few collectors (9.1%) at 1900 m and 9.6% at 2300 m followed by 8.3% at 2700 m. The study concluded that these species have been extracted so heavily in the past that they are found now sparsely in some sites of the study area. Secondly, due to loss of its habitat by deforestation and encroachment of land for cultivation its population is on the decline towards extinction. Therefore, the current study recommends the conservation of the remaining populations of targeted plants through active participation of local communities. PMID:23961117

  19. MIGRE: an Expert System as an aid for loose part diagnosis and mechanical shocks interpretation in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, B.; Puyal, C.; Fernandes, A.; Martin, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an application of the expert system technique to one of the functions which participate to the surveillance of the primary circuit of water-pressurized reactors: the detection of loose parts and the interpretation of mechanical shocks. First, we describe the domain of expertise and the context in which this expert system will be used. Then we deal with the principles and the different levels involved in the knowledge modeling and with the structure of the expert system

  20. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouradian, E. M.

    1983-12-31

    Thermal analyses for the preliminary design phase of the Receiver of the Carrizo Plains Solar Power Plant are presented. The sodium reference operating conditions (T/sub in/ = 610/sup 0/F, T/sub out/ = 1050/sup 0/F) have been considered. Included are: Nominal flux distribution on receiver panal, Energy input to tubes, Axial temperature distribution; sodium and tubes, Sodium flow distribution, Sodium pressure drop, orifice calculations, Temperature distribution in tube cut (R-0), Backface structure, and Nonuniform sodium outlet temperature. Transient conditions and panel front face heat losses are not considered. These are to be addressed in a subsequent design phase. Also to be considered later are the design conditions as variations from the nominal reference (operating) condition. An addendum, designated Appendix C, has been included describing panel heat losses, panel temperature distribution, and tube-manifold joint thermal model.

  1. Population morbidity in the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant observation zone as an integral part of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomenko, I M; Zakladna, N V; Orlova, N M

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the health status of adult population living in the Ukrainian nuclear power industry obser vation zone on the example of Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant. System review, analytic, sociological survey and statistical methods. There was established an increase in the incidence of digestive diseases among adult population in Nikopol of Dnipropetrovsk region, which is included in the Zaporizhzhia NPP observation zone. The highest increase was observed in the incidence of peptic ulcer, gastritis and duodenitis, cholecystitis and cholangitis by 340 %, 305 % and 83 %, respectively. In connection with the residence in industrially developed region and NPP life extension in Ukraine, the possible influence of harmful factors on health status of the population of observation zones, an increase in the incidence of digestive diseases among adult population, there is required continuous monitoring and detailed study of public health. I. M. Khomenko, N. V. Zakladna, N. M. Orlova.

  2. Solar radiation concentrators paired with multijunction photoelectric converters in ground-based solar power plants (part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionova, E. A.; Ulanov, M. V.; Davidyuk, N. Yu.; Sadchikov, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a method for determining parameters of radiation concentrator in solar power plants. To estimate the efficiency of concentrators in the form of Fresnel lenses in setups with three-junction photoelectric converters, the concept of the efficiency of the concentrator-photoelectric converter pair has been introduced. We have proposed a method for calculating the refracting profile of concentrators taking into account the dispersion relation for the refractive index and its variations with temperature for the material of the refracting profile of the concentrator (Wacker RT604 silicone compound). The results of calculation make it possible to achieve the maximal efficiency of the concentrator-photoelectric converter pair in the presence of chromatic aberrations in the optical system of solar radiation concentration.

  3. Working group 4a: Regional aspects. Nuclear power plants siting in the dutch speaking part of the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willems, M.; Medart, R.; Vanneste, O.

    1976-01-01

    The problems due to nuclear plant siting in the northern region of Belgium are reviewed with an emphasis on economical, environmental and esthetical aspects. Three types of sitings were analysed: inland, coastal and off-shore. For the in-land siting, Doel, where already two units are in operation (780 MWe) and a third in construction (900 MWe), is supposed to be able to receive a fourth unit of 1000 MWe. The coastal siting is practically impossible for two reasons: the lack of cooling water when a coastal inland region of 5 km is considered and the strong density of tourists on the 66 km coast. For artificial island siting the different aspects are considered: type of soil, marine environment, construction factors, security, construction time, costs, etc. A comparative study for 9 off-shore sites is presented. (A.F.)

  4. 137Cs dynamics in the forest of Fukushima after the nuclear power plant accident in March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, I.; Ohte, N.; Iseda, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Hirose, A.; Tanoi, K.

    2013-12-01

    The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant after the earthquake and Tsunami in March 11th 2011, caused large amount of radioactive Cesium (137Cs) emission into the environment. In the region of Fukushima Prefecture, forest dominates more than 70 % of the land area. River water from the forest area is used for food production and also for drinking water. Thus, it is important to understand the dynamics of 137Cs deposited in the forest to predict how the radioactive Cs diffuse and discharge from the forest catchments. We measured 137Cs concentration of the tree body, litter fall, throughfall, and stemflow, in order to clarify how 137Cs deposited on the above ground biomass of the forest are transported to the forest floor. We set forest site at the upstream part of Kami-Oguni River catchment, northern part of Fukushima Prefecture. Three plots (2 deciduous stands and 1 Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) plantation stand) were set in the forest site. Quercus serrata and C. japonica, which are representative tree species, were chosen at each plot and concentration of 137Cs on the bark, sapwood and heartwood were measured every 2 m from the ground to tree top. From each plot, 137Cs concentration of leaf litter was measured among species. Water samples of throughfall and stemflow were filtered and 137Cs concentration in suspended matter was measured. 137Cs was deposited on the bark of Q. serrata at high concentration (9-18 kBq/kg) but there were no clear relationship between tree height and concentration. 137Cs concentration of the sapwood (41 Bq/kg) was relatively higher than that of the heartwood (5 Bq/kg). It was suggested that 137Cs may be absorbed from bark and/or root. The concentration of 137Cs deposited in leaf litter varied from non-detected level to above 30 kBq/kg. The concentration was higher at evergreen tree than deciduous tree. It is considered that the litter of evergreen tree was derived from leaves on the tree canopy at the time of the

  5. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano R, M. de L.

    2013-10-01

    At the present time the operation licenses in force for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) will expire in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit-1 and Unit-2, respectively, for which the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) has begun its preparation to assist a solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. The present work has the purpose of defining the steps to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this process, as the normative, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc. so that the evaluation process will be effective and efficient, as much for the regulator organ as for the licensee. The advance carried out in the continuation of the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude is also exposed, taking like base the requirements established by the CNSNS, the regulator organ of the United States (US NRC), and the IAEA for license renovation solicitude of this type. A summary of the licenses granted from the beginning of commercial operation of the NPP-L V is included, both units and the amendments to these licenses, explaining the reason of the amendment shortly and in the dates they were granted. A brief exposition of the nuclear power plants to world level that have received extension of its operation is included. The normative that can be applied in a life extension evaluation is presented, the evaluation process to continue with the guides of the US NRC, the reach of the evaluation and the minimum information required to the licensee that should accompany to their solicitude. (author)

  6. Performance of Planted Herbaceous Species in Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) Plantations: Overstory Effects of Competition and Needlefall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagley, C.M.

    2001-07-03

    Research to determine the separate effects of above-ground and below-ground competition and needlefall of over-story pines on under-story plant performance. Periodic monitoring of over-story crown closure, soil water content, temperature, and nutrients were conducted. Results indicate competition for light had a more determental effect on performance of herbaceous species in longleaf pine plantations than that resulting from competition for below-ground resources.

  7. Safety assessment in plant layout design using indexing approach: implementing inherent safety perspective. Part 2-Domino Hazard Index and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, Alessandro; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2008-12-15

    The design of layout plans requires adequate assessment tools for the quantification of safety performance. The general focus of the present work is to introduce an inherent safety perspective at different points of the layout design process. In particular, index approaches for safety assessment and decision-making in the early stages of layout design are developed and discussed in this two-part contribution. Part 1 (accompanying paper) of the current work presents an integrated index approach for safety assessment of early plant layout. In the present paper (Part 2), an index for evaluation of the hazard related to the potential of domino effects is developed. The index considers the actual consequences of possible escalation scenarios and scores or ranks the subsequent accident propagation potential. The effects of inherent and passive protection measures are also assessed. The result is a rapid quantification of domino hazard potential that can provide substantial support for choices in the early stages of layout design. Additionally, a case study concerning selection among various layout options is presented and analyzed. The case study demonstrates the use and applicability of the indices developed in both parts of the current work and highlights the value of introducing inherent safety features early in layout design.

  8. Cd Toxicity and Accumulation in Rice Plants Vary with Soil Nitrogen Status and Their Genotypic Difference can be Partly Attributed to Nitrogen Uptake Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin DU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Two indica rice genotypes, viz. Milyang 46 and Zhenshan 97B differing in Cd accumulation and tolerance were used as materials in a hydroponic system consisting of four Cd levels (0, 0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 µmol/L and three N levels (23.2, 116.0 and 232.0 mg/L to study the effects of nitrogen status and nitrogen uptake capacity on Cd accumulation and tolerance in rice plants. N-efficient rice genotype, Zhenshan 97B, accumulated less Cd and showed higher Cd tolerance than N-inefficient rice genotype, Milyang 46. There was consistency between nitrogen uptake capacity and Cd tolerance in rice plants. Increase of N level in solution slightly increased Cd concentration in shoots but significantly increased in roots of both genotypes. Compared with the control at low N level, Cd tolerance in both rice genotypes could be significantly enhanced under normal N level, but no significant difference was observed between the Cd tolerances under normal N (116.0 mg/L and high N (232.0 mg/L conditions. The result proved that genotypic differences in Cd accumulation and toxicity could be, at least in part, attributed to N uptake capacity in rice plants.

  9. Accumulation of soil-borne aluminium, iron, manganese and zinc in plants cultivated in the region of Moanda (Gabon) and nutritional characteristics of the edible parts harvested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondo, Jean Aubin; Biyogo, Richard Menye; Eba, François; Prudent, Pascale; Fotio, Daniel; Ollui-Mboulou, Magloire; Omva-Zue, Joseph

    2013-08-15

    In central Africa, studies on the transfer of metals from soil to food crops, the composition of foods and the dietary intake of cultivated vegetables are scarce. In this study, aluminium (Al), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) transfer from naturally (pedogeochemically) contaminated soils into ten edible plants and human exposure to these metals via edible parts of the plants were investigated. The fertility of the soils studied was still satisfactory. Soil Al (33,029-40,031 mg kg(-1)), Fe (20,869 ± 1124 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (248.3 ± 37.9 mg kg(-1)) concentrations were consistent with those found in agricultural soils, but Mn concentrations were above those normally encountered in arable fields (10,000 mg kg(-1)). The results indicated a substantial accumulation of Fe in red roselle leaves and of Al, Mn and Zn in some leafy plants and okra (fruits). The present study highlights that adults consuming vegetables grown on naturally Mn-rich soils ingest significant amounts of Al, Mn and Zn. However, Zn amounts were below the recommended maximum tolerable levels for hazard risk. The study indicated that Al and Mn accumulation in food crops cultivated in the Moanda area of Gabon may represent a health hazard. However, the high levels of Zn in vegetables could be a pathway for Zn supplementation in human nutrition to reduce Zn deficiency in developing countries. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. The search for natural bioactive compounds through a multidisciplinary approach in Bolivia. Part II. Antimalarial activity of some plants used by Mosetene indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, V; Sauvain, M; Bourdy, G; Callapa, J; Rojas, I; Vargas, L; Tae, A; Deharo, E

    2000-02-01

    Forty-six different species collected in the Mosetene ethnia, dwelling in the Andean Piedmont of Bolivia, were screened for antimalarial properties. Thirty-three extracts were screened for antimalarial activity in vitro on Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant strain (Indo), and forty-seven extracts were evaluated in vivo on the rodent malaria P. vinckei petteri 279BY. Only two plants are specifically used in combination by the Mosetene against malaria attack (Hymenachne donacifolia and Tesseria integrifolia), but they did not display any activity in vivo at 1000 mg/kg. The in vivo most active extracts were Swietenia macrophylla bark, Trema micrantha bark and Triplaris americana bark, not all of them were used for antimalarial purposes by the Mosetene. The following extracts were moderately active: Jacaratia digitata inner bark and Momordica charantia aerial part (both traditionally used as febrifuge), Kalanchoe pinnate aerial part (used in inflammatory processes), Lunania parviflora twigs and leaves, Phyllanthus acuminatus (used as piscicide), Tynanthus schumannianus fruit (used against diarrhoea), Triumfetta semitrilobata (used as febrifuge, to alleviate kidney and gynecological pain) and finally Solanum mammosum fruit (used against scabies). We present here the results of this screening, emphazing on the in vivo antimalarial activity of the selected plants. The antimalarial in vivo activity of the selected species, in relation with their traditional Mosetene use is then discussed.

  11. Phylogeography of Phytophagous Weevils and Plant Species in Broadleaved Evergreen Forests: A Congruent Genetic Gap between Western and Eastern Parts of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Aoki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Quaternary climate cycles played an important role in shaping the distribution of biodiversity among current populations, even in warm-temperate zones, where land was not covered by ice sheets. We focused on the Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen forest community in Japan, which characterizes the biodiversity and endemism of the warm-temperate zone. A comparison of the phylogeographic patterns of three types of phytophagous weevils associated with Castanopsis (a host-specific seed predator, a generalist seed predator, and a host-specific leaf miner and several other plant species inhabiting the forests revealed largely congruent patterns of genetic differentiation between western and eastern parts of the main islands of Japan. A genetic gap was detected in the Kii Peninsula to Chugoku-Shikoku region, around the Seto Inland Sea. The patterns of western-eastern differentiation suggest past fragmentation of broadleaved evergreen forests into at least two separate refugia consisting of the southern parts of Kyushu to Shikoku and of Kii to Boso Peninsula. Moreover, the congruent phylogeographic patterns observed in Castanopsis and the phytophagous insect species imply that the plant-herbivore relationship has been largely maintained since the last glacial periods. These results reinforce the robustness of the deduced glacial and postglacial histories of Castanopsis-associated organisms.

  12. In vitro antifungal activities of extracts of fruits and other morphological parts of xanthium strumarium against the plant pathogen, rhizoctonia solani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, N.U.; Alsiddeeg, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro antifungal activity of different plant parts of Xanthium strumarium (Compositae) was investigated against Rhizoctonia solani to seek safe natural alternatives to the harmful synthetic fungicides. The most active plant parts of X. strumarium were seeds, extracted with n-hexane and the leaves, extracted with absolute ethanol. The two treatments resulted in growth inhibition diameters of 45 mm and 47 mm, respectively. The value of MIC lied between 350.0 and 175.0 mg of Xanthium oil/mL. Gas liquid chromatography of the seed oil of X. strumarium revealed the presence of the usual fatty acids, palmitoleic (7.6%), oleic (21.6%) and linoleic (70.4%). The oil was separated into free fatty acids fraction and unsaponifiable matter fraction. The unsaponifiable matter fraction was separated on TLC, out of six separated compounds, two were active against R. solani. The infrared spectra (FTIR) of these two purified compounds pointed to a long chain hydrocarbon back-bone for both, one of them possessing in addition, an alcoholic moiety. (author)

  13. Seismic fragility of RC shear walls in nuclear power plant Part 1: Characterization of uncertainty in concrete constitutive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Sammiuddin [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, 426 Mann Hall, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Gupta, Abhinav, E-mail: agupta1@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, 413 Mann Hall, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A framework is proposed for seismic fragility assessment of Reinforced Concrete structures. • Experimentally validated finite element models are used to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Critical parameters in concrete constitutive model are identified to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Uncertainties in model parameters of concrete damage plasticity model is characterized. • Closed form expressions are used to compute the damage variables and plasticity. - Abstract: This two part manuscript proposes a framework for seismic fragility assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear energy facilities. The novelty of the proposed approach lies in the characterization of uncertainties in the parameters of the material constitutive model. Concrete constitutive models that comprehensively address different damage states such as tensile cracking, compression failure, stiffness degradation, and recovery of degraded stiffness due to closing of previously formed cracks under dynamic loading are generally defined in terms of a large number of variables to characterize the plasticity and damage at material level. Over the past several years, many different studies have been presented on evaluation of fragility for reinforced concrete structures using nonlinear time history simulations. However, almost all of these studies do not consider uncertainties in the parameters of a comprehensive constitutive model. Part-I of this two-part manuscript presents a study that is used to identify uncertainties associated with the critical parameters in nonlinear concrete damage plasticity model proposed by Lubliner et al. (1989. Int. J. Solids Struct., 25(3), 299) and later modified by Lee and Fenves (1998a. J. Eng. Mech., ASCE, 124(8), 892) and Lee and Fenves (1998b. Earthquake Eng. Struct. Dyn., 27(9), 937) for the purpose of seismic fragility assessment. The limitations in implementation of the damage plasticity model within a finite element framework and

  14. Seismic fragility of RC shear walls in nuclear power plant Part 1: Characterization of uncertainty in concrete constitutive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Sammiuddin; Gupta, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A framework is proposed for seismic fragility assessment of Reinforced Concrete structures. • Experimentally validated finite element models are used to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Critical parameters in concrete constitutive model are identified to conduct nonlinear simulations. • Uncertainties in model parameters of concrete damage plasticity model is characterized. • Closed form expressions are used to compute the damage variables and plasticity. - Abstract: This two part manuscript proposes a framework for seismic fragility assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear energy facilities. The novelty of the proposed approach lies in the characterization of uncertainties in the parameters of the material constitutive model. Concrete constitutive models that comprehensively address different damage states such as tensile cracking, compression failure, stiffness degradation, and recovery of degraded stiffness due to closing of previously formed cracks under dynamic loading are generally defined in terms of a large number of variables to characterize the plasticity and damage at material level. Over the past several years, many different studies have been presented on evaluation of fragility for reinforced concrete structures using nonlinear time history simulations. However, almost all of these studies do not consider uncertainties in the parameters of a comprehensive constitutive model. Part-I of this two-part manuscript presents a study that is used to identify uncertainties associated with the critical parameters in nonlinear concrete damage plasticity model proposed by Lubliner et al. (1989. Int. J. Solids Struct., 25(3), 299) and later modified by Lee and Fenves (1998a. J. Eng. Mech., ASCE, 124(8), 892) and Lee and Fenves (1998b. Earthquake Eng. Struct. Dyn., 27(9), 937) for the purpose of seismic fragility assessment. The limitations in implementation of the damage plasticity model within a finite element framework and

  15. Decorative values and the nutritional status of some Magnolia species under the climatic conditions of Lublin (Poland. Part II. Evaluation of the nutritional status of the plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenia Michałojć

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted on six Magnolia species in the period 2006-2008 in the Botanical Garden of the Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin. The soil and leaves from the locations of the following species of Magnolia were subjected to evaluation: cucumber tree (Magnolia acuminata L., Kobushi magnolia (Magnolia kobus DC, purple lily magnolia (Magnolia liliiflora L., Japanese willow-leaf magnolia (Magnolia salicifolia Siebold et Zucc. Maxim., saucer magnolia (Magnolia x soulangiana Soul.-Bod., and umbrella magnolia (Magnolia tripetala L.. The studied plants were planted during the period 1968-1989 on grey-brown podzolic soil derived from loess. The significantly lowest content of phosphorus, potassium and magnesium as well as the lowest pH were recorded in the soil from the location occupied by the purple lily magnolia (M. liliiflora. The other sites were characterized by an optimal range of pH, high soil phosphorus and magnesium availability as well as medium potassium availability. An optimal content of nitrogen and calcium was found in the leaves of the cucumber tree (M. acuminata, of phosphorus and magnesium in the leaves of the Kobushi magnolia (M. kobus, and of potassium in the leaves of the Japanese willow-leaf magnolia (M. salicifolia. A low content of nitrogen and calcium was shown in the leaves of the purple lily magnolia (M. liliiflora, of phosphorus in the leaves of the saucer magnolia (M. x soulangiana, and of potassium in the indicator parts of the cucumber tree (M. acuminata. The study found that among the studied species the cucumber tree (M. acuminata could be a good biostabilizer of nitrogen, while the Kobushi magnolia (M. kobus a good biostabilizer of phosphorus and magnesium. In spite of significant differences in soil nutrient availability and clear variations in macronutrient contents in the indicator parts of the investigated plants, no visual symptoms of nutrient deficit were found in the Magnolia species

  16. Differential antifungal activity of alfalfa (Medicago santva L. saponins originated from roots and aerial parts for some ornamental plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Saniewska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The total saponins isolated from aerial parts and roots of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. at the concentration of 0,01%, 0,05% and 0,1% showed differential influence on the mycelium growth of Alternaria zinniae, Botrytis cinerea, Botrytis tulipae, Phoma narcissi, Phoma poolensis and Rhizoctonia solani. A higher inhibitory effect on in vitro growth of mycelium of all tested pathogens indicated saponins from roots of alfalfa than from aerial parts. Tested saponins from roots at lhe concentration of 0,1% totally inhibited linear growth of Phoma narcissi, and linear growth of Alternaria zinniae was limited about 67%, Botrytis cinerea about 74%, Botrytis tulipae about 68%, Phoma poolensis about 38%, and Rhizoctonia solani about 74% in comparison to the control. The saponins of alfalfa from roots at the concentration of 0,1% and 0,2% applied as preinoculation sprays evidently inhibited the development of Phoma narcissi on Hippeastrum leaves. This dose of aerial saponins of alfalfa did not effect the development of necrotic spots on the leaves.

  17. Organic matter dynamics in a savanna transition riparian zone: Input of plant reproductive parts increases leaf breakdown process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan S. Rezende

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM drives the functioning of most low order freshwater ecosystems. We evaluated plant litter input, litterfall, leaf litter breakdown rates, and the aquatic invertebrate community over the course of one year in a stream situation in a transition zone between savannah and Atlantic forest. Total organic matter input (litter fall was 335 g m-2 yr-1, which was mainly composed of leaves (50%. Higher values are found in the transition from dry to rainy season (September and October, probably in response to water stress. The remaining leaf mass (65% on average was lowest in May (49% and highest in August (79%. CPOM productivity in this transition riparian zone is higher than in other savannah systems, but lower than in Atlantic forest. The higher leaf litter breakdown in May was likely accompanied by environmental enrichment due to increase in fruits and flowers (high energy resources. The coefficient of decomposition was classified as fast (k= -0.016 and showed a positive relationship with water flow (increase in physical abrasion. Collected invertebrates were classified as 6% shredders and 12% scrapers. The remaining leaf mass showed a negative relationship with scraper abundance, highlighting the importance of these trophic groups in tropical streams. We can conclude that climate factors (e.g., rainfall directly affect the input and quality of CPOM and, consequently, leaf decomposition in savanna/Atlantic forest transition zones. 

  18. The right maintenance on the right components, at the right time, with the right parts: maintaining high plant reliability through an effective maintenance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Hatten, P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the maintenance program at a Nuclear Power Plant is to be proactive and prevent unexpected failures of equipment that can impact on Nuclear or Conventional Safety and Plant Production. This does not mean that all equipment failures will be prevented; in a number of cases the most cost effective solution is to allow equipment to run to failure. Deciding what components are critical to the plant is the first step. The industry uses guidance from INPO Advanced Process, AP913, to classify components as Critical, Non Critical or Run to Failure based on the consequence of the failure. Once this is complete, then the right maintenance program needs to be specified. This is done through utilization of experience from the industry based on the type of component. Maintenance strategies and templates have been produced for most power plant components. Each station or fleet needs then to apply the criteria, with exceptions as required, to determine the maintenance requirements and frequency for their components. This includes predictive and preventative maintenance. The more critical the component is the more rigorous the maintenance requirements. Once the maintenance program is defined it can be implemented. This requires that the Preventative Maintenance (PM's) are updated to ensure the correct tasks are in place and the frequency is correct. Work Management will group the PM's so they can scheduled efficiently and to minimize equipment down time. The last element is to ensure that the required parts are specified and are stocked or readily available for the maintenance when it is scheduled. This is an ongoing effort since components become obsolete or suppliers go out of business or change hands. (author)

  19. Calendar year 1995 groundwater quality report for the Beak Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Part 2: 1995 groundwater quality data interpretations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during the 1995 calendar year (CY) for several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities associated with the US DOE Y-12 Plant. The sites addressed by this document are located in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime. The Bear Creek Regime is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface water quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements. Each annual Part 2 GWQR addresses RCRA interim status reporting requirements regarding assessment of the horizontal and vertical extent of groundwater contamination. This report includes background information regarding the extent of groundwater and surface water contamination in the Bear Creek Regime based on the conceptual models described in the remedial investigation report (Section 2); a summary of the groundwater and surface water monitoring activities performed during CY 1995 (Section 3.0); analysis and interpretation of the CY 1995 monitoring data for groundwater (Section 4.0) and surface water (Section 5.0); a summary of conclusions and recommendations (Section 6.0); and a list of cited references (Section 7.0). Appendices contain diagrams, graphs, data tables, and summaries and the evaluation and decision criteria for data screening.

  20. Simultaneous determination of inorganic and organic ions in plant parts of Betula pendula from two different types of ecosystems (Wielkopolski National Park and Chemical Plant in Luboń, Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    The results of inorganic and organic anion concentrations in samples of soils and plant parts of Betula pendula (tap roots, lateral roots, stem, twigs, leaves), in the bioavailable fraction, are presented in this study. An ion chromatography method was applied for the first time in the simultaneous determination of inorganic and organic anions, as an effective tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of samples with different matrix. A linear gradient elution with potassium hydroxide allowed for the separation of both inorganic and organic ions such as: F(-), CH3COO(-), HCOO(-), Cl(-), NO2 (-), Br(-) and NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), CH2(COO)2 (2-), C2O4 (2-), PO4 (3-) and C3H5O(COO)3 (3-). The samples of soils and plant parts of B. pendula from the area of the Wielkopolski National Park (WNP) and the Chemical Plant in Luboń (LU; protected vs. contaminated area) were selected for the study. The obtained results indicated that such inorganic ions as: F(-), Cl(-), NO3 (-) and PO4 (3-) are quite easily transported from soil to leaves. In contrast, the mechanism of migration could not be clearly defined for SO4 (2-) because the ion was retained in roots of many of the analysed samples. Significantly higher bioavailability of inorganic ions was observed for samples collected from the area of the WNP. Phosphates were the only ions which showed no variation in their concentrations between the two sampling sites, both for soils and plant parts of B. pendula. None of the organic anions was detected in soil samples. The acetate, formate, malonate, oxalate and citrate ions were detected in all leaf samples. The statistical analysis allowed the author to determine the mechanism of ion migration and accumulation in leaves and, additionally, determine the variation in the occurrence of inorganic and organic ions depending on the sampling site (WNP vs. LU). The results of the statistical analysis were confirmed by the bioacumulation (BF) and translocation (TF) factors.

  1. Implementation of the Resource Disincentive in 40 CFR part 191.14 (e) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    In 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project Office (WPO) (DOE-WPO) prepared a strategy for complying with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Standards for the management of transuranic (TRU) waste. Section 3.2.2.2 of the DOE's report addressed compliance with the Assurance Requirements found in 40 CFR section 191.14. One of the Assurance Requirements addresses the selection of repository sites that contain recoverable natural resources. This report documents that the site selection process for the WIPP facility did indeed comply with the natural resource disincentive requirement in 40 CFR section 191,14(e) at the time selected and therefore complies with the standard at this time. Thus, it shall be shown that it is reasonably certain that the WIPP site provides better overall protection than practical alternatives that were available when the site was selected. It is important to point out here, and it will be discussed later in the report, that the resource disincentive requirement is a preliminary siting criterion that requires further evaluation of sites that have resources (i.e, hydrocarbons, minerals and groundwater) in the vicinity or on the site. This further evaluation requires that for sites that do have resources, a qualitative determination must be made that the site will provide better overall protection than practical alternatives. The purpose of this report is not to provide a quantitative evaluation for selection of the WIPP site. A further discussion on the difference between the qualitative analysis required under 40 CFR section 191.14(e) and the quantitative analysis under other sections of 40 CFR 191 is provided in section 2.1 of this report

  2. AtMic60 Is Involved in Plant Mitochondria Lipid Trafficking and Is Part of a Large Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Morgane; Gros, Valérie; Tardif, Marianne; Brugière, Sabine; Ferro, Myriam; Prinz, William A; Toulmay, Alexandre; Mathur, Jaideep; Wozny, Michael; Falconet, Denis; Maréchal, Eric; Block, Maryse A; Jouhet, Juliette

    2016-03-07

    The mitochondrion is an organelle originating from an endosymbiotic event and playing a role in several fundamental processes such as energy production, metabolite syntheses, and programmed cell death. This organelle is delineated by two membranes whose synthesis requires an extensive exchange of phospholipids with other cellular organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and vacuolar membranes in yeast. These transfers of phospholipids are thought to occur by a non-vesicular pathway at contact sites between two closely apposed membranes. In plants, little is known about the biogenesis of mitochondrial membranes. Contact sites between ER and mitochondria are suspected to play a similar role in phospholipid trafficking as in yeast, but this has never been demonstrated. In contrast, it has been shown that plastids are able to transfer lipids to mitochondria during phosphate starvation. However, the proteins involved in such transfer are still unknown. Here, we identified in Arabidopsis thaliana a large lipid-enriched complex called the mitochondrial transmembrane lipoprotein (MTL) complex. The MTL complex contains proteins located in the two mitochondrial membranes and conserved in all eukaryotic cells, such as the TOM complex and AtMic60, a component of the MICOS complex. We demonstrate that AtMic60 contributes to the export of phosphatidylethanolamine from mitochondria and the import of galactoglycerolipids from plastids during phosphate starvation. Furthermore, AtMic60 promotes lipid desorption from membranes, likely as an initial step for lipid transfer, and binds to Tom40, suggesting that AtMic60 could regulate the tethering between the inner and outer membranes of mitochondria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical and Radiological Characterization of Different parts of an Irradiation Coolant Channel Tube from Atucha I Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquin, Ruben

    2001-01-01

    The widespread replacement of reactor internals has generated a substantial volume of active material. It is essential to work with these components at least in a partial way before the next planned stop, which will take place during the second semester of the year 2002. Due to the fact that the reactor internals pool and the storage pool for irradiated nuclear fuel have limited capacities, it has been proposed to compact an experimental shift of 50 irradiated coolant channels, that are currently placed in storage pools. Basically the processed waste will be put in baskets at the bottom pools.The alternative choice proposes to divide an irradiation coolant channel tube into different parts: stainless steel section, zircaloy-4 section and stainless steel section with hardened zones with cobalt alloys named Estelite-6. The person in charge has already planned the constructive and operative solutions but the mechanical characterization of the different parts of the channel tube is necessary in order to dimension the compaction tool needed for the semi-industrial installation.In the present special report, two well-differentiated actions will be described. The necessary compacted strength of the irradiation coolant channel tube will be estimated for the stainless steel section and the zircaloy-4 section starting from experiment with unirradiated material and considering effects of radiation damage and hydrides on the ductility.These results will be used to design the necessary compacted tools for the semi-industrial installation. The necessary equipment for the radiological characterization of the different material sections already specified will be described and the most important emitting particles of radiation that could be detected will be mentioned. Also the decontamination process to use including the radiological characterization of every stage of the process will be described in order to establish the decontamination factor. Finally the most important

  4. Effect of Radiation on Seed Germinating Ability Ofwild-Growing and Cultivated Plants, Sources of Bioactive Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanov, Aleksandr; Tirranen, Lyalya; Zykova, Irina; Bondarenko, Gennadiy

    2016-07-01

    In the above-ground parts of common chickweed (Stellaria media) the content of vitamin C was experimentally quantified, which (in terms of dry matter) was 81.55 mg/100 g; 133 mg/100 g and 161.76 mg/100 g depending on the growing site. 52 components were detected in the essential oil of the above-ground parts of common chickweed (Stellaria media). Chamazulene, neophytodien and phytol are the major components of whole oil. A wide range of elements was identified in the plants and seeds of common chickweed (Stellaria media), and in the seeds of carrots, parsley and lettuce. It was established that UV irradiation (lamp with a wavelength of 254 nm and 283 nm) of chickweed seeds (Stellaria media) for 15 sec. and 100 sec. in a microbiological box on a table at a distance from the object didn't affect their germinating ability. The germinating ability of the experimental seeds was identical to the control (no irradiation) seeds. With the help of an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer Renger 2 (Germany) at a voltage of 1.6 kV during 15 sec. the effect of "soft" radiation on the seed germinating ability of chickweed, carrot, parsley and lettuce seeds was studied.Under the effect of "soft" radiation during 15 sec. all the experimental chickweed seeds sprouted, like in the control. The germinating ability of the exposed lettuce seeds was 100% after one day, while only 45% of the exposed parsley seeds grew after 21 days. The exposed carrot seeds (70%) grew after 18 days. The effect of "hard" radiation on the germinating ability of common chickweed seeds was investigated using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer S4 Pioneer (Germany) at a voltage of 60 kV for 15 sec and 100 sec. Under the effect of "hard" radiation and during 15 seconds of exposure, where the distance (L) from the focus of the X-ray tube to the seeds of chickweed was 20 mm, the germinating ability of the experimental chickweed seeds was 30 %. At a voltage of 60 kV and 100-second exposure the germinating ability of the

  5. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B [Athens, GA; Balish, Rebecca S [Oxford, OH; Tehryung, Kim [Athens, GA; McKinney, Elizabeth C [Athens, GA

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  6. Herbicides effect on the nitrogen fertilizer assimilation by sensitive plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladonin, V.F.; Samojlov, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    It has been established in studying the effect of herbicides on pea plants that the penetration of the preparations into the tissues of leaves and stems results in a slight increase of the rate of formation of dry substance in the leaves of the treated plants within 24 hours after treatment as compared with control, whereas in the last period of the analysis the herbicides strongly inhibit the formation of dry substance in leaves. The applied herbicide doses have resulted in drastic changes of the distribution of the plant-assimilated nitrogen between the protein and non-protein fractions in the leaves and stems of pea. When affected by the studied herbicides, the fertilizer nitrogen supply to the pea plants changes and the rate of the fertilizer nitrogen assimilation by the plants varies noticeably. The regularities of the fertilizer nitrogen inclusion in the protein and non-protein nitrogen compounds of the above-ground pea organs have been studied

  7. Plant elicitor peptides promote plant defences against nematodes in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Woo; Huffaker, Alisa; Crippen, Devany; Robbins, Robert T; Goggin, Fiona L

    2018-04-01

    Plant elicitor peptides (Peps) are widely distributed among angiosperms, and have been shown to amplify immune responses in multiple plant families. Here, we characterize three Peps from soybean (Glycine max) and describe their effects on plant defences against two damaging agricultural pests, the root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines). Seed treatments with exogenous GmPep1, GmPep2 or GmPep3 significantly reduced the reproduction of both nematodes. Pep treatment also protected plants from the inhibitory effects of root-knot nematodes on above-ground growth, and up-regulated basal expression levels of nematode-responsive defence genes. GmPep1 induced the expression of its propeptide precursor (GmPROPEP1), a nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat protein (NBS-LRR), a pectin methylesterase inhibitor (PMEI), Respiratory Burst Oxidase Protein D (RBOHD) and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leaves. In addition, GmPep2 and GmPep3 seed treatments up-regulated RBOHD expression and ROS accumulation in roots and leaves. These results suggest that GmPeps activate plant defences through systemic transcriptional reprogramming and ROS signalling, and that Pep seed treatments represent a potential strategy for nematode management. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  8. Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil from the Aerial Parts of Satureja hortensis As a Potent Medical Plant Using Traditional Hydrodistillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadhosseini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The water-distilled essential oils, which were obtained from the fresh aerial parts of Satureja hortensis were analyzed by means of GC and CC/MS instruments. The plant was collected during the flowering stage from Foroomad Mountains, Semnan Province, and heart of Iran. Twenty compounds were identified in the different samples analyzed, representing 100% of the total oil contents. In terms of general categories, monoterpene hydrocarbons dominated the chemical profile of the oils with γ-terpinene (27.4%, carvacrol (23.7%, p-cymene (11.1%, α-terpinene (10.2%, α-pinene (5.1% and myrcene (5.1% as the main constituent components. The other constituents were found to be α-thujene (3.9%, β-pinene (3.0%, sylvestrene (3.0%, α-phellandrene (1.2% and (--terpinen-4-ol (1.0%.

  9. A search for natural bioactive compounds in Bolivia through a multidisciplinary approach. Part I. Evaluation of the antimalarial activity of plants used by the Chacobo Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, V; Sauvain, M; Bourdy, G; Callapa, J; Bergeron, S; Rojas, I; Bravo, J A; Balderrama, L; Ortiz, B; Gimenez, A; Deharo, E

    2000-02-01

    Thirty extracts of plants traditionally used by the Chacobos, a native community living in the Amazonian part of Bolivia, were screened in vitro and/or in vivo for antimalarial activity. Two of the four species designated as antimalarial, Geissospermum laeve and Maquira coriacea, displayed rather good activity, corroborating their traditional uses. However, they did show a rather high toxicity in vivo. Among twelve species used to cure symptoms relevant to malaria, five showed good activity: Apuleia leiocarpa, Bauhinia guianensis, Nectandra cuspidata, Sparattanthelium amazonum, Tanaecium jaroba. Two species, Qualea paraensis and Sclerolobium aff. guianense, used to treat scabies, showed interesting antimalarial activity in vivo; three other species (Iryanthera laevis, Prunus amplifolia, Pterocarpus aff. amazonum) used for various medicinal purposes, apparently not related with a Plasmodium infection, also showed antimalarial activity. Finally, one species (Derris amazonica) used as a piscicide displayed good in vitro activity, in the same way as one Annonaceae, Guatteria aff. schomburgkiana, used for construction purposes.

  10. Simultaneous Photoacoustic and Photopyroelectric Detection of Trace Gas Emissions from Some Plant Parts and Their Related Essential Oils in a Combined Detection Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Taha, M. I.; Abu-Teir, M. M.; Al-Jamal, A. J.; Eideh, H.

    The aim of this work was to establish the feasibility of the combined photoacoustic (PA) and photopyroelectric (PPE) detection of the vapours emitted from essential oils and their corresponding uncrushed leaves or flowers. Gas traces of jasmine (Jessamine (Jasminum)), mint (Mentha arvensis L.) and Damask rose (Rosa damascena Miller) and their essential oils were tested using a combined cell fitted with both a photopyroelectric film (PVDF) and a microphone in conjunction with a pulsed wideband infrared source (PWBS) source. Infrared PA and PPE absorbances were obtained simultaneously at room temperatures with excellent reproducibility and high signal-to-noise ratios. Significant similarities found between the PA and PPE spectra of the trace gas emissions of plant parts, i.e., flowers or leaves and their related essential oils show the good correlation of their emissions and that both effects are initiated by the same absorbing molecules.

  11. Accounting for sap flow from different parts of the root system improves the prediction of xylem ABA concentration in plants grown with heterogeneous soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian C.; Egea, Gregorio; Davies, William J.

    2008-01-01

    When soil moisture is heterogeneous, sap flow from, and ABA status of, different parts of the root system impact on leaf xylem ABA concentration ([X-ABA]leaf). The robustness of a model for predicting [X-ABA]leaf was assessed. ‘Two root-one shoot’ grafted sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants received either deficit irrigation (DI, each root system received the same irrigation volumes) or partial rootzone drying (PRD, only one root system was watered and the other dried the soil). Irrespective of whether relative sap flow was assessed using sap flow sensors in vivo or by pressurization of de-topped roots, each root system contributed similarly to total sap flow during DI, while sap flow from roots in drying soil declined linearly with soil water potential (Ψsoil) during PRD. Although Ψsoil of the irrigated pot determined the threshold Ψsoil at which sap flow from roots in drying soil decreased, the slope of this decrease was independent of the wet pot Ψsoil. Irrespective of whether sap was collected from the wet or dry root system of PRD plants, or a DI plant, root xylem ABA concentration increased as Ψsoil declined. The model, which weighted ABA contributions of each root system according to the sap flow from each, almost perfectly explained [X-ABA] immediately above the graft union. That the model overestimated measured [X-ABA]leaf may result from changes in [X-ABA] along the transport pathway or an artefact of collecting xylem sap from detached leaves. The implications of declining sap flow through partially dry roots during PRD for the control of stomatal behaviour and irrigation scheduling are discussed. PMID:18940933

  12. Literature study regarding fire protection in nuclear power plants. Part 2: Fire detection and -extinguishing systems; Litteraturstudie angaaende brandskydd i kaernkraftverk. Del 2: Branddetektionssystem och slaecksystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaksson, S. [Swedish Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    1996-01-01

    This literature study has been made on behalf of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. The aim is to describe different aspects of fire protection in nuclear power plants. Detection and extinguishing systems in Swedish nuclear power plants have only to a limited extent been designed after functional demands, such as a maximum acceptable damage or a maximum time to detect a fire. The availability of detection systems is difficult to assess, partly because of lack of statistics. The user interface is very important in complex systems as nuclear plants. An extinguishing system designed according to the insurance companies` regulations will only fulfill the basic demands. It should be noted that normal sprinkler design does not aim for extinguishing fires, the objective is to control fire until manual extinguishment is possible. There is a great amount of statistics on wet and dry pipe sprinkler systems, while statistics are more scarce for deluge systems. The statistics on the reliability of gaseous extinguishing systems have been found very scarce. A drawback of these systems is that they are normally designed for one shot only. There are both traditional and more recent extinguishing systems that can replace halons. From now on there will be a greater need for a thorough examination of the properties needed for the individual application and a quantification of the acceptable damage. There are several indications on the importance of a high quality maintenance program as well as carefully developed routines for testing and surveillance to ensure the reliability of detection and extinguishing systems. 78 refs, 8 figs, 10 tabs.

  13. Development of techniques for separation and sorting system of different parts of field plants; Peltokasvien eri osien erottelu- ja lajittelutekniikan kehittaeminen - 502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindh, T.; Kallio, E.; Paappanen, T.; Leinonen, A. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Fuel Production

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this research was to construct a segregation concept for an integrated method, by which it is possible to produce fibre fraction for pulping industry and by-product fraction for energy production of the field plants. Experimental data was gathered of the mechanical dry-loosening and segregation technologies, e.g. of milling, crushing and chopping, for different parts of spring-harvested reed canary grass. The applicability of each processing method for loosening different parts of the plant were investigated on the basis of the particle sizes of the processing products, and on the basis of the properties, e.g. the ash content, of the fractions. Air-separation research for processed material was carried out using impact-separator. Especially the chopped material was examined as a function of the length of the chips by making sieving and air-separation tests. Technologies of drumming and chafing between flexible rollers were studied as alternatives for further processing of the chopped material, the aim of which was to find methods which do not crush and grind the straw unnecessarily. The suggestion for the basic elements of the mechanical, as simple segregation method as possible, are the processing phase based on chafing, and the air-separation supplemented with sieving. Depending on the quality requirements of the pulp, no additional mechanical processing might not be needed. Sometimes the chopping can be the only processing phase needed. Because of this the fractionation unit has to be flexible and adjustable with the quality requirements of the pulp

  14. Heavy metals translocation and accumulation from the rhizosphere soils to the edible parts of the medicinal plant Fengdan (Paeonia ostii) grown on a metal mining area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhang Jun; Xu, De Cong; Chen, Yan Song; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-09-01

    Fengdan (Paeonia ostii) is one of Chinese 34 famous medicinal materials. This study investigated the concentrations of Arsenic (As), Chromium (Cr), Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), Lead (Pb), Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn), and Zinc (Zn) in rhizosphere soils, cortex mouton and seeds of Fengdan planted in a metal mining area, China. The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, and Zn in the rhizosphere soils were above the limits set by the Chinese Soil Environmental Quality Standard (GB 15618-1995). The contamination factor (CF) of Cd was >5, while it was >2for As, Cu, Pb, and Zn in all the soils. The integrated pollution index for all the soils was >3 and ˂ 5. Metal concentrations in the edible parts of Fengdan were in the following decreasing order: Mn>Fe>Zn>Cu>Pb>As>Cr≥Cd. The transfer factor mean values for As, Cu, Cd and Fe in the cortex moutan of old Fengdan (over 6 years) were significantly higher than in young Fengdan. Available metal concentrations, pH and soil organic matter content influenced the metal concentrations of the cortex moutan. The results indicated that mining and smelting operations have led to heavy metals contamination of soils and medicinal parts of Fengdan. The major metal pollutants were elemental Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Heavy metals mainly accumulated in the cortex moutan of Fengdan. The mean concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Pb in the old cortex moutan (over 6 years) were above those of the Chinese Green Trade Standards for Medicinal Plants and Preparations in Foreign Trade (WM/T2-2004). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Plant communities of cultivated fields of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion part vi. communities of root crops on compact soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Rzymowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of plant communities accompanying root crops on compact soils is presented in the paper. It is the next part of the review of plant communities of agrocenoses of the Podlaski Przełom Bugu (Podlasie Bug Gorge mesoregion. The studied phytocoenoses were identified on the basis of 103 phytosociological relevés, made according to the Braun-Blanquet method. In the studied agrocenoses, plots of the associations Lamio-Veronicetum politae, Galinsogo-Setarietum and Oxalido-Chenopodietum polyspermi from the Polygono-Chenopodion polyspermi alliance were noted. Small patches of Lamio-Veronicetum and Oxalido-Chenopodietum were rarely noted in the studied area due to a small proportion of suitable habitats. In the area of Podlaski Przełom Bugu mesoregion, phytocoenoses of Oxalido-Chenopodietum developed in the river valleys on fertile muds and black soils. Typical plots of Galinsogo-Setarietum distinguishable by the mass occurrence of Galinsoga parviflora were only observed in the vicinity of farm buildings. Intermediate communities between Panico-Setarion and Polygono-Chenopodion polyspermi as well as phytocoenoces of Echinochloo-Setarietum typicum - subvariant with Veronica persica and Echinochloo-Setarietum fumarietosum - were also quite frequently noted in root crops on compact soils.

  16. Thermal treatment of stabilized air pollution control residues in a waste incinerator pilot plant. Part 1: Fate of elements and dioxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeldt, Brita; Jay, Klaus; Seifert, Helmuth; Vehlow, Jürgen; Christensen, Thomas H; Baun, Dorthe L; Mogensen, Erhardt P B

    2004-02-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incinerator plants that are treated by means of the Ferrox process can be more safely disposed of due to reduction of soluble salts and stabilization of heavy metals in an iron oxide matrix. Further stabilization can be obtained by thermal treatment inside a combustion chamber of a municipal solid waste incinerator. The influence of the Ferrox products on the combustion process, the quality of the residues, and the partitioning of heavy metals between the various solids and the gas have been investigated in the Karlsruhe TAM-ARA pilot plant for waste incineration. During the experiments only few parameters were influenced. An increase in the SO2 concentration in the raw gas and slightly lower temperatures in the fuel bed could be observed compared with reference tests. Higher contents of Fe and volatile heavy metals such as Zn, Cd, Pb and partly Hg in the Ferrox products lead to increased concentration of these elements in the solid residues of the co-feeding tests. Neither the burnout nor the PCDD/F formation was altered by the addition of the Ferrox products. Co-feeding of treated APC residues seems to be a feasible approach for obtaining a single solid residue from waste incineration.

  17. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoa Onguéné, Pascal; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Lifongo, Lydia Likowo; Ndom, Jean Claude; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2013-12-13

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from "very active" to "weakly active". However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from "very active" to "moderately active" are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria.

  18. Do rock fragments participate to plant water and mineral nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Tétégan, Marion; Besnault, Adeline; Cousin, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    Rock fragments modify soil properties, and can be a potential reservoir of water. Besides, recent studies showed that this coarse soil fraction is chemically active, release nutrients, and could therefore be involved in biogeochemical nutrient cycles. However, these studies carried out on rock fragments, crushed pebbles or mineral particles do not answer the question whether the coarse soil fraction has significant nutritive functions. Only a couple of studies were conducted on plants, one on grass and the other on coniferous seedlings. This present work attempted to assess if pebbles may act as water and nutrient sources for poplar saplings, a deciduous species. Remoulded soils were set up in 5 L-pots with three percentages of pebbles: 0, 20, and 40% in volume. We used, as substrate either fine earth or sand (quartz), and as rock fragments either calcareous or inert pebbles (quartz). Additional modalities were settled with sand mixed with 20 and 40% pebbles enriched with nutrients. Both fine earth and calcareous pebbles were collected from the Ap horizon of a calcareous lacustrine limestone silty soil located in the central region of France. After cleaning, all pebbles were mixed to reach a bulk density in pots of 1.1 g/cm3 for the fine earth and 1.5 g/cm3 for the sand. Ten replicates were settled per modality, and one cutting of Populus robusta was planted in each. The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions. All pots were saturated at the beginning of the experiment, then irrigated by capillarity and controlled to maintain a moderate water stress. Growth and evapotranspiration were followed regularly, while water stress status was measured by stomatal conductivity every day during two drying periods of 10 days. After three months, plants were collected, separated in below- and above-ground parts for biomass and cation analysis (Ca, Mg, K). Results showed that pebbles can participate to plant nutrition, but no reduction of water stress was observed

  19. Molecular Dissection of The Cellular Mechanisms Involved In Nickel Hyperaccumulation in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Salt

    2002-04-08

    Hyperaccumulator plant species are able to accumulate between 1-5% of their biomass as metal. However, these plants are often small, slow growing, and do not produce a high biomass. Phytoextraction, a cost-effective, in situ, plant based approach to soil remediation takes advantage of the remarkable ability of hyperaccumulating plants to concentrate metals from the soil and accumulate them in their harvestable, above-ground tissues. However, to make use of the valuable genetic resources identified in metal hyperaccumulating species, it will be necessary to transfer this material to high biomass rapidly growing crop plants. These plants would then be ideally suited to the phytoremediation process, having the ability to produce large amount of metal-rich plant biomass for rapid harvest and soil cleanup. Although progress is being made in understanding the genetic basis of metal hyperaccumulation a more complete understanding will be necessary before we can take full advantage of the genetic potential of these plants.

  20. The Interpolation Method for Estimating the Above-Ground Biomass Using Terrestrial-Based Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Surati Jaya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined several methods for interpolating biomass on logged-over dry land forest using terrestrial-based forest inventory in Labanan, East Kalimantan and Lamandau, Kota Wringing Barat, Central Kalimantan.  The plot-distances examined was 1,000−1,050 m for Labanan and 1,000−899m for Lawanda.  The main objective of this study was to obtain the best interpolation method having the most accurate prediction on spatial distribution of forest biomass for dry land forest. Two main interpolation methods were examined: (1 deterministic approach using the IDW method and (2 geo-statistics approach  using Kriging with spherical, circular, linear, exponential, and Gaussian models.   The study results at both sites consistently showed that the IDW method was better than the Kriging method for estimating the spatial distribution of biomass.  The validation results using chi-square test showed that the IDW interpolation provided accurate biomass estimation.   Using the percentage of mean deviation value (MD(%, it was also recognized that the IDWs with power parameter (p of 2 provided relatively low value , i.e., only 15% for Labanan, East Kalimantan Province and 17% for Lamandau, Kota Wringing Barat Central Kalimantan Province. In general, IDW interpolation method provided better results than the Kriging, where the Kriging method provided MD(% of about 27% and 21% for Lamandau and Labanan sites, respectively.Keywords:  deterministic, geostatistics, IDW, Kriging, above-groung biomass

  1. Standard practice for guided wave testing of above ground steel pipework using piezoelectric effect transduction

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a procedure for the use of guided wave testing (GWT), also previously known as long range ultrasonic testing (LRUT) or guided wave ultrasonic testing (GWUT). 1.2 GWT utilizes ultrasonic guided waves, sent in the axial direction of the pipe, to non-destructively test pipes for defects or other features by detecting changes in the cross-section and/or stiffness of the pipe. 1.3 GWT is a screening tool. The method does not provide a direct measurement of wall thickness or the exact dimensions of defects/defected area; an estimate of the defect severity however can be provided. 1.4 This practice is intended for use with tubular carbon steel or low-alloy steel products having Nominal Pipe size (NPS) 2 to 48 corresponding to 60.3 to 1219.2 mm (2.375 to 48 in.) outer diameter, and wall thickness between 3.81 and 25.4 mm (0.15 and 1 in.). 1.5 This practice covers GWT using piezoelectric transduction technology. 1.6 This practice only applies to GWT of basic pipe configuration. This inc...

  2. Above-ground biomass assessment of Mediterranean forests using airborne imaging spectrometry: the DAIS Peyne experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de S.M.; Pebesma, E.; Lacaze, B.

    2003-01-01

    In July of 1997, various experimental flights were carried out with the Digital Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (DAIS7915). DAIS7915, or DAIS for short, is a European airborne imaging spectrometer and is maintained and operated by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) at Oberpfaffenhofen. One of the 1997

  3. Above ground biomass and tree species richness estimation with airborne lidar in tropical Ghana forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaglio Laurin, Gaia; Puletti, Nicola; Chen, Qi; Corona, Piermaria; Papale, Dario; Valentini, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    Estimates of forest aboveground biomass are fundamental for carbon monitoring and accounting; delivering information at very high spatial resolution is especially valuable for local management, conservation and selective logging purposes. In tropical areas, hosting large biomass and biodiversity resources which are often threatened by unsustainable anthropogenic pressures, frequent forest resources monitoring is needed. Lidar is a powerful tool to estimate aboveground biomass at fine resolution; however its application in tropical forests has been limited, with high variability in the accuracy of results. Lidar pulses scan the forest vertical profile, and can provide structure information which is also linked to biodiversity. In the last decade the remote sensing of biodiversity has received great attention, but few studies focused on the use of lidar for assessing tree species richness in tropical forests. This research aims at estimating aboveground biomass and tree species richness using discrete return airborne lidar in Ghana forests. We tested an advanced statistical technique, Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), which does not require assumptions on data distribution or on the relationships between variables, being suitable for studying ecological variables. We compared the MARS regression results with those obtained by multilinear regression and found that both algorithms were effective, but MARS provided higher accuracy either for biomass (R2 = 0.72) and species richness (R2 = 0.64). We also noted strong correlation between biodiversity and biomass field values. Even if the forest areas under analysis are limited in extent and represent peculiar ecosystems, the preliminary indications produced by our study suggest that instrument such as lidar, specifically useful for pinpointing forest structure, can also be exploited as a support for tree species richness assessment.

  4. Estimation of above ground biomass for multi-stemmed short-rotation woody crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian A. Byrd; Wilson G. Hood; Michael C. Tyree; Dylan N. Dillaway

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing interest in short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) systems, an accurate yet quick, non-destructive means for determining aboveground biomass is necessary from both management and research perspectives.

  5. Above-ground net primary productivity in young stands of beech and spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajtík Jozef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available V tejto práci sme pomocou kombinácií kontinuálnych meraní a deštruktívnych odberov vzorníkov sledovali a porovnali zásobu nadzemnej biomasy a ročnú primárnu produkciu (NPP v prirodzene obnovených mladých porastoch buka a smreka. Na vybranej lokalite predpokladáme, že zmenené klimatické podmienky budú lepšie vyhovovať buku pred v súčasnosti prevládajúcim smrekom. Lokalita Vrchslatina sa nachádza v južnej časti Veporských vrchov v nadmorskej výške 977 m nad morom (48° 38΄ 50΄΄ N, 19° 36΄ 07΄΄ E. Priemerné ročné zrážky sa pohybujú okolo 900 mm, priemerná ročná teplota je 5,2 °C. Na sledovanej lokalite sme pozorovali odlišný priebeh rastu buka a smreka. Pri buku bola pozorovaná menšia medziročná mortalita, udržiaval sa až prehustený zápoj, v ktorom sa aj podúrovňové stromy snažili dostať do úrovne. Toto sa prejavilo na tvare kmeňov, ktoré sú tenké a vysoké. Štíhlostný koeficient sa pri stromoch so strednou hrúbkou a strednou výškou postupne zvyšoval od 1,19 do 1,40. Pri smreku dochádza k vyššej mortalite, vrastavé a podúrovňové stromy odumierajú z dôvodu nedostatku svetla. Stromy rastú viac do hrúbky, čo sa odráža aj na štíhlostnom koeficiente, ktorý bol po celé obdobie viac-menej konštantný a pohyboval sa v rozpätí 0,89 až 0,93 (tab. 1. Zásoby kmeňa sú pri smreku v jednotlivých rokoch o 3 - 10 m3.ha-1 väčšie ako pri buku (tab. 3. Po prepočítaní na sušinu je vplyvom rozdielnej objemovej hmotnosti (obr. 5 celková zásoba sušiny drevných častí (kmeň a konáre väčšia pri buku (tab. 3. Najväčší rozdiel medzi drevinami je v zásobe asimilačných orgánov, ktorá je pri smreku viac než trojnásobná (tab. 3 a 4. Počas rastu dochádza pri obidvoch drevinách k zvyšovaniu podielu kmeňa a znižovaniu podielu asimilačných orgánov (obr. 2. Hlavný medzidruhový rozdiel pri pomerne vyrovnaných hektárových zásobách je v rozdelení nadzemnej biomasy medzi komponenty, kde buk alokuje do kmeňa viac asimilátov ako smrek (obr. 2 - 4. Pri porovnaní ročnej NPP asimilačných orgánov a konárov neboli zistené žiadne signifikantné rozdiely medzi sledovanými drevinami (obr. 6. Ukázali sme, že zásoby nadzemnej biomasy ako aj NPP buka a smreka boli v mladých plnozakmenených porastoch z prirodzeného zmladenia na danom stanovišti podobné (tab. 3 a 4.

  6. Forest above Ground Biomass Inversion by Fusing GLAS with Optical Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohuan Xi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest biomass is an important parameter for quantifying and understanding biological and physical processes on the Earth’s surface. Rapid, reliable, and objective estimations of forest biomass are essential to terrestrial ecosystem research. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS produced substantial scientific data for detecting the vegetation structure at the footprint level. This study combined GLAS data with MODIS/BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function and ASTER GDEM data to estimate forest aboveground biomass (AGB in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan Province, China. The GLAS waveform characteristic parameters were extracted using the wavelet method. The ASTER DEM was used to compute the terrain index for reducing the topographic influence on the GLAS canopy height estimation. A neural network method was applied to assimilate the MODIS BRDF data with the canopy heights for estimating continuous forest heights. Forest leaf area indices (LAIs were derived from Landsat TM imagery. A series of biomass estimation models were developed and validated using regression analyses between field-estimated biomass, canopy height, and LAI. The GLAS-derived canopy heights in Xishuangbanna correlated well with the field-estimated AGB (R2 = 0.61, RMSE = 52.79 Mg/ha. Combining the GLAS estimated canopy heights and LAI yielded a stronger correlation with the field-estimated AGB (R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 38.20 Mg/ha, which indicates that the accuracy of the estimated biomass in complex terrains can be improved significantly by integrating GLAS and optical remote sensing data.

  7. Wildfires in bamboo-dominated Amazonian forest: impacts on above-ground biomass and biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Barlow

    Full Text Available Fire has become an increasingly important disturbance event in south-western Amazonia. We conducted the first assessment of the ecological impacts of these wildfires in 2008, sampling forest structure and biodiversity along twelve 500 m transects in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve, Acre, Brazil. Six transects were placed in unburned forests and six were in forests that burned during a series of forest fires that occurred from August to October 2005. Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR calculations, based on Landsat reflectance data, indicate that all transects were similar prior to the fires. We sampled understorey and canopy vegetation, birds using both mist nets and point counts, coprophagous dung beetles and the leaf-litter ant fauna. Fire had limited influence upon either faunal or floral species richness or community structure responses, and stems <10 cm DBH were the only group to show highly significant (p = 0.001 community turnover in burned forests. Mean aboveground live biomass was statistically indistinguishable in the unburned and burned plots, although there was a significant increase in the total abundance of dead stems in burned plots. Comparisons with previous studies suggest that wildfires had much less effect upon forest structure and biodiversity in these south-western Amazonian forests than in central and eastern Amazonia, where most fire research has been undertaken to date. We discuss potential reasons for the apparent greater resilience of our study plots to wildfire, examining the role of fire intensity, bamboo dominance, background rates of disturbance, landscape and soil conditions.

  8. Allometric equations for estimating the above-ground biomass in tropical lowland Dipterocarp forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basuki, T.M.; Laake, van P.E.; Skidmore, A.K.; Hussin, Y.A.

    2009-01-01

    Allometric equations can be used to estimate the biomass and carbon stock of forests. However, so far the equations for Dipterocarp forests have not been developed in sufficient detail. In this research, allometric equations are presented based on the genera of commercial species and mixed species.

  9. Above-ground wineries and interior thermal stability: traditional and contemporary envelope analysis in Mendoza, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ganem Karlen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El control en el intercambio de flujos energéticos interior-exterior y la inercia térmica de los materiales constructivos son características claves de la envolvente de los edificios de bodegas. Esta situación es particularmente importante en el caso de los edificios construidos sobresuelo en climas con temperaturas diarias y estacionales muy variables. En el caso de que la arquitectura no provea la respuesta adecuada, indefectiblemente se recurre al consumo de energía auxiliar. La bodega S.A., ubicada en Mendoza, Argentina, consume energía auxiliar equivalente a 2.500 kW por año. Dicha bodega sobresuelo presenta dos tipos de envolvente vertical: una tradicional en adobe (λ = 0.81W/mK y otra contemporánea en chapa galvanizada sin aislación (λ = 45 W/mK. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar los aspectos de materialidad, inercia térmica e intercambio de flujos energéticos de envolventes tradicionales y contemporáneas y, comparar los resultados obtenidos con un caso teórico de bodega subterránea. Entre los resultados obtenidos se observa que la envolvente tradicional mantiene las temperaturas interiores entre 8,5 ºC y 10 ºC por debajo de las temperaturas exteriores, mientras que los nuevos espacios con envolventes contemporáneas lo hacen solamente 3 ºC a 5 ºC por debajo de las temperaturas exteriores. En el caso de una bodega subterránea, las temperaturas estarían estables durante el año en 16,5 ºC; esto es, en verano, 20 ºC por debajo de las temperaturas exteriores.

  10. Storage of oil above ground for underground: Regulations, costs, and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lively-Diebold, B.; Driscoll, W.; Ameer, P.; Watson, S.

    1993-01-01

    Some owners of underground storage tank systems (USTs) appear to be replacing their systems with aboveground storage tank systems (ASTs) without full knowledge of the US Government environmental regulations that apply to facilities with ASTs, and their associated costs. This paper discusses the major federal regulatory requirements for USTs and ASTS, and presents the compliance costs for new tank systems that range in capacity from 1,000 to 10,000 gallons. The costs of two model UST system and two model AST systems are considered for new oil storage capacity, expansion of existing capacity, and replacement of an existing UST or AS T. For new capacity, ASTs are less expensive than USTs, although ASTs do have significant regulatory compliance costs that range from an estimated $8,000 to $14,000 in present value terms, depending on the size and type of system. For expanded or replacement capacity, ASTs are in all but one case less expensive than USTS; the exception is the expansion of capacity at an existing UST facility. In this case, the cost of a protected steel tank UST system is comparable to the cost of an AST system. Considering the present value of all costs over a 30 year useful life, the cost for an AST with a concrete dike is less than the cost of an AST with an earthen dike, for the tank sizes considered. This is because concrete dikes are cost competitive for small tanks, and the costs to clean up a release are higher for earthen dikes, due to the cost of disposal and replacement of oil-contaminated soil. The cost analyses presented here are not comprehensive, and are intended primarily for illustrative purposes. Only the major costs of tank purchase, installation, and regulatory compliance were considered

  11. Progress in Understanding the Sources, Deposition and Above-ground Fate of Trichloroacetic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cape, N.; Forczek, Sándor; Gullner, G.; Mena-Benitez, G.; Schröder, P.; Matucha, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2006), s. 276-286 ISSN 0944-1344 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/0874; GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : antioxidant enzymes * atmospheric TCA * detoxification Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.980, year: 2006

  12. Wildfires in bamboo-dominated Amazonian forest: impacts on above-ground biomass and biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Jos; Silveira, Juliana M; Mestre, Luiz A M; Andrade, Rafael B; Camacho D'Andrea, Gabriela; Louzada, Julio; Vaz-de-Mello, Fernando Z; Numata, Izaya; Lacau, Sébastien; Cochrane, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Fire has become an increasingly important disturbance event in south-western Amazonia. We conducted the first assessment of the ecological impacts of these wildfires in 2008, sampling forest structure and biodiversity along twelve 500 m transects in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve, Acre, Brazil. Six transects were placed in unburned forests and six were in forests that burned during a series of forest fires that occurred from August to October 2005. Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) calculations, based on Landsat reflectance data, indicate that all transects were similar prior to the fires. We sampled understorey and canopy vegetation, birds using both mist nets and point counts, coprophagous dung beetles and the leaf-litter ant fauna. Fire had limited influence upon either faunal or floral species richness or community structure responses, and stems wildfires had much less effect upon forest structure and biodiversity in these south-western Amazonian forests than in central and eastern Amazonia, where most fire research has been undertaken to date. We discuss potential reasons for the apparent greater resilience of our study plots to wildfire, examining the role of fire intensity, bamboo dominance, background rates of disturbance, landscape and soil conditions.

  13. Lidar remote sensing of above-ground biomass in three biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Lefsky; Warren B. Cohen; David J. Harding; Geoffrey G. Parkers; Steven A. Acker; S. Thomas. Gower

    2002-01-01

    Estimation of the amount of carbon stored in forests is a key challenge for understanding the global carbon cycle, one which remote sensing is expected to help address. However, estimation of carbon storage in moderate to high biomass forests is difficult for conventional optical and radar sensors. Lidar (light detection and ranging) instruments measure the vertical...

  14. End of the road for the LHC magnets...well, above ground that is!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The first LHC dipole cryomagnet has been delivered to the SMI2 building for final assembly prior to lowering it into the LHC tunnel. Over the next 3 years, all LHC cryomagnets will pass through these doors before starting their journey underground.

  15. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1993 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This annual groundwater report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual groundwater report for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts; Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline.

  16. Direct impact of the sustained decline in the photosystem II efficiency upon plant productivity at different developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yonglan; Ungerer, Petra; Zhang, Huayong; Ruban, Alexander V

    2017-05-01

    The impact of chronic photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII) on the productivity of plants remains unknown. The present study investigated the influences of persistent decline in the PSII yield on morphology and productivity of Arabidopsis plants that were exposed to lincomycin at two different developmental stages (seedling and rosette stage). The results indicated that, although retarded, the lincomycin treated plants were able to accomplish the entire growth period with only 50% of the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (Fv/Fm) of the control plants. The decline in quantum yield limited the electron transport rate (ETR). The impact of lincomycin on NPQ was not significant in seedlings, but was pronounced in mature plants. The treated plants produced an above ground biomass of 50% compared to control plants. Moreover, a linear relationship was found between the above ground biomass and total rosette leaf area, and the slope was decreased due to photoinhibition. The starch accumulation was highly inhibited by lincomycin treatment. Lincomycin induced a significant decrease in seed yield with plants treated from the rosette state showing higher yield than those treated from the seedling stage. Our data suggest that the sustained decline of PSII efficiency decreases plant productivity by constraining the ETR, leaf development and starch production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Wind energy assessment for the coastal part of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadem, S.K.; Ghosh, H.R.; Kaiser, S.; Aditya, S.K.; Hussain, M.

    2005-01-01

    Earlier measurement and study of wind speed for the coastal part of Bangladesh showed that some of the areas of this part would be useful for wind power generation. But till now no measurement at the hub height of wind machine has yet done. Data has been collected from different sources and analysis has been done using logarithmic law and micro scale modeling software, WAsP for wind energy assessment over the coastal part. It has been found that the speed varies from 4m/s to 5.7 m/s at a height of 50m above ground level depending on the land type. Wind power density varies from 100 to 250 w/m/sub 2/ indicate the wind power can play an important role in the e